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Sample records for generalized frequency spectra

  1. A general method for diagonal peak suppression in homonuclear correlated NMR spectra by spatially and frequency selective pulses☆

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Simon; Schrank, Evelyne; Zangger, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Homonuclear two- and multidimensional NMR spectra are standard experiments for the structure determination of small to medium-sized molecules. In the large majority of homonuclear correlated spectra the diagonal contains the most intense peaks. Cross-peaks near the diagonal could overlap with huge tails of diagonal peaks and can therefore be easily overlooked. Here we present a general method for the suppression of peaks along the diagonal in homonuclear correlated spectra. It is based on a spatially selective excitation followed by the suppression of magnetization which has not changed the frequency during the mixing process. In addition to the auto correlation removal, these experiments are also less affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities due to the slice selective excitation, which on the other side leads to a reduced intensity compared to regular homonuclear correlated spectra. PMID:23665403

  2. Radio spectra of High Frequency Peakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallacasa, D.; Orienti, M.

    2016-02-01

    New radio spectra of High Frequency Peakers (HFP) obtained from the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) show that variability is common among this class of sources. A subsample of sources have been observed with a nearly continuous spectral sampling between 1 and 10 GHz. The observed HFP sources were previously classified as F (flat), H (HFP profile with little or no flux density variability) and V (variable, but preserving a peaked spectrum). In general, sources classified as V and H show a decrease of the flux density measured in the optically thin part of the spectrum, while there is a moderate increment in the optically thick region, resulting into a progressive shift of the spectral peak to lower frequencies. This is consistent with the idea of an expanding bubble of radio plasma. The sources with an F classification instead show substantial variability, both in spectral shape and in time evolution. In these HFP sources an irregular production of energy is best observed since the radio emission is dominated by recently generated relativistic plasma, and the contribution of mini lobes, in which old plasma accumulates, is marginal if not absent at all, given the short radiative life of electrons in strong magnetic fields (tens of mG) found in these objects.

  3. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  4. GENERAL RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS ON NONLINEAR POWER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Donghui; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan E-mail: jgong@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2011-01-20

    The nonlinear nature of Einstein's equation introduces genuine relativistic higher order corrections to the usual Newtonian fluid equations describing the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We study the effect of such novel nonlinearities on the next-to-leading order matter and velocity power spectra for the case of a pressureless, irrotational fluid in a flat Friedmann background. We find that pure general relativistic corrections are negligibly small over all scales. Our result guarantees that, in the current paradigm of standard cosmology, one can safely use Newtonian cosmology even in nonlinear regimes.

  5. Signal Frequency Spectra with Audacity®

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gailey, Alycia

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the activity presented here is to allow students to explore the frequency components of various simple signals, with the ultimate goal of teaching them how to remove unwanted noise from a voice signal. Analysis of the frequency components of a signal allows students to design filters that remove unwanted components of a…

  6. Simple posterior frequency correction for vibrational spectra from molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Denis S.

    2016-05-01

    Vibrational spectra computed from molecular dynamics simulations with large integration time steps suffer from nonphysical frequency shifts of signals [M. Praprotnik and D. Janežič, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 174103 (2005)]. A simple posterior correction technique was developed for compensation of this behavior. It performs through replacement of abscissa in the calculated spectra using following formula: ν corrected = /√{ 2 ṡ (" separators=" 1 - cos ( 2 π ṡ Δ t ṡ ν initial ) ) } 2 π ṡ Δ t , where ν are initial and corrected frequencies and Δt is the MD simulation time step. Applicability of this method was tested on gaseous infrared spectra of hydrogen fluoride and formic acid.

  7. Simple posterior frequency correction for vibrational spectra from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S

    2016-05-01

    Vibrational spectra computed from molecular dynamics simulations with large integration time steps suffer from nonphysical frequency shifts of signals [M. Praprotnik and D. Janežič, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 174103 (2005)]. A simple posterior correction technique was developed for compensation of this behavior. It performs through replacement of abscissa in the calculated spectra using following formula: νcorrected=2⋅1-cos(2π⋅Δt⋅νinitial)2π⋅Δt, where ν are initial and corrected frequencies and Δt is the MD simulation time step. Applicability of this method was tested on gaseous infrared spectra of hydrogen fluoride and formic acid. PMID:27155626

  8. Power spectra at radio frequency of lightning return stroke waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The power spectra of the wideband (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic field signals in a number of lightning return strokes (primarily first return strokes) measured during a lightning storm which occurred in Lindau, West Germany in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data were obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks appearing in the spectra of many of the waveforms. An enhancement of power at frequencies of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  9. Experimental access to HSQC spectra decoupled in all frequency dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhaii, Peyman; Haase, Burkhard; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2009-08-01

    A new operator called RESET "Reducing nuclEar Spin multiplicitiEs to singuleTs" is presented to acquire broadband proton decoupled proton spectra in one and two dimensions. Basically, the homonuclear decoupling is achieved through the application of bilinear rotation pulses and delays. A [BIRD] r,x pulse building block is used to selectively invert all proton magnetization remotely attached to 13C isotopes, which is equivalent to a scalar J decoupling of the protons directly attached to 13C from all other protons in the spin system. In conjunction with an appropriate data processing technique pure shift proton spectra are obtained. For this purpose, the concept of constant time acquisition in the observe dimension is exploited. Both ideas were merged together producing superior HSQC based pseudo 3D pulse sequences. The resulting HSQC spectra show cross peaks with collapsed multiplet structures and singlet responses for the proton chemical shift frequencies. An unambiguous assignment of signals from overcrowded spectra becomes much easier. Finally, the recently introduced SHARC technique is exploited to enhance the capability of the scalar J decoupling method. A significant reduction of the total measurement time is achieved. The time is saved by reducing the number of 13C chemical shift evolution increments and working with superimposed narrow spectral bandwidths in the 13C indirect domain.

  10. Non-Equilibrium Allele Frequency Spectra Via Spectral Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Jody; Chen, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in the analysis of population genomics data consists of isolating signatures of natural selection from background noise caused by random drift and gene flow. Analyses of massive amounts of data from many related populations require high-performance algorithms to determine the likelihood of different demographic scenarios that could have shaped the observed neutral single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency spectrum. In many areas of applied mathematics, Fourier Transforms and Spectral Methods are firmly established tools to analyze spectra of signals and model their dynamics as solutions of certain Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). When spectral methods are applicable, they have excellent error properties and are the fastest possible in high dimension; see [15]. In this paper we present an explicit numerical solution, using spectral methods, to the forward Kolmogorov equations for a Wright-Fisher process with migration of K populations, influx of mutations, and multiple population splitting events. PMID:21376069

  11. Low frequency spectra of type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Flux density spectra have been determined for 91 simple type III solar bursts observed by the Goddard Space Flight Center radio astronomy experiment on the IMP-6 spacecraft during 1971 and 1972. Spectral peaks were found to occur at frequencies ranging from 44 kHz up to 2500 kHz. Half of the bursts peaked between 250 kHz and 900 kHz, corresponding to emission at solar distances of about 0.3 to 0.1 AU. Maximum burst flux density sometimes exceeds 10 to the -14th W/sq m/Hz. The primary factor controlling the spectral peak frequency of these bursts appears to be a variation in intrinsic power radiated by the source as the exciter moves outward from the sun, rather than radio propagation effects between the source and IMP-6. Thus, a burst spectrum strongly reflects the evolution of the properties of the exciting electron beam, and according to current theory, beam deceleration could help account for the observations.

  12. Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.

    2011-09-15

    A theory for localized low-frequency ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) modes in axisymmetric toroidal systems is generalized to take into account both toroidal and poloidal equilibrium plasma flows. The general set of equations describing the coupling of shear Alfven and slow (sound) modes and defining the continuous spectrum of rotating plasmas in axisymmetric toroidal systems is derived. The equations are applied to study the continuous spectra in large aspect ratio tokamaks. The unstable continuous modes in the case of predominantly poloidal plasma rotation with the angular velocity exceeding the sound frequency are found. Their stabilization by the shear Alfven coupling effect is studied.

  13. A model of the spectra and high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries have frequencies comparable to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit, and therefore may encode information about strong field general relativity. However, the origin of the oscillations and the associated X-ray spectra remain uncertain. I will discuss a new model for these spectra, which also acts to filter coherent QPOs from local accretion disk oscillations. This model explains many puzzling aspects of HFQPOs, makes predictions which are testable with archival and future X-ray data, and can in principle be used as a new method to measure black hole spin.

  14. Measurement of instrument noise spectra at frequencies below 1 hertz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snare, R. C.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The use of peak-to-peak values in describing output noise of a magnetometer or low frequency amplifier is of questionable value for certain applications. A more precise statement of instrument noise is made with a plot of the noise power spectral density vs frequency. The spectral density plot provides a rich source of information which can be used in the selection and testing of such instrumentation.

  15. Vibrational Spectra of Molecular Crystals with the Generalized Energy-Based Fragmentation Approach.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Jia, Junteng; Li, Shuhua

    2016-05-01

    The generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach for molecular crystals with periodic boundary condition (PBC) (denoted as PBC-GEBF) is extended to allow vibrational spectra of molecular crystals to be easily computed at various theory levels. Within the PBC-GEBF approach, the vibrational frequencies of a molecular crystal can be directly evaluated from molecular quantum chemistry calculations on a series of nonperiodic molecular systems. With this approach, the vibrational spectra of molecular crystals can be calculated with much reduced computational costs at various theory levels, as compared to those required by the methods based on periodic electronic structure theory. By testing the performance of the PBC-GEBF method for two molecular crystals (CO2 and imidazole), we demonstrate that the PBC-GEBF approach can reproduce the results of the methods based on periodic electronic structure theory in predicting vibrational spectra of molecular crystals. We apply the PBC-GEBF method at second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (PBC-GEBF-MP2 in short) to investigate the vibrational spectra of the urea and ammonia borane crystals. Our results show that the PBC-GEBF-MP2 method can provide quite accurate descriptions for the observed vibrational spectra of the two systems under study.

  16. DUO: A general program for calculating spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    DUO is a general, user-friendly program for computing rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. DUO solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei not only for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states (typical for the ground state of closed-shell diatomics) but also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states (typical for open-shell diatomics and excited states). Possible couplings include spin-orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin-spin. Corrections due to non-adiabatic effects can be accounted for by introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born-Oppenheimer breakdown curves. DUO requires user-specified potential energy curves and, if relevant, dipole moment, coupling and correction curves. From these it computes energy levels, line positions and line intensities. Several analytic forms plus interpolation and extrapolation options are available for representation of the curves. DUO can refine potential energy and coupling curves to best reproduce reference data such as experimental energy levels or line positions. DUO is provided as a Fortran 2003 program and has been tested under a variety of operating systems.

  17. Frequency spectra at large wavenumbers in two-dimensional Hasegawa-Wakatani turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhyung; Terry, Paul W.

    2012-10-01

    The two-dimensional Hasegawa-Wakatani model is well known to show weak (strong) turbulence for α1(1), where α is the adiabatic parameter. Weak turbulence has narrow frequency spectra peaked at linear wave frequecies φ0. However, fluctuations in weak turbulence at large wavenumbers are thought to show broad frequency spectra with zero mean frequency, a feature of strong turbulence. We present the numerical results of frequency spectra showing that these spectra at large wavenumbers have finite mean frequencies at intermediate α˜O(1). The potential fluctuation have finite mean frequencies (φ0) and broad spectral widths while the density fluctuations reproduce linear wave frequencies despite broad spectra. These finite mean frequencies proportional to poloidal wavenumber imply the existence of nonlinear wave resonances. Since one wave in the resonance is in the energy-dominant wavenumbers, the resonance is a nonlocal three-wave interaction, which may relay the linear wave properties of the low wavenumbers up to the large wavenumbers. This richness in the spectra will be presented in terms of the parameters of α and diamagnetic drift and the three-wave coupling analysis will be applied.

  18. High-frequency P wave spectra from explosions and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, William R.; Priestley, Keith F.

    Two explosion P wave spectral models [Sharpe, 1942; Mueller-Murphy, 1971] and two earthquake P wave spectral models [Archambeau, 1968, 1972; modified Brune 1970, 1971] are reviewed to assess their implications for high-frequency (>1 Hz) seismic discrimination between earthquakes and explosions. The importance of the corner frequency scaling, particularly for models with the same high-frequency spectral decay rate, is demonstrated by calculating source spectral ratios (a potentially important regional discriminant) for these models. We compare North American events and a limited data set of Central Asian events with these spectral models. We find North American earthquakes are consistent with a constant stress drop modified Brune model between 10 and 30 Hz. Shallow (<700 m depth) Pahute Mesa explosions at the Nevada Test Site have a high-frequency spectral decay between 10 and 30 Hz greater than the ω-2 predicted by the explosion models. Near regional recordings of the Soviet Joint Verification Experiment (JVE) explosion show a higher corner frequency and lower 1 to 4 Hz spectral ratios than predicted by either explosion model. The higher corner frequency of the Soviet JVE appears not to be due to attenuation, or receiver effects, and may represent a need for different corner frequency scaling, or result from source complications such as spall and tectonic release. A regional recording of the Soviet JVE (NEIC mb = 6.1) is shown to have a lower 1 to 4 Hz spectral ratio than a smaller earthquake (NEIC mb = 4.6) recorded on a nearly reciprocal path.

  19. OPTIMIZED MULTI-FREQUENCY SPECTRA FOR APPLICATIONS IN RADIATIVE FEEDBACK AND COSMOLOGICAL REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, Jordan; Skory, Stephen; Burns, Jack O.; Wise, John H.

    2012-09-01

    The recent implementation of radiative transfer algorithms in numerous hydrodynamics codes has led to a dramatic improvement in studies of feedback in various astrophysical environments. However, because of methodological limitations and computational expense, the spectra of radiation sources are generally sampled at only a few evenly spaced discrete emission frequencies. Using one-dimensional radiative transfer calculations, we investigate the discrepancies in gas properties surrounding model stars and accreting black holes that arise solely due to spectral discretization. We find that even in the idealized case of a static and uniform density field, commonly used discretization schemes induce errors in the neutral fraction and temperature by factors of two to three on average, and by over an order of magnitude in certain column density regimes. The consequences are most severe for radiative feedback operating on large scales, dense clumps of gas, and media consisting of multiple chemical species. We have developed a method for optimally constructing discrete spectra, and show that for two test cases of interest, carefully chosen four-bin spectra can eliminate errors associated with frequency resolution to high precision. Applying these findings to a fully three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of the early universe, we find that the H II region around a primordial star is substantially altered in both size and morphology, corroborating the one-dimensional prediction that discrete spectral energy distributions can lead to sizable inaccuracies in the physical properties of a medium, and as a result, the subsequent evolution and observable signatures of objects embedded within it.

  20. Frequency variations of solar radio zebras and their power-law spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. During solar flares several types of radio bursts are observed. The fine striped structures of the type IV solar radio bursts are called zebras. Analyzing them provides important information about the plasma parameters of their radio sources. We present a new analysis of zebras. Aims: Power spectra of the frequency variations of zebras are computed to estimate the spectra of the plasma density variations in radio zebra sources. Methods: Frequency variations of zebra lines and the high-frequency boundary of the whole radio burst were determined with and without the frequency fitting. The computed time dependencies of these variations were analyzed with the Fourier method. Results: First, we computed the variation spectrum of the high-frequency boundary of the whole radio burst, which is composed of several zebra patterns. This power spectrum has a power-law form with a power-law index -1.65. Then, we selected three well-defined zebra-lines in three different zebra patterns and computed the spectra of their frequency variations. The power-law indices in these cases are found to be in the interval between -1.61 and -1.75. Finally, assuming that the zebra-line frequency is generated on the upper-hybrid frequency and that the plasma frequency ωpe is much higher than the electron-cyclotron frequency ωce, the Fourier power spectra are interpreted to be those of the electron plasma density in zebra radio sources.

  1. Low-frequency suppression of random-telegraph-noise spectra in high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashkenazy, V.D. ); Jung, G. Instytut Fizuki, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02668 Warszawa ); Khalfin, I.B. ); Shapiro, B.Y. Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, 52100, Ramat Gan )

    1995-01-01

    Interaction of the random-telegraph-noise signals with pinned Abrikosov vortices in granular high-temperature superconductors is investigated. It is shown that the low-frequency part of random-noise spectra is suppressed due to interaction of Abrikosov vortices with pinning centers at low magnetic fields and/or due to mutual interactions of vortices in an Abrikosov lattice at high magnetic fields. Values of characteristic frequencies below which spectra are suppressed are evaluated for various experimental configurations including a typical experimental thin-film strip geometry. It is shown that characteristic frequencies and the functional dependence of the low-frequency part of the noise spectra strongly depend on the external magnetic field.

  2. Multivariate analysis of spectral data with frequency shifts: application to temperature dependent infrared spectra of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan

    2013-10-15

    Changes in the amide I' IR band with temperature are widely used for elucidation of peptide and protein conformational transitions and folding equilibria. Since amide I' exhibits inherent temperature dependent frequency shifts, standard mixture analysis methods are not applicable. To reliably extract the true thermodynamic states, frequency shifts of the component spectra must be explicitly taken into account. For this purpose, new methods termed shifted multivariate spectra analysis (SMSA) and parametric SMSA (pSMSA) are developed and tested on sets of synthetic data as well as real experimental amide I' spectra for thermal unfolding of an α-helical peptide. SMSA uses no specific functional form for the transition (soft modeling), while the parametric variant (pSMSA) assumes a thermodynamic model (hard modeling). The implementation is optimized specifically for amide I' IR in that it takes advantage of known, linear dependence of the frequencies as well as intensities on temperature. The synthetic data tests demonstrate the robustness of the methods; the initial test parameters are recovered with a high degree of reliability, although the nonparameteric SMSA is subject to the rotational ambiguity. Application to the peptide experimental amide I' data illustrates additional complications encountered with the analysis of real systems, such as correction for the side-chain spectra and interference of spectral shape changes. Nevertheless, the results are in excellent agreement with the independent control using circular dichroism (CD) data. The general applicability and limitations of the methods are discussed along with potential extensions.

  3. Vibrational and librational frequency coupling in stimulated scattering spectra of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorkenoo, K. D.; Rivoire, G.

    2002-02-01

    Evolution of the backward stimulated Raman spectrum in liquid water when the focusing point of the exciting beam is moved progressively in the bulk from the entrance surface to the bottom shows modulation structures. Proof has been made by using Fourier transform on the spectra that a low frequency structure is present when the focal point is near the entrance window. This structure coexists with a periodical high frequency structure when the focal point is moved inside the bulk. Propagative effects explain the high frequency modulation, while the low frequency modulation (quasi-period 20 cm-1) is explained by coupling of librational and vibrational molecular movements.

  4. Electrostatic frequency shifts in amide I vibrational spectra: Direct parameterization against experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-04-01

    The interpretation of protein amide I infrared spectra has been greatly assisted by the observation that the vibrational frequency of a peptide unit reports on its local electrostatic environment. However, the interpretation of spectra remains largely qualitative due to a lack of direct quantitative connections between computational models and experimental data. Here, we present an empirical parameterization of an electrostatic amide I frequency map derived from the infrared absorption spectra of 28 dipeptides. The observed frequency shifts are analyzed in terms of the local electrostatic potential, field, and field gradient, evaluated at sites near the amide bond in molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the frequency shifts observed in experiment correlate very well with the electric field in the direction of the C=O bond evaluated at the position of the amide oxygen atom. A linear best-fit mapping between observed frequencies and electric field yield sample standard deviations of 2.8 and 3.7 cm-1 for the CHARMM27 and OPLS-AA force fields, respectively, and maximum deviations (within our data set) of 9 cm-1. These results are discussed in the broader context of amide I vibrational models and the effort to produce quantitative agreement between simulated and experimental absorption spectra.

  5. Determination of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency from vertical velocity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recent work on the spectra of vertical velocity oscillations due to gravity waves in the troposphere, stratosphere and the mesosphere has revealed a typical feature which we call the Brunt-Vaisala cutoff. Several observers noticed a spectral peak near the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. This peak often is characterized by a very steep slope at the high frequency part, but a fairly shallow slope towards lower frequencies. Some example spectra of stratosphere observations are given. This distinct spectral shape (most clear at the upper height 22.5 km) can be explained by the fact that the vertical velocity amplitudes of atmospheric gravity waves increase with frequency up to their natural cutoff at the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. The measurement of the frequency of the peak in a vertical velocity spectrum was found to yield most directly the Brunt-Vaisala-frequency profile. Knowing the Brunt-Vaisala frequency profile, one can deduce the potential temperature profile, if one has a calibration temperature at one height. However, even the uncalibrated profile will be quite useful, e.g., to determine fronts (defined by temperature inversions) and the tropopause height. This method fails for superadiabatic lapse rates when the Brunt-Viasala frequency is imaginary. The application of this method will also be difficult when the wind velocity is too high, causing the Doppler effect to smear out the total spectrum and blur the Brunt-Vaisala cutoff. A similar deficiency will also appear if the gravity-wave distribution has a maximum in wind direction.

  6. FID detection of EPR and ENDOR spectra at high microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blok, H.; Akimoto, I.; Milikisyants, S.; Gast, P.; Groenen, E. J. J.; Schmidt, J.

    2009-11-01

    High-frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy allows FID detection of EPR spectra owing to the short dead time that can be achieved. This FID detection is particularly attractive for EPR and ENDOR spectroscopy of paramagnetic species that exhibit inhomogeneously broadened EPR lines and short dephasing times. Experiments are reported for the metalloprotein azurin at 275 GHz.

  7. Low-frequency magnetic fluctuation spectra in the magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Gary, S. Peter; Anderson, Brian J.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Hudson, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations have delineated several different kinds of enhanced magnetic fluctuation spectra below the proton cyclotron frequency in the terrestrial magnetosheath. A model is presented that represents the variation of plasma parameters across the plasma depletion layer and into the magnetosheath proper. Using this model, we find that many of the properties of the observed spectra follow directly from the predictions of linear Vlasov instability theory. The observed progression of spectral features is a natural progression from mirror mode to merged (in frequency range) proton and He(2+) cyclotron modes to bifurcated (in frequency range) cyclotron modes as plasma convects earthward in the magnetosheath. The necessary change in dispersion surface topology from separated proton and He(2+) cyclotron surfaces at low beta to merged surfaces at high beta is described.

  8. Simulation of multi-frequency EPR spectra for a distribution of the zero-field splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarkh, Mykhailo; Groenen, Edgar J. J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a numerical procedure called 'grid-of-errors' to extract the distribution of magnetic interactions from continuous-wave electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectra at multiple microwave frequencies. The approach is based on the analysis of the lineshape of the spectra and explicitly worked out for high-spin systems for which the lineshape is determined by a distribution of the zero-field splitting. Initial principal values of the zero-field splitting tensor are obtained from the EPR spectrum at a microwave frequency in the high-field limit, and the initial distribution is taken Gaussian. Subsequently, the grid-of-errors procedure optimizes this distribution, without any restriction to its shape, taking into account spectra at various microwave frequencies. The numerical procedure is illustrated for the Fe(III)-EDTA complex. An optimized distribution of the zero-field splitting is obtained, which provides a proper description of the EPR spectra at 9.5, 34, 94, and 275 GHz. The proposed approach can be used as well for distributions of magnetic interactions other than the zero-field splitting.

  9. Spatial-frequency spectra of printed characters and human visual perception.

    PubMed

    Põder, Endel

    2003-06-01

    It is well known that certain spatial frequency (SF) bands are more important than others for character recognition. Solomon and Pelli [Nature 369 (1994) 395-397] have concluded that human pattern recognition mechanism is able to use only a narrow band from available SF spectrum of letters. However, the SF spectra of letters themselves have not been studied carefully. Here I report the results of an analysis of SF spectra of printed characters and discuss their relationship to the observed band-pass nature of letter recognition. PMID:12782064

  10. Radial evolution of the high/low frequency breakpoint in magnetic field spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Ruzmaikin, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The spectra of magnetic field variations in the solar wind show different behavior in two frequency regions; a high frequency region in which the spectral exponent is about -5/3 and a low frequency region in which it is typically -1. The two types of variations must arise from different processes and a clue to the relationship between the spectral regions lies in understanding the behavior of the breakpoint between the spectral regions. Studies of the average behavior of spectra have shown that the break point occurs at about 3.5 hours at 1 AU. It is also known that, on average, the breakpoint occurs at lower frequencies with larger heliocentric distances. Ideally however, instead of the average properties of the spectra, we would like to know how the breakpoint evolves in particular samples of the solar wind as they propagate to larger heliocentric distances. In the study reported here we take advantage of the fact that, in 1974, Pioneer 10 (4.4 AU) and Pioneer 11 (5.6 AU) were close to being co-aligned and being aligned with the Earth. Solar wind observed at Earth can be closely matched with solar wind later observed at P10 and P11. We here compare the breakpoint observed at Earth with that observed at Pioneers 10 and 11 for matched samples of the wind.

  11. Enhanced frequency spectra of winds at the mesoscale based on radar profiler observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Gage, K. S.

    1990-01-01

    Frequency spectra of horizontal winds in the troposphere and stratosphere, over a range of periods and frequencies, have been studied by means of two radar profilers, located at Plattenville, Colorado, and Poker Flat, Alaska, to determine if the spectra deviations from a consistent power law behavior can be verified in a statistical sense. At Plattenville, the spectrum of both zonal and meridional winds in the troposphere is found to obey a low-frequency regime at periods longer than a few hours and a high-frequency regime at periods less than 1/2 hour. The energy levels in the high-frequency regime are enhanced over those obtained by extrapolation of the low-frequency regime by a factor of 4. At Poker Flat, a similar pattern is found in the stratosphere, and the magnitude of the enhancement factor is 1.7. It is suggested that the enhanced amplitudes reflect the effects of upward-propagating gravity waves launched by the flow over a rough terrain, and that they influence the dynamics of the large-scale circulation to a great extent.

  12. Band gaps and transmission spectra in generalized Fibonacci σ(p,q) one-dimensional magnonic quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Costa, C H O; Vasconcelos, M S

    2013-07-17

    We employ a microscopic theory to investigate spin wave (magnon) propagation through their dispersion and transmission spectra in magnonic crystals arranged to display deterministic disorder. In this work the quasiperiodic arrangement investigated is the well-known generalized Fibonacci sequence, which is characterized by the σ(p,q) parameter, where p and q are non-zero integers. In order to determine the bulk modes and transmission spectra of the spin waves, the calculations are carried out for the exchange dominated regime within the framework of the Heisenberg model and taking into account the random phase approximation. We have considered magnetic materials that have a ferromagnetic order, and the transfer-matrix treatment is applied to simplify the algebra. The results reveal that spin wave spectra display a rich and interesting magnonic pass- and stop-bands structures, including an almost symmetric band gap distribution around of a mid-gap frequency, which depends on the Fibonacci sequence type. PMID:23779133

  13. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    PubMed

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  14. Temperature effects in low-frequency Raman spectra of corticosteroid hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeva, V. A.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Surovtsev, N. V.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Tkachenko, L. I.; Karaush, N. N.; Stromylo, E. V.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental Raman spectra of the corticosteroid hormones corticosterone and desoxycorticosterone are recorded at different temperatures (in the range of 30-310 K) in the region of low-frequency (15-120 cm-1) vibrations using a solid-state laser at 532.1 nm. The intramolecular vibrations of both hormones are interpreted on the basis of Raman spectra calculated by the B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory method. The intermolecular bonds in tetramers of hormones are studied with the help of the topological theory of Bader using data of X-ray structural analysis for crystalline samples of hormones. The total energy of intermolecular interactions in the tetramer of desoxycorticosterone (-49.1 kJ/mol) is higher than in the tetramer of corticosterone (-36.9 kJ/mol). A strong intramolecular hydrogen bond O21-H⋯O=C20 with an energy of -42.4 kJ/mol was revealed in the corticosterone molecule, which is absent in the desoxycorticosterone molecule. This fact makes the Raman spectra of both hormones somewhat different. It is shown that the low-frequency lines in the Raman spectra are associated with skeletal vibrations of molecules and bending vibrations of the substituent at the C17 atom. The calculated Raman spectrum of the desoxycorticosterone dimer allows one to explain the splitting and shift of some lines and to interpret new strong lines observed in the spectra at low temperatures, which are caused by the intermolecular interaction and mixing of normal vibrations in a crystal cell. On the whole the calculated frequencies are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. [Study on the vibrational spectra characterization of synthetic jadeite jade made by General electric Company].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shu-Min; Qi, Li-Jian; Guo, Qing-Hong; Zhong, Zeng-Qiu; Qiu, Zhi-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang

    2008-04-01

    The object of the present study is the synthetic jadeite jade produced by American General Electric Corporation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Laser Raman spectroscopy were used to test its spectral properties in order to examine the feature of this kind of synthetic jadeite jade by vibrational spectroscopy and to figure out the mark for discriminate synthetic jadeite jade from natural jadeite jade. The study shows that GE synthetic jadeite jade is identical with natural jadeite jade in the main on fingerprint region in FTIR; There are clearly differences in the 2 000 -4 000 cm(-1) functional region in FTIR: a group of frequencies at 3 375, 3 471 and 3 614 cm(-1) indicate vibration absorption of O-H. GE synthetic jadeite jade has proven consistent with natural jadeite jade in the laser Raman spectra by a group of sharp scattering peaks at 376, 700, 989 and 1 039 cm(-1). In addition these scattering peaks show an intact crystal shape. The FTIR peaks and Raman spectral peaks shift to higher frequencies showing GE synthetic jadeite jade lacking isomorphism of heavy positive ions.

  16. On the spectra of type-III solar radio bursts observed at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, H.

    1982-01-01

    The spectra of strong bursts observed at low frequencies by OGO-5 during 1968-1970 are presented. They usually exhibit an intense main peak between 100 kHz and 1 MHz, and sometimes a less intense secondary peak between 1 and 3.5 MHz. Main peaks of 10 to the -12th W per sq m per Hz or more were obtained in very strong events, but because of antenna calibration problems those could be one or two orders of magnitude too high. Recently published work supports the finding that type III bursts at low frequencies can be at least four orders of magnitude more intense than at ground-based frequencies of observation. It is found that the energy received at the earth increases with decreasing frequency approximately as f to the -n, where n is between 3 and 4.

  17. Inductive phenomena at low frequencies in impedance spectra of proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivac, Ivan; Barbir, Frano

    2016-09-01

    The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells may exhibit inductive phenomena at low frequencies. The occurrence of inductive features at high frequencies is explained by the cables and wires of the test system. However, explanation of inductive loop at low frequencies requires a more detailed study. This review paper discusses several possible causes of such inductive behavior in PEM fuel cells, such as side reactions with intermediate species, carbon monoxide poisoning, and water transport, also as their equivalent circuit representations. It may be concluded that interpretation of impedance spectra at low frequencies is still ambiguous, and that better equivalent circuit models are needed with clearly defined physical meaning of each of the circuit elements.

  18. An improved dual-frequency technique for the remote sensing of ocean currents and wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, D. L.; Eng, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    A two frequency microwave radar technique for the remote sensing of directional ocean wave spectra and surface currents is investigated. This technique is conceptually attractive because its operational physical principle involves a spatial electromagnetic scattering resonance with a single, but selectable, long gravity wave. Multiplexing of signals having different spacing of the two transmitted frequencies allows measurements of the entire long wave ocean spectrum to be carried out. A new scatterometer is developed and experimentally tested which is capable of making measurements having much larger signal/background values than previously possible. This instrument couples the resonance technique with coherent, frequency agility radar capabilities. This scatterometer is presently configured for supporting a program of surface current measurements.

  19. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  20. Drop-port study of microresonator frequency combs: power transfer, spectra and time-domain characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hsun; Xuan, Yi; Fan, Li; Varghese, Leo Tom; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Xue, Xiaoxiao; Leaird, Daniel E; Qi, Minghao; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-09-23

    We use a drop-port geometry to characterize frequency combs generated from silicon nitride on-chip microresonators in the normal group velocity regime. In sharp contrast with the traditional transmission geometry, we observe smooth output spectra with comparable powers in the pump and adjacent comb lines. The power transfer into the comb may be explained to a large extent by the coupling parameters characterizing the linear operation of the resonances studied. Furthermore, comparison of thru- and drop-port spectra shows that much of the ASE noise is filtered out by transmission to the drop-port. Autocorrelation measurements are performed on the drop-port output, without the need to filter out or suppress the strong pump line as is necessary in thru-port experiments. Passively mode-locked pulses with low background are observed in a normal dispersion microcavity. PMID:24104133

  1. Temporal-frequency spectra for plane and spherical waves in a millimetric wave absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Glaucio L.; Cole, Roy S.

    1991-02-01

    Complete analytical expressions for the temporal power spectral density functions in a millimetric wave absorption region for plane and spherical waves have been developed for both amplitude and phase fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence. Asymptotic expressions for both high and low scintillation frequencies are derived. Theoretical expressions for the differential phase power spectrum (i.e., the phase difference between two frequencies) are also presented. Experimental results of amplitude and differential phase scintillations measured on a 4.1-km link across central London, are presented. Results show that the plane wave case gives the best agreement with theory for this particular link. It is also shown that neglecting the cross-spectral density term at the higher scintillation frequencies for the differential phase spectrum can lead to a large difference between the theoretical and experimental power spectra. In particular, for a small frequency separation and a large value of the outer scale of turbulence, the highest scintillation frequencies are too low to neglect the cross term.

  2. The effect of sampling rate and anti-aliasing filters on high-frequency response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Goulet, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used intensity measure in ground-motion prediction equations is the pseudo-absolute response spectral acceleration (PSA), for response periods from 0.01 to 10 s (or frequencies from 0.1 to 100 Hz). PSAs are often derived from recorded ground motions, and these motions are usually filtered to remove high and low frequencies before the PSAs are computed. In this article we are only concerned with the removal of high frequencies. In modern digital recordings, this filtering corresponds at least to an anti-aliasing filter applied before conversion to digital values. Additional high-cut filtering is sometimes applied both to digital and to analog records to reduce high-frequency noise. Potential errors on the short-period (high-frequency) response spectral values are expected if the true ground motion has significant energy at frequencies above that of the anti-aliasing filter. This is especially important for areas where the instrumental sample rate and the associated anti-aliasing filter corner frequency (above which significant energy in the time series is removed) are low relative to the frequencies contained in the true ground motions. A ground-motion simulation study was conducted to investigate these effects and to develop guidance for defining the usable bandwidth for high-frequency PSA. The primary conclusion is that if the ratio of the maximum Fourier acceleration spectrum (FAS) to the FAS at a frequency fsaa corresponding to the start of the anti-aliasing filter is more than about 10, then PSA for frequencies above fsaa should be little affected by the recording process, because the ground-motion frequencies that control the response spectra will be less than fsaa . A second topic of this article concerns the resampling of the digital acceleration time series to a higher sample rate often used in the computation of short-period PSA. We confirm previous findings that sinc-function interpolation is preferred to the standard practice of using

  3. Comment on "Orientation dependence of the optical spectra in graphene at high frequencies"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Huy-Viet; Nguyen, V. Hung

    2016-09-01

    Zhang et al. [Phys. Rev. B 77, 241402(R) (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevB.77.241402] reported a theoretical study of the optical spectra of monolayer graphene employing the Kubo formula within a tight-binding model. Their calculations predicted that at high frequencies the optical conductivity of graphene becomes strongly anisotropic. In particular, at frequencies comparable to the energy separation of the upper and lower bands at the Γ point, the optical conductivity is strongly suppressed if the field polarization is along the zigzag direction whereas it is significantly high for the armchair one. We find that, unfortunately, this result is just a consequence of the incorrect determination of the current operator in k space. Here, we present a standard scheme to obtain this operator correctly. As a result, we show that the optical conductivity of monolayer graphene is indeed isotropic, which is consistent with the results of other (both theoretical and experimental) studies in the literature.

  4. Generalized skew coefficients for flood-frequency analysis in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of generalized skew coefficients used in flood-frequency analysis. Station skew coefficients were computed for 267 long-term stream-gaging stations in Minnesota and the surrounding states of Iowa, North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, and the provinces of Manitoba and Ontario, Canada. Generalized skew coefficients were computed from station skew coefficients using a locally weighted regression technique. The resulting regression trend surface was the generalized skew coefficient map, except for the North Shore area, and has a mean square error of 0.182.

  5. Ionospheric Scintillation at Low Frequencies: Broadband Spectra and Phase Measurements from Natural Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Richard A.; Forte, Biagio; Coles, William A.

    2016-04-01

    Observations of strong natural radio sources such as Cassiopeia A taken using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) centred on the Netherlands, and the Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) in arctic Finland, over the frequency range 10-250 MHz show almost continual ionospheric scintillation. Dynamic spectra of these observations show scintillation varying from weak to strong scattering and the effects of refraction due to large-scale structure in the ionosphere can also be visible. Recent efforts have also attempted to measure phase scintillation in addition to the regular intensity measurements, using simultaneous low-resolution all-sky imaging, to confirm when strong refraction is seen. Delay-Doppler spectra (the two-dimensional power spectrum of a dynamic spectrum) sometimes show an arc structure, similar to the "scintillation arcs" reported from observations of interstellar scintillation, which can be used to model parameters such as the distance to the scattering "scree" and the velocity of the scattering medium transverse to the line of sight. These two parameters are inherently linked in modelling which means that one needs to be known before the other can be established accurately. The dense core of the LOFAR array has been used to take temporal cross-correlations between station pairs to establish a picture of the velocity field in the ionosphere; with KAIRA other supporting instrumentation can be used to estimate ionospheric velocities in nearby regions. These velocities are used to attempt to establish the altitudes dominating scattering due to the ionosphere.

  6. Change in the absorption spectra of blood exposed to a low-frequency magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Mit'kovskaya, N. P.; Galai, O. A.; Kuchinskii, A. V.; Laskina, O. V.

    2007-03-01

    We have used the absorption spectra of whole blood in the UV-visible and IR regions of the spectrum to study changes in the structure of the molecular components of blood when exposed to a low-frequency pulsed magnetic field used to treat ischemic heart disease. We show that pronounced changes in the spectra when the blood is directly exposed in vivo to a magnetic field may be due to breaking of the bond between the heme group and the protein of the hemoglobin, as a consequence of changes in the intermolecular interactions in the polypeptide chains of the hemoglobin and also the spin states of the paramagnetic heme components. Exposure to a magnetic field results in changes in the conformations of the polypeptide chains of hemoglobin and the rate of dissociation of oxyhemoglobin. The structural changes in the hemoglobin molecule are considered as one of the possible primary mechanisms of action on blood in vivo for a low-frequency pulsed magnetic field.

  7. Dynamic spectra of radio frequency bursts associated with edge-localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatipamula, Shekar G.; Yun, G. S.; Leem, J.; Park, H. K.; Kim, K. W.; Akiyama, T.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic emissions in the radio frequency (RF) range are detected in the high-confinement-mode (H-mode) plasma using a fast RF spectrometer on the KSTAR tokamak. The emissions at the crash events of edge-localized modes (ELMs) are found to occur as strong RF bursts with dynamic features in intensity and spectrum. The RF burst spectra (obtained with frequency resolution better than 10 MHz) exhibit diverse spectral features and evolve in multiple steps before the onset and through the ELM crash: (1) a narrow-band spectral line around 200 MHz persistent for extended duration in the pre-ELM crash times, (2) harmonic spectral lines with spacing comparable to deuterium or hydrogen ion cyclotron frequency at the pedestal, (3) rapid onset (faster than ~1 μs) of intense RF burst with wide-band continuum in frequency which coincides with the onset of ELM crash, and (4) a few additional intense RF bursts with chirping-down narrow-band spectrum during the crash. These observations indicate plasma waves are excited in the pedestal region and strongly correlated with the ELM dynamics such as the onset of the explosive crash. Thus the investigation of RF burst occurrence and their dynamic spectral features potentially offers the possibility of exploring H-mode physics in great detail.

  8. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers.

    PubMed

    Chou, Aaron S; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are reported of the cross-correlation of spectra of differential position signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of colocated 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers with flat broadband frequency response in the MHz range. The instrument obtains sensitivity to high frequency correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending beyond the 3.8 MHz inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. The dominant but uncorrelated shot noise is averaged down over 2×10^{8} independent spectral measurements with 381 Hz frequency resolution to obtain 2.1×10^{-20}m/sqrt[Hz] sensitivity to stationary signals. For signal bandwidths Δf>11  kHz, the sensitivity to strain h or shear power spectral density of classical or exotic origin surpasses a milestone PSD_{δh}

  9. First measurements of high frequency cross-spectra from a pair of large Michelson interferometers

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; et al

    2016-09-09

    Here, measurements are reported of the cross-correlation of spectra of differential position signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of colocated 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers with flat broadband frequency response in the MHz range. The instrument obtains sensitivity to high frequency correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending beyond the 3.8 MHz inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. The dominant but uncorrelated shot noise is averaged down over 2 × 108 independent spectral measurements with 381 Hz frequency resolution to obtain 2.1 × 10-20m/ √Hz sensitivity to stationary signals. For signal bandwidths Δf >more » 11 kHz, the sensitivity to strain h or shear power spectral density of classical or exotic origin surpasses a milestone PSDδh < tp where tp = 5.39 × 10-44/ Hz is the Planck time.« less

  10. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers.

    PubMed

    Chou, Aaron S; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are reported of the cross-correlation of spectra of differential position signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of colocated 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers with flat broadband frequency response in the MHz range. The instrument obtains sensitivity to high frequency correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending beyond the 3.8 MHz inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. The dominant but uncorrelated shot noise is averaged down over 2×10^{8} independent spectral measurements with 381 Hz frequency resolution to obtain 2.1×10^{-20}m/sqrt[Hz] sensitivity to stationary signals. For signal bandwidths Δf>11  kHz, the sensitivity to strain h or shear power spectral density of classical or exotic origin surpasses a milestone PSD_{δh}

  11. General properties of the radiation spectra from relativistic electrons moving in Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Takahara, Fumio

    2014-05-20

    Using a numerical method, we examine the radiation spectra from relativistic electrons moving in Langmuir turbulence, which are expected to exist in high energy astrophysical objects. The spectral shape is characterized by the spatial scale λ, field strength σ, and frequency of the Langmuir waves, and in terms of frequency they are represented by ω{sub 0} = 2πc/λ, ω{sub st} = eσ/mc, and ω{sub p}, respectively. We normalize ω{sub st} and ω {sub p} by ω{sub 0} as a ≡ ω{sub st}/ω{sub 0} and b ≡ ω{sub p}/ω{sub 0}, and examine the spectral shape in the a–b plane. An earlier study based on the diffusive radiation in Langmuir turbulence (DRL) theory by Fleishman and Toptygin showed that the typical frequency is γ{sup 2}ω{sub p} and that the low frequency spectrum behaves as F {sub ω}∝ω{sup 1} for b > 1 irrespective of a. Here, we adopt the first principle numerical approach to obtain the radiation spectra in more detail. We generate Langmuir turbulence by superposing Fourier modes, injecting monoenergetic electrons, solving the equation of motion, and calculating the radiation spectra using a Lienard-Wiechert potential. We find different features from the DRL theory for a > b > 1. The peak frequency turns out to be γ{sup 2}ω{sub st}, which is higher than the γ{sup 2}ω{sub p} predicted by the DRL theory, and the spectral index of the low frequency region is not 1 but 1/3. This is because the typical deflection angle of electrons is larger than the angle of the beaming cone ∼1/γ. We call the radiation for this case 'wiggler radiation in Langmuir turbulence'.

  12. Doppler frequency in interplanetary radar and general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvittie, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The change of frequency of an interplanetary radar signal sent from the earth to another planet or to a space probe is worked out according to general relativity. The Schwarzschild spacetime is employed and its null geodesics control the motion of the signals. Exact Doppler frequency formulas are derived for one-way and two-way radar in terms of an arbitrary Schwarzschild radial coordinate. A reduction to the special relativity case is used to interpret the formulas in terms of the relative radial velocity of emitter and target. The general relativity corrections are worked out approximately for each of three possible Schwarzschild radial coordinates, and a numerical example is given. The amount of the correction is different according as one or the other of the Schwarzschild coordinates is identified with the radius vector deduced from classical celestial mechanics. The identification problem is discussed.

  13. Comparability of lexical corpora: word frequency in phonological generalization.

    PubMed

    Gierut, Judith A; Dale, Rachel A

    2007-06-01

    Statistical regularities in language have been examined for new insight to the language acquisition process. This line of study has aided theory advancement, but it also has raised methodological concerns about the applicability of corpora data to child populations. One issue is whether it is appropriate to extend the regularities observed in the speech of adults to developing linguistic systems. The purpose of this paper is to establish the comparability of lexical corpora in accounting for behavioural effects of word frequency on children's phonological generalization. Four word frequency corpora were evaluated in comparison of child/adult and written/spoken sources. These were applied post-hoc to generalization data previously reported for two preschool children. Results showed that the interpretation of phonological generalization was the same within and across children, regardless of the corpus being used. Phonological gains were more evident in low than high frequency words. The findings have implications for the design of probabilistic studies of language acquisition and clinical treatment programmes.

  14. Reconstruction of bremsstrahlung spectra from attenuation data using generalized simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Menin, O H; Martinez, A S; Costa, A M

    2016-05-01

    A generalized simulated annealing algorithm, combined with a suitable smoothing regularization function is used to solve the inverse problem of X-ray spectrum reconstruction from attenuation data. The approach is to set the initial acceptance and visitation temperatures and to standardize the terms of objective function to automate the algorithm to accommodate different spectra ranges. Experiments with both numerical and measured attenuation data are presented. Results show that the algorithm reconstructs spectra shapes accurately. It should be noted that in this algorithm, the regularization function was formulated to guarantee a smooth spectrum, thus, the presented technique does not apply to X-ray spectrum where characteristic radiation are present.

  15. Reconstruction of bremsstrahlung spectra from attenuation data using generalized simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Menin, O H; Martinez, A S; Costa, A M

    2016-05-01

    A generalized simulated annealing algorithm, combined with a suitable smoothing regularization function is used to solve the inverse problem of X-ray spectrum reconstruction from attenuation data. The approach is to set the initial acceptance and visitation temperatures and to standardize the terms of objective function to automate the algorithm to accommodate different spectra ranges. Experiments with both numerical and measured attenuation data are presented. Results show that the algorithm reconstructs spectra shapes accurately. It should be noted that in this algorithm, the regularization function was formulated to guarantee a smooth spectrum, thus, the presented technique does not apply to X-ray spectrum where characteristic radiation are present. PMID:26943902

  16. Molecular dynamics study of two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra at vapor/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectra at vapor/water interface were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with a classical flexible and nonpolarizable model. The present model well describes the spectral diffusion of 2D infrared spectrum of bulk water as well as 2D HD-VSFG at the interface. The effect of isotopic dilution on the 2D HD-VSFG was elucidated by comparing the normal (H{sub 2}O) water and HOD water. We further performed decomposition analysis of 2D HD-VSFG into the hydrogen-bonding and the dangling (or free) OH vibrations, and thereby disentangled the different spectral responses and spectral diffusion in the 2D HD-VSFG. The present MD simulation demonstrated the role of anharmonic coupling between these modes on the cross peak in the 2D HD-VSFG spectrum.

  17. Assessing Polarizability Models for the Simulation of Low-Frequency Raman Spectra of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Bender, John S; Coasne, Benoit; Fourkas, John T

    2015-07-23

    Optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy is a widely used technique for probing the low-frequency, Raman-active dynamics of liquids. Although molecular simulations are an attractive tool for assigning liquid degrees of freedom to OKE spectra, the accurate modeling of the OKE and the motions that contribute to it relies on the use of a realistic and computationally tractable molecular polarizability model. Here we explore how the OKE spectrum of liquid benzene, and the underlying dynamics that determines its shape, are affected by the polarizability model employed. We test a molecular polarizability model that uses a point anisotropic molecular polarizability and three other models that distribute the polarizability over the molecule. The simplest and most computationally efficient distributed polarizability model tested is found to be sufficient for the accurate simulation of the many-body polarizability dynamics of this liquid. We further find that the atomic-to-molecular polarizability transformation approximation [Hu et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 7837-7849], used in conjunction with this distributed polarizability model, yields OKE spectra whose shapes differ negligibly from those calculated without this approximation, providing a substantial increase in computational efficiency.

  18. Vibrational spectra from atomic fluctuations in dynamics simulations. II. Solvent-induced frequency fluctuations at femtosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Tavan, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The midinfrared (MIR) spectra of molecules in polar solvents exhibit inhomogeneously broadened bands whose spectral positions are shifted as compared to the gas phase. The shifts are caused by interactions with structured solvation shells and the broadenings by fluctuations of these interactions. The MIR spectra can be calculated from hybrid molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which treat the solute molecule by density functional theory and the solvent by molecular mechanics by the so-called instantaneous normal mode analysis (INMA) or by Fourier transforming the time correlation function (FTTCF) of the molecular dipole moment. In Paper I of this work [M. Schmitz and P. Tavan, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 12233 (2004)] we explored an alternative method based on generalized virial (GV) frequencies noting, however, that GV systematically underestimates frequencies. As shown by us these artifacts are caused by solvent-induced fluctuations of the (i) equilibrium geometry, (ii) force constants, and (iii) normal mode directions as well as by (iv) diagonal and (v) off-diagonal anharmonicities. Here we now show, by analyzing the time scales of fluctuations and sample MD trajectories of formaldehyde in the gas phase and in water, that all these sources of computational artifacts can be made visible by a Fourier analysis of the normal coordinates. Correspondingly, the error sources (i) and (iii)-(v) can be removed by bandpass filtering, as long as the spectral signatures of the respective effects are well separated from the fundamental band. Furthermore, the artifacts arising from effect (ii) can be strongly diminished by a time-resolved version of the GV approach (TF-GV). The TF-GV method then yields for each mode j a trajectory of the vibrational frequency ωj(t|τ) at a time resolution τ>τj, which is only limited by the corresponding oscillation time τj=2π/ωj and, thus, is in the femtosecond range. A correlation analysis of these trajectories clearly separates the

  19. Time-dependent wave packet averaged vibrational frequencies from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Chao; Zhao, Bin; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) on the Stokes side arises from a third order polarization, P(3)(t), which is given by an overlap of a first order wave packet, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > , prepared by a narrow band (ps) Raman pump pulse, Epu(t), on the upper electronic e2 potential energy surface (PES), with a second order wave packet, <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | , that is prepared on the lower electronic e1 PES by a broadband (fs) probe pulse, Epr(t), acting on the first-order wave packet. In off-resonant FSRS, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > resembles the zeroth order wave packet |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > on the lower PES spatially, but with a force on |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > along the coordinates of the reporter modes due to displacements in the equilibrium position, so that <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | will oscillate along those coordinates thus giving rise to similar oscillations in P(3)(t) with the frequencies of the reporter modes. So, by recovering P(3)(t) from the FSRS spectrum, we are able to deduce information on the time-dependent quantum-mechanical wave packet averaged frequencies, ω ¯ j ( t ) , of the reporter modes j along the trajectory of |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > . The observable FSRS Raman gain is related to the imaginary part of P(3)(ω). The imaginary and real parts of P(3)(ω) are related by the Kramers-Kronig relation. Hence, from the FSRS Raman gain, we can obtain the complex P(3)(ω), whose Fourier transform then gives us the complex P(3)(t) to analyze for ω ¯ j ( t ) . We apply the theory, first, to a two-dimensional model system with one conformational mode of low frequency and one reporter vibrational mode of higher frequency with good results, and then we apply it to the time-resolved FSRS spectra of the cis-trans isomerization of retinal in rhodopsin [P. Kukura et al., Science 310, 1006 (2005)]. We obtain the vibrational

  20. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  1. Generalized flood-frequency estimates for urban areas in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gann, Ector Eugene

    1971-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating flood-frequency information for urban areas in Missouri. Flood-frequency relations are presented which provide an estimate of the flood-peak discharge for floods with recurrence intervals from 2.33 to 100 years for basins with various degrees of existing or projected urban development. Drainage area sizes for which the relations are applicable range from 0.1 to 50 square miles. These generalized relations will be useful to the urban planner and designer until more comprehensive studies are completed for the individual urban areas within the State. The relations will also be of use in the definition of flood-hazard areas in Missouri.

  2. Computational High-Frequency Overtone Spectra of the Water Ammonia Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sälli, Elina; Halonen, Lauri

    2011-06-01

    We have computed vibrational high-frequency overtone spectra of the water ammonia complex, {H_2O-NH_3}, and its isotopomers. The cluster has been modelled as two independently vibrating monomer units. Our internal coordinate Hamiltonians for each monomer unit have been constructed using exact gas phase kinetic energy operators. The potential energy and dipole moment surfaces have been calculated with the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method CCSD(T)-F12A and valence triple zeta VTZ-F12 basis around the equilibrium geometry of the complex. The vibrational eigenvalues are calculated variationally. The eigenfunctions obtained are used to compute the relative absorption intensities. In {H_2O-NH_3}, water molecule acts as the proton donor and its symmetry is broken. The hydrogen bonded {OH_b} bond oscillator undergoes a large redshift and intensity enhancement compared to the free hydrogen bond. Broken degeneracy of the asymmetric vibrations, quenched inversion splittings, and blueshift of the symmetric bend are the most visible changes in the ammonia unit. Our vibrational model is anharmonic. Therefore, we have been able to calculate not only high-frequency fundamentals but also overtones and combination levels that for this complex have not been detected experimentally. The calculated fundamentals agree well with matrix isolation and helium droplet measurements except for the bonded {OH_b} stretching of the water unit where our model overestimates the clustering induced shift. The same has previously been seen in the bonded {OH_b} stretch of the water dimer and is probably due to the couplings with the low-frequency modes.

  3. Quantum Vacuum Radiation Spectra from a Semiconductor Microcavity with a Time-Modulated Vacuum Rabi Frequency

    SciTech Connect

    De Liberato, Simone; Ciuti, Cristiano; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2007-03-09

    We develop a general theory of the quantum vacuum radiation generated by an arbitrary time modulation of the vacuum Rabi frequency of an intersubband transition in a doped quantum well system embedded in a planar microcavity. Both nonradiative and radiative losses are included within an input-output quantum Langevin framework. The intensity and the spectral signatures of the extra-cavity emission are characterized versus the modulation properties. For realistic parameters, the photon pair emission is predicted to largely exceed the blackbody radiation in the mid and far infrared. For strong and resonant modulation a parametric oscillation regime is achievable.

  4. The widest frequency radio relic spectra: observations from 150 MHz to 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Shimwell, Timothy; Rumsey, Clare; van Weeren, Reinout; Kierdorf, Maja; Donnert, Julius; Jones, Thomas W.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Hoeft, Matthias; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Carmen; Harwood, Jeremy J.; Saunders, Richard D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Radio relics are patches of diffuse synchrotron radio emission that trace shock waves. Relics are thought to form when intracluster medium electrons are accelerated by cluster merger-induced shock waves through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this paper, we present observations spanning 150 MHz to 30 GHz of the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' relics from the Giant Metrewave and Westerbork telescopes, the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Effelsberg telescope, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We detect both relics at 30 GHz, where the previous highest frequency detection was at 16 GHz. The integrated radio spectra of both sources clearly steepen above 2 GHz, at the ≳6σ significance level, supporting the spectral steepening previously found in the `Sausage' and the Abell 2256 relic. Our results challenge the widely adopted simple formation mechanism of radio relics and suggest more complicated models have to be developed that, for example, involve re-acceleration of aged seed electrons.

  5. A generalized BC for radio-frequency sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    A new radio-frequency (rf) sheath boundary condition (BC) is described and applied to the problem of far field sheaths. The new BC generalizes the one presently used in rf codes to include: (1) an arbitrary magnetic field angle, (2) the full complex impedance, (3) mobile ions, (4) unmagnetized ions, and (5) the magnetic pre-sheath. For a given wave-propagation (macro) problem, root-finding is used to match the impedance of the rf wave with that of the micro-sheath problem. For a model far-field sheath problem, it is shown that the structure of the (multiple) roots with the new BC is similar to that with the capacitive BC, but the location of the resonance changes when the full impedance is used.

  6. Wetting effect on optical sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of D-glucose, D-fructose, and sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu, Hoang Chi; Li, Hongyan; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2015-03-01

    We report a sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy study of D-glucose, D-fructose and sucrose in the Csbnd H stretching vibration regime. Wetting effect on the SFG spectra was investigated. The SFG spectrum of D-glucose changed from that of α-D-glucose into those of α-D-glucose monohydrate by wetting. The SFG spectra showed evidence of a small change of β-D-fructopyranose into other anomers by wetting. SFG spectra of sucrose did not change by wetting. Assignments of the vibrational peaks in the SFG spectra of the three sugars in the dry and wet states were performed in the Csbnd H stretching vibration region near 3000 cm-1.

  7. Wetting effect on optical sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of d-glucose, d-fructose, and sucrose.

    PubMed

    Hieu, Hoang Chi; Li, Hongyan; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2015-03-01

    We report a sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy study of d-glucose, d-fructose and sucrose in the CH stretching vibration regime. Wetting effect on the SFG spectra was investigated. The SFG spectrum of d-glucose changed from that of α-d-glucose into those of α-d-glucose monohydrate by wetting. The SFG spectra showed evidence of a small change of β-d-fructopyranose into other anomers by wetting. SFG spectra of sucrose did not change by wetting. Assignments of the vibrational peaks in the SFG spectra of the three sugars in the dry and wet states were performed in the CH stretching vibration region near 3000cm(-1).

  8. Source Spectra of Near Kamchatka Earthquakes: Recovering them from S-Wave Spectra, and Determination of Scaling for Three Corner Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a procedure for mass determination of the "source-controlled f max"—an important though not conventional parameter of earthquake source spectrum, relabeled here as "the third corner frequency," f c3, and discuss the results of its application. f max is the upper cutoff frequency of Fourier acceleration spectrum of a record of a local earthquake; both source and path attenuation contribute to f max. Most researchers believe the role of attenuation (" κ" parameter) to be dominating or exclusive. Still, source effect on f max is sometimes revealed. If real, it may be important for source physics. To understand better the f max phenomena, the constituents of f max must be accurately separated. With this goal, we process seismograms of moderate earthquakes from Kamchatka subduction zone. First, we need reliable estimates of attenuation to recover source spectra. To this goal, an iterative processing procedure is constructed, that adjusts the attenuation model until the recovered source acceleration spectra become, on the average, flat up either to f c3, or up to the high-frequency limit of the frequency range analyzed. The latter case occurs when f c3 is non-existent or unobservable. Below f c3, the double-corner source spectral model is thought to be valid, and the lower bound of acceleration spectral plateau is considered as the second corner frequency of earthquake source spectrum, fc2. The common corner frequency, f c1, is also estimated. Following this approach, more than 500 S-wave spectra of M = 4-6.5 Kamchatka earthquakes with hypocentral distances 80-220 km were analyzed. In about 80 % of the cases, f c3 is clearly manifested; the remaining cases show, at high frequency, flat source acceleration spectra. In addition, in about 2/3 of cases, f c2 is clearly above f c1, showing that double-corner spectra may dominate even at moderate magnitudes. Scaling behavior was examined for each of the corners. The f c1 vs. M 0 trend is common and close to

  9. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-10-31

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  10. General purpose computational tools for simulation and analysis of medium-energy backscattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Robert A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes a suite of computational tools for general-purpose ion-solid calculations, which has been implemented in the platform-independent computational environment Mathematica®. Although originally developed for medium energy work (beam energies < 300 keV), they are suitable for general, classical, non-relativistic calculations. Routines are available for stopping power, Rutherford and Lenz-Jensen (screened) cross sections, sputtering yields, small-angle multiple scattering, and back-scattering-spectrum simulation and analysis. Also included are a full range of supporting functions, as well as easily accessible atomic mass and other data on all the stable isotopes in the periodic table. The functions use common calling protocols, recognize elements and isotopes by symbolic names and, wherever possible, return symbolic results for symbolic inputs, thereby facilitating further computation. A new paradigm for the representation of backscattering spectra is introduced.

  11. Generalized Exponential Distribution in Flood Frequency Analysis for Polish Rivers.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Iwona; Strupczewski, Witold G; Bogdanowicz, Ewa; Kochanek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Many distributions have been used in flood frequency analysis (FFA) for fitting the flood extremes data. However, as shown in the paper, the scatter of Polish data plotted on the moment ratio diagram shows that there is still room for a new model. In the paper, we study the usefulness of the generalized exponential (GE) distribution in flood frequency analysis for Polish Rivers. We investigate the fit of GE distribution to the Polish data of the maximum flows in comparison with the inverse Gaussian (IG) distribution, which in our previous studies showed the best fitting among several models commonly used in FFA. Since the use of a discrimination procedure without the knowledge of its performance for the considered probability density functions may lead to erroneous conclusions, we compare the probability of correct selection for the GE and IG distributions along with the analysis of the asymptotic model error in respect to the upper quantile values. As an application, both GE and IG distributions are alternatively assumed for describing the annual peak flows for several gauging stations of Polish Rivers. To find the best fitting model, four discrimination procedures are used. In turn, they are based on the maximized logarithm of the likelihood function (K procedure), on the density function of the scale transformation maximal invariant (QK procedure), on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics (KS procedure) and the fourth procedure based on the differences between the ML estimate of 1% quantile and its value assessed by the method of moments and linear moments, in sequence (R procedure). Due to the uncertainty of choosing the best model, the method of aggregation is applied to estimate of the maximum flow quantiles. PMID:26657239

  12. Generalized Exponential Distribution in Flood Frequency Analysis for Polish Rivers

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Iwona; Strupczewski, Witold G.; Bogdanowicz, Ewa; Kochanek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Many distributions have been used in flood frequency analysis (FFA) for fitting the flood extremes data. However, as shown in the paper, the scatter of Polish data plotted on the moment ratio diagram shows that there is still room for a new model. In the paper, we study the usefulness of the generalized exponential (GE) distribution in flood frequency analysis for Polish Rivers. We investigate the fit of GE distribution to the Polish data of the maximum flows in comparison with the inverse Gaussian (IG) distribution, which in our previous studies showed the best fitting among several models commonly used in FFA. Since the use of a discrimination procedure without the knowledge of its performance for the considered probability density functions may lead to erroneous conclusions, we compare the probability of correct selection for the GE and IG distributions along with the analysis of the asymptotic model error in respect to the upper quantile values. As an application, both GE and IG distributions are alternatively assumed for describing the annual peak flows for several gauging stations of Polish Rivers. To find the best fitting model, four discrimination procedures are used. In turn, they are based on the maximized logarithm of the likelihood function (K procedure), on the density function of the scale transformation maximal invariant (QK procedure), on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics (KS procedure) and the fourth procedure based on the differences between the ML estimate of 1% quantile and its value assessed by the method of moments and linear moments, in sequence (R procedure). Due to the uncertainty of choosing the best model, the method of aggregation is applied to estimate of the maximum flow quantiles. PMID:26657239

  13. Generalized Exponential Distribution in Flood Frequency Analysis for Polish Rivers.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Iwona; Strupczewski, Witold G; Bogdanowicz, Ewa; Kochanek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Many distributions have been used in flood frequency analysis (FFA) for fitting the flood extremes data. However, as shown in the paper, the scatter of Polish data plotted on the moment ratio diagram shows that there is still room for a new model. In the paper, we study the usefulness of the generalized exponential (GE) distribution in flood frequency analysis for Polish Rivers. We investigate the fit of GE distribution to the Polish data of the maximum flows in comparison with the inverse Gaussian (IG) distribution, which in our previous studies showed the best fitting among several models commonly used in FFA. Since the use of a discrimination procedure without the knowledge of its performance for the considered probability density functions may lead to erroneous conclusions, we compare the probability of correct selection for the GE and IG distributions along with the analysis of the asymptotic model error in respect to the upper quantile values. As an application, both GE and IG distributions are alternatively assumed for describing the annual peak flows for several gauging stations of Polish Rivers. To find the best fitting model, four discrimination procedures are used. In turn, they are based on the maximized logarithm of the likelihood function (K procedure), on the density function of the scale transformation maximal invariant (QK procedure), on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics (KS procedure) and the fourth procedure based on the differences between the ML estimate of 1% quantile and its value assessed by the method of moments and linear moments, in sequence (R procedure). Due to the uncertainty of choosing the best model, the method of aggregation is applied to estimate of the maximum flow quantiles.

  14. Negative permittivity and permeability spectra of Cu/yttrium iron garnet hybrid granular composite materials in the microwave frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutaoka, Takanori Fukuyama, Koki; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Kasagi, Teruhiro; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Hatakeyama, Kenichi

    2013-12-23

    The relative complex permittivity and permeability spectra of the coagulated copper and yttrium iron garnet (Cu/YIG) hybrid granular composite materials have been studied in the microwave range. The insulator to metal transition was observed at the percolation threshold of Cu particle content (φ{sub Cu} = 16.0 vol. %) in the electrical conductivity. In the percolation threshold, the low frequency plasmonic state caused by the metallic Cu particle networks was observed. The percolated Cu/YIG granular composites show simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability spectra under external magnetic fields.

  15. Time-frequency demodulation analysis based on iterative generalized demodulation for fault diagnosis of planetary gearbox under nonstationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chen, Xiaowang; Liang, Ming; Ma, Fei

    2015-10-01

    The vibration signal of planetary gearboxes exhibits the characteristics of both amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM), and thus has a complex sideband structure. Time-varying speed and/or load will result in time variant characteristic frequency components. Since the modulating frequency is related to the gear fault characteristic frequency, the AM and FM parts each alone contains the information of the gear fault. We propose a time-frequency amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis metbhod to avoid the complex time-variant sideband analysis, and thereby identify the time-variant gear fault characteristic frequency. We enhance the time-frequency analysis via iterative generalized demodulation (IGD). The time-varying amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra have fine time-frequency resolution and are free of cross term interferences. They do not involve complex time-variant sidebands, thus considerably facilitating fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes under nonstationary conditions. The method is validated using both numerically simulated data and experimental signals.

  16. X-ray Spectra and Pulse Frequency Changes in SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baykal, A.; Stark, M. J.; Swank, J. H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The November 1999 outburst of the transient pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545 was monitored with the large area detectors of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer until the pulsar faded after a year. The 358 s pulsar was spun up for 150 days, at which point the flux dropped quickly by a factor of approximately 7, the frequency saturated and, as the flux continued to decline, a weak spin-down began. The pulses remained strong during the decay and the spin-up/flux correlation can be fit to the Ghosh and Lamb derivations for the spin-up caused by accretion from a thin, pressure-dominated disk, for a distance approximately 3.2 kpc and a surface magnetic field approximately 1.2 x 10(exp 13) Gauss. During the bright spin-up part of the outburst, the flux was subject to strong orbital modulation, peaking approximately 3 days after periastron of the eccentric 12.68 day orbit, while during the faint part, there was little orbital modulation. The X-ray spectra were typical of accreting pulsars, describable by a cut-off power-law, with an emission line near the 6.4 keV of Kappa(sub alpha) fluorescence from cool iron. The equivalent width of this emission did not share the orbital modulation, but nearly doubled during the faint phase, despite little change in the column density. The outburst could have been caused by an episode of increased wind from a Be star, such that a small accretion disk is formed during each periastron passage. A change in the wind and disk structure apparently occurred after 5 months such that the accretion rate was no longer modulated or the diffusion time was longer. The distance estimate implies the X-ray luminosity observed was between 1 X 10(exp 36) ergs s(exp -1) and 6 x 10(exp 34) ergs s(exp -1), with a small but definite correlation of the intrinsic power-law spectral index.

  17. Vibrational spectra of cis and trans but-2-enes: assignments, isolated CH stretching frequencies and CH bond lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, D. C.; Mackenzie, M. W.; Morrisson, A. R.; Lavalley, J. C.; Janin, A.; Fawcett, V.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    Infrared and Raman spectra have been obtained from 11 isotopomers of cis and trans but-2-enes in various phases ( c- and t-CH 3CHCHCH 3, CH 3CHCDCH 3, CD 3CHCHCD 3, CD 3CHCDCD 3, CD 3CDCDCD 3; c-CH 3CDCDCH 3). Nearly all the fundamentals are securely assigned. Isolated CH stretching frequencies ν isCH are observed or deduced from the spectra and used to predict CH bond lengths and dissociation energies. The olefinic CH and methyl CH s bonds are stronger in the cis compound than those in the trans, in keeping with substituent effects previously observed in propene, and with molecular mechanics predictions. Comparison of ν isCH values with local mode fifth overtone spectra for cis-CH 3CHCHCH 3 indicates that the part of the latter associated with the CH a bond cannot be readily interpreted.

  18. A high-frequency Doppler feature in the power spectra of simulated GRMHD black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Wellons, Sarah; Zhu, Yucong; Narayan, Ramesh; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2014-04-20

    Black hole binaries exhibit a wide range of variability phenomena, from large-scale state changes to broadband noise and quasi-periodic oscillations, but the physical nature of much of this variability is poorly understood. We examine the variability properties of three GRMHD simulations of thin accretion disks around black holes of varying spin, producing light curves and power spectra as would be seen by observers. We find that the simulated power spectra show a broad feature at high frequency, which increases in amplitude with the inclination of the observer. We show that this high-frequency feature is a product of the Doppler effect and that its location is a function of the mass and spin of the black hole. This Doppler feature demonstrates that power spectral properties of the accretion disk can be tied to, and potentially used to determine, physical properties of the black hole.

  19. Two-dimensional attractive Fermi gases' excitations and radio-frequency spectra across the BEC/BCS crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazzard, Kaden

    2012-06-01

    We calculate the radio-frequency spectra of two-dimensional attractive Fermi gases, including final state interactions, motivated by recent measurements by the groups of Koehl, Thomas, and Zwierlein. The calculation includes coherent excitations generated by the radio-frequency probe on top of the mean field solution. We find that although the gap is identical to the two particle theory, spectral shapes are modified both by many-body effects and by final state interactions. We compare these shapes to experimental measurements.

  20. A General Method for Extracting Individual Coupling Constants from Crowded (1)H NMR Spectra.

    PubMed

    Sinnaeve, Davy; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A

    2016-01-18

    Couplings between protons, whether scalar or dipolar, provide a wealth of structural information. Unfortunately, the high number of (1)H-(1)H couplings gives rise to complex multiplets and severe overlap in crowded spectra, greatly complicating their measurement. Many different methods exist for disentangling couplings, but none approaches optimum resolution. Here, we present a general new 2D J-resolved method, PSYCHEDELIC, in which all homonuclear couplings are suppressed in F2, and only the couplings to chosen spins appear, as simple doublets, in F1. This approaches the theoretical limit for resolving (1)H-(1)H couplings, with close to natural linewidths and with only chemical shifts in F2. With the same high sensitivity and spectral purity as the parent PSYCHE pure shift experiment, PSYCHEDELIC offers a robust method for chemists seeking to exploit couplings for structural, conformational, or stereochemical analyses.

  1. A General Method for Extracting Individual Coupling Constants from Crowded 1H NMR Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Couplings between protons, whether scalar or dipolar, provide a wealth of structural information. Unfortunately, the high number of 1H‐1H couplings gives rise to complex multiplets and severe overlap in crowded spectra, greatly complicating their measurement. Many different methods exist for disentangling couplings, but none approaches optimum resolution. Here, we present a general new 2D J‐resolved method, PSYCHEDELIC, in which all homonuclear couplings are suppressed in F 2, and only the couplings to chosen spins appear, as simple doublets, in F 1. This approaches the theoretical limit for resolving 1H‐1H couplings, with close to natural linewidths and with only chemical shifts in F 2. With the same high sensitivity and spectral purity as the parent PSYCHE pure shift experiment, PSYCHEDELIC offers a robust method for chemists seeking to exploit couplings for structural, conformational, or stereochemical analyses. PMID:26636773

  2. Revisiting the Generalization of Entropy for Non-positive Distribution: Application for Exponent Spectra Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaidzidis, Yannis L.; Gopta, Oxana; Kalaidzidis, Inna V.

    2009-12-01

    Originally the maximum entropy method for exponent deconvolution was restricted to the positive exponent's amplitudes by the entropy S(f, m) definition. It limits application of the method, since many experimental kinetics show both the rise and the decay, which manifest themselves as positive and negative amplitudes in the exponent spectrum. The generalization of entropy formulation for non-negative distribution (S. F. Gull and J. Skilling) overcomes this limitation. The drawback of the approach was, that m lost the meaning of the prior distribution, since that maximum of generalized S(f, m) is independent on m and achieved at f ≡ 0. It is significant problem when there are apriori information about possible spectrum behaviour. In the present work some assumptions of the entropy generalization was relaxed and alternative entropy formulation, with non-uniform prior was used for analysis of simulated and experimental data. The new approach was applied to spectra analysis of the absorption kinetics of the bacteriorhodopsin (bR—light driven proton pump from archea Halobacterium salinarium) photocycle. It was shown that the process of the intermediate M formation is non-exponential in the wild type bR. The non-exponential process could be interpreted as result of the protein conformational changes during proton transfer from the Shiff-base of bR.

  3. Generalized focus point and mass spectra comparison of highly natural SUGRA GUT models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Savoy, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Supergravity grand unified models (SUGRA GUTs) are highly motivated and allow for a high degree of electroweak naturalness when the superpotential parameter μ ˜100 - 300 GeV (preferring values closer to 100 GeV). We first illustrate that models with radiatively driven naturalness enjoy a generalized focus-point behavior wherein all soft terms are correlated instead of just scalar masses. Next, we generate spectra from four SUGRA GUT archetypes: 1. S O (10 ) models where the Higgs doublets live in different ten-dimensional irreducible representations (irreps), 2. models based on S O (10 ) where the Higgs multiplets live in a single ten-dimensional irrep but with D -term scalar mass splitting, 3. models based on S U (5 ), and 4. a more general SUGRA model with 12 independent parameters. Electroweak naturalness implies for all models a spectrum of light Higgsinos with mW˜1,Z˜ 1 ,2≲300 GeV and gluinos with mg ˜≲ 2 - 4 TeV . However, masses and mixing in the third generation sfermion sector differ distinctly between the models. These latter differences would be most easily tested at a linear e+e- collider with √{s }˜ multi-TeV scale but measurements at a 50-100 TeV hadron collider are also possible.

  4. A generalization of the double-corner-frequency source spectral model and its use in the SCEC BBP validation exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Di Alessandro, Carola; Abrahamson, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    The stochastic method of simulating ground motions requires the specification of the shape and scaling with magnitude of the source spectrum. The spectral models commonly used are either single-corner-frequency or double-corner-frequency models, but the latter have no flexibility to vary the high-frequency spectral levels for a specified seismic moment. Two generalized double-corner-frequency ω2 source spectral models are introduced, one in which two spectra are multiplied together, and another where they are added. Both models have a low-frequency dependence controlled by the seismic moment, and a high-frequency spectral level controlled by the seismic moment and a stress parameter. A wide range of spectral shapes can be obtained from these generalized spectral models, which makes them suitable for inversions of data to obtain spectral models that can be used in ground-motion simulations in situations where adequate data are not available for purely empirical determinations of ground motions, as in stable continental regions. As an example of the use of the generalized source spectral models, data from up to 40 stations from seven events, plus response spectra at two distances and two magnitudes from recent ground-motion prediction equations, were inverted to obtain the parameters controlling the spectral shapes, as well as a finite-fault factor that is used in point-source, stochastic-method simulations of ground motion. The fits to the data are comparable to or even better than those from finite-fault simulations, even for sites close to large earthquakes.

  5. Comparison of the RF frequency spectra of HEMP and lightning. Technical report, 22 Sep 87-10 Jul 90

    SciTech Connect

    Uman, M.A.

    1991-03-01

    Cloud pulses are much more common than these earlier studies indicate. Our spectra of the largest overhead cloud pulses are nearly parallel to but significantly below the HEMP spectrum from 1 MHz to 50 MHz, while obtained from lighting tens of kilometer offshore over salt water show faster relative decay with increasing frequency, are significantly below ours between 10 and 50 MHz, and are about equal to ours between 3 and 10 MHz. The shortest rise time to initial peak value of overhead lighting pulses are of the order of 0.3 micro sec. A broader bandwidth system than that used would allow measurement of the rapid field variation occurring throughout the cloud pulses associated with frequencies above abut 50 MHz but would observe essentially the same risetime to initial peak. That is, the higher frequency content of the cloud pulses is contained in the rapid field variation throughout the overall waveforms and not in the initial rise to peak value.

  6. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  7. Exploring the use of Generalized Indirect Covariance to reconstruct pure shift NMR spectra: Current Pros and Cons.

    PubMed

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Martin, Gary E; Parella, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    The current Pros and Cons of a processing protocol to generate pure chemical shift NMR spectra using Generalized Indirect Covariance are presented and discussed. The transformation of any standard 2D homonuclear and heteronuclear spectrum to its pure shift counterpart by using a reference DIAG spectrum is described. Reconstructed pure shift NMR spectra of NOESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY and HSQMBC experiments are reported for the target molecule strychnine.

  8. Origins of features in wave number-frequency spectra of space-time images of the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.; Farquharson, Gordon

    2012-06-01

    Wave number-frequency spectra measured with remote sensing systems consist of energy along the ocean wave dispersion relation and additional features that lie above and below this relation. At low frequencies a feature passing through the origin as a straight line is observed while one or more high-frequency features exhibit substantial curvature. Here we utilize images obtained on the open ocean from microwave Doppler shifts, which are directly related to scatterer velocity and allow us to calculate expected wave-wave interaction effects. We show that the strongest features lying off the first-order dispersion relation are not primarily due to second-order interactions, breaking caused by wind turbulence, advection by turbulence, or shadowing. The low-frequency feature can be seen traveling in the opposite direction to swell when looking nearly crosswind. We show that the most probable cause of these features is the interference of long ocean waves, which causes breaking near local maxima of surface slope. Doppler spectra observed by the radars indicate that the maximum speed reached by water particles on the open ocean is less than 6 m/s and usually close to the speed of the low-frequency feature in the wave number-frequency spectrum. Since this is much less than the phase speeds of dominant wind waves and swell, neither of these waves can be the breaking wave. Rather, we hypothesize that the superposition of these waves steepens short gravity waves on the surface, which then break to produce water parcels traveling near their phase speed, the speed observed by the radar.

  9. Stability and noise spectra of relative Loran-C frequency comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proverbio, E.; Quesada, V.; Simoncini, A.

    1973-01-01

    Relative comparisons of Loran-C frequency transmissions between the master station of Catanzaro (Simeri Crichi) and the X, Z slave stations of Estartit (Spain) and Lampedusa (Italy) are carrying out by the GG LORSTA monitor station of the Mediterranean Sea Loran-C chain. These comparisons are able to emphasize the relative and, under certain conditions, the absolute rate of the emitting standard frequencies of the slave stations and some relevant statistical properties of the Loran-C Method for frequency transmission and time synchronization. The stability of each Loran-C frequency standard transmission is subject to perturbations, more or less known, due to the propagation medium and other causes. Following the Allan (1966) method for data processing, the performance of the relative rate of frequency of the transmissions of the X, Z slave stations are described calculating the standard deviation of a set of N frequency measurements from its mean averaged during sampling times. This standard deviation is designated as the measure of the stability of the Loran-C frequency transmission.

  10. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  11. Frequency spectra of magnetostrictive and Lorentz forces generated in ferromagnetic materials by a CW excited EMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, C.; Lhémery, A.; Aristégui, C.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetostriction arises in ferromagnetic materials subjected to magnetization, e.g., when an EMAT (Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducer) is used to generate ultrasonic waves. In such a case, the magnetostriction force must be taken into account as a transduction process that adds up to the Lorentz force. When the static magnetic field is high compared to the dynamic field, both forces are driven by the excitation frequency. For lower static relative values of the magnetic fields, the Lorentz force comprises both the excitation frequency and its first harmonic. In this work, a model is derived to predict the frequency content of the magnetostrictive force that comprises several harmonics. The discrete frequency spectrum strongly depends on both the static field and the relative amplitude of the dynamic field. The only material input data needed to predict it is the curve of macroscopic magnetostrictive strain that can be measured in the direction of an imposed magnetic field. Then, the various frequency-dependent distributions of Lorentz and magnetostriction body forces can be transformed into equivalent surface stresses. Examples of computation are given for different static and dynamic magnetic fields to study their influence on the frequency content of waves generated in ferromagnetic materials.

  12. High frequency generalized transduction by miniMu plasmid phage.

    PubMed

    Wang, B M; Liu, L; Groisman, E A; Casadaban, M J; Berg, C M

    1987-06-01

    Deletion derivatives of phage Mu which replicate as multicopy plasmids, and also transpose and package like Mu, have been developed for the in vivo cloning of bacterial genes. We show here that these miniMu plasmid phage are also efficient at generalized transduction and that both in vivo cloning and generalized transduction of a given gene can be accomplished in a single experiment.

  13. Dielectric constant and low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih within the E3B model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, L.; Ni, Y.; Drews, S. E. P.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-08-28

    Two intrinsic difficulties in modeling condensed-phase water with conventional rigid non-polarizable water models are: reproducing the static dielectric constants for liquid water and ice Ih, and generating the peak at about 200 cm{sup −1} in the low-frequency infrared spectrum for liquid water. The primary physical reason for these failures is believed to be the missing polarization effect in these models, and consequently various sophisticated polarizable water models have been developed. However, in this work we pursue a different strategy and propose a simple empirical scheme to include the polarization effect only on the dipole surface (without modifying a model's intermolecular interaction potential). We implement this strategy for our explicit three-body (E3B) model. Our calculated static dielectric constants and low-frequency infrared spectra are in good agreement with experiment for both liquid water and ice Ih over wide temperature ranges, albeit with one fitting parameter for each phase. The success of our modeling also suggests that thermal fluctuations about local minima and the energy differences between different proton-disordered configurations play minor roles in the static dielectric constant of ice Ih. Our analysis shows that the polarization effect is important in resolving the two difficulties mentioned above and sheds some light on the origin of several features in the low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih.

  14. An empirical approach to the bond additivity model in quantitative interpretation of sum frequency generation vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Zhang, Wen-kai; Gan, Wei; Cui, Zhi-feng; Wang, Hong-fei

    2006-10-01

    Knowledge of the ratios between different polarizability βi'j'k' tensor elements of a chemical group in a molecule is crucial for quantitative interpretation and polarization analysis of its sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) spectrum at interface. The bond additivity model (BAM) or the hyperpolarizability derivative model along with experimentally obtained Raman depolarization ratios has been widely used to obtain such tensor ratios for the CH3, CH2, and CH groups. Successfully, such treatment can quantitatively reproduce the intensity polarization dependence in SFG-VS spectra for the symmetric (SS) and asymmetric (AS) stretching modes of CH3 and CH2 groups, respectively. However, the relative intensities between the SS and AS modes usually do not agree with each other within this model even for some of the simplest molecular systems, such as the air/methanol interface. This fact certainly has cast uncertainties on the effectiveness and conclusions based on the BAM. One of such examples is that the AS mode of CH3 group has never been observed in SFG-VS spectra from the air/methanol interface, while this AS mode is usually very strong for SFG-VS spectra from the air/ethanol interface, other short chain alcohol, as well as long chain surfactants. In order to answer these questions, an empirical approach from known Raman and IR spectra is used to make corrections to the BAM. With the corrected ratios between the βi'j'k' tensor elements of the SS and AS modes, all features in the SFG-VS spectra of the air/methanol and air/ethanol interfaces can be quantitatively interpreted. This empirical approach not only provides new understandings of the effectiveness and limitations of the bond additivity model but also provides a practical way for its application in SFG-VS studies of molecular interfaces.

  15. Atomistic modeling of the low-frequency mechanical modes and Raman spectra of icosahedral virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2010-02-01

    We describe a technique for calculating the low-frequency mechanical modes and frequencies of a large symmetric biological molecule where the eigenvectors of the Hessian matrix are determined with full atomic detail. The method, which follows order N methods used in electronic structure theory, determines the subset of lowest-frequency modes while using group theory to reduce the complexity of the problem. We apply the method to three icosahedral viruses of various T numbers and sizes; the human viruses polio and hepatitis B, and the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, a plant virus. From the normal-mode eigenvectors, we use a bond polarizability model to predict a low-frequency Raman scattering profile for the viruses. The full atomic detail in the displacement patterns combined with an empirical potential-energy model allows a comparison of the fully atomic normal modes with elastic network models and normal-mode analysis with only dihedral degrees of freedom. We find that coarse-graining normal-mode analysis (particularly the elastic network model) can predict the displacement patterns for the first few (˜10) low-frequency modes that are global and cooperative.

  16. Frequency dependent complex refractive indices of supercooled liquid water and ice determined from aerosol extinction spectra.

    PubMed

    Zasetsky, A Y; Khalizov, A F; Earle, M E; Sloan, J J

    2005-03-31

    Complex refractive indices of supercooled liquid water at 240, 253, 263, and 273 K, and ice at 200, 210, and 235 K in the mid infrared from 460 to 4000 cm(-1) are reported. The results were obtained from the extinction spectra of small (micron-size) aerosol particles, recorded using the cryogenic flow tube technique. An improved iterative procedure for retrieving complex refractive indices from extinction measurements is described. The refractive indices of ice determined in the present study are in good agreement with data reported earlier. The temperature region and range of states covered in the present work are relevant to the study of upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols and clouds.

  17. Low frequency collective vibrational spectra of zwitterionic glycine studied by DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shi Hua; Chen, Hua; Cui, Yi Ping

    2012-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and THz-TDS were used to obtain the experimental spectrum of glycine below 600 cm-1, and theoretical results of one or more zwitterionic glycine were calculated by DFT at the basis set of b31yp 6- 31+g(d,p) level based on Gaussian 03 software package in FIR region. There is more reasonable qualitative agreement between the calculated data of crystalline and observed line positions. Detailed assignments of the observed vibrational frequencies are discussed and the origins of some frequencies are analyzed by contrast. The low frequency collective mode of zwitterionic glycine is affected greatly by the intermolecular interaction and hydrogen-bonding effects and their vibrational modes are collective motion.

  18. Coupled calculation of vibrational frequencies and intensities. Part VI. IR and Raman spectra of crotonaldehyde, methacrolein and methyl-vinylketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelichmann, H.-J.; Bougeard, D.; Schrader, B.

    1981-12-01

    The vibrational spectra of trans-crotonaldehyde, methacrolein and methylvinylketone have been reinvestigated and the bands assigned. Normal coordinate analyses of these molecules based on the given assignments have been carried out in the valence force field approximation. A transferable force field for α, β-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones was obtained leading to good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. The relative cartesian displacements of the atoms given in the L matrices were used to compute the IR and Raman intensities of each mode by a modified CNDO/2 procedure. The intensity calculations confirm the assignments and support the calculated force constants.

  19. A novel set-up to investigate the low-frequency spectra of aqueous solutions at high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knake, L.; Vondracek, H.; Havenith, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel setup to investigate the low frequency (THz/FIR) spectra of an aqueous solution under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). By integration of a diamond anvil cell into a THz Fourier transform spectrometer, we are able to record the absorption of bulk water in the pressure range from 1 bar to 10 kbar. The difference in intensity can directly be compared to the difference in extinction coefficients. The spectroscopic data reveal a blue shift of the H-bond stretch vibration at 180 cm-1, which is evidence of changes in the H-bond network dynamics.

  20. Time and frequency resolved spectra of high molecular Rydberg states by dynamical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    1997-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of bound Rydberg states which can be detected by a delayed, pulsed field ionization is computed. The spectrum, measured for various delay times, provides information on the short and the longer time dynamics of high molecular Rydberg states. A quantitative dynamical theory, based on an effective Hamiltonian formalism is applied, illustrating the role of the Rydberg electron-core coupling and of an external electrical field in the delay-time dependent spectra. The sharpening of the spectra for longer delay times is reproduced by the dynamical computations. It is found that the overall intensity, as a function of the delay time before detection, is well described by a double exponential decay where the short lifetime is primarily a manifestation of the direct autoionization to the continuum, while the long lifetime is due to interseries coupling. Both lifetimes increase with the principal quantum number of the Rydberg states. The notion of trapped "reservoir states" is illustrated by the computational results, with special reference to a kinetic model analysis. The role of the initially optically accessed state(s) and of the depth of detection, in particular with regard to the intensity, is demonstrated. The effect of varying the strength of an external dc field in the time interval prior to the detection is illustrated by the dynamical computations, with respect to both the decay kinetics and the intensity of the spectrum.

  1. A general framework for numerical simulation of improvised explosive device (IED)-detection scenarios using density functional theory (DFT) and terahertz (THz) spectra.

    PubMed

    Shabaev, Andrew; Lambrakos, Samuel G; Bernstein, Noam; Jacobs, Verne L; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a general framework for numerical simulation of various types of scenarios that can occur for the detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) through the use of excitation using incident electromagnetic waves. A central component model of this framework is an S-matrix representation of a multilayered composite material system. Each layer of the system is characterized by an average thickness and an effective electric permittivity function. The outputs of this component are the reflectivity and the transmissivity as functions of frequency and angle of the incident electromagnetic wave. The input of the component is a parameterized analytic-function representation of the electric permittivity as a function of frequency, which is provided by another component model of the framework. The permittivity function is constructed by fitting response spectra calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and parameter adjustment according to any additional information that may be available, e.g., experimentally measured spectra or theory-based assumptions concerning spectral features. A prototype simulation is described that considers response characteristics for THz excitation of the high explosive β-HMX. This prototype simulation includes a description of a procedure for calculating response spectra using DFT as input to the Smatrix model. For this purpose, the DFT software NRLMOL was adopted.

  2. Demonstration of on-sky calibration of astronomical spectra using a 25 GHz near-IR laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Ycas, Gabriel G; Quinlan, Franklyn; Diddams, Scott A; Osterman, Steve; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Redman, Stephen; Terrien, Ryan; Ramsey, Lawrence; Bender, Chad F; Botzer, Brandon; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2012-03-12

    We describe and characterize a 25 GHz laser frequency comb based on a cavity-filtered erbium fiber mode-locked laser. The comb provides a uniform array of optical frequencies spanning 1450 nm to 1700 nm, and is stabilized by use of a global positioning system referenced atomic clock. This comb was deployed at the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly telescope at the McDonald Observatory where it was used as a radial velocity calibration source for the fiber-fed Pathfinder near-infrared spectrograph. Stellar targets were observed in three echelle orders over four nights, and radial velocity precision of ∼10 m/s (∼6 MHz) was achieved from the comb-calibrated spectra.

  3. Vibrational spectra of trimethylsilanol. The problem of the assignment of the SiOH group frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, Igor S.; Partal, F.; López González, J. J.; Sundius, Tom

    2004-04-01

    The assignment of the SiOH group vibrations of trimethylsilanol, which is still controversial, is proposed. This assignment is based on theoretical B3LYP force field scaled using the constants of the (CH 3) 3Si group optimized to fit experimental vibrational frequencies of (CH 3) 3SiF and (CD 3) 3SiF molecules as well as the OH stretching scale factor from methanol. The ab initio force field defined in this way gives a good agreement of the theoretical vibrational frequencies of trimethylsilanol with the positions of IR and Raman bands observed in the gas phase. This force field predicts the greatest contribution of the δ SiOH coordinates to the vibration with frequency of 804 cm -1. The elimination of the coupling of the SiOH deformation with methyl rocking modes by the normal coordinate treatment of (CD 3) 3SiOH gives 832 cm -1 for silanol deformation which is in a good agreement with the 834 cm -1 value proposed earlier for the bending mode of free silanol groups. The geometry and force field of the open chain H 3SiOH trimer is computed to model the change of the δ SiOH frequencies upon formation of the hydrogen-bonded polymers. This model predicts a significant shift of SiOH bending frequencies to the 1000-1200 cm -1 range while those of SiOD to the 800-850 cm -1 range. These predictions allow us to ascribe the 1087 cm -1 band observed in the IR spectrum of crystalline (CH 3) 3SiOH and the Raman 775 cm -1 band of the liquid (CH 3) 3SiOD to deformations of the hydrogen-bonded silanol groups.

  4. Structures and vibrational spectra of pinacol.. 1. Infrared and matrix infrared spectra of monomeric pinacol. Ab initio calculations on conformers and vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlqvist, Martti; Hotokka, Matti; Räsänen, Markku

    1998-04-01

    The infrared spectra of monomeric pinacol molecules (2,3-dimethyl-2,3-butanediol; (CH 3) 2C(OH)C(OH)(CH 3) 2) have been recorded in the gas phase and dilute nonpolar solutions, and in an argon matrix. The vibrational data are consistent with the intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded G-type (gauche with respect to the central C-C bond) conformers and there is no evidence for the T-type (trans with respect to the central C-C bond) conformers, which have been observed in the condensed phases. This was confirmed by studying the infrared region 835-815 cm -1, which was found to be the most indicative to show spectral changes within the type of the conformers. In this region the band of the T-type conformers (assigned to the hybridized asymmetric vibration of the central CC and CO stretching modes) disappears when going from the condensed phases to phases, where pinacol molecules are monomeric. Ab initio HF/6-311G** (MP2/6-311G**) calculations support the experimental findings; the calculated relative energies for the tGg', gGg', g'Gg', tTt, and gTg' conformers are 0.0 (0.0), 3.4 (3.4), 5.1 (5.9), 7.9 (11.3), and 12.0 (14.0) kJ mol -1, respectively. Consequently, only the G-type conformers are sufficiently populated to give rise to observable spectral lines. Both experimental findings and theoretical calculations demonstrated that the bands in the argon matrix spectrum of pinacol are due to the most stable tGg' conformer. Although the ab initio calculations predict that also the gGg' and g'Gg' conformers are present in the gas phase and in dilute nonpolar solutions their existence could not be confirmed experimentally. Hence, we conclude that the conformation sensitive bands may coincide in the spectra. The HF/6-311G** ab initio calculations for vibrational frequencies of pinacol are consistent with this conclusion, suggesting only small differences between the wavenumbers of the G-type conformers. Pinacol does not show infrared-induced photorotamerization in the low

  5. Low-frequency dynamics of DNA in Brillouin light scattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, S. G.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. I.; Zakharov, G. A.; Zhuravlev, A. V.; Medvedeva, A. V.; Schegolev, B. F.; Savvateeva-Popova, E. V.

    2014-02-01

    Brillouin light scattering studies of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the temperature interval 297-375 K are presented. The DNA fragment (119 bp) from the first intron of D melanogaster limk1 gene with AT-rich insertion (28 bp, mutant agn ts3) was used as an experimental sample. The temperature dependence of the hypersonic velocity was found to exhibit anomalies in the vicinity of 347 and 335 K. Computer modeling of possible conformational states which might be attained by the DNA fragment under study has shown the existence of local structures that evolve with varying temperature. Combined analysis of experimental data and results of the modeling reveals a close relation between the anomalous behavior of Brillouin light scattering spectra and conformational DNA dynamics. The results are discussed in the framework of modern models of conformational DNA transformations.

  6. General optimal attenuation of harmonic disturbance with unknown frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovski, Jovan D.

    2012-03-01

    We present algorithms for optimal harmonic disturbance attenuation in standard discrete-time control structure, based on a parametrisation of (marginally) stabilising controllers. The Frobenius norm and the spectral norm of the closed-loop transfer matrix at the disturbance frequencies are minimised. If there is only one frequency of the disturbance, the controller has an observer-based form, which we obtain by solving a static output feedback (SOF) stabilisation control problem. Although the SOF stabilisation problem is hard, the generical case of nonsquare matrix G 22 is solved by linear algebra methods. Numerical simulation results are presented. As a corollary, we transform the control problem with unit circle invariant zeros into a ℋ∞ control problem without such zeros. The elimination of the unit circle invariant zeros is based on the fact that matrix Y(zI - A + BF)-1 is stable, where (Y, F) with Y ≥ 0 is a solution of a discrete-time algebraic Riccati system.

  7. Frequency tuning of hearing in the beluga whale: discrimination of rippled spectra.

    PubMed

    Sysueva, Evgenia V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2014-02-01

    Frequency tuning was measured in the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) using rippled-noise test stimuli in conjunction with an auditory evoked potential (AEP) technique. The test stimulus was a 2-octave-wide rippled noise with frequency-proportional ripple spacing. The rippled-noise signal contained either a single reversal or rhythmic (1-kHz rate) reversals of the ripple phase. Single or rhythmic phase reversals evoked, respectively, a single auditory brainstem response (ABR) or a rhythmic AEP sequence-the envelope following response (EFR). The response was considered as an indication of resolvability of the ripple pattern. The rhythmic phase-reversal test with EFR recording revealed higher resolution than the single phase-reversal test with single ABR recording. The limit of ripple-pattern resolution with the single phase-reversal test ranged from 17 ripples per octave (rpo) at 32 kHz to 24 rpo at 45 to 64 kHz; for the rhythmic phase-reversal test, the limit ranged from 20 to 32 rpo. An interaction model of a ripple spectrum with frequency-tuned filters suggests that the ripple-pattern resolution limit of 20 to 32 rpo requires a filter quality Q of 29 to 46. Possible causes of disagreement of these estimates with several previously published data are discussed.

  8. Phonon Mean Free Path Spectra Measured by Broadband Frequency Domain Thermoreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malen, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Nonmetallic crystalline materials conduct heat by the transport of quantized atomic lattice vibrations called phonons. Thermal conductivity depends on how far phonons travel between scattering events -- their mean free paths (MFPs). Due to the breadth of the phonon MFP spectrum, nanostructuring of materials and devices can reduce thermal conductivity from bulk by scattering long MFP phonons, while short MFP phonons are unaffected. We have developed a novel approach called Broadband Frequency Domain Thermoreflectance (BB-FDTR) that uses high-frequency laser heating to generate non-Fourier heat conduction that can sort phonons based on their MFPs. BB-FDTR outputs thermal conductivity as a function of heating frequency. Through non-equilibrium Boltzmann Transport Equation models this data can be converted to thermal conductivity accumulation, which describes how thermal conductivity is summed from phonons with different MFPs. Relative to alternative approaches, BB-FDTR yields order-of-magnitude improvements in the resolution and breadth of the thermal conductivity accumulation function. We will present data for GaAs, GaN, AlN, Si, and SiC that show interesting commonalities near their respective Debye temperatures and suggest that there may be a universal phonon MFP spectrum for small unit cell non-metals in the high temperature limit. At the time of this abstract submission we are also working on measurements of semiconductor alloys and select metals that will be presented if completed by the conference.

  9. Frequency tuning of hearing in the beluga whale: discrimination of rippled spectra.

    PubMed

    Sysueva, Evgenia V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2014-02-01

    Frequency tuning was measured in the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) using rippled-noise test stimuli in conjunction with an auditory evoked potential (AEP) technique. The test stimulus was a 2-octave-wide rippled noise with frequency-proportional ripple spacing. The rippled-noise signal contained either a single reversal or rhythmic (1-kHz rate) reversals of the ripple phase. Single or rhythmic phase reversals evoked, respectively, a single auditory brainstem response (ABR) or a rhythmic AEP sequence-the envelope following response (EFR). The response was considered as an indication of resolvability of the ripple pattern. The rhythmic phase-reversal test with EFR recording revealed higher resolution than the single phase-reversal test with single ABR recording. The limit of ripple-pattern resolution with the single phase-reversal test ranged from 17 ripples per octave (rpo) at 32 kHz to 24 rpo at 45 to 64 kHz; for the rhythmic phase-reversal test, the limit ranged from 20 to 32 rpo. An interaction model of a ripple spectrum with frequency-tuned filters suggests that the ripple-pattern resolution limit of 20 to 32 rpo requires a filter quality Q of 29 to 46. Possible causes of disagreement of these estimates with several previously published data are discussed. PMID:25234904

  10. Search for solar normal modes in low-frequency seismic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Ross C.

    We use seismic array processing methods to attempt to enhance very low frequency harmonic signals (0-400 microhertz, also ?Hz or uHz) recorded on broadband seismic arrays. Since the discovery of this phenomenon in the 1990s, harmonic signals at these very low frequencies have come to be known as the Earth's "hum." A number of hypotheses have been suggested for the Earth's hum, including forcing by atmospheric turbulence, ocean waves, and, most recently, the Sun. We test the solar hypothesis by searching for statistically significant harmonic lines that correlate with independently observed solar free oscillations. The solar model assumes that free oscillations of the sun modulate the solar wind, producing pure harmonic components of Earth's magnetic field that are postulated to couple to the ground by electromagnetic induction. In this thesis we search the multitaper spectrum of stacks of seismic instruments for solar normal frequencies. We use a median stack instead of the more conventional mean because a more robust estimate of center is required for these low signal-to-noise data with occasional transients. A key advantage of a stack is that data gaps are easily ignored when computing the beam. Results from a stack of 18 Transportable Array stations show multiple possible g-mode detections at the 95-99% confidence level. We are presently applying this method to data from the Homestake Mine array, and may also do so with data from a broadband borehole array currently operating at Pinon Flats, California.

  11. An analysis of perceptual errors in reading mammograms using quasi-local spatial frequency spectra.

    PubMed

    Mello-Thoms, C; Dunn, S M; Nodine, C F; Kundel, H L

    2001-09-01

    In this pilot study the authors examined areas on a mammogram that attracted the visual attention of experienced mammographers and mammography fellows, as well as areas that were reported to contain a malignant lesion, and, based on their spatial frequency spectrum, they characterized these areas by the type of decision outcome that they yielded: true-positives (TP), false-positives (FP), true-negatives (TN), and false-negatives (FN). Five 2-view (craniocaudal and medial-lateral oblique) mammogram cases were examined by 8 experienced observers, and the eye position of the observers was tracked. The observers were asked to report the location and nature of any malignant lesions present in the case. The authors analyzed each area in which either the observer made a decision or in which the observer had prolonged (>1,000 ms) visual dwell using wavelet packets, and characterized these areas in terms of the energy contents of each spatial frequency band. It was shown that each decision outcome is characterized by a specific profile in the spatial frequency domain, and that these profiles are significantly different from one another. As a consequence of these differences, the profiles can be used to determine which type of decision a given observer will make when examining the area. Computer-assisted perception correctly predicted up to 64% of the TPs made by the observers, 77% of the FPs, and 70% of the TNs.

  12. Rolling element bearing defect detection using the generalized synchrosqueezing transform guided by time-frequency ridge enhancement.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Sanchez, Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada Lozada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Healthy rolling element bearings are vital guarantees for safe operation of the rotating machinery. Time-frequency (TF) signal analysis is an effective tool to detect bearing defects under time-varying shaft speed condition. However, it is a challenging work dealing with defective characteristic frequency and rotation frequency simultaneously without a tachometer. For this reason, a technique using the generalized synchrosqueezing transform (GST) guided by enhanced TF ridge extraction is suggested to detect the existence of the bearing defects. The low frequency band and the resonance band are first chopped from the Fourier spectrum of the bearing vibration measurements. The TF information of the lower band component and the resonance band envelope are represented using short-time Fourier transform, where the TF ridge are extracted by harmonic summation search and ridge candidate fusion operations. The inverse of the extracted TF ridge is subsequently used to guide the GST mapping the chirped TF representation to the constant one. The rectified TF pictures are then synchrosqueezed as sharper spectra where the rotation frequency and the defective characteristic frequency can be identified, respectively. Both simulated and experimental signals were used to evaluate the present technique. The results validate the effectiveness of the suggested technique for the bearing defect detection.

  13. Transition Densities and Sample Frequency Spectra of Diffusion Processes with Selection and Variable Population Size

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Daniel; Steinrücken, Matthias; Song, Yun S.; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Advances in empirical population genetics have made apparent the need for models that simultaneously account for selection and demography. To address this need, we here study the Wright–Fisher diffusion under selection and variable effective population size. In the case of genic selection and piecewise-constant effective population sizes, we obtain the transition density by extending a recently developed method for computing an accurate spectral representation for a constant population size. Utilizing this extension, we show how to compute the sample frequency spectrum in the presence of genic selection and an arbitrary number of instantaneous changes in the effective population size. We also develop an alternate, efficient algorithm for computing the sample frequency spectrum using a moment-based approach. We apply these methods to answer the following questions: If neutrality is incorrectly assumed when there is selection, what effects does it have on demographic parameter estimation? Can the impact of negative selection be observed in populations that undergo strong exponential growth? PMID:25873633

  14. DFT calculation of vibrational frequencies of clusters in GaAs and the Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika Devi, V.; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2012-09-01

    We have calculated the vibrational frequencies of clusters of Ga and As atoms from the first principles using the density-functional theory (DFT) method and the local-density approximation (LDA). We find that the calculated value of 286.2 cm-1 for a linear cluster of Ga2As2 is very near the experimental value of 292 ± 4 cm-1. The calculated value of 289.4 cm-1 for Ga2As6 (dumb bell) cluster is indeed very near the experimental value. There are strong phonon correlations so that the cluster frequency is within the dispersion relation of the crystal LO value. There is a weak line in the experimental Raman spectrum at 268 cm-1 which is very near the value of 267.3 cm-1 calculated for the Ga2As (triangular) cluster. The weak lines corresponding to the linear bonds provide the strength to the amorphous samples. There are clusters of atoms in the glassy state of GaAs.

  15. DFT calculation of vibrational frequencies of clusters in GaAs and the Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Radhika Devi, V; Shrivastava, Keshav N

    2012-09-01

    We have calculated the vibrational frequencies of clusters of Ga and As atoms from the first principles using the density-functional theory (DFT) method and the local-density approximation (LDA). We find that the calculated value of 286.2 cm(-1) for a linear cluster of Ga(2)As(2) is very near the experimental value of 292 ± 4 cm(-1). The calculated value of 289.4 cm(-1) for Ga(2)As(6) (dumb bell) cluster is indeed very near the experimental value. There are strong phonon correlations so that the cluster frequency is within the dispersion relation of the crystal LO value. There is a weak line in the experimental Raman spectrum at 268 cm(-1) which is very near the value of 267.3 cm(-1) calculated for the Ga(2)As (triangular) cluster. The weak lines corresponding to the linear bonds provide the strength to the amorphous samples. There are clusters of atoms in the glassy state of GaAs.

  16. Atmospheric general circulation and its low frequency variance - Radiative influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, V.

    1987-01-01

    The possible effects of radiation on the evolution of the atmosphere on time scales ranging from about a week to about 90 days are examined with reference to the available observational and modeling studies. The clear-sky and cloud radiative processes are shown to exert significant vertical, latitudinal, and longitudinal gradients in the diabatic heating within the troposphere and the stratosphere. The meridional heating gradient, which drives the general circulation, is altered significantly by clouds. The major conclusion of the study is that the observed negative anomalies in the outgoing IR radiation following intense warm episodes of tropicl sea-surface temperature (El Nino) are indeed anomalies in the cloud-radiative forcing.

  17. A general low frequency acoustic radiation capability for NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Schroeder, E. A.; Lipman, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new capability called NASHUA is described for calculating the radiated acoustic sound pressure field exterior to a harmonically-excited arbitrary submerged 3-D elastic structure. The surface fluid pressures and velocities are first calculated by coupling a NASTRAN finite element model of the structure with a discretized form of the Helmholtz surface integral equation for the exterior fluid. After the fluid impedance is calculated, most of the required matrix operations are performed using the general matrix manipulation package (DMAP) available in NASTRAN. Far field radiated pressures are then calculated from the surface solution using the Helmholtz exterior integral equation. Other output quantities include the maximum sound pressure levels in each of the three coordinate planes, the rms and average surface pressures and normal velocities, the total radiated power and the radiation efficiency. The overall approach is illustrated and validated using known analytic solutions for submerged spherical shells subjected to both uniform and nonuniform applied loads.

  18. On general ℋ2 control: from frequency to time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovski, Jovan D.

    2010-12-01

    This article presents a general formula for discrete-time ℋ2 control. It works with the regular and singular case of ℋ2 control, i.e. in the case of possibly non-left-invertible matrices G 12 and non-right-invertible matrices G 21, with possible unit circle invariant zeros. In the generic case, it can be simplified and adapted to work with the plant transfer matrix directly, without invoking the matrices of the parameterisation of stabilising controllers. A further result of this article is the presented necessary and sufficient conditions for state-space ℋ2 control, under only stabilisability and detectability assumptions. If the conditions are satisfied, an observer-based ℋ2 controller is constructed. The corresponding numerical algorithm consists of solving two discrete-time algebraic Riccati systems (DARSs) and two eigen-problems.

  19. Representation of high frequency Space Shuttle data by ARMA algorithms and random response spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, P. D.; Mushung, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    High frequency Space Shuttle lift-off data are treated by autoregressive (AR) and autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA) digital algorithms. These algorithms provide useful information on the spectral densities of the data. Further, they yield spectral models which lend themselves to incorporation to the concept of the random response spectrum. This concept yields a reasonably smooth power spectrum for the design of structural and mechanical systems when the available data bank is limited. Due to the non-stationarity of the lift-off event, the pertinent data are split into three slices. Each of the slices is associated with a rather distinguishable phase of the lift-off event, where stationarity can be expected. The presented results are rather preliminary in nature; it is aimed to call attention to the availability of the discussed digital algorithms and to the need to augment the Space Shuttle data bank as more flights are completed.

  20. Dielectrophoretic spectra of translational velocity and critical frequency for a spheroid in traveling electric field.

    PubMed

    Bunthawin, Sakshin; Wanichapichart, Pikul; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Coster, Hans G L

    2010-01-13

    An analysis has been made of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces acting on a spheroidal particle in a traveling alternating electric field. The traveling field can be generated by application of alternating current signals to an octapair electrode array arranged in phase quadrature sequence. The frequency dependent force can be resolved into two orthogonal forces that are determined by the real and the imaginary parts of the Clausius-Mossotti factor. The former is determined by the gradient in the electric field and directs the particle either toward or away from the tip of the electrodes in the electrode array. The force determined by the imaginary component is in a direction along the track of the octapair interdigitated electrode array. The DEP forces are related to the dielectric properties of the particle. Experiments were conducted to determine the DEP forces in such an electrode arrangement using yeast cells (Saccharomyces cervisiate TISTR 5088) with media of various conductivities. Experimental data are presented for both viable and nonviable cells. The dielectric properties so obtained were similar to those previously reported in literature using other DEP techniques.

  1. Static friction threshold effects on hysteresis and frequency spectra in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kadish, A.

    1999-06-01

    Static friction in rocks is modeled as a threshold phenomenon. An inverse problem in ground motion is analyzed for propagation in a medium with an arbitrary number of fractures at which static friction thresholds determine the onset of slippage. It is shown that seismic source dynamics inferred from surface motion is unique. This result is used to show that the threshold property of static friction is not a mechanism for hysteresis in rocks. The coda for the surface motion is shown, in the case of a single fracture and a deep source of finite duration, to be either a periodic function in time, or to asymptote in time to such a function, depending on an algebraic relation between ground and fracture parameters. The fundamental period of the coda is independent of the source time series and is equal to four times the signal transit time between the single fracture and ground surface. Only odd harmonics of the fundamental frequency are present in a Fourier series of these periodic functions. {copyright} {ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.}

  2. Reproducing Deep Tunneling Splittings, Resonances, and Quantum Frequencies in Vibrational Spectra From a Handful of Direct Ab Initio Semiclassical Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Conte, Riccardo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Ceotto, Michele

    2013-10-17

    A time-dependent semiclassical approach for vibrational spectra calculations is shown to describe deep tunneling splittings, resonances, and quantum frequencies in multidimensional multiwell systems, by propagating a very limited number of classical trajectories. The approach is tested on ammonia by evolving eight trajectories on a full-dimensional PES. Quantum effects are reproduced, and results are in good agreement with time-independent quantum calculations. All the features are maintained when ab initio "on-the-fly" dynamics is adopted, thus demonstrating that precomputation of the PES can be avoided. The approach overcomes the typical scaling issues of quantum mechanical techniques without introducing any simplifications nor reductions of dimensionality of the problem. The proposed methodology is promising for further applications to systems of major complexity. PMID:26705583

  3. Dipolar dynamic frequency shifts in multiple-quantum spectra of methyl groups in proteins: correlation with side-chain motion.

    PubMed

    Tugarinov, Vitali; Ollerenshaw, Jason E; Kay, Lewis E

    2006-07-01

    Small deviations from the expected relative positions of multiplet components in double- and zero-quantum 1H-13C methyl correlation maps have been observed in spectra recorded on a 7-kDa protein. These dynamic frequency shifts (DFS) are the result of dipolar cross-correlations that derive from fields produced by the spins within the methyl groups. The shifts have been quantified and compared with values calculated from a Redfield analysis. Good agreement is noted between the signs of the predicted and experimentally observed relative shifts of lines in both F1 and F2 dimensions of spectra, as well as between the magnitudes of the calculated and observed shifts in the F2 (1H) dimension. The experimental DFS values show a reasonable correlation with 2H relaxation-derived measures of methyl side-chain dynamics, as expected from theory. This suggests that in cases where such shifts can be quantified, they can serve as qualitative measures of motion. PMID:16826549

  4. Noninvasive Measure of Microvascular Nitric Oxide Function in Humans Using Very Low-Frequency Cutaneous Laser Doppler Flow Spectra

    PubMed Central

    STEWART, JULIAN M.; TANEJA, INDU; GOLIGORSKY, MICHAEL S.; MEDOW, MARVIN S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While higher frequency oscillations (0.021–0.6 Hz) in cutaneous blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) relate to oscillations in blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity, very low-frequency oscillations (VLF, 0.0095–0.021 Hz) do not. The authors investigated whether VLF LDF power is nitric oxide (NO) specific. Methods LDF combined with intradermal microdialysis was used in the calves of 22 healthy volunteers aged 19–27 years. LDF power spectral analysis was performed by windowed fast Fourier transform. The authors tested whether the NO synthesis inhibitor nitro-l-arginine (NLA) produced selective decreases in VLF power before and after stimulation with acetylcholine. Results NLA alone did not alter total power but selectively reduced VLF power by approximately 50%. LDF and spectral power increased markedly across all spectra with acetylcholine. This increase was blunted by NLA, which selectively reduced VLF power by approximately 50%. Conclusions The data suggest that VLF oscillations in the laser Doppler signal are NO dependent, increase with cholinergic stimulation, and have potential as a noninvasive marker for NO-dependent microvascular reactivity. PMID:17454670

  5. A Comparison of the Lower Stratospheric Age-Spectra Derived from a General Circulation Model and Two Data Assimilation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Zhu, Zhengxin; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    We use kinematic and diabatic back trajectory calculations, driven by winds from a general circulation model (GCM) and two different data assimilation systems (DAS), to compute the age spectrum at three latitudes in the lower stratosphere. The age-spectra are compared to chemical transport model (CTM) calculations, and the mean ages from all of these studies are compared to observations. The age spectra computed using the GCM winds show a reasonably isolated tropics in good agreement with observations; however, the age spectra determined from the DAS differ from the GCM spectra. For the DAS diabatic trajectory calculations there is too much exchange between the tropics and mid-latitudes. The age spectrum is thus too broad and the tropical mean age is too old as a result of mixing older mid latitude air with tropical air. Likewise the mid latitude mean age is too young due to the in mixing of tropical air. The DAS kinematic trajectory calculations show excessive vertical dispersion of parcels in addition to excessive exchange between the tropics and mid latitudes. Because air is moved rapidly to the troposphere from the vertical dispersion, the age spectrum is shifted toward the young side. The excessive vertical and meridional dispersion compensate in the kinematic case giving a reasonable tropical mean age. The CTM calculation of the age spectrum using the DAS winds shows the same vertical and meridional dispersive characteristics of the kinematic trajectory calculation. These results suggest that the current DAS products will not give realistic trace gas distributions for long integrations; they also help explain why the extra tropical mean ages determined in a number of previous DAS driven CTM s are too young compared with observations. Finally, we note trajectory-generated age spectra . show significant age anomalies correlated with the seasonal cycles. These anomalies can be linked to year-to-year variations in the tropical heating rate. The anomalies are

  6. General Conditions for Proximity-Induced Odd-Frequency Superconductivity in Two-Dimensional Electronic Systems.

    PubMed

    Triola, Christopher; Badiane, Driss M; Balatsky, Alexander V; Rossi, E

    2016-06-24

    We obtain the general conditions for the emergence of odd-frequency superconducting pairing in a two-dimensional (2D) electronic system proximity coupled to a superconductor, making minimal assumptions about both the 2D system and the superconductor. Using our general results we show that a simple heterostructure formed by a monolayer of a group VI transition metal dichalcogenide, such as molybdenum disulfide, and an s-wave superconductor with Rashba spin-orbit coupling exhibits odd-frequency superconducting pairing. Our results allow the identification of a new class of systems among van der Waals heterostructures in which odd-frequency superconductivity should be present. PMID:27391743

  7. Low frequency vibrational spectra, barrier to internal rotation, and RHF/STO-3G * ab initio calculations of 3-bromopropene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, J. R.; Tang, Qun; Little, T. S.

    1992-06-01

    The far-infrared spectrum of gaseous 3-bromopropene, CH 2CHCH 2Br, has been recorded from 350 to 35 cm -1 at a resolution of 0.1 cm -1. The fundamental asymmetric torsional frequencies of the more stable gauche (dihedral angle ∢ CCCBr = 118.0 ± 0.2°) and higher energy cis (bromine atom eclipsing the double bond and dihedral angle ∢ CCCBr = 0°) conformers have been observed at about 93 and 113.3 cm -1 in the low frequency Raman and far-infrared spectra of the gas respectively. Three excited state torsional transitions falling to lower frequency have also been observed for the cis conformer. From studies of the Raman spectrum of the gas at variable temperatures, a value of 257 ± 50 cm -1 (735 ± 143 cal mol -1) has been determined for the enthalpy difference between the conformers. From these data the asymmetric torsional potential governing internal rotation about the CC has been determined and the potential coefficients are: V1 = -293 ± 18; V2 = -106 ± 26; V3 = 825 ± 12; V4 = 85 ± 13; V6 = -53 ± 6 cm -1. This potential function gives cis to gauche, gauche to gauche and gauche to cis barriers of 749, 770 and 986 cm -1 respectively, and an enthalpy difference between the conformers of 237 ± 56 cm -1 (672 ± 160 cal mol -1). The r0 structural parameters for the heavy atom skeleton of the gauche conformer have been determined from previously reported microwave rotational constants along with a fixed CBr distance taken from the electron diffraction study. The determined parameters (distances in »ngströms, angles in degrees) are: r(C 1 = C 2) = 1.335 ± 0.003; r(C 2C 3) = 1.492 ± 0.002; ∢ C 1C 2C 3 = 122.6 ± 0.1; ∢ BrC 3C 2 = 110.1 ± 0.1; ∢ C 1C 2C 3Br = 118.0 ± 0.2. The asymmetric torsional potential surface, complete equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies have been calculated using restricted Hartree-Fock calculations with the STO-3G * basis set. All of these results are discussed and compared with the corresponding

  8. Doppler-shifting effects on frequency spectra of gravity waves observed near the summer mesopause at high latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of radar observations of horizontal and vertical velocities near the summer mesopause at Poker Flat (Alaska), showing that the observed vertical velocity spectra were influenced strongly by Doppler-shifting effects. The horizontal velocity spectra, however, were relatively insensitive to horizontal wind speed. The observed spectra are compared with predicted spectra for various models of the intrinsic motion spectrum and degrees of Doppler shifting.

  9. Precessional frequency of a gyroscope in the quaterionic formulation of general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, M.

    1989-01-01

    The precessional frequency of a gyroscope in a reference frame that orbits about a gravitational body is compared between Einstein's tensor formulation of general relativity and the author's quaternion generalization - obtained from a factorization of the tensor form. The difference in predictions then suggests an experiment that could choose which of these formulations of general relativity is more valid in the analysis of gyroscopic motion.

  10. General conditions for proximity induced odd-frequency superconductivity in two-dimensional electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Enrico; Triola, Christopher; Badiane, Driss; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    We obtain the general conditions for the emergence of odd-frequency superconducting pairing in a two-dimensional (2D) electronic system proximity-coupled to a superconductor, making minimal assumptions about both the 2D system and the superconductor. Using our general results we show that a simple heterostructure formed by a monolayer of a group VI transition metal dichalcogenide, such as molybdenum disulfide, and an s-wave superconductor with Rashba spin-orbit coupling will exhibit odd-frequency superconducting pairing. Work supported by US DOE BES E304, KAW, ACS-PRF-53581-DNI5, and NSF-DMR-1455233.

  11. NEUTRINO SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISKS: NEUTRINO GENERAL RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS AND THE CONSEQUENCES FOR NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, O. L.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Surman, R. E-mail: olcaball@ncsu.edu E-mail: surmanr@union.edu

    2012-02-01

    Black hole (BH) accretion disks have been proposed as good candidates for a range of interesting nucleosynthesis, including the r-process. The presence of the BH influences the neutrino fluxes and affects the nucleosynthesis resulting from the interaction of the emitted neutrinos and hot outflowing material ejected from the disk. We study the impact of general relativistic effects on the neutrinos emitted from BH accretion disks. We present abundances obtained by considering null geodesics and energy shifts for two different disk models. We find that both the bending of the neutrino trajectories and the energy shifts have important consequences for the nucleosynthetic outcome.

  12. A simple and general strategy for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Chang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-04-01

    Currently, two-photon excitation microscopy is the method of choice for imaging living cells within thick specimen. A remaining problem for this technique is the damage caused by the high photon flux in the excitation region. To reduce the required flux, a promising solution is to use highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs, which are known to induce two-photon transitions much more efficiently. It is still an open question what the best scheme is for generating such photon pairs. Here we propose one simple general strategy for this task. As an example, we show explicitly that this general strategy can be realized faithfully within the widely applicable coherently pumped Jaynes-Cummings model. It is shown quantitatively that this strategy can generate highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs which can dramatically enhance two-photon excitation efficiency. We believe the proposed strategy can guide new designs for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs.

  13. A simple and general strategy for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Chang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-01-01

    Currently, two-photon excitation microscopy is the method of choice for imaging living cells within thick specimen. A remaining problem for this technique is the damage caused by the high photon flux in the excitation region. To reduce the required flux, a promising solution is to use highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs, which are known to induce two-photon transitions much more efficiently. It is still an open question what the best scheme is for generating such photon pairs. Here we propose one simple general strategy for this task. As an example, we show explicitly that this general strategy can be realized faithfully within the widely applicable coherently pumped Jaynes-Cummings model. It is shown quantitatively that this strategy can generate highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs which can dramatically enhance two-photon excitation efficiency. We believe the proposed strategy can guide new designs for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs. PMID:27087255

  14. A Neural Network Model Can Explain Ventriloquism Aftereffect and Its Generalization across Sound Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to synchronous but spatially disparate auditory and visual stimuli produces a perceptual shift of sound location towards the visual stimulus (ventriloquism effect). After adaptation to a ventriloquism situation, enduring sound shift is observed in the absence of the visual stimulus (ventriloquism aftereffect). Experimental studies report opposing results as to aftereffect generalization across sound frequencies varying from aftereffect being confined to the frequency used during adaptation to aftereffect generalizing across some octaves. Here, we present an extension of a model of visual-auditory interaction we previously developed. The new model is able to simulate the ventriloquism effect and, via Hebbian learning rules, the ventriloquism aftereffect and can be used to investigate aftereffect generalization across frequencies. The model includes auditory neurons coding both for the spatial and spectral features of the auditory stimuli and mimicking properties of biological auditory neurons. The model suggests that different extent of aftereffect generalization across frequencies can be obtained by changing the intensity of the auditory stimulus that induces different amounts of activation in the auditory layer. The model provides a coherent theoretical framework to explain the apparently contradictory results found in the literature. Model mechanisms and hypotheses are discussed in relation to neurophysiological and psychophysical data. PMID:24228250

  15. Research on Automatic Classification, Indexing and Extracting: A General-Purpose Frequency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, F. T.; Williams, John H., Jr.

    To support studies in automatic indexing, classification and extracting, a general purpose frequency program was developed to further theoretical and practical understanding of text word distributions. While the program is primarily designed for counting strings of character-oriented data, it can be used without change for counting any items which…

  16. Parametrizing Epoch of Reionization foregrounds: a deep survey of low-frequency point-source spectra with the Murchison Widefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; Trott, C. M.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; McKinley, B.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Carroll, P.; Dillon, J. S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Jacobs, D. C.; Kim, H.-S.; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Neben, A. R.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Sethi, S. K.; Shankar, N. U.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Thyagarajan, N.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments that pursue detection of signals from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are relying on spectral smoothness of source spectra at low frequencies. This article empirically explores the effect of foreground spectra on EoR experiments by measuring high-resolution full-polarization spectra for the 586 brightest unresolved sources in one of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) EoR fields using 45 h of observation. A novel peeling scheme is used to subtract 2500 sources from the visibilities with ionospheric and beam corrections, resulting in the deepest, confusion-limited MWA image so far. The resulting spectra are found to be affected by instrumental effects, which limit the constraints that can be set on source-intrinsic spectral structure. The sensitivity and power-spectrum of the spectra are analysed, and it is found that the spectra of residuals are dominated by point spread function sidelobes from nearby undeconvolved sources. We release a catalogue describing the spectral parameters for each measured source.

  17. General-form 3-3-3 interpolation kernel and its simplified frequency-response derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tian-Bo

    2016-11-01

    An interpolation kernel is required in a wide variety of signal processing applications such as image interpolation and timing adjustment in digital communications. This article presents a general-form interpolation kernel called 3-3-3 interpolation kernel and derives its frequency response in a closed-form by using a simple derivation method. This closed-form formula is preliminary to designing various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels subject to a set of design constraints. The 3-3-3 interpolation kernel is formed through utilising the third-degree piecewise polynomials, and it is an even-symmetric function. Thus, it will suffice to consider only its right-hand side when deriving its frequency response. Since the right-hand side of the interpolation kernel contains three piecewise polynomials of the third degree, i.e. the degrees of the three piecewise polynomials are (3,3,3), we call it the 3-3-3 interpolation kernel. Once the general-form frequency-response formula is derived, we can systematically formulate the design of various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels subject to a set of design constraints, which are targeted for different interpolation applications. Therefore, the closed-form frequency-response expression is preliminary to the optimal design of various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels. We will use an example to show the optimal design of a 3-3-3 interpolation kernel based on the closed-form frequency-response expression.

  18. Second order elasticity at hypersonic frequencies of reactive polyurethanes as seen by generalized Cauchy relations.

    PubMed

    Philipp, M; Vergnat, C; Müller, U; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J; Possart, W; Alnot, P; Krüger, J K

    2009-01-21

    The non-equilibrium process of polymerization of reactive polymers can be accompanied by transition phenomena like gelation or the chemical glass transition. The sensitivity of the mechanical properties at hypersonic frequencies-including the generalized Cauchy relation-to these transition phenomena is studied for three different polyurethanes using Brillouin spectroscopy. As for epoxies, the generalized Cauchy relation surprisingly holds true for the non-equilibrium polymerization process and for the temperature dependence of polyurethanes. Neither the sol-gel transition nor the chemical and thermal glass transitions are visible in the representation of the generalized Cauchy relation. Taking into account the new results and combining them with general considerations about the elastic properties of the isotropic state, an improved physical foundation of the generalized Cauchy relation is proposed.

  19. So-called `relaxation' mode located at 0.1 cm-1 in the low-frequency Raman spectra of ethylene glycol - acetone mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amo, Y.; Kameda, Y.; Usuki, T.

    2016-05-01

    Low frequency Raman spectra of ethylene glycol(EG) and acetone mixtures are investigated by high-resolution double monochrometer. A broad peak located at 0.1 cm-1 in susceptibility spectra is compared with the dielectric loss spectra. Both Raman relaxation time(τMRT1) and dielectric relaxation time(τD1) are determined by the model fitting method. The ratio τMRT1/τD1 does not depend on static dielectric constant of mixtures and is almost constant, ≈3.2, from 1.0 (pure EG) to 0.3 mole fraction. This result indicates that both τMRT1 and τD1 are determined by the same molecular dynamics.

  20. A Generalized Fast Frequency Sweep Algorithm for Coupled Circuit-EM Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, G; Jandhyala, V; Champagne, N; Sharpe, R; Fasenfest, B J; Rockway, J D

    2004-12-14

    An Asymptotic Wave Expansion (AWE) technique is implemented into the EIGER computational electromagnetics code. The AWE fast frequency sweep is formed by separating the components of the integral equations by frequency dependence, then using this information to find a rational function approximation of the results. The standard AWE method is generalized to work for several integral equations, including the EFIE for conductors and the PMCHWT for dielectrics. The method is also expanded to work for two types of coupled circuit-EM problems as well as lumped load circuit elements. After a simple bisecting adaptive sweep algorithm is developed, dramatic speed improvements are seen for several example problems.

  1. Assessment of cross-frequency coupling with confidence using generalized linear models

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, M. A.; Eden, U. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain voltage activity displays distinct neuronal rhythms spanning a wide frequency range. How rhythms of different frequency interact – and the function of these interactions – remains an active area of research. Many methods have been proposed to assess the interactions between different frequency rhythms, in particular measures that characterize the relationship between the phase of a low frequency rhythm and the amplitude envelope of a high frequency rhythm. However, an optimal analysis method to assess this cross-frequency coupling (CFC) does not yet exist. New Method Here we describe a new procedure to assess CFC that utilizes the generalized linear modeling (GLM) framework. Results We illustrate the utility of this procedure in three synthetic examples. The proposed GLM-CFC procedure allows a rapid and principled assessment of CFC with confidence bounds, scales with the intensity of the CFC, and accurately detects biphasic coupling. Comparison with Existing Methods Compared to existing methods, the proposed GLM-CFC procedure is easily interpretable, possesses confidence intervals that are easy and efficient to compute, and accurately detects biphasic coupling. Conclusions The GLM-CFC statistic provides a method for accurate and statistically rigorous assessment of CFC. PMID:24012829

  2. Two generalized algorithms measuring phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network.

    PubMed

    Li, Qun; Zheng, Chen-Guang; Cheng, Ning; Wang, Yi-Yi; Yin, Tao; Zhang, Tao

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of studies pays attention to cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network, as it is considered to play an important role in exchanging and integrating of information. In this study, two generalized algorithms, phase-amplitude coupling-evolution map approach and phase-amplitude coupling-conditional mutual information which have been developed and applied originally in an identical rhythm, are generalized to measure cross-frequency coupling. The effectiveness of quantitatively distinguishing the changes of coupling strength from the measurement of phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is demonstrated based on simulation data. The data suggest that the generalized algorithms are able to effectively evaluate the strength of PAC, which are consistent with those traditional approaches, such as PAC-PLV and PAC-MI. Experimental data, which are local field potentials obtained from anaesthetized SD rats, have also been analyzed by these two generalized approaches. The data show that the theta-low gamma PAC in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 network is significantly decreased in the glioma group compared to that in the control group. The results, obtained from either simulation data or real experimental signals, are consistent with that of those traditional approaches PAC-MI and PAC-PLV. It may be considered as a proper indicator for the cross frequency coupling in sub-network, such as the hippocampal CA3 and CA1. PMID:27275379

  3. Two generalized algorithms measuring phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network.

    PubMed

    Li, Qun; Zheng, Chen-Guang; Cheng, Ning; Wang, Yi-Yi; Yin, Tao; Zhang, Tao

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of studies pays attention to cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network, as it is considered to play an important role in exchanging and integrating of information. In this study, two generalized algorithms, phase-amplitude coupling-evolution map approach and phase-amplitude coupling-conditional mutual information which have been developed and applied originally in an identical rhythm, are generalized to measure cross-frequency coupling. The effectiveness of quantitatively distinguishing the changes of coupling strength from the measurement of phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is demonstrated based on simulation data. The data suggest that the generalized algorithms are able to effectively evaluate the strength of PAC, which are consistent with those traditional approaches, such as PAC-PLV and PAC-MI. Experimental data, which are local field potentials obtained from anaesthetized SD rats, have also been analyzed by these two generalized approaches. The data show that the theta-low gamma PAC in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 network is significantly decreased in the glioma group compared to that in the control group. The results, obtained from either simulation data or real experimental signals, are consistent with that of those traditional approaches PAC-MI and PAC-PLV. It may be considered as a proper indicator for the cross frequency coupling in sub-network, such as the hippocampal CA3 and CA1.

  4. Effect of frequency tuning on bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensity, and shape in the 10 GHz NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Mal, Kedar; Kumar, Narender; Lakshmy, P. S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, P.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    Studies on the effect of the frequency tuning on the bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensities, and beam shape of various ions have been carried out in the 10 GHz NANOGAN ECR ion source. The warm and cold components of the electrons were found to be directly correlated with beam intensity enhancement in case of Ar{sup 9+} but not so for O{sup 5+}. The warm electron component was, however, much smaller compared to the cold component. The effect of the fine tuning of the frequency on the bremsstrahlung spectrum, beam intensities and beam shape is presented.

  5. Non-Gaussian statistics of amide I mode frequency fluctuation of N-methylacetamide in methanol solution: Linear and nonlinear vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwac, Kijeong; Lee, Hochan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2004-01-01

    By carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of an N-methylacetamide (NMA) in methanol solution, the amide I mode frequency fluctuation and hydrogen bonding dynamics were theoretically investigated. Combining an extrapolation formula developed from systematic ab initio calculation studies of NMA-(CH3OH)n clusters with a classical molecular dynamics simulation method, we were able to quantitatively describe the solvatochromic vibrational frequency shift induced by the hydrogen-bonding interaction between NMA and solvent methanol. It was found that the fluctuating amide I mode frequency distribution is notably non-Gaussian and it can be decomposed into two Gaussian peaks that are associated with two distinctively different solvation structures. The ensemble-average-calculated linear response function associated with the IR absorption is found to be oscillating, which is in turn related to the doublet amide I band shape. Numerically calculated infrared absorption spectra are directly compared with experiment and the agreement was found to be excellent. By using the Onsager's regression hypothesis, the rate constants of the interconversion process between the two solvation structures were obtained. Then, the nonlinear response functions associated with two-dimensional infrared pump-probe spectroscopy were simulated. The physics behind the two-dimensional line shape and origin of the cross peaks in the time-resolved pump-probe spectra is explained and the result is compared with 2D spectra experimentally measured recently by Woutersen et al. [S. Woutersen, Y. Mu, G. Stock, and P. Hamm, Chem. Phys. 266, 137 (2001)].

  6. Computing frequency by using generalized zero-crossing applied to intrinsic mode functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This invention presents a method for computing Instantaneous Frequency by applying Empirical Mode Decomposition to a signal and using Generalized Zero-Crossing (GZC) and Extrema Sifting. The GZC approach is the most direct, local, and also the most accurate in the mean. Furthermore, this approach will also give a statistical measure of the scattering of the frequency value. For most practical applications, this mean frequency localized down to quarter of a wave period is already a well-accepted result. As this method physically measures the period, or part of it, the values obtained can serve as the best local mean over the period to which it applies. Through Extrema Sifting, instead of the cubic spline fitting, this invention constructs the upper envelope and the lower envelope by connecting local maxima points and local minima points of the signal with straight lines, respectively, when extracting a collection of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) from a signal under consideration.

  7. Very low frequency oscillations in the power spectra of heart rate variability during dry supine immersion and exposure to non-hypoxic hypobaria.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, K K

    2011-06-01

    The origin of very low frequency (VLF) oscillations in the power spectra of heart rate variability (HRV) is controversial with possible mechanisms involving thermoregulation and/or renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Recently, a major contribution from vagal influences has been suggested. The present study investigated the behaviour of VLF (0.004-0.040 Hz) components of HRV power spectra in a group of healthy male volunteers during their exposure to (1) dry, supine, immersion in thermo-neutral water for 6 h (n = 7) and (2) non-hypoxic hypobaria (breathing 40-60% oxygen at 15,000' simulated in a decompression chamber) for 5 h (n = 15). The two manoeuvres are established to increase vagal outflow. During both the manoeuvres, all the frequency domain indices of HRV exhibited a significant increase. Increase in HRV was much more than that in the R-R interval. At 6 h of immersion, the R-R interval increased by ∼ 15% but the total power increased ∼ fourfold. Similarly, at 5 h of exposure to hypobaria, total power increased ∼ twofold with a very modest increase in an R-R of ∼ 9%. Increase in spectral power was appreciable even after normalization with mean R-R(2). Increase in VLF during immersion was more than reported during enalaprilat blockade of angiotensin convertase enzyme. Plasma renin activity did not vary during hypobaria. There was a significant increase in pNN50, an established marker of cardiac vagal activity. Centre frequencies of the spectra and slope (β) of the relation between log(PSD) and log(frequency) did not change. Results were supportive of the notion that the parasympathetic system is pre-potent to influence slower (than respiratory) frequency components in HRV spectrum. Additionally, such an effect was without a change in the time constant of effector responses or pacemaker frequencies of VLF and LF periodicities and HRV was not a simple linear surrogate for cardiac vagal effects. An invariance of spectral exponent (β) ruled out

  8. Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this study, I used seismic waveforms recorded within 2 km from the epicenter of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions to invert for the moment-tensor spectra of these explosions. I employed a one-dimensional (1D) Earth model for Green's function calculations. The model was developed from P- and Rg-wave travel times and amplitudes. I selected data for the inversion based on the criterion that they had consistent travel times and amplitude behavior as those predicted by the 1D model. Due to limited azimuthal coverage of the sources and the mostly vertical-component-only nature of the dataset, only long-period, volumetric components of the moment-tensor spectra were well constrained.

  9. Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this study, I used seismic waveforms recorded within 2 km from the epicenter of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions to invert for the moment-tensor spectra of these explosions. I employed a one-dimensional (1D) Earth model for Green's function calculations. The model was developed from P- and Rg-wave travel times and amplitudes. I selected data for the inversion based on the criterion that they had consistent travel times and amplitude behavior as those predicted by the 1D model. Due to limited azimuthal coverage of the sources and the mostly vertical-component-only nature of the dataset, only long-period, volumetricmore » components of the moment-tensor spectra were well constrained.« less

  10. The ratio between corner frequencies of source spectra of P- and S-waves—a new discriminant between earthquakes and quarry blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataeva, G.; Gitterman, Y.; Shapira, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzes and compares the P- and S-wave displacement spectra from local earthquakes and explosions of similar magnitudes. We propose a new approach to discrimination between low-magnitude shallow earthquakes and explosions by using ratios of P- to S-wave corner frequencies as a criterion. We have explored 2430 digital records of the Israeli Seismic Network (ISN) from 456 local events (226 earthquakes, 230 quarry blasts, and a few underwater explosions) of magnitudes Md = 1.4-3.4, which occurred at distances up to 250 km during 2001-2013 years. P-wave and S-wave displacement spectra were computed for all events following Brune's source model of earthquakes (1970, 1971) and applying the distance correction coefficients (Shapira and Hofstetter, Teconophysics 217:217-226, 1993; Ataeva G, Shapira A, Hofstetter A, J Seismol 19:389-401, 2015), The corner frequencies and moment magnitudes were determined using multiple stations for each event, and then the comparative analysis was performed. The analysis showed that both P-wave and especially S-wave displacement spectra of quarry blasts demonstrate the corner frequencies lower than those obtained from earthquakes of similar magnitudes. A clear separation between earthquake and explosion populations was obtained for ratios of P- to S-wave corner frequency f 0(P)/f 0(S). The ratios were computed for each event with corner frequencies f 0 of P- and S-wave, which were obtained from the measured f {0/I} at individual stations, then corrected for distance and finally averaged. We obtained empirically the average estimation of f 0(P)/f 0(S) = 1.23 for all used earthquakes, and 1.86 for all explosions. We found that the difference in the ratios can be an effective discrimination parameter which does not depend on estimated moment magnitude M w . The new multi-station Corner Frequency Discriminant (CFD) for earthquakes and explosions in Israel was developed based on ratios P- to S-wave corner frequencies f 0(P)/f 0(S

  11. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L.; Baker, John G.

    2013-09-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ˜ 10(-5) - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  12. Low frequency noise in a quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Groesbeck, D. E.; Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A quiet, clean, general aviation, turbofan engine was instrumented to measure the fluctuating pressures in the combustor, turbine exit duct, engine nozzle and the far field. Both a separate flow nozzle and an internal mixer nozzle were tested. The fluctuating pressure data are presented in overall pressure and power levels and in spectral plots. The combustor data are compared to recent theory and found to be in excellent agreement. The results indicate that microphone correction procedures for elevated mean pressures are questionable. Ordinary coherence function analysis suggests the presence of an additional low frequency noise source downstream of the turbine that is due to the turbine itself. Low frequency narrowband data and coherence function analysis are presented.

  13. Generalized frequency coding: a method of preparing polymorphic multistate characters for phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, E N; Gutberlet, R L

    2001-04-01

    A new method of coding polymorphic multiistate characters for phylogenetic analysis is presented. By dividing such characters into subcharacters, their frequency distributions can be represented with discrete states. Differential weighting is used to counter the effect of representing one character with multiple characters. The new method, generalized frequency coding (GFC), is potentially superior to previously used methods in that it incorporates more information and is applicable to both qualitative and quantitative characters. When applied to a previously published data set that includes both types of polymorphic multistate characters, the method performed well, as assessed with g1 and nonparametric bootstrap statistics and giving results congruent with those of other studies. The data set was also used to compare GFC with both gap-weighting and Manhattan distance step matrix coding. On these grounds and for philosophical reasons, we consider GFC to be a better estimator of phylogeny. PMID:12116926

  14. Low-frequency vibrations in resonance Raman spectra of horse heart myoglobin. Iron-ligand and iron-nitrogen vibrational modes.

    PubMed

    Desbois, A; Lutz, M; Banerjee, R

    1979-04-17

    The low-frequency regions (150--700 cm-1) of resonance Raman (RR) spectra of various complexes of oxidized and reduced horse heart myoglobin were examined by use of 441.6-nm excitation. In this frequency range, RR spectra show 10 bands common to all myoglobin derivatives (numbered here for convenience from I to X). Relative intensities of bands IV, V, and X constitute good indicators of the doming state of the heme and, consequently, of the spin state of the iron atom. An additional band is present for several complexes (fluorometmyoglobin, hydroxymetmyoglobin, azidometmyoglobin, and oxymyoglobin). Isotopic substitutions on the exogenous ligands and of the iron atom (56Fe leads to 54Fe) allow us to assign these additional lines to the stretching vibrations of the Fe-sixth ligand bond. Similarly, bands II are assigned to stretching vibrations of the Fe-N-(pyrrole) bonds. An assignment of bands VI to stretching vibrations of the Fe-Nepsilon(proximal histidine) bonds is also proposed. Mechanisms for the resonance enhancement of the main low-frequency bands are discussed on the basis of the excitation profiles and of the dispersion curves for depolarization ratios obtained for fluorometmyoglobin and hydroxymetmyoglobin.

  15. Generalized stepwise demodulation transform and synchrosqueezing for time-frequency analysis and bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Juanjuan; Liang, Ming; Necsulescu, Dan-Sorin; Guan, Yunpeng

    2016-04-01

    The energy concentration level is an important indicator for time-frequency analysis (TFA). Weak energy concentration would result in time-frequency representation (TFR) diffusion and thus leading to ambiguous results or even misleading signal analysis results, particularly for nonstationary multicomponent signals. To improve the energy concentration level, this paper proposes a generalized stepwise demodulation transform (GSDT). The rationale of the proposed method is that (1) the generalized demodulation (GD) can map the original signal into an analytic signal with constant instantaneous frequency (IF) and improve the energy concentration level on time-frequency plane, and (2) focusing on a short window around the time instant of interest, a backward demodulation operation can recover the original frequency at the time instant without affecting the improved energy concentration level. By repeating the backward demodulation at every time instant of interest, the TFR of the entire signal can be attained with enhanced energy concentration level. With the GSDT, an iterative GSDT (IGSDT) is developed to analyze multicomponent signal that is subjected to different modulating sources for their constituent components. The IGSDT iteratively demodulates each constituent component to attain its TFR and the TFR of the whole signal is derived from superposing all the resulting TFRs of constituent components. The cross-term free and more energy concentrated TFR of the signal is, therefore, obtained, and the diffusion in the TFR can be reduced. The GSDT-based synchrosqueezing transform is also elaborated to further enhance the GSDT(IGSDT) yielded TFR. The effectiveness of the proposed method in TFA is tested using both simulated monocomponent and multicomponent signals. The application of the proposed method to bearing fault detection is explored. Bearing condition and fault pattern can be revealed by the proposed method resulting TFR. The main advantages of the proposed method

  16. Pulse retrieval in frequency-resolved optical gating based on the method of generalized projections

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R. ); Kohler, B.; Wilson, K. )

    1994-12-15

    We use the algorithmic method of generalized projections (GP's) to retrieve the intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse from the experimental trace in frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). Using simulations, we show that the use of GP's improves significantly the convergence properties of the algorithm over the basic FROG algorithm. In experimental measurements, the GP-based algorithm achieves significantly lower errors than previous algorithms. The use of GP's also permits the inclusion of an arbitrary material response function in the FROG problem.

  17. A Horn-fed Frequency Scanning Holographic Antenna Based on Generalized Law of Reflection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Cheng, Bo; Pan, Xiaotian; Qiao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    A new method of designing horn-fed frequency scanning holographic antenna is proposed. The artificial surface design of holographic antenna is based on generalized law of reflection. The input admittance is utilized to construct the interference pattern of the surface which is intervened by the excitation wave and the required radiation wave. The scalar admittance unit cell which is composed of sub-wavelength metallic patch on grounded dielectric substrate is implemented to design artificial surface, and the simulation results are just as expected that the antenna can scan the beam as the frequency changes. Furthermore, a cross shaped patch printed on grounded dielectric unit cells is used to reduce the designing complexity of tensor admittance surface. At last, a frequency scanning holographic antenna with tensor admittance surface with ability of changing linear polarization excitation wave to left-hand circular polarization (LCP) radiation wave is designed and fabricated. The full-wave simulation and experimental results show well agreement and confirm the method proposed. PMID:27515782

  18. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Safi, Kristin N; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e) ≤ 50) and much smaller (N(e) ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  19. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Safi, Kristin N; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e) ≤ 50) and much smaller (N(e) ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas.

  20. A Horn-fed Frequency Scanning Holographic Antenna Based on Generalized Law of Reflection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Cheng, Bo; Pan, Xiaotian; Qiao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    A new method of designing horn-fed frequency scanning holographic antenna is proposed. The artificial surface design of holographic antenna is based on generalized law of reflection. The input admittance is utilized to construct the interference pattern of the surface which is intervened by the excitation wave and the required radiation wave. The scalar admittance unit cell which is composed of sub-wavelength metallic patch on grounded dielectric substrate is implemented to design artificial surface, and the simulation results are just as expected that the antenna can scan the beam as the frequency changes. Furthermore, a cross shaped patch printed on grounded dielectric unit cells is used to reduce the designing complexity of tensor admittance surface. At last, a frequency scanning holographic antenna with tensor admittance surface with ability of changing linear polarization excitation wave to left-hand circular polarization (LCP) radiation wave is designed and fabricated. The full-wave simulation and experimental results show well agreement and confirm the method proposed.

  1. A Horn-fed Frequency Scanning Holographic Antenna Based on Generalized Law of Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dawei; Cheng, Bo; Pan, Xiaotian; Qiao, Lifang

    2016-08-01

    A new method of designing horn-fed frequency scanning holographic antenna is proposed. The artificial surface design of holographic antenna is based on generalized law of reflection. The input admittance is utilized to construct the interference pattern of the surface which is intervened by the excitation wave and the required radiation wave. The scalar admittance unit cell which is composed of sub-wavelength metallic patch on grounded dielectric substrate is implemented to design artificial surface, and the simulation results are just as expected that the antenna can scan the beam as the frequency changes. Furthermore, a cross shaped patch printed on grounded dielectric unit cells is used to reduce the designing complexity of tensor admittance surface. At last, a frequency scanning holographic antenna with tensor admittance surface with ability of changing linear polarization excitation wave to left-hand circular polarization (LCP) radiation wave is designed and fabricated. The full-wave simulation and experimental results show well agreement and confirm the method proposed.

  2. A Horn-fed Frequency Scanning Holographic Antenna Based on Generalized Law of Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dawei; Cheng, Bo; Pan, Xiaotian; Qiao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    A new method of designing horn-fed frequency scanning holographic antenna is proposed. The artificial surface design of holographic antenna is based on generalized law of reflection. The input admittance is utilized to construct the interference pattern of the surface which is intervened by the excitation wave and the required radiation wave. The scalar admittance unit cell which is composed of sub-wavelength metallic patch on grounded dielectric substrate is implemented to design artificial surface, and the simulation results are just as expected that the antenna can scan the beam as the frequency changes. Furthermore, a cross shaped patch printed on grounded dielectric unit cells is used to reduce the designing complexity of tensor admittance surface. At last, a frequency scanning holographic antenna with tensor admittance surface with ability of changing linear polarization excitation wave to left-hand circular polarization (LCP) radiation wave is designed and fabricated. The full-wave simulation and experimental results show well agreement and confirm the method proposed. PMID:27515782

  3. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Safi, Kristin N.; Busch, Jeremiah W.

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (Ne ≤ 50) and much smaller (Ne ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  4. Correlation of observed and model vibrational frequencies for aqueous organic acids: UV resonance Raman spectra and molecular orbital calculations of benzoic, salicylic, and phthalic acids.

    PubMed

    Trout, Chad C; Tambach, T J; Kubicki, James D

    2005-09-01

    The aromatic carboxylic acids benzoic, salicylic and phthalic acid were used to study the interaction of soluble organics compounds with metal cations. To accomplish this, we have developed methods for studying the carboxylic acids using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) combined with molecular orbital density functional theory calculations. The pH values of the acid solutions were based on the pK(a)'s for the different acids to examine the neutral and charged species. Deprotonation of the organic acids was detectable down to 10(-4)M using UVRR (two orders of magnitude lower than previous vibrational spectroscopy studies). Limitations to decreasing the concentration lower using the current UVRR facilities are discussed. Two methods were used to calculate the optimized geometry and frequencies of the acids: explicit and continuum solvation. The frequencies from the experimental spectra were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the two methods.

  5. Correlation of observed and model vibrational frequencies for aqueous organic acids: UV resonance Raman spectra and molecular orbital calculations of benzoic, salicylic, and phthalic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trout, Chad C.; Tambach, T. J.; Kubicki, James D.

    2005-09-01

    The aromatic carboxylic acids benzoic, salicylic and phthalic acid were used to study the interaction of soluble organics compounds with metal cations. To accomplish this, we have developed methods for studying the carboxylic acids using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) combined with molecular orbital density functional theory calculations. The pH values of the acid solutions were based on the p Ka's for the different acids to examine the neutral and charged species. Deprotonation of the organic acids was detectable down to 10 -4 M using UVRR (two orders of magnitude lower than previous vibrational spectroscopy studies). Limitations to decreasing the concentration lower using the current UVRR facilities are discussed. Two methods were used to calculate the optimized geometry and frequencies of the acids: explicit and continuum solvation. The frequencies from the experimental spectra were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the two methods.

  6. An investigation of the vertical wavenumber and frequency spectra of gravity wave motions in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Chou, Hua-Guo

    1987-01-01

    The vertical and oblique velocities of atmospheric motions in the lower stratosphere were analyzed using data obtained on February 1-5, 1986, from the Poker Flat, Alaska, MST radar; two beams of orthogonal polarization were directed vertically, and four oblique beams at 7 deg off-vertical were directed at azimuths of 64, 154, 244, and 334 deg from north. Results indicate that the majority of the energy at gravity wave periods is associated with inertia-gravity wave motions having an upward direction of propagation and dominant vertical wavelengths near 2 km. The results of vertical wavenumber spectra support the saturation hypothesis of Dewan and Good (1986) and Smith et al. (1987), suggesting that saturation processes act to control spectral amplitudes at large wavenumbers.

  7. Analysis of mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in hMTH1 knockdown TK6 cells exposed to UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Fotouhi, Asal; Hagos, Winta Woldai; Ilic, Marina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; de Gruijl, Frank; Mullenders, Leon; Jansen, Jacob G; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a highly mutagenic agent that damages the DNA by the formation of mutagenic photoproducts at dipyrimidine sites and by oxidative DNA damages via reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can also give rise to mutations via oxidation of dNTPs in the nucleotide pool, e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP and subsequent incorporation during DNA replication. Here we show that expression of human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) which sanitizes the nucleotide pool by dephosphorylating oxidized dNTPs, protects against mutagenesis induced by long wave UVA light and by UVB light but not by short wave UVC light. Mutational spectra analyses of UVA-induced mutations at the endogenous Thymidine kinase gene in human lymphoblastoid cells revealed that hMTH1 mainly protects cells from transitions at GC and AT base pairs.

  8. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  9. Generation of tunable, high repetition rate frequency combs with equalized spectra using carrier injection based silicon modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarjun, K. P.; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2016-03-01

    High repetition-rate frequency combs with tunable repetition rate and carrier frequency are extensively used in areas like Optical communications, Microwave Photonics and Metrology. A common technique for their generation is strong phase modulation of a CW-laser. This is commonly implemented using Lithium-Niobate based modulators. With phase modulation alone, the combs have poor spectral flatness and significant number of missing lines. To overcome this, a complex cascade of multiple intensity and phase modulators are used. A comb generator on Silicon based on these principles is desirable to enable on-chip integration with other functionalities while reducing power consumption and footprint. In this work, we analyse frequency comb generation in carrier injection based Silicon modulators. We observe an interesting effect in these comb generators. Enhanced absorption accompanying carrier injection, an undesirable effect in data modulators, shapes the amplitude here to enable high quality combs from a single modulator. Thus, along with reduced power consumption to generate a specific number of lines, the complexity has also been significantly reduced. We use a drift-diffusion solver and mode solver (Silvaco TCAD) along with Soref-Bennett relations to calculate the variations in refractive indices and absorption of an optimized Silicon PIN - waveguide modulator driven by an unbiased high frequency (10 Ghz) voltage signal. Our simulations demonstrate that with a device length of 1 cm, a driving voltage of 2V and minor shaping with a passive ring-resonator filter, we obtain 37 lines with a flatness better than 5-dB across the band and power consumption an order of magnitude smaller than Lithium-Niobate modulators.

  10. Using low-frequency IR spectra for the unambiguous identification of metal ion-ligand coordination sites in purpose-built complexes.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gábor; Csendes, Zita; Peintler, Gábor; Berkesi, Ottó; Sipos, Pál; Pálinkó, István

    2014-03-25

    One of the aims of our long-term research is the identification of metal ion-ligand coordination sites in bioinspired metal ion-C- or N-protected amino acid (histidine, tyrosine, cysteine or cystine) complexes immobilised on the surface of chloropropylated silica gel or Merrifield resin. In an attempt to reach this goal, structurally related, but much simpler complexes have been prepared and their metal ion-ligand vibrations were determined from their low-frequency IR spectra. The central ions were Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) or Cu(II) and the ligands (imidazole, isopropylamine, monosodium malonate) were chosen to possess only one-type of potential donor group. The low-frequency IR spectra were taken of the complexes for each ion-ligand combination and the typical metal ion-functional group vibration bands were selected and identified. The usefulness of the obtained assignments is demonstrated on exemplary immobilised metal ion-protected amino acid complexes.

  11. Prediction of radio frequency power generation of Neptune's magnetosphere from generalized radiometric Bode's law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Million, M. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio frequency emission power has been shown to vary as a function of both solar wind and planetary values such as magnetic field by Kaiser and Desch (1984). Planetary magnetic fields have been shown to scale with planetary variables such as density and angular momentum by numerous researchers. This paper combines two magnetic scaling laws with the radiometric law to yield 'Bode's'-type laws governing planetary radio emissions. Further analysis allows the reduction of variables to planetary mass and orbital distance. These generalized laws are then used to predict the power otuput of Neptune to be about 1.6 x 10 to the 7th W; with the intensity peaking at about 3 MHz.

  12. Prediction of radio frequency power generation of Neptune's magnetosphere from generalized radiometric Bode's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millon, M. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio frequency emission power has been shown to vary as a function of both solar wind and planetary values such as magnetic field by Kaiser and Desch. Planetary magnetic fields have been shown to scale with planetary variables such as density and angular momentum by numerous researchers. This paper combines two magnetic scaling laws (Busse's and Curtis Ness') with the radiometric law to yield "Bode's"-type laws governing planetary radio emission. Further analysis allows the reduction of variables to planetary mass and orbital distance. These generalized laws are then used to predict the power output of Neptune to be about 1.6×107W; with the intensity peaking at about 3 MHz.

  13. Ploidy frequencies in plants with ploidy heterogeneity: fitting a general gametic model to empirical population data

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Jan; Herben, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Genome duplication (polyploidy) is a recurrent evolutionary process in plants, often conferring instant reproductive isolation and thus potentially leading to speciation. Outcome of the process is often seen in the field as different cytotypes co-occur in many plant populations. Failure of meiotic reduction during gametogenesis is widely acknowledged to be the main mode of polyploid formation. To get insight into its role in the dynamics of polyploidy generation under natural conditions, and coexistence of several ploidy levels, we developed a general gametic model for diploid–polyploid systems. This model predicts equilibrium ploidy frequencies as functions of several parameters, namely the unreduced gamete proportions and fertilities of higher ploidy plants. We used data on field ploidy frequencies for 39 presumably autopolyploid plant species/populations to infer numerical values of the model parameters (either analytically or using an optimization procedure). With the exception of a few species, the model fit was very high. The estimated proportions of unreduced gametes (median of 0.0089) matched published estimates well. Our results imply that conditions for cytotype coexistence in natural populations are likely to be less restrictive than previously assumed. In addition, rather simple models show sufficiently rich behaviour to explain the prevalence of polyploids among flowering plants. PMID:23193129

  14. Polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide in the pressure range 0-10 kbar. I. Vibration frequencies, C-S bond length, and Fermi resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, S.; Whalley, Edward

    1986-09-01

    The effect of pressure on the polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulphide, i.e., the peak frequencies, bandwidths, and relative intensities of both the allowed ν1 and 2ν2 bands and the interaction-induced ν2 and ν3 bands, have been measured at 22 °C up to 10 kbar. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the frequencies and on the relative isotropic intensity of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands. The frequency of the ν1 band increases linearly with pressure, within the experimental uncertainty, at the rate 0.16±0.01 cm-1 kbar-1, and the frequencies of the ν2, ν3, and 2ν2 bands decrease nonlinearly. The frequency shifts are described by second-order perturbation theory with the molecular anharmonicity and the intermolecular interaction as perturbations. The leading terms of the shifts consist of the same derivative of the interaction potential, multiplied by different anharmonicity constants, and the shifts of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands suggests that the C-S bond length decreases at the rate 2×10-4 Å kbar-1. The relative isotropic intensity of the 2ν2 and ν1 bands increases with pressure at the rate 0.050 kbar-1, whereas the anisotropic 2ν2 intensity relative to the isotropic ν1 intensity is independent of pressure to the experimental precision of ˜0.005. The effect of pressure on the second derivative of the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the polarizability with respect to the bend coordinate was estimated as 1.1×10-43 C m2 V-1 kbar-1 and ˜0, respectively, from these values.

  15. Ab Initio Calculation Of Vibrational Frequencies In AsxS1-x Glass And The Raman Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazrul; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2009-06-01

    We have made many different models for the understanding of the structure of AsS glass. In particular, we made the models of AsS3 (triangular), AsS3 (pyramid), AsS4 (3S on one side, one on the other side of As, S3-As-S), AsS4 (pyramid), AsS4 (tetrahedral), AsS7, As2S6 (dumb bell), As2S3 (bipyramid), As2S3 (zig-zag), As3S2 (bipyramid), As3S2 (linear), As4S4 (cubic), As4S4 (ring), As4S (tetrahedral), As4S (pyramid), As4S3 (linear) and As6S2 (dumb bell) by using the density functional theory which solves the Schrödinger equation for the given number of atoms in a cluster in the local density approximation. The models are optimized for the minimum energy which determines the structures, bond lengths and angles. For the optimized clusters, we calculated the vibrational frequencies in each case by calculating the gradients of the first principles potential. We compare the experimentally observed Raman frequencies with those calculated so that we can identify whether the cluster is present in the glass. In this way we find that AsS4 (S3-As-S), As4S4 (ring), As2S3 (bipyramid), As4S4 (cubic), As4S3 (linear), As2S3 (zig-zag), AsS4 (Td), As2S6 (dumb bell), AsS3 (triangle) and AsS3 (pyramid) structures are present in the actual glass.

  16. Vibrational frequency analysis, FT-IR and Laser-Raman spectra, DFT studies on ethyl (2E)-2-cyano-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-acrylate.

    PubMed

    Sert, Yusuf; Sreenivasa, S; Doğan, Hatice; Mohan, N R; Suchetan, P A; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-09-15

    The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100 cm(-1)) of ethyl (2E)-2-cyano-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-acrylate in solid phase have been recorded. Its theoretical vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, Raman activities and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: the highly parameterized empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis using VEDA4 software. The optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been seen to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated by using the same theoretical calculations.

  17. Directional spectra of ocean waves from microwave backscatter: A physical optics solution with application to the short-pulse and two-frequency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two simple microwave radar techniques that are potentially capable of providing routine satellite measurements of the directional spectrum of ocean waves were developed. One technique, the short pulse technique, makes use of very short pulses to resolve ocean surface wave contrast features in the range direction; the other technique, the two frequency correlation technique makes use of coherency in the transmitted waveform to detect the large ocean wave contrast modulation as a beat or mixing frequency in the power backscattered at two closely separated microwave frequencies. A frequency domain analysis of the short pulse and two frequency systems shows that the two measurement systems are essentially duals; they each operate on the generalized (three frequency) fourth-order statistical moment of the surface transfer function in different, but symmetrical ways, and they both measure the same directional contrast modulation spectrum. A three dimensional physical optics solution for the fourth-order moment was obtained for backscatter in the near vertical, specular regime, assuming Gaussian surface statistics.

  18. Interpreting Vibrational Sum-frequency Spectra of Sulfur Dioxide at the Air/Water Interface: A Comprehensive Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Chang, Tsun-Mei; Tao, Fu-Ming; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the solvation and spectroscopic properties of SO2 at the air/water interface using molecular simulation techniques. Molecular interactions from both Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) and classical polarizable models were utilized to understand the properties of SO2:(H2O)x complexes in the vicinity of the air/water interface. The KS-DFT was included to allow comparisons with sum-frequency generation spectroscopy through the identification of surface SO2:(H2O)x complexes. Using our simulation results, we were able to develop a much more detailed picture for the surface structure of SO2 that is consistent with the spectroscopic data obtained Richmond and coworkers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 16806 (2005)). We also found many similarities and differences between to the two interaction potentials, including a noticeable weakness of the classical potential model in reproducing the asymmetric hydrogen bonding of water with SO2 due to its inability to account for SO2 resonance structures. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  19. High frequency permeability and permittivity spectra of BiFeO{sub 3}/(CoTi)-BaM ferrite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yun; Wu, Xiaohan; Li, Qifan; Yu, Ting; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Zhongyan; Su, Zhijuan; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2015-05-07

    Low magnetic loss ferrite composites consisting of Ba(CoTi){sub 1.2}Fe{sub 9.6}O{sub 19} and BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) ferrite were investigated for permeability, permittivity, and high frequency losses at 10 MHz–1 GHz. The phase fraction of BiFeO{sub 3} was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray diffraction measurements. An effective medium approach was employed to predict the effective permeability and permittivity for the ferrite composites, which was found to be in good agreement with experimental data. The experiment demonstrated low magnetic losses (<0.128), modified by BFO phase fraction, while retaining high permeability (∼10.86) at 300 MHz. More importantly, the BFO phase resulted in a reduction of magnetic loss by 32%, as BFO phase increased from 2.7 vol. % to 12.6 vol. %. The effect of BFO phase on magnetic and dielectric properties revealed great potential for use in the miniaturization of high efficiency antennas.

  20. Frequency-Selective Heteronuclear Dephasing and Selective Carbonyl Labeling to Deconvolute Crowded Spectra of Membrane Proteins By Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method that combines carbonyl-selective labeling with frequency-selective heteronuclear recoupling to resolve the spectral overlap of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of membrane proteins in fluid lipid membranes with broad lines and high redundancy in the primary sequence. We implemented this approach in both heteronuclear 15N-13Cα and homonuclear 13C-13C dipolar assisted rotational resonance (DARR) correlation experiments. We demonstrate its efficacy for the membrane protein phospholamban reconstituted in fluid PC/PE/PA lipid bilayers. The main advantage of this method is to discriminate overlapped 13Cα resonances by strategically labeling the preceding residue. This method is highly complementary to 13C′i-1-15Ni-13Cαi and 13Cαi-1-15Ni-1-13C′i experiments to discriminate inter-residue spin systems at a minimal cost to signal-to-noise. PMID:21482162

  1. MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD FITTING OF X-RAY POWER DENSITY SPECTRA: APPLICATION TO HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM THE NEUTRON STAR X-RAY BINARY 4U1608-522

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier; Vaughan, Simon

    2012-02-20

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from weakly magnetized neutron stars display rapid frequency variability (second timescales) and high coherence with quality factors up to at least 200 at frequencies about 800-850 Hz. Their parameters have been estimated so far from standard min({chi}{sup 2}) fitting techniques, after combining a large number of power density spectra (PDS), to have the powers normally distributed (the so-called Gaussian regime). Before combining PDS, different methods to minimize the effects of the frequency drift to the estimates of the QPO parameters have been proposed, but none of them relied on fitting the individual PDS. Accounting for the statistical properties of PDS, we apply a maximum likelihood method to derive the QPO parameters in the non-Gaussian regime. The method presented is general, easy to implement, and can be applied to fitting individual PDS, several PDS simultaneously, or their average, and is obviously not specific to the analysis of kHz QPO data. It applies to the analysis of any PDS optimized in frequency resolution and for low-frequency variability or PDS containing features whose parameters vary on short timescales, as is the case for kHz QPOs. It is equivalent to the standard {chi}{sup 2} minimization fitting when the number of PDS fitted is large. The accuracy, reliability, and superiority of the method is demonstrated with simulations of synthetic PDS, containing Lorentzian QPOs of known parameters. Accounting for the broadening of the QPO profile, due to the leakage of power inherent to windowed Fourier transforms, the maximum likelihood estimates of the QPO parameters are asymptotically unbiased and have negligible bias when the QPO is reasonably well detected. By contrast, we show that the standard min({chi}{sup 2}) fitting method gives biased parameters with larger uncertainties. The maximum likelihood fitting method is applied to a subset of archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data of the neutron

  2. Proposed parameter-free model for interpreting the measured positron annihilation spectra of materials using a generalized gradient approximation.

    PubMed

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Kuriplach, Jan

    2015-04-10

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is often used to analyze the local electronic structure of materials of technological interest. Reliable theoretical tools are crucial to interpret the measured spectra. Here, we propose a parameter-free gradient correction scheme for a local-density approximation obtained from high-quality quantum Monte Carlo data. The results of our calculations compare favorably with positron affinity and lifetime measurements, opening new avenues for highly precise and advanced positron characterization of materials.

  3. Frequency spectra and cosinor for evaluating circadian rhythms in rodent data and in man during Gemini and Vostok flights.

    PubMed

    Halberg, F

    1970-01-01

    With the advent of a capability for extraterrestrial existence of lifeforms, chronobiology--the study of biological rhythms--has reached a position analogous to that of classical endocrinology. Just as an endocrine gland can be removed from an experimental animal, the effects of removal examined and the gland (or an extract) then replaced to determine whether the removal effects are reversible, lifeforms should be rigorously evaluated by rhythmometry before and during their (attempted) removal from Earth effects, as well as following their return to Earth. Methods lending themselves to such studies before, during and after travel in extraterrestrial space are illustrated herein, and their applications may be of value to preventive medicine as well as to basic science. Analyses of terrestrial control data and of restricted time series from extraterrestrial missions indicate that substantial scientific returns on Earth can be anticipated if in the routine of all mammalian space travelers provisions are made for: (1) monitoring body core temperature so as to evaluate its stable circadian rhythm--a phenomenon of interest in itself and also a reference rhythm for other variables; (2) saving aliquots from all urine samples, whereby a spectrum of diverse rhythms can be examined; (3) repeating simple performance tests, e.g., of grip strength or eye-hand coordination. Plans also should be implemented in unmanned space vehicles for explicit chronobiologic studies so designed that daily cosinor analysis can determine, e.g., whether circadian phase control or the desynchronized period length be altered as we move away from the Earth. Thus, some of the mechanisms underlying rhythms are now amenable to study on experimental mammals in unmanned space vehicles. In view of the high degree of generality of mammalian rhythms--many related to human well-being and optimal performance--and of dramatic consequences from some rhythmic variations in man, such studies deserve time and

  4. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas; Torchinsky, Darius H; Dyre, Jeppe C; Nelson, Keith A

    2013-03-28

    This paper presents and discusses the temperature and frequency dependence of the longitudinal and shear viscoelastic response at MHz and GHz frequencies of the intermediate glass former glycerol and the fragile glass former tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704). Measurements were performed using the recently developed time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, in which acoustic waves are generated optically, propagated through nm thin liquid layers of different thicknesses, and detected optically after transmission into a transparent detection substrate. This allows for a determination of the frequency dependence of the speed of sound and the sound-wave attenuation. When the data are converted into mechanical moduli, a linear relationship between longitudinal and shear acoustic moduli is revealed, which is consistent with the generalized Cauchy relation. In glycerol, the temperature dependence of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz over an extended range of temperatures. The shoving model's prediction for the relaxation time's temperature dependence is fairly well obeyed for both liquids as demonstrated from a plot with no adjustable parameters. Finally, we show that for both liquids the instantaneous shear modulus follows an exponential temperature dependence to a good approximation, as predicted by Granato's interstitialcy model. PMID:23556795

  5. Effect of X-ray Line Spectra Profile Fitting with Pearson VII, Pseudo-Voigt and Generalized Fermi Functions on Asphalt Binder Aromaticity and Crystallite Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebresellasie, K.; Shirokoff, J.; Lewis, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray line spectra profile fitting using Pearson VII, pseudo-Voigt and generalized Fermi functions was performed on asphalt binders prior to the calculation of aromaticity and crystallite size parameters. The effects of these functions on the results are presented and discussed in terms of the peak profile fit parameters, the uncertainties in calculated values that can arise owing to peak shape, peak features in the pattern and crystallite size according to the asphalt models (Yen, modified Yen or Yen-Mullins) and theories. Interpretation of these results is important in terms of evaluating the performance of asphalt binders widely used in the application of transportation systems (roads, highways, airports).

  6. General Method for Determination of the Surface Composition in Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts from the L Edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tiapin; Childers, David; Gomez, Carolina; Karim, Ayman M.; Schweitzer, Neil; Kropf, Arthur; Wang, Hui; Bolin, Trudy B.; Hu, Yongfeng; Kovarik, Libor; Meyer, Randall; Miller, Jeffrey T.

    2012-10-08

    Bimetallic PtPd on silica nano-particle catalysts have been synthesized and their average structure determined by Pt L3 and Pd K-edge extended X-ray absorption finestructure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The bimetallic structure is confirmed from elemental line scans by STEM for the individual 1-2 nm sized particles. A general method is described to determine the surface composition in bimetallic nanoparticles even when both metals adsorb, for example, CO. By measuring the change in the L3 X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra with and without CO in bimetallic particles and comparing these changes to those in monometallic particles of known size the fraction of surface atoms can be determined. The turnover rates (TOR) and neopentane hydrogenolysis and isomerization selectivities based on the surface composition suggest that the catalytic and spectroscopic properties are different from those in monometallic nano-particle catalysts. At the same neo-pentane conversion, the isomerization selectivity is higher for the PtPd catalyst while the TOR is lower than that of both Pt and Pd. As with the catalytic performance, the infrared spectra of adsorbed CO are not a linear combination of the spectra on monometallic catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Pt-CO adsorption enthalpy increases while the Pd-CO bond energy decreases. The ability to determine the surface composition allows for a better understanding of the spectroscopic and catalytic properties of bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts.

  7. Bad Dream Frequency in Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Prevalence, Correlates, and Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Nadorff, Michael R.; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety (CBT) to enhanced usual care (EUC), it assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post-treatment (3 months), and 6, 9, 12 and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post-treatment and throughout follow-up compared to EUC. PMID:23470116

  8. Comment on 'Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks'[Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that some of the main results of the recent paper by Lakhin and Ilgisonis [Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)], viz. the derivation of the equations for the continuous spectra of poloidally and toroidally rotating plasmas and their special solution for large aspect ratio tokamaks with large parallel flows were obtained before by Goedbloed, Belieen, van der Holst, and Keppens [Phys. Plasmas 11, 28 (2004)]. A further rearrangement of the system of equations for the coupled Alfven and slow continuous spectra clearly exhibits: (a) coupling through a single tangential derivative, which is a generalization of the geodesic curvature; (b) the 'transonic' transitions of the equilibrium, which need to be carefully examined in order to avoid entering hyperbolic flow regimes where the stability formalism breaks down. A critical discussion is devoted to the implications of this failure, which is generally missed in the tokamak literature, possibly as a result of the wide-spread use of the sonic Mach number of gas dynamics, which is an irrelevant and misleading parameter in 'transonic' magnetohydrodynamics. Once this obstacle in understanding is removed, further application of the theory of trans-slow Alfven continuum instabilities to both tokamaks, with possible implications for the L-H transition, and astrophysical objects like 'fat' accretion disks, with a possible new route to magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, becomes feasible.

  9. Slow and fast narrow spectra aurora E region echoes during the March 17, 2015 storm at mid latitudes. Multi-static, multi-frequency radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Jorge; St-Maurice, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Coherent E region echoes were observed at midlatitudes during the March 17, 2015 storm. The observations came from multi-static, multi-frequency, wide-field of view radars operating at 32.55 and 36.2 MHz in northern Germany. Each of the three receiver stations used, two in monostatic and one in bistatic modes, allow interferometry. These radars systems are devoted primarily to the measurement of mesospheric winds from specular meteor echoes. However during this storm, the strongest of the current solar cycle, strong Radar Aurora echoes were observed during the day for more than four hours. Here we present the main features observed, with a specific emphasis on echoes presenting narrow spectra with slower (around 180 m/s) and faster (as fast as 1600 m/s) Doppler velocities, than nominal typical ion-acoustic velocity expected to be between 400 and 800 m/s. We find that in both types of echoes the range vs. time slopes are between 800 and 1400 m/s. They agree rather well with the Doppler velocity for the narrow fast types but do not agree at all in the narrow slow spectral case. In both instances, the echoes are organized in localized horizontal structures with a range extent typically between 50 and 80 km. The fast-narrow structures tend to occur at higher altitudes than the well-known Farley-Buneman echoes, while the slow-narrow structures occur at lower altitudes (lower than 95 km). Both echo types come from regions with relatively small flow angles. Moreover the altitude of all echoes went down after 16:15 UT with the small-narrow echoes acquiring even smaller Doppler velocities. In large part thanks to the echo localization made feasible by interferometry, these new features are shedding some new important perspective on our understanding of auroral E-region radar echoes, particularly when it comes to spectra classified in the past as "Type III" and "Type IV" echoes.

  10. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  11. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  12. Joint envelope and frequency order spectrum analysis based on iterative generalized demodulation for planetary gearbox fault diagnosis under nonstationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chen, Xiaowang; Liang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Planetary gearbox vibration signals under nonstationary conditions are characterized by time-varying nature and complex multi-components, making it very difficult to extract features for fault diagnosis. Order spectrum analysis is one of the effective approaches for nonstationary signal analysis of rotating machinery. The main idea of order analysis is to map the time-varying frequency components into constant ones. Inspired by this idea, we propose a new order spectrum analysis method to exploit the unique property of iterative generalized demodulation in converting arbitrary instantaneous frequency trajectories of multi-component signals into constant frequency lines on the time-frequency plane. This new method is completely algorithm-based and tachometer/encoder-free, thus easy to implement. It does not involve equi-angular resampling commonly required by most order tracking methods and is hence free from the decimation and/or interpolation error. The proposed order analysis method can eliminate the time-variation effect of frequency and thus can effectively reveal the harmonic order constituents of nonstationary multi-component signals. However, the planetary gearbox vibration signals also lead to complex sideband orders. As such, we further propose to analyze the order spectrum of amplitude envelope. This will eliminate the complex sideband orders in the order spectrum of original signals, leading to a substantially simplified and more reliable gear characteristic frequency identification process. Nevertheless, the gear and/or planet carrier rotating frequency orders, which are irrelevant to gear fault, may still exist. To avoid possible misleading results due to such frequency orders, we also propose to analyze the order spectrum of instantaneous frequency. Theoretically, the peaks present in frequency order spectrum directly correspond to the gear characteristic frequency orders, which can be used to extract gear fault signature more explicitly. The proposed

  13. On hydrologic similarity: A dimensionless flood frequency model using a generalized geomorphologic unit hydrograph and partial area runoff generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Wood, Eric F.; Beven, Keith J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the shortcomings of the original theory of the geomorphologic unit hydrograph (GUH) is that it assumes that runoff is generated uniformly from the entire catchment area. It is now recognized that in many catchments much of the runoff during storm events is produced on partial areas which usually form on narrow bands along the stream network. A storm response model that includes runoff generation on partial areas by both Hortonian and Dunne mechanisms was recently developed by the authors. In this paper a methodology for integrating this partial area runoff generation model with the GUH-based runoff routing model is presented; this leads to a generalized GUH. The generalized GUH and the storm response model are then used to estimate physically based flood frequency distributions. In most previous work the initial moisture state of the catchment had been assumed to be constant for all the storms. In this paper we relax this assumption and allow the initial moisture conditions to vary between storms. The resulting flood frequency distributions are cast in a scaled dimensionless framework where issues such as catchment scale and similarity can be conveniently addressed. A number of experiments are performed to study the sensitivity of the flood frequency response to some of the 'similarity' parameters identified in this formulation. The results indicate that one of the most important components of the derived flood frequency model relates to the specification of processes within the runoff generation model; specifically the inclusion of both saturation excess and Horton infiltration excess runoff production mechanisms. The dominance of these mechanisms over different return periods of the flood frequency distribution can significantly affect the distributional shape and confidence limits about the distribution. Comparisons with observed flood distributions seem to indicate that such mixed runoff production mechanisms influence flood distribution shape. The

  14. Nonlinear frequency shift of electrostatic waves in general collisionless plasma: Unifying theory of fluid and kinetic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Dodin, Ilya Y.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear frequency shift is derived in a transparent asymptotic form for intense Langmuir waves in general collisionless plasma. The formula describes both fluid and kinetic effects simultaneously. The fluid nonlinearity is expressed, for the first time, through the plasma dielectric function, and the kinetic nonlinearity accounts for both smooth distributions and trapped-particle beams. Various known limiting scalings are reproduced as special cases. The calculation avoids differential equations and can be extended straightforwardly to other nonlinear plasma waves.

  15. A garden of orchids: a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestel, B. D.; Osbaldestin, A. H.

    2004-10-01

    We consider a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational flux, showing, in the strong coupling limit, the fluctuations of the exponentially decaying eigenfunctions are governed by the dynamics of a renormalization operator on a renormalization strange set. This work generalizes previous analyses which have considered only the golden mean case. Projections of the renormalization strange sets are illustrated analogous to the 'orchid' present in the golden mean case.

  16. Generalized Bloch's theorem for viscous metamaterials: Dispersion and effective properties based on frequencies and wavenumbers that are simultaneously complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Michael J.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2016-05-01

    It is common for dispersion curves of damped periodic materials to be based on real frequencies as a function of complex wavenumbers or, conversely, real wavenumbers as a function of complex frequencies. The former condition corresponds to harmonic wave motion where a driving frequency is prescribed and where attenuation due to dissipation takes place only in space alongside spatial attenuation due to Bragg scattering. The latter condition, on the other hand, relates to free wave motion admitting attenuation due to energy loss only in time while spatial attenuation due to Bragg scattering also takes place. Here, we develop an algorithm for 1D systems that provides dispersion curves for damped free wave motion based on frequencies and wavenumbers that are permitted to be simultaneously complex. This represents a generalized application of Bloch's theorem and produces a dispersion band structure that fully describes all attenuation mechanisms, in space and in time. The algorithm is applied to a viscously damped mass-in-mass metamaterial exhibiting local resonance. A frequency-dependent effective mass for this damped infinite chain is also obtained. xml:lang="fr"

  17. Site-specific estimation of peak-streamflow frequency using generalized least-squares regression for natural basins in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Slade, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, has developed a computer program to estimate peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged sites in natural basins in Texas. Peak-streamflow frequency refers to the peak streamflows for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years. Peak-streamflow frequency estimates are needed by planners, managers, and design engineers for flood-plain management; for objective assessment of flood risk; for cost-effective design of roads and bridges; and also for the desin of culverts, dams, levees, and other flood-control structures. The program estimates peak-streamflow frequency using a site-specific approach and a multivariate generalized least-squares linear regression. A site-specific approach differs from a traditional regional regression approach by developing unique equations to estimate peak-streamflow frequency specifically for the ungaged site. The stations included in the regression are selected using an informal cluster analysis that compares the basin characteristics of the ungaged site to the basin characteristics of all the stations in the data base. The program provides several choices for selecting the stations. Selecting the stations using cluster analysis ensures that the stations included in the regression will have the most pertinent information about flooding characteristics of the ungaged site and therefore provide the basis for potentially improved peak-streamflow frequency estimation. An evaluation of the site-specific approach in estimating peak-streamflow frequency for gaged sites indicates that the site-specific approach is at least as accurate as a traditional regional regression approach.

  18. Extension of a nonlinear systems theory to general-frequency unsteady transonic aerodynamic responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for modeling nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses, for subsequent use in aeroservoelastic analysis and design, using the Volterra-Wiener theory of nonlinear systems is presented. The methodology is extended to predict nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses of arbitrary frequency. The Volterra-Wiener theory uses multidimensional convolution integrals to predict the response of nonlinear systems to arbitrary inputs. The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code is used to generate linear and nonlinear unit impulse responses that correspond to each of the integrals for a rectangular wing with a NACA 0012 section with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. The computed kernels then are used to predict linear and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses via convolution and compared to responses obtained using the CAP-TSD code directly. The results indicate that the approach can be used to predict linear unsteady aerodynamic responses exactly for any input amplitude or frequency at a significant cost savings. Convolution of the nonlinear terms results in nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses that compare reasonably well with those computed using the CAP-TSD code directly but at significant computational cost savings.

  19. ELSTAB-Fiber-Optic Time and Frequency Distribution Technology: A General Characterization and Fundamental Limits.

    PubMed

    Krehlik, Przemyslaw; Sliwczynski, Lukasz; Buczek, Lukasz; Kolodziej, Jacek; Lipinski, Marcin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of the electronically stabilized (thus named ELSTAB) fiber-optic time and frequency (T&F) distribution system based on our idea of using variable electronic delay lines as compensating elements. Various extensions of the basic system, allowing building a long-haul, multiuser network are described. The fundamental limitations of the method arising from fiber chromatic dispersion and system dynamics are discussed. We briefly characterize the main hardware challenge of the system, which is the design of a pair of low-noise, precisely matched delay lines. Finally, we present experimental results with T&F distribution over up to 615 km of fiber, where we demonstrate frequency stability in the range of 1-7 ×10(-17) for 10(5) s averaging and time calibration with accuracy well below 50 ps. Also, practical implementation of the ELSTAB in the Polish T&F distribution network is shown. PMID:26599816

  20. Confidence intervals for population allele frequencies: the general case of sampling from a finite diploid population of any size.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tak; Keenan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of population allele frequencies using sample data forms a central component of studies in population genetics. These estimates can be used to test hypotheses on the evolutionary processes governing changes in genetic variation among populations. However, existing studies frequently do not account for sampling uncertainty in these estimates, thus compromising their utility. Incorporation of this uncertainty has been hindered by the lack of a method for constructing confidence intervals containing the population allele frequencies, for the general case of sampling from a finite diploid population of any size. In this study, we address this important knowledge gap by presenting a rigorous mathematical method to construct such confidence intervals. For a range of scenarios, the method is used to demonstrate that for a particular allele, in order to obtain accurate estimates within 0.05 of the population allele frequency with high probability (> or = 95%), a sample size of > 30 is often required. This analysis is augmented by an application of the method to empirical sample allele frequency data for two populations of the checkerspot butterfly (Melitaea cinxia L.), occupying meadows in Finland. For each population, the method is used to derive > or = 98.3% confidence intervals for the population frequencies of three alleles. These intervals are then used to construct two joint > or = 95% confidence regions, one for the set of three frequencies for each population. These regions are then used to derive a > or = 95%% confidence interval for Jost's D, a measure of genetic differentiation between the two populations. Overall, the results demonstrate the practical utility of the method with respect to informing sampling design and accounting for sampling uncertainty in studies of population genetics, important for scientific hypothesis-testing and also for risk-based natural resource management. PMID:24465792

  1. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the ECMWF general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.J.; Gates, W.L.; Arpe, K.

    1992-09-01

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected EC model variables are investigated in a simulation of ``perpetual July`` with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales (as determined by the enfolding time of lagged autocorrelation functions) are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and run-off, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over the oceans.

  2. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the ECMWF general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.J.; Gates, W.L. ); Arpe, K. )

    1992-09-01

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected EC model variables are investigated in a simulation of perpetual July'' with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales (as determined by the enfolding time of lagged autocorrelation functions) are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and run-off, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over the oceans.

  3. A Generalized Heterodyne Method Incorporating a High-Frequency Integral-Type PLL for Sensorless Drives of PMSMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Shinji

    This paper proposes a new generalized heterodyne method that incorporates a high-frequency integral-type phase-locked loop (PLL) as a versatile rotor-phase estimation method from stator current caused by high-frequency voltage injection for sensorless drive of salient-pole permanent-magnet synchronous motors. The proposed method has the following characteristics that are in direct contrast to those of conventional heterodyne methods. 1) In principle, it can be applied to almost all voltage injection methods. 2) In principle, it can properly estimate the rotor phase over a wide range of speed. 3) It employs a new simple estimation structure based on the high-frequency integral-type PLL method, which does not require any additional filters. 4) An analytical method for designing the components of the structure has been established and no trial and error method is required for selecting the parameters for the components. 5) The stability of the phase-estimation system of the structure is guaranteed. 6) The high-frequency noises generated in the heterodyne process do not appear on the estimated rotor phase.

  4. Frequency-range discriminations: special and general abilities in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Weisman, R; Njegovan, M; Sturdy, C; Phillmore, L; Coyle, J; Mewhort, D

    1998-09-01

    The acoustic frequency ranges in birdsongs and human speech can provide important pitch cues for recognition. Zebra finches and humans were trained to sort contiguous frequencies into 3 or 8 ranges, based on associations between the ranges and reward. The 3-range task was conducted separately in 3 spectral regions. Zebra finches discriminated 3 ranges in the medium and high spectral regions faster than in the low region and discriminated 8 ranges with precision. Humans discriminated 3 ranges in all 3 spectral regions to the same modest standard and acquired only a crude discrimination of the lowest and highest of 8 ranges. The results indicate that songbirds have a special sensitivity to the pitches in conspecific songs and, relative to humans, have a remarkable general ability to sort pitches into ranges.

  5. Frequency-range discriminations: special and general abilities in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Weisman, R; Njegovan, M; Sturdy, C; Phillmore, L; Coyle, J; Mewhort, D

    1998-09-01

    The acoustic frequency ranges in birdsongs and human speech can provide important pitch cues for recognition. Zebra finches and humans were trained to sort contiguous frequencies into 3 or 8 ranges, based on associations between the ranges and reward. The 3-range task was conducted separately in 3 spectral regions. Zebra finches discriminated 3 ranges in the medium and high spectral regions faster than in the low region and discriminated 8 ranges with precision. Humans discriminated 3 ranges in all 3 spectral regions to the same modest standard and acquired only a crude discrimination of the lowest and highest of 8 ranges. The results indicate that songbirds have a special sensitivity to the pitches in conspecific songs and, relative to humans, have a remarkable general ability to sort pitches into ranges. PMID:9770314

  6. Frequency of dissociative identity disorder in the general population in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Akyüz, G; Doğan, O; Sar, V; Yargiç, L I; Tutkun, H

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the prevalence of dissociative identity disorder in the general population. The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) was administered to 994 subjects in 500 homes who constituted a representative sample of the population of Sivas City, Turkey. The mean DES score was 6.7+/-6.1 (mean +/- SD). Of the 62 respondents who scored above 17 on the DES, 32 (51.6%) could be contacted during the second phase of the study. They were matched for age and gender with a group of respondents who scored below 10 on the scale, and the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) was then administered to both groups. Seventeen subjects (1.7%) received a diagnosis of dissociative disorder according to the structured interview. In the third phase, eight of 17 subjects who had a dissociative disorder on the structured interview could be contacted for a clinical evaluation. They were matched with a nondissociative control group and interviewed by a clinician blind to the structured interview diagnosis. Four of eight subjects were diagnosed clinically with dissociative identity disorder, yielding a minimum prevalence of 0.4%. Dissociative identity disorder is not rare in the general population. Self-rating instruments and structured interviews can be used successfully for screening these cases. Our data, derived from a population with no public awareness about dissociative identity disorder and no exposure to systematic psychotherapy, suggest that dissociative identity disorder cannot be considered simply an iatrogenic artifact, a culture-bound syndrome, or a phenomenon induced by media influences.

  7. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  8. Noxious stimulation in children receiving general anaesthesia evokes an increase in delta frequency brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Caroline; Poorun, Ravi; Goksan, Sezgi; Worley, Alan; Boyd, Stewart; Rogers, Richard; Ali, Tariq; Slater, Rebeccah

    2014-01-01

    More than 235,000 children/year in the UK receive general anaesthesia, but it is unknown whether nociceptive stimuli alter cortical brain activity in anaesthetised children. Time-locked electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to experimental tactile stimuli, experimental noxious stimuli, and clinically required cannulation were examined in 51 children (ages 1–12 years) under sevoflurane monoanaesthesia. Based on a pilot study (n = 12), we hypothesised that noxious stimulation in children receiving sevoflurane monoanaesthesia would evoke an increase in delta activity. This was tested in an independent sample of children (n = 39), where a subset (n = 11) had topical local anaesthetic applied prior to stimulation. A novel method of time-locking the stimuli to the EEG recording was developed using an event detection interface and high-speed camera. Clinical cannulation evoked a significant increase (34.2 ± 8.3%) in delta activity (P = 0.042), without concomitant changes in heart rate or reflex withdrawal, which was not observed when local anaesthetic was applied (P = 0.30). Experimental tactile (P = 0.012) and noxious (P = 0.0099) stimulation also evoked significant increases in delta activity, but the magnitude of the response was graded with stimulus intensity, with the greatest increase evoked by cannulation. We demonstrate that experimental and clinically essential noxious procedures, undertaken in anaesthetised children, alter the pattern of EEG activity, that this response can be inhibited by local anaesthetic, and that this measure is more sensitive than other physiological indicators of nociception. This technique provides the possibility that sensitivity to noxious stimuli during anaesthesia could be investigated in other clinical populations. PMID:25218826

  9. Linkage disequilibria and the site frequency spectra in the su(s) and su(w(a)) regions of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Langley, C H; Lazzaro, B P; Phillips, W; Heikkinen, E; Braverman, J M

    2000-01-01

    Over the last decade, surveys of DNA sequence variation in natural populations of several Drosophila species and other taxa have established that polymorphism is reduced in genomic regions characterized by low rates of crossing over per physical length. Parallel studies have also established that divergence between species is not reduced in these same genomic regions, thus eliminating explanations that rely on a correlation between the rates of mutation and crossing over. Several theoretical models (directional hitchhiking, background selection, and random environment) have been proposed as population genetic explanations. In this study samples from an African population (n = 50) and a European population (n = 51) were surveyed at the su(s) (1955 bp) and su(w(a)) (3213 bp) loci for DNA sequence polymorphism, utilizing a stratified SSCP/DNA sequencing protocol. These loci are located near the telomere of the X chromosome, in a region of reduced crossing over per physical length, and exhibit a significant reduction in DNA sequence polymorphism. Unlike most previously surveyed, these loci reveal substantial skews toward rare site frequencies, consistent with the predictions of directional hitchhiking and random environment models and inconsistent with the general predictions of the background selection model (or neutral theory). No evidence for excess geographic differentiation at these loci is observed. Although linkage disequilibrium is observed between closely linked sites within these loci, many recombination events in the genealogy of the sampled alleles can be inferred and the genomic scale of linkage disequilibrium, measured in base pairs between sites, is the same as that observed for loci in regions of normal crossing over. We conclude that gene conversion must be high in these regions of low crossing over. PMID:11102378

  10. The effects of general anesthetics on ESR spectra of spin labels in phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing purified Na,K-ATPase or microsomal protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Makiko; Hiraoki, Toshifumi; Kimura, Kunie; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the effects of general anesthetics on liposome containing spin labels, 5-doxyl stearic acid (5-DSA) and 16-doxyl stearic acid (16-DSA), and purified Na,K-ATPase or membrane protein of microsome using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The spectra of 16-DSA in liposomes with both proteins showed three sharp signals compared with 5-DSA. The difference in the order parameter S value of 5-DSA and 16-DSA suggested that the nitroxide radical location of 5-DSA and 16-DSA were different in the membrane bilayer. The results were almost the same as those obtained in liposomes without proteins. The addition of sevoflurane, isoflurane, halothane, ether, ethanol and propofol increased the intensity of the signals, but the clinical concentrations of anesthetics did not significantly alter the S and τ values, which are indices of the fluidity of the membrane. These results suggest that anesthetics remain on the surface of the lipid bilayer and do not act on both the inside hydrophobic area and the relatively hydrophilic area near the surface. These results and others also suggest that the existence of Na,K-ATPase and microsomal proteins did not affect the environment around the spin labels in the liposome and the effects of anesthetics on liposome as a model membrane.

  11. Vibrational spectra, isolated CH stretching frequencies and CH bond lengths in CH 3OCH 2X compounds (XF, Cl, Br, I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, D. C.; Torto, I.; Morrisson, A. R.

    1983-05-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra are reported for CH 3OCH 2X, CHD 2OCD 2X, CD 3OCHDX (XF, Cl, Br, I) and for CH 3OCD 2Cl and CD 3OCH 2Cl, in various phases. νCHis values are obtained which enable CH bond lengths and dissociation energies to be predicted. The changes in bond lengths from Me 2O to MeOCH 2X and from MeOCH 2F to MeOCH 2Cl are in good agreement with those calculated ab initio and in radical disagreement with microwave-based values. The effect of halogen is to strengthen all the CH bonds present, especially that lying parallel to the CX one. All major features in the spectra are explained if only the gauche skeletal conformer exists in the phases studied. However, two transient bands in solid films of CH 3OCH 2F may indicate the presence of a metastable trans conformer phase. Secure assignments for CH 3OCH 2Cl are based on the CH 3OCD 2Cl and CD 3OCH 2Cl spectra and extended by analogy to most of the vibrations of the F, Br and I compounds.

  12. Generalized Mach-Zehnder interferometer architectures for radio frequency translation and multiplication: Suppression of unwanted harmonics by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Hasan, Mehedi; Guemri, Rabiaa; Lucarz, Frédéric; Hall, Trevor J.

    2015-11-01

    A generalized array of N parallel phase modulators electrically driven with a progressive 2 π / N phase shift is analyzed. For N-even, the equivalence of this configuration to parallel Mach-Zehnder architectures, and specifically the equivalence for N=4 to a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator is shown. A simple approach to the design of this architecture that determines the static optical phase shifts required in each of the N parallel arms to suppress unwanted harmonics while maximizing the harmonics of interest is developed. The proposed design approach is validated by numerical simulations of N=4 and N=6 architectures with properly determined optical phase shifts. Optical single-side-band modulation (lower and upper) and frequency multiplication of an electrical drive signal with high suppression of unwanted harmonics is shown to be achievable.

  13. Inference of Super-exponential Human Population Growth via Efficient Computation of the Site Frequency Spectrum for Generalized Models.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The site frequency spectrum (SFS) and other genetic summary statistics are at the heart of many population genetic studies. Previous studies have shown that human populations have undergone a recent epoch of fast growth in effective population size. These studies assumed that growth is exponential, and the ensuing models leave an excess amount of extremely rare variants. This suggests that human populations might have experienced a recent growth with speed faster than exponential. Recent studies have introduced a generalized growth model where the growth speed can be faster or slower than exponential. However, only simulation approaches were available for obtaining summary statistics under such generalized models. In this study, we provide expressions to accurately and efficiently evaluate the SFS and other summary statistics under generalized models, which we further implement in a publicly available software. Investigating the power to infer deviation of growth from being exponential, we observed that adequate sample sizes facilitate accurate inference; e.g., a sample of 3000 individuals with the amount of data expected from exome sequencing allows observing and accurately estimating growth with speed deviating by ≥10% from that of exponential. Applying our inference framework to data from the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project, we found that a model with a generalized growth epoch fits the observed SFS significantly better than the equivalent model with exponential growth (P-value [Formula: see text]). The estimated growth speed significantly deviates from exponential (P-value [Formula: see text]), with the best-fit estimate being of growth speed 12% faster than exponential.

  14. Solar flare soft-X-ray spectra from Very Low Frequency observations of ionospheric modulations: Possibility of uninterrupted observation of non-thermal electron-plasma interaction in solar atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    The hard and soft X-ray regions of a solar flare spectrum are the manifestation of interaction, namely of bremsstrahlung radiation of the non-thermal electrons moving inward in the denser part of the solar atmosphere with the plasma heated by those energetic electrons. The continuous and uninterrupted knowledge of X-ray photon spectra of flares are of great importance to derive information on the electron acceleration and hence time-evolution of energy transport and physics during solar flares. Satellite observations of solar X-ray spectrum are often limited by the restricted windows in each duty cycle to avoid the interaction of detectors and instruments with harmful energetic charge particles. In this work we have tried to tackle the problem by examining the possibility of using Earth's ionosphere and atmosphere as the detector of such transient events. Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere are the places where the X-rays and gamma-rays from such astronomical sources are absorbed. The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectra and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the electron and ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. As a preliminary exercise we developed a novel deconvolution method to extract the soft X-ray part of spectra of some solar flares of different classes from the electron density profiles obtained from Very Low Frequency (VLF) observation of lower ionosphere during those events. The method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. with the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere.

  15. Spectra of data sampled at frequency-modulated rates in application to cardiovascular signals: Part 2. Evaluation of Fourier transform algorithms.

    PubMed

    TenVoorde, B J; Faes, T J; Rompelman, O

    1994-01-01

    For three direct Fourier transform algorithms we quantified the influence of pulse frequency modulation (PFM) on the spectral estimation of pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). The simulation study is based on sinusoid functions sampled according to a pulse sequence which is the output of an integral pulse frequency modulator (IPFM). One algorithm exactly reproduces the theoretical spectrum derived in Part 1. The other two, including the classical FFT, scale all PFM-induced components in a different way, and in addition, generate higher modulating frequency harmonics. For a PFM depth below 30%, the sum of spurious PFM components is almost linearly dependent on this modulation depth, for all three algorithms. Dividing the effect of PFM in a 'harmonic' and 'aliasing' distortion, we found that the FFT has a relatively high harmonic distortion, compared to an algorithm that takes into account the non-uniform character of the data. In the cardiovascular (worst) case of 30% modulation in heart rate (PFM) at a frequency of 0.1 Hz, the FFT spectrum of beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure variations contains approximately 20% of spurious components caused solely by the modulation in time occurrences of the blood pressure samples. The 'non-uniform' algorithm performs twice as well in this case. PMID:8182965

  16. On the possibility of analytical approximation of line forms during random disorders of the resonance frequencies in molecular vibration-rotation spectra for satellite sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    The generalization spectral line contour concept and formulas for a two component mixture, as well as consequences of the general formula are discussed. The calculation procedure, initial information, calculation results and comparison of calculations with available experimental data, for radiation absorption in three CO2 bands are presented.

  17. A high eating frequency is associated with an overall healthy lifestyle in middle-aged men and women and reduced likelihood of general and central obesity in men.

    PubMed

    Holmbäck, Isabel; Ericson, Ulrika; Gullberg, Bo; Wirfält, Elisabet

    2010-10-01

    The role of eating frequency in obesity development is debated. Therefore, we investigated the association between eating frequency, BMI and waist circumference (WC), as well as how eating frequency is related to diet composition and lifestyle factors. A subsample (aged 47-68 years) of men (n 1355) and women (n 1654) from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort was used for the present cross-sectional study. The daily eating frequency was calculated based on the number of self-reported eating occasions during an ordinary day. Regression analysis and ANOVA examined the associations between eating frequency, BMI and WC, while adjusting for potential confounders. The energy percentage (E%) from carbohydrates as well as relative fibre intake (g/MJ) increased with higher eating frequency; while E% from fat, protein and alcohol decreased. A low daily eating frequency was associated with smoking, higher alcohol consumption, and lower leisure-time physical activity. Eating three or fewer meals per d was also associated with increased likelihood of general and central obesity in men when adjusting for total energy intake, lifestyle and dietary factors. However, results did not reach statistical significance among women. The present study suggests that a high daily eating frequency is associated with a healthy lifestyle and dietary pattern in both men and women, and a reduced likelihood of general and central obesity in men. There is a need for prospective studies investigating the association between eating frequency, diet and body composition.

  18. Note of Clarification on the Coding of Light Verbs in "Semantic Generality, Input Frequency and the Acquisition of Syntax" (Journal of Child Language 31, 61-99)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theakson, Anna L.; Lieven, Elena V. M.; Pine, Julian M.; Rowland, Caroline F.

    2006-01-01

    In our recent paper, "Semantic generality, input frequency and the acquisition of syntax" ("Journal of Child Language" 31, 61-99), we presented data from two-year-old children to examine the question of whether the semantic generality of verbs contributed to their ease and stage of acquisition over and above the effects of their typically high…

  19. Unravelling thermal emissivity spectra of the main minerals on Mercury's surface by comparison with ab initio calculated IR-HT vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangarone, C.; Helbert, J.; Tribaudino, M.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Prencipe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral signatures of minerals are intimately related to the crystal structure; therefore they may represent a remote sensing model to determine surface composition of planetary bodies, by analysing their spectral reflectance and emission. However, one of the most critical point is data interpretation considering planetary surfaces, as Mercury, where the changes in spectral characteristics are induced by the high temperatures conditions (Helbert et al., 2013). The aim of this work is to interpret the experimental thermal emissivity spectra with an innovative approach: simulating IR spectra of the main mineral families that compose the surface of Mercury, focusing on pyroxenes (Sprague et al., 2002), both at room and high temperature, exploiting the accuracy of ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, by means of CRYSTAL14 code (Dovesi et al., 2014). The simulations will be compared with experimental emissivity measurements of planetary analogue samples at temperature up to 1000K, performed at Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) by Institute of Planetary Research (DLR, Berlin). Results will be useful to create a theoretical background to interpret HT-IR emissivity spectra that will be collected by the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS), a spectrometer developed by DLR that will be on board of the ESA BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) scheduled for 2017. The goal is to point out the most interesting spectral features for a geological mapping of Mercury and other rocky bodies, simulating the environmental conditions of the inner planets of Solar System. Dovesi R., Saunders V. R., Roetti C., Orlando R., Zicovich-Wilson C. M., Pascale F., Civalleri B., Doll K., Harrison N. M., Bush I. J., D'Arco P., Llunell M., Causà M. & Noël Y. 2014. CRYSTAL14 User's Manual, University of Torino. Sprague, A. L., Emery, J. P., Donaldson, K. L., Russell, R. W., Lynch, D. K., & Mazuk, A. L. (2002). Mercury: Mid-infrared (3-13.5

  20. Use of Generalized Extreme Value Covariates to Improve Estimation of Trends and Return Frequencies for Lake Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paynter, S.; Nachabe, M.

    2008-12-01

    One of the most important tools in water management is the accurate forecast of both long-term and short- term extreme values for both flood and drought conditions. Traditional methods of trend detection, such as ordinary least squares (OLS) or the Mann-Kendall test, are not aptly suited for hydrologic systems while traditional methods of predicting extreme flood and drought frequencies, such as distribution fitting without parameter covariates, may be highly inaccurate in lake-type systems, especially in the short-term. In the case of lakes, traditional frequency return estimates assume extremes are independent of trend or starting lake stages. However, due to the significant autocorrelation of lake levels, the initial stage can have a significant influence on the severity of a given event. The aim of this research was to accurately identify the direction and magnitude of trends in flood and drought stages and provide more accurate predictions of both long-term and short-term flood and drought stage return frequencies utilizing the generalized extreme value distribution with time and starting stage covariates. All of the lakes researched evidenced either no trend or very small trends unlikely to significantly alter prediction of future flood or drought return levels. However, for all of the lakes significant improvement in the prediction of extremes was obtained with the inclusion of starting lake stage as a covariate. Traditional methods of predicting flood or drought stages significantly overpredict stages when starting lake stages are low and underpredict stages when starting stages are high. The difference between these predictions can be nearly two meters, a significant amount in urbanized watersheds in areas of the world with flat topography. Differences of near two meters can mean significant alterations in evacuation or other water management decisions. In addition to improving prediction of extreme events, utilizing GEV with time or starting stage

  1. Theoretical Investigation on the Substituent Effect of Halogen Atoms at the C8 Position of Adenine: Relative Stability, Vibrational Frequencies, and Raman Spectra of Tautomers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Li; Wu, De-Yin; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-06-16

    We have theoretically investigated the substituent effect of adenine at the C8 position with a substituent X = H, F, Cl, and Br by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p) level. The aim is to study the substituent effect of halogen atoms on the relative stability, vibrational frequencies, and solvation effect of tautomers. Our calculated results show that for substituted adenine molecules the N9H8X tautomer to be the most stable structure in gas phase at the present theoretical level. Here N9H8X denotes the hydrogen atom binds to the N9 position of imidazole ring and X denotes H, F, Cl, and Br atoms. The influence of the induced attraction of the fluorine substituent is significantly larger than chlorine and bromine ones. The halogen substituent effect has a significant influence on changes of vibrational frequencies and Raman intensities. PMID:27243104

  2. Theoretical Investigation on the Substituent Effect of Halogen Atoms at the C8 Position of Adenine: Relative Stability, Vibrational Frequencies, and Raman Spectra of Tautomers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Li; Wu, De-Yin; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-06-16

    We have theoretically investigated the substituent effect of adenine at the C8 position with a substituent X = H, F, Cl, and Br by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p) level. The aim is to study the substituent effect of halogen atoms on the relative stability, vibrational frequencies, and solvation effect of tautomers. Our calculated results show that for substituted adenine molecules the N9H8X tautomer to be the most stable structure in gas phase at the present theoretical level. Here N9H8X denotes the hydrogen atom binds to the N9 position of imidazole ring and X denotes H, F, Cl, and Br atoms. The influence of the induced attraction of the fluorine substituent is significantly larger than chlorine and bromine ones. The halogen substituent effect has a significant influence on changes of vibrational frequencies and Raman intensities.

  3. Characterization of timing jitter spectra in free-running mode-locked lasers with 340  dB dynamic range over 10 decades of Fourier frequency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a method that enables accurate timing jitter spectral-density characterization of free-running mode-locked laser oscillators over more than 10 decades of Fourier frequency from mHz to tens of MHz range. The method is based on analyzing both the input voltage noise to the slave laser and the output voltage noise from the balanced optical cross-correlator (BOC), when two mode-locked lasers are synchronized in repetition rate by the BOC. As a demonstration experiment, timing jitter spectrum of a free-running mode-locked Er-fiber laser with a dynamic range of >340  dB is measured over Fourier frequency ranging from 1 mHz to 38.5 MHz (Nyquist frequency). The demonstrated method can resolve different noise mechanisms that cause specific jitter characteristics in free-running mode-locked laser oscillators for a vast range of time scales from <100  ns to >1000  s.

  4. Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.E.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

  5. Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.E.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

  6. General formalism for the efficient calculation of derivatives of EM frequency-domain responses and derivatives of the misfit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Oleg; Kuvshinov, Alexei

    2010-04-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) studies of the Earth have advanced significantly over the past few years. This progress was driven, in particular, by new developments in the methods of 3-D inversion of EM data. Due to the large scale of the 3-D EM inverse problems, iterative gradient-type methods have mostly been employed. In these methods one has to calculate multiple times the gradient of the penalty function-a sum of misfit and regularization terms-with respect to the model parameters. However, even with modern computational capabilities the straightforward calculation of the misfit gradients based on numerical differentiation is extremely time consuming. Much more efficient and elegant way to calculate the gradient of the misfit is provided by the so-called `adjoint' approach. This is now widely used in many 3-D numerical schemes for inverting EM data of different types and origin. It allows the calculation of the misfit gradient for the price of only a few additional forward calculations. In spite of its popularity we did not find in the literature any general description of the approach, which would allow researchers to apply this methodology in a straightforward manner to their scenario of interest. In the paper, we present formalism for the efficient calculation of the derivatives of EM frequency-domain responses and the derivatives of the misfit with respect to variations of 3-D isotropic/anisotropic conductivity. The approach is rather general; it works with single-site responses, multisite responses and responses that include spatial derivatives of EM field. The formalism also allows for various types of parametrization of the 3-D conductivity distribution. Using this methodology one can readily obtain appropriate formulae for the specific sounding methods. To illustrate the concept we provide such formulae for a number of EM techniques: geomagnetic depth sounding (GDS), conventional and generalized magnetotellurics, the magnetovariational method, horizontal

  7. Analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared and Raman vibrational spectra

    PubMed Central

    Louant, Orian; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Using a recently developed recursive scheme for the calculation of high-order geometric derivatives of frequency-dependent molecular properties [Ringholm et al., J. Comp. Chem., 2014, 35, 622], we present the first analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared (IR) and Raman spectra including anharmonicity both in the vibrational frequencies and in the IR and Raman intensities. In the case of anharmonic corrections to the Raman intensities, this involves the calculation of fifth-order energy derivatives—that is, the third-order geometric derivatives of the frequency-dependent polarizability. The approach is applicable to both Hartree–Fock and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. Using generalized vibrational perturbation theory to second order, we have calculated the anharmonic infrared and Raman spectra of the non- and partially deuterated isotopomers of nitromethane, where the inclusion of anharmonic effects introduces combination and overtone bands that are observed in the experimental spectra. For the major features of the spectra, the inclusion of anharmonicities in the calculation of the vibrational frequencies is more important than anharmonic effects in the calculated infrared and Raman intensities. Using methanimine as a trial system, we demonstrate that the analytic approach avoids errors in the calculated spectra that may arise if numerical differentiation schemes are used. PMID:26784673

  8. A new efficient method for determining weighted power spectra: detection of low-frequency solar p-modes by analysis of BiSON data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. T.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; New, R.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new and highly efficient algorithm for computing a power spectrum made from evenly spaced data which combines the noise-reducing advantages of the weighted fit with the computational advantages of the fast Fourier transform. We apply this method to a 10-yr data set of the solar p-mode oscillations obtained by the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) and thereby uncover three new low-frequency modes. These are the ℓ= 2, n= 5 and n= 7 modes and the ℓ= 3, n=7 mode. In the case of the ℓ= 2, n= 5 mode, this is believed to be the first such identification of this mode in the literature. The statistical weights needed for the method are derived from a combination of the real data and a sophisticated simulation of the instrument performance. Variations in the weights are due mainly to the differences in the noise characteristics of the various BiSON instruments, the change in those characteristics over time and the changing line-of-sight velocity between the stations and the Sun. It should be noted that a weighted data set will have a more time-dependent signal than an unweighted set and that, consequently, its frequency spectrum will be more susceptible to aliasing.

  9. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  10. XTRAN2L - A PROGRAM FOR SOLVING THE GENERAL-FREQUENCY UNSTEADY TWO-DIMENSIONAL TRANSONIC SMALL-DISTURBANCE EQUATIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Program for Solving the General-Frequency Unsteady Two-Dimensional Transonic Small-Disturbance Equation, XTRAN2L, is used to calculate time-accurate, finite-difference solutions of the nonlinear, small-disturbance potential equation for two- dimensional transonic flow about airfoils. The code can treat forced harmonic, pulse, or aeroelastic transient type motions. XTRAN2L uses a transonic small-disturbance equation that incorporates a time accurate finite-difference scheme. Airfoil flow tangency boundary conditions are defined to include airfoil contour, chord deformation, nondimensional plunge displacement, pitch, and trailing edge control surface deflection. Forced harmonic motion can be based on: 1) coefficients of harmonics based on information from each quarter period of the last cycle of harmonic motion; or 2) Fourier analyses of the last cycle of motion. Pulse motion (an alternate to forced harmonic motion) in which the airfoil is given a small prescribed pulse in a given mode of motion, and the aerodynamic transients are calculated. An aeroelastic transient capability is available within XTRAN2L, wherein the structural equations of motion are coupled with the aerodynamic solution procedure for simultaneous time-integration. The wake is represented as a slit downstream of the airfoil trailing edge. XTRAN2L includes nonreflecting farfield boundary conditions. XTRAN2L was developed on a CDC CYBER mainframe running under NOS 2.4. It is written in FORTRAN 5 and uses overlays to minimize storage requirements. The program requires 120K of memory in overlayed form. XTRAN2L was developed in 1987.

  11. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  12. Study on the interaction between albendazole and eosin Y by fluorescence, resonance Rayleigh scattering and frequency doubling scattering spectra and their analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fengling; Huang, Wei; Yang, Jidong; Li, Qin

    In pH 3.25-3.35 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, albendazole (ABZ) could react with eosin Y (EY) to form a 1:1 ion-association complex, which not only results in the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and frequency doubling scattering (FDS). Furthermore, a new RRS spectrum will appear, and the maximum RRS wavelength was located at about 356 nm. The detection limit for ABZ were 21.51 ng mL-1 for the fluorophotometry, 6.93 ng mL-1 for the RRS method and 12.89 ng mL-1 for the FDS method. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. The experimental conditions were optimized and effects of coexisting substances were evaluated. Meanwhile, the influences of coexisting substances were tested. The methods have been successfully applied to the determination of ABZ in capsules and human urine samples. The composition and structure of the ion-association complex and the reaction mechanism were discussed.

  13. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  14. The Relationship between Lexical Frequency Profiling Measures and Rater Judgements of Spoken and Written General English Language Proficiency on the CELPIP-General Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Scott Roy

    2015-01-01

    Independent confirmation that vocabulary in use unfolds across levels of performance as expected can contribute to a more complete understanding of validity in standardized English language tests. This study examined the relationship between Lexical Frequency Profiling (LFP) measures and rater judgements of test-takers' overall levels of…

  15. Perpendicular blade vortex interaction and its implications for helicopter noise prediction: Wave-number frequency spectra in a trailing vortex for BWI noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devenport, William J.; Glegg, Stewart A. L.

    1993-01-01

    spectrum especially for the spectral peak at low frequencies, which previously was poorly predicted.

  16. Response to 'Comment on 'Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks' '[Phys. Plasmas 19, 064701 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.

    2012-06-15

    The equations for the continuous spectra derived in our paper [V. P. Lakhin and V. I. Ilgisonis, Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)] can be reduced to the matrix form used by Goedbloed et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 28 (2004)]. It is shown that the assumptions made in our paper provide the elliptic flow regime and guarantee the existence of plasma equilibrium with nested magnetic surfaces of circular cross-section. The new results on magnetohydrodynamic instabilities of such tokamak equilibria obtained in our paper but absent in the paper by Goedbloed et al. are emphasized.

  17. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. III - General spectral properties of X1-X5 type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Kreplin, R. W.; Cohen, L.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of six class X1-X5 solar flares are discussed. The spectra were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07 and 3.14-3.24 A. Electron temperatures derived from dielectronic satellite line to resonance line ratios for Fe XXV and Ca XIX are found to remain fairly constant around 22,000,000 and 16,000,000 K respectively during the rise phase of the flares, then decrease by approximately 6,000,000 K during the decay phase. Nonthermal motions derived from line widths for the April 27, 1979 event are found to be greatest during the rise phase (approximately 130 km/sec) and decrease to about 60 km/sec during decay. Volume emission measures for Fe XXV, Ca XIX and Ca XX are derived from photon fluxes as a function of temperature, and examination of the intensity behavior of the Fe K alpha emission as a function of time indicates that it is a result of fluorescence. Differences between the present and previous observations of temperature variation are discussed, and it is concluded that the flare plasmas are close to ionization equilibrium for the flares investigated.

  18. Temperature effect on optical spectra of monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Soklaski, Ryan; Liang, Yufeng; Yang, Li

    2014-05-12

    Recently, measured optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra reveal substantial frequency shifts of both exciton and trion peaks as monolayer molybdenum disulfide, MoS{sub 2}, is cooled from 363 K to 4 K. First-principles simulations using the GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation approach satisfactorily reproduce these frequency shifts by incorporating the thermal expansion effect. Studying these temperature effects in monolayer MoS{sub 2} is crucial for rectifying the results of available experiments with the previous predictions of zero-temperature-limit simulations. Moreover, our estimated thermal expansion coefficient of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is less than that of bulk counterpart by tracking the frequency shifts of the exciton peaks in optical spectra. This may serve as a convenient way to estimate thermal expansion coefficients of general two-dimensional chalcogenides.

  19. [Quality of life and perceived general health state related to seizure type and frequency, electroencephalographic findings, cognitive impairment, therapeutic response and secondary effects in persons with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Rossinol, Antoni; Molina, Irene; Rossinol, Tomeu; Garcia-Mas, Alexandre

    2013-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. The perceived quality of life (QoL) in persons with epilepsy has demonstrated to be a relevant factor for the continuity of treatment and for the patients' own general health perception. Currently, the positive concept of QoL is used to assess the psychosocial factors of the epilepsy, replacing the concept of stigma. AIM. To analyze the relationship between QoL and general health perception, with several relevant clinical parameters in a sample of persons with epilepsy, in order to draw conclusions that help to suggest a more global approach to the disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS. We applied the Spanish versions of the QOLIE-10, the GHQ-12, and MMSE, and registered the clinical parameters (diagnostic, years of illness, electroencephalographic patterns, seizure type and frequency, response to medication, and side effects) in a sample of 29 persons with epilepsy. RESULTS. QoL and perceived general health are two unrelated factors respect to the clinical features. QoL is closely related to the frequency and type of crisis, whilst the years of illness and the level of neurocognitive impairment are not related with QoL. CONCLUSIONS. From the clinical point of view, it must be taken into account the relationship between the persons with epilepsy perceived QoL with factors such as the seizure frequency, side effects of the medication, and the general health perception, in order to obtain the best response and treatment adherence.

  20. Stimulated echoes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for solids with simple line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Burkhard; Diezemann, Gregor; Böhmer, Roland

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on ion conductors often yield rather unstructured spectra, which are hard to interpret if the relation between the actual translational motion of the mobile species and the changes of the NMR frequencies is not known. In order to facilitate a general analysis of experiments on solids with such spectra, different models for the stochastic evolution of the NMR frequencies are considered. The treated models involve random frequency jumps, diffusive evolutions, or approximately fixed frequency jumps. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra as well as stimulated-echo functions for the study of slow and ultraslow translational dynamics are calculated for Gaussian equilibrium line shapes. The results are compared with corresponding ones from rotational models and with experimental data.

  1. Spectra generated by a non-central generalized Kratzer potential and explicit expressions for expectation values of rs in N-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, Aysen

    2015-09-01

    Analytical solutions of the N-dimensional non-relativistic wave equation with the non-central generalized Kratzer potential with arbitrary angular momentum have been investigated within the framework of the asymptotic iteration method. In hyperspherical coordinates, the normalized wave functions for rovibrational states are obtained in terms of generalized Laguerre and Gegenbauer polynomials. We have also derived the recurrence formulas and the radial expectation values of the reduced internuclear distances in N-dimensions. Rovibrational expectation values < {nl}| {(\\frac{r}{{r}e})}s| {nl}> . are given for -3≤slant s≤slant 3.

  2. A general evaluation of the frequency distribution of clay and associated minerals in the alluvial soils of ceylon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herath, J.W.; Grimshaw, R.W.

    1971-01-01

    Clay mineral analyses were made of several alluvial clay materials from Ceylon. These studies show that the soil materials can be divided into 3 clay mineral provinces on the basis of the frequency distribution of clay and associated minerals. The provinces closely follow the climatic divisions. The characteristic feature of this classification is the progressive development of gibbsite from Dry to Wet Zone areas. Gibbsite has been used as a reliable indicator mineral. ?? 1971.

  3. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  4. Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Patients Differ Strongly in Frequencies and Spectra between Patients with Low CD4+ Cell Counts Examined Postmortem and Compensated Patients Examined Antemortem Irrespective of the HAART Era

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Marta K.; Benková, Kamila; Selinger, Pavel; Dogoši, Marek; Kinkorová Luňáčková, Iva; Koutníková, Hana; Laštíková, Jarmila; Roubíčková, Alena; Špůrková, Zuzana; Laclová, Lucie; Eis, Václav; Šach, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Objective AIDS-related mortality has changed dramatically with the onset of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has even allowed compensated HIV-infected patients to withdraw from secondary therapy directed against opportunistic pathogens. However, in recently autopsied HIV-infected patients, we observed that associations with a broad spectrum of pathogens remain, although detailed analyses are lacking. Therefore, we focused on the possible frequency and spectrum shifts in pathogens associated with autopsied HIV-infected patients. Design We hypothesized that the pathogens frequency and spectrum changes found in HIV-infected patients examined postmortem did not recapitulate the changes found previously in HIV-infected patients examined antemortem in both the pre- and post-HAART eras. Because this is the first comprehensive study originating from Central and Eastern Europe, we also compared our data with those obtained in the West and Southwest Europe, USA and Latin America. Methods We performed autopsies on 124 HIV-infected patients who died from AIDS or other co-morbidities in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2014. The pathological findings were retrieved from the full postmortem examinations and autopsy records. Results We collected a total of 502 host-pathogen records covering 82 pathogen species, a spectrum that did not change according to patients’ therapy or since the onset of the epidemics, which can probably be explained by the fact that even recently deceased patients were usually decompensated (in 95% of the cases, the last available CD4+ cell count was falling below 200 cells*μl-1) regardless of the treatment they received. The newly identified pathogen taxa in HIV-infected patients included Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Aerococcus viridans and Escherichia hermannii. We observed a very limited overlap in both the spectra and frequencies of the pathogen species found postmortem in HIV-infected patients in Europe, the USA and Latin

  5. High-latitude irregularity spectra deduced from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wernik, A.W.; Gola, M.; Liu, C.H.; Franke, S.J. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-10-01

    High-latitude scintillation data show that the strength and spectral index of intensity scintillation are dependent on the propagation geometry. It is shown here that anisotropic irregularity spectra, with different indices along and across the magnetic field, lead to geometrical effects similar to those observed. In general, the spectrum along the magnetic field is steeper than that across the field, and the difference is more pronounced for nighttime conditions. Spectral anisotropy can be interpreted as a size-dependent irregularity anisotropy. It is found that large-scale irregularities in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere are almost isotropic, while small-scale irregularities are anisotropic and considerably more so at night than during the day. It is shown that anisotropic irregularity spectra could account for the observed scintillation and in situ temporal spectra with frequency-dependent slope. 26 refs.

  6. Self-consistent phonons revisited. II. A general and efficient method for computing free energies and vibrational spectra of molecules and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sandra E.; Georgescu, Ionuţ; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    2013-01-01

    The self-consistent phonons (SCP) method provides a consistent way to include anharmonic effects when treating a many-body quantum system at thermal equilibrium. The system is then described by an effective temperature-dependent harmonic Hamiltonian, which can be used to estimate the system's properties, such as its free energy or its vibrational spectrum. The numerical bottleneck of the method is the evaluation of Gaussian averages of the potential energy and its derivatives. Several algorithmic ideas/tricks are introduced to reduce the cost of such integration by orders of magnitude, e.g., relative to that of the previous implementation of the SCP approach by Calvo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 074303 (2010), 10.1063/1.3465554]. One such algorithmic improvement is the replacement of standard Monte Carlo integration by quasi-Monte Carlo integration utilizing low-discrepancy sequences. The performance of the method is demonstrated on the calculation of vibrational frequencies of pyrene. It is then applied to compute the free energies of five isomers of water hexamer using the WHBB potential of Bowman and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 094509 (2011), 10.1063/1.3554905]. The present results predict the hexamer prism being thermodynamically most stable, with the free energy of the hexamer cage being about 0.2 kcal mol-1 higher at all temperatures below T = 200 K.

  7. Space-time spectral structure of a GLAS general circulation model and a comparison with observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Shukla, J.

    1981-01-01

    The wavenumber-frequency spectra of geopotential height computed from a winter simulation of a general circulation model are compared with the observed winter spectra averaged over 15 winters. The space and time scales studied include: (1) stationary planetary waves; (2) stationary synoptic-scale waves; (3) low-frequency planetary waves; (4) low frequency synoptic-scale waves; (5) medium-frequency planetary waves; and (6) medium frequency synoptic-scale waves. Variances in these categories are presented and their distributions with latitude and height are discussed.

  8. The frequency of alcohol, illicit and licit drug consumption in the general driving population in South-East Hungary.

    PubMed

    Institóris, László; Tóth, Anita Réka; Molnár, Attila; Arok, Zsófia; Kereszty, Eva; Varga, Tibor

    2013-01-10

    In the framework of the DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol, and Medicines) EU-6 project, a roadside survey was performed in South-East Hungary to determine the incidence of alcohol and the most frequent illicit and licit drug consumption (amphetamines, THC, illicit and medical opiates, cocaine, ketamine, benzodiazepines, zopiclone and zolpidem) in the general driving population. All 3110 drivers stopped between 01 January 2008 and 31 December 2009 were checked for alcohol, and among them 2738 persons (87.7%) participated in the further examinations, on a voluntary basis. Licit and illicit drugs were determined from their oral fluid samples by GC-MS analysis. Illicit drugs were detected in 27 cases (0.99%), licit drugs in 85 cases (3.14%), and alcohol (cut off: 0.1g/l) was found in 4 (0.13%) cases. Illicit drug consumption was the highest among men of the ages 18-34, during the spring, and on the week-end nights. With respect to licit drugs, the highest incidence was found among women over the age of 50, during the summer, and on the week-days. All alcohol positive cases were men over the age of 35. In comparison to international European averages, the alcohol and illicit drug consumption was low, but the licit drug consumption was over the European average.

  9. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  10. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, Cameron J. Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Huang, Xinchuan; Maltseva, Elena; Buma, Wybren Jan; Petrignani, Annemieke; Oomens, Jos; Lee, Timothy J.

    2015-12-14

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesian derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C–H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned.

  11. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Cameron J.; Candian, Alessandra; Huang, Xinchuan; Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesian derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C-H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned.

  12. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Cameron J; Candian, Alessandra; Huang, Xinchuan; Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Lee, Timothy J; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2015-12-14

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesian derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C-H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned. PMID:26671382

  13. Transverse wavevector dependent and frequency dependent dielectric function, magnetic permittivity and generalized conductivity of interaction site fluids: MD calculations for the TIP4P water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelyan, Igor P.

    The dielectric properties of interaction site models of polar fluids may be investigated in a computer experiment using not only the charge fluctuations but also correlations corresponding to a current of moving charges. This current may be associated with a generalized dynamical polarization or separated into electric and magnetic components. The first approach deals with the dielectric permittivity related to a generalized conductivity, whereas the second leads to the functions describing polarization and magnetization fluctuations separately. The latter functions are only the source for calculating the magnetic susceptibility for a system of interaction sites. The transverse wavevector dependent and frequency dependent dielectric functions and magnetic susceptibility are evaluated for the TIP4P water model over a very wide scale of wavelengths and frequencies using molecular dynamics simulations. The transverse part of the dielectric functions may differ drastically from their longitudinal component. A relationship between the two approaches is discussed and the limiting transition to the static dielectric constant in the infinite-wavelength regime is analysed. The propagation of transverse electromagnetic waves in TIP4P water is considered.

  14. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  15. Generalized multidimensional earthquake frequency distributions consistent with Non-Extensive Statistical Physics: An appraisal of the universality in the interdependence of magnitude, interevent time and interevent distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanis, Andreas; Vallianatos, Philippos; Efstathiou, Angeliki

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that earthquake frequency is related to earthquake magnitude via a simple linear relationship of the form logN = a - bM, where N is the number of earthquakes in a specified time interval; this is the famous Gutenberg - Richter (G-R) law. The generally accepted interpretation of the G-R law is that it expresses the statistical behaviour of a fractal active tectonic grain (active faulting). The relationship between the constant b and the fractal dimension of the tectonic grain has been demonstrated in various ways. The story told by the G-R law is, nevertheless, incomplete. It is now accepted that the active tectonic grain comprises a critical complex system, although it hasn't yet been established whether it is stationary (Self-Organized Critical), evolutionary (Self-Organizing Critical), or a time-varying blend of both. At any rate, critical systems are characterized by complexity and strong interactions between near and distant neighbours. This, in turn, implies that the self-organization of earthquake occurrence should be manifested by certain statistical behaviour of its temporal and spatial dependence. A strong line of evidence suggests that G-R law is a limiting case of a more general frequency-magnitude distribution, which is properly expressed in terms of Non-Extensive Statistical Physics (NESP) on the basis of the Tsallis entropy; this is a context natural and particularly suitable for the description of complex systems. A measure of temporal dependence in earthquake occurrence is the time lapsed between consecutive events above a magnitude threshold over a given area (interevent time). A corresponding measure of spatial dependence is the hypocentral distance between consecutive events above a magnitude threshold over a given area (interevent distance). The statistics of earthquake frequency vs. interevent time have been studied by several researchers and have been shown to comply with the predictions of the NESP formalism. There's also

  16. Anharmonic IR Spectra of Biomolecules: Nucleobases and Their Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Carnimeo, Ivan; Fornaro, Teresa

    2014-06-01

    Computational spectroscopy techniques have become in the last years effective means to predict and characterize spectra, such as infrared, for molecular systems of increasing dimensions with account for different environments. We are actively developing a comprehensive and robust computational protocol, set within a perturbative vibrational framework [1], aimed at a quantitative reproduction of the spectra of biomolecules. In order to model the vibrational spectra of weakly bound molecular complexes, dispersion interactions should be taken into proper account. In this work, we present critical assessment of dispersion-corrected DFT approaches for anharmonic vibrational frequency calculations. It is shown that fully anharmonic IR spectra, simulated through full and reduced-dimensionality generalized second-order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2)[1] with the potential energy surfaces computed with the B3LYP-D3 approach, may be used to interpret experimental data of nucleobases and their complexes[2] by the direct comparison of experimental IR spectra with their theoretical anharmonic counterpart, taking into account also overtones and combination bands. [1] V. Barone, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014,16, 1759-1787 [2] T. Fornaro, M. Biczysko, S. Monti, V. Barone, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C3CP54724H

  17. Quantitative measurement of temperature by proton resonance frequency shift at low field: a general method to correct non-linear spatial and temporal phase deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimault, S.; Lucas, T.; Quellec, S.; Mariette, F.

    2004-09-01

    MRI thermometry methods are usually based on the temperature dependence of the proton resonance frequency. Unfortunately, these methods are very sensitive to the phase drift induced by the instability of the scanner which prevents any temperature mapping over long periods of time. A general method based on 3D spatial modelling of the phase drift as a function of time is presented. The MRI temperature measurements were validated on gel samples with uniform and constant temperature and with a linear temperature gradient. In the case of uniform temperature conditions, correction of the phase drift proved to be essential when long periods of acquisition were required, as bias could reach values of up to 200 °C in its absence. The temperature uncertainty measured by MRI was 1.2 °C in average over 290 min. This accuracy is coherent with the requirements for food applications especially when thermocouples are useless.

  18. Regular/irregular is not the whole story: the role of frequency and generalization in the acquisition of German past participle inflection.

    PubMed

    Szagun, Gisela

    2011-09-01

    The acquisition of German participle inflection was investigated using spontaneous speech samples from six children between 1;4 and 3;8 and ten children between 1;4 and 2;10 recorded longitudinally at regular intervals. Child-directed speech was also analyzed. In adult and child speech weak participles were significantly more frequent than strong participles. Children's errors involved all elements of participle marking. All error types, including over-regularization, occurred from the beginning alongside correct forms. Errors decreased significantly over age. Over-regularization in the sense of -t affixation on strong verbs was significantly more frequent than erroneous -en suffixation on weak verbs but not than prefix and suffix omission. On participles with stem vowel change erroneous stem vowel was significantly more frequent than correct stem vowel with suffix error alone. Error patterns are explained in terms of frequencies, and participle inflection being learned as part of general verb inflection. PMID:21134319

  19. Infrared Spectra of Perdeuterated Naphthalene, Phenanthrene, Chrysene, and Pyrene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Sandford, Scott A.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Calculations are carried out using density functional theory (DFT) to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities of perdeuterated naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene. We also report matrix- isolation spectra for these four species. The theoretical and experimental frequencies and relative intensities for the perdeuterated species are in generally good agreement. The effect of perdeuteration is to reduce the sum of the integrated intensities by a factor of about 1.75. This reduction occurs for all vibrational motions, except for the weak low frequency ring deformation modes. There is also a significant redistribution of the relative intensities between the out-of-plane C-D bands relative to those found for the out-of-plane C-H bands. The theoretical isotopic ratios provide an excellent diagnostic of the degree of C-H(C-D) involvement in the vibrational bands, allowing in most cases a clear distinction of the type of motion.

  20. Health effects from low-frequency noise and infrasound in the general population: Is it time to listen? A systematic review of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene; van Poll, Ric; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-07-01

    A systematic review of observational studies was conducted to assess the association between everyday life low-frequency noise (LFN) components, including infrasound and health effects in the general population. Literature databases Pubmed, Embase and PsycInfo and additional bibliographic sources such as reference sections of key publications and journal databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies published from 2000 to 2015. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of them examined subjective annoyance as primary outcome. The adequacy of provided information in the included papers and methodological quality of studies was also addressed. Moreover, studies were screened for meta-analysis eligibility. Some associations were observed between exposure to LFN and annoyance, sleep-related problems, concentration difficulties and headache in the adult population living in the vicinity of a range of LFN sources. However, evidence, especially in relation to chronic medical conditions, was very limited. The estimated pooled prevalence of high subjective annoyance attributed to LFN was about 10%. Epidemiological research on LFN and health effects is scarce and suffers from methodological shortcomings. Low frequency noise in the everyday environment constitutes an issue that requires more research attention, particularly for people living in the vicinity of relevant sources. PMID:26994804

  1. Prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among people working with sound systems and general population in Brazil: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    El Dib, Regina P; Silva, Edina MK; Morais, José F; Trevisani, Virgínia FM

    2008-01-01

    Background Music is ever present in our daily lives, establishing a link between humans and the arts through the senses and pleasure. Sound technicians are the link between musicians and audiences or consumers. Recently, general concern has arisen regarding occurrences of hearing loss induced by noise from excessively amplified sound-producing activities within leisure and professional environments. Sound technicians' activities expose them to the risk of hearing loss, and consequently put at risk their quality of life, the quality of the musical product and consumers' hearing. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among sound technicians in Brazil and compare this with a control group without occupational noise exposure. Methods This was a cross-sectional study comparing 177 participants in two groups: 82 sound technicians and 95 controls (non-sound technicians). A questionnaire on music listening habits and associated complaints was applied, and data were gathered regarding the professionals' numbers of working hours per day and both groups' hearing complaint and presence of tinnitus. The participants' ear canals were visually inspected using an otoscope. Hearing assessments were performed (tonal and speech audiometry) using a portable digital AD 229 E audiometer funded by FAPESP. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the sound technicians and controls regarding age and gender. Thus, the study sample was homogenous and would be unlikely to lead to bias in the results. A statistically significant difference in hearing loss was observed between the groups: 50% among the sound technicians and 10.5% among the controls. The difference could be addressed to high sound levels. Conclusion The sound technicians presented a higher prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure than did the general population, although the possibility of residual

  2. Anomalies in vibrational spectra of hydrides of the VA group elements in the condensed state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, Shavkat S.; Sennikov, Petr G.

    2000-12-01

    The results of a study of vibrational spectra of volatile hydrides of the VA group elements of periods 2 - 4 in the liquid state and in solutions of liquefied noble gases have been generalized and analyzed over wide frequency and temperature ranges. A number of anomalies have been revealed in the spectra of these hydrides that manifest themselves through an unusual behavior of band intensities of basic, composite vibrations and overtones on a transition from the gas phase to the condensed state, and dependences of spectroscopic and dynamic parameters as well as a non- coincidence of the line maxima in isotropic and anisotropic Raman spectra ((delta) v equals vaniso-viso) on the temperature of liquid hydrides. Mechanisms of intermolecular interactions in these liquids are discussed with the use of the as-obtained data on the intensity, frequency and shape of vibrational band contours.

  3. Statistical changes in lakes in urbanizing watersheds and lake return frequencies adjusted for trend and initial stage utilizing generalized extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paynter, Shayne

    Many water resources throughout the world are demonstrating changes in historic water levels. Potential reasons for these changes include climate shifts, anthropogenic alterations or basin urbanization. The focus of this research was threefold: (1) to determine the extent of spatio-temporal changes in regional precipitation patterns, (2) to determine the statistical changes that occur in lakes with urbanizing watersheds, and (3) to develop accurate prediction of trends and lake level return frequencies. To investigate rainfall patterns regionally, appropriate distributions, either gamma or generalized extreme value (GEV), were fitted to variables at a number of rainfall gages utilizing maximum likelihood estimation. The spatial distribution of rainfall variables was found to be quite homogenous within the region in terms of an average annual expectation. Furthermore, the temporal distribution of rainfall variables was found to be stationary with only one gage evidencing a significant trend. In order to study statistical changes of lake water surface levels in urbanizing watersheds, serial changes in time series parameters, autocorrelation and variance were evaluated and a regression model to estimate weekly lake level fluctuations was developed. The following general conclusions about lakes in urbanizing watersheds were reached: (1) The statistical structure of lake level time series is systematically altered and is related to the extent of urbanization, (2) in the absence of other forcing mechanisms, autocorrelation and baseflow appear to decrease, and (3) the presence of wetlands adjacent to lakes can offset the reduction in baseflow. In regards to the third objective, the direction and magnitude of trends in flood and drought stages were estimated and both long-term and short-term flood and drought stage return frequencies were predicted utilizing the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution with time and starting stage covariates. All of the lakes

  4. SEC Vidicon spectra of Geminid meteors, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.; Clifton, K. S.

    1975-01-01

    The SEC Vidicon, a low light level closed circuit television system, was used to obtain 137 spectrographic records of meteors at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, during the Geminid meteor shower in December 1972. Seven of the best Geminid meteor spectra are studied here in detail. The near infrared, out to wavelengths near 9000 A, is recorded for the first time for Geminids. The spectra, in general, exhibit the elements previously found in photographic records of this shower but show a surprising frequency of occurrence of the forbidden green line of O I at 5577 A. This line is normally absent from meteors moving as slowly as the Geminids (36 km/sec) and its presence in these records may be due to the added sensitivity available with the SEC Vidicon. The average green line duration in Geminid meteors with a luminosity near zero absolute visual magnitude is 0.73 sec at a mean height of 95 km, 11 km lower than the green line peak in Perseid meteors of the same luminosity.

  5. Effects of anisotropy on the frequency spectrum of gravity waves observed by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    In the investigation of gravity waves using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar data, model gravity-wave spectra have been used. In these model spectra, one usually assumes azimuthal symmetry. The effect of spectral anisotropy on the observed spectrum is studied here. It is shown that for a general Garrett-Munk-type spectrum, the anisotropy does not affect the frequency spectrum observed by the vertically beamed radar. For the oblique beam, however, the observed frequency spectrum is changed. A general gravity wave spectrum including azimuthal anisotropy is considered.

  6. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  7. Atlantic sea surface height and velocity spectra inferred from satellite altimetry and a hierarchy of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biri, Stavroula; Serra, Nuno; Scharffenberg, Martin G.; Stammer, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    Frequency and wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and surface geostrophic velocity are presented, as they result for the Atlantic Ocean from a 23 year long altimeter data set and from a hierarchy of ocean model simulations with spatial resolutions of 16, 8, and 4 km. SSH frequency spectra follow a spectral decay of roughly f-1 on long periods; toward higher frequencies a spectral decay close to f-2 is found. For geostrophic velocity spectra, a somewhat similar picture emerges, albeit with flatter spectral relations. In terms of geostrophic velocity wavenumber spectra, we find a general relation close to k-3 in the high-resolution model results. Outside low-energy regions all model spectra come close to observed spectra at low frequencies and wavenumbers in terms of shape and amplitude. However, the highest model resolution appears essential for reproducing the observed spectra at high frequencies and wavenumbers. This holds especially for velocity spectra in mid and high latitudes, suggesting that eddy resolving ocean models need to be run at a resolution of 1/24° or better if one were to fully resolve the observed mesoscale eddy field. Causes for remaining discrepancies between observed and simulated results can be manifold. At least partially, they can be rationalized by taking into account an aliasing effect of unresolved temporal variability in the altimetric observations occurring on periods smaller than the 20 days Nyquist period of the altimetric data, thereby leading to an overestimate of variability in the altimetric estimates, roughly on periods below 100 days.

  8. Vibrational spectra of corticosteroid hormones in the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, O. P.; Nazarov, M. M.; Sapozhnikov, D. A.; Man'kova, A. A.; Fedulova, E. V.; Volodin, V. A.; Minaeva, V. A.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.

    2010-11-01

    The terahertz time-domain and Raman spectra of corticosteroid hormones in the region of low-frequency infrared vibrations have been measured. On the ground of quantum chemical calculations of the frequencies and normal modes the assignments of vibrational bands in the THz-spectra are performed.

  9. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  10. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  11. Theoretical prediction of vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zefu; Dunn, Kevin M.; Boggs, James E.

    The complete harmonic force field and the diagonal and first off-diagonal cubic constants of aniline have been calculated ab initio using a 4-21 basis set augmented by addition of d functions to the nitrogen atom. The force constants were then scaled using scale factors optimized previously to give the best fit to the similarly computed vibrational spectra of benzene and its deuterated isotopomers. The vibrational spectra of aniline, aniline-NHD, and aniline-ND2 were then calculated from this scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field and compared with experimentally observed spectra. Several corrections were made to previously proposed empirical spectral assignments. Because of computational difficulties, no definitive statement can be made about the torsion or inversion modes of the amino group. Aside from these and the C-H stretching frequencies for which the detailed assignment is still quite uncertain, the average deviation between the observed frequencies and those obtained entirely from the scaled computed force field is 9·1 cm-1. Dipole moment derivatives and infrared absorption intensities were also calculated, but these are of lower accuracy.

  12. Dynamic radio spectra from two fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Lin, C. S.; Dowell, J.; Schinzel, F. K.; Stovall, K.

    2015-11-01

    We present dynamic spectra from the Long Wavelength Array telescope of two large meteors (fireballs) observed to emit between 37 and 54 MHz. These spectra show the first ever recorded broadband measurements of this newly discovered VHF emission. The spectra show that the emission is smooth and steep, getting very bright at lower frequencies. We suggest that this signal is possibly emission of Langmuir waves and that these waves could be excited by a bump-on-tail instability within the trail. The spectra of one fireball display broadband temporal frequency sweeps. We suggest that these sweeps are evidence of individual expanding clumps of emitting plasma. While some of these proposed clumps may have formed at the very beginning of the fireball event, others must have formed seconds after the initial event.

  13. PIA update: Correlation analyses of mass spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, L. W.; Clark, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    The PIA instrument aboard the Giotto spacecraft (a time of flight spectrometer) has been presented elsewhere. The mass spectra used in this analysis were decoded and mass numbers assigned according to the presence of carbon and silver, using the global values for these elements in their spectral absence. The results presented here were obtained using a frequency of occurrence based on analysis which correlated how often mass numbers appear in the mass spectra and which mass numbers tend to occur together in the same spectra; no amplitude information is utilized. The data are presented as plots of mass vs coincident mass for different subsets of the PIA data set, with both axes having units of atomic mass. Frequency contours are plotted at approximately five percent contour intervals, relative to the maximum AMU occurrence in that plot. The plots presented are symmetrical about the matrix diagonal, i.e., every mass is coincident with itself in a given spectra.

  14. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  15. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  16. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  17. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectra of Halomethyl Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Wren, Scott W.; McCoy, Anne B.; Ervin, Kent M.; Lineberger, W. Carl

    2009-06-01

    Halomethyl anions undergo a significant geometry change upon electron photodetachment, resulting in multiple extended vibrational progressions in the photoelectron spectra. The normal mode analysis that successfully models photoelectron spectra when geometry changes are modest is unable to reproduce the experimental data using physically reasonable parameters. A three-dimensional anharmonic coupled-mode analysis was employed to accurately reproduce the observed vibrational structure. We present the 364 nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of the halomethyl anions CHX_2^- and CDX_2^- (X = Cl, Br, I) and report electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, and geometries.

  18. A reassessment of frequency estimates of PvuII-generated VNTR profiles in a Finnish, an Italian, and a general U.S. Caucasian database: no evidence for ethnic subgroups affecting forensic estimates.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Monson, K L; Giusti, A M

    1994-09-01

    Recently, Krane et al. addressed the effect of estimating various target DNA profile frequencies in Finnish, Italian, and general U.S. Caucasian databases. They observed that, when using an "inappropriate ethnic," or noncognate, database (e.g., a Finnish target profile frequency estimated in an Italian database, and vice versa), estimates were less common than when the target profile frequencies were estimated using their own ethnic, or cognate, database, and these estimates differed by more than one order of magnitude. These differences were attributed to the effects of subgroups. We demonstrate that the differences can be ascribed to statistical artifacts that induce large biases and correlations. Additionally, we show that the differences of estimates of any specific DNA profile frequency based on allelic size frequencies from different databases become smaller when the fixed-bin rather than a +/- 2.5% floating-bin approach is used. PMID:7915881

  19. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  20. Event terms in the response spectra prediction equation and their deviation due to stress drop variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, H.; Nakano, K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the characteristics of strong ground motions separated from acceleration Fourier spectra and acceleration response spectra of 5% damping calculated from weak and moderate ground motions observed by K-NET, KiK-net, and the JMA Shindokei Network in Japan using the generalized spectral inversion method. The separation method used the outcrop motions at YMGH01 as reference where we extracted site responses due to shallow weathered layers. We include events with JMA magnitude equal to or larger than 4.5 observed from 1996 to 2011. We find that our frequency-dependent Q values are comparable to those of previous studies. From the corner frequencies of Fourier source spectra, we calculate Brune's stress parameters and found a clear magnitude dependence, in which smaller events tend to spread over a wider range while maintaining the same maximum value. We confirm that this is exactly the case for several mainshock-aftershock sequences. The average stress parameters for crustal earthquakes are much smaller than those of subduction zone, which can be explained by their depth dependence. We then compared the strong motion characteristics based on the acceleration response spectra and found that the separated characteristics of strong ground motions are different, especially in the lower frequency range less than 1Hz. These differences comes from the difference between Fourier spectra and response spectra found in the observed data; that is, predominant components in high frequency range of Fourier spectra contribute to increase the response in lower frequency range with small Fourier amplitude because strong high frequency component acts as an impulse to a Single-Degree-of-Freedom system. After the separation of the source terms for 5% damping response spectra we can obtain regression coefficients with respect to the magnitude, which lead to a new GMPE as shown in Fig.1 on the left. Although stress drops for inland earthquakes are 1/7 of the subduction

  1. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  2. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  3. Spectra of stable sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Stephen D.

    1992-12-01

    The continuous emission of picosecond pulses of light has been observed to originate from a bubble trapped at the pressure antinode of a resonant sound field in water and in water/glycerin mixtures. The spectra of this light in several solutions has been measured with a scanning monochrometer/photomultiplier detector system. The spectra are broadband and show strong emission in the UV region. A comparison of this measurement to two other independently produced spectra is made. The spectra are also modeled by a blackbody radiation distribution to determine an effective blackbody temperature and a size is deduced as if Sonoluminescence were characterized by blackbody radiation.

  4. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  5. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Nitrogen Substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP/4-31G approach is used to compute the harmonic frequencies of substituted naphthalene, anthracene, and their cations. The substitutions include cyano (CN), aminio (NH2), imino (NH), and replacement of a CH group by a nitrogen atom. All unique sites are considered, namely 1 and 2 for naphthalene and 1, 2, and 9 for an'tracene, except for the imino, where only 2-iminonaphthalene is studied. The IR spectra of these substituted species are compared with those of the unsubstituted molecules. The addition of a CN group does not significantly affect the spectra except to add the CN stretching frequency. Replacing a CH group by N has only a small effect on the IR spectra. The addition of the NH2 group dramatically affects the neutral spectra, giving it much of the character of the cation spectra. However, the neutral 2-irrinonaphthalene spectra looks more like that of naphthalene than like the 2-aminonaphthalene spectra.

  6. Strong scintillations in astrophysics. 4. Cross-correlation between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The cross correlation of the intensity fluctuations between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects on the intensity correlations based on the Markov approximation were calculated. Results may be applied to quite general turbulence spectra for an extended turbulent medium. Calculations of the cross-correlation function and of finite bandwidth effects are explicitly carried out for both Gaussian and Kolmogorov turbulence spectra. The increases of the correlation scale of intensity fluctuations are different for these two spectra and the difference can be used to determine whether the interstellar turbulent medium has a Gaussian or a Kolmogorov spectrum.

  7. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  8. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  9. Fully Integrated Approach to Compute Vibrationally Resolved Optical Spectra: From Small Molecules to Macrosystems.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Bloino, Julien; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2009-03-10

    A general and effective time-independent approach to compute vibrationally resolved electronic spectra from first principles has been integrated into the Gaussian computational chemistry package. This computational tool offers a simple and easy-to-use way to compute theoretical spectra starting from geometry optimization and frequency calculations for each electronic state. It is shown that in such a way it is straightforward to combine calculation of Franck-Condon integrals with any electronic computational model. The given examples illustrate the calculation of absorption and emission spectra, all in the UV-vis region, of various systems from small molecules to large ones, in gas as well as in condensed phases. The computational models applied range from fully quantum mechanical descriptions to discrete/continuum quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical/polarizable continuum models. PMID:26610221

  10. Acceleration spectra for subduction zone earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Choy, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    We estimate the source spectra of shallow earthquakes from digital recordings of teleseismic P wave groups, that is, P+pP+sP, by making frequency dependent corrections for the attenuation and for the interference of the free surface. The correction for the interference of the free surface assumes that the earthquake radiates energy from a range of depths. We apply this spectral analysis to a set of 12 subduction zone earthquakes which range in size from Ms = 6.2 to 8.1, obtaining corrected P wave acceleration spectra on the frequency band from 0.01 to 2.0 Hz. Seismic moment estimates from surface waves and normal modes are used to extend these P wave spectra to the frequency band from 0.001 to 0.01 Hz. The acceleration spectra of large subduction zone earthquakes, that is, earthquakes whose seismic moments are greater than 1027 dyn cm, exhibit intermediate slopes where u(w)???w5/4 for frequencies from 0.005 to 0.05 Hz. For these earthquakes, spectral shape appears to be a discontinuous function of seismic moment. Using reasonable assumptions for the phase characteristics, we transform the spectral shape observed for large earthquakes into the time domain to fit Ekstrom's (1987) moment rate functions for the Ms=8.1 Michoacan earthquake of September 19, 1985, and the Ms=7.6 Michoacan aftershock of September 21, 1985. -from Authors

  11. Stretched-exponential Doppler spectra in underwater acoustic communication channels.

    PubMed

    van Walree, P A; Jenserud, T; Otnes, R

    2010-11-01

    The theory of underwater sound interacting with the sea surface predicts a Gaussian-spread frequency spectrum in the case of a large Rayleigh parameter. However, recent channel soundings reveal more sharply peaked spectra with heavier tails. The measured Doppler spread increases with the frequency and differs between multipath arrivals. The overall Doppler spectrum of a broadband waveform is the sum of the spectra of all constituent paths and frequencies, and is phenomenologically described by a stretched or compressed exponential. The stretched exponential also fits well to the broadband spectrum of a single propagation path, and narrowband spectra summed over all paths.

  12. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  13. Effects of axion-photon mixing on gamma-ray spectra from magnetized astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Sigl, Guenter

    2007-12-15

    Astrophysical {gamma}-ray sources come in a variety of sizes and magnetizations. We deduce general conditions under which {gamma}-ray spectra from such sources would be significantly affected by axion-photon mixing. We show that, depending on strength and coherence of the magnetic field, axion couplings down to {approx}(10{sup 13}GeV){sup -1} can give rise to significant axion-photon conversions in the environment of accreting massive black holes. Resonances can occur between the axion mass term and the plasma frequency term as well as between the plasma frequency term and the vacuum Cotton-Mouton shift. Both resonances and nonresonant transitions could induce detectable features or even strong suppressions in finite energy intervals of {gamma}-ray spectra from active galactic nuclei. Such effects can occur at keV to TeV energies for couplings that are currently allowed by all experimental constraints.

  14. Prediction of electroencephalographic spectra from neurophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Wright, J. J.; Bahramali, H.; Gordon, E.; Rowe, D. L.

    2001-02-01

    A recent neurophysical model of propagation of electrical waves in the cortex is extended to include a physiologically motivated subcortical feedback loop via the thalamus. The electroencephalographic spectrum when the system is driven by white noise is then calculated analytically in terms of physiological parameters, including the effects of filtering of signals by the cerebrospinal fluid, skull, and scalp. The spectral power at low frequencies is found to vary as f-1 when awake and f-3 when asleep, with a breakpoint to a steeper power-law tail at frequencies above about 20 Hz in both cases; the f-1 range concurs with recent magnetoencephalographic observations of such a regime. Parameter sensitivities are explored, enabling a model with fewer free parameters to be proposed, and showing that spectra predicted for physiologically reasonable parameter values strongly resemble those observed in the laboratory. Alpha and beta peaks seen near 10 Hz and twice that frequency, respectively, in the relaxed wakeful state are generated via subcortical feedback in this model, thereby leading to predictions of their frequencies in terms of physiological parameters, and of correlations in their occurrence. Subcortical feedback is also predicted to be responsible for production of anticorrelated peaks in deep sleep states that correspond to the occurrence of theta rhythm at around half the alpha frequency and sleep spindles at 3/2 times the alpha frequency. An additional positively correlated waking peak near three times the alpha frequency is also predicted and tentatively observed, as are two new types of sleep spindle near 5/2 and 7/2 times the alpha frequency, and anticorrelated with alpha. These results provide a theoretical basis for the conventional division of EEG spectra into frequency bands, but imply that the exact bounds of these bands depend on the individual. Three types of potential instability are found: one at zero frequency, another in the theta band at around

  15. Inversion of swell frequency from a 1-year HF radar dataset collected in Brittany (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Forget, Philippe; Guan, Changlong

    2014-10-01

    This article presents long period ocean wave (swell) frequencies inverted from a 13-month dataset of high-frequency (HF) phased array radars and an assessment of these estimates by comparison with WAVEWATCH III model data. The method of swell frequency inversion from high-frequency radar sea echo Doppler spectra is described. Radar data were collected from a two-site HF Wellen Radar (WERA) radar system on the west coast of Brittany (France) operating at 12 MHz. A standard beam-forming processing technique has been used to obtain Doppler spectra of processed radar cells. Swell frequencies are obtained from the frequencies of particular spectral peaks of the second-order continuum in hourly averaged Doppler spectra. The data coverage of effective Doppler spectra considered for swell frequency estimates shows the influence of islands and shallow water effects. Swell estimates from both radar stations are in good agreement. The comparison of radar-derived results to WAVEWATCH III (WW3) estimates shows that radar measurements agree quite well with model results. The bias and standard deviation between two estimates are very small for swells with frequency less than 0.09 Hz (period >11 s), whereas radar estimates are generally lower than model estimates for shorter swells, along with higher standard deviation. Statistical analysis suggests that radar measurement uncertainty explains most of the difference between radar and model estimates. For each swell event, time series of frequency exhibits a quasi-linear frequency increase which is associated with the dispersive property of wave phase velocity. The use of swell frequency estimates from both radars on common radar cells only slightly increases the accuracy of swell frequency measurement.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  17. Vibrational spectra of zinc, cadmium and mercury dimethyl species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, A. M.; McKean, D. C.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Fawcett, V.

    1994-04-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra have been obtained in the gas phase for the species M( 12CH 3) 2, M( 13CH 3) 2, M( 12CD 3) 2 and M( 13CD 3) 2, where M  Zn, Cd and Hg. All but one of the skeletal bending modes are observed directly in the infrared. 13C frequency shifts confirm the assignment of a number of combination and overtone bands, including the 1300 cm -1 bands of Zn(CH 3) 2 and Cd(CH 3) 2 which arise from ν 10 + ν 14. Infrared spectra in the 1400-1500 cm -1 region are difficult to interpret but the evidence points to both the δ asCH 3 modes lying near 1445 cm -1. A number of Fermi resonances affecting δ sCD 3 levels are identified in the d6 species. Some features of the ν asCH 3 bands can be explained in terms of existing free internal rotor theory. Observed values of 13C frequency shifts are generally in good agreement with those from previous scaled ab initio calculations. There is an urgent need for high resolution studies of jet-cooled samples.

  18. On the analysis of photo-electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, C.-Z.; Dinh, P.M.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2015-09-15

    We analyze Photo-Electron Spectra (PES) for a variety of excitation mechanisms from a simple mono-frequency laser pulse to involved combination of pulses as used, e.g., in attosecond experiments. In the case of simple pulses, the peaks in PES reflect the occupied single-particle levels in combination with the given laser frequency. This usual, simple rule may badly fail in the case of excitation pulses with mixed frequencies and if resonant modes of the system are significantly excited. We thus develop an extension of the usual rule to cover all possible excitation scenarios, including mixed frequencies in the attosecond regime. We find that the spectral distributions of dipole, monopole and quadrupole power for the given excitation taken together and properly shifted by the single-particle energies provide a pertinent picture of the PES in all situations. This leads to the derivation of a generalized relation allowing to understand photo-electron yields even in complex experimental setups.

  19. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin-orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin-spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born-Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  20. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  1. Multiple frequency atmospheric radar techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stitt, Gary Richard

    The use of multiple frequency coding to improve the vertical resolution of pulsed-Doppler very high frequency atmospheric radars, especially with regards to the two-frequency techniques known as frequency domain interferometry (FDI), is presented. This technique consists of transmitting alternate pulses on two distinct carrier frequencies. The two resulting time series are used to evaluate the normalized cross-correlation function, whose magnitude and phase are related to the thickness and position of a scattering layer. These same time series are also used to evaluate cross-spectra, which yield magnitude and phase values for each Doppler frequency component of the return signal.

  2. Modeling the Infrared Emission Spectra of Specific PAH Molecules in Interstellar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen

    2007-05-01

    The 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 micron emission features ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of Galactic and extragalactic objects, are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Although the PAH hypothesis is quite successful in explaining the general pattern of the observed emission spectra, so far there is no actual precise identification of a single specific PAH molecule in interstellar space. Therefore, when modeling the observed PAH emission spectra, astronomers usually take an empirical approach by constructing 'astro-PAHs' which do not represent any specific material, but approximate the actual absorption properties of the PAH mixture in astrophysical regions. We propose a Spitzer Theory Program to study the photoexcitation of specific PAH molecules and their ions in interstellar space, taking a statistical-mechanical (instead of thermal) approach. For most of the specific PAH molecules selected for this research (with a small number of vibrational degrees of freedom), thermal approximation is not valid. Using available laboratory and quantum-chemical data (e.g. vibrational frequencies, UV/visible/IR absorption cross sections), we will calculate the emission spectra of 21 representative specific PAH molecules and their ions, ranging from naphthalene to circumcoronene, illuminated by interstellar radiation fields of a wide range of intensities. This program will create a web-based 'library' of the emission spectra of 21 specific PAH molecules and their ions as a function of starlight intensities. This 'library' will be made publicly available by October 2008 on the internet at http://www.missouri.edu/~lia/. By comparing observed PAH spectra with model spectra produced by co-adding the emission spectra of different PAH molecules available in this 'library' (with different weights for different species), one will be able to estimate the total PAH mass and relative abundances of each PAH species, using real PAH properties.

  3. Theoretical Raman spectra of carbonate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobocioiu, E.; Caracas, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Raman spectra of the majority of MeCO3 minerals, with Me=alkali elements, calc-alkali elements or combinations thereof, are determined using density functional perturbation theory in the ABINIT implementation. We consider more than a dozen different minerals, most of them with rhombohedral, i.e. calcite-like, or orthorhombic, i.e. aragonite-like, structures [1]. We start with the experimental structure and perform two distinct structural relaxations: one at experimental density, i.e. experimental volume, and one at theoretical 0GPa pressure. During these structural relaxations we minimize the energy, the residual forces on the atoms and the non-hydrostatic stresses on the unit cell. Consequently in the end we obtain to distinct sets of data. We find that the relative intensities of the major Raman peaks are in good agreement with respect to experiment. The positions of the peaks are consistently shifted relative to the experiment. As a general rule, the best agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for the calcualtions performed at experimental density. We find that all spectra are dominated, as expected, by the stretching modes of the planar CO3 groups. Their theoretical frequency varies from as low as 1066 in paralstonite [BaCa(CO3)2] up to high as 1113 cm-1 in eitelite [Na2Mg(CO3)2]. The low-frequency modes are dominated by the heavy cations. Their degeneracy is directly determined by the symmetry of the structure. We performed a detailed comparative study to be able to identify identification trends. Finally we discuss C and O isotope fractionation patterns. We compute log(β) functions based on the vibrational information contained in the Brillouin zone center. Though not complete, this information is already enough to give us a reasonable estimation of the partitioning. Reference: Caracas, R., Bobocioiu, E. (2011) The WURM project - a freely available web-based repository of computed physical data for minerals, American Mineralogist, vol. 96

  4. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  5. Microwave spectra of some chlorine and fluorine compounds. [spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequencies, peak absorption intensities, and integrated intensities are shown for 21 organic compounds which contain chlorine, fluorine, or both.

  6. Graviton spectra in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, Massimo; Litterio, Marco; Occhionero, Franco

    1996-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an ω³ increase and initiates an ω⁻⁷ decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre-Big Bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post-Big Bang). We evaluate both analytically and numerically the frequency and the intensity of the peak and we show that they may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak is at variance with ordinarily monotonic (either increasing or decreasing) graviton spectra of canonical cosmologies; its detection would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology.

  7. Graviton Spectra in String Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, M.; Occhionero, F.; Litterio, M.

    1997-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an {omega}{sup 3} increase and initiates an {omega}{sup {minus}7} decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre{endash}big bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post{endash}big bang). The frequency and the intensity of the peak may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak, at variance with ordinarily monotonic graviton spectra, would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  9. Prediction of earthquake response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical equations for predicting earthquake response spectra in terms of magnitude, distance, and site conditions, using a two-stage regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity. We analyzed horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5 percent damping for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in Western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. We developed predictive equations for 12 different periods between 0.1 and 4.0 s, both for the larger of two horizontal components and for the random horizontal component. The resulting spectra show amplification at soil sites compared to rock sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.3 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 2.0 s. For periods less than 0.3 s there is slight deamplification at the soil sites. These results are generally consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predicted spectra is the change of shape with magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Irifunac and Anderson). This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficient for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 7 km of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake and within about 15 km of a magnitude 7.5 event. The amount by

  10. Resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots coupled to slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Choudhury, Kaushik; Mann, Nishan; Manson, Ross; Hughes, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Using a polaron master equation approach, we investigate the resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots (QDs) coupled to an acoustic phonon bath and photonic crystal waveguides with a rich local density of photon states (LDOS). Resonance fluorescence spectra from QDs in semiconductor crystals are known to show strong signatures of electron-phonon interactions, but when coupled to a structured photonic reservoir, the QD emission properties are also determined by the frequency dependence of the LDOS of the photon reservoir. Here, we investigate the simultaneous role of coupled photon and phonon baths on the characteristic Mollow triplet spectra from a strongly driven QD. As an example structured photonic reservoir, we first study a photonic crystal coupled cavity waveguide, and find that photons and phonons have counterinteracting effects near the upper mode edge of the coupled-cavity waveguide, thus establishing the importance of their separate roles in determining the emission spectra. The general theory is developed for arbitrary photonic reservoirs and is further applied to determine the resonance fluorescence spectra from a realistic, disordered W1 photonic crystal waveguide showing important photon-phonon interaction effects that are directly relevant to emerging experiments and theoretical proposals.

  11. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchet, F.; Lis, D.; Caudano, Y.; Mani, A. A.; Peremans, A.; Champagne, B.; Guthmuller, J.

    2012-03-01

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  12. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  13. Multifrequency spectra of BL Lac objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Kondo, Y.; Mufson, S. L.; Wandel, A.

    1988-01-01

    A program to obtain simultaneous multifrequency spectra of BL Lacertae objects that are known X-ray sources is discussed. The IUE spectra are generally featureless and well-fitted by power law models. For the faintest exposures, Gaussian extraction of the spectrum can greatly impove the signal-to-noise. Most program objects vary in the ultraviolet, although the time scales are not known because of limited observing time. The broadband spectra of BL Lacs exhibit a range of characteristics but the curvature is always downward and the shape is generally smooth. This can be interpreted as synchrotron emission from a relativistic jet; different jet models are possible, and each allows a range of values for the bulk velocity, magnetic field strength, and electron density. Synchrotron models are not required, however an accretion disk model also gives a good fit to the ultraviolet-through-X-ray continuum.

  14. GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRA AND SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS FROM SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chhotray, Atul; Lazzati, Davide

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues in gamma-ray burst (GRB) physics is the origin of the prompt gamma-ray spectrum. Its general non-thermal character and the softness in the X-ray band remain unexplained. We tackle these issues by performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation–matter interactions in a scattering dominated photon–lepton plasma. The plasma—initially in equilibrium—is driven to non-equilibrium conditions by a sudden energy injection in the lepton population, mimicking the effect of a shock wave or the dissipation of magnetic energy. Equilibrium restoration occurs due to an energy exchange between the photons and leptons. While the initial and final equilibrium spectra are thermal, the transitional photon spectra are characterized by non-thermal features such as power-law tails, high energy bumps, and multiple components. Such non-thermal features are observed at infinity if the dissipation occurs at small to moderate optical depths, and the spectrum is released before thermalization is complete. We model the synthetic spectra with a Band function and show that the resulting spectral parameters are similar to observations for a frequency range of 2–3 orders of magnitude around the peak. In addition, our model predicts correlations between the low-frequency photon index and the peak frequency as well as between the low- and high-frequency indices. We explore baryon and pair-dominated fireballs and reach the conclusion that baryonic fireballs are a better model for explaining the observed features of GRB spectra.

  15. Radial evolution of power spectra of interplanetary Alfvenic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavassano, B.; Dobrowolny, M.; Mariani, F.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The radial evolution of the power spectra of the MHD turbulence within the trailing edge of high speed streams in the solar wind was investigated with the magnetic field data of Helios 1 and 2 for heliocentric distance between 0.3 and 0.9 AU. In the analyzed frequency range (.00028 Hz to .0083 Hz) the computed spectra have, near the Earth, values of the spectral index close to that predicted for an incompressible hydromagnetic turbulence in a stationary state. Approaching the Sun the spectral slope remains unchanged for frequencies f or approximately .00 Hz, whereas at lower frequencies, a clear evolution toward a less steep fall off with frequency is found. The radial gradient of the power in Alfvenic fluctuations depends on frequency and it increases upon increasing frequency. For frequencies f or approximately .00 Hz, however, the radial gradient remains approximately the same. Possible theoretical implications of the observational features are discussed.

  16. Beat frequency interference pattern characteristics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency spectra and corresponding beat frequencies created by the relative motions between multiple Solar Power Satellites due to solar wind, lunar gravity, etc. were analyzed. The results were derived mathematically and verified through computer simulation. Frequency spectra plots were computer generated. Detailed computations were made for the seven following locations in the continental US: Houston, Tx.; Seattle, Wa.; Miami, Fl.; Chicago, Il.; New York, NY; Los Angeles, Ca.; and Barberton, Oh.

  17. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  18. Newmark design spectra considering earthquake magnitudes and site categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Xie, Wei-Chau; Pandey, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Newmark design spectra have been implemented in many building codes, especially in building codes for critical structures. Previous studies show that Newmark design spectra exhibit lower amplitudes at high frequencies and larger amplitudes at low frequencies in comparison with spectra developed by statistical methods. To resolve this problem, this study considers three suites of ground motions recorded at three types of sites. Using these ground motions, influences of the shear-wave velocity, earthquake magnitudes, source-to-site distances on the ratios of ground motion parameters are studied, and spectrum amplification factors are statistically calculated. Spectral bounds for combinations of three site categories and two cases of earthquake magnitudes are estimated. Site design spectrum coefficients for the three site categories considering earthquake magnitudes are established. The problems of Newmark design spectra could be resolved by using the site design spectrum coefficients to modify the spectral values of Newmark design spectra in the acceleration sensitive, velocity sensitive, and displacement sensitive regions.

  19. Raman spectra of shocked minerals. I. Olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Heymann, D.; Celucci, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    The Raman spectra of olivine contained in a chip of the Twin Sisters Peak (Washington) dunite shocked to 22.2 GPa is shown to be identical to that of unshocked olivine in the same rock. The Raman spectra of powder of the rock shocked to 20.1 GPa and of chips shocked to 59.5 GPa and 60.7 GPa display strong and broad low-frequency features with crests at 475/cm, 556/cm, and 572/cm, and broad high-frequency features near 1100/cm. It is suggested that these features are due to the formation of olivine glass with a considerable degree of three-dimensional Si-O-Si linkage having scattered domains of greatly variable grain size, internal structure, and chemical composition. 54 references.

  20. Raman spectra of shocked minerals. I - Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Celucci, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Raman spectra of olivine contained in a chip of the Twin Sisters Peak (Washington) dunite shocked to 22.2 GPa is shown to be identical to that of unshocked olivine in the same rock. The Raman spectra of powder of the rock shocked to 20.1 GPa and of chips shocked to 59.5 GPa and 60.7 GPa display strong and broad low-frequency features with crests at 475/cm, 556/cm, and 572/cm, and broad high-frequency features near 1100/cm. It is suggested that these features are due to the formation of olivine glass with a considerable degree of three-dimensional Si-O-Si linkage having scattered domains of greatly variable grain size, internal structure, and chemical composition.

  1. Infrared spectra of FHF - in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunnilall, C. J.; Sherman, W. F.

    1982-03-01

    The bifluoride ion, FHF -, has been substitutionally isolated within single crystal samples of several different alkali halides. Infrared spectra of these crystals have been studied for sample temperatures down to 8K when half-bandwidths of less than 1 cm -1 have been observed. (Note that at room temperature ν 3 is observed to have a half-bandwidth of about 40 cm -1). The frequency shifts and half-bandwidth changes caused by cooling are considered together with the frequency shifts caused by pressures up to 10 k bar. The low temperature spectra clearly indicate that FHF - is a linear symmetrical ion when substitutionally isolated within alkali halides of either the NaCl or CsCl structure.

  2. Anharmonic Vibrational Spectra of Hydrogen Bonded Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2006-03-01

    We report anharmonic vibrational spectra for a variety of hydrogen bonded clusters such as (H2O)n and (HF)n, n=1-5. We investigate the convergence of the hydrogen bonded frequencies with basis set and level of electron correlation and compare with the available experimental data. For this purpose we employ the correlation-consistent basis sets up to quintuple zeta (5z) quality and compute the spectra at the second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) and Coupled Cluster plus Single and Double with perturbative estimate of Triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The correlation between the calculated elongations in the hydrogen bonding stretches and the corresponding computed/observed vibrational frequencies suggest an extension of Badger's rule for these hydrogen bonded systems.

  3. Predicting Infrared Spectra of Nerve Agents Using Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.-P.; Wang, H.-T.; Zheng, W.-P.; Sun, C.; Bai, Y.; Guo, X.-D.; Sun, H.

    2016-09-01

    Vibration frequencies of four nerve agents and two simulators are calculated using B3LYP coupled with ten basis sets. To evaluate the accuracy of calculated spectra, root mean square error (RMSE) and weighted cross-correlation average (WCCA) are considered. The evaluation shows that B3LYP/6-311+g(d,p) performs best in predicting infrared spectra, and polarization functions are found to be more important than diffusion functions in spectra simulation. Moreover, B3LYP calculation underestimates frequencies related to the P atom. The WCCA metric derives 1.008 as a unique scaling factor for calculated frequencies. The results indicate that the WCCA metric can identify six agents based on calculated spectra.

  4. Jet Signatures in the Spectra of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O' Riordan, Michael; Pe'er, Asaf; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2016-03-01

    Jets are observed as radio emission in active galactic nuclei and during the low/hard state in X-ray binaries (XRBs), but their contribution at higher frequencies has been uncertain. We study the dynamics of jets in XRBs using the general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code HARM. We calculate the high-energy spectra and variability properties using a general-relativistic radiative transport code based on grmonty. We find the following signatures of jet emission: (i) a significant γ-ray peak above ˜1022 Hz, (ii) a break in the optical/UV spectrum, with a change from ν {L}ν ˜ {ν }0 to ν {L}ν ˜ ν , followed by another break at higher frequencies where the spectrum roughly returns to ν {L}ν ˜ {ν }0, and (iii) a pronounced synchrotron peak near or below ˜1014 Hz indicates that a significant fraction of any observed X-ray emission originates in the jet. We investigate the variability during a large-scale magnetic field inversion in which the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) jet is quenched and a new transient hot reconnecting plasmoid is launched by the reconnecting field. The ratio of the γ-rays to X-rays changes from {L}γ /{L}{{X}}\\gt 1 in the BZ jet to {L}γ /{L}{{X}}\\lt 1 during the launching of the transient plasmoid.

  5. Interaction of low-frequency axisymmetric ultrasonic guided waves with bends in pipes of arbitrary bend angle and general bend radius.

    PubMed

    Verma, Bhupesh; Mishra, Tarun Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2014-03-01

    The use of ultrasonic guided waves for the inspection of pipes with elbow and U-type bends has received much attention in recent years, but studies for more general bend angles which may also occur commonly, for example in cross-country pipes, are limited. Here, we address this topic considering a general bend angle φ, a more general mean bend radius R in terms of the wavelength of the mode studied and pipe thickness b. We use 3D Finite Element (FE) simulation to understand the propagation of fundamental axisymmetric L(0,2) mode across bends of different angles φ. The effect of the ratio of the mean bend radius to the wavelength of the mode studied, on the transmission and reflection of incident wave is also considered. The studies show that as the bend angle is reduced, a progressively larger extent of mode-conversion affects the transmission and velocity characteristics of the L(0,2) mode. However the overall message on the potential of guided waves for inspection and monitoring of bent pipes remains positive, as bends seem to impact mode transmission only to the extent of 20% even at low bend angles. The conclusions seem to be valid for different typical pipe thicknesses b and bend radii. The modeling approach is validated by experiments and discussed in light of physics of guided waves.

  6. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  7. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  8. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  9. A novel computational method for comparing vibrational circular dichroism spectra.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Zhu, Chengyue; Reiling, Stephan; Vaz, Roy

    2010-08-01

    A novel method, SimIR/VCD, for comparing experimental and calculated VCD (vibrational circular dichroism) spectra is developed, based on newly defined spectra similarities. With computationally optimized frequency scaling and shifting, a calculated spectrum can be easily identified to match an observed spectrum, which leads to an unbiased molecular chirality assignment. The time-consuming manual band-fitting work is greatly reduced. With (1S)-(-)-alpha-pinene as an example, it demonstrates that the calculated VCD similarity is correlated with VCD spectra matching quality and has enough sensitivity to identify variations in the spectra. The study also compares spectra calculated using different DFT methods and basis sets. Using this method should facilitate the spectra matching, reduce human error and provide a confidence measure in the chiral assignment using VCD spectroscopy.

  10. Simulation of dielectric spectra of erythrocytes with various shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Dielectric spectra of erythrocyte suspensions were numerically simulated over a frequency range from 1 kHz to 100 MHz to study the effects of erythrocyte shape on the dielectric spectra. First, a biconcave-discoid model for normal erythrocytes or discocytes was compared with an equivalent oblate spheroid model. The two models showed similar dielectric spectra to each other, suggesting that the oblate spheroid model can be approximately used for discocytes. Second, dielectric spectra were simulated for discocytes deformed by osmotic cell swelling. The deformation resulted in the increase in relaxation intensity and the sharpening of spectrum shape. Finally, dielectric spectra were simulated for echinocytes, stomatocytes and sickle cells that are induced by chemical agents and diseases. The dielectric spectra of echinocytes and stomatocytes were similar to each other, being distinguishable from that of discocytes and quite different from that of sickle cells.

  11. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R

    2014-02-01

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  12. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  13. Band Spectra and Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronig, R. De L.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. The Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules and their Classification by Means of Quantum Numbers: 1. General foundations; 2. Wave mechanics of diatomic molecules; 3. Electronic levels; 4. Vibrational levels; 5. Rotational levels; 6. Stark and Zeeman effect; 7. Energy levels of polyatomic molecules; Part II. Fine Structure and Wave Mechanical Properties of the Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules: 8. The perturbation function; 9. Rotational distortion of spin multiplets; 10. Fine structure; 11. Perturbations and predissociation; 12. Even and odd levels; 13. Symmetrical and antisymmetrical levels; Part III. Selection Rules and Intensities in Diatomic Molecules: 14. General foundations; 15. Electronic bands; 16. Vibrational bands; 17. Rotational bands; 18. Band spectra and nuclear structure; 19. Transitions in the Stark and Zeeman effect; Part IV. Macroscopic Properties of Molecular Gases: 20. Scattering; 21. Dispersion; 22. Kerr and Faraday effect; 23. Dielectric constants; 24. Magnetic susceptibilities; 25. Specific heats; Part V. Molecule Formation and Chemical Binding: 26. Heteropolar molecules; 27. Homopolar molecules. Chemical forces between two H-atoms and two He-atoms; 28. The general theory of homopolar compounds; Bibliography; Subject index.

  14. Adaptive filtering of Echelle spectra of distant Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priebe, A.; Liebscher, D.-E.; Lorenz, H.; Richter, G.-M.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the Ly alpha - forest of distant (approximately greater than 3) Quasars is an important tool in obtaining a more detailed picture of the distribution of matter along the line of sight and thus of the general distribution of matter in the Universe and is therefore of important cosmological significance. Obviously, this is one of the tasks where spectral resolution plays an important role. The spectra used were obtained with the EFOSC at the ESO 3.6m telescope. Applying for the data reduction the standard Echelle procedure, as it is implemented for instance in the MIDAS-package, one uses stationary filters (e.g. median) for noise and cosmic particle event reduction in the 2-dimensional Echelle image. These filters are useful if the spatial spectrum of the noise reaches essentially higher frequencies then the highest resolution features in the image. Otherwise the resolution in the data will be degraded and the spectral lines smoothed. However, in the Echelle spectra the highest resolution is already in the range of one or a few pixels and therefore stationary filtering means always a loss of resolution. An Echelle reduction procedure on the basis of a space variable filter described which recognizes the local resolution in the presence of noise and adapts to it is developed. It was shown that this technique leads to an improvement in resolution by a factor of 2 with respect to standard procedures.

  15. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  16. Fluctuations of surface-enhanced Raman spectra of CO adsorbed on gold substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudelski, Andrzej; Pettinger, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of CO adsorbed on roughened gold surfaces has been studied using a Raman microscope with high spatial resolution. Sequentially recorded SERS spectra showed variations of Raman lines in their number, intensity, frequency, and halfwidth. Sometimes, in addition to the band for CO adsorbed at top sites, Raman peaks for bridge-bonded CO appear, showing large intensity fluctuations. Obviously, SERS fluctuations represent a more general property of SERS and point to local restructuring of substrates that changes temporarily the character of adsorption sites and/or their contribution to SERS. The single molecule 'blinking' effect is also discussed.

  17. Similarity criteria for the spectra of wall pressure fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimtsov, B. M.

    1984-02-01

    Experimental data on the spectra of wall pressure fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer are presented in order to establish a generalized law governing wall pressure for determining aerodynamic parameters in wind tunnel tests. The wall pressure fluctuation spectra are presented over a wide range of Mach numbers (M = 0.015-4), Reynolds numbers (Re = 600 to 150,000), and Strouhal numbers (S = 0.2 to 1000) which are determined by means of a unified measurement procedure and a system of sensors with high spatial resolution. It is found that the calculations of pressure fluctuations in the audio frequency range are in good agreement with measurements of pressure fluctuations on the surface of a passenger aircraft fuselage in a wind tunnel test.

  18. Theoretical infrared spectra of some model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - Effect of ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Frees, D. J.; Miller, M. D.; Talbi, D.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.

    1993-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis of ionized PAHs as possible carriers of the UIR bands, we realized a computational exploration on selected PAHs of small dimension in order to identify which changes ionization would induce on their IR spectra. In this study we performed ab initio calculations of the spectra of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene. The results are significantly important. The frequencies in the cations are slightly shifted with respect to the neutral species, but no general conclusion can be reached from the three molecules considered. By contrast, the relative intensities of most vibrations are strongly affected by ionization, leading to a much better agreement between the calculated CH/CC vibration intensity ratios and those deduced from observations.

  19. IUE archived spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Edward C.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Heap, Sara R.; West, Donald K.; Schmitz, Marion

    1988-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite has been in continuous operation since January 26, 1978. To date, approximately 65,000 spectra have been stored in an archive at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. A number of procedures have been generated to facilitate access to the data in the IUE spectral archive. This document describes the procedures which include on-line quick look of the displays, search of an observation data base for selected observations, and several methods for ordering data from the archive.

  20. Improved beam smoothing with SSD using generalized phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The smoothing of the spatial illumination of an inertial confinement fusion target is examined by its spatial frequency content. It is found that the smoothing by spectral dispersion method, although efficient for glass lasers, can yield poor smoothing at low spatial frequency. The dependence of the smoothed spatial spectrum on the characteristics of phase modulation and dispersion is examined for both sinusoidal and more general phase modulation. It is shown that smoothing with non-sinusoidal phase modulation can result in spatial spectra which are substantially identical to that obtained with the induced spatial incoherence or similar method where random phase plates are present in both methods and identical beam divergence is assumed.

  1. Meteors and meteorites spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.; Lenža, L.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; Knížek, A.; Kubelík, P.; Kaiserová, T.; Váňa, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of our meteor spectroscopy project is to better understand the physical and chemical properties of meteoroids. Astrometric and spectral observations of real meteors are obtained via spectroscopic CCD video systems. Processed meteor data are inserted to the EDMOND database (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database) together with spectral information. The fully analyzed atmospheric trajectory, orbit and also spectra of a Leonid meteor/meteoroid captured in November 2015 are presented as an example. At the same time, our target is the systematization of spectroscopic emission lines for the comparative analysis of meteor spectra. Meteoroid plasma was simulated in a laboratory by laser ablation of meteorites samples using an (ArF) excimer laser and the LIDB (Laser Induced Dielectric Breakdown) in a low pressure atmosphere and various gases. The induced plasma emissions were simultaneously observed with the Echelle Spectrograph and the same CCD video spectral camera as used for real meteor registration. Measurements and analysis results for few selected meteorite samples are presented and discussed.

  2. Title: Near-UV behaviour of observed TNO reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seccull, Tom; Fraser, Wesley Cristopher; Izawa, Matthew; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-10-01

    Observed spectra provide the best diagnostics of the surface compositions of Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs). We have observed the spectra of 7 TNOs, from across almost the full range of dynamical classes, using the VLT's X-Shooter spectrograph. Compared to the 5 targets in our sample which exhibit linear spectra in the UV-optical range, two of of our targets show highly unusual spectral behaviour, whereby their reflectance decreases sharply at wavelengths below ~440nm. Those same objects exhibit typically unremarkable spectra in the optical and near-IR spectral regions. In these regions where available, our observed spectra of the targets are in agreement with spectra or photometry available in the literature. Using a different solar analogue to produce our reflectance spectra does not remove the UV decrease exhibited by the two targets. Further, it appears that neither reducing the spectra with different pipelines, nor using drastically different parameters in those pipelines changes this general behaviour. Based on laboratory spectra of complex hydrocarbons it is plausible that the near-UV behaviour is the result of a surface coating of organic substances on the TNOs which exhibit it. The spectra of organics are also consistent in having a general red slope similar to that observed in the spectra of many TNOs. While laboratory spectra of some silicate substances also show a decrease in reflectance in the near-UV spectral region that is in principle consistent with our observations, those silicates do not exhibit a red slope consistent with our optical spectra. Hence, the hypothesis that silicates are present seems less likely than the hypothesis that this UV decrease is due to the presence of organics on the surfaces of these objects.

  3. Development and implementation of an empirical frequency map for use in MD simulations of isotope-edited proteins, and, Development, implementation, and evaluation of an online student portal as a textbook replacement in an advanced general chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorb, Justin Matthew

    The first portion of this thesis describes an extension of work done in the Skinner group to develop an empirical frequency map for N-methylacetamide (NMA) in water. NMA is a peptide bond capped on either side by a methyl group and is therefore a common prototypical molecule used when studying complicated polypeptides and proteins. This amide bond is present along the backbone of every protein as it connects individual component amino acids. This amide bond also has a strong observable frequency in the IR due to the Amide-I mode (predominantly carbon-oxygen stretching motion). This project describes the simplification of the prior model for mapping the frequency of the Amide-I mode from the electric field due to the environment and develops a parallel implementation of this algorithm for use in larger biological systems, such as the trans-membrane portion of the tetrameric polypeptide bundle protein CD3zeta. The second portion of this thesis describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an online textbook within the context of a cohesive theoretical framework. The project begins by describing what is meant when discussing a digital textbook, including a survey of various types of digital media being used to deliver textbook-like content. This leads into the development of a theoretical framework based on constructivist pedagogical theory, hypertext learning theory, and chemistry visualization and representation frameworks. The implementation and design of ChemPaths, the general chemistry online text developed within the Chemistry Education Digital Library (ChemEd DL) is then described. The effectiveness of ChemPaths being used as a textbook replacement in an advanced general chemistry course is evaluated within the developed theoretical framework both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  4. Solvent effect on the vibrational spectra of Carvedilol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Pataki, Hajnalka; Unsalan, Ozan; Mikosch, Hans; Vajna, Balázs; Marosi, György

    2012-09-01

    Carvedilol (CRV) is an important medicament for heart arrhythmia. The aim of this work was the interpretation of its vibrational spectra with consideration on the solvent effect. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded in solid state as well in solution. The experimental spectra were evaluated using DFT quantum chemical calculations computing the optimized structure, atomic net charges, vibrational frequencies and force constants. The same calculations were done for the molecule in DMSO and aqueous solutions applying the PCM method. The calculated force constants were scaled to the experimentally observed solid state frequencies. The characters of the vibrational modes were determined by their potential energy distributions. Solvent effects on the molecular properties were interpreted. Based on these results vibrational spectra were simulated.

  5. Brane Constructions and BPS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Ashwin

    The object of this work is to exploit various constructions of string theory and M-theory to yield new insights into supersymmetric theories in both four and three dimensions. In 4d, we extend work on Seiberg-Witten theory to study and compute BPS spectra of the class of complete N = 2 theories. The approach we take is based on the program of geometric engineering, in which 4d theories are constructed from compactifications of type IIB strings on Calabi-Yau manifolds. In this setup, the natural candidates for BPS states are D3 branes wrapped on supersymmetric 3-cycles in the Calabi-Yau. Our study makes use of the mathematical structure of quivers, whose representation theory encodes the notion of stability of BPS particles. Except for 11 exceptional cases, all complete theories can be constructed by wrapping stacks of two M5 branes on Riemann surfaces. By exploring the connection between quivers and M5 brane theories, we develop a powerful algorithm for computing BPS spectra, and give an in-depth study of its applications. In particular, we compute BPS spectra for all asymptotically free complete theories, as well as an infinite set of conformal SU(2)k theories with certain matter content. From here, we go on to apply the insight gained from our 4d study to 3d gauge theories. We consider the analog of the M5 brane construction in the case of 3d N = 2 theories: pairs of M5 branes wrapped on a 3-manifold. Using the ansantz of R-flow, we study 3-manifolds consisting of Riemann surfaces fibered over R. When the construction is non-singular, the resulting IR physics is described by a free abelian Chern-Simons theory. The mathematical data of a tangle captures the data of the gauge theory, and the Reidemeister equivalances on tangles correspond to dualities of physical descriptions. To obtain interacting matter, we allow singularities in the construction. By extending the tangle description to these singular cases, we find a set of generalized Reidemeister moves that

  6. Laboratory spectra of C60 and related molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janca, J.; Solc, M.; Vetesnik, M.

    1994-01-01

    The electronic spectra of fullerene structures in high frequency discharge are studied in the plasma chemistry laboratory of the Faculty of Science of Masaryk University in Brno. The ultraviolet and visual spectra are investigated in order to be compared with the diffuse interstellar bands and interpreted within the theory of quantum mechanics. The preliminary results of the study are presented here in the form of a poster.

  7. Pressure power spectra beneath a supersonic turbulent boundary layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John Francis; Pruett, Brian O. M.

    2010-06-01

    Wind tunnel experiments up to Mach 3 have provided fluctuating wall-pressure spectra beneath a supersonic turbulent boundary layer to frequencies reaching 400 kHz by combining signals from piezoresistive silicon pressure transducers effective at low- and mid-range frequencies and piezoelectric quartz sensors to detect high frequency events. Data were corrected for spatial attenuation at high frequencies and for wind-tunnel noise and vibration at low frequencies. The resulting power spectra revealed the {omega}{sup -1} dependence for fluctuations within the logarithmic region of the boundary layer, but are essentially flat at low frequency and do not exhibit the theorized {omega}{sup 2} dependence. Variations in the Reynolds number or streamwise measurement location collapse to a single curve for each Mach number when normalized by outer flow variables. Normalization by inner flow variables is successful for the {omega}{sup -1} region but less so for lower frequencies. A comparison of the pressure fluctuation intensities with fifty years of historical data shows their reported magnitude chiefly is a function of the frequency response of the sensors. The present corrected data yield results in excess of the bulk of the historical data, but uncorrected data are consistent with lower magnitudes. These trends suggest that much of the historical compressible database may be biased low, leading to the failure of several semi-empirical predictive models to accurately represent the power spectra acquired during the present experiments.

  8. Comparison of remotely sensed continental-shelf wave spectra with spectra computed by using a wave refraction computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    An initial attempt was made to verify the Langley Research Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science mid-Atlantic continental-shelf wave refraction model. The model was used to simulate refraction occurring during a continental-shelf remote sensing experiment conducted on August 17, 1973. Simulated wave spectra compared favorably, in a qualitative sense, with the experimental spectra. However, it was observed that most of the wave energy resided at frequencies higher than those for which refraction and shoaling effects were predicted, In addition, variations among the experimental spectra were so small that they were not considered statistically significant. In order to verify the refraction model, simulation must be performed in conjunction with a set of significantly varying spectra in which a considerable portion of the total energy resides at frequencies for which refraction and shoaling effects are likely.

  9. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  10. Inflation and alternatives with blue tensor spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Xue, Wei E-mail: wei.xue@sissa.it

    2014-10-01

    We study the tilt of the primordial gravitational waves spectrum. A hint of blue tilt is shown from analyzing the BICEP2 and POLARBEAR data. Motivated by this, we explore the possibilities of blue tensor spectra from the very early universe cosmology models, including null energy condition violating inflation, inflation with general initial conditions, and string gas cosmology, etc. For the simplest G-inflation, blue tensor spectrum also implies blue scalar spectrum. In general, the inflation models with blue tensor spectra indicate large non-Gaussianities. On the other hand, string gas cosmology predicts blue tensor spectrum with highly Gaussian fluctuations. If further experiments do confirm the blue tensor spectrum, non-Gaussianity becomes a distinguishing test between inflation and alternatives.

  11. Atomistic modeling of two-dimensional electronic spectra and excited-state dynamics for a Light Harvesting 2 complex.

    PubMed

    van der Vegte, C P; Prajapati, J D; Kleinekathöfer, U; Knoester, J; Jansen, T L C

    2015-01-29

    The Light Harvesting 2 (LH2) complex is a vital part of the photosystem of purple bacteria. It is responsible for the absorption of light and transport of the resulting excitations to the reaction center in a highly efficient manner. A general description of the chromophores and the interaction with their local environment is crucial to understand this highly efficient energy transport. Here we include this interaction in an atomistic way using mixed quantum-classical (molecular dynamics) simulations of spectra. In particular, we present the first atomistic simulation of nonlinear optical spectra for LH2 and use it to study the energy transport within the complex. We show that the frequency distributions of the pigments strongly depend on their positions with respect to the protein scaffold and dynamics of their local environment. Furthermore, we show that although the pigments are closely packed the transition frequencies of neighboring pigments are essentially uncorrelated. We present the simulated linear absorption spectra for the LH2 complex and provide a detailed explanation of the states responsible for the observed two-band structure. Finally, we discuss the energy transfer within the complex by analyzing population transfer calculations and 2D spectra for different waiting times. We conclude that the energy transfer from the B800 ring to the B850 ring is mediated by intermediate states that are delocalized over both rings, allowing for a stepwise downhill energy transport.

  12. [Infrared Spectra Characteristics of the Silicate Nickel Ores: A Comparison Study on Different Ore Samples from Indonesia and China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-li; Fu, Wei; Wang, Bao-hua; Zhang, Ya-qian; Huang, Xiao-rong; Niu, Hu-jie

    2015-03-01

    The silicate nickel ores developed in the lateritic nickel deposit, from Kolonodale, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and Yuanjiang, Yunnan province, China, were selected for the present study. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier infrared spectra were used to analyze the mineralogical attribute of laterite nickel ores from two different places. The results show that these two different silicate nickel ores have unique infrared spectra characteristics individually, which contributes to the ore classification. The silicate nickel ores from Kolonodale deposit, Indonesia, can be classified as the serpentine type, the montmorillonite + serpentine type, and the garnierite type. While, the silicate nickel ores from Yuanjiang deposit, China, can be classified as the serpentine type and the talc + serpentine type. Moreover, the mineral crystallinity of Yuanjiang nickel ores is generally better than Kolonodale nickel ores. According to the advantage of infrared absorption spectra in distinguishing mineral polytypes, it can be determined that lizardite is the main mineral type in the silicate nickel ores of the two deposits, and there is no obvious evidence of chrysotile and antigorite's existence. The characteristic of infrared absorption spectra also shows that frequency change of OH libration indicates Ni (Fe) replacing Mg in the serpentine type nickel-bearing mineral, that is, OH libration of serpentine moves to higher frequency, with the proportion of Ni (Fe) replacing Mg increasing. PMID:26117869

  13. [Infrared Spectra Characteristics of the Silicate Nickel Ores: A Comparison Study on Different Ore Samples from Indonesia and China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-li; Fu, Wei; Wang, Bao-hua; Zhang, Ya-qian; Huang, Xiao-rong; Niu, Hu-jie

    2015-03-01

    The silicate nickel ores developed in the lateritic nickel deposit, from Kolonodale, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and Yuanjiang, Yunnan province, China, were selected for the present study. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier infrared spectra were used to analyze the mineralogical attribute of laterite nickel ores from two different places. The results show that these two different silicate nickel ores have unique infrared spectra characteristics individually, which contributes to the ore classification. The silicate nickel ores from Kolonodale deposit, Indonesia, can be classified as the serpentine type, the montmorillonite + serpentine type, and the garnierite type. While, the silicate nickel ores from Yuanjiang deposit, China, can be classified as the serpentine type and the talc + serpentine type. Moreover, the mineral crystallinity of Yuanjiang nickel ores is generally better than Kolonodale nickel ores. According to the advantage of infrared absorption spectra in distinguishing mineral polytypes, it can be determined that lizardite is the main mineral type in the silicate nickel ores of the two deposits, and there is no obvious evidence of chrysotile and antigorite's existence. The characteristic of infrared absorption spectra also shows that frequency change of OH libration indicates Ni (Fe) replacing Mg in the serpentine type nickel-bearing mineral, that is, OH libration of serpentine moves to higher frequency, with the proportion of Ni (Fe) replacing Mg increasing.

  14. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  15. Altered spatial frequency content in paintings by artists with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel; Meng, Ming

    2011-01-01

    While it is difficult to imagine the way someone with mental illness perceives the world, paintings produced by mental illness sufferers with artistic talents offer a hint of this experience. Here we analyze these images in terms of statistics related to low-level visual processing. It is known that art in general possesses regular spatial frequency amplitude spectra, probably due to factors including luminance compression, approximation of natural scene spatial statistics, media, and aesthetics. Whatever the contributions of those factors may be, would the same ones apply for artists with schizophrenia? We find that spatial frequency content in paintings by five artists with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder is significantly different from that found in a large sample of art by painters without schizophrenia, while other basic spatial and intensity statistics are not different for the two groups. In particular, amplitude spectrum slopes are significantly steeper for paintings by artists with schizophrenia. A separate study of the works of one artist diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder confirmed these findings and showed no effect of medication type on amplitude spectrum slope. We suggest that these results support the notion that people with schizophrenia show decreased contrast sensitivity at low spatial frequencies. If people with schizophrenia cannot perceive low frequencies at the same level of contrast as that at which healthy individuals can, it follows that on average they will portray such components with higher contrast, resulting in steeper spectra. PMID:23145222

  16. Atomic and Molecular Aspects of Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochi, Taha

    2012-11-01

    In the first section we present the atomic part where a C2+ atomic target was prepared and used to generate theoretical data to investigate recombination lines arising from electron-ion collisions in thin plasma. R-matrix method was used to describe the C2+ plus electron system. Theoretical data concerning bound and autoionizing states were generated in the intermediate-coupling approximation. The data were used to generate dielectronic recombination data for C+ which include transition lines, oscillator strengths, radiative transition probabilities, emissivities and dielectronic recombination coefficients. The data were cast in a line list containing 6187 optically-allowed transitions which include many C II lines observed in astronomical spectra. This line list was used to analyze the spectra from a number of astronomical objects, mainly planetary nebulae, and identify their electron temperature. The electron temperature investigation was also extended to include free electron energy analysis to investigate the long-standing problem of discrepancy between the results of recombination and forbidden lines analysis and its possible connection to the electron distribution. In the second section we present the results of our molecular investigation; the generation of a comprehensive, calculated line list of frequencies and transition probabilities for H2D+. The line list contains over 22 million rotational-vibrational transitions occurring between more than 33 thousand energy levels and covers frequencies up to 18500 cm-1. About 15% of these levels are fully assigned with approximate rotational and vibrational quantum numbers. A temperature-dependent partition function and cooling function are presented. Temperature-dependent synthetic spectra for the temperatures T=100, 500, 1000 and 2000 K in the frequency range 0-10000 cm-1 were also generated and presented graphically.

  17. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wishnow, E. H.; Gush, H. P.; Halpern, M.; Ozier, I.

    2002-01-01

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 1/cm..

  18. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072

  19. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wishnow, E H; Gush, H P; Halpern M; Ozier, I

    2002-09-19

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 cm{sup -1}.

  20. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  1. Database-Driven Analyses of Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, Jan

    2012-03-01

    Spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools to study the physical properties and chemical composition of very diverse astrophysical environments. In principle, each nuclide has a unique set of spectral features; thus, establishing the presence of a specific material at astronomical distances requires no more than finding a laboratory spectrum of the right material that perfectly matches the astronomical observations. Once the presence of a substance is established, a careful analysis of the observational characteristics (wavelengths or frequencies, intensities, and line profiles) allows one to determine many physical parameters of the environment in which the substance resides, such as temperature, density, velocity, and so on. Because of this great diagnostic potential, ground-based and space-borne astronomical observatories often include instruments to carry out spectroscopic analyses of various celestial objects and events. Of particular interest is molecular spectroscopy at infrared wavelengths. From the spectroscopic point of view, molecules differ from atoms in their ability to vibrate and rotate, and quantum physics inevitably causes those motions to be quantized. The energies required to excite vibrations or rotations are such that vibrational transitions generally occur at infrared wavelengths, whereas pure rotational transitions typically occur at sub-mm wavelengths. Molecular vibration and rotation are coupled though, and thus at infrared wavelengths, one commonly observes a multitude of ro-vibrational transitions (see Figure 13.1). At lower spectral resolution, all transitions blend into one broad ro-vibrational molecular band. The isotope. Molecular spectroscopy thus allows us to see a difference of one neutron in an atomic nucleus that is located at astronomical distances! Since the detection of the first interstellar molecules (the CH [21] and CN [14] radicals), more than 150 species have been detected in space, ranging in size from diatomic

  2. Far-infrared spectra of acetanilide revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spire, A.; Barthes, M.; Kellouai, H.; De Nunzio, G.

    2000-03-01

    A new investigation of the temperature dependence of the far-infrared spectra of acetanilide and some isotopomers is presented. Four absorption bands are considered at 31, 42, 64, and 80 cm-1, and no significant change of their integrated intensity is observed when reducing the temperature. The temperature induced frequency shift values and other properties of these bands are consistent with an assignment as anharmonic lattice phonons. These results rule out the assignment of the 64, 80, and 106 cm-1 bands as normal modes of the polaronic excitation, as previously suggested.

  3. [EPR spectra of silkworm eggs].

    PubMed

    Korkhova, E D; Chepel', L M; Nikolov, O T; Komar', I N; Shakhbazov, V G

    1976-01-01

    ESR spectra of the native grain of the silkworm have been studied in the course of embryo formation, during a diapause, and during embryo development after the diapause. It is shown that the nature of ESR spectra of the grain is not determined by the metabolic processes, but by the presence of pigments in it and other stationary biological structures having developed pi-systems and unpaired electrones. The latter are mainly found in the envelope and may give the ESR spectra, with various g-factors. A dependence of the ESR spectra integral intensity of the grain on the denotype is discovered.

  4. Spectrum (pl: spectra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In general terms, the distribution of intensity of electromagnetic radiation with wavelength. Thus when we examine the spectrum of star we are looking at a map of this brightness distribution. In the context of visible light, the visible spectrum is the band of colors produced when white light is passed through a glass prism, which has the effect of spreading out light according to wavelength. Fr...

  5. How to avoid misinterpretation of heart rate variability power spectra?

    PubMed

    Cammann, Henning; Michel, Josef

    2002-04-01

    Spectral analysis of R-R Interval time series is increasingly used to determine periodic components of heart rate variability (HRV). Particular diagnostic relevance is assigned to a low-frequency (LF) component, associated with blood pressure regulation, and a high-frequency (HF) component, also referred to as respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in the HRV power spectra. Frequency ranges for parametrisation of power spectra have been defined for either component in numerous publications.Results obtained from examinations with standardised psychic load in which ECG and respiratory signal are continuously recorded and adequately processed have shown that the true individual frequency range of the HF component can be reliably determined only by means of characteristics of respiration (respiratory rate (RR), range and median value of RR, tidal depth). Respiratory rhythms are interindividually extremely differentiated and of individual-specific nature. In many cases LF and HF components may be totally superimposed on each other and, consequently, cannot be diagnostically evaluated.

  6. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    DOE PAGES

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is usedmore » to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.« less

  7. Analytic studies of dispersive properties of shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chavdarovski, Ilija; Zonca, Fulvio

    2014-05-15

    The properties of the low frequency shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in toroidal geometry are examined analytically and numerically considering wave particle interactions with magnetically trapped and circulating particles, using the theoretical model described in [I. Chavdarovski and F. Zonca, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 115001 (2009)] and following the framework of the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation. Effects of trapped particles as well as diamagnetic effects on the frequencies and damping rates of the beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes, kinetic ballooning modes and beta-induced Alfvén-acoustic eigenmodes are discussed and shown to be crucial to give a proper assessment of mode structure and stability conditions. Present results also demonstrate the mutual coupling of these various branches and suggest that frequency as well as mode polarization are crucial for their identification on the basis of experimental evidence.

  8. Frequency Correction for MIRO Chirp Transformation Spectroscopy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    This software processes the flyby spectra of the Chirp Transform Spectrometer (CTS) of the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). The tool corrects the effect of Doppler shift and local-oscillator (LO) frequency shift during the flyby mode of MIRO operations. The frequency correction for CTS flyby spectra is performed and is integrated with multiple spectra into a high signal-to-noise averaged spectrum at the rest-frame RF frequency. This innovation also generates the 8 molecular line spectra by dividing continuous 4,096-channel CTS spectra. The 8 line spectra can then be readily used for scientific investigations. A spectral line that is at its rest frequency in the frame of the Earth or an asteroid will be observed with a time-varying Doppler shift as seen by MIRO. The frequency shift is toward the higher RF frequencies on approach, and toward lower RF frequencies on departure. The magnitude of the shift depends on the flyby velocity. The result of time-varying Doppler shift is that of an observed spectral line will be seen to move from channel to channel in the CTS spectrometer. The direction (higher or lower frequency) in the spectrometer depends on the spectral line frequency under consideration. In order to analyze the flyby spectra, two steps are required. First, individual spectra must be corrected for the Doppler shift so that individual spectra can be superimposed at the same rest frequency for integration purposes. Second, a correction needs to be applied to the CTS spectra to account for the LO frequency shifts that are applied to asteroid mode.

  9. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to ‑3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  10. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  11. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  12. Development of site-specific earthquake response spectra for eastern US sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1993-08-01

    Site-specific earthquake, uniform-hazard response spectra have been defined for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites for use in evaluating existing facilities and designing new facilities. The site-specific response spectra were defined from probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard studies following the requirements in DOE-STD-1024-92, ``Guidelines for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves at DOE Sites.` For these two sites, the results show that site-specific uniform-hazard response spectra are slightly higher in the high-frequency range and considerably lower in the low-frequency range compared with response spectra defined for these sites in the past.

  13. Understanding Vibration Spectra of Planetary Gear Systems for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the vibration spectra is very useful for any gear fault detection scheme based upon vibration measurements. The vibration measured from planetary gears is complicated. Sternfeld noted the presence of sidebands about the gear mesh harmonics spaced at the planet passage frequency in spectra measured near the ring gear of a CH-47 helicopter. McFadden proposes a simple model of the vibration transmission that predicts high spectral amplitudes at multiples of the planet passage frequency, for planetary gears with evenly spaced planets. This model correctly predicts no strong signal at the meshing frequency when the number of teeth on the ring gear is not an integer multiple of the number of planets. This paper will describe a model for planetary gear vibration spectra developed from the ideas started in reference. This model predicts vibration to occur only at frequencies that are multiples of the planet repetition passage frequency and clustered around gear mesh harmonics. Vibration measurements will be shown from tri-axial accelerometers mounted on three different planetary gear systems and compared with the model. The model correctly predicts the frequencies with large components around the first several gear mesh harmonics in measurements for systems with uniformly and nonuniformly spaced planet gears. Measurements do not confirm some of the more detailed features predicted by the model. Discrepancies of the ideal model to the measurements are believed due to simplifications in the model and will be discussed. Fault detection will be discussed applying the understanding will be discussed.

  14. Simulation of mammographic x-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; O'Foghludha, F

    1980-01-01

    Attempts to simulate Mo-anode spectra for film mammography by using Mo filters with W-anode tubes have been reported by several workers, and others have generated W-like continua for xeromammographic purposes by heavy Al filtration of Mo-anode tubes. In the present work the success of these simulations was tested by Si(Li) spectrometric methods that measured the spectral shapes and the exposure levels. Comparisons of Mo-anode/Al-filter with W-anode/Al-filter combinations were made, and also of W-anode/M-filter with Mo-anode/Mo-folter combinations. In certain circumstance the spectral shape is moderately well simulated but in all cases the useful output is less in the simulations than in the original spectra. The general conclusion is that simulation is always less attractive than direct use of the desired anode. PMID:7393143

  15. Simulation of mammographic x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.A.; O'Foghludha, F.

    1980-05-01

    Attempts to simulate Mo-anode spectra for film mammography by using Mo filters with W-anode tubes have been reported by several workers, and others have generated W-like continua for xeromammographic purposes by heavy A1 filtration of Mo-anode tubes. In the present work the success of these simulations was tested by Si(Li) spectrometric methods that measured the spectral shapes and the exposure levels. Comparisons of Mo-anode/A1-filter with W-anode/A1-filter combinations were made, and also of W-anode/M-filter with Mo-anode/Mo-folter combinations. In certain circumstance the spectral shape is moderately well simulated but in all cases the useful output is less in the simulations than in the original spectra. The general conclusion is that simulation is always less attractive than direct use of the desired anode.

  16. Human EEG spectra before and during cannabis hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Koukkou, M; Lehmann, D

    1976-12-01

    EEG correlates of subjective experiences induced by delta9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and EEG correlates of individual disposition to such experiences were investigated. Twelve normal volunteers took 200 mug/kg THC orally. The subjects were asked to signal subjective experiences. The EEG was analyzed (period analysis) before and repeatedly after THC injestion, during resting, attention, eye closure, visual hallucinations, and body image disturbances. EEG frequency spectra differed significantly between resting and visual hallucinations and body image disturbances. The differences included slower alpha and more theta during THC experiences, reminiscent of initial drowsiness EEG, and of some results in schizophrenia. The differences between spectra during visual hallucinations and during body image disturbances indicate different functional brain states. Subjects with a high tendency to cannabinol induced experiences exhibited resting spectra before and after THC with higher modal alpha frequences (reminiscent of subjects with high neuroticism scores) than subjects with a low tendency.

  17. Infrared spectra of molecules and materials of astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durig, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Vibrational spectra were studied from 400 to 33/cm for molecules which may be present in the atmosphere of Jovian planets. The microwave spectrum of cis glyoxal was studied. Sources of color variation in the Jovian atmosphere were analyzed in relation to molecular crystals. The low frequency modes of acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-d sub 4 are discussed.

  18. Raman intensity and spectra predictions for cylindrical viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2007-07-01

    A theoretical framework for predicting low frequency Raman vibrational spectra of viral capsids is presented and applied to the M13 bacteriophage. The method uses a continuum elastic theory for the vibrational modes and a bond-charge polarizability model of an amorphous material to roughly predict the Raman intensities. Comparison is made to experimental results for the M13 bacteriophage virus.

  19. Synthetic normal-mode spectra: a full-coupling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. Y.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    Normal-mode spectra may be used to investigate the large-scale anelastic structure of the entire earth. The relevant theory was developed a few decades ago, however, mainly due to computational limitations, several approximations are commonly employed, and thus far the full merits of the complete theory have not been taken advantage of. In this study, we present an exact algebraic form of the theory for an aspherical, anelastic and rotating earth model in which either complex or real spherical harmonic bases are used. Physical dispersion is incorporated into the quadratic eigenvalue problem by expanding the logarithmic frequency term to 2nd order. In addition, we carry out numerical experiments up to 3 mHz to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of commonly used approximate mode synthetics. We find that (1) approximating mode frequencies for realistic earth models with an average over degenerate frequencies of two coupled modes for physical dispersion, Coriolis effects and perturbed kinematic energy terms gives rise to subtle differences in mode spectra; (2) taking into account the exact normalization of modes instead of the one for a spherical, non-rotation model improves mode spectra by ~2%; (3) consideration of mode coupling in a narrow frequency band yields up to 10% discrepancies in mode spectra compared with wide-band coupling, indicating that the popular splitting function approach may introduce slight biases in normal-mode tomography.

  20. Infrared spectra of jennite and tobermorite from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Vidmer, Alexandre Sclauzero, Gabriele; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2014-06-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of jennite, tobermorite 14 Å, anomalous tobermorite 11 Å, and normal tobermorite 11 Å are simulated within a density-functional-theory scheme. The atomic coordinates and the cell parameters are optimized resulting in structures which agree with previous studies. The vibrational frequencies and modes are obtained for each mineral. The vibrational density of states is analyzed through extensive projections on silicon tetrahedra, oxygen atoms, OH groups, and water molecules. The coupling with the electric field is achieved through the use of density functional perturbation theory, which yields Born effective charges and dielectric constants. The simulated absorption spectra reproduce well the experimental spectra, thereby allowing for a detailed interpretation of the spectral features in terms of the underlying vibrational modes. In the far-infrared part of the absorption spectra, the interplay between Ca and Si related vibrations leads to differences which are sensitive to the calcium/silicon ratio of the mineral.

  1. Diminishing high-frequency directivity due to a source effect: Empirical evidence from small earthquakes in the Abruzzo region, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacor, F.; Gallovič, F.; Puglia, R.; Luzi, L.; D'Amico, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the directivity effects of ~250 aftershocks (magnitudes 3-5.5) of the Mw 6.1 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy). To this end, we estimate the apparent source spectra at each station removing path and site effects inferred by standard Generalized Inversion Technique. Then, we evaluate the residuals between the apparent source spectra and the event mean source spectrum at selected frequencies. We investigate azimuthal and frequency dependence of the residuals for 40 events with the best station coverage. For most of events with the strongest directivity effect (Mw 3.4-4.0), we observe a remarkable decrease of the directivity amplification at high frequencies, which has not yet been documented for such relatively small-magnitude events. Since there is negligible distance dependence, we ascribe this observation to a source phenomenon such as significant small-scale rupture propagation complexity.

  2. Trion spectra of semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Axel; Runge, Erich; Zimmermann, Roland

    2001-03-01

    The linear optical properties of quantum wells and quantum wires in the presence of a moderate background carrier density nB are investigated theoretically and compared with recent experiments. At low n_B, excitons and trions (charged excitons) are the relevant excitations. We present a density-matrix approach, which starts from the interband polarization and couples directly to higher order correlation functions which are related to three-particle excitations. It allows to describe both trionic and excitonic states. A generalized dynamical truncation scheme is applied and yields an expression for the absorption coefficient of trions in terms of trion eigenstates. Then, in combination with a numerical solution of the three-particle Schrödinger equation we sucessfully model (i) experimental photoluminescence lineshapes (their asymmetry towards lower photon energy and temperature-dependence is related to carrier recoil) [1], (ii) radiative trion lifetime (shown to depend linearly on temperature for a thermalized trion distribution) [2], and (iii) the influence of an electrical field (quantum-confined Stark effect) [3]. The optical response of excitons and trions can be studied alternatively by the solution of the time-dependent trion Schrödinger equation yielding information about (i) the appearance of trion triplet states (shown to be optically inactice at vanishing center-of-mass momentum), and (ii) exciton-electron scattering states (which give rise to a broadening of the high-energy side of the exciton). Altogether, a consistent and thorough picture of exciton related absorption spectra in the presence of additional carriers can be derived either from density matrix theory or the solution of the time-dependent three-particle Schrödinger equation. [1] A. Esser et al., Phys. Rev. B 62, 8232 (2000); [2] V. Ciulin et al., Phys. Rev. B (2000); [3] A. Esser et al., Phys. Status Solidi B 221, 281 (2000).

  3. Incorporating Spectra Into Periodic Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Alanna; Hong, J.; Protopapas, P.; Kashyap, V.

    2011-09-01

    The Chandra surveys have resulted in a wealth of data on low-luminosity X-ray sources (Lx 1030-34 erg/s) of Galactic scales beyond the local solar neighborhood. Many of these are compact binaries, in particular, cataclysmic variables, often identified by their periodic X-ray variability and spectra. Hong et al. (2009, 2011) have used energy quantiles (Hong, Schlegel & Grindlay, 2004) as a fast, robust indicator of spectral hardness and absorption of the X-ray sources. Energy quantiles also enable a simple but effective illustration of spectral changes with phase in these periodic systems: e.g. absorption by the accreting material is understood to drive the periodic light-curves. An interesting question is how to best make use of the information encapsulated in the periodic change in energy spectrum, along with the periodic change in intensity, especially for cases of ambiguous period determination? And, how to do it computationally efficiently? A first approach is to do the period search in intensity, as is standard; and then use a criterion of spectral variation to verify possible periods. Huijse, Zegers & Protopapas (2011) recently demonstrated a powerful period estimation technique using information potential and correntropy embedded in the light curve. Similar quantities based on energies (or energy quantiles) of X-ray photons can serve as criteria of spectral variation. A different approach treats the spectrum variations and intensity variations completely independently, searching through period-space in each, and then combining the results. A more general method would include both at the same time, looking for statistically significant variations above what is expected for a constant (in intensity and spectrum).

  4. Raman spectra of R{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R—rare earth) sesquioxides with C-type bixbyite crystal structure: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Abrashev, M. V.; Todorov, N. D.; Geshev, J.

    2014-09-14

    Raman spectra of R{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R—Sc, Er, Y, Ho, Gd, Eu, and Sm) powders with C-type bixbyite crystal structure are measured. With the help of these data and ones, previously published for other oxides from the same structural family, general dependencies of the frequencies of the Raman peaks on the cubic crystal unit cell parameter are constructed. Using these dependencies and knowing the symmetry of the peaks for one of the oxides, determined from previous single-crystal measurements, it is possible to find out the symmetry of the peaks from the spectra of all compounds. It was found that the frequency of the six lowest frequency peaks scales with the square root of the mass of the rare earth showing that mainly R ions take part in these vibrations. These results agree with performed here lattice dynamical calculations. The anomalous softening of the frequency of some peaks in the spectra of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} is discussed.

  5. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  6. Computer Processing Of Tunable-Diode-Laser Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1991-01-01

    Tunable-diode-laser spectrometer measuring transmission spectrum of gas operates under control of computer, which also processes measurement data. Measurements in three channels processed into spectra. Computer controls current supplied to tunable diode laser, stepping it through small increments of wavelength while processing spectral measurements at each step. Program includes library of routines for general manipulation and plotting of spectra, least-squares fitting of direct-transmission and harmonic-absorption spectra, and deconvolution for determination of laser linewidth and for removal of instrumental broadening of spectral lines.

  7. [Saltation behavior in excitation spectra of fluorescent molecules].

    PubMed

    Miao, Di; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Yang, Jun; Xu, Zhen-hua; Wu, Jin-guang

    2004-05-01

    Excitation spectra are commonly used to study relationship between molecular structure of fluorescent substances and energy transfer during the fluorescence process. It is generally taken for granted that the excitation spectrum of the sample is equivalent to its absorption spectrum, even a copy of the latter. However, exceptions have been found in many cases. Considering various factors that affect the excitation spectra of solution comprehensively, a model has been established to study the behavior of the excitation spectra. After analyzing the model mathematically, including introducing catastrophe theory, we came into the following conclusions: As far as the topological properties are concerned, the excitation spectra are the same as its absorption spectra, provided the concentration of the substance is below a threshold. However, when the concentration is beyond the threshold, the excitation spectra undergo a series of topological saltation, leading to significant a deviation from the absorption spectra. Comparative studies of both excitation and absorption spectra of naphthalene dissolved in n-hexane confirmed the above hypothesis.

  8. Frequency spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  9. Inversion of generalized relaxation time distributions with optimized damping parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsch, Nicolas; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Retrieving the Relaxation Time Distribution (RDT), the Grains Size Distribution (GSD) or the Pore Size Distribution (PSD) from low-frequency impedance spectra is a major goal in geophysics. The “Generalized RTD” generalizes parametric models like Cole-Cole and many others, but remains tricky to invert since this inverse problem is ill-posed. We propose to use generalized relaxation basis function (for instance by decomposing the spectra on basis of generalized Cole-Cole relaxation elements instead of the classical Debye basis) and to use the L-curve approach to optimize the damping parameter required to get smooth and realistic inverse solutions. We apply our algorithm to three examples, one synthetic and two real data sets, and the program includes the possibility of converting the RTD into GSD or PSD by choosing the value of the constant connecting the relaxation time to the characteristic polarization size of interest. A high frequencies (typically above 1 kHz), a dielectric term in taken into account in the model. The code is provided as an open Matlab source as a supplementary file associated with this paper.

  10. Can We Infer Ocean Dynamics from Altimeter Wavenumber Spectra?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, James; Shriver, Jay; Arbic, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and kinetic energy (KE) have been used to infer the dynamics of the ocean. When quasi-geostrophic dynamics (QG) or surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) turbulence dominate and an inertial subrange exists, a steep SSH wavenumber spectrum is expected with k-5 for QG turbulence and a flatter k-11/3 for SQG turbulence. However, inspection of the spectral slopes in the mesoscale band of 70 to 250 km shows that the altimeter wavenumber slopes typically are much flatter than the QG or SQG predictions over most of the ocean. Comparison of the altimeter wavenumber spectra with the spectra estimated from the output of an eddy resolving global ocean circulation model (the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM, at 1/25 resolution), which is forced by high frequency winds and includes the astronomical forcing of the sun and the moon, suggests that the flatter slopes of the altimeter may arise from three possible sources, the presence of internal waves, the lack of an inertial subrange in the 70 to 250 km band and noise or submesoscales at small scales. When the wavenumber spectra of SSH and KE are estimated near the internal tide generating regions, the resulting spectra are much flatter than the expectations of QG or SQG theory. If the height and velocity variability are separated into low frequency (periods greater than 2 days) and high frequency (periods less than a day), then a different pattern emerges with a relatively flat wavenumber spectrum at high frequency and a steeper wavenumber spectrum at low frequency. The stationary internal tides can be removed from the altimeter spectrum, which steepens the spectral slopes in the energetic internal wave regions. Away from generating regions where the internal waves

  11. Modulation spectra of natural sounds and ethological theories of auditory processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nandini C.; Theunissen, Frédéric E.

    2003-12-01

    The modulation statistics of natural sound ensembles were analyzed by calculating the probability distributions of the amplitude envelope of the sounds and their time-frequency correlations given by the modulation spectra. These modulation spectra were obtained by calculating the two-dimensional Fourier transform of the autocorrelation matrix of the sound stimulus in its spectrographic representation. Since temporal bandwidth and spectral bandwidth are conjugate variables, it is shown that the joint modulation spectrum of sound occupies a restricted space: sounds cannot have rapid temporal and spectral modulations simultaneously. Within this restricted space, it is shown that natural sounds have a characteristic signature. Natural sounds, in general, are low-passed, showing most of their modulation energy for low temporal and spectral modulations. Animal vocalizations and human speech are further characterized by the fact that most of the spectral modulation power is found only for low temporal modulation. Similarly, the distribution of the amplitude envelopes also exhibits characteristic shapes for natural sounds, reflecting the high probability of epochs with no sound, systematic differences across frequencies, and a relatively uniform distribution for the log of the amplitudes for vocalizations. It is postulated that the auditory system as well as engineering applications may exploit these statistical properties to obtain an efficient representation of behaviorally relevant sounds. To test such a hypothesis we show how to create synthetic sounds with first and second order envelope statistics identical to those found in natural sounds.

  12. Near Infrared Spectra of Mixtures Relevant to Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrapa, Rachel M. E.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sanford, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    We will present near IR spectra of ice mixtures and review the differences between spectra of mixtures and those of pure solids: the creation of new features, weakening and shifting of bands, dependence on concentration, and changes with temperature. The forbidden CO2 (2nu3) overtone at 2.134 microns (4685/cm) is absent from the spectrum of pure CO2, but present in all of the following mixtures: H2O/CO2 = 5 and = 25, H2O:CH3OH:CO2 = 100:2.5:1, and CH3OH:CO2 = 5. Also, in mixtures of H2O and any other material, we see a feature at 1.89 microns (5290/cm) that is possibly related to the "dangling OH" feature at 2.73 microns (3360/cm). The features of a material in H2O are generally weaker and shifted to longer wavelength in comparison to the pure substance. For example, the largest near-IR absorption of pure solid CH4 is located at 2.324 microns (4303/cm) but is broader and at slightly longer wavelength in samples mixed with H2O. The degree of shifting and weakening depends on the ratio of the mixture. The mixture mentioned above was at a ratio of H2O/ CH4 = 3. When the ratio rises to H2O/ CH4 = 87, the CH4 feature at 2.324 microns is shifted to shorter wavelength and is much broader and weaker. In CH4/ H2O mixtures the peaks shift to higher frequency and become increasingly broad, but this trend is reversible on re-cooling, even though the phase transitions of H2O are irreversible. In short, mixtures created in the lab produce spectra that are very different from modeled combinations of end member species. Recent Cassini VIMS observations show the CO2 fundamental at 4.255 microns (2350/cm) on Iapetus [l] and at 4.26 microns (2347/cm) on Phoebe [2], while Galileo NIMS observed it at 4.25 microns (2353/cm) on Ganymede [3]. Since pure CO2 is located at 4.266 (2344/cm), the CO2 must be mixed with something else to produce the shift. A mixture of CH3OH:CO2 = 5 at 90 K shifts the fundamental to 4.262 microns (2346/cm). The shifts in the feature between satellites could

  13. Raman Spectra Of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuković, T.; Dmitrović, S.; Dobardžić, E.

    2007-04-01

    Using nonresonant bond-polarization theory, Raman spectra of periodic double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are calculated. Due to the lower symmetry of DWCNT, the number of Raman active modes is much larger compared to those of its layers. Complete frequency range of the tubes spectra has been analyzed for large number of tubes. We found that only modes whose frequencies are below 800 cm-1 have noticeable up shifts compared to those of isolated layers. Special attention is given to radial breathing modes (RBMs) and G-band region since these modes are used for the identification of singe-walled carbon nanotubes. In case of breathing like modes (BLMs), frequency of the out of phase mode is found to be chirality dependent, while the in phase one remains only diameter dependent as in the case of individual layers.

  14. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  15. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  16. IRAS Low Resolution Spectra of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.

    2002-01-01

    Optical/near-infrared studies of asteroids are based on reflected sunlight and surface albedo variations create broad spectral features, suggestive of families of materials. There is a significant literature on these features, but there is very little work in the thermal infrared that directly probes the materials emitting on the surfaces of asteroids. We have searched for and extracted 534 thermal spectra of 245 asteroids from the original Dutch (Groningen) archive of spectra observed by the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). We find that, in general, the observed shapes of the spectral continua are inconsistent with that predicted by the standard thermal model used by IRAS. Thermal models such as proposed by Harris (1998) and Harris et al.(1998) for the near-earth asteroids with the "beaming parameter" in the range of 1.0 to 1.2 best represent the observed spectral shapes. This implies that the IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS, Tedesco, 1992) and the Supplementary IMPS (SIMPS, Tedesco, et al., 2002) derived asteroid diameters are systematically underestimated, and the albedos are overestimated. We have tentatively identified several spectral features that appear to be diagnostic of at least families of materials. The variation of spectral features with taxonomic class hints that thermal infrared spectra can be a valuable tool for taxonomic classification of asteroids.

  17. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  18. 47 CFR 2.1507 - Test frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test frequencies. 2.1507 Section 2.1507 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL... Radiobeacons (EPIRBs) Environmental and Operational Test Procedures § 2.1507 Test frequencies. Testing of...

  19. Similarity spectra analysis of high-performance jet aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Gee, Kent L; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2013-04-01

    Noise measured in the vicinity of an F-22A Raptor has been compared to similarity spectra found previously to represent mixing noise from large-scale and fine-scale turbulent structures in laboratory-scale jet plumes. Comparisons have been made for three engine conditions using ground-based sideline microphones, which covered a large angular aperture. Even though the nozzle geometry is complex and the jet is nonideally expanded, the similarity spectra do agree with large portions of the measured spectra. Toward the sideline, the fine-scale similarity spectrum is used, while the large-scale similarity spectrum provides a good fit to the area of maximum radiation. Combinations of the two similarity spectra are shown to match the data in between those regions. Surprisingly, a combination of the two is also shown to match the data at the farthest aft angle. However, at high frequencies the degree of congruity between the similarity and the measured spectra changes with engine condition and angle. At the higher engine conditions, there is a systematically shallower measured high-frequency slope, with the largest discrepancy occurring in the regions of maximum radiation.

  20. Similarity spectra analysis of high-performance jet aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Gee, Kent L; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2013-04-01

    Noise measured in the vicinity of an F-22A Raptor has been compared to similarity spectra found previously to represent mixing noise from large-scale and fine-scale turbulent structures in laboratory-scale jet plumes. Comparisons have been made for three engine conditions using ground-based sideline microphones, which covered a large angular aperture. Even though the nozzle geometry is complex and the jet is nonideally expanded, the similarity spectra do agree with large portions of the measured spectra. Toward the sideline, the fine-scale similarity spectrum is used, while the large-scale similarity spectrum provides a good fit to the area of maximum radiation. Combinations of the two similarity spectra are shown to match the data in between those regions. Surprisingly, a combination of the two is also shown to match the data at the farthest aft angle. However, at high frequencies the degree of congruity between the similarity and the measured spectra changes with engine condition and angle. At the higher engine conditions, there is a systematically shallower measured high-frequency slope, with the largest discrepancy occurring in the regions of maximum radiation. PMID:23556581

  1. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  2. Reference solar spectra: how do they compare in the UV?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueymard, C.

    Reference spectra covering all (or nearly all) the solar spectrum and integrating to at least 95% of the solar constant are needed in a variety of disciplines. Due to current experimental limitations these spectra are not monolithic but are rather composites that need to be assembled from a mix of space measurements, ground observatory measurements, and solar models. Depending on the sources of data used in each waveband and various scaling factors, these reference spectra may differ substantially. The focus is here on those historic spectra that have reached standard or pseudo-standard status [ASTM, Colina, Kurucz, Smith & Gottlieb, Thekaekara, and Wehrli]. The UV part of each of these spectra are compared to that of a recently published reference spectrum (Gueymard, 2004), to a UV spectrum measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory with a Brewer spectrophotometer (Gröbner and Kerr, 2001), and to the latest measured data from the SORCE satellite with the SIM and SOLSTICE instruments. In particular, it is found that the Gueymard and Gröbner spectra are in almost perfect agreement over the whole spectral range of the latter (295--355 nm), at their common resolution of 0.5 nm. In comparison, the older Wehrli spectrum shows noticeable differences. The relationship between the experimental wavelength accuracy and the absolute accuracy of these spectra is discussed in detail. In the UV, it is argued that wavelength accuracy is the dominant source of error in the most recent spectra, although absolute calibration generally becomes the dominant factor when considering relaxed resolutions (e.g., > 5 nm). The process of deriving reference spectra is now being standardized by ISO (Tobiska and Nusinov, 2000; ISO, 2002). This initiative opens the door to the development of more dependable and intercomparable spectra. In particular, the derivation of the recent Gueymard spectrum and how it respects the ISO guidelines are discussed in detail.

  3. On the potential usefulness of Fourier spectra of delayed fluorescence from plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2014-12-09

    Delayed fluorescence (DF) from photosystem II (PSII) of plants can be potentially used as a biosensor for the detection of plant physiological status and environmental changes. It has been analyzed mainly in the time domain. Frequency-domain analysis through Fourier transform allows viewing a signal from another angle, but the usefulness of DF spectra has not been well studied. In this work, experiments were conducted to show the differences and similarities in DF spectra of different plants with short pulse excitation. The DF spectra show low-pass characteristics with first-order attenuation of high frequencies. The results also show that the low-frequency components differ while the high-frequency components are similar. These may imply the potential usefulness of Fourier spectra of DF to analyze photoelectron transport in plants and classify samples.

  4. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  5. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  6. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  7. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  8. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  9. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  10. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  12. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  13. Maturation of EEG Power Spectra in Early Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cragg, Lucy; Kovacevic, Natasa; McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Poulsen, Catherine; Martinu, Kristina; Leonard, Gabriel; Paus, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the fine-grained development of the EEG power spectra in early adolescence, and the extent to which it is reflected in changes in peak frequency. It also sought to determine whether sex differences in the EEG power spectra reflect differential patterns of maturation. A group of 56 adolescents were tested at age 10 years and…

  14. Complex Spectra in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Giroud, C.; Jaspers, R.; Jupen, C.; Marchuk, O.; O'Mullane, M.; Summers, H. P.; Whiteford, A.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2005-01-01

    The need for quantitative evaluation of complex line emission spectra as observed in hot fusion plasmas initiated a challenging development of sophisticated interpretation tools based on integrating advanced atomic modelling with detailed treatment of the plasma environment. The successful merging of the two worlds has led to routine diagnostic procedures which have contributed enormously to the understanding of underlying plasma processes and also to a wide acceptance of spectroscopy as a reliable diagnostic method. In this paper three characteristic types of spectra of current and continuing interest are presented. The first is that of medium/heavy species with many ionisation stages revealed in survey VUV and XUV spectra. Such species occur as control gases, as wall materials, as ablated heavy species and possible as layered wall dopants for monitoring erosion. The spectra are complex with line-like and quasi-continuum regions and are amenable to advanced `pattern recognition' methods. The second type is of few electron, highly ionised systems observed as line-of-sight integrated passive emission spectra in the soft x-ray region. They are analysed successfully in terms of plasma parameters through matching of observation with predicted synthetic spectra. Examples used here include highly resolved helium-like emission spectra of argon, iron and titanium observed on the tokamaks TEXTOR and Tore Supra. The third type, and the emphasis of this work, comprises spectra linked to active beam spectroscopy, that is, charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES). In this case, a complex spectrum is again composed of a (usually) dominating active spectrum and an underlying passive emission spectrum. Its analysis requires modelling of both active and passive features. Examples used here are from the CXRS diagnostic at JET and TEXTOR. They display characteristic features of the main light impurity ions (C+6, He+2, N+7, Ne+10 and Ar+18

  15. Tuning vibrational mode localization with frequency windowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaolu; Talbot, Justin J.; Steele, Ryan P.

    2016-09-01

    Local-mode coordinates have previously been shown to be an effective starting point for anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy calculations. This general approach borrows techniques from localized-orbital machinery in electronic structure theory and generates a new set of spatially localized vibrational modes. These modes exhibit a well-behaved spatial decay of anharmonic mode couplings, which, in turn, allows for a systematic, a priori truncation of couplings and increased computational efficiency. Fully localized modes, however, have been found to lead to unintuitive mixtures of characteristic motions, such as stretches and bends, and accordingly large bilinear couplings. In this work, a very simple, tunable localization frequency window is introduced, in order to realize the transition from normal modes to fully localized modes. Partial localization can be achieved by localizing only pairs of modes within this traveling frequency window, which allows for intuitive interpretation of modes. The optimal window size is suggested to be a few hundreds of wave numbers, based on small- to medium-sized test systems, including water clusters and polypeptides. The new sets of partially localized coordinates retain their spatial coupling decay behavior while providing a reduced number of potential energy evaluations for convergence of anharmonic spectra.

  16. Raman spectra of solid benzene under high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiery, M.-M.; Kobashi, K.; Spain, I. L.

    1985-01-01

    Raman spectra of solid benzene have been measured at room temperature up to about 140 kbar, using the diamond anvil cell. Effort has been focused upon the lattice vibration spectra at pressures above that of phase II. It is found that a change in slopes occurs in the frequency-pressure curves at about 40 kbar. Furthermore, a new band appears above 90 kbar. These features probably correspond respectively to the II-III phase transition, which has been reported previously, and a III-IV phase transition, reported here for the first time.

  17. Investigation of the Moessbauer Spectrum Quality as a Dependence on the Frequency of the Velocity Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Pechousek, J.

    2010-07-13

    This paper is focused on a quality characterizing the Moessbauer spectra measured for various frequencies of the velocity signal. Standard electromechanical double-loudspeaker drive and digital PID velocity controller were used for calibration spectra measurement in the frequency interval from 4 up to 100 Hz. Several parameters were evaluated for recommendation of the suitable velocity signal frequency.

  18. Analysis of photometric spectra of 17 meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The initial phase of the photometry which involved 17 meteor spectra consisting of eight Geminid spectra, six Orionid spectra and three Eta Aquarid spectra is discussed. Among these 17 spectra it is found that the Geminid spectra are of the best quality and are used for the identification of the atomic lines and molecular bands that normally appear on video tape spectra. The data from the Geminid records are used for developing calibration techniques in photometry. The Orionid and Eta Aquarid spectra are chosen for early analysis because of the current interest in all physical and chemical data relating to Comet Halley.

  19. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  20. Inflation in general covariant theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongqing; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we study inflation in the framework of the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ. We find that the Friedmann-Robterson-Walker (FRW) universe is necessarily flat in such a setup. We work out explicitly the linear perturbations of the flat FRW universe without specifying to a particular gauge, and find that the perturbations are different from those obtained in general relativity, because of the presence of the high-order spatial derivative terms. Applying the general formulas to a single scalar field, we show that in the sub-horizon regions, the metric and scalar field are tightly coupled and have the same oscillating frequencies. In the super-horizon regions, the perturbations become adiabatic, and the comoving curvature perturbation is constant. We also calculate the power spectra and indices of both the scalar and tensor perturbations, and express them explicitly in terms of the slow roll parameters and the coupling constants of the high-order spatial derivative terms. In particular, we find that the perturbations, of both scalar and tensor, are almost scale-invariant, and, with some reasonable assumptions on the coupling coefficients, the spectrum index of the tensor perturbation is the same as that given in the minimum scenario in general relativity (GR), whereas the index for scalar perturbation in general depends on λ and is different from the standard GR value. The ratio of the scalar and tensor power spectra depends on the high-order spatial derivative terms, and can be different from that of GR significantly.

  1. Reduction of multielement mass spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Caffee, M.W.; Hudson, G.B.; Storch, N.A.

    1990-06-29

    Even though the spectra obtained by inductively coupled plasma source spectrometry (ICP-MS) are relatively simple, their interpretation can be complicated by the presence of molecular and isobaric interferants. To the extent that isotopic abundances are known and constant, one can treat observed spectra as sums of known components. A linear decomposition approach for determining the concentrations of the components in a spectrum and correctly propagating uncertainties is presented. This technique differs from linear regression in that an exact fit is made to a subset of isotopes and goodness-of-fit is evaluated from the deviations between the predicted and measured intensities of the other, unfit isotopes. This technique can be applied to a wide range of spectral fitting problems. In this paper, its applicability to ICP-MS spectra is used to demonstrate the use and utility of the technique. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  3. Nonperturbative signatures in pair production for general elliptic polarization fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. L.; Lu, D.; Xie, B. S.; Shen, B. F.; Fu, L. B.; Liu, J.

    2015-06-01

    The momentum signatures in nonperturbative multiphoton pair production for general elliptic polarization electric fields are investigated by employing the real-time Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism. For a linearly polarized electric field we find that the positions of the nodes in momentum spectra of created pairs depend only on the electric-field frequency. The polarization of external fields could not only change the node structures or even make the nodes disappear but also change the thresholds of pair production. The momentum signatures associated to the node positions in which the even-number photon pair creation process is forbidden could be used to distinguish the orbital angular momentum of created pairs on the momentum spectra. These distinguishable momentum signatures could be relevant for providing the output information of created particles and also the input information of ultrashort laser pulses.

  4. Terahertz spectroscopic polarimetry of generalized anisotropic media composed of Archimedean spiral arrays: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschaffenburg, Daniel J.; Williams, Michael R. C.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopic polarimetry has been used to measure the polarization state of all spectral components in a broadband THz pulse upon transmission through generalized anisotropic media consisting of two-dimensional arrays of lithographically defined Archimedean spirals. The technique allows a full determination of the frequency-dependent, complex-valued transmission matrix and eigenpolarizations of the spiral arrays. Measurements were made on a series of spiral array orientations. The frequency-dependent transmission matrix elements as well as the eigenpolarizations were determined, and the eigenpolarizations were found be to elliptically corotating, as expected from their symmetry. Numerical simulations are in quantitative agreement with measured spectra.

  5. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Leitner, D; Benitez, J Y; Lyneis, C M; Todd, D S; Ropponen, T; Ropponen, J; Koivisto, H; Gammino, S

    2008-03-01

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency. PMID:18377002

  6. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA INTHE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd,Damon S.; Ropponen,Tommi; Ropponen,Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Gammino, Santo

    2007-11-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for Nuclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental set-up to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental set-up for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the correction for detector efficiency, the shielding of the detector and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power and heating frequency.

  7. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  8. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  9. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  10. On the calibration of the IRAS low-resolution spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kevin; Cohen, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The need for corrections to the LRS spectra based on a study of a number of normal stars observed by IRAS is discussed. The spectra of bright stars, such as alpha CMa, were found to be inconsistent with blackbody sources, this effect being generally observed in sources earlier than about K3. An attempt is made to correct the LRS spectra by changing the blackbody calibration temperature for Alpha Tau, assumed to be a 10,000-K blackbody source for the original LRS flux calibration. It is found that an anomalously low color temperature must be assumed for alpha Tau to produce reasonable results for earlier-type stars. Corrections based on a set of stars with well-determined effective temperatures are examined, as are the resulting color temperatures for 72 stars with Atlas spectra.

  11. Spectra of hybrid synchrotron emission in hot black hole winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Ken; Fukue, Jun

    2015-12-01

    We solve radiative transfer to obtain the hybrid synchrotron spectra from a hot, optically thin black hole wind, by integrating the radiative transfer equation in the comoving frame and considering the relativistic effect of wind flow as well as the emission and absorption along the line-of-sight. We find two primary characteristics in the hybrid model: (1) a shoulder at low frequencies and (2) a power-law tail at high frequencies. Even if only 10-4 of the total electron energy is injected as non-thermal electrons, higher luminosity can be produced compared to the pure thermal model. Thus, there is a large difference between the pure thermal model and the hybrid one. In addition, as the wind velocity becomes large, the thermal peak of the comoving spectra shifts toward the high-frequency regime, due to the relativistic Doppler effect. As the wind velocity increases, on the other hand, the thermal peak of the observed spectra shifts toward the low-frequency regime, due to the redshifted part in the far side and limb side.

  12. 1/f 2 Characteristics and isotropy in the fourier power spectra of visual art, cartoons, comics, mangas, and different categories of photographs.

    PubMed

    Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2010-08-19

    Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D) Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f(2) characteristics), which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas), have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations), we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy) in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f(2) characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic perception remains

  13. 1/ fα spectra in elementary cellular automata and fractal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Jan; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2005-06-01

    We systematically compute the power spectra of the one-dimensional elementary cellular automata introduced by Wolfram. On the one hand our analysis reveals that one automaton displays 1/f spectra though considered as trivial, and on the other hand that various automata classified as chaotic or complex display no 1/f spectra. We model the results generalizing the recently investigated Sierpinski signal to a class of fractal signals that are tailored to produce 1/fα spectra. From the widespread occurrence of (elementary) cellular automata patterns in chemistry, physics, and computer sciences, there are various candidates to show spectra similar to our results.

  14. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Methyl Substitution and Loss of H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP approach, in conjunction with the 4-31G basis set, is used to compute the harmonic frequencies of 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracene, and their cations. The IR spectra of the methyl substituted species are very similar to the parent spectra, except for the addition of the methyl C-H stretch at lower frequency than the aromatic C-H stretch. The loss of a single hydrogen from naphthalene, anthracene, and their cations is shown to have a very small effect on the IR spectra. Loss of a methyl hydrogen from 1- or 2-methylnaphthalene, or their cations, is shown to shift the side group C-H frequencies from below aromatic hydrogen stretching frequencies to above them. The loss of IT from 2-methylenenaphthalene shows only a small shift in the side group C-H stretching frequency.

  15. cloud supersaturations and CCN spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James; Noble, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Multiple regression analysis predictions of low altitude cloud droplet concentrations based on measured CCN spectra compared much better with measured low altitude droplet concentrations than various CCN concentrations at single supersaturations (S) in two aircraft cumulus cloud projects, RICO and ICE-T. The addition of vertical velocity (W) to the single and multiple regressions showed small improvements. For RICO the multiple regression correlations were also superior to previous adiabatic model predictions of droplet concentrations also based on CCN spectra and mean W. More adiabatic cloud parcels showed only slightly better correlations than flight-averaged droplet concentrations. Results show the value of more extensive CCN spectra and the relative unimportance of W variations for determining droplet concentrations in these Caribbean cumuli. The fact that flight-averaged droplet concentrations of all low cloud data was almost as well correlated with CCN spectra as were droplet concentrations of more adiabatic cloud parcels indicates that entrainment did not significantly perturb CCN-droplet concentration relationships. As should be expected higher cloud S were determined for the cumulus clouds than for stratus clouds. Suppression of cloud S by higher CCN concentrations that had previously been observed in stratus was observed in ICE-T but not in RICO where the CCN range may have been too low for cloud S suppression. But ICE-T and a stratus project, POST, even showed this S suppression over the same limited maritime CCN range as RICO.

  16. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  17. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  18. Source spectra of seismic hum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kiwamu

    2014-10-01

    The observation of seismic hum from 2 to 20 mHz, also known as Earth's background free oscillations, has been established. Recent observations by broad-band seismometers show simultaneous excitation of Love waves (fundamental toroidal modes) and Rayleigh waves (fundamental spheroidal modes). The excitation amplitudes above 10 mHz can be explained by random shear traction sources on Earth's surface. With estimated source distributions, the most likely excitation mechanism is a linear coupling between ocean infragravity waves and seismic surface waves through seafloor topography. Observed Love and Rayleigh wave amplitudes below 5 mHz suggest that surface pressure sources could also contribute to their excitations, although the amplitudes have large uncertainties due to the high noise levels of the horizontal components. To quantify the observation, we develop a new method for estimation of the source spectra of random tractions on Earth's surface by modelling cross-spectra between pairs of stations. The method is to calculate synthetic cross-spectra for spatially isotropic and homogeneous excitations by random shear traction and pressure sources, and invert them with the observed cross-spectra to obtain the source spectra. We applied this method to the IRIS, ORFEUS, and F-net records from 618 stations with three components of broad-band seismometers for 2004-2011. The results show the dominance of shear traction above 5 mHz, which is consistent with past studies. Below 5 mHz, however, the spectral amplitudes of the pressure sources are comparable to those of shear traction. Observed acoustic resonance between the atmosphere and the solid Earth at 3.7 and 4.4 mHz suggests that atmospheric disturbances are responsible for the surface pressure sources, although non-linear ocean wave processes are also candidates for the pressure sources. Excitation mechanisms of seismic hum should be considered as a superposition of the processes of the solid Earth, atmosphere and ocean

  19. Applicability of density functional theory in reproducing accurate vibrational spectra of surface bound species.

    PubMed

    Matanović, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando H; Henson, Neil J

    2014-10-01

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of -2.62 and -1.1% for the N-N stretching and Rh-H stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the Rh-H and N-N stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schrödinger equation associated with the Rh-H, Rh-N, and N-N potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for N-N and Rh-H stretching modes as -31 cm(-1) and -77 cm(-1) at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments. PMID:25164265

  20. Applicability of Density Functional Theory in Reproducing Accurate Vibrational Spectra of Surface Bound Species

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-10-05

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of 22.62 and 21.1% for the NAN stretching and RhAH stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the RhAH and NAN stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schr€odinger equation associated with the RhAH, RhAN, and NAN potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for NAN and RhAH stretching modes as 231 cm21 and 277 cm21 at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments.

  1. Gravity wave spectra in the middle atmosphere as observed by Rayleigh lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.; Hauchecorne, A.; Chanin, M.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Rayleigh lidar offers the unique ability to make routine measurements of temperature (or density) mesoscale fluctuations in the 30 to 75 km altitude range. Power spectra of density and temperature fluctuations, versus vertical wavenumber and (apparent) frequency, are derived from lidar measurements. These spectra are interpreted in the framework of the gravity wave theory. Power spectral density increases from the stratosphere to the mesosphere in the entire accessible spectral range. Comparison with vertical spectra obtained with various sounding systems indicates a dispersion of the temperature power spectra in the stratosphere as an increase with altitude of the ratio of potential to kinetic energy.

  2. Higher-order spectra for identification of nonlinear modal coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Daryl; Worden, Keith; Platten, Michael F.; Wright, Jan R.; Cooper, Jonathan E.

    2009-05-01

    Over the past four decades considerable work has been done in the area of power spectrum estimation. The information contained within the power spectrum relates to a signal's autocorrelation or 'second-order statistics'. The power spectrum provides a complete statistical description of a Gaussian process; however, a problem with this information is that it is phase blind. This problem is addressed if one turns to a system's frequency response function (FRF). The FRF graphs the magnitude and phase of the frequency response of a system; in order to do this it requires information regarding the frequency content of the input and output signals. Situations arise in science and engineering whereby signal analysts are required to look beyond second-order statistics and analyse a signal's higher-order statistics (HOS). HOS or spectra give information on a signal's deviation from Gaussianity and consequently are a good indicator function for the presence of nonlinearity within a system. One of the main problems in nonlinear system identification is that of high modal density. Many modelling schemes involve making some expansion of the nonlinear restoring force in terms of polynomial or other basis terms. If more than one degree-of-freedom is involved this becomes a multivariate problem and the number of candidate terms in the expansion grows explosively with the order of nonlinearity and the number of degrees-of-freedom. This paper attempts to use HOS to detect and qualify nonlinear behaviour for a number of symmetrical and asymmetrical systems over a range of degrees-of-freedom. In doing so the paper also attempts to show that HOS are a more sensitive tool than the FRF in detecting nonlinearity. Furthermore, the object of this paper is to try and identify which modes couple in a nonlinear manner in order to reduce the number of candidate coupling terms, for a model, as much as possible. The bispectrum method has previously been applied to simple low-DOF systems with high

  3. Assessment of multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, N

    2008-01-21

    Electromagnetic fields both in daily life and at workplaces exhibit increasingly complex frequency spectra. Present spectral assessment rules proved to be too conservative for health risk assessment. This is because they are based on the assumption that cells would react like linear systems in terms of responding to a sum of frequencies by a sum of independent responses to each individual frequency. Based on numerical investigations with the Hodgkin-Huxley and the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley nerve cell models, it could be shown that accounting for the nonlinear behaviour of cellular excitation processes avoids considerable overestimation of simultaneous exposures to multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic fields. Besides this, it could be shown that the role of phase relationships is less important than that assumed so far. The present assessment rules lead to non-compliances of marketed electric appliances. For general application, a nonlinear biology-based assessment (NBBA) rule has been proposed, validated and proven advantageous compared with ICNIRP's rule. While staying conservative it avoids unnecessary overestimation and demonstrates compliance even in cases of suspected non-conformities. It is up to responsible bodies to decide upon the adoption of this proposal and the potential need for implementing additional or reducing the already incorporated safety factors.

  4. Assessment of multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic field exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields both in daily life and at workplaces exhibit increasingly complex frequency spectra. Present spectral assessment rules proved to be too conservative for health risk assessment. This is because they are based on the assumption that cells would react like linear systems in terms of responding to a sum of frequencies by a sum of independent responses to each individual frequency. Based on numerical investigations with the Hodgkin-Huxley and the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley nerve cell models, it could be shown that accounting for the nonlinear behaviour of cellular excitation processes avoids considerable overestimation of simultaneous exposures to multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic fields. Besides this, it could be shown that the role of phase relationships is less important than that assumed so far. The present assessment rules lead to non-compliances of marketed electric appliances. For general application, a nonlinear biology-based assessment (NBBA) rule has been proposed, validated and proven advantageous compared with ICNIRP's rule. While staying conservative it avoids unnecessary overestimation and demonstrates compliance even in cases of suspected non-conformities. It is up to responsible bodies to decide upon the adoption of this proposal and the potential need for implementing additional or reducing the already incorporated safety factors.

  5. Quantifying in vivo MR spectra with circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2006-03-01

    Accurate and robust quantification of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data is essential to its application in research and medicine. The performance of existing analysis methods is problematic for in vivo studies where low signal-to-noise ratio, overlapping peaks and intense artefacts are endemic. Here, a new frequency-domain technique for MRS data analysis is introduced wherein the circular trajectories which result when spectral peaks are projected onto the complex plane, are fitted with active circle models. The use of active contour strategies naturally allows incorporation of prior knowledge as constraint energy terms. The problem of phasing spectra is eliminated, and baseline artefacts are dealt with using active contours-snakes. The stability and accuracy of the new technique, CFIT, is compared with a standard time-domain fitting tool, using simulated 31P data with varying amounts of noise and 98 real human chest and heart 31P MRS data sets. The real data were also analyzed by our standard frequency-domain absorption-mode technique. On the real data, CFIT demonstrated the least fitting failures of all methods and an accuracy similar to the latter method, with both these techniques outperforming the time-domain approach. Contrasting results from simulations argue that performance relative to Cramer-Rao Bounds may not be a suitable indicator of fitting performance with typical in vivo data such as these. We conclude that CFIT is a stable, accurate alternative to the best existing methods of fitting in vivo data.

  6. Numerical calculations of wall pressure spectra for equilibrium turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momii, K.; Jinno, K.; Ueda, T.; Koike, T.

    1983-08-01

    The streamwise wavenumber spectra of wall pressure fluctuations are numerically calculated by using the profiles of mean velocity gradient, vertical turbulent intensity, and vertical velocity correlation which have already been obtained by various investigators. The formulations of convective velocities obtained by Panton and Linebarger (1974) are employed in the transformations of wavenumber spectra into frequency spectra. The transformed frequency spectra show good agreement with the experimental results by Willmarth and Wooldridge (1962) for a zero pressure gradient and by Bradshaw (1967) for an adverse pressure gradient. It is found that the streamwise anisotropy of velocity correlation in turbulent boundary layer increases the level of the spectra in low wavenumbers. Moreover, the effect of downstream pressure gradient is found to be equivalent to that of the anisotropy of the turbulence.

  7. Drag coefficient comparisons between observed and model simulated directional wave spectra under hurricane conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yalin; Rogers, W. Erick

    2016-06-01

    In this study, Donelan, M.A., Babanin, A.V., Young, I.R., Banner, M.L., 2006. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 36, 1672-1688 source function is used to calculate drag coefficients from both the scanning radar altimeter (SRA) measured two dimensional wave spectra obtained during hurricane Ivan in 2004 and the WAVEWATCH III simulated wave spectra. The drag coefficients disagree between the SRA and model spectra mainly in the right/left rear quadrant of the hurricane where the observed spectra appear to be bimodal while the model spectra are single peaked with more energy in the swell frequencies and less energy in the wind sea frequencies. These results suggest that WAVEWATCH III is currently not capable of providing sensible stress calculations in the rear quadrants of the hurricane.

  8. Quantification of in vivo ³¹P NMR brain spectra using LCModel.

    PubMed

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Nguyen, Tra-My; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Mochel, Fanny; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2015-06-01

    Quantification of (31)P NMR spectra is commonly performed using line-fitting techniques with prior knowledge. Currently available time- and frequency-domain analysis software includes AMARES (in jMRUI) and CFIT respectively. Another popular frequency-domain approach is LCModel, which has been successfully used to fit both (1)H and (13)C in vivo NMR spectra. To the best of our knowledge LCModel has not been used to fit (31)P spectra. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using LCModel to quantify in vivo (31)P MR spectra, provided that adequate prior knowledge and LCModel control parameters are used. Both single-voxel and MRSI data are presented, and similar results are obtained with LCModel and with AMARES. This provides a new method for automated, operator-independent analysis of (31)P NMR spectra. PMID:25871439

  9. 47 CFR 95.1111 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1111 Frequency coordination. (a) Prior to operation, authorized health care providers who desire to use wireless medical...

  10. Simulation of transient infrared spectra of a photoswitchable peptide.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Maja; Lieder, Martin; Nguyen, Phuong H; Stock, Gerhard

    2011-12-14

    In transient infrared (IR) experiments, a molecular system may be photoexcited in a nonstationary conformational state, whose time evolution is monitored via IR spectroscopy with high temporal and structural resolution. As a theoretical formulation of these experiments, this work derives explicit expressions for transient one- and two-dimensional IR spectra and discusses various levels of approximation and sampling strategies. Adopting a photoswitchable octapeptide in water as a representative example, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed and the photoinduced conformational dynamics and associated IR spectra are discussed in detail. Interestingly, it is found that the time scales of dynamics and spectra may differ from residue to residue by up to an order of magnitude. Considering merely the cumulative spectrum of all residues, the contributions of the individual residues largely compensate each other, which may explain the surprisingly small frequency shifts and short photoproduct rise times found in experiment. Even when a localized amide I mode is probed (e.g., via isotope labeling), the vibrational frequency shift is shown to depend in a complicated way on the conformation of the entire peptide as well as on the interaction with the solvent. In this context, various issues concerning the interpretation of transient IR spectra and conformational dynamics in terms of a few exponential time scales are discussed. PMID:22168727

  11. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  12. [Raman, FTIR spectra and normal mode analysis of acetanilide].

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui-Qin; Tao, Ya-Ping; Han, Li-Gang; Han, Yun-Xia; Mo, Yu-Jun

    2012-10-01

    The Raman and FTIR spectra of acetanilide (ACN) were measured experimentally in the regions of 3 500-50 and 3 500-600 cm(-1) respectively. The equilibrium geometry and vibration frequencies of ACN were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT) method (B3LYP/6-311G(d, p)). The results showed that the theoretical calculation of molecular structure parameters are in good agreement with previous report and better than the ones calculated based on 6-31G(d), and the calculated frequencies agree well with the experimental ones. Potential energy distribution of each frequency was worked out by normal mode analysis, and based on this, a detailed and accurate vibration frequency assignment of ACN was obtained. PMID:23285870

  13. Near-Infrared Spectra of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardy, C. L.; Fesen, R. A.; Hoflich, P.; Nomoto, K.; Garnavich, P. M.; Jha, S.; Challis, P. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Wheeler, J. C.; Sakai, S.

    2001-12-01

    We present results from a survey of the near-infrared properties of all types of supernovae. Near-infrared spectra of the subluminous Type Ia SN 1999by taken 5 days before to two weeks after maximum light have been analysed using self-consistent SN Ia explosion models. The data generally agree with 1D delayed-detonation models, indicate a near Chandrasekhar-mass WD progenitor, and show low yield of iron-peak elements confined to the innermost layers of the ejecta. This puts strong constraints on the mixing of large iron blobs into the outer layers due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the deflagration phase. NIR spectra of Type IIP SNe are relatively line-free during the plateau phase, showing largely hydrogen emission with only a handful of other lines, mostly in the 1-1.2 micron region. After the plateau phase, Type IIP spectra become much richer, showing many overlapping emission features throughout the near-infrared. It appears that CO emission is a common feature of core-collapse supernovae, as several detections of first overtone CO emission near 2.3 microns have been made, including SN 1998S (IIn), SN 1999em, SN 1999gi (IIP) and SN 2000ew (Ic). Finally, we find that Type IIn supernovae often exhibit extraordinary infrared excesses at late times. This is probably thermal emission from hot dust, most likely in the dense circumstellar gas surrounding the progenitor star. The infrared luminosity can reach 1041-42 erg s-1, and can last for several years. A possible scenario is that the dust emission is an ``infrared echo'' powered not by the flash of the SN explosion, but rather by UV/X-ray emission from the strong shock interaction with the dense circumstellar material.

  14. Ground-state features in the THz spectra of molecular clusters of β-HMX.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Shabaev, Andrew; Lambrakos, Samuel G; Massa, Lou

    2012-10-01

    We present calculations of absorption spectra arising from molecular vibrations at THz frequencies for molecular clusters of the explosive HMX using density functional theory (DFT). The features of these spectra can be shown to follow from the coupling of vibrational modes. In particular, the coupling among ground-state vibrational modes provides a reasonable molecular-level interpretation of spectral features associated with the vibrational modes of molecular clusters. THz excitation from the ground state is associated with frequencies that characteristically perturb molecular electronic states, in contrast to frequencies, which are usually substantially above the mid-infrared (mid-IR) range, that can induce appreciable electronic-state transition. Owing to this characteristic of THz excitation, one is able to make a direct association between local oscillations about ground-state minima of molecules, either isolated or comprising a cluster, and THz absorption spectra. The DFT software program GAUSSIAN was used for the calculations of the absorption spectra presented here.

  15. Correction of electrode modelling errors in multi-frequency EIT imaging.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Markus; Holder, David

    2016-06-01

    The differentiation of haemorrhagic from ischaemic stroke using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) requires measurements at multiple frequencies, since the general lack of healthy measurements on the same patient excludes time-difference imaging methods. It has previously been shown that the inaccurate modelling of electrodes constitutes one of the largest sources of image artefacts in non-linear multi-frequency EIT applications. To address this issue, we augmented the conductivity Jacobian matrix with a Jacobian matrix with respect to electrode movement. Using this new algorithm, simulated ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes in a realistic head model were reconstructed for varying degrees of electrode position errors. The simultaneous recovery of conductivity spectra and electrode positions removed most artefacts caused by inaccurately modelled electrodes. Reconstructions were stable for electrode position errors of up to 1.5 mm standard deviation along both surface dimensions. We conclude that this method can be used for electrode model correction in multi-frequency EIT.

  16. A novel probe head for high-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annino, G.; Cassettari, M.; Longo, I.; Martinelli, M.; Van Bentum, P. J. M.; Van der Horst, E.

    1999-03-01

    A probe head especially useful for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers working at high field—high frequency is presented. The probe head is based on the whispering gallery mode dielectric resonators that proved very effective in the ultrahigh frequency range. The excitation network uses a properly shaped dielectric waveguide sharing its external field pattern with the field of the resonators. Very simple resonators made with polyethylene in both single and doubly stacked disk configurations are used. The experimental characterization by a submillimeter network analyzer shows for the resonances studied in a wide range of frequencies up to ≈400 GHz high loaded merit factor QL values and good coupling factors. Resonators also maintain their general characteristics when large quantities of low loss samples for EPR measurements are properly inserted. Preliminary EPR spectra of diphenylpicrylhyldrazyl at 7 and 10 T obtained with the novel apparatus are finally presented.

  17. Classifying Spectra Based on DLS and Rough Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhanyi; Zhao, Yongheng

    2003-01-01

    Until now, it is still difficult to identify different kinds of celestial bodies depending on their spectra, because it needs a lot of astronomers" manual work of measuring, marking and identifying, which is generally very hard and time-consuming. And with the exploding spectral data from all kinds of telescopes, it is becoming more and more urgent to find a thoroughly automatic way to deal with such a kind of problem. In fact, when we change our viewpoint, we can find that it is a traditional problem in pattern recognition field when considering the whole process of dealing with spectral signals: filtering noises, extracting features, constructing classifiers, etc. The main purpose for automatic classification and recognition of spectra in LAMOST (Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope) project is to identify a celestial body"s type only based on its spectrum. For this purpose, one of the key steps is to establish a good model to describe all kinds of spectra and thus it will be available to construct some excellent classifiers. In this paper, we present a novel describing language to represent spectra. And then, based on the language, we use some algorithms to extract classifying rules from raw spectra datasets and then construct classifiers to identify spectra by using rough set method. Compared with other methods, our technique is more similar to man"s thinking way, and to some extent, efficient.

  18. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  19. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  20. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to 10 mm. Methods: Parallel double-station video observations allowed us to compute heliocentric orbits for all meteors. Most observations were performed during the periods of activity of major meteor showers in the years between 2006 and 2012. Spectra are classified according to relative intensities of the low-temperature emission lines of Mg, Na, and Fe. Results: Shower meteors were found to be of normal composition, except for Southern δ Aquariids and some members of the Geminid shower, neither of which have Na in the meteor spectra. Variations in Na content are typical for the Geminid shower. Three populations of Na-free mereoroids were identified. The first population are iron meteorites, which have an asteroidal-chondritic origin, but one meteoroid with low perihelion (0.11 AU) was found among the iron meteorites. The second population were Sun-approaching meteoroids in which sodium is depleted by thermal desorption. The third population were Na-free meteoroids of cometary origin. Long exposure to cosmic rays on the surface of comets in the Oort cloud and disintegration of this crust might be the origin of this population of meteoroids. Spectra (Figs. 17-30) are only, Tables 4-6 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A67

  1. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  2. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  3. Variable spectra of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of EXOSAT spectra of active galaxies are presented. The objects examined for X-ray spectral variability were MR 2251-178 and 3C 120. The results of these investigations are described, as well as additional results on X-ray spectral variability related to EXOSAT observations of active galaxies. Additionally, the dipping X-ray source 4U1624-49 was also investigated.

  4. An atlas of selected calibrated stellar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Russell G.; Cohen, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Five hundred and fifty six stars in the IRAS PSC-2 that are suitable for stellar radiometric standards and are brighter than 1 Jy at 25 microns were identified. In addition, 123 stars that meet all of our criteria for calibration standards, but which lack a luminosity class were identified. An approach to absolute stellar calibration of broadband infrared filters based upon new models of Vega and Sirius due to Kurucz (1992) is presented. A general technique used to assemble continuous wide-band calibrated infrared spectra is described and an absolutely calibrated 1-35 micron spectrum of alpha(Tau) is constructed and the method using new and carefully designed observations is independently validated. The absolute calibration of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) database is investigated by comparing the observed spectrum of alpha(Tau) with that assumed in the original LRS calibration scheme. Neglect of the SiO fundamental band in alpha(Tau) has led to the presence of a specious 'emission' feature in all LRS spectra near 8.5 microns, and to an incorrect spectral slope between 8 and 12 microns. Finally, some of the properties of asteroids that effect their utility as calibration objects for the middle and far infrared region are examined. A technique to determine, from IRAS multiwaveband observations, the basic physical parameters needed by various asteroid thermal models that minimize the number of assumptions required is developed.

  5. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  6. Spectra of Cas A's Highest Velocity Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan

    2010-08-01

    The young age and close distance of the Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) make it perhaps our best case study and clearest look at the explosion dynamics of a core-collapse supernova (CCSN). Interestingly, Cas A exhibits two nearly opposing streams of high velocity ejecta or `jets' in its NE and SW regions racing outward at speeds more than twice that of the main shell. The nature of these jets, however, and their possible association with an aspherical supernova explosion mechanism is controversial. A handful of existing low-resolution spectra of outer knots in the NE jet display chemical abundances hinting at an origin from the S-Si-Ca- Ar rich layer deep inside the progenitor. If these abundances could be firmly established in both the NE and SW jets, it would be very strong evidence in support of a highly asymmetrical explosion engine for Cas A's progenitor and, in turn, for CCSNe in general. We request KPNO 4m telescope + MARS time to obtain high quality multi-object spectroscopy of Cas A's highest velocity ejecta to measure their nitrogen, sulfur, oxygen, calcium, and argon abundances. These spectra will be analyzed with the metal-rich shock models of J. Raymond and then compared to current sets of CCSN models paying particular attention to knot composition vs. ejection velocity and ejecta mixing.

  7. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  8. Preliminary investigation on the relation between maximum wave height and wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Aifeng; Wen, Cheng; Wu, Yuqing; Wu, Haoran; Li, Shuo; Cao, Guangsui

    2016-04-01

    The maximum wave height is important not only for the determination of design wave parameters but also for the marine disaster defense. While it cannot be predicted straightforwardly at present, since the general numerical models for wave forecasting are all based on phase averaged spectra model. Then it becomes very useful to make clear the relationship between the maximum wave height and wave spectra parameters, such as average wave steepness, spectra width and spectra type, such as one single peak spectra or multi peaks spectra. In order to perform this research procedure, plenty of observed wave data are required. We collected ten years wave data measured from a ship in North Sea, one year wave pressure data from nine points around Korea, four years buoy data from three points along Chinese coast. The preliminary investigation results on the relations between maximum waves and spectra via the mention observed data will be present here.

  9. General Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is a General Dentist? Article Chapters What Is a General Dentist? General ... Reviewed: January 2012 ?xml:namespace> Related Articles: General Dentists FAGD and MAGD: What Do These Awards Mean? ...

  10. Vibrational spectra from atomic fluctuations in dynamics simulations. I. Theory, limitations, and a sample application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Tavan, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Hybrid molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which combine density functional theory (DFT) descriptions of a molecule with a molecular mechanics (MM) modeling of its solvent environment, have opened the way towards accurate computations of solvation effects in the vibrational spectra of molecules. Recently, Wheeler et al. [ChemPhysChem 4, 382 (2002)] have suggested to compute these spectra from DFT/MM-MD trajectories by diagonalizing the covariance matrix of atomic fluctuations. This so-called principal mode analysis (PMA) allegedly can replace the well-established approaches, which are based on Fourier transform methods or on conventional normal mode analyses. By scrutinizing and revising the PMA approach we identify five conditions, which must be guaranteed if PMA is supposed to render exact vibrational frequencies. Besides specific choices of (a) coordinates and (b) coordinate systems, these conditions cover (c) a harmonic intramolecular potential, (d) a complete thermal equilibrium within the molecule, and (e) a molecular Hamiltonian independent of time. However, the PMA conditions [(c)-(d)] and [(c)-(e)] are generally violated in gas phase DFT-MD and liquid phase DFT/MM-MD trajectories, respectively. Based on a series of simple analytical model calculations and on the analysis of MD trajectories calculated for the formaldehyde molecule in the gas phase (DFT) and in liquid water (DFT/MM) we show that in both phases the violation of condition (d) can cause huge errors in PMA frequency computations, whereas the inevitable violations of conditions (c) and (e), the latter being generic to the liquid phase, imply systematic and sizable underestimates of the vibrational frequencies by PMA. We demonstrate that the huge errors, which are caused by an incomplete thermal equilibrium violating (d), can be avoided if one introduces mode-specific temperatures Tj and calculates the frequencies from a "generalized virial" (GV) expression instead from PMA. Concerning ways to

  11. Generalized Fourier analysis for phase retrieval of fringe pattern.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jingang; Weng, Jiawen

    2010-12-20

    A generalized Fourier analysis, by use of an adaptive multiscale windowed Fourier transform (AWFT), has been presented for the phase retrieval of fringe patterns. The Fourier transform method can be considered as a special case of AWFT method with a maximum window. The instantaneous frequency of the local signal is introduced to estimate whether the condition for separating the first spectrum component is satisfied for the phase retrieval of fringe patterns. The adaptive window width for this algorithm is determined by the length of the local stationary fringe pattern in order to balance the frequency and space resolution. The local stationary length of fringe pattern is defined as the signal satisfying the condition that whose first spectrum component is separated from all the other spectra within the local spatial area. In comparison with Fourier transform, fixed windowed Fourier transform and wavelet transform in numerical simulation and experiment, the adaptive multiscale windowed Fourier transform can present more accurate results of phase retrieval.

  12. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  13. IIB soliton spectra with all fluxes activated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah

    2003-05-01

    Building upon an earlier proposal for the classification of fluxes, a sequence is proposed which generalizes the AHSS by computing type IIB string theory's group of conserved RR and also NS charges, which is conjectured to be a K-theory of dual pairs. As a test of this proposal, the formalism of Maldacena, Moore and Seiberg ( arxiv:hep-th/0108100) is applied to classify D-branes, NS5-branes, F-strings and their dielectric counterparts in IIB compactified on a 3-sphere with both NS and RR background fluxes. The soliton spectra on the 3-sphere are then compared with the output of the sequence, as is the baryon spectrum in Witten's non- spinc example, AdS 5× RP5. The group of conserved charges is seen to change during Brown-Teitelboim-like phase transitions which change the effective cosmological constant.

  14. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  15. Universality of vibrational spectra of globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e. regardless of the protein in question, it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond previous claims of universality, confirming that universality holds even in the frequency range that is well above 100 cm-1 (300-4000 cm-1), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such ‘outlier’ proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another significant implication of our findings is that the universality can provide an exquisite tool for assessing and improving the quality of potential functions and the quality of various models used for NMA computations. Finally, we show that the input configuration also affects the density of modes, thus emphasizing the importance of simplified potential energy formulations that are minimized at the outset. In summary, our findings call for a serious two-way dialogue between theory and experiment: experimental spectra of proteins could now guide the fine tuning of theoretical empirical potentials, and the various features and peaks observed in theoretical studies—being universal, and hence now rising in importance—would hopefully spur experimental confirmation.

  16. Universality of vibrational spectra of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2016-02-23

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e. regardless of the protein in question, it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond previous claims of universality, confirming that universality holds even in the frequency range that is well above 100 cm(-1) (300-4000 cm(-1)), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such 'outlier' proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another significant implication of our findings is that the universality can provide an exquisite tool for assessing and improving the quality of potential functions and the quality of various models used for NMA computations. Finally, we show that the input configuration also affects the density of modes, thus emphasizing the importance of simplified potential energy formulations that are minimized at the outset. In summary, our findings call for a serious two-way dialogue between theory and experiment: experimental spectra of proteins could now guide the fine tuning of theoretical empirical potentials, and the various features and peaks observed in theoretical studies--being universal, and hence now rising in importance--would hopefully spur experimental confirmation.

  17. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}∼ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}∼ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1–10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}∼ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ∼60–80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ∼1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  18. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  19. Infrared and vibrational CD spectra of partially solvated alpha-helices: DFT-based simulations with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Turner, David R; Kubelka, Jan

    2007-02-22

    Theoretical simulations are used to investigate the effects of aqueous solvent on the vibrational spectra of model alpha-helices, which are only partly exposed to solvent to mimic alpha-helices in proteins. Infrared absorption (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) amide I' spectra for 15-amide alanine alpha-helices are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with the property transfer method. The solvent is modeled by explicit water molecules hydrogen bonded to the solvated amide groups. Simulated spectra for two partially solvated model alpha-helices, one corresponding to a more exposed and the other to a more buried structure, are compared to the fully solvated and unsolvated (gas phase) simulations. The dependence of the amide I spectra on the orientation of the partially solvated helix with respect to the solvent and effects of solvation on the amide I' of 13C isotopically substituted alpha-helices are also investigated. The partial exposure to solvent causes significant broadening of the amide I' bands due to differences in the vibrational frequencies of the explicitly solvated and unsolvated amide groups. The different degree of partial solvation is reflected primarily in the frequency shifts of the unsolvated (buried) amide group vibrations. Depending on which side of the alpha-helix is exposed to solvent, the simulated IR band-shapes exhibit significant changes, from broad and relatively featureless to distinctly split into two maxima. The simulated amide I' VCD band-shapes for the partially solvated alpha-helices parallel the broadening of the IR and exhibit more sign variation, but generally preserve the sign pattern characteristic of the alpha-helical structures and are much less dependent on the alpha-helix orientation with respect to the solvent. The simulated amide I' IR spectra for the model peptides with explicitly hydrogen-bonded water are consistent with the experimental data for small alpha-helical proteins

  20. Theoretical IR spectra of ionized naphthalene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauzat, F.; Talbi, D.; Miller, M. D.; DeFrees, D. J.; Ellinger, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study of the effect of ionization on the IR spectrum of naphthalene, using ab initio molecular orbital theory. For that purpose we determined the structures, band frequencies, and intensities of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene. The calculated frequencies and intensities allowed an assignment of the most important bands appearing in the newly reported experimental spectrum of the positive ion. Agreement with the experimental spectrum is satisfactory enough to take into consideration the unexpected and important result that ionization significantly affects the intensities of most vibrations. A possible consequence on the interpretation of the IR interstellar emission, generally supposed to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is briefly presented.

  1. Raman Spectra of Liquid Water from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics: Vibrational Signatures of Charge Fluctuations in the Hydrogen Bond Network.

    PubMed

    Wan, Quan; Spanu, Leonardo; Galli, Giulia A; Gygi, François

    2013-09-10

    We report the first ab initio simulations of the Raman spectra of liquid water, obtained by combining first principles molecular dynamics and density functional perturbation theory. Our computed spectra are in good agreement with experiments, especially in the low frequency region. We also describe a systematic strategy to analyze the Raman intensities, which is of general applicability to molecular solids and liquids, and it is based on maximally localized Wannier functions and effective molecular polarizabilities. Our analysis revealed the presence of intermolecular charge fluctuations accompanying the hydrogen bond (HB) stretching modes at 270 cm(-1), in spite of the absence of any Raman activity in the isotropic spectrum. We also found that charge fluctuations partly contribute to the 200 cm(-1) peak in the anisotropic spectrum, thus providing insight into the controversial origin of such peak. Our results highlighted the importance of taking into account electronic effects in interpreting the Raman spectra of liquid water and the key role of charge fluctuations within the HB network; they also pointed at the inaccuracies of models using constant molecular polarizabilities to describe the Raman response of liquid water. PMID:26592405

  2. Fermi resonance in the phonon spectra of quaternary chalcogenides of the type Cu2ZnGeS4.

    PubMed

    Valakh, M Ya; Litvinchuk, A P; Dzhagan, V M; Yukhymchuk, V O; Yaremko, A M; Romanyuk, Yu A; Guc, M; Bodnar, I V; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Zahn, D R T

    2016-02-17

    The experimental resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering spectra of the kesterite structural modification of Cu2ZnGeS4 single crystals are reported. The results are compared with those calculated theoretically within the density functional perturbation theory. For the majority of lines a good agreement (within 2-5 cm(-1)) is established between experimental and calculated mode frequencies. However, several dominant spectral lines, in particular the two intense fully symmetric modes, are found to deviate from the calculated values by as much as 20 cm(-1). A possible reason for this discrepancy is found to be associated with the Fermi resonant interaction between one and two-phonon vibrational excitations. The modelling of spectra, which takes into account the symmetry of interacting states, allows a qualitative description of the observed experimental findings. Due to the similarity of the vibrational spectra of Cu2A (II) B (IV) S4 (A  =  Zn, Mn, Cd; B  =  Sn, Ge, Si) chalcogenides, Fermi resonance is argued to be a general phenomenon for this class of compounds. PMID:26795711

  3. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  4. 47 CFR 95.1111 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 95.1111 Section 95.1111... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1111 Frequency coordination. (a... devices must register all devices with a designated frequency coordinator. Except as specified in §...

  5. 47 CFR 95.1111 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 95.1111 Section 95.1111... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1111 Frequency coordination. (a... devices must register all devices with a designated frequency coordinator. Except as specified in §...

  6. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  7. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  8. 47 CFR 95.1111 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 95.1111 Section 95.1111... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1111 Frequency coordination. (a... devices must register all devices with a designated frequency coordinator. Except as specified in §...

  9. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  10. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1111 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 95.1111 Section 95.1111... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1111 Frequency coordination. (a... devices must register all devices with a designated frequency coordinator. Except as specified in §...

  12. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  13. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  14. Characteristics of Langmuir electric field waveforms and power spectra exhibiting nonlinear behavior in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigsbee, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Schwartz, S. J.; Lefebvre, B.; Lucek, E.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Kucharek, H.

    2010-10-01

    Langmuir wave characteristics in the Earth's foreshock were examined to identify possible nonlinear wave behavior for two case studies with data from the Cluster Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver. The occurrence rates of four types of power spectra near the foreshock edge were determined: (1) spectra with power at the local plasma frequency fpe only, (2) spectra with power at fpe and 2fpe, (3) spectra with double peaks near fpe, and (4) spectra with double peaks near fpe and peaks at low frequencies indicative of ion acoustic waves. For electric field waveform amplitudes between 0.1 and 22.0 mV/m, most power spectra fell into the fpe only and double-peaked categories. The maximum Langmuir wave amplitudes and bump-on-tail reduced electron distribution functions from Cluster PEACE data were more consistent with saturation of wave growth by electrostatic decay than modulational instabilities. However, few spectra had the double peaks near fpe and ion acoustic waves indicative of electrostatic decay, suggesting other processes may also be at work. For amplitudes greater than 22.0 mV/m, most power spectra fell into the fpe and 2fpe category, but many of the harmonics were too weak to be clearly distinguished from harmonics caused by instrumental effects.

  15. Definition of energy-calibrated spectra for national reachback

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Christopher L.; Hertz, Kristin L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the timeliness and accuracy of analysis results of spectra submitted to National Reachback, particularly for the detection of threat items. Many spectra submitted for analysis include either a calibration spectrum using 137Cs or no calibration spectrum at all. The single line provided by 137Cs is insufficient to adequately calibrate nonlinear spectra. A calibration source that provides several lines that are well-spaced, from the low energy cutoff to the full energy range of the detector, is needed for a satisfactory energy calibration. This paper defines the requirements of an energy calibration for the purposes of National Reachback, outlines a method to validate whether a given spectrum meets that definition, discusses general source considerations, and provides a specific operating procedure for calibrating the GR-135.

  16. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGES

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore » multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  17. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  18. Exact results for amplitude spectra of fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, Johannes; Szendro, Ivan G; Krug, Joachim

    2013-09-01

    Starting from fitness correlation functions, we calculate exact expressions for the amplitude spectra of fitness landscapes as defined by Stadler [1996. Landscapes and their correlation functions. J. Math. Chem. 20, 1] for common landscape models, including Kauffman's NK-model, rough Mount Fuji landscapes and general linear superpositions of such landscapes. We further show that correlations decaying exponentially with the Hamming distance yield exponentially decaying spectra similar to those reported recently for a model of molecular signal transduction. Finally, we compare our results for the model systems to the spectra of various experimentally measured fitness landscapes. We claim that our analytical results should be helpful when trying to interpret empirical data and guide the search for improved fitness landscape models.

  19. Infrared spectra of brassinolide and castasterone steroid phytohormones and their 24-epi derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, N. A.; Buslov, D. K.

    2010-09-01

    Absorption bands in IR spectra of brassinolide, castasterone, and their 24-epi derivatives in the frequency range 3800-1000 cm-1 have been interpreted. A number of spectral features distinguishing brassinolide from castasterone have been found. The conducted analysis shows that the structural differences manifest themselves in IR spectra of the investigated brassinosteroids in the region of stretching vibrations of CO-H, C=O, C-OH, C-O-C, CH3, CH2, and CH groups. The main distinctions in IR spectra of brassinolides and castasterones are due to the B ring structure. All hydroxyl groups of brassinosteroids pressed in KBr are included in hydrogen bonds. Broad bands attributed to associated OH groups are observed in the IR spectra. Two possible kinds of hydrogen bonding exist. IR spectra of diluted solutions of the studied brassinosteroids contain two bands caused by vibrations of free hydroxyls and those associated by intramolecular hydrogen bonds. A fraction of the C=O groups of brassinosteroids pressed in KBr remains free. High-frequency bands in solid-state IR spectra are due to vibrations of free C=O groups whereas low-frequency bands are attributed to stretching vibrations of associated groups. The lack of low-frequency bands in solution spectra proves that the C=OṡṡṡH-O hydrogen bond is intermolecular rather than intramolecular. Vibrational frequencies of brassinolide C=O groups are higher than the corresponding frequencies for castasterones because of the influence of oxygen in the seven-membered B ring.

  20. Noise power spectra of images from digital mammography detectors.

    PubMed

    Williams, M B; Mangiafico, P A; Simoni, P U

    1999-07-01

    Noise characterization through estimation of the noise power spectrum (NPS) is a central component of the evaluation of digital x-ray systems. We begin with a brief review of the fundamentals of NPS theory and measurement, derive explicit expressions for calculation of the one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) NPS, and discuss some of the considerations and tradeoffs when these concepts are applied to digital systems. Measurements of the NPS of two detectors for digital mammography are presented to illustrate some of the implications of the choices available. For both systems, two-dimensional noise power spectra obtained over a range of input fluence exhibit pronounced asymmetry between the orthogonal frequency dimensions. The 2D spectra of both systems also demonstrate dominant structures both on and off the primary frequency axes indicative of periodic noise components. Although the two systems share many common noise characteristics, there are significant differences, including markedly different dark-noise magnitudes, differences in NPS shape as a function of both spatial frequency and exposure, and differences in the natures of the residual fixed pattern noise following flat fielding corrections. For low x-ray exposures, quantum noise-limited operation may be possible only at low spatial frequency. Depending on the method of obtaining the 1D NPS (i.e., synthetic slit scanning or slice extraction from the 2D NPS), on-axis periodic structures can be misleadingly smoothed or missed entirely. Our measurements indicate that for these systems, 1D spectra useful for the purpose of detective quantum efficiency calculation may be obtained from thin cuts through the central portion of the calculated 2D NPS. On the other hand, low-frequency spectral values do not converge to an asymptotic value with increasing slit length when 1D spectra are generated using the scanned synthetic slit method. Aliasing can contribute significantly to the digital NPS, especially near the