Science.gov

Sample records for generalized frequency spectra

  1. Signal Frequency Spectra with Audacity®

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gailey, Alycia

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the activity presented here is to allow students to explore the frequency components of various simple signals, with the ultimate goal of teaching them how to remove unwanted noise from a voice signal. Analysis of the frequency components of a signal allows students to design filters that remove unwanted components of a…

  2. Hardware Demonstration: Frequency Spectra of Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloskey, John; Dimov, Jen

    2017-01-01

    Radiated emissions measurements as specified by MIL-STD-461 are performed in the frequency domain, which is best suited to continuous wave (CW) types of signals. However, many platforms implement signals that are single event pulses or transients. Such signals can potentially generate momentary radiated emissions that can cause interference in the system, but they may be missed with traditional measurement techniques. This demonstration provides measurement and analysis techniques that effectively evaluate the potential emissions from such signals in order to evaluate their potential impacts to system performance.

  3. Automatic frequency and phase alignment of in vivo J-difference-edited MR spectra by frequency domain correlation.

    PubMed

    Wiegers, Evita C; Philips, Bart W J; Heerschap, Arend; van der Graaf, Marinette

    2017-12-01

    J-difference editing is often used to select resonances of compounds with coupled spins in 1 H-MR spectra. Accurate phase and frequency alignment prior to subtracting J-difference-edited MR spectra is important to avoid artefactual contributions to the edited resonance. In-vivo J-difference-edited MR spectra were aligned by maximizing the normalized scalar product between two spectra (i.e., the correlation over a spectral region). The performance of our correlation method was compared with alignment by spectral registration and by alignment of the highest point in two spectra. The correlation method was tested at different SNR levels and for a broad range of phase and frequency shifts. In-vivo application of the proposed correlation method showed reduced subtraction errors and increased fit reliability in difference spectra as compared with conventional peak alignment. The correlation method and the spectral registration method generally performed equally well. However, better alignment using the correlation method was obtained for spectra with a low SNR (down to ~2) and for relatively large frequency shifts. Our correlation method for simultaneously phase and frequency alignment is able to correct both small and large phase and frequency drifts and also performs well at low SNR levels.

  4. Power spectra at radio frequency of lightning return stroke waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The power spectra of the wideband (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic field signals in a number of lightning return strokes (primarily first return strokes) measured during a lightning storm which occurred in Lindau, West Germany in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data were obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks appearing in the spectra of many of the waveforms. An enhancement of power at frequencies of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  5. Short wind waves on the ocean: Wavenumber-frequency spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.

    2015-03-01

    Dominant surface waves on the ocean exhibit a dispersion relation that confines their energy to a curve in a wavenumber-frequency spectrum. Short wind waves on the ocean, on the other hand, are advected by these dominant waves so that they do not exhibit a well-defined dispersion relation over many realizations of the surface. Here we show that the short-wave analog to the dispersion relation is a distributed spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency plane that collapses to the standard dispersion relation in the absence of long waves. We compute probability distributions of short-wave wavenumber given a (frequency, direction) pair and of short-wave frequency given a (wavenumber, direction) pair. These two probability distributions must yield a single spectrum of surface displacements as a function of wavenumber and frequency, F(k,f). We show that the folded, azimuthally averaged version of this spectrum has a "butterfly" pattern in the wavenumber-frequency plane if significant long waves are present. Integration of this spectrum over frequency yields the well-known k-3 wavenumber spectrum. When integrated over wavenumber, the spectrum yields an f-4 form that agrees with measurement. We also show that a cut through the unfolded F(k,f) at constant k produces the well-known form of moderate-incidence-angle Doppler spectra for electromagnetic scattering from the sea. This development points out the dependence of the short-wave spectrum on the amplitude of the long waves.

  6. Low frequency spectra of type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Flux density spectra have been determined for 91 simple type III solar bursts observed by the Goddard Space Flight Center radio astronomy experiment on the IMP-6 spacecraft during 1971 and 1972. Spectral peaks were found to occur at frequencies ranging from 44 kHz up to 2500 kHz. Half of the bursts peaked between 250 kHz and 900 kHz, corresponding to emission at solar distances of about 0.3 to 0.1 AU. Maximum burst flux density sometimes exceeds 10 to the -14th W/sq m/Hz. The primary factor controlling the spectral peak frequency of these bursts appears to be a variation in intrinsic power radiated by the source as the exciter moves outward from the sun, rather than radio propagation effects between the source and IMP-6. Thus, a burst spectrum strongly reflects the evolution of the properties of the exciting electron beam, and according to current theory, beam deceleration could help account for the observations.

  7. A generalized modal shock spectra method for spacecraft loads analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M.; Salama, M.

    1979-01-01

    Unlike the traditional shock spectra approach, the generalization presented in this paper permits elastic interaction between the spacecraft and launch vehicle in order to obtain accurate bounds on the spacecraft response and structural loads. In addition, the modal response from a previous launch vehicle transient analysis - with or without a dummy spacecraft - is exploited in order to define a modal impulse as a simple idealization of the actual forcing function. The idealized modal forcing function is then used to derive explicit expressions for an estimate of the bound on the spacecraft structural response and forces.

  8. Investigation of Temperature Ratio Effect on the Low-Frequency Acoustic Spectra of Heated Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Sofia

    Jet noise remains one of the most important problems in the aviation industry, and its reduction is sought in the context of both commercial and military aircraft. In this thesis, an investigation of the jet noise is conducted in terms of the effect of temperature and Mach number on low frequency acoustic spectra. A low-order model derived from the generalized acoustic analogy method via a low-frequency asymptotic approach is utilized, where the mean flow and pertinent statistical quantities are obtained from RANS simulations. The study involves a combination of seven acoustic Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 and five temperature ratios (TR) ranging from 1 to 3. The model is calibrated with existing experimental measurements of a Mach 0.9 and TR = 1 jet. The results show that the sound pressure level increases with the increase in Mach number, and decreases with the decrease in temperature ratios.

  9. Rabi-Bloch oscillations in spatially distributed systems: Temporal dynamics and frequency spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levie, Ilay; Kastner, Raphael; Slepyan, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    We consider one-dimensional chains of two-level quantum systems coupled via tunneling. The chain is driven by the superposition of dc and ac fields in the strong coupling regime. Based on the fundamental principles of electrodynamics and quantum theory, we have developed a generalized model of quantum dynamics for such interactions, free of rotating-wave approximation. The system of equations of motion was studied numerically. We analyzed the dynamics and spectra of the inversion density, dipole current density, and tunneling current density. In the case of resonant interaction with the ac component, the particle dynamics exhibits itself in the oscillatory regime, which may be interpreted as a combination of Rabi and Bloch oscillations with their strong mutual influence. Such scenario for an obliquely incident ac field dramatically differs from the individual picture of both types of oscillations due to the interactions. This effect is counterintuitive because of the existence of markedly different frequency ranges for such two types of oscillations. These dynamics manifest themselves in multiline spectra in different combinations of Rabi and Bloch frequencies. The effect is promising as a framework of a new type of spectroscopy in nanoelectronics and electrical control of nanodevices.

  10. First-Principles Framework to Compute Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectra of Semiconductors and Insulators.

    PubMed

    Wan, Quan; Galli, Giulia

    2015-12-11

    We present a first-principles framework to compute sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectra of semiconductors and insulators. The method is based on density functional theory and the use of maximally localized Wannier functions to compute the response to electric fields, and it includes the effect of electric field gradients at surfaces. In addition, it includes quadrupole contributions to SFG spectra, thus enabling the verification of the dipole approximation, whose validity determines the surface specificity of SFG spectroscopy. We compute the SFG spectra of ice I_{h} basal surfaces and identify which spectra components are affected by bulk contributions. Our results are in good agreement with experiments at low temperature.

  11. Efficient and optimized identification of generalized Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation spectra

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Behzad; Davarian, Ali; Pryse, Kenneth M.; Elson, Elliot L.; Genin, Guy M.

    2017-01-01

    Viscoelastic relaxation spectra are essential for predicting and interpreting the mechanical responses of materials and structures. For biological tissues, these spectra must usually be estimated from viscoelastic relaxation tests. Interpreting viscoelastic relaxation tests is challenging because the inverse problem is expensive computationally. We present here an efficient algorithm that enables rapid identification of viscoelastic relaxation spectra. The algorithm was tested against trial data to characterize its robustness and identify its limitations and strengths. The algorithm was then applied to identify the viscoelastic response of reconstituted collagen, revealing an extensive distribution of viscoelastic time constants. PMID:26523785

  12. Efficient and optimized identification of generalized Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation spectra.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Behzad; Davarian, Ali; Pryse, Kenneth M; Elson, Elliot L; Genin, Guy M

    2015-03-01

    Viscoelastic relaxation spectra are essential for predicting and interpreting the mechanical responses of materials and structures. For biological tissues, these spectra must usually be estimated from viscoelastic relaxation tests. Interpreting viscoelastic relaxation tests is challenging because the inverse problem is expensive computationally. We present here an efficient algorithm that enables rapid identification of viscoelastic relaxation spectra. The algorithm was tested against trial data to characterize its robustness and identify its limitations and strengths. The algorithm was then applied to identify the viscoelastic response of reconstituted collagen, revealing an extensive distribution of viscoelastic time constants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Theoretical aspects and the experience of studying spectra of low-frequency microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birialtsev, E.; Vildanov, A.; Eronina, E.; Rizhov, D.; Rizhov, V.; Sharapov, I.

    2009-04-01

    The appearance of low-frequency spectral anomalies in natural microseismic noise over oil and gas deposits is observed since 1989 in different oil and gas regions (S. Arutunov, S. Dangel, G. Goloshubin). Several methods of prospecting and exploration of oil and gas deposits based on this effect (NTK ANCHAR, Spectraseis AG). There are several points of view (S. Arutunov, E. Birialtsev, Y. Podladchikov) about the physical model of effect which are based on fundamentally different geophysical mechanisms. One of them is based on the hypothesis of generation of the microseismic noise in to an oil and gas reservoir. Another point of view is based on the mechanism of the filtering microseismic noise in the geological medium where oil and gas reservoir is the contrast layer. For the first hypothesis an adequate quantity physical-mathematical model is absent. Second hypothesis has a discrepancy of distribution energy on theoretical calculated frequencies of waveguides «ground surface - oil deposit» eigenmodes. The fundamental frequency (less than 1 Hz for most cases) should have a highest amplitude as opposed to the regular observation range is 1-10 Hz. During 2005-2008 years by specialists of «Gradient» JSC were processed microsesmic signals from more 50 geological objects. The parameters of low-frequency anomalies were compared with medium properties (porosity, saturation and viscosity) defined according to drilling, allowed to carry out a statistical analysis and to establish some correlation. This paper presents results of theoretical calculation of spectra of microseisms in the zone of oil and gas deposits by mathematical modeling of propagation of seismic waves and comparing spectra of model microseisms with actually observed. Mathematical modeling of microseismic vibrations spectra showed good correlation of theoretical spectra and observed in practice. This is proof the applicability of microseismic methods of exploration for oil and gas. Correlation between

  14. Coherence Volume of an Optical Wave Field with Broad Frequency and Angular Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakin, D. V.; Mysina, N. Yu.; Ryabukho, V. P.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the sizes of a region in a three-dimensional space in which an optical wave field excites mutually coherent perturbations. We discuss the conditions under which the length of this region along the direction of propagation of the wave field and, correspondingly, its volume are determined either by the width of the frequency spectrum of the field or by the width of its angular spectrum, or by the parameters of these spectra simultaneously. We obtain expressions for estimating extremely small values of the coherence volume of the fields with a broad frequency spectrum and an extremely broad angular spectrum. Using the notion of instantaneous speckle-modulation of the wave field, we give a physical interpretation to the occurrence of a limited coherence volume of the field. The length of the spatiotemporal coherence region in which mutually coherent perturbations occur at different times is determined. The coherence volume of a wave field that illuminates an object in high-resolution microscopy with frequency broadband light is considered. The conditions for the dominant influence of the angular or frequency spectra on the longitudinal length of the coherence region are given, and the conditions for the influence of the frequency spectrum width on the transverse coherence of the wave field are examined. We show that, when using fields with broad and ultrabroad spectra in high-resolution microscopy, this influence should be taken into account.

  15. A simple method for the computation of first neighbour frequencies of DNAs from CD spectra

    PubMed Central

    Marck, Christian; Guschlbauer, Wilhelm

    1978-01-01

    A procedure for the computation of the first neighbour frequencies of DNA's is presented. This procedure is based on the first neighbour approximation of Gray and Tinoco. We show that the knowledge of all the ten elementary CD signals attached to the ten double stranded first neighbour configurations is not necessary. One can obtain the ten frequencies of an unknown DNA with the use of eight elementary CD signals corresponding to eight linearly independent polymer sequences. These signals can be extracted very simply from any eight or more CD spectra of double stranded DNA's of known frequencies. The ten frequencies of a DNA are obtained by least square fit of its CD spectrum with these elementary signals. One advantage of this procedure is that it does not necessitate linear programming, it can be used with CD data digitalized using a large number of wavelengths, thus permitting an accurate resolution of the CD spectra. Under favorable case, the ten frequencies of a DNA (not used as input data) can be determined with an average absolute error < 2%. We have also observed that certain satellite DNA's, those of Drosophila virilis and Callinectes sapidus have CD spectra compatible with those of DNA's of quasi random sequence; these satellite DNA's should adopt also the B-form in solution. PMID:673843

  16. Fitting the low-frequency Raman spectra to boson peak models: glycerol, triacetin and polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, S. A.; Perova, T. S.; Faurskov Nielsen, O.; Praestgaard, E.; Rasmussen, U.; Kolomiyets, T. M.; Voyiatzis, G. A.; Anastasiadis, S. H.

    1999-04-01

    A computational approach was elaborated to explicitly account for the Rayleigh line wing, the Boson peak and vibrational contributions to the low-frequency Raman spectra of amorphous solids and viscous liquids. It was shown that the low-frequency Raman spectra of glycerol and polystyrene consist of the Rayleigh contribution of Lorentzian form and the Boson peak which profile follows the predictions of the theory by Martin and Brenig in the version by Malinovsky and Sokolov. In the case of triacetin, the Boson peaks decay faster in their high-frequency side than the above theory predicts. Their form can be successfully modeled with a newly introduced empirical function intermediate between the Martin-Brenig and Malinovsky-Sokolov predictions.

  17. Spatial-frequency spectra of printed characters and human visual perception.

    PubMed

    Põder, Endel

    2003-06-01

    It is well known that certain spatial frequency (SF) bands are more important than others for character recognition. Solomon and Pelli [Nature 369 (1994) 395-397] have concluded that human pattern recognition mechanism is able to use only a narrow band from available SF spectrum of letters. However, the SF spectra of letters themselves have not been studied carefully. Here I report the results of an analysis of SF spectra of printed characters and discuss their relationship to the observed band-pass nature of letter recognition.

  18. Generalized Doppler and aberration kernel for frequency-dependent cosmological observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasini, Siavash; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2017-11-01

    We introduce a frequency-dependent Doppler and aberration transformation kernel for the harmonic multipoles of a general cosmological observable with spin weight s , Doppler weight d and arbitrary frequency spectrum. In the context of cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies, the frequency-dependent formalism allows to correct for the motion-induced aberration and Doppler effects on individual frequency maps with different masks. It also permits to deboost background radiations with non-blackbody frequency spectra, like extragalactic foregrounds and CMB spectra with primordial spectral distortions. The formalism can also be used to correct individual E and B polarization modes and account for motion-induced E/B mixing of polarized observables with d ≠1 at different frequencies. We apply the generalized aberration kernel on polarized and unpolarized specific intensity at 100 and 217 GHz and show that the motion-induced effects typically increase with the frequency of observation. In all-sky CMB experiments, the frequency-dependence of the motion-induced effects for a blackbody spectrum are overall negligible. However in a cut-sky analysis, ignoring the frequency dependence can lead to percent level error in the polarized and unpolarized power spectra over all angular scales. In the specific cut-sky used in our analysis (b >4 5 ° ,fsky≃14 % ), and for the dipole-inferred velocity β =0.00123 typically attributed to our peculiar motion, the Doppler and aberration effects can change polarized and unpolarized power spectra of specific intensity in the CMB rest frame by 1 - 2 % , but we find the polarization cross-leakage between E and B modes to be negligible.

  19. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    PubMed

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  20. Retrieval of complex χ(2) parts for quantitative analysis of sum-frequency generation intensity spectra

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Matthias J.; Koelsch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has become an established technique for in situ surface analysis. While spectral recording procedures and hardware have been optimized, unique data analysis routines have yet to be established. The SFG intensity is related to probing geometries and properties of the system under investigation such as the absolute square of the second-order susceptibility χ(2)2. A conventional SFG intensity measurement does not grant access to the complex parts of χ(2) unless further assumptions have been made. It is therefore difficult, sometimes impossible, to establish a unique fitting solution for SFG intensity spectra. Recently, interferometric phase-sensitive SFG or heterodyne detection methods have been introduced to measure real and imaginary parts of χ(2) experimentally. Here, we demonstrate that iterative phase-matching between complex spectra retrieved from maximum entropy method analysis and fitting of intensity SFG spectra (iMEMfit) leads to a unique solution for the complex parts of χ(2) and enables quantitative analysis of SFG intensity spectra. A comparison between complex parts retrieved by iMEMfit applied to intensity spectra and phase sensitive experimental data shows excellent agreement between the two methods. PMID:26450297

  1. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig

    Measurements are reported of high frequency cross-spectra of signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of co-located 39 m, high power Michelson interferometers. The instrument obtains differential position sensitivity to cross-correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending to the 3.8 MHz inverse light crossing time of the apparatus. A model of universal exotic spatial shear correlations that matches the Planck scale holographic information bound of space-time position states is excluded to 4.6{\\sigma} significance.

  2. Inductive phenomena at low frequencies in impedance spectra of proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivac, Ivan; Barbir, Frano

    2016-09-01

    The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells may exhibit inductive phenomena at low frequencies. The occurrence of inductive features at high frequencies is explained by the cables and wires of the test system. However, explanation of inductive loop at low frequencies requires a more detailed study. This review paper discusses several possible causes of such inductive behavior in PEM fuel cells, such as side reactions with intermediate species, carbon monoxide poisoning, and water transport, also as their equivalent circuit representations. It may be concluded that interpretation of impedance spectra at low frequencies is still ambiguous, and that better equivalent circuit models are needed with clearly defined physical meaning of each of the circuit elements.

  3. Low-frequency dielectric spectra of low-resistivity GaSe crystals (in Ukrainian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stakhira, J.; Fl'Unt, O.; Fiyala, Ya.

    The low-frequency dielectric response of low-resistivity GaSe layered crystal along the c-axis has been investigated at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The normalized spectra (activation energies from frequency shift is 0.19 eV) have been treated analytically employing equivalent circuits. It is shown that experimental data cannot be obtained with the circuit containing only ideal capacitors and resistors. At the same time, the equivalent circuit containing dispersive capacitors characterized by the power law dependence on frequency C^*=B(jω)^{n-1}, where ω is radian frequency, 0< n< 1, gives a good agreement with experimental data. This means that measured response of low-resistivity GaSe crystals follows the ``universal" power law of dielectric response χ^*˜(jω)^{n-1}, but not the Debye one. The nature of the ``universal" power law is explained by many-body interactions between localized charge carriers.

  4. A comparison of the far-infrared and low-frequency Raman spectra of glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perova, T. S.; Vij, J. K.; Christensen, D. H.; Nielsen, O. F.

    1999-04-01

    Far-infrared and low-frequency Raman spectra in the wavenumber range from 15 to 500 cm -1 were recorded for glycerol, triacetin (glycerol triacetate) and o-terphenyl at temperatures from 253 to 355 K. The far-infrared spectra of glycerol appear complex compared with the spectra of triacetin owing to the presence of hydrogen bonding in glycerol. The experimental results obtained for o-terphenyl are in good agreement with normal mode analyses carried out for crystalline o-terphenyl (A. Criado, F.J. Bermejo, A. de Andres, Mol. Phys. 82 (1994) 787). The far-infrared results are compared with the low-frequency Raman spectra of these three glass-forming liquids. The difference in temperature dependences found from these spectra is explained on the basis of different temperature contributions of the relaxational and vibrational processes to the low-frequency vibrational spectra.

  5. Highly Accurate Quantitative Analysis Of Enantiomeric Mixtures from Spatially Frequency Encoded 1H NMR Spectra.

    PubMed

    Plainchont, Bertrand; Pitoux, Daisy; Cyrille, Mathieu; Giraud, Nicolas

    2018-02-06

    We propose an original concept to measure accurately enantiomeric excesses on proton NMR spectra, which combines high-resolution techniques based on a spatial encoding of the sample, with the use of optically active weakly orienting solvents. We show that it is possible to simulate accurately dipolar edited spectra of enantiomers dissolved in a chiral liquid crystalline phase, and to use these simulations to calibrate integrations that can be measured on experimental data, in order to perform a quantitative chiral analysis. This approach is demonstrated on a chemical intermediate for which optical purity is an essential criterion. We find that there is a very good correlation between the experimental and calculated integration ratios extracted from G-SERF spectra, which paves the way to a general method of determination of enantiomeric excesses based on the observation of 1 H nuclei.

  6. Auditory frequency generalization in the goldfish (Carassius auratus)1

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Auditory frequency generalization in the goldfish was studied at five points within the best hearing range through the use of classical respiratory conditioning. Each experimental group received single-stimulus conditioning sessions at one of five stimulus frequencies (100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 Hz), and were subsequently tested for generalization at eight neighboring frequencies. All stimuli were presented 30 db above absolute threshold. Significant generalization decrements were found for all subjects. For the subjects conditioned in the range between 100 and 800 Hz, a nearly complete failure to generalize was found at one octave above and below the training frequency. The subjects conditioned at 1600 Hz produced relatively more flat gradients between 900 and 2000 Hz. The widths of the generalization gradients, expressed in Hz, increased as a power function of frequency with a slope greater than one. PMID:16811481

  7. Very low H O H bending frequencies. IV. Fourier transform infrared spectra of synthetic dittmarite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šoptrajanov, Bojan; Stefov, Viktor; Kuzmanovski, Igor; Jovanovski, Gligor; Lutz, H. Dieter; Engelen, Bernward

    2002-08-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectra of MgNH 4PO 4·H 2O (the synthetic analogue of the mineral dittmarite) and of a series of its partially deuterated analogues have been studied as a part of our continuous work on compounds exhibiting very low water bending frequencies. Although, the presence of ammonium bands makes the assignments in this case more difficult than for the potassium analogues, the isomorphism between the compounds of the MNH 4PO 4·H 2O type (M=Mg, Co, Ni, Mn and one of the polymorphs of CdNH 4PO 4·H 2O) and those which contain potassium instead of ammonium as well as the careful analysis of the spectra warrant the conclusion that in the presently studied compound the water bending mode appears at a frequency which is far more than 100 cm -1 lower than in the gaseous water. The spectra clearly show that the ammonium ions in the structure are involved in quite strong hydrogen bonds, a characteristic which is a precondition for a material to behave as a protonic conductor.

  8. An improved dual-frequency technique for the remote sensing of ocean currents and wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, D. L.; Eng, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    A two frequency microwave radar technique for the remote sensing of directional ocean wave spectra and surface currents is investigated. This technique is conceptually attractive because its operational physical principle involves a spatial electromagnetic scattering resonance with a single, but selectable, long gravity wave. Multiplexing of signals having different spacing of the two transmitted frequencies allows measurements of the entire long wave ocean spectrum to be carried out. A new scatterometer is developed and experimentally tested which is capable of making measurements having much larger signal/background values than previously possible. This instrument couples the resonance technique with coherent, frequency agility radar capabilities. This scatterometer is presently configured for supporting a program of surface current measurements.

  9. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  10. Drop-port study of microresonator frequency combs: power transfer, spectra and time-domain characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hsun; Xuan, Yi; Fan, Li; Varghese, Leo Tom; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Xue, Xiaoxiao; Leaird, Daniel E; Qi, Minghao; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-09-23

    We use a drop-port geometry to characterize frequency combs generated from silicon nitride on-chip microresonators in the normal group velocity regime. In sharp contrast with the traditional transmission geometry, we observe smooth output spectra with comparable powers in the pump and adjacent comb lines. The power transfer into the comb may be explained to a large extent by the coupling parameters characterizing the linear operation of the resonances studied. Furthermore, comparison of thru- and drop-port spectra shows that much of the ASE noise is filtered out by transmission to the drop-port. Autocorrelation measurements are performed on the drop-port output, without the need to filter out or suppress the strong pump line as is necessary in thru-port experiments. Passively mode-locked pulses with low background are observed in a normal dispersion microcavity.

  11. General relativistic spectra of accretion discs around rapidly rotating neutron stars: effect of light bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Thampan, Arun V.

    2001-08-01

    We present computed spectra, as seen by a distant observer, from the accretion disc around a rapidly rotating neutron star. Our calculations are carried out in a fully general relativistic framework, with an exact treatment of rotation. We take into account the Doppler shift, gravitational redshift and light-bending effects in order to compute the observed spectrum. We find that light bending significantly modifies the high-energy part of the spectrum. Computed spectra for slowly rotating neutron stars are also presented. These results would be important for modelling the observed X-ray spectra of low-mass X-ray binaries containing fast-spinning neutron stars.

  12. Reference-free, high-resolution measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dohyeon; Jeon, Chan-Gi; Shin, Junho; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Park, Sang Eon; Song, Youjian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Timing jitter is one of the most important properties of femtosecond mode-locked lasers and optical frequency combs. Accurate measurement of timing jitter power spectral density (PSD) is a critical prerequisite for optimizing overall noise performance and further advancing comb applications both in the time and frequency domains. Commonly used jitter measurement methods require a reference mode-locked laser with timing jitter similar to or lower than that of the laser-under-test, which is a demanding requirement for many laser laboratories, and/or have limited measurement resolution. Here we show a high-resolution and reference-source-free measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs using an optical fibre delay line and optical carrier interference. The demonstrated method works well for both mode-locked oscillators and supercontinua, with 2 × 10−9 fs2/Hz (equivalent to −174 dBc/Hz at 10-GHz carrier frequency) measurement noise floor. The demonstrated method can serve as a simple and powerful characterization tool for timing jitter PSDs of various comb sources including mode-locked oscillators, supercontinua and recently emerging Kerr-frequency combs; the jitter measurement results enabled by our method will provide new insights for understanding and optimizing timing noise in such comb sources. PMID:28102352

  13. The effect of sampling rate and anti-aliasing filters on high-frequency response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Goulet, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used intensity measure in ground-motion prediction equations is the pseudo-absolute response spectral acceleration (PSA), for response periods from 0.01 to 10 s (or frequencies from 0.1 to 100 Hz). PSAs are often derived from recorded ground motions, and these motions are usually filtered to remove high and low frequencies before the PSAs are computed. In this article we are only concerned with the removal of high frequencies. In modern digital recordings, this filtering corresponds at least to an anti-aliasing filter applied before conversion to digital values. Additional high-cut filtering is sometimes applied both to digital and to analog records to reduce high-frequency noise. Potential errors on the short-period (high-frequency) response spectral values are expected if the true ground motion has significant energy at frequencies above that of the anti-aliasing filter. This is especially important for areas where the instrumental sample rate and the associated anti-aliasing filter corner frequency (above which significant energy in the time series is removed) are low relative to the frequencies contained in the true ground motions. A ground-motion simulation study was conducted to investigate these effects and to develop guidance for defining the usable bandwidth for high-frequency PSA. The primary conclusion is that if the ratio of the maximum Fourier acceleration spectrum (FAS) to the FAS at a frequency fsaa corresponding to the start of the anti-aliasing filter is more than about 10, then PSA for frequencies above fsaa should be little affected by the recording process, because the ground-motion frequencies that control the response spectra will be less than fsaa . A second topic of this article concerns the resampling of the digital acceleration time series to a higher sample rate often used in the computation of short-period PSA. We confirm previous findings that sinc-function interpolation is preferred to the standard practice of using

  14. First measurements of high frequency cross-spectra from a pair of large Michelson interferometers

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; ...

    2016-09-09

    Here, measurements are reported of the cross-correlation of spectra of differential position signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of colocated 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers with flat broadband frequency response in the MHz range. The instrument obtains sensitivity to high frequency correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending beyond the 3.8 MHz inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. The dominant but uncorrelated shot noise is averaged down over 2 × 10 8 independent spectral measurements with 381 Hz frequency resolution to obtain 2.1 × 10 -20m/ √Hz sensitivity to stationary signals. For signal bandwidthsmore » Δf > 11 kHz, the sensitivity to strain h or shear power spectral density of classical or exotic origin surpasses a milestone PSD δh < t p where t p = 5.39 × 10 -44/ Hz is the Planck time.« less

  15. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers.

    PubMed

    Chou, Aaron S; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer

    2016-09-09

    Measurements are reported of the cross-correlation of spectra of differential position signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of colocated 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers with flat broadband frequency response in the MHz range. The instrument obtains sensitivity to high frequency correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending beyond the 3.8 MHz inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. The dominant but uncorrelated shot noise is averaged down over 2×10^{8} independent spectral measurements with 381 Hz frequency resolution to obtain 2.1×10^{-20}m/sqrt[Hz] sensitivity to stationary signals. For signal bandwidths Δf>11  kHz, the sensitivity to strain h or shear power spectral density of classical or exotic origin surpasses a milestone PSD_{δh}

  16. Structures, vibrational frequencies, and infrared spectra of the hexa-hydrated benzene clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Jongseob; Lee, Han Myoung; Tarakeshwar, P.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2000-10-01

    The water hexamer is known to have a number of isoenergetic structures. The first experimental identification of the O-H stretching vibrational spectra of the water hexamer was done in the presence of benzene. It was followed by the identification of the pure water hexamer structure by vibration-rotational tunneling (VRT) spectroscopy. Although both experiments seem to have located only the Cage structure, the structure of the benzene-water hexamer complex is not clearly known, and the effect of benzene in the water hexamer is unclear. In particular, it is not obvious how the energy difference between nearly isoenergetic water hexamer conformers changes in the presence of benzene. Thus, we have compared the benzene complexes with four low-lying isoenergetic water hexamers, Ring, Book, Cage, and Prism structures, using ab initio calculations. We also investigated the effects of the presence of benzene on the structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared (IR) intensities for the four low-lying energy conformers. There is little change in the structure of the water hexamer upon its interaction with the benzene molecule. Hence the deformation energies are very small. The dominant contribution to the benzene-water cluster interaction mainly comes from the π-H interactions between benzene and a single water molecule. As a result of this π-H interaction, O-Hπ bond length increases and the corresponding stretching vibrational frequencies are redshifted. The IR spectral features of both (H2O)6 and benzene-(H2O)6 are quite similar. From both the energetics and the comparison of calculated and experimental spectra of the benzene-(H2O)6, the water structure in these complexes is found to have the Cage form. In particular, among the four different Cage structures, only one conformer matches the experimental O-H vibrational frequencies.

  17. Electromagnetic fluctuation spectra of collective oscillations in magnetized Maxwellian equal mass plasmas for low-frequency waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    Recently, the general electromagnetic fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas has been used to study the steady-state fluctuation spectra and the total intensity of low-frequency collective weakly damped modes for parallel wave vectors in Maxwellian plasmas. Now, we address the same question with respect to an arbitrary direction of the wave-vector. Here, we analyze this problem for equal mass plasmas. These plasmas are a very good tool to study various plasma phenomena, as they considerably facilitate the theoretical consideration and at the same time provide with their clear physical picture. Finally, we compare our results in the limiting case of parallelmore » wave vectors with the previous study.« less

  18. How to constrain snow particle scattering models? A novel approach using triple-frequency radar Doppler spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneifel, S.; Battaglia, A.; Kollias, P.; Leinonen, J. S.; Maahn, M.; Kalesse, H.; Tridon, F.; Crewell, S.

    2016-12-01

    During the last years, an increasing number of microwave (MW) scattering databases and novel approximations for single particles, complex aggregates and even rimed and melting aggregates became available. While these developments are in general a great step forward, their evaluation with observations is a very necessary but also challenging task. Recently available multi-frequency radar observations which cover the Rayleigh up to the Mie scattering regime revealed characteristic signatures of rimed and unrimed aggregated particles. However, the observed signatures are still affected by both, the particle size distribution (PSD) and the single scattering properties of the particles which makes a clear evaluation of one or the other challenging. In this contribution we present a new approach which uses the radar Doppler spectra at three frequencies (X, Ka, and W-band) collected during a recent winter field campaign in Finland. We analyzed a snowfall event which includes rimed and unrimed snow aggregates. A large selection of spectra obtained from low-turbulence regions within the cloud reveals distinctly different signatures of the derived Doppler spectral ratios. Due to the third frequency, a characteristic curve can be derived which is almost independent of the underlying particle size distribution and velocity-size relation. The characteristics of the curves obtained for rimed and unrimed are distinctly different. The observed signatures were compared with scattering calculations obtained with discrete dipole approximation (DDA), self-similar Rayleigh-Gans approximation (SSRG), and with the classical soft spheroid (T-Matrix) method. While the DDA calculations of unrimed and rimed aggregates fit the observed signatures well, the T-Matrix results lie far outside the observed range. The SSRG approximations was found to be principally able to recover the main features but a better matching would need an adjustment of the published coefficients. Future campaigns, like

  19. Comparison between measured and predicted turbulence frequency spectra in ITG and TEM regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrin, J.; Arnichand, H.; Bernardo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Jenko, F.; Hacquin, S.; Pueschel, M. J.; Sabot, R.

    2017-06-01

    The observation of distinct peaks in tokamak core reflectometry measurements—named quasi-coherent-modes (QCMs)—are identified as a signature of trapped-electron-mode (TEM) turbulence (Arnichand et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 014037). This phenomenon is investigated with detailed linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the Gene code. A Tore-Supra density scan is studied, which traverses through a linear (LOC) to saturated (SOC) ohmic confinement transition. The LOC and SOC phases are both simulated separately. In the LOC phase, where QCMs are observed, TEMs are robustly predicted unstable in linear studies. In the later SOC phase, where QCMs are no longer observed, ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) modes are identified. In nonlinear simulations, in the ITG (SOC) phase, a broadband spectrum is seen. In the TEM (LOC) phase, a clear emergence of a peak at the TEM frequencies is seen. This is due to reduced nonlinear frequency broadening of the underlying linear modes in the TEM regime compared with the ITG regime. A synthetic diagnostic of the nonlinearly simulated frequency spectra reproduces the features observed in the reflectometry measurements. These results support the identification of core QCMs as an experimental marker for TEM turbulence.

  20. General properties of the radiation spectra from relativistic electrons moving in Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Takahara, Fumio, E-mail: teraki@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2014-05-20

    Using a numerical method, we examine the radiation spectra from relativistic electrons moving in Langmuir turbulence, which are expected to exist in high energy astrophysical objects. The spectral shape is characterized by the spatial scale λ, field strength σ, and frequency of the Langmuir waves, and in terms of frequency they are represented by ω{sub 0} = 2πc/λ, ω{sub st} = eσ/mc, and ω{sub p}, respectively. We normalize ω{sub st} and ω {sub p} by ω{sub 0} as a ≡ ω{sub st}/ω{sub 0} and b ≡ ω{sub p}/ω{sub 0}, and examine the spectral shape in the a–b plane. An earliermore » study based on the diffusive radiation in Langmuir turbulence (DRL) theory by Fleishman and Toptygin showed that the typical frequency is γ{sup 2}ω{sub p} and that the low frequency spectrum behaves as F {sub ω}∝ω{sup 1} for b > 1 irrespective of a. Here, we adopt the first principle numerical approach to obtain the radiation spectra in more detail. We generate Langmuir turbulence by superposing Fourier modes, injecting monoenergetic electrons, solving the equation of motion, and calculating the radiation spectra using a Lienard-Wiechert potential. We find different features from the DRL theory for a > b > 1. The peak frequency turns out to be γ{sup 2}ω{sub st}, which is higher than the γ{sup 2}ω{sub p} predicted by the DRL theory, and the spectral index of the low frequency region is not 1 but 1/3. This is because the typical deflection angle of electrons is larger than the angle of the beaming cone ∼1/γ. We call the radiation for this case 'wiggler radiation in Langmuir turbulence'.« less

  1. On the frequency spectra of the core magnetic field Gauss coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, Vincent; Wardinski, Ingo; Baerenzung, Julien; Holschneider, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    From monthly mean observatory data spanning 1957-2014, geomagnetic field secular variation values were calculated by annual differences. Estimates of the spherical harmonic Gauss coefficients of the core field secular variation were then derived by applying a correlation based modelling. Finally, a Fourier transform was applied to the time series of the Gauss coefficients. This process led to reliable temporal spectra of the Gauss coefficients up to spherical harmonic degree 5 or 6, and down to periods as short as 1 or 2 years depending on the coefficient. We observed that a k-2 slope, where k is the frequency, is an acceptable approximation for these spectra, with possibly an exception for the dipole field. The monthly estimates of the core field secular variation at the observatory sites also show that large and rapid variations of the latter happen. This is an indication that geomagnetic jerks are frequent phenomena and that significant secular variation signals at short time scales - i.e. less than 2 years, could still be extracted from data to reveal an unexplored part of the core dynamics.

  2. Vibrational spectra from atomic fluctuations in dynamics simulations. II. Solvent-induced frequency fluctuations at femtosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Tavan, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The midinfrared (MIR) spectra of molecules in polar solvents exhibit inhomogeneously broadened bands whose spectral positions are shifted as compared to the gas phase. The shifts are caused by interactions with structured solvation shells and the broadenings by fluctuations of these interactions. The MIR spectra can be calculated from hybrid molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which treat the solute molecule by density functional theory and the solvent by molecular mechanics by the so-called instantaneous normal mode analysis (INMA) or by Fourier transforming the time correlation function (FTTCF) of the molecular dipole moment. In Paper I of this work [M. Schmitz and P. Tavan, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 12233 (2004)] we explored an alternative method based on generalized virial (GV) frequencies noting, however, that GV systematically underestimates frequencies. As shown by us these artifacts are caused by solvent-induced fluctuations of the (i) equilibrium geometry, (ii) force constants, and (iii) normal mode directions as well as by (iv) diagonal and (v) off-diagonal anharmonicities. Here we now show, by analyzing the time scales of fluctuations and sample MD trajectories of formaldehyde in the gas phase and in water, that all these sources of computational artifacts can be made visible by a Fourier analysis of the normal coordinates. Correspondingly, the error sources (i) and (iii)-(v) can be removed by bandpass filtering, as long as the spectral signatures of the respective effects are well separated from the fundamental band. Furthermore, the artifacts arising from effect (ii) can be strongly diminished by a time-resolved version of the GV approach (TF-GV). The TF-GV method then yields for each mode j a trajectory of the vibrational frequency ωj(t|τ) at a time resolution τ>τj, which is only limited by the corresponding oscillation time τj=2π/ωj and, thus, is in the femtosecond range. A correlation analysis of these trajectories clearly separates the

  3. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  4. High frequency signal acquisition using a smartphone in an undergraduate teaching laboratory: Applications in ultrasonic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Blake T; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N

    2016-10-01

    A simple and inexpensive approach to acquiring signals in the megahertz frequency range using a smartphone is described. The approach is general, applicable to electromagnetic as well as acoustic measurements, and makes available to undergraduate teaching laboratories experiments that are traditionally inaccessible due to the expensive equipment that are required. This paper focuses on megahertz range ultrasonic resonance spectra in liquids and solids, although there is virtually no upper limit on frequencies measurable using this technique. Acoustic resonance measurements in water and Fluorinert in a one dimensional (1D) resonant cavity were conducted and used to calculate sound speed. The technique is shown to have a precision and accuracy significantly better than one percent in liquid sound speed. Measurements of 3D resonances in an isotropic solid sphere were also made and used to determine the bulk and shear moduli of the sample. The elastic moduli determined from the solid resonance measurements agreed with those determined using a research grade vector network analyzer to better than 0.5%. The apparatus and measurement technique described can thus make research grade measurements using standardly available laboratory equipment for a cost that is two-to-three orders of magnitude less than the traditional measurement equipment used for these measurements.

  5. General and inducible hypermutation facilitate parallel adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa despite divergent mutation spectra.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Michael R; Sundin, George W

    2012-08-21

    The successful growth of hypermutator strains of bacteria contradicts a clear preference for lower mutation rates observed in the microbial world. Whether by general DNA repair deficiency or the inducible action of low-fidelity DNA polymerases, the evolutionary strategies of bacteria include methods of hypermutation. Although both raise mutation rate, general and inducible hypermutation operate through distinct molecular mechanisms and therefore likely impart unique adaptive consequences. Here we compare the influence of general and inducible hypermutation on adaptation in the model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 through experimental evolution. We observed divergent spectra of single base substitutions derived from general and inducible hypermutation by sequencing rpoB in spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (Rif(R)) mutants. Likewise, the pattern of mutation in a draft genome sequence of a derived inducible hypermutator isolate differed from those of general hypermutators reported in the literature. However, following experimental evolution, populations of both mutator types exhibited comparable improvements in fitness across varied conditions that differed from the highly specific adaptation of nonmutators. Our results suggest that despite their unique mutation spectra, general and inducible hypermutation can analogously influence the ecology and adaptation of bacteria, significantly shaping pathogenic populations where hypermutation has been most widely observed.

  6. Doppler frequency in interplanetary radar and general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvittie, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The change of frequency of an interplanetary radar signal sent from the earth to another planet or to a space probe is worked out according to general relativity. The Schwarzschild spacetime is employed and its null geodesics control the motion of the signals. Exact Doppler frequency formulas are derived for one-way and two-way radar in terms of an arbitrary Schwarzschild radial coordinate. A reduction to the special relativity case is used to interpret the formulas in terms of the relative radial velocity of emitter and target. The general relativity corrections are worked out approximately for each of three possible Schwarzschild radial coordinates, and a numerical example is given. The amount of the correction is different according as one or the other of the Schwarzschild coordinates is identified with the radius vector deduced from classical celestial mechanics. The identification problem is discussed.

  7. Wetting effect on optical sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of D-glucose, D-fructose, and sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu, Hoang Chi; Li, Hongyan; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2015-03-01

    We report a sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy study of D-glucose, D-fructose and sucrose in the Csbnd H stretching vibration regime. Wetting effect on the SFG spectra was investigated. The SFG spectrum of D-glucose changed from that of α-D-glucose into those of α-D-glucose monohydrate by wetting. The SFG spectra showed evidence of a small change of β-D-fructopyranose into other anomers by wetting. SFG spectra of sucrose did not change by wetting. Assignments of the vibrational peaks in the SFG spectra of the three sugars in the dry and wet states were performed in the Csbnd H stretching vibration region near 3000 cm-1.

  8. Wetting effect on optical sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of d-glucose, d-fructose, and sucrose.

    PubMed

    Hieu, Hoang Chi; Li, Hongyan; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2015-03-05

    We report a sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy study of d-glucose, d-fructose and sucrose in the CH stretching vibration regime. Wetting effect on the SFG spectra was investigated. The SFG spectrum of d-glucose changed from that of α-d-glucose into those of α-d-glucose monohydrate by wetting. The SFG spectra showed evidence of a small change of β-d-fructopyranose into other anomers by wetting. SFG spectra of sucrose did not change by wetting. Assignments of the vibrational peaks in the SFG spectra of the three sugars in the dry and wet states were performed in the CH stretching vibration region near 3000cm(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The variation in frequency locations in Doppler ultrasound spectra for maximum blood flow velocities in narrowed vessels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingyun; Zhang, Yufeng; Gao, Lian; Deng, Li; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Kexin; Li, Haiyan

    2017-11-01

    This study assessed the variation in the frequency locations in the Doppler ultrasound spectra for the maximum blood flow velocities of in vessels with different degrees of bilaterally axisymmetric stenosis. This was done by comparing the relationship between the velocity distributions and corresponding Doppler power spectra. First, a geometric vessel model with axisymmetric stenosis was established. This made it possible to obtain the blood flow velocity distributions for different degrees of stenosis from the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Then, the Doppler spectra were calculated for the entire segment of the vessel that was covered by the sound field. Finally, the maximum frequency locations for the spectra were determined based on the intersections of the maximum values chosen from the calculated blood flow velocity distributions and their corresponding spectra. The computational analysis showed that the maximum frequencies, which corresponded to the maximum blood flow velocities for different degrees of stenosis, were located at different positions along the spectral falling edges. The location for a normal (stenosis free) vessel was in the middle of the falling edge. For vessels with increasing degrees of stenosis, this location shifted approximately linearly downward along the falling edge. For 40% stenosis, the location reached a position at the falling edge of 0.32. Results obtained using the Field II simulation tool demonstrated the validity of the theoretical analysis and calculations, and may help to improve the maximum velocity estimation accuracy for Doppler blood flow spectra in stenosed vessels. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Negative permittivity and permeability spectra of Cu/yttrium iron garnet hybrid granular composite materials in the microwave frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutaoka, Takanori, E-mail: tsutaok@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Fukuyama, Koki; Kinoshita, Hideaki

    2013-12-23

    The relative complex permittivity and permeability spectra of the coagulated copper and yttrium iron garnet (Cu/YIG) hybrid granular composite materials have been studied in the microwave range. The insulator to metal transition was observed at the percolation threshold of Cu particle content (φ{sub Cu} = 16.0 vol. %) in the electrical conductivity. In the percolation threshold, the low frequency plasmonic state caused by the metallic Cu particle networks was observed. The percolated Cu/YIG granular composites show simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability spectra under external magnetic fields.

  11. X-ray Spectra and Pulse Frequency Changes in SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baykal, A.; Stark, M. J.; Swank, J. H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The November 1999 outburst of the transient pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545 was monitored with the large area detectors of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer until the pulsar faded after a year. The 358 s pulsar was spun up for 150 days, at which point the flux dropped quickly by a factor of approximately 7, the frequency saturated and, as the flux continued to decline, a weak spin-down began. The pulses remained strong during the decay and the spin-up/flux correlation can be fit to the Ghosh and Lamb derivations for the spin-up caused by accretion from a thin, pressure-dominated disk, for a distance approximately 3.2 kpc and a surface magnetic field approximately 1.2 x 10(exp 13) Gauss. During the bright spin-up part of the outburst, the flux was subject to strong orbital modulation, peaking approximately 3 days after periastron of the eccentric 12.68 day orbit, while during the faint part, there was little orbital modulation. The X-ray spectra were typical of accreting pulsars, describable by a cut-off power-law, with an emission line near the 6.4 keV of Kappa(sub alpha) fluorescence from cool iron. The equivalent width of this emission did not share the orbital modulation, but nearly doubled during the faint phase, despite little change in the column density. The outburst could have been caused by an episode of increased wind from a Be star, such that a small accretion disk is formed during each periastron passage. A change in the wind and disk structure apparently occurred after 5 months such that the accretion rate was no longer modulated or the diffusion time was longer. The distance estimate implies the X-ray luminosity observed was between 1 X 10(exp 36) ergs s(exp -1) and 6 x 10(exp 34) ergs s(exp -1), with a small but definite correlation of the intrinsic power-law spectral index.

  12. Frequency-selective quantitation of short-echo time 1H magnetic resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poullet, Jean-Baptiste; Sima, Diana M.; Van Huffel, Sabine; Van Hecke, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Accurate and efficient filtering techniques are required to suppress large nuisance components present in short-echo time magnetic resonance (MR) spectra. This paper discusses two powerful filtering techniques used in long-echo time MR spectral quantitation, the maximum-phase FIR filter (MP-FIR) and the Hankel-Lanczos Singular Value Decomposition with Partial ReOrthogonalization (HLSVD-PRO), and shows that they can be applied to their more complex short-echo time spectral counterparts. Both filters are validated and compared through extensive simulations. Their properties are discussed. In particular, the capability of MP-FIR for dealing with macromolecular components is emphasized. Although this property does not make a large difference for long-echo time MR spectra, it can be important when quantifying short-echo time spectra.

  13. Multivariate cross-frequency coupling via generalized eigendecomposition

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael X

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new framework for analyzing cross-frequency coupling in multichannel electrophysiological recordings. The generalized eigendecomposition-based cross-frequency coupling framework (gedCFC) is inspired by source-separation algorithms combined with dynamics of mesoscopic neurophysiological processes. It is unaffected by factors that confound traditional CFC methods—such as non-stationarities, non-sinusoidality, and non-uniform phase angle distributions—attractive properties considering that brain activity is neither stationary nor perfectly sinusoidal. The gedCFC framework opens new opportunities for conceptualizing CFC as network interactions with diverse spatial/topographical distributions. Five specific methods within the gedCFC framework are detailed, these are validated in simulated data and applied in several empirical datasets. gedCFC accurately recovers physiologically plausible CFC patterns embedded in noise that causes traditional CFC methods to perform poorly. The paper also demonstrates that spike-field coherence in multichannel local field potential data can be analyzed using the gedCFC framework, which provides significant advantages over traditional spike-field coherence analyses. Null-hypothesis testing is also discussed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21792.001 PMID:28117662

  14. Energy Spectra and High Frequency Oscillations in 4U 0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, E. C.; Kaaret, P.; Chen, K.; Tavani, M.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P.; Grindlay, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in 4U 0614+091, combining timing and spectral analysis of RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) observations. The energy spectrum of the source can be described by a power law plus a blackbody component. The blackbody has a variable temperature (kT approximately 0.8 to 1.4 keV) and accounts for 10 to 25% of the total energy flux. The power law flux and photon index also vary (F approximately 0.8 to 1.6 x 10(exp -9) erg/sq cm.s and alpha approximately 2.0 to 2.8 respectively). We find a robust correlation of the frequency of the higher frequency QPO with the flux of the blackbody. The source follows the same relation even in observations separated by several months. The QPO frequency does not have a similarly unique correlation with the total flux or the flux of the power law component. The RMS amplitudes of the higher frequency QPO rise with energy but are consistent with a constant for the lower frequency QPO. These results may be interpreted in terms of a beat frequency model for the production of the high frequency QPOs.

  15. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  16. Wind Speed Dependence of Acoustic Ambient Vertical Directional Spectra at High Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-26

    the measurements, which is 8 to 32 kHz, is sufficiently high that the propagation is adequately modeled using the Eikonal equation approximation. 4 TD...level spectra were calculated from the resulting time series. Spectral levels at 8, 16, and 32 kHz were recorded in a database along with the wind...indications of biological or industrial contaminations were removed. The resulting database seen here contained 215 samples. 10 * TD 8565 0z 00 a.I. cn

  17. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  18. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two-frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  19. Fine structure of the low-frequency spectra of heart rate and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kuusela, Tom A; Kaila, Timo J; Kähönen, Mika

    2003-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the principal frequency components of the heart rate and blood pressure variability in the low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) band. The spectral composition of the R–R interval (RRI) and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) in the frequency range below 0.15 Hz were carefully analyzed using three different spectral methods: Fast Fourier transform (FFT), Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD), and autoregression (AR). All spectral methods were used to create time–frequency plots to uncover the principal spectral components that are least dependent on time. The accurate frequencies of these components were calculated from the pole decomposition of the AR spectral density after determining the optimal model order – the most crucial factor when using this method – with the help of FFT and WVD methods. Results Spectral analysis of the RRI and SAP of 12 healthy subjects revealed that there are always at least three spectral components below 0.15 Hz. The three principal frequency components are 0.026 ± 0.003 (mean ± SD) Hz, 0.076 ± 0.012 Hz, and 0.117 ± 0.016 Hz. These principal components vary only slightly over time. FFT-based coherence and phase-function analysis suggests that the second and third components are related to the baroreflex control of blood pressure, since the phase difference between SAP and RRI was negative and almost constant, whereas the origin of the first component is different since no clear SAP–RRI phase relationship was found. Conclusion The above data indicate that spontaneous fluctuations in heart rate and blood pressure within the standard low-frequency range of 0.04–0.15 Hz typically occur at two frequency components rather than only at one as widely believed, and these components are not harmonically related. This new observation in humans can help explain divergent results in the literature concerning spontaneous low-frequency oscillations. It also raises methodological

  20. Fine structure of the low-frequency spectra of heart rate and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kuusela, Tom A; Kaila, Timo J; Kähönen, Mika

    2003-10-13

    The aim of this study was to explore the principal frequency components of the heart rate and blood pressure variability in the low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) band. The spectral composition of the R-R interval (RRI) and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) in the frequency range below 0.15 Hz were carefully analyzed using three different spectral methods: Fast Fourier transform (FFT), Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD), and autoregression (AR). All spectral methods were used to create time-frequency plots to uncover the principal spectral components that are least dependent on time. The accurate frequencies of these components were calculated from the pole decomposition of the AR spectral density after determining the optimal model order--the most crucial factor when using this method--with the help of FFT and WVD methods. Spectral analysis of the RRI and SAP of 12 healthy subjects revealed that there are always at least three spectral components below 0.15 Hz. The three principal frequency components are 0.026 +/- 0.003 (mean +/- SD) Hz, 0.076 +/- 0.012 Hz, and 0.117 +/- 0.016 Hz. These principal components vary only slightly over time. FFT-based coherence and phase-function analysis suggests that the second and third components are related to the baroreflex control of blood pressure, since the phase difference between SAP and RRI was negative and almost constant, whereas the origin of the first component is different since no clear SAP-RRI phase relationship was found. The above data indicate that spontaneous fluctuations in heart rate and blood pressure within the standard low-frequency range of 0.04-0.15 Hz typically occur at two frequency components rather than only at one as widely believed, and these components are not harmonically related. This new observation in humans can help explain divergent results in the literature concerning spontaneous low-frequency oscillations. It also raises methodological and computational questions regarding

  1. Dielectric constant and low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih within the E3B model.

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Ni, Y; Drews, S E P; Skinner, J L

    2014-08-28

    Two intrinsic difficulties in modeling condensed-phase water with conventional rigid non-polarizable water models are: reproducing the static dielectric constants for liquid water and ice Ih, and generating the peak at about 200 cm(-1) in the low-frequency infrared spectrum for liquid water. The primary physical reason for these failures is believed to be the missing polarization effect in these models, and consequently various sophisticated polarizable water models have been developed. However, in this work we pursue a different strategy and propose a simple empirical scheme to include the polarization effect only on the dipole surface (without modifying a model's intermolecular interaction potential). We implement this strategy for our explicit three-body (E3B) model. Our calculated static dielectric constants and low-frequency infrared spectra are in good agreement with experiment for both liquid water and ice Ih over wide temperature ranges, albeit with one fitting parameter for each phase. The success of our modeling also suggests that thermal fluctuations about local minima and the energy differences between different proton-disordered configurations play minor roles in the static dielectric constant of ice Ih. Our analysis shows that the polarization effect is important in resolving the two difficulties mentioned above and sheds some light on the origin of several features in the low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih.

  2. Dielectric constant and low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih within the E3B model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, L.; Ni, Y.; Drews, S. E. P.

    2014-08-28

    Two intrinsic difficulties in modeling condensed-phase water with conventional rigid non-polarizable water models are: reproducing the static dielectric constants for liquid water and ice Ih, and generating the peak at about 200 cm{sup −1} in the low-frequency infrared spectrum for liquid water. The primary physical reason for these failures is believed to be the missing polarization effect in these models, and consequently various sophisticated polarizable water models have been developed. However, in this work we pursue a different strategy and propose a simple empirical scheme to include the polarization effect only on the dipole surface (without modifying a model's intermolecularmore » interaction potential). We implement this strategy for our explicit three-body (E3B) model. Our calculated static dielectric constants and low-frequency infrared spectra are in good agreement with experiment for both liquid water and ice Ih over wide temperature ranges, albeit with one fitting parameter for each phase. The success of our modeling also suggests that thermal fluctuations about local minima and the energy differences between different proton-disordered configurations play minor roles in the static dielectric constant of ice Ih. Our analysis shows that the polarization effect is important in resolving the two difficulties mentioned above and sheds some light on the origin of several features in the low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih.« less

  3. Wave-field decay rate estimate from the wavenumber-frequency spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comisel, H.; Narita, Y.; Voros, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Observational data for wave or turbulent fields are conveniently analyzed and interpreted in the Fourier domain spanning the frequencies and the wavenumbers. If a wave field has not only oscillatory components (characterized by real parts of frequency) but also temporally decaying components (characterized by imaginary parts of frequency), the energy spectrum shows a frequency broadening around the peak due to the imaginary parts of frequency (or the decay rate). The mechanism of the frequency broadening is the same as that of the Breit-Wigner spectrum in nuclear resonance phenomena. We show that the decay rate can observationally and directly be estimated once multi-point data are available, and apply the method to Cluster four-point magnetometer data in the solar wind on a spatial scale of about 1000 km. The estimated decay rate is larger than the eddy turnover time, indicating that the decay profile of solar wind turbulence is more plasma physical such as excitation of whistler waves and other modes rather than hydrodynamic turbulence behavior.

  4. Interference effects in the sum frequency generation spectra of thin organic films. II: Applications to different thin-film systems.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Zhao, Yanbao; Li, Na; Ma, Yunsheng; Osawa, Masatoshi; Davies, Paul B; Ye, Shen

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, the results of the modeling calculations carried out for predicting the interference effects expected in the sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of a specific thin-layer system, described in the accompanying paper, are tested by comparing them with the experimental spectra obtained for a real thin-layer film comprising an organic monolayer/variable thickness dielectric layer/gold substrate. In this system, two contributions to the SFG spectra arise, a resonant contribution from the organic film and a nonresonant contribution from the gold substrate. The modeling calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra over a wide range of thicknesses and for different polarization combinations. The introduction of another resonant monolayer adjacent to the gold substrate and with the molecules having a reverse orientation has a significant affect on the spectral shapes which is predicted. If a dielectric substrate such as CaF(2) is used instead of a gold substrate, only the spectral intensities vary with the film thickness but not the spectral shapes. The counterpropagating beam geometry will change both the thickness dependent spectral shapes and the intensity of different vibrational modes in comparison with a copropagating geometry. The influences of these experimental factors, i.e., the molecular orientational structure in the thin film, the nature of the substrate, and the selected incident beam geometry, on the experimental SFG spectra are quantitatively predicted by the calculations. The thickness effects on the signals from a SFG active monolayer contained in a thin liquid-layer cell of the type frequently used for in situ electrochemical measurements is also discussed. The modeling calculation is also valid for application to other thin-film systems comprising more than two resonant SFG active interfaces by appropriate choice of optical geometries and relevant optical properties.

  5. Atomistic modeling of the low-frequency mechanical modes and Raman spectra of icosahedral virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2010-02-01

    We describe a technique for calculating the low-frequency mechanical modes and frequencies of a large symmetric biological molecule where the eigenvectors of the Hessian matrix are determined with full atomic detail. The method, which follows order N methods used in electronic structure theory, determines the subset of lowest-frequency modes while using group theory to reduce the complexity of the problem. We apply the method to three icosahedral viruses of various T numbers and sizes; the human viruses polio and hepatitis B, and the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, a plant virus. From the normal-mode eigenvectors, we use a bond polarizability model to predict a low-frequency Raman scattering profile for the viruses. The full atomic detail in the displacement patterns combined with an empirical potential-energy model allows a comparison of the fully atomic normal modes with elastic network models and normal-mode analysis with only dihedral degrees of freedom. We find that coarse-graining normal-mode analysis (particularly the elastic network model) can predict the displacement patterns for the first few (˜10) low-frequency modes that are global and cooperative.

  6. Structures and vibrational spectra of pinacol.. 1. Infrared and matrix infrared spectra of monomeric pinacol. Ab initio calculations on conformers and vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlqvist, Martti; Hotokka, Matti; Räsänen, Markku

    1998-04-01

    The infrared spectra of monomeric pinacol molecules (2,3-dimethyl-2,3-butanediol; (CH 3) 2C(OH)C(OH)(CH 3) 2) have been recorded in the gas phase and dilute nonpolar solutions, and in an argon matrix. The vibrational data are consistent with the intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded G-type (gauche with respect to the central C-C bond) conformers and there is no evidence for the T-type (trans with respect to the central C-C bond) conformers, which have been observed in the condensed phases. This was confirmed by studying the infrared region 835-815 cm -1, which was found to be the most indicative to show spectral changes within the type of the conformers. In this region the band of the T-type conformers (assigned to the hybridized asymmetric vibration of the central CC and CO stretching modes) disappears when going from the condensed phases to phases, where pinacol molecules are monomeric. Ab initio HF/6-311G** (MP2/6-311G**) calculations support the experimental findings; the calculated relative energies for the tGg', gGg', g'Gg', tTt, and gTg' conformers are 0.0 (0.0), 3.4 (3.4), 5.1 (5.9), 7.9 (11.3), and 12.0 (14.0) kJ mol -1, respectively. Consequently, only the G-type conformers are sufficiently populated to give rise to observable spectral lines. Both experimental findings and theoretical calculations demonstrated that the bands in the argon matrix spectrum of pinacol are due to the most stable tGg' conformer. Although the ab initio calculations predict that also the gGg' and g'Gg' conformers are present in the gas phase and in dilute nonpolar solutions their existence could not be confirmed experimentally. Hence, we conclude that the conformation sensitive bands may coincide in the spectra. The HF/6-311G** ab initio calculations for vibrational frequencies of pinacol are consistent with this conclusion, suggesting only small differences between the wavenumbers of the G-type conformers. Pinacol does not show infrared-induced photorotamerization in the low

  7. Distortion of the convolution spectra of PSK signals in frequency multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viniarskii, V. F.; Marchenko, V. F.; Petrin, Iu. M.

    1983-09-01

    The influence of the input and output circuits of frequency multipliers on the convolution spectrum of binary and ternary PSK signals is examined. It is shown that transient processes caused by the phase switching of the input signal lead to the amplitude-phase modulation of the harmonic signal. Experimental results are presented on the balance circuits of MOS varactor doublers and triplers.

  8. Calculating Permittivity and Dielectric Loss Frequency Spectra for Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaev, S.; Makhmadbegov, R. S.

    2018-01-01

    Analytic expressions for dielectric permittivity factor ɛ1(ω) and dielectric dissipation factor ɛ2(ω) of electrolyte solutions are obtained, based on the ratio between complex factors of dielectric permittivity and specific conductivity. The range of frequency dispersion of dynamic factors ɛ1(ω) and ɛ2(ω) for aqueous solutions of LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl is considered. Numerical calculations are performed for friction coefficients β a and β b ; relaxation times τ a , τ b , and τ ab ; and factors ɛ1(ω) and ɛ2(ω) in a wide range of variation for ρ; concentration c; temperature T; and frequencies ω. The resulting theoretically calculated ɛ1(ω) and ɛ2(ω) values and the Cole-Cole diagram are in quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  9. Classificaiton and Discrimination of Sources with Time-Varying Frequency and Spatial Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    sensitivity enhancement by impulse noise excision," in Proc. IEEE Nat. Radar Conf., pp. 252-256, 1997. [7] M. Turley, " Impulse noise rejection in HF...specific time-frequency points or regions, where one or more signals reside, enhances signal-to- noise ratio (SNR) and allows source discrimination and...source separation. The proposed algorithm is developed assuming deterministic signals with additive white complex Gaussian noise . 6. Estimation of FM

  10. A general framework for numerical simulation of improvised explosive device (IED)-detection scenarios using density functional theory (DFT) and terahertz (THz) spectra.

    PubMed

    Shabaev, Andrew; Lambrakos, Samuel G; Bernstein, Noam; Jacobs, Verne L; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a general framework for numerical simulation of various types of scenarios that can occur for the detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) through the use of excitation using incident electromagnetic waves. A central component model of this framework is an S-matrix representation of a multilayered composite material system. Each layer of the system is characterized by an average thickness and an effective electric permittivity function. The outputs of this component are the reflectivity and the transmissivity as functions of frequency and angle of the incident electromagnetic wave. The input of the component is a parameterized analytic-function representation of the electric permittivity as a function of frequency, which is provided by another component model of the framework. The permittivity function is constructed by fitting response spectra calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and parameter adjustment according to any additional information that may be available, e.g., experimentally measured spectra or theory-based assumptions concerning spectral features. A prototype simulation is described that considers response characteristics for THz excitation of the high explosive β-HMX. This prototype simulation includes a description of a procedure for calculating response spectra using DFT as input to the Smatrix model. For this purpose, the DFT software NRLMOL was adopted. © 2011 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  11. A generalization of the double-corner-frequency source spectral model and its use in the SCEC BBP validation exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Di Alessandro, Carola; Abrahamson, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    The stochastic method of simulating ground motions requires the specification of the shape and scaling with magnitude of the source spectrum. The spectral models commonly used are either single-corner-frequency or double-corner-frequency models, but the latter have no flexibility to vary the high-frequency spectral levels for a specified seismic moment. Two generalized double-corner-frequency ω2 source spectral models are introduced, one in which two spectra are multiplied together, and another where they are added. Both models have a low-frequency dependence controlled by the seismic moment, and a high-frequency spectral level controlled by the seismic moment and a stress parameter. A wide range of spectral shapes can be obtained from these generalized spectral models, which makes them suitable for inversions of data to obtain spectral models that can be used in ground-motion simulations in situations where adequate data are not available for purely empirical determinations of ground motions, as in stable continental regions. As an example of the use of the generalized source spectral models, data from up to 40 stations from seven events, plus response spectra at two distances and two magnitudes from recent ground-motion prediction equations, were inverted to obtain the parameters controlling the spectral shapes, as well as a finite-fault factor that is used in point-source, stochastic-method simulations of ground motion. The fits to the data are comparable to or even better than those from finite-fault simulations, even for sites close to large earthquakes.

  12. Representation of high frequency Space Shuttle data by ARMA algorithms and random response spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, P. D.; Mushung, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    High frequency Space Shuttle lift-off data are treated by autoregressive (AR) and autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA) digital algorithms. These algorithms provide useful information on the spectral densities of the data. Further, they yield spectral models which lend themselves to incorporation to the concept of the random response spectrum. This concept yields a reasonably smooth power spectrum for the design of structural and mechanical systems when the available data bank is limited. Due to the non-stationarity of the lift-off event, the pertinent data are split into three slices. Each of the slices is associated with a rather distinguishable phase of the lift-off event, where stationarity can be expected. The presented results are rather preliminary in nature; it is aimed to call attention to the availability of the discussed digital algorithms and to the need to augment the Space Shuttle data bank as more flights are completed.

  13. Experimental diagnostics and modeling of inductive phenomena at low frequencies in impedance spectra of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivac, Ivan; Šimić, Boris; Barbir, Frano

    2017-10-01

    Representation of fuel cell processes by equivalent circuit models, involving resistance and capacitance elements representing activation losses on both anode and cathode in series with resistance representing ohmic losses, cannot capture and explain the inductive loop that may show up at low frequencies in Nyquist diagram representation of the electrochemical impedance spectra. In an attempt to explain the cause of the low-frequency inductive loop and correlate it with the processes within the fuel cell electrodes, a novel equivalent circuit model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been proposed and experimentally verified here in detail. The model takes into account both the anode and the cathode, and has an additional resonant loop on each side, comprising of a resistance, capacitance and inductance in parallel representing the processes within the catalyst layer. Using these additional circuit elements, more accurate and better fits to experimental impedance data in the wide frequency range at different current densities, cell temperatures, humidity of gases, air flow stoichiometries and backpressures were obtained.

  14. Efficient computation of the joint sample frequency spectra for multiple populations

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, John A.; Terhorst, Jonathan; Song, Yun S.

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of studies in population genetics have employed the sample frequency spectrum (SFS), a summary statistic which describes the distribution of mutant alleles at a polymorphic site in a sample of DNA sequences and provides a highly efficient dimensional reduction of large-scale population genomic variation data. Recently, there has been much interest in analyzing the joint SFS data from multiple populations to infer parameters of complex demographic histories, including variable population sizes, population split times, migration rates, admixture proportions, and so on. SFS-based inference methods require accurate computation of the expected SFS under a given demographic model. Although much methodological progress has been made, existing methods suffer from numerical instability and high computational complexity when multiple populations are involved and the sample size is large. In this paper, we present new analytic formulas and algorithms that enable accurate, efficient computation of the expected joint SFS for thousands of individuals sampled from hundreds of populations related by a complex demographic model with arbitrary population size histories (including piecewise-exponential growth). Our results are implemented in a new software package called momi (MOran Models for Inference). Through an empirical study we demonstrate our improvements to numerical stability and computational complexity. PMID:28239248

  15. Efficient computation of the joint sample frequency spectra for multiple populations.

    PubMed

    Kamm, John A; Terhorst, Jonathan; Song, Yun S

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of studies in population genetics have employed the sample frequency spectrum (SFS), a summary statistic which describes the distribution of mutant alleles at a polymorphic site in a sample of DNA sequences and provides a highly efficient dimensional reduction of large-scale population genomic variation data. Recently, there has been much interest in analyzing the joint SFS data from multiple populations to infer parameters of complex demographic histories, including variable population sizes, population split times, migration rates, admixture proportions, and so on. SFS-based inference methods require accurate computation of the expected SFS under a given demographic model. Although much methodological progress has been made, existing methods suffer from numerical instability and high computational complexity when multiple populations are involved and the sample size is large. In this paper, we present new analytic formulas and algorithms that enable accurate, efficient computation of the expected joint SFS for thousands of individuals sampled from hundreds of populations related by a complex demographic model with arbitrary population size histories (including piecewise-exponential growth). Our results are implemented in a new software package called momi (MOran Models for Inference). Through an empirical study we demonstrate our improvements to numerical stability and computational complexity.

  16. Predicting General Aviation Accident Frequency From Pilot Total Flight Hours

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    Craig (2001) hypothesized a killing zonea range of pilot total flight hours (TFH) from about 50-350, over : which general aviation (GA) pilots are at greatest risk. The current work tested a number of candidate modeling : functions on eight ...

  17. General misincorporation frequency: Re-evaluation of the fidelity of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Li, Bianbian; Liu, Xiaoying; Tang, Hong; Zhuang, Xiyao; Yang, Mingqi; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Huidong; Yang, Chun

    2018-02-19

    DNA replication in cells is performed in the presence of four dNTPs and four rNTPs. In this study, we re-evaluated the fidelity of DNA polymerases using the general misincorporation frequency consisting of three incorrect dNTPs and four rNTPs but not using the traditional special misincorporation frequency with only the three incorrect dNTPs. We analyzed both the general and special misincorporation frequencies of nucleotide incorporation opposite dG, rG, or 8-oxoG by Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage 1 (PaP1) DNA polymerase Gp90 or Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase Dpo4. Both misincorporation frequencies of other DNA polymerases published were also summarized and analyzed. The general misincorporation frequency is obviously higher than the special misincorporation frequency for many DNA polymerases, indicating the real fidelity of a DNA polymerase should be evaluated using the general misincorporation frequency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anomalies in the Spectra of the Uncorrelated Components of the Electric Field of the Earth at Frequencies that are Multiples of the Frequencies of Rotation of Relativistic Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, L. V.; Isakevich, V. V.; Isakevich, D. V.

    2018-05-01

    A system is constructed, which, on the basis of extensive experimental material and the use of eigenoscopy, has allowed us to detect anomalies in the spectra of uncorrelated components localized near the rotation frequencies and twice the rotation frequencies of relativistic binary star systems with vanishingly low probability of false alarm, not exceeding 10-17.

  19. Low frequency vibrational spectra and the nature of metal-oxygen bond of alkaline earth metal acetylacetonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakheri, Hamideh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz; Heravi, Mohammad Momen; Morsali, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Theoretical quantum chemistry calculations were used to assign the observed vibrational band frequencies of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba acetylacetonates complexes. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out at the B3LYP level, using LanL2DZ, def2SVP, and mixed, GenECP, (def2SVP for metal ions and 6-311++G** for all other atoms) basis sets. The B3LYP level, with mixed basis sets, was utilized for calculations of vibrational frequencies, IR intensity, and Raman activity. Analysis of the vibrational spectra indicates that there are several bands which could almost be assigned mainly to the metal-oxygen vibrations. The strongest Raman band in this region could be used as a measure of the stability of the complex. The effects of central metal on the bond orders and charge distributions in alkaline earth metal acetylacetonates were studied by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) method for fully optimized compounds. Optimization were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level for the lighter alkaline earth metal complexes (Be, Mg, and Ca acetylacetonates) while the B3LYP level, using LanL2DZ (extrabasis, d and f on oxygen and metal atoms), def2SVP and mixed (def2SVP on metal ions and 6-311++G** for all other atoms) basis sets for all understudy complexes. Calculations indicate that the covalence nature of metal-oxygen bonds considerably decreases from Be to Ba complexes. The nature of metal-oxygen bond was further studied by using Atoms In Molecules (AIM) analysis. The topological parameters, Wiberg bond orders, natural charges of O and metal ions, and also some vibrational band frequencies were correlated with the stability constants of understudy complexes.

  20. A general purpose wideband optical spatial frequency spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, G. S.; Mellor, F. A.

    1972-01-01

    The light scattered at various angles by a transparent media is studied. An example of these applications is the optical Fourier spectrum measurement resulting from various spatial frequencies which were recorded on a photographic emulsion. A method for obtaining these measurements consists of illuminating the test object with parallel monochromatic light. A stationary lens, placed in the resulting wavefield at a distance of one focal length from the object, will focus parallel waves emanating from the test object at a point lying in the focal plane of the lens. A light detector with a small filtering aperture is then used to measure the intensity variation of the light in the focal or transform plane of the lens. Such measurements require the use of a lens which is highly corrected for all of the common aberrations except chromatic aberration.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Low-Frequency Spectra in Molten Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide Salts of Imidazolium Cations Studied by Femtosecond Raman-Induced Kerr Effect Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Hideaki; Kakinuma, Shohei

    2015-07-30

    In this study, the temperature dependence of the low-frequency spectra of liquid bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide salts of the monocations 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium and the dications 1,6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl)hexane and 1,12-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl)dodecane has been investigated by means of femtosecond optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. The intensity in the low-frequency region below 20 cm(-1) in the spectra of the four ionic liquids increases with rising temperature. From a line-shape analysis of the broadened low-frequency spectra of the ionic liquids, it is clear that the lowest-frequency component, which peaks at approximately 5 cm(-1), contributes to the temperature dependence of the spectra. This implies that the activity of the intermolecular translational vibrational motion is increasing with rising temperature. It is also possible that decoupling in the crossover process between intermolecular vibrational motion and structural relaxation occurs as a result of a deterioration of the non-Markovian feature or the loss of memory caused by the higher temperature. The peak of the highest-frequency component, which is due mainly to the imidazolium ring libration, shifts to lower frequency with increasing temperature. This is attributed to weaker interactions of the ionic liquids at higher temperatures. Temperature-dependent viscosities from 293 to 353 K of the four ionic liquids have also been characterized.

  2. - and Frequency-Domain Signatures of Velocity Changing Collisions in Sub-Doppler Saturation Spectra and Pressure Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gregory; Xu, Hong; Forthomme, Damien; Dagdigian, Paul; Sears, Trevor

    2017-06-01

    We have combined experimental and theoretical approaches to the competition between elastic and inelastic collisions of CN radicals with Ar, and how this competition influences time-resolved saturation spectra. Experimentally, we have measured transient, two-color sub-Doppler saturation spectra of CN radicals with an amplitude chopped saturation laser tuned to selected Doppler offsets within rotational lines of the A-X (2-0) band, while scanning a frequency modulated probe laser across the hyperfine-resolved saturation features of corresponding rotational lines of the A-X (1-0) band. A steady-state depletion spectrum includes off-resonant contributions ascribed to velocity diffusion, and the saturation recovery rates depend on the sub-Doppler detuning. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo solutions to the Boltzmann equation for the collisional evolution of the velocity distributions of CN radicals, combined with a pressure-dependent and speed-dependent lifetime broadening. Velocity changing collisions are included by appropriately sampling the energy resolved differential cross sections for elastic scattering of selected rotational states of CN (X). The velocity space diffusion of Doppler tagged molecules proceeds through a series of small-angle scattering events, eventually terminating in an inelastic collision that removes the molecule from the coherently driven ensemble of interest. Collision energy-dependent total cross sections and differential cross sections for elastic scattering of selected CN rotational states with Ar were computed with Hibridon quantum scattering calculations, and used for sampling in the Monte Carlo modeling. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences within the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  3. Doppler-shifting effects on frequency spectra of gravity waves observed near the summer mesopause at high latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of radar observations of horizontal and vertical velocities near the summer mesopause at Poker Flat (Alaska), showing that the observed vertical velocity spectra were influenced strongly by Doppler-shifting effects. The horizontal velocity spectra, however, were relatively insensitive to horizontal wind speed. The observed spectra are compared with predicted spectra for various models of the intrinsic motion spectrum and degrees of Doppler shifting.

  4. A Generalized Approach to Model the Spectra and Radiation Dose Rate of Solar Particle Events on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; McDole, Thoren; Kühl, Patrick; Appel, Jan C.; Matthiä, Daniel; Krauss, Johannes; Köhler, Jan

    2018-01-01

    For future human missions to Mars, it is important to study the surface radiation environment during extreme and elevated conditions. In the long term, it is mainly galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) modulated by solar activity that contribute to the radiation on the surface of Mars, but intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events may induce acute health effects. Such events may enhance the radiation level significantly and should be detected as immediately as possible to prevent severe damage to humans and equipment. However, the energetic particle environment on the Martian surface is significantly different from that in deep space due to the influence of the Martian atmosphere. Depending on the intensity and shape of the original solar particle spectra, as well as particle types, the surface spectra may induce entirely different radiation effects. In order to give immediate and accurate alerts while avoiding unnecessary ones, it is important to model and well understand the atmospheric effect on the incoming SEPs, including both protons and helium ions. In this paper, we have developed a generalized approach to quickly model the surface response of any given incoming proton/helium ion spectra and have applied it to a set of historical large solar events, thus providing insights into the possible variety of surface radiation environments that may be induced during SEP events. Based on the statistical study of more than 30 significant solar events, we have obtained an empirical model for estimating the surface dose rate directly from the intensities of a power-law SEP spectra.

  5. A general low frequency acoustic radiation capability for NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Schroeder, E. A.; Lipman, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new capability called NASHUA is described for calculating the radiated acoustic sound pressure field exterior to a harmonically-excited arbitrary submerged 3-D elastic structure. The surface fluid pressures and velocities are first calculated by coupling a NASTRAN finite element model of the structure with a discretized form of the Helmholtz surface integral equation for the exterior fluid. After the fluid impedance is calculated, most of the required matrix operations are performed using the general matrix manipulation package (DMAP) available in NASTRAN. Far field radiated pressures are then calculated from the surface solution using the Helmholtz exterior integral equation. Other output quantities include the maximum sound pressure levels in each of the three coordinate planes, the rms and average surface pressures and normal velocities, the total radiated power and the radiation efficiency. The overall approach is illustrated and validated using known analytic solutions for submerged spherical shells subjected to both uniform and nonuniform applied loads.

  6. Analysis of high-frequency energy in long-term average spectra of singing, speech, and voiceless fricatives

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Brian B.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Story, Brad H.

    2012-01-01

    The human singing and speech spectrum includes energy above 5 kHz. To begin an in-depth exploration of this high-frequency energy (HFE), a database of anechoic high-fidelity recordings of singers and talkers was created and analyzed. Third-octave band analysis from the long-term average spectra showed that production level (soft vs normal vs loud), production mode (singing vs speech), and phoneme (for voiceless fricatives) all significantly affected HFE characteristics. Specifically, increased production level caused an increase in absolute HFE level, but a decrease in relative HFE level. Singing exhibited higher levels of HFE than speech in the soft and normal conditions, but not in the loud condition. Third-octave band levels distinguished phoneme class of voiceless fricatives. Female HFE levels were significantly greater than male levels only above 11 kHz. This information is pertinent to various areas of acoustics, including vocal tract modeling, voice synthesis, augmentative hearing technology (hearing aids and cochlear implants), and training/therapy for singing and speech. PMID:22978902

  7. Low to high frequency ratio of heart rate variability spectra fails to describe sympatho-vagal balance in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Milicević, Goran

    2005-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects an influence of autonomic nervous system on heart work. In healthy subjects, ratio between low and high frequency components (LF/HF ratio) of HRV spectra represents a measure of sympatho-vagal balance. The ratio was defined by the authorities as an useful clinical tool, but it seems that it fails to summarise sympatho-vagal balance in a clinical setting. Value of the method was re-evaluated in several categories of cardiac patients. HRV was analysed from 24-hour Holter ECGs in 132 healthy subjects, and 2159 cardiac patients dichotomised by gender, median of age, diagnosis of myocardial infarction or coronary artery surgery, left ventricular systolic function and divided by overall HRV into several categories. In healthy subjects, LF/HF ratio correlated with overall HRV negatively, as expected. The paradoxical finding was obtained in cardiac patients; the lower the overall HRV and the time-domain indices of vagal modulation activity were the lower the LF/HF ratio was. If used as a measure of sympatho-vagal balance, long-term recordings of LF/HF ratio contradict to clinical finding and time-domain HRV indices in cardiac patients. The ratio cannot therefore be used as a reliable marker of autonomic activity in a clinical setting.

  8. Study of transmittance and reflectance spectra of the cornea and the sclera in the THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iomdina, Elena N.; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Seliverstov, Sergey V.; Sianosyan, Alisa A.; Teplyakova, Kseniya O.; Rusova, Anastasia A.

    2016-09-01

    An adequate water balance (hydration extent) is one of the basic factors of normal eye function, including its external shells: the cornea and the sclera. Adequate control of corneal and scleral hydration is very important for early diagnosis of a variety of eye diseases, stating indications for and contraindications against keratorefractive surgeries and the choice of contact lens correction solutions. THz systems of creating images in reflected beams are likely to become ideal instruments of noninvasive control of corneal and scleral hydration degrees. This paper reports on the results of a study involving transmittance and reflectance spectra for the cornea and the sclera of rabbit and human eyes, as well as those of the rabbit eye, in the frequency range of 0.13 to 0.32 THz. The dependence of the reflectance coefficient of these tissues on water mass percentage content was determined. The experiments were performed on three corneas, three rabbit scleras, two rabbit eyes, and three human scleras. The preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed technique, based on the use of a continuous THz radiation, may be utilized to create a device for noninvasive control of corneal and scleral hydration, which has clear potential of broad practical application.

  9. Analysis of high-frequency energy in long-term average spectra of singing, speech, and voiceless fricatives.

    PubMed

    Monson, Brian B; Lotto, Andrew J; Story, Brad H

    2012-09-01

    The human singing and speech spectrum includes energy above 5 kHz. To begin an in-depth exploration of this high-frequency energy (HFE), a database of anechoic high-fidelity recordings of singers and talkers was created and analyzed. Third-octave band analysis from the long-term average spectra showed that production level (soft vs normal vs loud), production mode (singing vs speech), and phoneme (for voiceless fricatives) all significantly affected HFE characteristics. Specifically, increased production level caused an increase in absolute HFE level, but a decrease in relative HFE level. Singing exhibited higher levels of HFE than speech in the soft and normal conditions, but not in the loud condition. Third-octave band levels distinguished phoneme class of voiceless fricatives. Female HFE levels were significantly greater than male levels only above 11 kHz. This information is pertinent to various areas of acoustics, including vocal tract modeling, voice synthesis, augmentative hearing technology (hearing aids and cochlear implants), and training/therapy for singing and speech.

  10. A generalized approach to automated NMR peak list editing: application to reduced dimensionality triple resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Hunter N B; Riaz, Nadeem; Aramini, James M; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2004-10-01

    We present an algorithm and program called Pattern Picker that performs editing of raw peak lists derived from multidimensional NMR experiments with characteristic peak patterns. Pattern Picker detects groups of correlated peaks within peak lists from reduced dimensionality triple resonance (RD-TR) NMR spectra, with high fidelity and high yield. With typical quality RD-TR NMR data sets, Pattern Picker performs almost as well as human analysis, and is very robust in discriminating real peak sets from noise and other artifacts in unedited peak lists. The program uses a depth-first search algorithm with short-circuiting to efficiently explore a search tree representing every possible combination of peaks forming a group. The Pattern Picker program is particularly valuable for creating an automated peak picking/editing process. The Pattern Picker algorithm can be applied to a broad range of experiments with distinct peak patterns including RD, G-matrix Fourier transformation (GFT) NMR spectra, and experiments to measure scalar and residual dipolar coupling, thus promoting the use of experiments that are typically harder for a human to analyze. Since the complexity of peak patterns becomes a benefit rather than a drawback, Pattern Picker opens new opportunities in NMR experiment design.

  11. [Influence of electromagnetic emission at the frequencies of molecular absorption and emission spectra of oxygen and nitrogen oxide on the adhesion and formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm].

    PubMed

    Pronina, E A; Shvidenko, I G; Shub, G M; Shapoval, O G

    2011-01-01

    Evaluate the influence of electromagnetic emission (EME) at the frequencies of molecular absorption and emission spectra of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen oxide (MAES 02 and MAES NO respectively) on the adhesion, population progress and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Adhesive activity was evaluated by mean adhesion index (MAI) of bacteria on human erythrocytes. Population growth dynamic was assessed by optical density index of broth cultures; biofilm formation--by values of optical density of the cells attached to the surface of polystyrol wells. P.aeruginosa bacteria had high adhesive properties that have increased under the influence of MAES 02 frequency emission and have not changed under the influence of MAES NO frequency. Exposure of bacteria to MAES NO frequency did not influence the population progress; exposure to MAES 02 frequency stimulated the biofilm formation ability of the bacteria, and MAES NO--decreased this ability. EME at MAES NO frequency can be used to suppress bacterial biofilm formation by pseudomonas.

  12. Iterative generalized time-frequency reassignment for planetary gearbox fault diagnosis under nonstationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowang; Feng, Zhipeng

    2016-12-01

    Planetary gearboxes are widely used in many sorts of machinery, for its large transmission ratio and high load bearing capacity in a compact structure. Their fault diagnosis relies on effective identification of fault characteristic frequencies. However, in addition to the vibration complexity caused by intricate mechanical kinematics, volatile external conditions result in time-varying running speed and/or load, and therefore nonstationary vibration signals. This usually leads to time-varying complex fault characteristics, and adds difficulty to planetary gearbox fault diagnosis. Time-frequency analysis is an effective approach to extracting the frequency components and their time variation of nonstationary signals. Nevertheless, the commonly used time-frequency analysis methods suffer from poor time-frequency resolution as well as outer and inner interferences, which hinder accurate identification of time-varying fault characteristic frequencies. Although time-frequency reassignment improves the time-frequency readability, it is essentially subject to the constraints of mono-component and symmetric time-frequency distribution about true instantaneous frequency. Hence, it is still susceptible to erroneous energy reallocation or even generates pseudo interferences, particularly for multi-component signals of highly nonlinear instantaneous frequency. In this paper, to overcome the limitations of time-frequency reassignment, we propose an improvement with fine time-frequency resolution and free from interferences for highly nonstationary multi-component signals, by exploiting the merits of iterative generalized demodulation. The signal is firstly decomposed into mono-components of constant frequency by iterative generalized demodulation. Time-frequency reassignment is then applied to each generalized demodulated mono-component, obtaining a fine time-frequency distribution. Finally, the time-frequency distribution of each signal component is restored and superposed to

  13. Difference optimization: Automatic correction of relative frequency and phase for mean non-edited and edited GABA 1H MEGA-PRESS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleve, Marianne; Krämer, Martin; Gussew, Alexander; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2017-06-01

    Phase and frequency corrections of magnetic resonance spectroscopic data are of major importance to obtain reliable and unambiguous metabolite estimates as validated in recent research for single-shot scans with the same spectral fingerprint. However, when using the J-difference editing technique 1H MEGA-PRESS, misalignment between mean edited (ON ‾) and non-edited (OFF ‾) spectra that may remain even after correction of the corresponding individual single-shot scans results in subtraction artefacts compromising reliable GABA quantitation. We present a fully automatic routine that iteratively optimizes simultaneously relative frequencies and phases between the mean ON ‾ and OFF ‾ 1H MEGA-PRESS spectra while minimizing the sum of the magnitude of the difference spectrum (L1 norm). The proposed method was applied to simulated spectra at different SNR levels with deliberately preset frequency and phase errors. Difference optimization proved to be more sensitive to small signal fluctuations, as e.g. arising from subtraction artefacts, and outperformed the alternative spectral registration approach, that, in contrast to our proposed linear approach, uses a nonlinear least squares minimization (L2 norm), at all investigated levels of SNR. Moreover, the proposed method was applied to 47 MEGA-PRESS datasets acquired in vivo at 3 T. The results of the alignment between the mean OFF ‾ and ON ‾ spectra were compared by applying (a) no correction, (b) difference optimization or (c) spectral registration. Since the true frequency and phase errors are not known for in vivo data, manually corrected spectra were used as the gold standard reference (d). Automatically corrected data applying both, method (b) or method (c), showed distinct improvements of spectra quality as revealed by the mean Pearson correlation coefficient between corresponding real part mean DIFF ‾ spectra of Rbd = 0.997 ± 0.003 (method (b) vs. (d)), compared to Rad = 0.764 ± 0.220 (method (a) vs

  14. Difference optimization: Automatic correction of relative frequency and phase for mean non-edited and edited GABA 1H MEGA-PRESS spectra.

    PubMed

    Cleve, Marianne; Krämer, Martin; Gussew, Alexander; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2017-06-01

    Phase and frequency corrections of magnetic resonance spectroscopic data are of major importance to obtain reliable and unambiguous metabolite estimates as validated in recent research for single-shot scans with the same spectral fingerprint. However, when using the J-difference editing technique 1 H MEGA-PRESS, misalignment between mean edited (ON‾) and non-edited (OFF‾) spectra that may remain even after correction of the corresponding individual single-shot scans results in subtraction artefacts compromising reliable GABA quantitation. We present a fully automatic routine that iteratively optimizes simultaneously relative frequencies and phases between the mean ON‾ and OFF‾ 1 H MEGA-PRESS spectra while minimizing the sum of the magnitude of the difference spectrum (L 1 norm). The proposed method was applied to simulated spectra at different SNR levels with deliberately preset frequency and phase errors. Difference optimization proved to be more sensitive to small signal fluctuations, as e.g. arising from subtraction artefacts, and outperformed the alternative spectral registration approach, that, in contrast to our proposed linear approach, uses a nonlinear least squares minimization (L 2 norm), at all investigated levels of SNR. Moreover, the proposed method was applied to 47 MEGA-PRESS datasets acquired in vivo at 3T. The results of the alignment between the mean OFF‾ and ON‾ spectra were compared by applying (a) no correction, (b) difference optimization or (c) spectral registration. Since the true frequency and phase errors are not known for in vivo data, manually corrected spectra were used as the gold standard reference (d). Automatically corrected data applying both, method (b) or method (c), showed distinct improvements of spectra quality as revealed by the mean Pearson correlation coefficient between corresponding real part mean DIFF‾ spectra of R bd =0.997±0.003 (method (b) vs. (d)), compared to R ad =0.764±0.220 (method (a) vs. (d

  15. The IR Absorption Spectra of Aqueous Solutions of Dimethylsulfoxide over the Frequency Range 50-300 cm-1 and the Mobility of Water Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemenkova, Z. S.; Novskova, T. A.; Lyashchenko, A. K.

    2008-04-01

    The IR absorption spectra of aqueous solutions of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) with concentrations from 100% H2O to 100% DMSO were recorded over the frequency range 50-500 cm-1. The absorption spectra were described using the theoretical scheme of hindered rotators. A model was developed according to which orientation relaxation in solution was related to separate rotations of H2O and DMSO molecules through fixed small and (or) large angles in a unified network of H-bonds consisting of several subsystems ordered to various degrees. The calculated absorption spectra were in agreement with the experimental data in the far IR region. Elementary motions of molecules were found to slow down in the passage from pure dimethylsulfoxide to its aqueous solutions. The special features of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration of DMSO polar and nonpolar groups were considered.

  16. Entropy-based derivation of generalized distributions for hydrometeorological frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Singh, Vijay P.

    2018-02-01

    Frequency analysis of hydrometeorological and hydrological extremes is needed for the design of hydraulic and civil infrastructure facilities as well as water resources management. A multitude of distributions have been employed for frequency analysis of these extremes. However, no single distribution has been accepted as a global standard. Employing the entropy theory, this study derived five generalized distributions for frequency analysis that used different kinds of information encoded as constraints. These distributions were the generalized gamma (GG), the generalized beta distribution of the second kind (GB2), and the Halphen type A distribution (Hal-A), Halphen type B distribution (Hal-B) and Halphen type inverse B distribution (Hal-IB), among which the GG and GB2 distribution were previously derived by Papalexiou and Koutsoyiannis (2012) and the Halphen family was first derived using entropy theory in this paper. The entropy theory allowed to estimate parameters of the distributions in terms of the constraints used for their derivation. The distributions were tested using extreme daily and hourly rainfall data. Results show that the root mean square error (RMSE) values were very small, which indicated that the five generalized distributions fitted the extreme rainfall data well. Among them, according to the Akaike information criterion (AIC) values, generally the GB2 and Halphen family gave a better fit. Therefore, those general distributions are one of the best choices for frequency analysis. The entropy-based derivation led to a new way for frequency analysis of hydrometeorological extremes.

  17. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  18. Vibronic Boson Sampling: Generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling for Molecular Vibronic Spectra at Finite Temperature.

    PubMed

    Huh, Joonsuk; Yung, Man-Hong

    2017-08-07

    Molecular vibroic spectroscopy, where the transitions involve non-trivial Bosonic correlation due to the Duschinsky Rotation, is strongly believed to be in a similar complexity class as Boson Sampling. At finite temperature, the problem is represented as a Boson Sampling experiment with correlated Gaussian input states. This molecular problem with temperature effect is intimately related to the various versions of Boson Sampling sharing the similar computational complexity. Here we provide a full description to this relation in the context of Gaussian Boson Sampling. We find a hierarchical structure, which illustrates the relationship among various Boson Sampling schemes. Specifically, we show that every instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling with an initial correlation can be simulated by an instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling without initial correlation, with only a polynomial overhead. Since every Gaussian state is associated with a thermal state, our result implies that every sampling problem in molecular vibronic transitions, at any temperature, can be simulated by Gaussian Boson Sampling associated with a product of vacuum modes. We refer such a generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling motivated by the molecular sampling problem as Vibronic Boson Sampling.

  19. A Generalized Fast Frequency Sweep Algorithm for Coupled Circuit-EM Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rockway, J D; Champagne, N J; Sharpe, R M

    2004-01-14

    Frequency domain techniques are popular for analyzing electromagnetics (EM) and coupled circuit-EM problems. These techniques, such as the method of moments (MoM) and the finite element method (FEM), are used to determine the response of the EM portion of the problem at a single frequency. Since only one frequency is solved at a time, it may take a long time to calculate the parameters for wideband devices. In this paper, a fast frequency sweep based on the Asymptotic Wave Expansion (AWE) method is developed and applied to generalized mixed circuit-EM problems. The AWE method, which was originally developed for lumped-loadmore » circuit simulations, has recently been shown to be effective at quasi-static and low frequency full-wave simulations. Here it is applied to a full-wave MoM solver, capable of solving for metals, dielectrics, and coupled circuit-EM problems.« less

  20. High-frequency predictions for number counts and spectral properties of extragalactic radio sources. New evidence of a break at mm wavelengths in spectra of bright blazar sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucci, M.; Toffolatti, L.; de Zotti, G.; Martínez-González, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present models to predict high-frequency counts of extragalactic radio sources using physically grounded recipes to describe the complex spectral behaviour of blazars that dominate the mm-wave counts at bright flux densities. We show that simple power-law spectra are ruled out by high-frequency (ν ≥ 100 GHz) data. These data also strongly constrain models featuring the spectral breaks predicted by classical physical models for the synchrotron emission produced in jets of blazars. A model dealing with blazars as a single population is, at best, only marginally consistent with data coming from current surveys at high radio frequencies. Our most successful model assumes different distributions of break frequencies, νM, for BL Lacs and flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). The former objects have substantially higher values of νM, implying that the synchrotron emission comes from more compact regions; therefore, a substantial increase of the BL Lac fraction at high radio frequencies and at bright flux densities is predicted. Remarkably, our best model is able to give a very good fit to all the observed data on number counts and on distributions of spectral indices of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies above 5 and up to 220 GHz. Predictions for the forthcoming sub-mm blazar counts from Planck, at the highest HFI frequencies, and from Herschel surveys are also presented. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Very low frequency oscillations in the power spectra of heart rate variability during dry supine immersion and exposure to non-hypoxic hypobaria.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, K K

    2011-06-01

    The origin of very low frequency (VLF) oscillations in the power spectra of heart rate variability (HRV) is controversial with possible mechanisms involving thermoregulation and/or renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Recently, a major contribution from vagal influences has been suggested. The present study investigated the behaviour of VLF (0.004-0.040 Hz) components of HRV power spectra in a group of healthy male volunteers during their exposure to (1) dry, supine, immersion in thermo-neutral water for 6 h (n = 7) and (2) non-hypoxic hypobaria (breathing 40-60% oxygen at 15,000' simulated in a decompression chamber) for 5 h (n = 15). The two manoeuvres are established to increase vagal outflow. During both the manoeuvres, all the frequency domain indices of HRV exhibited a significant increase. Increase in HRV was much more than that in the R-R interval. At 6 h of immersion, the R-R interval increased by ∼ 15% but the total power increased ∼ fourfold. Similarly, at 5 h of exposure to hypobaria, total power increased ∼ twofold with a very modest increase in an R-R of ∼ 9%. Increase in spectral power was appreciable even after normalization with mean R-R(2). Increase in VLF during immersion was more than reported during enalaprilat blockade of angiotensin convertase enzyme. Plasma renin activity did not vary during hypobaria. There was a significant increase in pNN50, an established marker of cardiac vagal activity. Centre frequencies of the spectra and slope (β) of the relation between log(PSD) and log(frequency) did not change. Results were supportive of the notion that the parasympathetic system is pre-potent to influence slower (than respiratory) frequency components in HRV spectrum. Additionally, such an effect was without a change in the time constant of effector responses or pacemaker frequencies of VLF and LF periodicities and HRV was not a simple linear surrogate for cardiac vagal effects. An invariance of spectral exponent (β) ruled out

  2. General solution of undersampling frequency conversion and its optimization for parallel photodisplacement imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Toshihiko; Ninomiya, Takanori

    2006-10-10

    A general solution of undersampling frequency conversion and its optimization for parallel photodisplacement imaging is presented. Phase-modulated heterodyne interference light generated by a linear region of periodic displacement is captured by a charge-coupled device image sensor, in which the interference light is sampled at a sampling rate lower than the Nyquist frequency. The frequencies of the components of the light, such as the sideband and carrier (which include photodisplacement and topography information, respectively), are downconverted and sampled simultaneously based on the integration and sampling effects of the sensor. A general solution of frequency and amplitude in this downconversion is derived by Fourier analysis of the sampling procedure. The optimal frequency condition for the heterodyne beat signal, modulation signal, and sensor gate pulse is derived such that undesirable components are eliminated and each information component is converted into an orthogonal function, allowing each to be discretely reproduced from the Fourier coefficients. The optimal frequency parameters that maximize the sideband-to-carrier amplitude ratio are determined, theoretically demonstrating its high selectivity over 80 dB. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that this technique is capable of simultaneous imaging of reflectivity, topography, and photodisplacement for the detection of subsurface lattice defects at a speed corresponding to an acquisition time of only 0.26 s per 256 x 256 pixel area.

  3. Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaoning

    2016-08-01

    In this study, I used seismic waveforms recorded within 2 km from the epicenter of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions to invert for the moment-tensor spectra of these explosions. I employed a one-dimensional (1D) Earth model for Green's function calculations. The model was developed from P- and R g-wave travel times and amplitudes. I selected data for the inversion based on the criterion that they had consistent travel times and amplitude behavior as those predicted by the 1D model. Due to limited azimuthal coverage of the sources and the mostly vertical-component-only nature of the dataset, only long-period,more » volumetric components of the moment-tensor spectra were well constrained.« less

  4. An auxiliary frequency tracking system for general purpose lock-in amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kai; Chen, Liuhao; Huang, Anfeng; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Hanlu

    2018-04-01

    Lock-in amplifiers (LIAs) are designed to measure weak signals submerged by noise. This is achieved with a signal modulator to avoid low-frequency noise and a narrow-band filter to suppress out-of-band noise. In asynchronous measurement, even a slight frequency deviation between the modulator and the reference may lead to measurement error because the filter’s passband is not flat. Because many commercial LIAs are unable to track frequency deviations, in this paper we propose an auxiliary frequency tracking system. We analyze the measurement error caused by the frequency deviation and propose both a tracking method and an auto-tracking system. This approach requires only three basic parameters, which can be obtained from any general purpose LIA via its communications interface, to calculate the frequency deviation from the phase difference. The proposed auxiliary tracking system is designed as a peripheral connected to the LIA’s serial port, removing the need for an additional power supply. The test results verified the effectiveness of the proposed system; the modified commercial LIA (model SR-850) was able to track the frequency deviation and continuous drift. For step frequency deviations, a steady tracking error of less than 0.001% was achieved within three adjustments, and the worst tracking accuracy was still better than 0.1% for a continuous frequency drift. The tracking system can be used to expand the application scope of commercial LIAs, especially for remote measurements in which the modulation clock and the local reference are separated.

  5. Changes in Alpha Frequency and Power of the Electroencephalogram during Volatile-Based General Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hight, Darren; Voss, Logan J; Garcia, Paul S; Sleigh, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) at the alpha frequency (8-12 Hz) are thought to be ubiquitous during surgical anesthesia, but the details of how this oscillation responds to ongoing changes in volatile anesthetic concentration have not been well characterized. It is not known how often alpha oscillations are absent in the clinical context, how sensitively alpha frequency and power respond to changes in anesthetic concentration, and what effect increased age has on alpha frequency. Bipolar EEG was recorded frontally from 305 patients undergoing surgery with sevoflurane or desflurane providing general anesthesia. A new method of detecting the presence of alpha oscillations based on the stability of the rate of change of the peak frequency in the alpha range was developed. Linear concentration-response curves were fitted to assess the sensitivity of alpha power and frequency measures to changing levels of anesthesia. Alpha oscillations were seen to be inexplicably absent in around 4% of patients. Maximal alpha power increased with increasing volatile anesthetic concentrations in half of the patients, and decreased in the remaining patients. Alpha frequency decreased with increasing anesthetic concentrations in near to 90% of patients. Increasing age was associated with decreased sensitivity to volatile anesthesia concentrations, and with decreased alpha frequency, which sometimes transitioned into the theta range (5-7 Hz). While peak alpha frequency shows a consistent slowing to increasing volatile concentrations, the peak power of the oscillation does not, suggesting that frequency might be more informative of depth of anesthesia than traditional power based measures during volatile-based anesthesia. The alpha oscillation becomes slower with increasing age, even when the decreased anesthetic needs of older patients were taken into account.

  6. Frequency standards based on ultracold atoms in tests of general relativity, navigation and gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kudeyarov, K. S.; Kolachevsky, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    Research and development in the field of optical clocks based on ultracold atoms and ions have enabled the relative uncertainty in frequency to be reduced down to a few parts in 1018. The use of novel, precise frequency comparison methods opens up new possibilities for basic research (sensitive tests of general relativity, a search for a drift of fundamental constants and a search for ‘dark matter’) as well as for state-of-the-art navigation and gravimetry. We discuss the key methods that are used in creating precision clocks (including transportable clocks) based on ultracold atoms and ions and the feasibility of using them in resolving current relativistic gravimetry issues.

  7. On the information content of natural frequency spectra associated with different angular numbers. [acoustic velocity in vibrating fluid sphere model of earth structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, V.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of inferring the speed of sound in a contained spherically symmetric fluid solely from its natural frequencies of vibration is considered. An investigation of the case in which the data consist of the two spectra associated with the angular numbers 0 and 1, suggests the possibility that a one-parameter family of slowness profiles can be constructed. These profiles are compatible with the data, up to first order in the non-uniformity of the fluid. It is conjectured that for other angular numbers, the loss of information increases as the difference between them increases.

  8. A general theory on frequency and time-frequency analysis of irregularly sampled time series based on projection methods - Part 1: Frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoir, Guillaume; Crucifix, Michel

    2018-03-01

    We develop a general framework for the frequency analysis of irregularly sampled time series. It is based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, but extended to algebraic operators accounting for the presence of a polynomial trend in the model for the data, in addition to a periodic component and a background noise. Special care is devoted to the correlation between the trend and the periodic component. This new periodogram is then cast into the Welch overlapping segment averaging (WOSA) method in order to reduce its variance. We also design a test of significance for the WOSA periodogram, against the background noise. The model for the background noise is a stationary Gaussian continuous autoregressive-moving-average (CARMA) process, more general than the classical Gaussian white or red noise processes. CARMA parameters are estimated following a Bayesian framework. We provide algorithms that compute the confidence levels for the WOSA periodogram and fully take into account the uncertainty in the CARMA noise parameters. Alternatively, a theory using point estimates of CARMA parameters provides analytical confidence levels for the WOSA periodogram, which are more accurate than Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) confidence levels and, below some threshold for the number of data points, less costly in computing time. We then estimate the amplitude of the periodic component with least-squares methods, and derive an approximate proportionality between the squared amplitude and the periodogram. This proportionality leads to a new extension for the periodogram: the weighted WOSA periodogram, which we recommend for most frequency analyses with irregularly sampled data. The estimated signal amplitude also permits filtering in a frequency band. Our results generalise and unify methods developed in the fields of geosciences, engineering, astronomy and astrophysics. They also constitute the starting point for an extension to the continuous wavelet transform developed in a companion

  9. Huntington disease reduced penetrance alleles occur at high frequency in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Madore, Steven J.; Gordon, Erynn S.; Gerry, Norman; Davidson, Mark; Slama, Ramy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To directly estimate the frequency and penetrance of CAG repeat alleles associated with Huntington disease (HD) in the general population. Methods: CAG repeat length was evaluated in 7,315 individuals from 3 population-based cohorts from British Columbia, the United States, and Scotland. The frequency of ≥36 CAG alleles was assessed out of a total of 14,630 alleles. The general population frequency of reduced penetrance alleles (36–39 CAG) was compared to the prevalence of patients with HD with genetically confirmed 36–39 CAG from a multisource clinical ascertainment in British Columbia, Canada. The penetrance of 36–38 CAG repeat alleles for HD was estimated for individuals ≥65 years of age and compared against previously reported clinical penetrance estimates. Results: A total of 18 of 7,315 individuals had ≥36 CAG, revealing that approximately 1 in 400 individuals from the general population have an expanded CAG repeat associated with HD (0.246%). Individuals with CAG 36–37 genotypes are the most common (36, 0.096%; 37, 0.082%; 38, 0.027%; 39, 0.000%; ≥40, 0.041%). General population CAG 36–38 penetrance rates are lower than penetrance rates extrapolated from clinical cohorts. Conclusion: HD alleles with a CAG repeat length of 36–38 occur at high frequency in the general population. The infrequent diagnosis of HD at this CAG length is likely due to low penetrance. Another important contributing factor may be reduced ascertainment of HD in those of older age. PMID:27335115

  10. Computing frequency by using generalized zero-crossing applied to intrinsic mode functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This invention presents a method for computing Instantaneous Frequency by applying Empirical Mode Decomposition to a signal and using Generalized Zero-Crossing (GZC) and Extrema Sifting. The GZC approach is the most direct, local, and also the most accurate in the mean. Furthermore, this approach will also give a statistical measure of the scattering of the frequency value. For most practical applications, this mean frequency localized down to quarter of a wave period is already a well-accepted result. As this method physically measures the period, or part of it, the values obtained can serve as the best local mean over the period to which it applies. Through Extrema Sifting, instead of the cubic spline fitting, this invention constructs the upper envelope and the lower envelope by connecting local maxima points and local minima points of the signal with straight lines, respectively, when extracting a collection of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) from a signal under consideration.

  11. Determination of thorium (IV) using isophthalaldehyde-tetrapyrrole as probe by resonance light scattering, second-order scattering and frequency-doubling scattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Xue, Jinhua; Xiao, Xilin; Xu, Li; Jiang, Min; Peng, Pengcheng; Liao, Lifu

    2017-12-01

    The coordination reaction of thorium (IV) with a ditopic bidentate ligand to form supramolecular polymer was studied by resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra, second-order scattering (SOS) spectra and frequency-doubling scattering (FDS) spectra, respectively. The ditopic bidentate ligand is isophthalaldehyde-tetrapyrrole (IPTP). It was synthesized through a condensation reaction of isophthalaldehyde with pyrrole. The formation of supramolecular polymer results in remarkable intensity enhancements of the three light scattering signals. The maximum scattering wavelengths of RLS, FDS and SOS were 290, 568 and 340 nm, respectively. The reaction was used to establish new light scattering methods for the determination of thorium (IV) by using IPTP as probe. Under optimum conditions, the intensity enhancements of RLS, SOS and FDS were directly proportional to the concentration of thorium (IV) in the ranges of 0.01 to 1.2 μg mL- 1, 0.05 to 1.2 μg mL- 1 and 0.05 to 1.2 μg mL- 1, respectively. The detection limits were 0.003 μg mL- 1, 0.012 μg mL- 1 and 0.021 μg mL- 1, respectively. The methods were suitable for analyzing thorium (IV) in actual samples. The results show acceptable recoveries and precision compared with a reference method.

  12. Frequency-dependent failure mechanisms of nanocrystalline gold interconnect lines under general alternating current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X. M.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-09-01

    Thermal fatigue failure of metallization interconnect lines subjected to alternating currents (AC) is becoming a severe threat to the long-term reliability of micro/nanodevices with increasing electrical current density/power. Here, thermal fatigue failure behaviors and damage mechanisms of nanocrystalline Au interconnect lines on the silicon glass substrate have been investigated by applying general alternating currents (the pure alternating current coupled with a direct current (DC) component) with different frequencies ranging from 0.05 Hz to 5 kHz. We observed both thermal fatigue damages caused by Joule heating-induced cyclic strain/stress and electromigration (EM) damages caused by the DC component. Besides, the damage formation showed a strong electrically-thermally-mechanically coupled effect and frequency dependence. At lower frequencies, thermal fatigue damages were dominant and the main damage forms were grain coarsening with grain boundary (GB) cracking/voiding and grain thinning. At higher frequencies, EM damages took over and the main damage forms were GB cracking/voiding of smaller grains and hillocks. Furthermore, the healing effect of the reversing current was considered to elucidate damage mechanisms of the nanocrystalline Au lines generated by the general AC. Lastly, a modified model was proposed to predict the lifetime of the nanocrystalline metal interconnect lines, i.e., that was a competing drift velocity-based approach based on the threshold time required for reverse diffusion/healing to occur.

  13. A new method of passive modifications for partial frequency assignment of general structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotti, Roberto; Ouyang, Huajiang; Richiedei, Dario

    2018-01-01

    The assignment of a subset of natural frequencies to vibrating systems can be conveniently achieved by means of suitable structural modifications. It has been observed that such an approach usually leads to the undesired change of the unassigned natural frequencies, which is a phenomenon known as frequency spill-over. Such an issue has been dealt with in the literature only in simple specific cases. In this paper, a new and general method is proposed that aims to assign a subset of natural frequencies with low spill-over. The optimal structural modifications are determined through a three-step procedure that considers both the prescribed eigenvalues and the feasibility constraints, assuring that the obtained solution is physically realizable. The proposed method is therefore applicable to very general vibrating systems, such as those obtained through the finite element method. The numerical difficulties that may occur as a result of employing the method are also carefully addressed. Finally, the capabilities of the method are validated in three test-cases in which both lumped and distributed parameters are modified to obtain the desired eigenvalues.

  14. An improved peak frequency shift method for Q estimation based on generalized seismic wavelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Gao, Jinghuai

    2018-02-01

    As a powerful tool for hydrocarbon detection and reservoir characterization, the quality factor, Q, provides useful information in seismic data processing and interpretation. In this paper, we propose a novel method for Q estimation. The generalized seismic wavelet (GSW) function was introduced to fit the amplitude spectrum of seismic waveforms with two parameters: fractional value and reference frequency. Then we derive an analytical relation between the GSW function and the Q factor of the medium. When a seismic wave propagates through a viscoelastic medium, the GSW function can be employed to fit the amplitude spectrum of the source and attenuated wavelets, then the fractional values and reference frequencies can be evaluated numerically from the discrete Fourier spectrum. After calculating the peak frequency based on the obtained fractional value and reference frequency, the relationship between the GSW function and the Q factor can be built by the conventional peak frequency shift method. Synthetic tests indicate that our method can achieve higher accuracy and be more robust to random noise compared with existing methods. Furthermore, the proposed method is applicable to different types of source wavelet. Field data application also demonstrates the effectiveness of our method in seismic attenuation and the potential in the reservoir characteristic.

  15. The ratio between corner frequencies of source spectra of P- and S-waves—a new discriminant between earthquakes and quarry blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataeva, G.; Gitterman, Y.; Shapira, A.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes and compares the P- and S-wave displacement spectra from local earthquakes and explosions of similar magnitudes. We propose a new approach to discrimination between low-magnitude shallow earthquakes and explosions by using ratios of P- to S-wave corner frequencies as a criterion. We have explored 2430 digital records of the Israeli Seismic Network (ISN) from 456 local events (226 earthquakes, 230 quarry blasts, and a few underwater explosions) of magnitudes Md = 1.4-3.4, which occurred at distances up to 250 km during 2001-2013 years. P-wave and S-wave displacement spectra were computed for all events following Brune's source model of earthquakes (1970, 1971) and applying the distance correction coefficients (Shapira and Hofstetter, Teconophysics 217:217-226, 1993; Ataeva G, Shapira A, Hofstetter A, J Seismol 19:389-401, 2015), The corner frequencies and moment magnitudes were determined using multiple stations for each event, and then the comparative analysis was performed.

  16. Toward ab initio molecular dynamics modeling for sum-frequency generation spectra; an efficient algorithm based on surface-specific velocity-velocity correlation function.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Usui, Kota; Hasegawa, Taisuke; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2015-09-28

    Interfacial water structures have been studied intensively by probing the O-H stretch mode of water molecules using sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. This surface-specific technique is finding increasingly widespread use, and accordingly, computational approaches to calculate SFG spectra using molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of interfacial water molecules have been developed and employed to correlate specific spectral signatures with distinct interfacial water structures. Such simulations typically require relatively long (several nanoseconds) MD trajectories to allow reliable calculation of the SFG response functions through the dipole moment-polarizability time correlation function. These long trajectories limit the use of computationally expensive MD techniques such as ab initio MD and centroid MD simulations. Here, we present an efficient algorithm determining the SFG response from the surface-specific velocity-velocity correlation function (ssVVCF). This ssVVCF formalism allows us to calculate SFG spectra using a MD trajectory of only ∼100 ps, resulting in the substantial reduction of the computational costs, by almost an order of magnitude. We demonstrate that the O-H stretch SFG spectra at the water-air interface calculated by using the ssVVCF formalism well reproduce those calculated by using the dipole moment-polarizability time correlation function. Furthermore, we applied this ssVVCF technique for computing the SFG spectra from the ab initio MD trajectories with various density functionals. We report that the SFG responses computed from both ab initio MD simulations and MD simulations with an ab initio based force field model do not show a positive feature in its imaginary component at 3100 cm(-1).

  17. A general theory on frequency and time-frequency analysis of irregularly sampled time series based on projection methods - Part 2: Extension to time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoir, Guillaume; Crucifix, Michel

    2018-03-01

    Geophysical time series are sometimes sampled irregularly along the time axis. The situation is particularly frequent in palaeoclimatology. Yet, there is so far no general framework for handling the continuous wavelet transform when the time sampling is irregular. Here we provide such a framework. To this end, we define the scalogram as the continuous-wavelet-transform equivalent of the extended Lomb-Scargle periodogram defined in Part 1 of this study (Lenoir and Crucifix, 2018). The signal being analysed is modelled as the sum of a locally periodic component in the time-frequency plane, a polynomial trend, and a background noise. The mother wavelet adopted here is the Morlet wavelet classically used in geophysical applications. The background noise model is a stationary Gaussian continuous autoregressive-moving-average (CARMA) process, which is more general than the traditional Gaussian white and red noise processes. The scalogram is smoothed by averaging over neighbouring times in order to reduce its variance. The Shannon-Nyquist exclusion zone is however defined as the area corrupted by local aliasing issues. The local amplitude in the time-frequency plane is then estimated with least-squares methods. We also derive an approximate formula linking the squared amplitude and the scalogram. Based on this property, we define a new analysis tool: the weighted smoothed scalogram, which we recommend for most analyses. The estimated signal amplitude also gives access to band and ridge filtering. Finally, we design a test of significance for the weighted smoothed scalogram against the stationary Gaussian CARMA background noise, and provide algorithms for computing confidence levels, either analytically or with Monte Carlo Markov chain methods. All the analysis tools presented in this article are available to the reader in the Python package WAVEPAL.

  18. Rain retrieval from dual-frequency radar Doppler spectra: validation and potential for a midlatitude precipitating case-study

    SciTech Connect

    Tridon, F.; Battaglia, A.; Luke, E.

    A recently developed technique retrieving the binned raindrop size distributions (DSDs) and air state parameters from ground-based K a and W-band radars Doppler spectra profiles is improved and applied to a typical midlatitude rain event. The retrievals are thoroughly validated against DSD observations of a 2D video disdrometer and independent X-band observations. Here for this case-study, profiles of rain rate, R, mean volume diameter and concentration parameter are retrieved, with low bias and standard deviations. In light rain (0.1 < R < 1 mm h -1), the radar reflectivities must be calibrated with a collocated disdrometer which introduces random errorsmore » due to sampling mismatch between the two instruments. The best performances are obtained in moderate rain (1 < R < 20 mm h -1) where the retrieval is providing self-consistent estimates of the absolute calibration and of the attenuation caused by antenna or radome wetness for both radars.« less

  19. Rain retrieval from dual-frequency radar Doppler spectra: validation and potential for a midlatitude precipitating case-study

    DOE PAGES

    Tridon, F.; Battaglia, A.; Luke, E.; ...

    2017-01-27

    A recently developed technique retrieving the binned raindrop size distributions (DSDs) and air state parameters from ground-based K a and W-band radars Doppler spectra profiles is improved and applied to a typical midlatitude rain event. The retrievals are thoroughly validated against DSD observations of a 2D video disdrometer and independent X-band observations. Here for this case-study, profiles of rain rate, R, mean volume diameter and concentration parameter are retrieved, with low bias and standard deviations. In light rain (0.1 < R < 1 mm h -1), the radar reflectivities must be calibrated with a collocated disdrometer which introduces random errorsmore » due to sampling mismatch between the two instruments. The best performances are obtained in moderate rain (1 < R < 20 mm h -1) where the retrieval is providing self-consistent estimates of the absolute calibration and of the attenuation caused by antenna or radome wetness for both radars.« less

  20. A generalized modal shock spectra method for spacecraft loads analysis. [internal loads in a spacecraft structure subjected to a dynamic launch environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M.; Salama, M.

    1979-01-01

    Unlike an earlier shock spectra approach, generalization permits an accurate elastic interaction between the spacecraft and launch vehicle to obtain accurate bounds on the spacecraft response and structural loads. In addition, the modal response from a previous launch vehicle transient analysis with or without a dummy spacecraft - is exploited to define a modal impulse as a simple idealization of the actual forcing function. The idealized modal forcing function is then used to derive explicit expressions for an estimate of the bound on the spacecraft structural response and forces. Greater accuracy is achieved with the present method over the earlier shock spectra, while saving much computational effort over the transient analysis.

  1. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10 -5 - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  2. Artificial neural networks for retrieving absorption and reduced scattering spectra from frequency-domain diffuse reflectance spectroscopy at short source-detector separation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Huang, Po-Jung; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) based on the frequency-domain (FD) technique has been employed to investigate the optical properties of deep tissues such as breast and brain using source to detector separation up to 40 mm. Due to the modeling and system limitations, efficient and precise determination of turbid sample optical properties from the FD diffuse reflectance acquired at a source-detector separation (SDS) of around 1 mm has not been demonstrated. In this study, we revealed that at SDS of 1 mm, acquiring FD diffuse reflectance at multiple frequencies is necessary for alleviating the influence of inevitable measurement uncertainty on the optical property recovery accuracy. Furthermore, we developed artificial neural networks (ANNs) trained by Monte Carlo simulation generated databases that were capable of efficiently determining FD reflectance at multiple frequencies. The ANNs could work in conjunction with a least-square optimization algorithm to rapidly (within 1 second), accurately (within 10%) quantify the sample optical properties from FD reflectance measured at SDS of 1 mm. In addition, we demonstrated that incorporating the steady-state apparatus into the FD DRS system with 1 mm SDS would enable obtaining broadband absorption and reduced scattering spectra of turbid samples in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm. PMID:27446671

  3. Vibration and acoustic frequency spectra for industrial process modeling using selective fusion multi-condition samples and multi-source features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Qiao, Junfei; Wu, ZhiWei; Chai, Tianyou; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Frequency spectral data of mechanical vibration and acoustic signals relate to difficult-to-measure production quality and quantity parameters of complex industrial processes. A selective ensemble (SEN) algorithm can be used to build a soft sensor model of these process parameters by fusing valued information selectively from different perspectives. However, a combination of several optimized ensemble sub-models with SEN cannot guarantee the best prediction model. In this study, we use several techniques to construct mechanical vibration and acoustic frequency spectra of a data-driven industrial process parameter model based on selective fusion multi-condition samples and multi-source features. Multi-layer SEN (MLSEN) strategy is used to simulate the domain expert cognitive process. Genetic algorithm and kernel partial least squares are used to construct the inside-layer SEN sub-model based on each mechanical vibration and acoustic frequency spectral feature subset. Branch-and-bound and adaptive weighted fusion algorithms are integrated to select and combine outputs of the inside-layer SEN sub-models. Then, the outside-layer SEN is constructed. Thus, "sub-sampling training examples"-based and "manipulating input features"-based ensemble construction methods are integrated, thereby realizing the selective information fusion process based on multi-condition history samples and multi-source input features. This novel approach is applied to a laboratory-scale ball mill grinding process. A comparison with other methods indicates that the proposed MLSEN approach effectively models mechanical vibration and acoustic signals.

  4. Interpreting Vibrational Sum-frequency Spectra of Sulfur Dioxide at the Air/Water Interface: A Comprehensive Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    We investigated the solvation and spectroscopic properties of SO2 at the air/water interface using molecular simulation techniques. Molecular interactions from both Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) and classical polarizable models were utilized to understand the properties of SO2:(H2O)x complexes in the vicinity of the air/water interface. The KS-DFT was included to allow comparisons with sum-frequency generation spectroscopy through the identification of surface SO2:(H2O)x complexes. Using our simulation results, we were able to develop a much more detailed picture for the surface structure of SO2 that is consistent with the spectroscopic data obtained Richmond and coworkers (J. Am. Chem. Soc.more » 127, 16806 (2005)). We also found many similarities and differences between to the two interaction potentials, including a noticeable weakness of the classical potential model in reproducing the asymmetric hydrogen bonding of water with SO2 due to its inability to account for SO2 resonance structures. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.« less

  5. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces. II. Two-dimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Gruenbaum, S M; Skinner, J L

    2014-12-14

    The structural stability and function of biomolecules is strongly influenced by the dynamics and hydrogen bonding of interfacial water. Understanding and characterizing the dynamics of these water molecules require a surface-sensitive technique such as two-dimensional vibrational sum-frequency generation (2DSFG) spectroscopy. We have combined theoretical 2DSFG calculations with molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the dynamics of water near different lipid and surfactant monolayer surfaces. We show that 2DSFG can distinguish the dynamics of interfacial water as a function of the lipid charge and headgroup chemistry. The dynamics of water is slow compared to the bulk near water-zwitterionic and water-anionic interfaces due to conformational constraints on interfacial water imposed by strong phosphate-water hydrogen bonding. The dynamics of water is somewhat faster near water-cationic lipid interfaces as no such constraint is present. Using hydrogen bonding and rotational correlation functions, we characterize the dynamics of water as a function of the distance from the interface between water and zwitterionic lipids. We find that there is a transition from bulk-like to interface-like dynamics approximately 7 Å away from a zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine monolayer surface.

  6. [The effect of electromagnetic waves of very high frequency of molecular spectra of radiation and absorption of nitric oxide on the functional activity of platelets].

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Maĭborodin, A V; Volin, M V; Krenitskiĭ, A P; Tupikin, V D

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of electromagnetic EMI MMD-fluctuation on the frequencies of molecular spectra of radiation, and nitric oxide absorption under in vitro conditions on the functional activity of platelets in patients with unstable angina pectoris, with the help of a specially created generator. At amplitude-modulated and continuous modes of EMI MMD-irradiation of platelet-rich plasma for 5, 15 and 30 min the platelet functional activity decreases, which was shown up in reduction of their activation and fall of aggregative ability. The degree, to which platelet functional activity was inhibited, depended on the mode of irradiation and on duration of EMI MMD effect. The most obvious changes in platelet activation and in their readiness to aggregative response were observed at a continuous mode of irradiation within a 15 min interval.

  7. Directional spectra of ocean waves from microwave backscatter: A physical optics solution with application to the short-pulse and two-frequency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two simple microwave radar techniques that are potentially capable of providing routine satellite measurements of the directional spectrum of ocean waves were developed. One technique, the short pulse technique, makes use of very short pulses to resolve ocean surface wave contrast features in the range direction; the other technique, the two frequency correlation technique makes use of coherency in the transmitted waveform to detect the large ocean wave contrast modulation as a beat or mixing frequency in the power backscattered at two closely separated microwave frequencies. A frequency domain analysis of the short pulse and two frequency systems shows that the two measurement systems are essentially duals; they each operate on the generalized (three frequency) fourth-order statistical moment of the surface transfer function in different, but symmetrical ways, and they both measure the same directional contrast modulation spectrum. A three dimensional physical optics solution for the fourth-order moment was obtained for backscatter in the near vertical, specular regime, assuming Gaussian surface statistics.

  8. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Safi, Kristin N.; Busch, Jeremiah W.

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (Ne ≤ 50) and much smaller (N e ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  9. Adding a dimension to the infrared spectra of interfaces using heterodyne detected 2D sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten years, two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has become an important technique for studying molecular structures and dynamics. We report the implementation of heterodyne detected two-dimensional sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy, which is the analog of 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, but is selective to noncentrosymmetric systems such as interfaces. We implement the technique using mid-IR pulse shaping, which enables rapid scanning, phase cycling, and automatic phasing. Absorptive spectra are obtained, that have the highest frequency resolution possible, from which we extract the rephasing and nonrephasing signals that are sometimes preferred. Using this technique, we measure the vibrational mode of CO adsorbed on a polycrystalline Pt surface. The 2D spectrum reveals a significant inhomogenous contribution to the spectral line shape, which is quantified by simulations. This observation indicates that the surface conformation and environment of CO molecules is more complicated than the simple “atop” configuration assumed in previous work. Our method can be straightforwardly incorporated into many existing SFG spectrometers. The technique enables one to quantify inhomogeneity, vibrational couplings, spectral diffusion, chemical exchange, and many other properties analogous to 2D IR spectroscopy, but specifically for interfaces. PMID:22143772

  10. Adding a dimension to the infrared spectra of interfaces using heterodyne detected 2D sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Zanni, Martin T

    2011-12-27

    In the last ten years, two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has become an important technique for studying molecular structures and dynamics. We report the implementation of heterodyne detected two-dimensional sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy, which is the analog of 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, but is selective to noncentrosymmetric systems such as interfaces. We implement the technique using mid-IR pulse shaping, which enables rapid scanning, phase cycling, and automatic phasing. Absorptive spectra are obtained, that have the highest frequency resolution possible, from which we extract the rephasing and nonrephasing signals that are sometimes preferred. Using this technique, we measure the vibrational mode of CO adsorbed on a polycrystalline Pt surface. The 2D spectrum reveals a significant inhomogenous contribution to the spectral line shape, which is quantified by simulations. This observation indicates that the surface conformation and environment of CO molecules is more complicated than the simple "atop" configuration assumed in previous work. Our method can be straightforwardly incorporated into many existing SFG spectrometers. The technique enables one to quantify inhomogeneity, vibrational couplings, spectral diffusion, chemical exchange, and many other properties analogous to 2D IR spectroscopy, but specifically for interfaces.

  11. Relationship between frequency power spectra and intermittent, large-amplitude bursts in the Alcator C-Mod scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorsen, A.; Garcia, O. E.; Kube, R.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    Fluctuations in the boundary region of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have been analyzed using gas puff imaging data from a set of Ohmically heated plasma density scan experiments. It is found that the relative fluctuation amplitudes are modest and close to normally distributed at the separatrix but become increasingly larger and skewed towards the main chamber wall. The frequency power spectra are nevertheless similar for all radial positions and line-averaged densities. Predictions of a stochastic model, describing the plasma fluctuations as a super-position of uncorrelated pulses, are shown to be in excellent agreement with the measurements. This implies that the pulse duration is the same, while the degree of pulse overlap decreases radially outwards in the scrape-off layer. The universal frequency power spectral density is thus determined by the shape and duration of the large-amplitude bursts associated with blob-like structures. The model also describes the rate of threshold level crossings, for which the exponential tails underline the intermittency of the fluctuations in the far scarpe-off layer.

  12. Dependence of flux-flow critical frequencies and generalized bundle sizes on distance of fluxoid traversal and fluxoid length in foil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.D.; Joiner, W.C.H.

    1979-10-01

    Flux-flow noise power spectra taken on Pb/sub 80/In/sub 20/ foils as a function of the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the sample surfaces are used to study changes in frequencies and bundle sizes as distances of fluxoid traversal and fluxoid lengths change. The results obtained for the frequency dependence of the noise spectra are entirely consistent with our model for flux motion interrupted by pinning centers, provided one makes the reasonable assumption that the distance between pinning centers which a fluxoid may encounter scales inversely with the fluxoid length. The importance of pinning centers in determining themore » noise characteristics is also demonstrated by the way in which subpulse distributions and generalized bundle sizes are altered by changes in the metallurgical structure of the sample. In unannealed samples the dependence of bundle size on magnetic field orientation is controlled by a structural anisotropy, and we find a correlation between large bundle size and the absence of short subpulse times. Annealing removes this anisotropy, and we find a stronger angular variation of bundle size than would be expected using present simplified models.« less

  13. Directly assessing interpersonal RSA influences in the frequency domain: An illustration with generalized partial directed coherence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siwei; Gates, Kathleen M; Blandon, Alysia Y

    2018-06-01

    Despite recent research indicating that interpersonal linkage in physiology is a common phenomenon during social interactions, and the well-established role of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in socially facilitative physiological regulation, little research has directly examined interpersonal influences in RSA, perhaps due to methodological challenges in analyzing multivariate RSA data. In this article, we aim to bridge this methodological gap by introducing a new method for quantifying interpersonal RSA influences. Specifically, we show that a frequency-domain statistic, generalized partial directed coherence (gPDC), can be used to capture lagged relations in RSA between social partners without first estimating RSA for each person. We illustrate its utility by examining the relation between gPDC and marital conflict in a sample of married couples. Finally, we discuss how gPDC complements existing methods in the time domain and provide guidelines for choosing among these different statistical techniques. © 2018 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. Interior sound field control using generalized singular value decomposition in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Yann; Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain; Moreau, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The problem of controlling a sound field inside a region surrounded by acoustic control sources is considered. Inspired by the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral, the use of double-layer source arrays allows such a control and avoids the modification of the external sound field by the control sources by the approximation of the sources as monopole and radial dipole transducers. However, the practical implementation of the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral in physical space leads to large numbers of control sources and error sensors along with excessive controller complexity in three dimensions. The present study investigates the potential of the Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (GSVD) to reduce the controller complexity and separate the effect of control sources on the interior and exterior sound fields, respectively. A proper truncation of the singular basis provided by the GSVD factorization is shown to lead to effective cancellation of the interior sound field at frequencies below the spatial Nyquist frequency of the control sources array while leaving the exterior sound field almost unchanged. Proofs of concept are provided through simulations achieved for interior problems by simulations in a free field scenario with circular arrays and in a reflective environment with square arrays.

  15. Cellular computational generalized neuron network for frequency situational intelligence in a multi-machine power system.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yawei; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar

    2017-09-01

    To prevent large interconnected power system from a cascading failure, brownout or even blackout, grid operators require access to faster than real-time information to make appropriate just-in-time control decisions. However, the communication and computational system limitations of currently used supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system can only deliver delayed information. However, the deployment of synchrophasor measurement devices makes it possible to capture and visualize, in near-real-time, grid operational data with extra granularity. In this paper, a cellular computational network (CCN) approach for frequency situational intelligence (FSI) in a power system is presented. The distributed and scalable computing unit of the CCN framework makes it particularly flexible for customization for a particular set of prediction requirements. Two soft-computing algorithms have been implemented in the CCN framework: a cellular generalized neuron network (CCGNN) and a cellular multi-layer perceptron network (CCMLPN), for purposes of providing multi-timescale frequency predictions, ranging from 16.67 ms to 2 s. These two developed CCGNN and CCMLPN systems were then implemented on two different scales of power systems, one of which installed a large photovoltaic plant. A real-time power system simulator at weather station within the Real-Time Power and Intelligent Systems (RTPIS) laboratory at Clemson, SC, was then used to derive typical FSI results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A frequency-domain approach to improve ANNs generalization quality via proper initialization.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Majdi; Fekih, Afef; Seibi, Abdennour C; Hmida, Jalel Ben

    2018-08-01

    The ability to train a network without memorizing the input/output data, thereby allowing a good predictive performance when applied to unseen data, is paramount in ANN applications. In this paper, we propose a frequency-domain approach to evaluate the network initialization in terms of quality of training, i.e., generalization capabilities. As an alternative to the conventional time-domain methods, the proposed approach eliminates the approximate nature of network validation using an excess of unseen data. The benefits of the proposed approach are demonstrated using two numerical examples, where two trained networks performed similarly on the training and the validation data sets, yet they revealed a significant difference in prediction accuracy when tested using a different data set. This observation is of utmost importance in modeling applications requiring a high degree of accuracy. The efficiency of the proposed approach is further demonstrated on a real-world problem, where unlike other initialization methods, a more conclusive assessment of generalization is achieved. On the practical front, subtle methodological and implementational facets are addressed to ensure reproducibility and pinpoint the limitations of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency dispersion of sound propagation in Rouse polymer melts via generalized dynamic random phase approximation.

    PubMed

    Erukhimovich, I Ya; Kudryavtsev, Ya V

    2003-08-01

    An extended generalization of the dynamic random phase approximation (DRPA) for L-component polymer systems is presented. Unlike the original version of the DRPA, which relates the (LxL) matrices of the collective density-density time correlation functions and the corresponding susceptibilities of concentrated polymer systems to those of the tracer macromolecules and so-called broken-links system (BLS), our generalized DRPA solves this problem for the (5xL) x (5xL) matrices of the coupled susceptibilities and time correlation functions of the component number, kinetic energy and flux densities. The presented technique is used to study propagation of sound and dynamic form-factor in disentangled (Rouse) monodisperse homopolymer melt. The calculated ultrasonic velocity and absorption coefficient reveal substantial frequency dispersion. The relaxation time tau is proportional to the degree of polymerization N, which is N times less than the Rouse time and evidences strong dynamic screening because of interchain interaction. We discuss also some peculiarities of the Brillouin scattering in polymer melts. Besides, a new convenient expression for the dynamic structure function of the single Rouse chain in (q,p) representation is found.

  18. Time-frequency analysis of time-varying modulated signals based on improved energy separation by iterative generalized demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chu, Fulei; Zuo, Ming J.

    2011-03-01

    Energy separation algorithm is good at tracking instantaneous changes in frequency and amplitude of modulated signals, but it is subject to the constraints of mono-component and narrow band. In most cases, time-varying modulated vibration signals of machinery consist of multiple components, and have so complicated instantaneous frequency trajectories on time-frequency plane that they overlap in frequency domain. For such signals, conventional filters fail to obtain mono-components of narrow band, and their rectangular decomposition of time-frequency plane may split instantaneous frequency trajectories thus resulting in information loss. Regarding the advantage of generalized demodulation method in decomposing multi-component signals into mono-components, an iterative generalized demodulation method is used as a preprocessing tool to separate signals into mono-components, so as to satisfy the requirements by energy separation algorithm. By this improvement, energy separation algorithm can be generalized to a broad range of signals, as long as the instantaneous frequency trajectories of signal components do not intersect on time-frequency plane. Due to the good adaptability of energy separation algorithm to instantaneous changes in signals and the mono-component decomposition nature of generalized demodulation, the derived time-frequency energy distribution has fine resolution and is free from cross term interferences. The good performance of the proposed time-frequency analysis is illustrated by analyses of a simulated signal and the on-site recorded nonstationary vibration signal of a hydroturbine rotor during a shut-down transient process, showing that it has potential to analyze time-varying modulated signals of multi-components.

  19. Effect of X-ray Line Spectra Profile Fitting with Pearson VII, Pseudo-Voigt and Generalized Fermi Functions on Asphalt Binder Aromaticity and Crystallite Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebresellasie, K.; Shirokoff, J.; Lewis, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray line spectra profile fitting using Pearson VII, pseudo-Voigt and generalized Fermi functions was performed on asphalt binders prior to the calculation of aromaticity and crystallite size parameters. The effects of these functions on the results are presented and discussed in terms of the peak profile fit parameters, the uncertainties in calculated values that can arise owing to peak shape, peak features in the pattern and crystallite size according to the asphalt models (Yen, modified Yen or Yen-Mullins) and theories. Interpretation of these results is important in terms of evaluating the performance of asphalt binders widely used in the application of transportation systems (roads, highways, airports).

  20. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. IV - General spectral properties of M type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Kreplin, R. W.; Mariska, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The spectral characteristics in selected narrow regions of the X-ray spectrum of class M solar flares are analyzed. High-resolution spectra in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07, 3.14-3.24 and 8.26-8.53 A, which contain lines important for the determination of electron temperature and departure from ionization equilibrium, were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers. Temperatures of up to 20,000,000 K are obtained from line ratios during flare rise phases in M as well as X flares, while in the decay phase the calcium temperature can be as low as 8,000,000 K, which is significantly lower than in X flares. Large nonthermal motions (on the order of 130 km/sec at most) are also observed in M as well as X flares, which are largest during the soft X-ray rise phase. Finally, it is shown that the method proposed by Gabriel and Phillips (1979) for detecting departures of electrons from Maxwellian velocity distributions is not sufficiently sensitive to give reliable results for the present data.

  1. Goodness-of-Fit Tests for Generalized Normal Distribution for Use in Hydrological Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Samiran

    2018-04-01

    The use of three-parameter generalized normal (GNO) as a hydrological frequency distribution is well recognized, but its application is limited due to unavailability of popular goodness-of-fit (GOF) test statistics. This study develops popular empirical distribution function (EDF)-based test statistics to investigate the goodness-of-fit of the GNO distribution. The focus is on the case most relevant to the hydrologist, namely, that in which the parameter values are unidentified and estimated from a sample using the method of L-moments. The widely used EDF tests such as Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramer von Mises, and Anderson-Darling (AD) are considered in this study. A modified version of AD, namely, the Modified Anderson-Darling (MAD) test, is also considered and its performance is assessed against other EDF tests using a power study that incorporates six specific Wakeby distributions (WA-1, WA-2, WA-3, WA-4, WA-5, and WA-6) as the alternative distributions. The critical values of the proposed test statistics are approximated using Monte Carlo techniques and are summarized in chart and regression equation form to show the dependence of shape parameter and sample size. The performance results obtained from the power study suggest that the AD and a variant of the MAD (MAD-L) are the most powerful tests. Finally, the study performs case studies involving annual maximum flow data of selected gauged sites from Irish and US catchments to show the application of the derived critical values and recommends further assessments to be carried out on flow data sets of rivers with various hydrological regimes.

  2. Bad Dream Frequency in Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Prevalence, Correlates, and Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Nadorff, Michael R.; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety (CBT) to enhanced usual care (EUC), it assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post-treatment (3 months), and 6, 9, 12 and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post-treatment and throughout follow-up compared to EUC. PMID:23470116

  3. Comparison of the observed and calculated coherent forward scattering spectra of the 842.5 nm Ar I and 844.6 nm O I lines in a radio frequency glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuta, Hideyuki

    2017-06-01

    The coherent forward scattering (CFS) spectra of O I 844.6 nm and Ar I 842.5 nm lines in a radio frequency (RF) glow discharge were measured using a CFS spectrometer that functions in the Faraday configuration with permanent double-ring magnets and a diode-laser source. A significant change in the CFS spectrum of the Ar I 842.5 nm line was observed when the partial pressures of argon in a Hesbnd Ar RF glow discharge were changed . Based on the theoretical calculations of the CFS spectra performed using Faraday functions, a comparison between the observed and calculated spectra was performed. The CFS line profile of O I 844.6 nm and changes in the Ar I 842.5 nm CFS spectrum are explained by theoretical calculations.

  4. Lateral organization of mixed, two-phosphatidylcholine liposomes as investigated by GPS, the slope of Laurdan generalized polarization spectra.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Alba A; Velázquez, Jesús B; Fernández, Marta S

    2007-10-01

    The effect of the excitation or emission wavelengths on Laurdan generalized polarization (GP) can be evaluated by GPS, a quantitative, simplified determination of the GP spectrum slope, the thermotropic dependence of which allows the assessment of phospholipid lamellar membrane phase, as shown in a recent publication of our laboratory [J.B. Velázquez, M.S. Fernández, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 455 (2006) 163-174]. In the present work, we applied Laurdan GPS to phase transition studies of mixed, two-phosphatidylcholine liposomes prepared from variable proportions of dimyristoyl- and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC and DPPC, respectively). We have found that the GPS function reports a clear limit between the gel/liquid-crystalline phase coexistence region and the liquid-crystalline state, not only at a certain temperature T(c) for liposomes of constant composition submitted to temperature scans, but also at a defined mole fraction X(c), for two-component liposomes of variable composition at constant temperature. The T(c) or the X(c) values obtained from GPS vs. temperature or GPS vs. composition plots, respectively, allow the construction of a partial phase diagram for the DMPC-DPPC mixtures, showing the boundary between the two-phase coexisting region and the liquid-crystalline state. Likewise, at the onset of the transition region, i.e., the two-phase coexisting region as detected by GPS, it is possible to determine, although with less precision, a temperature T(o) or a mole fraction X(o) defining a boundary located below but near the limit between the gel and ripple phase, reported in the literature. These GPS results are consistent with the proposal by several authors that a fraction of L(alpha) phospholipids coexists with gel phospholipids in the rippled phase.

  5. Mössbauer spectra linearity improvement by sine velocity waveform followed by linearization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Pavel; Frank, Tomas; Pechousek, Jiri; Kouril, Lukas

    2018-05-01

    This note reports the development of a new method for linearizing the Mössbauer spectra recorded with a sine drive velocity signal. Mössbauer spectra linearity is a critical parameter to determine Mössbauer spectrometer accuracy. Measuring spectra with a sine velocity axis and consecutive linearization increases the linearity of spectra in a wider frequency range of a drive signal, as generally harmonic movement is natural for velocity transducers. The obtained data demonstrate that linearized sine spectra have lower nonlinearity and line width parameters in comparison with those measured using a traditional triangle velocity signal.

  6. On hydrologic similarity: A dimensionless flood frequency model using a generalized geomorphologic unit hydrograph and partial area runoff generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Wood, Eric F.; Beven, Keith J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the shortcomings of the original theory of the geomorphologic unit hydrograph (GUH) is that it assumes that runoff is generated uniformly from the entire catchment area. It is now recognized that in many catchments much of the runoff during storm events is produced on partial areas which usually form on narrow bands along the stream network. A storm response model that includes runoff generation on partial areas by both Hortonian and Dunne mechanisms was recently developed by the authors. In this paper a methodology for integrating this partial area runoff generation model with the GUH-based runoff routing model is presented; this leads to a generalized GUH. The generalized GUH and the storm response model are then used to estimate physically based flood frequency distributions. In most previous work the initial moisture state of the catchment had been assumed to be constant for all the storms. In this paper we relax this assumption and allow the initial moisture conditions to vary between storms. The resulting flood frequency distributions are cast in a scaled dimensionless framework where issues such as catchment scale and similarity can be conveniently addressed. A number of experiments are performed to study the sensitivity of the flood frequency response to some of the 'similarity' parameters identified in this formulation. The results indicate that one of the most important components of the derived flood frequency model relates to the specification of processes within the runoff generation model; specifically the inclusion of both saturation excess and Horton infiltration excess runoff production mechanisms. The dominance of these mechanisms over different return periods of the flood frequency distribution can significantly affect the distributional shape and confidence limits about the distribution. Comparisons with observed flood distributions seem to indicate that such mixed runoff production mechanisms influence flood distribution shape. The

  7. A garden of orchids: a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestel, B. D.; Osbaldestin, A. H.

    2004-10-01

    We consider a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational flux, showing, in the strong coupling limit, the fluctuations of the exponentially decaying eigenfunctions are governed by the dynamics of a renormalization operator on a renormalization strange set. This work generalizes previous analyses which have considered only the golden mean case. Projections of the renormalization strange sets are illustrated analogous to the 'orchid' present in the golden mean case.

  8. Modeling the frequency of opposing left-turn conflicts at signalized intersections using generalized linear regression models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Pan; Chen, Yuguang; Bai, Lu; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify whether the frequency of traffic conflicts at signalized intersections can be modeled. The opposing left-turn conflicts were selected for the development of conflict predictive models. Using data collected at 30 approaches at 20 signalized intersections, the underlying distributions of the conflicts under different traffic conditions were examined. Different conflict-predictive models were developed to relate the frequency of opposing left-turn conflicts to various explanatory variables. The models considered include a linear regression model, a negative binomial model, and separate models developed for four traffic scenarios. The prediction performance of different models was compared. The frequency of traffic conflicts follows a negative binominal distribution. The linear regression model is not appropriate for the conflict frequency data. In addition, drivers behaved differently under different traffic conditions. Accordingly, the effects of conflicting traffic volumes on conflict frequency vary across different traffic conditions. The occurrences of traffic conflicts at signalized intersections can be modeled using generalized linear regression models. The use of conflict predictive models has potential to expand the uses of surrogate safety measures in safety estimation and evaluation.

  9. Site-specific estimation of peak-streamflow frequency using generalized least-squares regression for natural basins in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Slade, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, has developed a computer program to estimate peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged sites in natural basins in Texas. Peak-streamflow frequency refers to the peak streamflows for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years. Peak-streamflow frequency estimates are needed by planners, managers, and design engineers for flood-plain management; for objective assessment of flood risk; for cost-effective design of roads and bridges; and also for the desin of culverts, dams, levees, and other flood-control structures. The program estimates peak-streamflow frequency using a site-specific approach and a multivariate generalized least-squares linear regression. A site-specific approach differs from a traditional regional regression approach by developing unique equations to estimate peak-streamflow frequency specifically for the ungaged site. The stations included in the regression are selected using an informal cluster analysis that compares the basin characteristics of the ungaged site to the basin characteristics of all the stations in the data base. The program provides several choices for selecting the stations. Selecting the stations using cluster analysis ensures that the stations included in the regression will have the most pertinent information about flooding characteristics of the ungaged site and therefore provide the basis for potentially improved peak-streamflow frequency estimation. An evaluation of the site-specific approach in estimating peak-streamflow frequency for gaged sites indicates that the site-specific approach is at least as accurate as a traditional regional regression approach.

  10. The frequency and characteristics of chronic widespread pain in general practice: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Jens; Jordan, Kelvin; Croft, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Chronic widespread pain is common in the community but is not often diagnosed in primary care. One explanation may be that widespread pain is presented and treated in primary care as multiple episodes of regional pain. To determine whether patients who consult with multiple regional pain syndromes have characteristics consistent with chronic widespread pain. Case-control study. One general practice in North Staffordshire, UK. Participants were 148 cases who consulted regularly with different musculoskeletal pains over 5 years, and 524 controls who had not consulted for musculoskeletal pain during the same period. A postal questionnaire survey and medical record review were undertaken. Cases with musculoskeletal pain reported more health problems and higher levels of fatigue than controls, and significantly worse general health and greater sleep disturbance (odds ratios 3.3. and 3.1, respectively). They generally reported more severe symptoms and consulted more frequently for a range of problems, but this was not explained by a general propensity to consult. Patients who consult in primary care with multiple regional pain syndromes have similar characteristics to those associated with chronic widespread pain and fibromyalgia. Recognising the need for general approaches to pain management, rather than treating each syndrome as a regional problem of pain, may improve the outcome in such patients.

  11. High frequency scattering by a smooth coated cylinder simulated with generalized impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Hasnain H.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Rigorous uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UGTD) diffraction coefficients are presented for a coated convex cylinder simulated with generalized impedance boundary conditions. In particular, ray solutions are obtained which remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly to those in the deep lit and shadow regions. These involve new transition functions in place of the usual Fock-type integrals, characteristic to the impedance cylinder. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder. As usual, the diffraction coefficients for the convex cylinder are obtained via a generalization of the corresponding ones for the circular cylinder.

  12. Extension of a nonlinear systems theory to general-frequency unsteady transonic aerodynamic responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for modeling nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses, for subsequent use in aeroservoelastic analysis and design, using the Volterra-Wiener theory of nonlinear systems is presented. The methodology is extended to predict nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses of arbitrary frequency. The Volterra-Wiener theory uses multidimensional convolution integrals to predict the response of nonlinear systems to arbitrary inputs. The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code is used to generate linear and nonlinear unit impulse responses that correspond to each of the integrals for a rectangular wing with a NACA 0012 section with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. The computed kernels then are used to predict linear and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses via convolution and compared to responses obtained using the CAP-TSD code directly. The results indicate that the approach can be used to predict linear unsteady aerodynamic responses exactly for any input amplitude or frequency at a significant cost savings. Convolution of the nonlinear terms results in nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses that compare reasonably well with those computed using the CAP-TSD code directly but at significant computational cost savings.

  13. Time-varying higher order spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boashash, Boualem; O'Shea, Peter

    1991-12-01

    A general solution for the problem of time-frequency signal representation of nonlinear FM signals is provided, based on a generalization of the Wigner-Ville distribution. The Wigner- Ville distribution (WVD) is a second order time-frequency representation. That is, it is able to give ideal energy concentration for quadratic phase signals and its ensemble average is a second order time-varying spectrum. The same holds for Cohen's class of time-frequency distributions, which are smoothed versions of the WVD. The WVD may be extended so as to achieve ideal energy concentration for higher order phase laws, and such that the expectation is a time-varying higher order spectrum. The usefulness of these generalized Wigner-Ville distributions (GWVD) is twofold. Firstly, because they achieve ideal energy concentration for polynomial phase signals, they may be used for optimal instantaneous frequency estimation. Second, they are useful for discriminating between nonstationary processes of differing higher order moments. In the same way that the WVD is generalized, we generalize Cohen's class of TFDs by defining a class of generalized time-frequency distributions (GTFDs) obtained by a two dimensional smoothing of the GWVD. Another results derived from this approach is a method based on higher order spectra which allows the separation of cross-terms and auto- terms in the WVD.

  14. Generalized migration in frequency-wavenumber domain (MGF-K) in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, Andrzej; Półchłopek, Anna

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the background of MGF-K migration in dual domain (wavenumber-frequency K-F and space-time) in anisotropic media is presented. Algorithms for poststack (zero-offset) and prestack migration are based on downward extrapolation of acoustic wavefield by shift-phase with correction filter for lateral variability of medium's parameters. In anisotropic media, the vertical wavenumber was determined from full elastic wavefield equations for two dimensional (2D) tilted transverse isotropy (TTI) model. The method was tested on a synthetic wavefield for TTI anticlinal model (zero-offset section) and on strongly inhomogeneous vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) Marmousi model. In both cases, the proper imaging of assumed media was obtained.

  15. The molecular epidemiology of Huntington disease is related to intermediate allele frequency and haplotype in the general population.

    PubMed

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Wright, Galen E B; Baine, Fiona; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Aminkeng, Folefac; Semaka, Alicia J; McDonald, Cassandra; Davidson, Mark; Madore, Steven J; Gordon, Erynn S; Gerry, Norman P; Cornejo-Olivas, Mario; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Tishkoff, Sarah; Greenberg, Jacquie L; Krause, Amanda; Hayden, Michael R

    2018-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is the most common monogenic neurodegenerative disorder in populations of European ancestry, but occurs at lower prevalence in populations of East Asian or black African descent. New mutations for HD result from CAG repeat expansions of intermediate alleles (IAs), usually of paternal origin. The differing prevalence of HD may be related to the rate of new mutations in a population, but no comparative estimates of IA frequency or the HD new mutation rate are available. In this study, we characterize IA frequency and the CAG repeat distribution in fifteen populations of diverse ethnic origin. We estimate the HD new mutation rate in a series of populations using molecular IA expansion rates. The frequency of IAs was highest in Hispanic Americans and Northern Europeans, and lowest in black Africans and East Asians. The prevalence of HD correlated with the frequency of IAs by population and with the proportion of IAs found on the HD-associated A1 haplotype. The HD new mutation rate was estimated to be highest in populations with the highest frequency of IAs. In European ancestry populations, one in 5,372 individuals from the general population and 7.1% of individuals with an expanded CAG repeat in the HD range are estimated to have a molecular new mutation. Our data suggest that the new mutation rate for HD varies substantially between populations, and that IA frequency and haplotype are closely linked to observed epidemiological differences in the prevalence of HD across major ancestry groups in different countries. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Confidence intervals for population allele frequencies: the general case of sampling from a finite diploid population of any size.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tak; Keenan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of population allele frequencies using sample data forms a central component of studies in population genetics. These estimates can be used to test hypotheses on the evolutionary processes governing changes in genetic variation among populations. However, existing studies frequently do not account for sampling uncertainty in these estimates, thus compromising their utility. Incorporation of this uncertainty has been hindered by the lack of a method for constructing confidence intervals containing the population allele frequencies, for the general case of sampling from a finite diploid population of any size. In this study, we address this important knowledge gap by presenting a rigorous mathematical method to construct such confidence intervals. For a range of scenarios, the method is used to demonstrate that for a particular allele, in order to obtain accurate estimates within 0.05 of the population allele frequency with high probability (> or = 95%), a sample size of > 30 is often required. This analysis is augmented by an application of the method to empirical sample allele frequency data for two populations of the checkerspot butterfly (Melitaea cinxia L.), occupying meadows in Finland. For each population, the method is used to derive > or = 98.3% confidence intervals for the population frequencies of three alleles. These intervals are then used to construct two joint > or = 95% confidence regions, one for the set of three frequencies for each population. These regions are then used to derive a > or = 95%% confidence interval for Jost's D, a measure of genetic differentiation between the two populations. Overall, the results demonstrate the practical utility of the method with respect to informing sampling design and accounting for sampling uncertainty in studies of population genetics, important for scientific hypothesis-testing and also for risk-based natural resource management.

  17. Intraoperative Low-frequency Electroacupuncture under General Anesthesia Improves Postoperative Recovery in a Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Grech, Dennis; Li, Zhifeng; Morcillo, Patrick; Kalyoussef, Evelyne; Kim, David D; Bekker, Alex; Ulloa, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Neuronal stimulation improves physiological responses to infection and trauma, but the clinical potential of this strategy is unknown. We hypothesized that transdermal neural stimulation through low-frequency electroacupuncture might control the immune responses to surgical trauma and expedite the postoperative recovery. However, the efficiency of electroacupuncture is questioned due to the placebo effect. Here, electroacupuncture was performed on anesthetized patients to avoid any placebo. This is a prospective double-blinded pilot trial to determine whether intraoperative electroacupuncture on anesthetized patients improves postoperative recovery. Patients with electroacupuncture required 60% less postoperative analgesic, even they had pain scores similar to those in the control patients. Electroacupuncture prevented postoperative hyperglycemia and attenuated serum adrenocorticotropic hormone in the older and heavier group of patients. From an immunological perspective, electroacupuncture did not affect the protective immune responses to surgical trauma, including the induction of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10. The most significant immunological effect of electroacupuncture was enhancing transforming growth factor-β1 production during surgery in the older and lighter group of patients. These results suggest that intraoperative electroacupuncture on anesthetized patients can reduce postoperative use of analgesics and improve immune and stress responses to surgery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  19. Study of complex permittivity spectra of binary mixtures of 2-chloroaniline and methanol in frequency range 10 KHz to 2 MHz at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, N. S.; Vankar, H. P.; Rana, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    The complex relative dielectric function ɛ*(ω)=ɛ'-jɛ″ of the binary mixture of 2-chloroaniline(2-CA) and methanol (MeOH) were measured using precision LCR meter in the frequency range of 10 KHz to 2 MHz The measurements were carried out at eight different temperatures and five different concentrations of 2-CA and MeOH. The loss tangent peaks were observed in the studied frequency range for all the binary mixtures. From the loss tangent peaks electrode polarization relaxation time were evaluated. In the plot of real part of complex permittivity against frequency, at different temperatures for 2-CA (54.54%) + MeOH (45.45%) and 2-CA (27.27%) + MeOH (72.72%)and 100% MeOH systems permittivity inversion effect was observed.

  20. Frequency of a positive family history of colorectal cancer in general practice: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Plath, Jasper; Siebenhofer, Andrea; Koné, Insa; Hechtner, Marlene; Schulz-Rothe, Sylvia; Beyer, Martin; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Guethlin, Corina

    2017-02-01

    Evidence on the frequency of a positive family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) among individuals aged <55 years is lacking. General practice setting might be well suited for the identification of individuals in this above-average risk group. To determine the frequency of a reported positive family history of CRC among patients aged 40 to 54 years in a general practice setting. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 21 general practices in Germany. Patients aged 40 to 54 years were identified by means of the practice software and interviewed by health care assistants using a standardized four-item questionnaire. Outcome was occurrence of a positive family history of CRC, defined as at least one first-degree relative (FDR: parents, siblings, or children) with CRC. Further measurements were FDRs with CRC / colorectal polyps (adenomas) diagnosed before the age of 50 and occurrence of three or more relatives with colorectal, stomach, cervical, ovarian, urethel or renal pelvic cancer. Out of 6723 participants, 7.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.6% to 7.8%) reported at least one FDR with CRC and 1.2% (95% CI 0.9% to 1.5%) reported FDRs with CRC diagnosed before the age of 50. A further 2.6% (95% CI 2.3% to 3.0%) reported colorectal polyps in FDRs diagnosed before the age of 50 and 2.1% (95% CI 1.8% to 2.5%) reported three or more relatives with entities mentioned above. One in 14 patients reported at least one FDR with CRC. General practice should be considered when defining requirements of risk-adapted CRC screening. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Unravelling thermal emissivity spectra of the main minerals on Mercury's surface by comparison with ab initio calculated IR-HT vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangarone, C.; Helbert, J.; Tribaudino, M.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Prencipe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral signatures of minerals are intimately related to the crystal structure; therefore they may represent a remote sensing model to determine surface composition of planetary bodies, by analysing their spectral reflectance and emission. However, one of the most critical point is data interpretation considering planetary surfaces, as Mercury, where the changes in spectral characteristics are induced by the high temperatures conditions (Helbert et al., 2013). The aim of this work is to interpret the experimental thermal emissivity spectra with an innovative approach: simulating IR spectra of the main mineral families that compose the surface of Mercury, focusing on pyroxenes (Sprague et al., 2002), both at room and high temperature, exploiting the accuracy of ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, by means of CRYSTAL14 code (Dovesi et al., 2014). The simulations will be compared with experimental emissivity measurements of planetary analogue samples at temperature up to 1000K, performed at Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) by Institute of Planetary Research (DLR, Berlin). Results will be useful to create a theoretical background to interpret HT-IR emissivity spectra that will be collected by the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS), a spectrometer developed by DLR that will be on board of the ESA BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) scheduled for 2017. The goal is to point out the most interesting spectral features for a geological mapping of Mercury and other rocky bodies, simulating the environmental conditions of the inner planets of Solar System. Dovesi R., Saunders V. R., Roetti C., Orlando R., Zicovich-Wilson C. M., Pascale F., Civalleri B., Doll K., Harrison N. M., Bush I. J., D'Arco P., Llunell M., Causà M. & Noël Y. 2014. CRYSTAL14 User's Manual, University of Torino. Sprague, A. L., Emery, J. P., Donaldson, K. L., Russell, R. W., Lynch, D. K., & Mazuk, A. L. (2002). Mercury: Mid-infrared (3-13.5

  2. Noxious stimulation in children receiving general anaesthesia evokes an increase in delta frequency brain activity.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Caroline; Poorun, Ravi; Goksan, Sezgi; Worley, Alan; Boyd, Stewart; Rogers, Richard; Ali, Tariq; Slater, Rebeccah

    2014-11-01

    More than 235,000 children/year in the UK receive general anaesthesia, but it is unknown whether nociceptive stimuli alter cortical brain activity in anaesthetised children. Time-locked electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to experimental tactile stimuli, experimental noxious stimuli, and clinically required cannulation were examined in 51 children (ages 1-12 years) under sevoflurane monoanaesthesia. Based on a pilot study (n=12), we hypothesised that noxious stimulation in children receiving sevoflurane monoanaesthesia would evoke an increase in delta activity. This was tested in an independent sample of children (n=39), where a subset (n=11) had topical local anaesthetic applied prior to stimulation. A novel method of time-locking the stimuli to the EEG recording was developed using an event detection interface and high-speed camera. Clinical cannulation evoked a significant increase (34.2 ± 8.3%) in delta activity (P=0.042), without concomitant changes in heart rate or reflex withdrawal, which was not observed when local anaesthetic was applied (P=0.30). Experimental tactile (P=0.012) and noxious (P=0.0099) stimulation also evoked significant increases in delta activity, but the magnitude of the response was graded with stimulus intensity, with the greatest increase evoked by cannulation. We demonstrate that experimental and clinically essential noxious procedures, undertaken in anaesthetised children, alter the pattern of EEG activity, that this response can be inhibited by local anaesthetic, and that this measure is more sensitive than other physiological indicators of nociception. This technique provides the possibility that sensitivity to noxious stimuli during anaesthesia could be investigated in other clinical populations. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Noxious stimulation in children receiving general anaesthesia evokes an increase in delta frequency brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Caroline; Poorun, Ravi; Goksan, Sezgi; Worley, Alan; Boyd, Stewart; Rogers, Richard; Ali, Tariq; Slater, Rebeccah

    2014-01-01

    More than 235,000 children/year in the UK receive general anaesthesia, but it is unknown whether nociceptive stimuli alter cortical brain activity in anaesthetised children. Time-locked electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to experimental tactile stimuli, experimental noxious stimuli, and clinically required cannulation were examined in 51 children (ages 1–12 years) under sevoflurane monoanaesthesia. Based on a pilot study (n = 12), we hypothesised that noxious stimulation in children receiving sevoflurane monoanaesthesia would evoke an increase in delta activity. This was tested in an independent sample of children (n = 39), where a subset (n = 11) had topical local anaesthetic applied prior to stimulation. A novel method of time-locking the stimuli to the EEG recording was developed using an event detection interface and high-speed camera. Clinical cannulation evoked a significant increase (34.2 ± 8.3%) in delta activity (P = 0.042), without concomitant changes in heart rate or reflex withdrawal, which was not observed when local anaesthetic was applied (P = 0.30). Experimental tactile (P = 0.012) and noxious (P = 0.0099) stimulation also evoked significant increases in delta activity, but the magnitude of the response was graded with stimulus intensity, with the greatest increase evoked by cannulation. We demonstrate that experimental and clinically essential noxious procedures, undertaken in anaesthetised children, alter the pattern of EEG activity, that this response can be inhibited by local anaesthetic, and that this measure is more sensitive than other physiological indicators of nociception. This technique provides the possibility that sensitivity to noxious stimuli during anaesthesia could be investigated in other clinical populations. PMID:25218826

  4. Finite-Frequency Simulations of Core-Reflected Seismic Waves to Assess Models of General Lower Mantle Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, A.; Walker, A. M.; Wookey, J.; Kendall, J.

    2012-12-01

    The core-mantle boundary (CMB) region is the site of the largest change in properties in the Earth. Moreover, the lowermost mantle above it (known as D″) shows the largest lateral variations in seismic velocity and strength of seismic anisotropy below the upper mantle. It is therefore vital to be able to accurately forward model candidate structures in the lowermost mantle with realistic sensitivity to structure and at the same frequencies at which observations are made. We use the spectral finite-element method to produce synthetic seismograms of ScS waves traversing a model of D″ anisotropy derived from mineralogical texture calculations and show that the seismic discontinuity atop the lowermost mantle varies in character laterally purely as a function of the strength and orientation of anisotropy. The lowermost mantle is widely anisotropic, shown by numerous shear wave splitting studies using waves of dominant frequency ~0.2-1 Hz. Whilst methods exist to model the finite-frequency seismic response of the lowermost mantle, most make the problem computationally efficient by imposing a certain symmetry to the problem, and of those which do not, almost none allow for completely general elasticity. Where low frequencies are simulated to reduce computational cost, it is uncertain whether waves of that frequency have comparable sensitivity to D″ structure as those observed at shorter periods. Currently, therefore, these computational limitations precludes the ability to interpret our observations fully. We present recent developments in taking a general approach to forward-modelling waves in D″. We use a modified version of SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, which uses the spectral finite-element method to model seismic wave propagation in a fully generally-elastic (i.e., 3D-varying, arbitrarily anisotropic) Earth. The calculations are computationally challenging: to approach the frequency of the observations, up to 10,000 processor cores and up to 2 TB of memory are needed. The

  5. On the possibility of analytical approximation of line forms during random disorders of the resonance frequencies in molecular vibration-rotation spectra for satellite sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    The generalization spectral line contour concept and formulas for a two component mixture, as well as consequences of the general formula are discussed. The calculation procedure, initial information, calculation results and comparison of calculations with available experimental data, for radiation absorption in three CO2 bands are presented.

  6. High-Nuclearity Magnetic Clusters: Generalized Spin Hamiltonian and Its Use for the Calculation of the Energy Levels, Bulk Magnetic Properties, and Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectra.

    PubMed

    Borrás-Almenar, J. J.; Clemente-Juan, J. M.; Coronado, E.; Tsukerblat, B. S.

    1999-12-27

    A general solution of the exchange problem in the high-nuclearity spin clusters (HNSC) containing arbitrary number of exchange-coupled centers and topology is developed. All constituent magnetic centers are supposed to possess well-isolated orbitally non-degenerate ground states so that the isotropic Heisenberg-Dirac-Van Vleck (HDVV) term is the leading part of the exchange spin Hamiltonian. Along with the HDVV term, we consider higher-order isotropic exchange terms (biquadratic exchange), as well as the anisotropic terms (anisotropic and antisymmetric exchange interactions and local single-ion anisotropies). All these terms are expressed as irreducible tensor operators (ITO). This allows us to take full advantage of the spin symmetry of the system. At the same time, we have also benefitted by taking into account the point group symmetry of the cluster, which allows us to work with symmetrized spin functions. This results in an additional reduction of the matrices to diagonalize. The approach developed here is accompanied by an efficient computational procedure that allows us to calculate the bulk magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, and magnetic specific heat) as well as the spectroscopic properties of HNSC. Special attention is paid to calculate the magnetic excitations observed by inelastic neutron scattering (INS), their intensities, and their Q and temperature dependencies. This spectroscopic technique provides direct access to the energies and wave functions of the different spin states of the cluster; thus, it can be applied to spin clusters in order to obtain deep and detailed information on the nature of the magnetic exchange phenomenon. The general expression for the INS cross-section of spin clusters interacting by all kinds of exchange interactions, including also the single-ion zero-field splitting term, is derived for the first time. A closed-form expression is also derived for the particular case in which only the isotropic

  7. Analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared and Raman vibrational spectra

    PubMed Central

    Louant, Orian; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Using a recently developed recursive scheme for the calculation of high-order geometric derivatives of frequency-dependent molecular properties [Ringholm et al., J. Comp. Chem., 2014, 35, 622], we present the first analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared (IR) and Raman spectra including anharmonicity both in the vibrational frequencies and in the IR and Raman intensities. In the case of anharmonic corrections to the Raman intensities, this involves the calculation of fifth-order energy derivatives—that is, the third-order geometric derivatives of the frequency-dependent polarizability. The approach is applicable to both Hartree–Fock and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. Using generalized vibrational perturbation theory to second order, we have calculated the anharmonic infrared and Raman spectra of the non- and partially deuterated isotopomers of nitromethane, where the inclusion of anharmonic effects introduces combination and overtone bands that are observed in the experimental spectra. For the major features of the spectra, the inclusion of anharmonicities in the calculation of the vibrational frequencies is more important than anharmonic effects in the calculated infrared and Raman intensities. Using methanimine as a trial system, we demonstrate that the analytic approach avoids errors in the calculated spectra that may arise if numerical differentiation schemes are used. PMID:26784673

  8. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration in a Langmuir monolayer with high-resolution spectra and ultrafast vibrational dynamics in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-08-28

    Even though in principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurement should generate identical information for a given molecular system, inhomogeneous character of surface vibrations in the sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies has only been studied with the time-domain SFGVS by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough line shape. Here with recently developed high-resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS) we show that the inhomogeneous line shape can be obtained in the frequency-domain, for the anchoring CN stretch of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuirmore » monolayer at the air-water interface, and that an excellent agreement with the time-domain SFG free-induction-decay (FID) results can be established. We found that the 8CB CN stretch spectrum consists of a single peak centered at 2234.00 + * 0.01 cm-1 with a total line width of 10.9 + - 0.3 cm-1 at half maximum. The Lorentzian contribution accounts only for 4:7 + -0:4 cm-1 to this width and the Gaussian (inhomogeneous) broadening for as much as 8:1+*0:2 cm-1. Polarization analysis of the -CN spectra showed that the -CN group is tilted 57 + - 2 degrees from the surface normal. The large heterogeneity in the -CN spectrum is tentatively attributed to the -CN group interactions with the interfacial water molecules penetrated/accomodated into the 8CB monolayer, a unique phenomenon for the nCB Langmuir monolayers reported previously.« less

  9. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration in a Langmuir monolayer with high-resolution spectra and ultrafast vibrational dynamics in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, Luis; Wang, Hong-fei

    2013-08-01

    While in principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurements should generate identical information for a given molecular system, the inhomogeneous character of surface vibrations in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies has only been studied with time-domain SFG-VS by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, this due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough lineshape. Here, with the recently developed high-resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS) technique, we show that the inhomogeneous lineshape can be obtained in the frequency-domain for the anchoring CN stretch of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface, and that an excellent agreement with the time-domain SFG free-induction-decay can be established. We found that the 8CB CN stretch spectrum consists of a single peak centered at 2234.00 ± 0.01 cm-1 with a total linewidth of 10.9 ± 0.3 cm-1 at half maximum. The Lorentzian contribution accounts only for 4.7 ± 0.4 cm-1 to this width and the Gaussian (inhomogeneous) broadening for as much as 8.1 ± 0.2 cm-1. Polarization analysis of the -CN spectra showed that the -CN group is tilted 57° ± 2° from the surface normal. The large heterogeneity in the -CN spectrum is tentatively attributed to the -CN group interactions with the interfacial water molecules penetrated/accommodated into the 8CB monolayer, a unique phenomenon for the nCB Langmuir monolayers reported previously.

  10. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration in a Langmuir monolayer with high-resolution spectra and ultrafast vibrational dynamics in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS).

    PubMed

    Velarde, Luis; Wang, Hong-fei

    2013-08-28

    While in principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurements should generate identical information for a given molecular system, the inhomogeneous character of surface vibrations in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies has only been studied with time-domain SFG-VS by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, this due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough lineshape. Here, with the recently developed high-resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS) technique, we show that the inhomogeneous lineshape can be obtained in the frequency-domain for the anchoring CN stretch of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface, and that an excellent agreement with the time-domain SFG free-induction-decay can be established. We found that the 8CB CN stretch spectrum consists of a single peak centered at 2234.00 ± 0.01 cm(-1) with a total linewidth of 10.9 ± 0.3 cm(-1) at half maximum. The Lorentzian contribution accounts only for 4.7 ± 0.4 cm(-1) to this width and the Gaussian (inhomogeneous) broadening for as much as 8.1 ± 0.2 cm(-1). Polarization analysis of the -CN spectra showed that the -CN group is tilted 57° ± 2° from the surface normal. The large heterogeneity in the -CN spectrum is tentatively attributed to the -CN group interactions with the interfacial water molecules penetrated/accommodated into the 8CB monolayer, a unique phenomenon for the nCB Langmuir monolayers reported previously.

  11. Improving the photoresponse spectra of BaSi2 layers by capping with hydrogenated amorphous Si layers prepared by radio-frequency hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihao; Gotoh, Kazuhiro; Deng, Tianguo; Sato, Takuma; Takabe, Ryota; Toko, Kaoru; Usami, Noritaka; Suemasu, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    We studied the surface passivation effect of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers on BaSi2 films. a-Si:H was formed by an electron-beam evaporation of Si, and a supply of atomic hydrogen using radio-frequency plasma. Surface passivation effect was first investigated on a conventional n-Si(111) substrate by capping with 20 nm-thick a-Si:H layers, and next on a 0.5 μm-thick BaSi2 film on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy. The internal quantum efficiency distinctly increased by 4 times in a wide wavelength range for sample capped in situ with a 3 nm-thick a-Si:H layer compared to those capped with a pure a-Si layer.

  12. Iminopropadienones RN=C=C=C=O and bisiminopropadienes RN=C=C=C=NR: Matrix infrared spectra and anharmonic frequency calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, Didier; Baraille, Isabelle; Andersen, Heidi Gade; Wentrup, Curt

    2013-10-01

    Methyliminopropadienone MeN=C=C=C=O 1a was generated by flash vacuum thermolysis from four different precursors and isolated in solid argon. The matrix-isolation infrared spectrum is dominated by unusually strong anharmonic effects resulting in complex fine structure of the absorptions due to the NCCCO moiety in the 2200 cm-1 region. Doubling and tripling of the corresponding absorption bands are observed for phenyliminopropadienone PhN=C=C=C=O 1b and bis(phenylimino)propadiene PhN=C=C=C=NPh 9, respectively. Anharmonic vibrational frequency calculations allow the identification of a number of overtones and combination bands as the cause of the splittings for each molecule. This method constitutes an important tool for the characterization of reactive intermediates and unusual molecules by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Amplification of anharmonicities in multiphoton vibrational action spectra.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Parneix, P

    2012-01-16

    The influence of one or several infrared laser pulses on the stability of bare and argon-tagged sodium chloride clusters is investigated theoretically by a combination of computational methods involving explicit molecular dynamics and properly calibrated unimolecular rate theories. The fragmentation spectra obtained by varying the laser frequency in the far-IR range is compared to the linear absorption spectrum resulting from the dipole moment autocorrelation function. Under appropriate laser field parameters, the action spectra are found to resemble the absorption spectra quite accurately in terms of positions, line widths, and even relative intensities. However, the action spectra exhibit residual and systematic redshifts of a few percent, which are partly due to the finite spectral bandwidth but are amplified by the progressive heating by the laser. A quantitative analysis suggests that these anharmonicity effects should generally arise upon multiple photon absorption. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A national review of the frequency of minimally invasive surgery among general surgery residents: assessment of ACGME case logs during 2 decades of general surgery resident training.

    PubMed

    Richards, Morgan K; McAteer, Jarod P; Drake, F Thurston; Goldin, Adam B; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Gow, Kenneth W

    2015-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created a shift in how many surgical diseases are treated. Examining the effect on resident operative experience provides valuable insight into trends that may be useful for restructuring the requirements of resident training. To evaluate changes in general surgery resident operative experience regarding MIS. Retrospective review of the frequency of MIS relative to open operations among general surgery residents using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for academic years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012. General surgery residency training among accredited programs in the United States. We analyzed the difference in the mean number of MIS techniques and corresponding open procedures across training periods using 2-tailed t tests with statistical significance set at P < .05. Of 6,467,708 operations with the option of MIS, 2,393,030 (37.0%) were performed with the MIS approach. Of all MIS operations performed, the 5 most common were cholecystectomy (48.5%), appendectomy (16.2%), groin hernia repair (10.0%), abdominal exploration (nontrauma) (4.4%), and antireflux procedures (3.6%). During the study period, there was a transition from a predominantly open to MIS approach for appendectomy, antireflux procedures, thoracic wedge resection, and partial gastric resection. Cholecystectomy is the only procedure for which MIS was more common than the open technique throughout the study period (P < .001). The open approach is more common for all other procedures, including splenectomy (0.7% MIS), common bile duct exploration (24.9% MIS), gastrostomy (25.9% MIS), abdominal exploration (33.1% MIS), hernia (20.3% MIS), lung resection (22.3% MIS), partial or total colectomy (39.1%), enterolysis (19.0% MIS), ileostomy (9.0% MIS), enterectomy (5.2% MIS), vagotomy (1.8% MIS), and pediatric antireflux procedures (35.9% MIS); P < .001. Minimally invasive surgery has an increasingly prominent role in contemporary

  15. Study on the interaction between albendazole and eosin Y by fluorescence, resonance Rayleigh scattering and frequency doubling scattering spectra and their analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fengling; Huang, Wei; Yang, Jidong; Li, Qin

    In pH 3.25-3.35 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, albendazole (ABZ) could react with eosin Y (EY) to form a 1:1 ion-association complex, which not only results in the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and frequency doubling scattering (FDS). Furthermore, a new RRS spectrum will appear, and the maximum RRS wavelength was located at about 356 nm. The detection limit for ABZ were 21.51 ng mL-1 for the fluorophotometry, 6.93 ng mL-1 for the RRS method and 12.89 ng mL-1 for the FDS method. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. The experimental conditions were optimized and effects of coexisting substances were evaluated. Meanwhile, the influences of coexisting substances were tested. The methods have been successfully applied to the determination of ABZ in capsules and human urine samples. The composition and structure of the ion-association complex and the reaction mechanism were discussed.

  16. Electronic polarization effect on low-frequency infrared and Raman spectra of aprotic solvent: Molecular dynamics simulation study with charge response kernel by second order Møller-Plesset perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isegawa, Miho; Kato, Shigeki

    2007-12-01

    Low-frequency infrared (IR) and depolarized Raman scattering (DRS) spectra of acetonitrile, methylene chloride, and acetone liquids are simulated via molecular dynamics calculations with the charge response kernel (CRK) model obtained at the second order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) level. For this purpose, the analytical second derivative technique for the MP2 energy is employed to evaluate the CRK matrices. The calculated IR spectra reasonably agree with the experiments. In particular, the agreement is excellent for acetone because the present CRK model well reproduces the experimental polarizability in the gas phase. The importance of interaction induced dipole moments in characterizing the spectral shapes is stressed. The DRS spectrum of acetone is mainly discussed because the experimental spectrum is available only for this molecule. The calculated spectrum is close to the experiment. The comparison of the present results with those by the multiple random telegraph model is also made. By decomposing the polarizability anisotropy time correlation function to the contributions from the permanent, induced polarizability and their cross term, a discrepancy from the previous calculations is observed in the sign of permanent-induce cross term contribution. The origin of this discrepancy is discussed by analyzing the correlation functions for acetonitrile.

  17. Quantum Mechanical Calculations of Vibrational Sum-Frequency-Generation (SFG) Spectra of Cellulose: Dependence of the CH and OH Peak Intensity on the Polarity of Cellulose Chains within the SFG Coherence Domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher M; Chen, Xing; Weiss, Philip A; Jensen, Lasse; Kim, Seong H

    2017-01-05

    Vibrational sum-frequency-generation (SFG) spectroscopy is capable of selectively detecting crystalline biopolymers interspersed in amorphous polymer matrices. However, the spectral interpretation is difficult due to the lack of knowledge on how spatial arrangements of crystalline segments influence SFG spectra features. Here we report time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations of cellulose crystallites in intimate contact with two different polarities: parallel versus antiparallel. TD-DFT calculations reveal that the CH/OH intensity ratio is very sensitive to the polarity of the crystallite packing. Theoretical calculations of hyperpolarizability tensors (β abc ) clearly show the dependence of SFG intensities on the polarity of crystallite packing within the SFG coherence length, which provides the basis for interpretation of the empirically observed SFG features of native cellulose in biological systems.

  18. Perpendicular blade vortex interaction and its implications for helicopter noise prediction: Wave-number frequency spectra in a trailing vortex for BWI noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devenport, William J.; Glegg, Stewart A. L.

    1993-01-01

    spectrum especially for the spectral peak at low frequencies, which previously was poorly predicted.

  19. Validation of Spectra and Phase in Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy through Internal Heterodyne Phase-Resolved Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Chen, Shunli; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-03-03

    Reliably determination of the spectral features and their phases in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for surfaces with closely overlapping peaks has been a standing issue. Here we present two approaches towards resolving such issue. The first utilizes the high resolution and accurate lineshape from the recently developed sub-wavenumber high resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS), from which the detail spectral parameters, including relative spectral phases, of overlapping peaks can be determined through reliable spectral fitting. These results are further validated by using the second method that utilizes the azimuthal angle phase dependence of the z-cut α-quartz crystal, a common phase standard,more » through the spectral interference between the SFG fields of the quartz surface, as the internal phase reference, and the adsorbed molecular layer. Even though this approach is limited to molecular layers that can be transferred or deposited onto the quartz surface, it is simple and straightforward, as it requires only an internal phase standard with a single measurement that is free of phase drifts. More importantly, it provides unambiguous SFG spectral phase information of such surfaces. Using this method, the absolute phase of the molecular susceptibility tensors of the CH3, CH2 and chiral C-H groups in different Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) molecular monolayers and drop-cast peptide films are determined. These two approaches are fully consistent with and complement to each other, making both easily applicable tools in SFG-VS studies. More importantly, as the HR-BB-SFG-VS technique can be easily applied to various surfaces and interfaces, such validation of the spectral and phase information from HR-BB-SFG-VS measurement demonstrates it as one most promising tool for interrogating the detailed structure and interactions of complex molecular interfaces.« less

  20. An observational study of the frequency, severity, and etiology of failures in postoperative care after major elective general surgery.

    PubMed

    Symons, Nicholas R A; Almoudaris, Alex M; Nagpal, Kamal; Vincent, Charles A; Moorthy, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the nature of process failures in postoperative care, to assess their frequency and preventability, and to explore their relationship to adverse events. Adverse events are common and are frequently caused by failures in the process of care. These processes are often evaluated independently using clinical audit. There is little understanding of process failures in terms of their overall frequency, relative risk, and cumulative effect on the surgical patient. Patients were observed daily from the first postoperative day until discharge by an independent surgeon. Field notes on the circumstances surrounding any nonroutine or atypical event were recorded. Field notes were assessed by 2 surgeons to identify failures in the process of care. Preventability, the degree of harm caused to the patient, and the underlying etiology of process failures were evaluated by 2 independent surgeons. Fifty patients undergoing major elective general surgery were observed for a total of 659 days of postoperative care. A total of 256 process failures were identified, of which 85% were preventable and 51% directly led to patient harm. Process failures occurred in all aspects of care, the most frequent being medication prescribing and administration, management of lines, tubes, and drains, and pain control interventions. Process failures accounted for 57% of all preventable adverse events. Communication failures and delays were the main etiologies, leading to 54% of process failures. Process failures are common in postoperative care, are highly preventable, and frequently cause harm to patients. Interventions to prevent process failures will improve the reliability of surgical postoperative care and have the potential to reduce hospital stay.

  1. Frequency of acromegaly in adults with diabetes or glucose intolerance and estimated prevalence in the general population.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of acromegaly in adults with diabetes mellitus (DM) or glucose intolerance (GI) and to estimate its prevalence in the general population. A total of 2,270 patients with DM or GI and age from 20 to 70 years were studied. Patients with known pituitary disease and pregnant women were excluded. Serum IGF-1 was measured in all subjects and, if elevated, a new measurement was obtained together with the measurement of GH in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Patients with persistently elevated IGF-1 and inadequate suppression of GH were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Acromegaly was not suspected by the assistant physician in any of the patients. Six patients had persistently elevated IGF-1 and inadequate suppression of GH in the OGTT (without other conditions associated with GH or IGF-1 elevation). Pituitary adenoma was detected by MRI in three patients, and two subjects presented an acromegalic phenotype. Two patients were submitted to transsphenoidal surgery, with immunohistochemistry confirming immunoreactivity for GH. Another patient was treated with octreotide LAR which resulted in the normalization of IGF-1 and GH. Considering a prevalence of DM or GI of 20% in adults and the occurrence of these co-morbidities in 55% of patients with acromegaly, the frequency of 3/2,270 found in this study permits to estimate 480 cases/1,000,000 adults. The present results suggest that the prevalence of acromegaly is underestimated and further studies are needed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of biochemical screening in certain groups of patients.

  2. Application of the parametric proper generalized decomposition to the frequency-dependent calculation of the impedance of an AC line with rectangular conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancarlos-González, Abel; Pineda-Sanchez, Manuel; Puche-Panadero, Ruben; Sapena-Bano, Angel; Riera-Guasp, Martin; Martinez-Roman, Javier; Perez-Cruz, Juan; Roger-Folch, Jose

    2017-12-01

    AC lines of industrial busbar systems are usually built using conductors with rectangular cross sections, where each phase can have several parallel conductors to carry high currents. The current density in a rectangular conductor, under sinusoidal conditions, is not uniform. It depends on the frequency, on the conductor shape, and on the distance between conductors, due to the skin effect and to proximity effects. Contrary to circular conductors, there are not closed analytical formulas for obtaining the frequency-dependent impedance of conductors with rectangular cross-section. It is necessary to resort to numerical simulations to obtain the resistance and the inductance of the phases, one for each desired frequency and also for each distance between the phases' conductors. On the contrary, the use of the parametric proper generalized decomposition (PGD) allows to obtain the frequency-dependent impedance of an AC line for a wide range of frequencies and distances between the phases' conductors by solving a single simulation in a 4D domain (spatial coordinates x and y, the frequency and the separation between conductors). In this way, a general "virtual chart" solution is obtained, which contains the solution for any frequency and for any separation of the conductors, and stores it in a compact separated representations form, which can be easily embedded on a more general software for the design of electrical installations. The approach presented in this work for rectangular conductors can be easily extended to conductors with an arbitrary shape.

  3. Mapping of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure levels in outdoor environment and comparing with reference levels for general public health.

    PubMed

    Cansiz, Mustafa; Abbasov, Teymuraz; Kurt, M Bahattin; Celik, A Recai

    2018-03-01

    In this study, radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure levels were measured on the main streets in the city center of Diyarbakır, Turkey. Measured electric field levels were plotted on satellite imagery of Diyarbakır and were compared with exposure guidelines published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). Exposure measurements were performed in dense urban, urban and suburban areas each day for 7 consecutive days. The measurement system consisted of high precision and portable spectrum analyzer, three-axis electric field antenna, connection cable and a laptop which was used to record the measurement samples as a data logger. The highest exposure levels were detected for two places, which are called Diclekent and Batıkent. It was observed that the highest instantaneous electric field strength value for Batıkent was 7.18 V/m and for Diclekent was 5.81 V/m. It was statistically determined that the main contributor band to the total exposure levels was Universal Mobile Telecommunications System band. Finally, it was concluded that all measured exposure levels were lower than the reference levels recommended by ICNIRP for general public health.

  4. Generalized Hurst exponent and multifractal function of original and translated texts mapped into frequency and length time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.

    2012-09-01

    A nonlinear dynamics approach can be used in order to quantify complexity in written texts. As a first step, a one-dimensional system is examined: two written texts by one author (Lewis Carroll) are considered, together with one translation into an artificial language (i.e., Esperanto) are mapped into time series. Their corresponding shuffled versions are used for obtaining a baseline. Two different one-dimensional time series are used here: one based on word lengths (LTS), the other on word frequencies (FTS). It is shown that the generalized Hurst exponent h(q) and the derived f(α) curves of the original and translated texts show marked differences. The original texts are far from giving a parabolic f(α) function, in contrast to the shuffled texts. Moreover, the Esperanto text has more extreme values. This suggests cascade model-like, with multiscale time-asymmetric features as finally written texts. A discussion of the difference and complementarity of mapping into a LTS or FTS is presented. The FTS f(α) curves are more opened than the LTS ones.

  5. Generalized Hurst exponent and multifractal function of original and translated texts mapped into frequency and length time series.

    PubMed

    Ausloos, M

    2012-09-01

    A nonlinear dynamics approach can be used in order to quantify complexity in written texts. As a first step, a one-dimensional system is examined: two written texts by one author (Lewis Carroll) are considered, together with one translation into an artificial language (i.e., Esperanto) are mapped into time series. Their corresponding shuffled versions are used for obtaining a baseline. Two different one-dimensional time series are used here: one based on word lengths (LTS), the other on word frequencies (FTS). It is shown that the generalized Hurst exponent h(q) and the derived f(α) curves of the original and translated texts show marked differences. The original texts are far from giving a parabolic f(α) function, in contrast to the shuffled texts. Moreover, the Esperanto text has more extreme values. This suggests cascade model-like, with multiscale time-asymmetric features as finally written texts. A discussion of the difference and complementarity of mapping into a LTS or FTS is presented. The FTS f(α) curves are more opened than the LTS ones.

  6. [Frequency and characteristics of strokes involving the perforating arteries in the Department of Neurology at the Befelatanana General Hospital, Antananarivo].

    PubMed

    Rasaholiarison, Nomena Finiavana; Randrianasolo, Rahamefy Odilon; Rajaonarison, Lala Andriamasinavalona; Rakotomanana, Jenny Larissa; Razafimahefa, Julien; Tehindrazanarivelo, Alain Djacoba

    2017-01-01

    Strokes of the perforating arteries are mainly arteriolopathies. They result in dementia and stroke recurrence. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of these strokes to better prevent these complications. We conducted a descriptive, retrospective study in the department of neurology at the Befelatanana general hospital, Antananarivo over the period 01 March-25 September 2015. All patients with abrupt neurological deficit and deep brain involvement on brain scanner were included in the study. The features of strokes involving the perforating arteries were collected. Data were processed with SPSS 20 software. Out of 172 patients with a stroke, 83(48.25%) had stroke involving the perforating arteries. Stroke involving the perforating arteries affected young people (65.06%) aged less than 65 years and preferentially the male population (61.44%). Haemorrhagic forms accounted for 67.46%. Thirty-one patients (37.34%) had stroke recurrences and, among them, almost a quarter had 2 recurrences (38.70%) in less than a year. All patients with recurrence had dysexecutive disorder (p < 0.0001) and poor antihypertensive medication adherence. Mortality accounted for only 6.02% in patients with onset of these strokes during hospitalization. Specific neurologic follow-up is necessary after a first stroke involving perforating arteries in order to make an early diagnosis of dementia and to prevent recurrences.

  7. Response to 'Comment on 'Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks' '[Phys. Plasmas 19, 064701 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Peoples' Friendship University, 3 Ordzhonikidze St., Moscow 117198

    2012-06-15

    The equations for the continuous spectra derived in our paper [V. P. Lakhin and V. I. Ilgisonis, Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)] can be reduced to the matrix form used by Goedbloed et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 28 (2004)]. It is shown that the assumptions made in our paper provide the elliptic flow regime and guarantee the existence of plasma equilibrium with nested magnetic surfaces of circular cross-section. The new results on magnetohydrodynamic instabilities of such tokamak equilibria obtained in our paper but absent in the paper by Goedbloed et al. are emphasized.

  8. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. III - General spectral properties of X1-X5 type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Kreplin, R. W.; Cohen, L.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of six class X1-X5 solar flares are discussed. The spectra were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07 and 3.14-3.24 A. Electron temperatures derived from dielectronic satellite line to resonance line ratios for Fe XXV and Ca XIX are found to remain fairly constant around 22,000,000 and 16,000,000 K respectively during the rise phase of the flares, then decrease by approximately 6,000,000 K during the decay phase. Nonthermal motions derived from line widths for the April 27, 1979 event are found to be greatest during the rise phase (approximately 130 km/sec) and decrease to about 60 km/sec during decay. Volume emission measures for Fe XXV, Ca XIX and Ca XX are derived from photon fluxes as a function of temperature, and examination of the intensity behavior of the Fe K alpha emission as a function of time indicates that it is a result of fluorescence. Differences between the present and previous observations of temperature variation are discussed, and it is concluded that the flare plasmas are close to ionization equilibrium for the flares investigated.

  9. XTRAN2L - A PROGRAM FOR SOLVING THE GENERAL-FREQUENCY UNSTEADY TWO-DIMENSIONAL TRANSONIC SMALL-DISTURBANCE EQUATIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Program for Solving the General-Frequency Unsteady Two-Dimensional Transonic Small-Disturbance Equation, XTRAN2L, is used to calculate time-accurate, finite-difference solutions of the nonlinear, small-disturbance potential equation for two- dimensional transonic flow about airfoils. The code can treat forced harmonic, pulse, or aeroelastic transient type motions. XTRAN2L uses a transonic small-disturbance equation that incorporates a time accurate finite-difference scheme. Airfoil flow tangency boundary conditions are defined to include airfoil contour, chord deformation, nondimensional plunge displacement, pitch, and trailing edge control surface deflection. Forced harmonic motion can be based on: 1) coefficients of harmonics based on information from each quarter period of the last cycle of harmonic motion; or 2) Fourier analyses of the last cycle of motion. Pulse motion (an alternate to forced harmonic motion) in which the airfoil is given a small prescribed pulse in a given mode of motion, and the aerodynamic transients are calculated. An aeroelastic transient capability is available within XTRAN2L, wherein the structural equations of motion are coupled with the aerodynamic solution procedure for simultaneous time-integration. The wake is represented as a slit downstream of the airfoil trailing edge. XTRAN2L includes nonreflecting farfield boundary conditions. XTRAN2L was developed on a CDC CYBER mainframe running under NOS 2.4. It is written in FORTRAN 5 and uses overlays to minimize storage requirements. The program requires 120K of memory in overlayed form. XTRAN2L was developed in 1987.

  10. The Relationship between Lexical Frequency Profiling Measures and Rater Judgements of Spoken and Written General English Language Proficiency on the CELPIP-General Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Scott Roy

    2015-01-01

    Independent confirmation that vocabulary in use unfolds across levels of performance as expected can contribute to a more complete understanding of validity in standardized English language tests. This study examined the relationship between Lexical Frequency Profiling (LFP) measures and rater judgements of test-takers' overall levels of…

  11. Multispectral processing without spectra.

    PubMed

    Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out,for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1553 (1994)] we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 3 x 3 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model [G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 3003 (1994)]. We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting.

  12. Multispectral processing without spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Mark S.; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out, for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 1553 (1994) we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 33 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 3003 (1994). We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. 2003 Optical Society of America

  13. Infrared Spectra of Substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Calculations are carried out using density functional theory (DFT) to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities of 1-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9-cyanoanthracene, 2-aminoanthracene, acridine, and their positive ions. The theoretical data are compared with matrix-isolation spectra for these species also reported in this work. The theoretical and experimental frequencies and relative intensities for the neutral species are in generally good agreement, whereas the positive ion spectra are only in qualitative agreement. Relative to anthracene, we find that substitution of amethyl or CN for a hydrogen does not significantly affect the spectrum other than to add the characteristic methyl C-H stretch and C-N stretch (near 2200/cm), respectively. However, addition of NH2 dramatically affects the spectrum of the neutral. Not only are the NH2 modes themselves strong, but this electron withdrawing group induces sufficient partial charge on the ring to give the neutral molecule characteristics of the anthracene cation spectrum. The sum of the absolute intensities is about four times larger for 2-aminoanthracene than for 9-cyanoanthracene. Substituting nitrogen in the ring at the nine position (acridine) does not greatly alter the spectrum compared with anthracene.

  14. A generalized strategy for designing (19)F/(1)H dual-frequency MRI coil for small animal imaging at 4.7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingzhi; Hockett, Frank D; Chen, Junjie; Zhang, Lei; Caruthers, Shelton D; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2011-07-01

    To propose and test a universal strategy for building (19) F/(1) H dual-frequency RF coil that permits multiple coil geometries. The feasibility to design (19) F/(1) H dual-frequency RF coil based on coupled resonator model was investigated. A series capacitive matching network enables robust impedance matching for both harmonic oscillating modes of the coupled resonator. Two typical designs of (19) F/(1) H volume coils (birdcage and saddle) at 4.7T were implemented and evaluated with electrical bench test and in vivo (19) F/(1) H dual-nuclei imaging. For various combinations of internal resistances of the sample coil and secondary resonator, numerical solutions for the tunable capacitors to optimize impedance matching were obtained using a root-seeking program. Identical and homogeneous B1 field distribution at (19) F and (1) H frequencies were observed in bench test and phantom image. Finally, in vivo mouse imaging confirmed the sensitivity and homogeneity of the (19) F/(1) H dual-frequency coil design. A generalized strategy for designing (19) F/(1) H dual-frequency coils based on the coupled resonator approach was developed and validated. A unique feature of this design is that it preserves the B1 field homogeneity of the RF coil at both resonant frequencies. Thus it minimizes the susceptibility effect on image co-registration. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Wavelet theory applied to the study of spectra of trans-Neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Feliciano, A. C.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.

    2018-06-01

    Context. Reflection spectroscopy in the near-infrared (NIR) is used to investigate the surface composition of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). In general, these spectra are difficult to interpret due to the low apparent brightness of the TNOs, causing low signal-to-noise ratio even in spectra obtained with the largest telescopes available on Earth, making it necessary to use filtering techniques to analyze and interpret them. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to analyze the spectra of TNOs. Specifically, our aim was to filter these spectra in the best possible way: maximizing noise removal, while minimizing the loss of signal. Methods: We used wavelets to filter the spectra. Wavelets are a mathematical tool that decompose the signal into its constituent parts, allowing us to analyze the data in different areas of frequencies with the resolution of each component tied to its scale. To check the reliability of our method, we compared the filtered spectra with the spectra of water and methanol ices to identify some common structures between them. Results: Of the 50 TNOs in our sample, we identify traces of water ices and methanol in the spectra of several of them, some with previous reports, while for other objects there were no previous reports. Conclusions: We conclude that the wavelet technique is successful in filtering spectra of TNOs.

  16. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Cameron J; Candian, Alessandra; Huang, Xinchuan; Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Lee, Timothy J; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2015-12-14

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesian derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C-H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned.

  17. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, Cameron J., E-mail: mackie@strw.leidenuniv.nl; Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2015-12-14

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesianmore » derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C–H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned.« less

  18. A dual spectroscopic fluorescence probe based on carbon dots for detection of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol/Fe (III) ion by fluorescence and frequency doubling scattering spectra and its analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinxia; Bai, Zhangjun; Zu, Fanlin; Yan, Fanyong; Wei, Junfu; Zhang, Saihui; Luo, Yunmei

    2018-07-05

    A convenient, highly sensitive and reliable assay for 2,4,6‑trinitrophenol (TNP) and Fe (III) ion (Fe 3+ ) in the dual spectroscopic manner is developed based on novel carbon dots (CDs). The CDs with highly blue emitting fluorescent were easily prepared via the one-step potassium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from dextrin. The as-synthesized CDs exhibited the high crystalline quality, the excellent fluorescence characteristics with a high quantum yield of ~13.1%, and the narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 6.3±0.5nm. Fluorescence and frequency doubling scattering (FDS) spectra of CDs show the unique changes in the presence of TNP/Fe 3+ by different mechanism. The fluorescence of CDs decreased apparently in the presence of TNP via electron-transfer. Thus, after the experimental conditions were optimized, the linear range for detection TNP is 0-50μM, the detection limit was 19.1nM. With the addition of Fe 3+ , the FDS of CDs appeared to be highly sensitive with a quick response to Fe 3+ as a result of the change concentration of the scattering particle. The emission peak for FDS at 450nm was enhanced under the excitation wavelength at 900nm. The fluorescence response changes linearly with Fe 3+ concentration in the range of 8-40μM, the detection limits were determined to be 44.1nM. The applications of CDs were extended for the detection of TNP, Fe 3+ in real water samples with a high recovery. The results reported here may become the potential tools for the fast response of TNP and Fe 3+ in the analysis of environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Frequency of rare mutations and common genetic variations in severe hypertriglyceridemia in the general population of Spain.

    PubMed

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Blanco-Torrecilla, Cristian; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2016-04-23

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a common complex metabolic trait that results of the accumulation of relatively common genetic variants in combination with other modifier genes and environmental factors resulting in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemias is diagnosed in adulthood and their molecular bases have not been fully defined yet. The prevalence of HTG is highly variable among populations, possibly caused by differences in environmental factors and genetic background. However, the prevalence of very high TG and the frequency of rare mutations causing HTG in a whole non-selected population have not been previously studied. The total of 23,310 subjects over 18 years from a primary care-district in a middle-class area of Zaragoza (Spain) with TG >500 mg/dL were selected to establish HTG prevalence. Those affected of primary HTG were considered for further genetic analysis. The promoters, coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, LMF1, APOC2, APOA5, APOE and GPIHBP1 genes were sequenced. The frequency of rare variants identified was studied in 90 controls. One hundred ninety-four subjects (1.04%) had HTG and 90 subjects (46.4%) met the inclusion criteria for primary HTG. In this subgroup, nine patients (12.3%) were carriers of 7 rare variants in LPL, LMF1, APOA5, GPIHBP1 or APOE genes. Three of these mutations are described for the first time in this work. The presence of a rare pathogenic mutation did not confer a differential phenotype or a higher family history of HTG. The prevalence of rare mutations in candidate genes in subjects with primary HTG is low. The low frequency of rare mutations, the absence of a more severe phenotype or the dominant transmission of the HTG would not suggest the use of genetic analysis in the clinical practice in this population.

  20. Relationship of strength of social support and frequency of social contact with hypertension and general health status among older adults in the mobile care unit in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Kandari, Yagoub Yousif

    2011-06-01

    The major aim of this research is to examine the relationship between social support and hypertension and general health among older adults who live with their families and receiving care from the governmental institution in Kuwait related to the Ministry of Social Affairs, which is a home care unit. A total of 1,427 participants was selected. Some physical, sociocultural and demographic information was requested. Social support, frequency of contact, strength of relations, and self-rating health scales were used. The Somatic Symptoms Inventory was also used. The SPSS package was used to analyze the data. The findings indiated a direct relationship between social support and general health status among older adults in Kuwaiti society. Social support and social networking has a greater effect on the life of the elderly than on other age categories in the human population, given the decline in the general health of older adults due to psychological functions.

  1. A generalized time-frequency subtraction method for robust speech enhancement based on wavelet filter banks modeling of human auditory system.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Chang, Chip-Hong

    2007-08-01

    We present a new speech enhancement scheme for a single-microphone system to meet the demand for quality noise reduction algorithms capable of operating at a very low signal-to-noise ratio. A psychoacoustic model is incorporated into the generalized perceptual wavelet denoising method to reduce the residual noise and improve the intelligibility of speech. The proposed method is a generalized time-frequency subtraction algorithm, which advantageously exploits the wavelet multirate signal representation to preserve the critical transient information. Simultaneous masking and temporal masking of the human auditory system are modeled by the perceptual wavelet packet transform via the frequency and temporal localization of speech components. The wavelet coefficients are used to calculate the Bark spreading energy and temporal spreading energy, from which a time-frequency masking threshold is deduced to adaptively adjust the subtraction parameters of the proposed method. An unvoiced speech enhancement algorithm is also integrated into the system to improve the intelligibility of speech. Through rigorous objective and subjective evaluations, it is shown that the proposed speech enhancement system is capable of reducing noise with little speech degradation in adverse noise environments and the overall performance is superior to several competitive methods.

  2. Non-stationary signal analysis based on general parameterized time-frequency transform and its application in the feature extraction of a rotary machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Peng, Zhike; Chen, Shiqian; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Wenming

    2018-06-01

    With the development of large rotary machines for faster and more integrated performance, the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for them are becoming more challenging. Since the time-frequency (TF) pattern of the vibration signal from the rotary machine often contains condition information and fault feature, the methods based on TF analysis have been widely-used to solve these two problems in the industrial community. This article introduces an effective non-stationary signal analysis method based on the general parameterized time-frequency transform (GPTFT). The GPTFT is achieved by inserting a rotation operator and a shift operator in the short-time Fourier transform. This method can produce a high-concentrated TF pattern with a general kernel. A multi-component instantaneous frequency (IF) extraction method is proposed based on it. The estimation for the IF of every component is accomplished by defining a spectrum concentration index (SCI). Moreover, such an IF estimation process is iteratively operated until all the components are extracted. The tests on three simulation examples and a real vibration signal demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of our method.

  3. The Transfer of Resonance Line Polarization with Partial Frequency Redistribution in the General Hanle–Zeeman Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, E. Alsina; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Belluzzi, L., E-mail: ealsina@iac.es

    2017-02-10

    The spectral line polarization encodes a wealth of information about the thermal and magnetic properties of the solar atmosphere. Modeling the Stokes profiles of strong resonance lines is, however, a complex problem both from a theoretical and computational point of view, especially when partial frequency redistribution (PRD) effects need to be taken into account. In this work, we consider a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary intensity (Hanle–Zeeman regime) and orientation, both deterministic and micro-structured. Working within the framework of a rigorous PRD theoretical approach, we have developed a numerical code that solves the full non-LTEmore » radiative transfer problem for polarized radiation, in one-dimensional models of the solar atmosphere, accounting for the combined action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects, as well as for PRD phenomena. After briefly discussing the relevant equations, we describe the iterative method of solution of the problem and the numerical tools that we have developed and implemented. We finally present some illustrative applications to two resonance lines that form at different heights in the solar atmosphere, and provide a detailed physical interpretation of the calculated Stokes profiles. We find that magneto-optical effects have a strong impact on the linear polarization signals that PRD effects produce in the wings of strong resonance lines. We also show that the weak-field approximation has to be used with caution when PRD effects are considered.« less

  4. The contribution of demographic and morbidity factors to self-reported visit frequency of patients: a cross-sectional study of general practice patients in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Stephanie A; Britt, Helena

    2004-01-01

    Background Understanding the factors that affect patients' utilisation of health services is important for health service provision and effective patient management. This study aimed to investigate the specific morbidity and demographic factors related to the frequency with which general practice patients visit a general practitioner/family physician (GP) in Australia. Methods A sub-study was undertaken as part of an ongoing national study of general practice activity in Australia. A cluster sample of 10,755 general practice patients were surveyed through a random sample of 379 general practitioners. The patient reported the number of times he/she had visited a general practitioner in the previous twelve months. The GP recorded all the patient's major health problems, including those managed at the current consultation. Results Patients reported an average of 8.8 visits to a general practitioner per year. After adjusting for other patient demographics and number of health problems, concession health care card holders made on average 2.6 more visits per year to a general practitioner than did non-card holders (p < .001). After adjustment, patients from remote/very remote locations made 2.3 fewer visits per year than patients from locations where services were highly accessible (p < .001). After adjustment for patient demographics, patients with diagnosed anxiety made on average 2.7 more visits per year (p = 0.003), those with diagnosed depression 2.2 more visits than average (p < .0001), and those with back problems 2.4 more visits (p = 0.009) than patients without the respective disorders. Conclusions Anxiety, back pain and depression are associated with greater patient demand for general practice services than other health problems. The effect of sociodemographic factors on patient utilisation of general practice services is complex. Equity of access to general practice services remains an issue for patients from remote areas, while concession health care card

  5. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  6. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  7. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures.

  8. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  9. Anisotropic spectra of acoustic type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, E.; P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 53 Leninsky Ave., 119991 Moscow; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2008-06-15

    The problem of spectra for acoustic type of turbulence generated by shocks being randomly distributed in space is considered. It is shown that for turbulence with a weak anisotropy, such spectra have the same dependence in k-space as the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili spectrum: E(k){approx}k{sup -2}. However, the frequency spectrum has always the falling {approx}{omega}{sup -2}, independent of anisotropy. In the strong anisotropic case the energy distribution relative to wave vectors takes anisotropic dependence, forming in the large-k region spectra of the jet type.

  10. Vibrational investigation on FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra, IR intensity, Raman activity, peak resemblance, ideal estimation, standard deviation of computed frequencies analyses and electronic structure on 3-methyl-1,2-butadiene using HF and DFT (LSDA/B3LYP/B3PW91) calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, S; Jayaprakash, A; Mohan, S; Karabacak, M

    2011-11-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) spectral measurements of 3-methyl-1,2-butadiene (3M12B) have been attempted in the present work. Ab-initio HF and DFT (LSDA/B3LYP/B3PW91) calculations have been performed giving energies, optimized structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities and Raman activities. Complete vibrational assignments on the observed spectra are made with vibrational frequencies obtained by HF and DFT (LSDA/B3LYP/B3PW91) at 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The results of the calculations have been used to simulate IR and Raman spectra for the molecule that showed good agreement with the observed spectra. The potential energy distribution (PED) corresponding to each of the observed frequencies are calculated which confirms the reliability and precision of the assignment and analysis of the vibrational fundamentals modes. The oscillation of vibrational frequencies of butadiene due to the couple of methyl group is also discussed. A study on the electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures reveal the correlations between standard heat capacities (C) standard entropies (S), and standard enthalpy changes (H). Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Monte Carlo turbulence simulation using rational approximations to von Karman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    Turbulence simulation is computationally much simpler using rational spectra, but turbulence falls off as f exp -5/3 in frequency ranges of interest to aircraft response and as predicted by von Karman's model. Rational approximations to von Karman spectra should satisfy three requirements: (1) the rational spectra should provide a good approximation to the von Karman spectra in the frequency range of interest; (2) for stability, the resulting rational transfer function should have all its poles in the left half-plane; and (3) at high frequencies, the rational spectra must fall off as an integer power of frequency, and since the -2 power is closest to the -5/3 power, the rational approximation should roll off as the -2 power at high frequencies. Rational approximations to von Karman spectra that satisfy these three criteria are presented, along with spectra from simulated turbulence. Agreement between the spectra of the simulated turbulence and von Karman spectra is excellent.

  12. Health effects from low-frequency noise and infrasound in the general population: Is it time to listen? A systematic review of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene; van Poll, Ric; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-07-01

    A systematic review of observational studies was conducted to assess the association between everyday life low-frequency noise (LFN) components, including infrasound and health effects in the general population. Literature databases Pubmed, Embase and PsycInfo and additional bibliographic sources such as reference sections of key publications and journal databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies published from 2000 to 2015. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of them examined subjective annoyance as primary outcome. The adequacy of provided information in the included papers and methodological quality of studies was also addressed. Moreover, studies were screened for meta-analysis eligibility. Some associations were observed between exposure to LFN and annoyance, sleep-related problems, concentration difficulties and headache in the adult population living in the vicinity of a range of LFN sources. However, evidence, especially in relation to chronic medical conditions, was very limited. The estimated pooled prevalence of high subjective annoyance attributed to LFN was about 10%. Epidemiological research on LFN and health effects is scarce and suffers from methodological shortcomings. Low frequency noise in the everyday environment constitutes an issue that requires more research attention, particularly for people living in the vicinity of relevant sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among people working with sound systems and general population in Brazil: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    El Dib, Regina P; Silva, Edina MK; Morais, José F; Trevisani, Virgínia FM

    2008-01-01

    Background Music is ever present in our daily lives, establishing a link between humans and the arts through the senses and pleasure. Sound technicians are the link between musicians and audiences or consumers. Recently, general concern has arisen regarding occurrences of hearing loss induced by noise from excessively amplified sound-producing activities within leisure and professional environments. Sound technicians' activities expose them to the risk of hearing loss, and consequently put at risk their quality of life, the quality of the musical product and consumers' hearing. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among sound technicians in Brazil and compare this with a control group without occupational noise exposure. Methods This was a cross-sectional study comparing 177 participants in two groups: 82 sound technicians and 95 controls (non-sound technicians). A questionnaire on music listening habits and associated complaints was applied, and data were gathered regarding the professionals' numbers of working hours per day and both groups' hearing complaint and presence of tinnitus. The participants' ear canals were visually inspected using an otoscope. Hearing assessments were performed (tonal and speech audiometry) using a portable digital AD 229 E audiometer funded by FAPESP. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the sound technicians and controls regarding age and gender. Thus, the study sample was homogenous and would be unlikely to lead to bias in the results. A statistically significant difference in hearing loss was observed between the groups: 50% among the sound technicians and 10.5% among the controls. The difference could be addressed to high sound levels. Conclusion The sound technicians presented a higher prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure than did the general population, although the possibility of residual

  14. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Nitrogen Substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP/4-31G approach is used to compute the harmonic frequencies of substituted naphthalene, anthracene, and their cations. The substitutions include cyano (CN), aminio (NH2), imino (NH), and replacement of a CH group by a nitrogen atom. All unique sites are considered, namely 1 and 2 for naphthalene and 1, 2, and 9 for an'tracene, except for the imino, where only 2-iminonaphthalene is studied. The IR spectra of these substituted species are compared with those of the unsubstituted molecules. The addition of a CN group does not significantly affect the spectra except to add the CN stretching frequency. Replacing a CH group by N has only a small effect on the IR spectra. The addition of the NH2 group dramatically affects the neutral spectra, giving it much of the character of the cation spectra. However, the neutral 2-irrinonaphthalene spectra looks more like that of naphthalene than like the 2-aminonaphthalene spectra.

  15. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  16. Interpretation of comet spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpigny, C.

    1976-01-01

    The spectra of comets are discussed by considering successively a number of molecules that have been studied recently: CN, CH, C2, C3, OH, CH(+). The first two of this list, CN and CH, have been analyzed in greatest detail. A classification of the spectra of cometary heads is introduced.

  17. Event terms in the response spectra prediction equation and their deviation due to stress drop variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, H.; Nakano, K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the characteristics of strong ground motions separated from acceleration Fourier spectra and acceleration response spectra of 5% damping calculated from weak and moderate ground motions observed by K-NET, KiK-net, and the JMA Shindokei Network in Japan using the generalized spectral inversion method. The separation method used the outcrop motions at YMGH01 as reference where we extracted site responses due to shallow weathered layers. We include events with JMA magnitude equal to or larger than 4.5 observed from 1996 to 2011. We find that our frequency-dependent Q values are comparable to those of previous studies. From the corner frequencies of Fourier source spectra, we calculate Brune's stress parameters and found a clear magnitude dependence, in which smaller events tend to spread over a wider range while maintaining the same maximum value. We confirm that this is exactly the case for several mainshock-aftershock sequences. The average stress parameters for crustal earthquakes are much smaller than those of subduction zone, which can be explained by their depth dependence. We then compared the strong motion characteristics based on the acceleration response spectra and found that the separated characteristics of strong ground motions are different, especially in the lower frequency range less than 1Hz. These differences comes from the difference between Fourier spectra and response spectra found in the observed data; that is, predominant components in high frequency range of Fourier spectra contribute to increase the response in lower frequency range with small Fourier amplitude because strong high frequency component acts as an impulse to a Single-Degree-of-Freedom system. After the separation of the source terms for 5% damping response spectra we can obtain regression coefficients with respect to the magnitude, which lead to a new GMPE as shown in Fig.1 on the left. Although stress drops for inland earthquakes are 1/7 of the subduction

  18. Characteristics of magnetospheric radio noise spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio noise spectra (30 kHz to 10 MHz) taken by IMP-6 and RAE-2 exhibit time-varying characteristics which are related to spacecraft position and magnetospheric processes. In the mid-frequency range (100-1,000 kHz) intense noise peaks rise by a factor of 100 or more above background; 80% of the peak frequencies are within the band 125 kHz to 600 kHz, and the peak occurs most often (18% of the time) at 280 kHz. This intense mid-frequency noise has been detected at radial distances from 1.3 Re to 60 Re on all sides of the Earth during magnetically quiet as well as disturbed periods. Maximum occurrence of the mid-frequency noise is in the evening to midnight hours where splash-type energetic particle precipitation takes place. ""Magnetospheric lightning'' can be invoked to explain the spectral shape of the observed spectra.

  19. Estimated carrier frequency of creatine transporter deficiency in females in the general population using functional characterization of novel missense variants in the SLC6A8 gene.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Caro-Lyne; Patel, Jaina; Wang, Peixiang; Minassian, Berge; Salomons, Gajja S; Marshall, Christian R; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2015-07-10

    Creatine transporter deficiency (CRTR-D) is an X-linked inherited disorder of creatine transport. All males and about 50% of females have intellectual disability or cognitive dysfunction. Creatine deficiency on brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and elevated urinary creatine to creatinine ratio are important biomarkers. Mutations in the SLC6A8 gene occur de novo in 30% of males. Despite reports of high prevalence of CRTR-D in males with intellectual disability, there are no true prevalence studies in the general population. To determine carrier frequency of CRTR-D in the general population we studied the variants in the SLC6A8 gene reported in the Exome Variant Server database and performed functional characterization of missense variants. We also analyzed synonymous and intronic variants for their predicted pathogenicity using in silico analysis tools. Nine missense variants were functionally analyzed using transient transfection by site-directed mutagenesis with In-Fusion HD Cloning in HeLa cells. Creatine uptake was measured by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for creatine measurement. The c.1654G>T (p.Val552Leu) variant showed low residual creatine uptake activity of 35% of wild type transfected HeLa cells and was classified as pathogenic. Three variants (c.808G>A; p.Val270Met, c.942C>G; p.Phe314Leu and c.952G>A; p.Ala318Thr) were predicted to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis, but proved to be non-pathogenic by our functional analysis. The estimated carrier frequency of CRTR-D was 0.024% in females in the general population. We recommend functional studies for all novel missense variants by transient transfection followed by creatine uptake measurement by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as fast and cost effective method for the functional analysis of missense variants in the SLC6A8 gene. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  1. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  2. Acceleration spectra for subduction zone earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Choy, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    We estimate the source spectra of shallow earthquakes from digital recordings of teleseismic P wave groups, that is, P+pP+sP, by making frequency dependent corrections for the attenuation and for the interference of the free surface. The correction for the interference of the free surface assumes that the earthquake radiates energy from a range of depths. We apply this spectral analysis to a set of 12 subduction zone earthquakes which range in size from Ms = 6.2 to 8.1, obtaining corrected P wave acceleration spectra on the frequency band from 0.01 to 2.0 Hz. Seismic moment estimates from surface waves and normal modes are used to extend these P wave spectra to the frequency band from 0.001 to 0.01 Hz. The acceleration spectra of large subduction zone earthquakes, that is, earthquakes whose seismic moments are greater than 1027 dyn cm, exhibit intermediate slopes where u(w)???w5/4 for frequencies from 0.005 to 0.05 Hz. For these earthquakes, spectral shape appears to be a discontinuous function of seismic moment. Using reasonable assumptions for the phase characteristics, we transform the spectral shape observed for large earthquakes into the time domain to fit Ekstrom's (1987) moment rate functions for the Ms=8.1 Michoacan earthquake of September 19, 1985, and the Ms=7.6 Michoacan aftershock of September 21, 1985. -from Authors

  3. Fourier spectra of resonant nuclear forward scattering: lineshape dependence on absorber thickness distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykov, A. I.; Nomura, K.; Wang, J.

    2013-08-01

    We report on recent developments in the analysis of nuclear forward scattering (NFS) using the Fourier transformation of measured time spectra. In the frequency domain, it is shown that the lineshape is generally described by the convolution of two intensity factors. One of them is Lorentzian related to free decay. We derived the expressions for the second factor related to the Frenkel exciton polariton formed in Mössbauer media. For stray particles of a powder spread over a 2D surface the particle size distribution can be derived from Mössbauer thickness distribution. The thickness-related lineshape is deconvolved through sharpening the Fourier NFS spectra. The lineshapes in these sharpened spectra are theoretically expressed via the parameters of the particle size distributions. Through fitting the lineshapes with our theoretical expressions the particle size distribution parameters were determined.

  4. Rich magneto-absorption spectra of AAB-stacked trilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Do, Thi-Nga; Shih, Po-Hsin; Chang, Cheng-Peng; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2016-06-29

    A generalized tight-binding model is developed to investigate the feature-rich magneto-optical properties of AAB-stacked trilayer graphene. Three intragroup and six intergroup inter-Landau-level (inter-LL) optical excitations largely enrich magneto-absorption peaks. In general, the former are much higher than the latter, depending on the phases and amplitudes of LL wavefunctions. The absorption spectra exhibit single- or twin-peak structures which are determined by quantum modes, LL energy spectra and Fermion distribution. The splitting LLs, with different localization centers (2/6 and 4/6 positions in a unit cell), can generate very distinct absorption spectra. There exist extra single peaks because of LL anti-crossings. AAB, AAA, ABA, and ABC stackings considerably differ from one another in terms of the inter-LL category, frequency, intensity, and structure of absorption peaks. The main characteristics of LL wavefunctions and energy spectra and the Fermi-Dirac function are responsible for the configuration-enriched magneto-optical spectra.

  5. Development of a scale to measure symptoms of anxiety and depression in the general UK population: the psychiatric symptom frequency scale.

    PubMed Central

    Lindelow, M; Hardy, R; Rodgers, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The psychiatric symptom frequency (PSF) scale was developed to assess symptoms of anxiety and depression (i.e. affective symptoms) experienced over the past year in the general population. This study aimed to examine the distribution of PSF scores, internal consistency, and factor structure and to investigate relationships between total scores for this scale and other indicators of poor mental health. PARTICIPANTS: The Medical Research Council national survey of health and development, a class stratified cohort study of men and women followed up from birth in 1946, with the most recent interview at age 43 when the PSF scale was administered. MAIN RESULTS: The PSF scale showed high internal consistency between the 18 items (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88). Ratings on items of the scale reflected one predominant factor, incorporating both depression and anxiety, and two additional factors of less statistical importance, one reflecting sleep problems and the other panic and situational anxiety. Total scores were calculated by adding 18 items of the scale, and high total scores were found to be strongly associated with reports of contact with a doctor or other health professional and use of prescribed medication for "nervous or emotional trouble or depression," and with suicidal ideas. CONCLUSIONS: The PSF is a useful and valid scale for evaluating affective symptoms in the general population. It is appropriate for administration by lay interviewers with minimal training, is relatively brief, and generates few missing data. The total score is a flexible measure which can be used in continuous or binary form to suit the purposes of individual investigations, and provides discrimination at lower as well as upper levels of symptom severity. PMID:9425466

  6. Study of RCR Catalogue Radio Source Integral Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelenkova, O. P.; Majorova, E. K.

    2018-04-01

    We present the characteristics of the sources found on the averaged scans of the "Cold" experiment 1980-1999 surveys in the right-ascension interval 2h< RA < 7h. Thereby, a refinement of the parameters of the RC catalog sources (RATANCold) for this interval is complete. To date, the RCR catalog (RATAN Cold Refined) covers the right-ascension interval 2h< RA < 17h and includes 830 sources. The spectra are built for them with the use of new data in the range of 70-230 MHz. The dependence between the spectral indices α 0.5, α 3.94 and integral flux density at the frequencies of 74 and 150 MHz, at 1.4, 3.94 and 4.85 GHz is discussed.We found that at 150 MHz in most sources the spectral index α 0.5 gets steeper with increasing flux density. In general, the sources with flat spectra are weaker in terms of flux density than the sources with steep spectra, which especially differs at 150 MHz. We believe that this is due to the brightness of their extended components, which can be determined by the type of accretion and the neighborhood of the source.

  7. Microearthquake spectra from the Anza, California, seismic network: site response and source scaling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Wennerberg, Leif

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed spectra of local microearthquakes recorded by the Anza, California, seismic network to isolate the effects of site response and to investigate the scaling of source parameters for small earthquakes. Spectra of microearthquakes (M < 2; Mo< 1019 dyne-cm) at Anza have shapes characteristic of the receiver sites and are generally independent of the source region. Thus, the site response is a major conditioner of the observed spectral shape. To remove the effects of site response from the spectra of a M ∼ 3 event and isolate its source spectrum, we divided by the spectra of an adjacent aftershock used as an empirical Green's function event. The spectral ratios indicate that the apparent corner frequencies of small earthquakes (Mo < 1019dyne-cm) observed at even the high-fmax stations on hard rock are much lower than the source corner frequencies. The spectral ratios are consistent with stress drop remaining constant with decreasing seismic moment, for events with moments as small as 1018 dyne-cm. The spectral ratios display remarkable agreement between sites which showed vast differences in their original spectra, indicating that the spectral division effectively removed the site response. The source spectrum of the M ∼ 3 event has a high-frequency spectral fall-off of about ω−2. An apparent dependence of high-frequency fall-off with seismic moment in the original spectra can also be explained by the effects of site response. The difference between the P- and S-wave corner frequencies and high-frequency roll-offs in the observed spectra for these events is the result of the site response and is not a source property. The shapes of the spectra of microearthquakes at Anza can largely be explained by attenuation at shallow depth with a frequency-independent Q. For some sites, near-surface resonances are also apparent in the spectra of microearthquakes. It is indicated by t* values determined for each site that Qp ∼ Qsfor the shallow

  8. Spatial prediction of landslide susceptibility using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system combined with frequency ratio, generalized additive model, and support vector machine techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Pourghasemi, Hamid Reza; Panahi, Mahdi; Kornejady, Aiding; Wang, Jiale; Xie, Xiaoshen; Cao, Shubo

    2017-11-01

    The spatial prediction of landslide susceptibility is an important prerequisite for the analysis of landslide hazards and risks in any area. This research uses three data mining techniques, such as an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system combined with frequency ratio (ANFIS-FR), a generalized additive model (GAM), and a support vector machine (SVM), for landslide susceptibility mapping in Hanyuan County, China. In the first step, in accordance with a review of the previous literature, twelve conditioning factors, including slope aspect, altitude, slope angle, topographic wetness index (TWI), plan curvature, profile curvature, distance to rivers, distance to faults, distance to roads, land use, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and lithology, were selected. In the second step, a collinearity test and correlation analysis between the conditioning factors and landslides were applied. In the third step, we used three advanced methods, namely, ANFIS-FR, GAM, and SVM, for landslide susceptibility modeling. Subsequently, the results of their accuracy were validated using a receiver operating characteristic curve. The results showed that all three models have good prediction capabilities, while the SVM model has the highest prediction rate of 0.875, followed by the ANFIS-FR and GAM models with prediction rates of 0.851 and 0.846, respectively. Thus, the landslide susceptibility maps produced in the study area can be applied for management of hazards and risks in landslide-prone Hanyuan County.

  9. How often should general practitioners provide nutrition care to patients? A forecasting activity to determine the target frequency for chronic-disease management in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ball, Lauren; Lee, Patricia; Ambrosini, Gina L; Hamilton, Kyra; Tuffaha, Haitham

    2016-11-01

    Supporting patients to have healthy dietary behaviours contributes significantly to preventing and managing lifestyle-related chronic diseases. 'Nutrition care' refers to any practice provided by a health professional to support a patient to improve their dietary behaviours and subsequent health outcomes. Approximately 3% of consultations by Australian general practitioners (GPs) involve the provision of nutrition care. The aim of the present paper was to forecast the potential implications of a higher frequency of nutrition care by GPs. Evidence on the effect of improved dietary behaviours on chronic disease outcomes, number of Australian adults estimated to have poor dietary behaviours and effectiveness of GPs providing nutrition care were taken into consideration. Using hypertension as a case example, for GPs to provide nutrition care to all hypertensive adults who would benefit from improved dietary behaviours, GPs would need to provide nutrition care in a target rate of 4.85% of consultations or 4.5 million different patients each year. The target aligns with the existing priorities for supporting chronic-disease prevention and management in Australia by increasing the rate that brief lifestyle interventions are provided by primary health professionals. This conservative target presents a considerable challenge for GPs, support staff, researchers and policy makers, but can be used to inform future interventions to support nutrition care by GPs.

  10. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin-orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin-spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born-Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  11. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  12. Frequency domain measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eischer, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Stable frequency sources and signal processing blocks were characterized by their noise spectra, both discrete and random, in the frequency domain. Conventional measures are outlined, and systems for performing the measurements are described. Broad coverage of system configurations which were found useful is given. Their functioning and areas of application are discussed briefly. Particular attention is given to some of the potential error sources in the measurement procedures, system configurations, double-balanced-mixer-phase-detectors, and application of measuring instruments.

  13. Broadband midinfrared frequency comb with tooth scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin F.; Masłowski, P.; Mills, A.; Mohr, C.; Jiang, Jie; Schunemann, Peter G.; Fermann, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    Frequency combs are a massively parallel source of extremely accurate optical frequencies. Frequency combs generally operate at the visible or near-infrared wavelengths, but fundamental molecular vibrations occur at midinfrared wavelengths. We demonstrate an optically-referenced, broadband midinfrared frequency comb based on a doublyresonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By tuning the wavelength of the reference laser, the comb line frequencies are tuned as well. By scanning the reference wavelength, any frequency can be accessed, not just the frequencies of the base comb. Combined with our comb-resolving Fourier transform spectrometer, we can measure 200 wavenumber wide broadband absorption spectra with 200 kHz linewidth comb teeth. Our OPO is pumped by an amplified Tm fiber frequency comb, with phase-locked carrier envelope offset frequency, and repetition rate fixed by phase-locking a frequency comb line to a narrow linewidth diode laser at a telecom channel. The frequency comb is referenced to GPS by long-term stabilization of the repetition rate to a selected value using the temperature of the reference laser as the control. The resulting pump comb is about 3W of 100 fs pulses at 418 MHz repetition rate at 1950 nm. Part of the comb is used for supercontinuum generation for frequency stabilization, and the rest pumps an orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) crystal in a doubly-resonant optical parametric oscillator cavity, yielding collinear signal and idler beams from about 3 to 5.5 μm. We verify comb scanning by resolving the 200 MHz wide absorption lines of the entire fundamental CO vibrational manifold at 11 Torr pressure.

  14. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Boezio, M.; Bravar, U.; Bruno, A.; Christian, E. R.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Martucci, M.; Mergè, M.; Munini, R.; Ricci, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Stochaj, S.

    2017-12-01

    We report updated event-integrated spectra from several SEP events measured with PAMELA. The measurements were made from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high latitudes. Spectra have been assembled from these high-latitude measurements. The field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high-latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft orbits. Correcting for data gaps, solid angle effects and improved background corrections, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra for twenty-eight SEP events. Where statistics permit, the spectra exhibit power law shapes in energy with a high-energy exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two genuine ground level enhancements (GLE). In those cases the roll-over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold ( 1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events, i.e., all roll over in an exponential fashion with rapidly decreasing intensity at high energies.

  15. Directional Wave Spectra Observed During Intense Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. O.; Potter, H.; Lund, B.; Tamura, H.; Graber, H. C.

    2018-02-01

    Two deep-sea moorings were deployed 780 km off the coast of southern Taiwan for 4-5 months during the 2010 typhoon season. Directional wave spectra, wind speed and direction, and momentum fluxes were recorded on two Extreme Air-Sea Interaction buoys during the close passage of Severe Tropical Storm Dianmu and three tropical cyclones (TCs): Typhoon Fanapi, Super Typhoon Megi, and Typhoon Chaba. Conditions sampled include significant wave heights up to 11 m and wind speeds up to 26 m s-1. Details varied for large-scale spectral structure in frequency and direction but were mostly bimodal. The modes were generally composed of a swell system emanating from the most intense storm region and local wind-seas. The peak systems were consistently young, meaning actively forced by winds, when the storms were close. During the peaks of the most intense passages—Chaba at the northern mooring and Megi at the southern—the bimodal seas coalesced. During Chaba, the swell and wind-sea coupling directed the high frequency waves and the wind stress away from the wind direction. A spectral wave model was able reproduce many of the macrofeatures of the directional spectra.

  16. iMARS--mutation analysis reporting software: an analysis of spontaneous cII mutation spectra.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Claire; Lewis, Paul D

    2006-01-31

    The sensitivity of any mutational assay is determined by the level at which spontaneous mutations occur in the corresponding untreated controls. Establishing the type and frequency at which mutations occur naturally within a test system is essential if one is to draw scientifically sound conclusions regarding chemically induced mutations. Currently, mutation-spectra analysis is laborious and time-consuming. Thus, we have developed iMARS, a comprehensive mutation-spectrum analysis package that utilises routinely used methodologies and visualisation tools. To demonstrate the use and capabilities of iMARS, we have analysed the distribution, types and sequence context of spontaneous base substitutions derived from the cII gene mutation assay in transgenic animals. Analysis of spontaneous mutation spectra revealed variation both within and between the transgenic rodent test systems Big Blue Mouse, MutaMouse and Big Blue Rat. The most common spontaneous base substitutions were G:C-->A:T transitions and G:C-->T:A transversions. All Big Blue Mouse spectra were significantly different from each other by distribution and nearly all by mutation type, whereas the converse was true for the other test systems. Twenty-eight mutation hotspots were observed across all spectra generally occurring in CG, GA/TC, GG and GC dinucleotides. A mutation hotspot at nucleotide 212 occurred at a higher frequency in MutaMouse and Big Blue Rat. In addition, CG dinucleotides were the most mutable in all spectra except two Big Blue Mouse spectra. Thus, spontaneous base-substitution spectra showed more variation in distribution, type and sequence context in Big Blue Mouse relative to spectra derived from MutaMouse and Big Blue Rat. The results of our analysis provide a baseline reference for mutation studies utilising the cII gene in transgenic rodent models. The potential differences in spontaneous base-substitution spectra should be considered when making comparisons between these test systems

  17. Identifying Broadband Rotational Spectra with Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    A typical broadband rotational spectrum may contain several thousand observable transitions, spanning many species. Identifying the individual spectra, particularly when the dynamic range reaches 1,000:1 or even 10,000:1, can be challenging. One approach is to apply automated fitting routines. In this approach, combinations of 3 transitions can be created to form a "triple", which allows fitting of the A, B, and C rotational constants in a Watson-type Hamiltonian. On a standard desktop computer, with a target molecule of interest, a typical AUTOFIT routine takes 2-12 hours depending on the spectral density. A new approach is to utilize machine learning to train a computer to recognize the patterns (frequency spacing and relative intensities) inherit in rotational spectra and to identify the individual spectra in a raw broadband rotational spectrum. Here, recurrent neural networks have been trained to identify different types of rotational spectra and classify them accordingly. Furthermore, early results in applying convolutional neural networks for spectral object recognition in broadband rotational spectra appear promising. Perez et al. "Broadband Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy for structure determination: The water heptamer." Chem. Phys. Lett., 2013, 571, 1-15. Seifert et al. "AUTOFIT, an Automated Fitting Tool for Broadband Rotational Spectra, and Applications to 1-Hexanal." J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2015, 312, 13-21. Bishop. "Neural networks for pattern recognition." Oxford university press, 1995.

  18. RM-CLEAN: RM spectra cleaner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George

    2017-08-01

    RM-CLEAN reads in dirty Q and U cubes, generates rmtf based on the frequencies given in an ASCII file, and cleans the RM spectra following the algorithm given by Brentjens (2007). The output cubes contain the clean model components and the CLEANed RM spectra. The input cubes must be reordered with mode=312, and the output cubes will have the same ordering and thus must be reordered after being written to disk. RM-CLEAN runs as a MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) task and a Python wrapper is included with the code.

  19. On the analysis of photo-electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, C.-Z., E-mail: gao@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; CNRS, LPT; Dinh, P.M.

    2015-09-15

    We analyze Photo-Electron Spectra (PES) for a variety of excitation mechanisms from a simple mono-frequency laser pulse to involved combination of pulses as used, e.g., in attosecond experiments. In the case of simple pulses, the peaks in PES reflect the occupied single-particle levels in combination with the given laser frequency. This usual, simple rule may badly fail in the case of excitation pulses with mixed frequencies and if resonant modes of the system are significantly excited. We thus develop an extension of the usual rule to cover all possible excitation scenarios, including mixed frequencies in the attosecond regime. We find thatmore » the spectral distributions of dipole, monopole and quadrupole power for the given excitation taken together and properly shifted by the single-particle energies provide a pertinent picture of the PES in all situations. This leads to the derivation of a generalized relation allowing to understand photo-electron yields even in complex experimental setups.« less

  20. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  1. Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of the wave field during hurricane conditions is studied using the National Data Buoy Center directional wave buoy data set from the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. The buoy information, comprising the directional wave spectra during the passage of several hurricanes, was referenced to the center of the hurricane using the path of the hurricane, the propagation velocity, and the radius of the maximum winds. The directional wave spectra were partitioned into their main components to quantify the energy corresponding to the observed wave systems and to distinguish between wind-sea and swell. The findings are consistent with those found using remote sensing data (e.g., Scanning Radar Altimeter data). Based on the previous work, the highest waves are found in the right forward quadrant of the hurricane, where the spectral shape tends to become uni-modal, in the vicinity of the region of maximum winds. More complex spectral shapes are observed in distant regions at the front of and in the rear quadrants of the hurricane, where there is a tendency of the spectra to become bi- and tri-modal. The dominant waves generally propagate at significant angles to the wind direction, except in the regions next to the maximum winds of the right quadrants. Evidence of waves generated by concentric eyewalls associated with secondary maximum winds was also found. The frequency spectra display some of the characteristics of the JONSWAP spectrum adjusted by Young (J Geophys Res 111:8020, 2006); however, at the spectral peak, the similarity with the Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum is clear. These results establish the basis for the use in assessing the ability of numerical models to simulate the wave field in hurricanes.

  2. Quantum Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    1992-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (i) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems--This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential -energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (ii) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes --Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  3. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  4. Synchrotron Spectra of Short-Period Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, I. F.

    2001-02-01

    A model with synchrotron radiation near the light cylinder is proposed to explain the observed spectra of short-period pulsars (P≤0.1 s). These spectra can be described if a power-law energy distribution of the emitting electrons with exponent γ=2 8 is assumed. For most pulsars, the peak frequency νm is below 10 MHz. The νm(γ) dependence is derived, and shows that the peak frequencies for pulsars with spectral indices α<1.5 may fall in the observable range. In particular, νm may be νm ˜ 100 MHz for PSR J0751 + 1807 and PSR J1640 + 2224. The observed radio spectrum of Geminga (PSR J0633 + 1746) can be described by a synchrotron model with a monoenergetic or Maxwellian distribution of relativistic electrons and a small angle β between the spin axis and magnetic moment (β ˜ 10°).

  5. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  6. Computer simulation of backscattering spectra from paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Silva, T. F.

    2017-09-01

    To study the role of lateral non-homogeneity on backscattering analysis of paintings, a simplified model of paint consisting of randomly distributed spherical pigment particles embedded in oil/binder has been developed. Backscattering spectra for lead white pigment particles in linseed oil have been calculated for 3 MeV H+ at a scattering angle of 165° for pigment volume concentrations ranging from 30 vol.% to 70 vol.% using the program STRUCTNRA. For identical pigment volume concentrations the heights and shapes of the backscattering spectra depend on the diameter of the pigment particles: This is a structural ambiguity for identical mean atomic concentrations but different lateral arrangement of materials. Only for very small pigment particles the resulting spectra are close to spectra calculated supposing atomic mixing and assuming identical concentrations of all elements. Generally, a good fit can be achieved when evaluating spectra from structured materials assuming atomic mixing of all elements and laterally homogeneous depth distributions. However, the derived depth profiles are inaccurate by a factor of up to 3. The depth range affected by this structural ambiguity ranges from the surface to a depth of roughly 0.5-1 pigment particle diameters. Accurate quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra from paintings therefore requires taking the correct microstructure of the paint layer into account.

  7. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Cecchet, F; Lis, D; Caudano, Y; Mani, A A; Peremans, A; Champagne, B; Guthmuller, J

    2012-03-28

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  8. Martian neutron leakage spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1988-06-01

    A high-energy nucleon-meson transport code is used to calculate energy spectra of Martian leakage neutrons. Four calculations are used to simulate a uniform surface layer containing various amounts of water, different burial depths of a 50 percent water layer underneath a 1 percent water layer, changing atmospheric pressure, and a thick carbon dioxide ice sheet overlying a "dirty" water ice sheet. Calculated spectra at energies less than about 1000 eV were fitted by a superposition of thermal and epithermal functions having four free parameters, two of which (thermal and epithermal amplitudes) were found to vary systematically and to specify uniquely the configuration in each of the series. Parameter variations depend on the composition of the assumed surface layers through the average atomic mass and the macroscopic scattering and absorption cross sections. It is concluded that measurements of leakage neutron spectra should allow determination of the hydrogen content of surface layers buried to depths up to about 100 g/sq. cm and determination of the thickness of a polar dry ice cap up to a thickness of about 250 g/sq. cm.

  9. Estimating Spectra from Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmbach, J. Bryce; Connolly, Andrew J.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring the physical properties of galaxies such as redshift frequently requires the use of spectral energy distributions (SEDs). SED template sets are, however, often small in number and cover limited portions of photometric color space. Here we present a new method to estimate SEDs as a function of color from a small training set of template SEDs. We first cover the mathematical background behind the technique before demonstrating our ability to reconstruct spectra based upon colors and then compare our results to other common interpolation and extrapolation methods. When the photometric filters and spectra overlap, we show that the error in the estimated spectra is reduced by more than 65% compared to the more commonly used techniques. We also show an expansion of the method to wavelengths beyond the range of the photometric filters. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our technique by generating 50 additional SED templates from an original set of 10 and by applying the new set to photometric redshift estimation. We are able to reduce the photometric redshifts standard deviation by at least 22.0% and the outlier rejected bias by over 86.2% compared to original set for z ≤ 3.

  10. Radial evolution of power spectra of interplanetary Alfvenic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavassano, B.; Dobrowolny, M.; Mariani, F.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The radial evolution of the power spectra of the MHD turbulence within the trailing edge of high speed streams in the solar wind was investigated with the magnetic field data of Helios 1 and 2 for heliocentric distance between 0.3 and 0.9 AU. In the analyzed frequency range (.00028 Hz to .0083 Hz) the computed spectra have, near the Earth, values of the spectral index close to that predicted for an incompressible hydromagnetic turbulence in a stationary state. Approaching the Sun the spectral slope remains unchanged for frequencies f or approximately .00 Hz, whereas at lower frequencies, a clear evolution toward a less steep fall off with frequency is found. The radial gradient of the power in Alfvenic fluctuations depends on frequency and it increases upon increasing frequency. For frequencies f or approximately .00 Hz, however, the radial gradient remains approximately the same. Possible theoretical implications of the observational features are discussed.

  11. Smoking, leisure-time exercise and frequency of self-reported common cold among the general population in northeastern China: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ge; Liu, Hongjian; He, Minfu; Yue, Mengjia; Gong, Ping; Wu, Fangyuan; Li, Xuanxuan; Pang, Yingxin; Yang, Xiaodi; Ma, Juan; Liu, Meitian; Li, Jinghua; Zhang, Xiumin

    2018-02-27

    Physical activity (PA) and smoking have been reported to be associated with the duration and severity of common cold symptoms. However, few studies have addressed the associations between the frequency of leisure-time exercise, cigarette smoking status and the frequency of the common cold in a cold area. This study was designed to investigate these issues in northeastern China. This cross-sectional study included individuals who participated in a regular health examination conducted in Jilin Province, China. Information on episodes of the common cold, the frequency of leisure-time exercise and cigarette smoking status in the past year were collected by self-administered health questionnaires. Ordinal logistic regression models were used to analyse the associations between the frequency of leisure-time exercise, cigarette smoking status and the retrospective frequency of common cold. A total of 1413 employees participated in the study, with an average age of 38.92 ± 9.04 years and 44.4% of them were male. Of all participants, 80.8% reported having experienced the common cold in the past year. After adjustment, the risk of suffering from the common cold more than once (odds ratios (ORs), 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-1.99) in passive smokers was 1.59 times as high as that in non-smokers. Nevertheless, the results of the adjusted analysis showed no statistically significant relation between current smoking and the frequency of the common cold. A high frequency of leisure-time exercise (≥3 days/week) was associated with a 26% reduced risk of having at least one episode of the common cold (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.55-0.98) compared with a low frequency group (< 4 days/month). For current and passive smokers, the protective effect of a high frequency of leisure-time exercise appears not to be obvious (current smokers: OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.33-1.43; passive smokers: OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.69-1.93). Passive smoking was associated with a higher risk of having

  12. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, themore » spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.« less

  13. The Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra (SASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Song, Inseok; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie

    2010-12-01

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 μm R ~ 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  14. The Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra (SASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, D. R.; van Dyk, S. D., Makowiecki, W.; Stauffer, J.; Song, I.; Ro, J.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, S.

    2011-11-01

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra (SASS), which includes 159 stellar spectra (5 to 32 micron; R about 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, like blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, dominated by Hydrogen lines around A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases PAH features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  15. [Individual parameters of general low-frequency magnetic therapy as a possibility for improving the clinical efficacy of the combined treatment of patients with essential arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, V D; Maslov, A G; Lobkaeva, E P; Krylov, V N; Obukhova, E O

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for the choice of low-frequency magnetic therapy on an individual basis using the results of analysis of heart rhythm variability. The clinical efficiency of low-frequency magnetic therapy incorporated in the combined treatment of 65 patients aged between 25 and 45 years with essential arterial hypertension was estimated. The statistically significant positive effects of the treatment included normalization of blood pressure and characteristics of heart rhythm variability as well as resolution of clinical symptoms of vegetative dysregulation.

  16. Energy spectra of X-ray clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avni, Y.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure for estimating the ranges of parameters that describe the spectra of X-rays from clusters of galaxies is presented. The applicability of the method is proved by statistical simulations of cluster spectra; such a proof is necessary because of the nonlinearity of the spectral functions. Implications for the spectra of the Perseus, Coma, and Virgo clusters are discussed. The procedure can be applied in more general problems of parameter estimation.

  17. Four years of meteor spectra patrol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of the NASA-Langley Research Center meteor spectra patrol is described in general terms. The recording of very faint meteors was made possible by three great strides in optical and photographic technology in the 1960's: (1) the availability of optical-grade fused silica at modest cost, (2) the development of large transmission gratings with high blaze efficiency, and (3) the development of a method for avoiding plate fogging due to background skylight, which consisted of using a photoelectric meteor detector which actuates the spectrograph shutter when a meteor occurs in the field. The classification scheme for meteor spectra developed by Peter M. Millman is described.

  18. Hadron rapidity spectra within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A 2-stage hybrid model is proposed that joins the fast initial state of interaction, described by the hadron string dynamics (HSD) model, to subsequent evolution of the expanding system at the second stage, treated within ideal hydrodynamics. The developed hybrid model is assigned to describe heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna. Generally, the model is in reasonable agreement with the available data on proton rapidity spectra. However, reproducing proton rapidity spectra, our hybrid model cannot describe the rapidity distributions of pions. The model should be improved by taking into consideration viscosity effects at the hydrodynamical stage of system evolution.

  19. Microresonator Frequency Comb Optical Clock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-22

    lithic construction with small size and power consumption. Microcomb development has included frequency control of their spectra [8–11...frequency f eo and amplified to a maximum of 140 mW. The first-order sideband powers are approximately 3 dB lower than the pump, and the piece of highly...resonator offers sufficient peak power for our experiments and is stable and repeatable even for different settings of pump frequency and power

  20. Beat frequency interference pattern characteristics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency spectra and corresponding beat frequencies created by the relative motions between multiple Solar Power Satellites due to solar wind, lunar gravity, etc. were analyzed. The results were derived mathematically and verified through computer simulation. Frequency spectra plots were computer generated. Detailed computations were made for the seven following locations in the continental US: Houston, Tx.; Seattle, Wa.; Miami, Fl.; Chicago, Il.; New York, NY; Los Angeles, Ca.; and Barberton, Oh.

  1. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R

    2014-02-01

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  2. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E., E-mail: jsader@unimelb.edu.au; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noisemore » spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.« less

  3. Patterns of daily duration and frequency of breastfeeding among exclusively breastfed infants in Shiraz, Iran, a 6-month follow-up study using Bayesian generalized linear mixed models.

    PubMed

    Saki, Azadeh; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Tabesh, Hamed

    2012-12-19

    Despite numerous studies on the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding during the first half year of life, little information is available on actual breastfeeding practices in terms of daily duration and frequency of suckling. This study proposes to determine daily breastfeeding patterns among exclusively breastfed infants from birth to six months. An observational prospective follow-up study of daily feeding practices among exclusively breastfed infants was conducted in 2007/2008. Mothers were recruited and interviewed during their first month postpartum health center visit. A total of 287 mothers were recruited into the study. Primary outcome measures were suckling duration and frequency of breastfeeding during daytime and nighttime. Mothers were asked at each healthcare visit to report the daily duration in minutes and the daily number of breastfeeding sessions. Mixed models were used to determine breastfeeding patterns and predictors. Of 287 mothers selected for this study, 174 (61%) exclusively breastfeeding until six months after delivery. Mixed modeling showed that as the infant's age increased duration of one suckling, cumulative duration and frequency of breastfeeding during daytime, nighttime and a twenty four hour period all gradually decreased. Infants gender and receiving professional advice about breastfeeding were also significant factors in breastfeeding patterns (p<0.05). The one suckling duration and frequency of feeds in this study population were considerably higher than values reported in other populations. The variation of feeding patterns between exclusively breastfed infants was very wide. The distributions of one suckling duration, frequency of breastfeeding and cumulative duration of feeds were right-skewed. The current professional advices about breastfeeding are not appropriate because they do not consider unique condition within specific populations.

  4. Control spectra for Quito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  5. Multiscale climate emulator of multimodal wave spectra: MUSCLE-spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Ana; Hegermiller, Christie A.; Antolinez, Jose A. A.; Camus, Paula; Vitousek, Sean; Ruggiero, Peter; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Tomás, Antonio; Mendez, Fernando J.

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of multimodal directional wave spectra is important for many offshore and coastal applications, such as marine forecasting, coastal hazard assessment, and design of offshore wave energy farms and coastal structures. However, the multivariate and multiscale nature of wave climate variability makes this complex problem tractable using computationally expensive numerical models. So far, the skill of statistical-downscaling model-based parametric (unimodal) wave conditions is limited in large ocean basins such as the Pacific. The recent availability of long-term directional spectral data from buoys and wave hindcast models allows for development of stochastic models that include multimodal sea-state parameters. This work introduces a statistical downscaling framework based on weather types to predict multimodal wave spectra (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, and mean wave direction from different storm systems, including sea and swells) from large-scale atmospheric pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using the categorical distribution for the sea-state type, the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for wave height and wave period, a multivariate Gaussian copula for the interdependence between variables, and a Markov chain model for the chronology of daily weather types. We apply the model to the southern California coast, where local seas and swells from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute to the multimodal wave spectrum. This work allows attribution of particular extreme multimodal wave events to specific atmospheric conditions, expanding knowledge of time-dependent, climate-driven offshore and coastal sea-state conditions that have a significant influence on local nearshore processes, coastal morphology, and flood hazards.

  6. Multiscale Climate Emulator of Multimodal Wave Spectra: MUSCLE-spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, A.; Hegermiller, C.; Alvarez Antolinez, J. A.; Camus, P.; Vitousek, S.; Ruggiero, P.; Barnard, P.; Erikson, L. H.; Tomas, A.; Mendez, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of multimodal directional wave spectra is important for many offshore and coastal applications, such as marine forecasting, coastal hazard assessment, and design of offshore wave energy farms and coastal structures. However, the multivariate and multiscale nature of wave climate variability makes this problem complex yet tractable using computationally-expensive numerical models. So far, the skill of statistical-downscaling models based parametric (unimodal) wave conditions is limited in large ocean basins such as the Pacific. The recent availability of long-term directional spectral data from buoys and wave hindcast models allows for development of stochastic models that include multimodal sea-state parameters. This work introduces a statistical-downscaling framework based on weather types to predict multimodal wave spectra (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, and mean wave direction from different storm systems, including sea and swells) from large-scale atmospheric pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using the categorical distribution for the sea-state type, the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for wave height and wave period, a multivariate Gaussian copula for the interdependence between variables, and a Markov chain model for the chronology of daily weather types. We apply the model to the Southern California coast, where local seas and swells from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute to the multimodal wave spectrum. This work allows attribution of particular extreme multimodal wave events to specific atmospheric conditions, expanding knowledge of time-dependent, climate-driven offshore and coastal sea-state conditions that have a significant influence on local nearshore processes, coastal morphology, and flood hazards.

  7. On the consideration of scaling properties of extreme rainfall in Madrid (Spain) for developing a generalized intensity-duration-frequency equation and assessing probable maximum precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas-Castillo, M. Carmen; Rodríguez-Solà, Raúl; Navarro, Xavier; Russo, Beniamino; Lastra, Antonio; González, Paula; Redaño, Angel

    2018-01-01

    The fractal behavior of extreme rainfall intensities registered between 1940 and 2012 by the Retiro Observatory of Madrid (Spain) has been examined, and a simple scaling regime ranging from 25 min to 3 days of duration has been identified. Thus, an intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) master equation of the location has been constructed in terms of the simple scaling formulation. The scaling behavior of probable maximum precipitation (PMP) for durations between 5 min and 24 h has also been verified. For the statistical estimation of the PMP, an envelope curve of the frequency factor ( k m ) based on a total of 10,194 station-years of annual maximum rainfall from 258 stations in Spain has been developed. This curve could be useful to estimate suitable values of PMP at any point of the Iberian Peninsula from basic statistical parameters (mean and standard deviation) of its rainfall series. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. The Martian atmospheric planetary boundary layer stability, fluxes, spectra, and similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    This is the first analysis of the high frequency data from the Viking lander and spectra of wind, in the Martian atmospheric surface layer, along with the diurnal variation of the height of the mixed surface layer, are calculated for the first time for Mars. Heat and momentum fluxes, stability, and z(sub O) are estimated for early spring, from a surface temperature model and from Viking Lander 2 temperatures and winds at 44 deg N, using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The afternoon maximum height of the mixed layer for these seasons and conditions is estimated to lie between 3.6 and 9.2 km. Estimations of this height is of primary importance to all models of the boundary layer and Martian General Circulation Models (GCM's). Model spectra for two measuring heights and three surface roughnesses are calculated using the depth of the mixed layer, and the surface layer parameters and flow distortion by the lander is also taken into account. These experiments indicate that z(sub O), probably lies between 1.0 and 3.0 cm, and most likely is closer to 1.0 cm. The spectra are adjusted to simulate aliasing and high frequency rolloff, the latter caused both by the sensor response and the large Kolmogorov length on Mars. Since the spectral models depend on the surface parameters, including the estimated surface temperature, their agreement with the calculated spectra indicates that the surface layer estimates are self consistent. This agreement is especially noteworthy in that the inertial subrange is virtually absent in the Martian atmosphere at this height, due to the large Kolmogorov length scale. These analyses extend the range of applicability of terrestrial results and demonstrate that it is possible to estimate the effects of severe aliasing of wind measurements, to produce a models which agree well with the measured spectra. The results show that similarity theory developed for Earth applies to Mars, and that the spectral models are universal.

  9. Planck intermediate results: XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; ...

    2016-12-12

    Continuum spectra covering centimetre to submillimetre wavelengths are presented in this paper for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, mainly active galactic nuclei, based on four-epoch Planck data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous ground-based radio observations between 1.1 and 37 GHz. The single-survey Planck data confirm that the flattest high-frequency radio spectral indices are close to zero, indicating that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum is much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The radio spectra peak at highmore » frequencies and exhibit a variety of shapes. For a small set of low-z sources, we find a spectral upturn at high frequencies, indicating the presence of intrinsic cold dust. Finally, variability can generally be approximated by achromatic variations, while sources with clear signatures of evolving shocks appear to be limited to the strongest outbursts.« less

  10. Planck intermediate results. XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovatta, T.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Järvelä, E.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mingaliev, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nieppola, E.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rastorgueva-Foi, E. A.; S Readhead, A. C.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Richards, J. L.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Sotnikova, Y.; Stolyarov, V.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tammi, J.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Valtaoja, E.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wehrle, A. E.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Continuum spectra covering centimetre to submillimetre wavelengths are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, mainly active galactic nuclei, based on four-epoch Planck data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous ground-based radio observations between 1.1 and 37 GHz. The single-survey Planck data confirm that the flattest high-frequency radio spectral indices are close to zero, indicating that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum is much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The radio spectra peak at high frequencies and exhibit a variety of shapes. For a small set of low-z sources, we find a spectral upturn at high frequencies, indicating the presence of intrinsic cold dust. Variability can generally be approximated by achromatic variations, while sources with clear signatures of evolving shocks appear to be limited to the strongest outbursts.

  11. Planck intermediate results: XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.

    Continuum spectra covering centimetre to submillimetre wavelengths are presented in this paper for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, mainly active galactic nuclei, based on four-epoch Planck data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous ground-based radio observations between 1.1 and 37 GHz. The single-survey Planck data confirm that the flattest high-frequency radio spectral indices are close to zero, indicating that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum is much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The radio spectra peak at highmore » frequencies and exhibit a variety of shapes. For a small set of low-z sources, we find a spectral upturn at high frequencies, indicating the presence of intrinsic cold dust. Finally, variability can generally be approximated by achromatic variations, while sources with clear signatures of evolving shocks appear to be limited to the strongest outbursts.« less

  12. Simulation of Infrared Spectra of Carbonaceous Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadswell, G.; Duley, W. W.

    1997-02-01

    Random covalent network (RCN) theory is applied to describe the infrared spectroscopic properties of carbonaceous solids with compositions containing a mixture of aromatic, aliphatic, and diamond-like hydrocarbons. Application of this technique to carbonaceous dust is equivalent to the synthesis of solids whose structure and bonding satisfy stoicheometry while minimizing strain energy. The result involves a range of compositions compatible with carbon bonding and the hydrogen concentration incorporated in the network. In general, only a limited range of compositions is available rather than the infinite number of possible compositions expected without the inclusion of these constraints. When compositions have been defined in this way, infrared spectra may be synthesized for comparison with astronomical spectra of interstellar carbonaceous solids. Such spectra contain components corresponding to absorption by CHn groups in which n = 1-3. We find, however, that additional spectral features, not included in our simple chemical model, must be present also in dust. We give plots of such spectra in the 3100-2800 cm-1 (3.2-3.6 μm) region for comparison with infrared spectra of interstellar dust. We have also developed an RCN formalism that incorporates oxygen into the carbon network as OH groups, and we show that this inclusion introduces a strong additional absorption band in the 3300 cm-1 (3.0 μm) region.

  13. Electromagnetic fluctuation spectra of collective oscillations in magnetized Maxwellian plasmas for parallel wave vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    The general electromagnetic fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas is used to calculate the steady-state wave number spectra and total electromagnetic field strength of low-frequency collective weakly damped eigenmodes with parallel wavevectors in a Maxwellian electron-proton plasma. These result from the equilibrium of spontaneous emission and collisionless damping, and they represent the minimum electromagnetic fluctuations guaranteed in quiet thermal space plasmas, including the interstellar and interplanetary medium. Depending on the plasma beta, the ratio of |δB |/B0 can be as high as 10-12 .

  14. Ultra-narrow EIA spectra of 85Rb atom in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Qureshi, Muhammad Mohsin; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-narrow EIA spectral features of thermal 85Rb atom with respect to coupling Rabi frequencies in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system have been unraveled in the cases of same (σ+ -σ+ , π ∥ π) and orthogonal (σ+ -σ- , π ⊥ π)polarization configurations. The EIA signals with subnatural linewidth of ~ 100 kHz even in the cases of same circular and linear polarizations of coupling and probe laser have been obtained for the first time theoretically and experimentally. In weak coupling power limit of orthogonal polarization configurations, time-dependent transfer of coherence plays major role in the splitting of the EIA spectra while in strong coupling power, Mollow triplet-like mechanism due to strong power bring into broad split feature. The experimental ultra-narrow EIA features using one laser combined with an AOM match well with simulated spectra obtained by using generalized time-dependent optical Bloch equations.

  15. Theoretical infrared spectra of some model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - Effect of ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Frees, D. J.; Miller, M. D.; Talbi, D.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.

    1993-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis of ionized PAHs as possible carriers of the UIR bands, we realized a computational exploration on selected PAHs of small dimension in order to identify which changes ionization would induce on their IR spectra. In this study we performed ab initio calculations of the spectra of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene. The results are significantly important. The frequencies in the cations are slightly shifted with respect to the neutral species, but no general conclusion can be reached from the three molecules considered. By contrast, the relative intensities of most vibrations are strongly affected by ionization, leading to a much better agreement between the calculated CH/CC vibration intensity ratios and those deduced from observations.

  16. Extracting oscillation frequencies from sparse spectra: Fourier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerzykiewicz, M.

    2008-12-01

    I begin by explaining the properties of spectral windows of time-series data. Emphasis is on data obtained at a single geographic longitude, but ground-based multi-longitude cam- paigns and space missions such as MOST and Hipparcos are not entirely neglected. In the second section, I consider the Fourier transform of time-series data and the procedure of pre-whitening. Sect. 3 is devoted to the pioneers of the subject. In Sect. 4, I suggest how to avoid pitfalls in the practice of periodogram-analysing variable-stars observations. In the last section, I venture an opinion.

  17. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  18. Solvent effect on the vibrational spectra of Carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Billes, Ferenc; Pataki, Hajnalka; Unsalan, Ozan; Mikosch, Hans; Vajna, Balázs; Marosi, György

    2012-09-01

    Carvedilol (CRV) is an important medicament for heart arrhythmia. The aim of this work was the interpretation of its vibrational spectra with consideration on the solvent effect. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded in solid state as well in solution. The experimental spectra were evaluated using DFT quantum chemical calculations computing the optimized structure, atomic net charges, vibrational frequencies and force constants. The same calculations were done for the molecule in DMSO and aqueous solutions applying the PCM method. The calculated force constants were scaled to the experimentally observed solid state frequencies. The characters of the vibrational modes were determined by their potential energy distributions. Solvent effects on the molecular properties were interpreted. Based on these results vibrational spectra were simulated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. THz spectra and corresponding vibrational modes of DNA base pair cocrystals and polynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Zhao, Dongbo; Dong, Hao; Jiang, Ling; Huang, Lin; Liu, Yunfei; Li, Shuhua

    2018-07-01

    The generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach has been applied to study the THz spectra and vibrational modes of base pair cocrystals under periodic boundary conditions (denoted as PBC-GEBF). Results of vibrational mode reveal that hydrogen bonds play a pivotal role in the pairing process of base crystals, where most Nsbnd H and Csbnd H bonds stretch to some extent. We also found that hydrogen bonds of a self-made A:T cocrystal completely break in a transition from liquid to the solid state, while self-made C:G cocrystal is different and easier to form a cocrystal, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and terahertz (THz) spectra. Furthermore, we have studied DNA polynucleotides (in both A and B forms) found that the vibrational modes changed a lot during the process of their forming double strand. Despite the key role played by hydrogen bonds, the key contribution originates from collective motions of the main skeleton. A comparative study of the spectra of some stranded fragments suggests that different sequences or forms have similar spectra in THz band. They distinguish from each other mainly in the low-frequency regions, especially below 1 THz. This study would make great contributions to the molecular dynamics model based DNA long-chain structure simulation in the future study.

  20. THz spectra and corresponding vibrational modes of DNA base pair cocrystals and polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Zhao, Dongbo; Dong, Hao; Jiang, Ling; Huang, Lin; Liu, Yunfei; Li, Shuhua

    2018-07-05

    The generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach has been applied to study the THz spectra and vibrational modes of base pair cocrystals under periodic boundary conditions (denoted as PBC-GEBF). Results of vibrational mode reveal that hydrogen bonds play a pivotal role in the pairing process of base crystals, where most NH and CH bonds stretch to some extent. We also found that hydrogen bonds of a self-made A:T cocrystal completely break in a transition from liquid to the solid state, while self-made C:G cocrystal is different and easier to form a cocrystal, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and terahertz (THz) spectra. Furthermore, we have studied DNA polynucleotides (in both A and B forms) found that the vibrational modes changed a lot during the process of their forming double strand. Despite the key role played by hydrogen bonds, the key contribution originates from collective motions of the main skeleton. A comparative study of the spectra of some stranded fragments suggests that different sequences or forms have similar spectra in THz band. They distinguish from each other mainly in the low-frequency regions, especially below 1 THz. This study would make great contributions to the molecular dynamics model based DNA long-chain structure simulation in the future study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The first observation of Carbon-13 spin noise spectra

    PubMed Central

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Müller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the first 13C NMR spin noise spectra obtained without any pulse excitation by direct detection of the randomly fluctuating noise from samples in a cryogenically cooled probe. Noise power spectra were obtained from 13C enriched methanol and glycerol samples at 176 MHz without and with 1H decoupling, which increases the sensitivity without introducing radio frequency interference with the weak spin noise. The multiplet amplitude ratios in 1H coupled spectra indicate that, although pure spin noise prevails in these spectra, the influence of absorbed circuit noise is still significant at the high concentrations used. In accordance with the theory heteronuclear Overhauser enhancements are absent from the 1H-decoupled 13C spin noise spectra. PMID:23041799

  2. Laboratory spectra of C60 and related molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janca, J.; Solc, M.; Vetesnik, M.

    1994-01-01

    The electronic spectra of fullerene structures in high frequency discharge are studied in the plasma chemistry laboratory of the Faculty of Science of Masaryk University in Brno. The ultraviolet and visual spectra are investigated in order to be compared with the diffuse interstellar bands and interpreted within the theory of quantum mechanics. The preliminary results of the study are presented here in the form of a poster.

  3. Comparison of remotely sensed continental-shelf wave spectra with spectra computed by using a wave refraction computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    An initial attempt was made to verify the Langley Research Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science mid-Atlantic continental-shelf wave refraction model. The model was used to simulate refraction occurring during a continental-shelf remote sensing experiment conducted on August 17, 1973. Simulated wave spectra compared favorably, in a qualitative sense, with the experimental spectra. However, it was observed that most of the wave energy resided at frequencies higher than those for which refraction and shoaling effects were predicted, In addition, variations among the experimental spectra were so small that they were not considered statistically significant. In order to verify the refraction model, simulation must be performed in conjunction with a set of significantly varying spectra in which a considerable portion of the total energy resides at frequencies for which refraction and shoaling effects are likely.

  4. Resonant Raman spectra of diindenoperylene thin films.

    PubMed

    Scholz, R; Gisslén, L; Schuster, B-E; Casu, M B; Chassé, T; Heinemeyer, U; Schreiber, F

    2011-01-07

    Resonant and preresonant Raman spectra obtained on diindenoperylene (DIP) thin films are interpreted with calculations of the deformation of a relaxed excited molecule with density functional theory (DFT). The comparison of excited state geometries based on time-dependent DFT or on a constrained DFT scheme with observed absorption spectra of dissolved DIP reveals that the deformation pattern deduced from constrained DFT is more reliable. Most observed Raman peaks can be assigned to calculated A(g)-symmetric breathing modes of DIP or their combinations. As the position of one of the laser lines used falls into a highly structured absorption band, we have carefully analyzed the Raman excitation profile arising from the frequency dependence of the dielectric tensor. This procedure gives Raman cross sections in good agreement with the observed relative intensities, both in the fully resonant and in the preresonant case.

  5. Resonant Raman spectra of diindenoperylene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Gisslén, L.; Schuster, B.-E.; Casu, M. B.; Chassé, T.; Heinemeyer, U.; Schreiber, F.

    2011-01-01

    Resonant and preresonant Raman spectra obtained on diindenoperylene (DIP) thin films are interpreted with calculations of the deformation of a relaxed excited molecule with density functional theory (DFT). The comparison of excited state geometries based on time-dependent DFT or on a constrained DFT scheme with observed absorption spectra of dissolved DIP reveals that the deformation pattern deduced from constrained DFT is more reliable. Most observed Raman peaks can be assigned to calculated A_g-symmetric breathing modes of DIP or their combinations. As the position of one of the laser lines used falls into a highly structured absorption band, we have carefully analyzed the Raman excitation profile arising from the frequency dependence of the dielectric tensor. This procedure gives Raman cross sections in good agreement with the observed relative intensities, both in the fully resonant and in the preresonant case.

  6. Theoretical Interpretation of the Fluorescence Spectra of Toluene and P- Cresol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    NUMBER OF PAGES Toluene Geometrica 25 p-Cresol Fluorescence Is. PRICE CODE Spectra 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 13. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19...State Frequencies of Toluene ................ 19 6 Computed and exp" Ground State Frequencies of p-Cresol ............... 20 7 Correction Factors for...Computed Ground State Vibrational Frequencies ....... 21 8 Computed and Corrected Excited State Frequencies of Toluene ............. 22 9 Computed and

  7. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  8. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  9. Theoretical verification and extension of the McKean relationship between bond lengths and stretching frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, J. A.; Cremer, D.

    1999-08-01

    Vibrational spectra contain explicit information on the electronic structure and the bonding situation of a molecule, which can be obtained by transforming the vibrational normal modes of a molecule into appropriate internal coordinate modes, which are localized in a fragment of the molecule and which are associated to that internal coordinate that describes the molecular fragment in question. It is shown that the adiabatic internal modes derived recently (Int. J. Quant. Chem., 67 (1998) 1) are the theoretical counterparts of McKean's isolated CH stretching modes (Chem. Soc. Rev., 7 (1978) 399). Adiabatic CH stretching frequencies obtained from experimental vibrational spectra can be used to determine CH bond lengths with high accuracy. Contrary to the concept of isolated stretching frequencies a generalization to any bond of a molecule is possible as is demonstrated for the CC stretching frequencies. While normal mode frequencies do not provide a basis to determine CC bond lengths and CC bond strengths, this is possible with the help of the adiabatic CC stretching frequencies. Measured vibrational spectra are used to describe different types of CC bonds in a quantitative way. For CH bonds, it is also shown that adiabatic stretching frequency leads to the definition of an ideal dissociation energy, which contrary to the experimentally determined dissociation energy is a direct measure of the bond strength. The difference between measured and ideal dissociation energies gives information on stabilization or destabilization of the radicals formed in a dissociation process.

  10. A sensitive continuum analysis method for gamma ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakur, Alakh N.; Arnold, James R.

    1993-01-01

    In this work we examine ways to improve the sensitivity of the analysis procedure for gamma ray spectra with respect to small differences in the continuum (Compton) spectra. The method developed is applied to analyze gamma ray spectra obtained from planetary mapping by the Mars Observer spacecraft launched in September 1992. Calculated Mars simulation spectra and actual thick target bombardment spectra have been taken as test cases. The principle of the method rests on the extraction of continuum information from Fourier transforms of the spectra. We study how a better estimate of the spectrum from larger regions of the Mars surface will improve the analysis for smaller regions with poorer statistics. Estimation of signal within the continuum is done in the frequency domain which enables efficient and sensitive discrimination of subtle differences between two spectra. The process is compared to other methods for the extraction of information from the continuum. Finally we explore briefly the possible uses of this technique in other applications of continuum spectra.

  11. Far-infrared spectra of acetanilide revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spire, A.; Barthes, M.; Kellouai, H.; De Nunzio, G.

    2000-03-01

    A new investigation of the temperature dependence of the far-infrared spectra of acetanilide and some isotopomers is presented. Four absorption bands are considered at 31, 42, 64, and 80 cm-1, and no significant change of their integrated intensity is observed when reducing the temperature. The temperature induced frequency shift values and other properties of these bands are consistent with an assignment as anharmonic lattice phonons. These results rule out the assignment of the 64, 80, and 106 cm-1 bands as normal modes of the polaronic excitation, as previously suggested.

  12. Database-Driven Analyses of Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, Jan

    2012-03-01

    Spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools to study the physical properties and chemical composition of very diverse astrophysical environments. In principle, each nuclide has a unique set of spectral features; thus, establishing the presence of a specific material at astronomical distances requires no more than finding a laboratory spectrum of the right material that perfectly matches the astronomical observations. Once the presence of a substance is established, a careful analysis of the observational characteristics (wavelengths or frequencies, intensities, and line profiles) allows one to determine many physical parameters of the environment in which the substance resides, such as temperature, density, velocity, and so on. Because of this great diagnostic potential, ground-based and space-borne astronomical observatories often include instruments to carry out spectroscopic analyses of various celestial objects and events. Of particular interest is molecular spectroscopy at infrared wavelengths. From the spectroscopic point of view, molecules differ from atoms in their ability to vibrate and rotate, and quantum physics inevitably causes those motions to be quantized. The energies required to excite vibrations or rotations are such that vibrational transitions generally occur at infrared wavelengths, whereas pure rotational transitions typically occur at sub-mm wavelengths. Molecular vibration and rotation are coupled though, and thus at infrared wavelengths, one commonly observes a multitude of ro-vibrational transitions (see Figure 13.1). At lower spectral resolution, all transitions blend into one broad ro-vibrational molecular band. The isotope. Molecular spectroscopy thus allows us to see a difference of one neutron in an atomic nucleus that is located at astronomical distances! Since the detection of the first interstellar molecules (the CH [21] and CN [14] radicals), more than 150 species have been detected in space, ranging in size from diatomic

  13. Fluctuation spectra in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, C. M.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Roth, J. R.; Hong, J. Y.; Powers, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The electrostatic potential fluctuation spectrum in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma was studied with capacitive probes in the low pressure (high impedance) mode and in the high pressure (low impedance) mode. Under different operating conditions, the plasma exhibited electrostatic potential fluctuations (1) at a set of discrete frequencies, (2) at a continuum of frequencies, and (3) as incoherent high-frequency turbulence. The frequencies and azimuthal wave numbers were determined from digitally implemented autopower and cross-power spectra. The azimuthal dispersion characteristics of the unstable waves were examined by varying the electrode voltage, the polarity of the voltage, and the neutral background density at a constant magnetic field strength.

  14. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in TPT. These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by fluorescent emission. Here we examine the fluorescence spectra of highlighter inks using green and violet laser pointers. We use an RSpec Explorer spectrometer to obtain spectra and compare the emission spectra of blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and purple highlighters. The website Compound Interest details the chemical composition of highlighter inks; in addition, the site discusses how some base dye colors can be combined to produce the variety commercially available colors. Spectra obtained in this study were qualitatively consistent with the Compound Interest site. We discuss similarities and differences between various highlighter colors and conclude with the relevance of such studies to physics students.

  15. Frequency of reporting on patient and public involvement (PPI) in research studies published in a general medical journal: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Price, Amy; Schroter, Sara; Snow, Rosamund; Hicks, Melissa; Harmston, Rebecca; Staniszewska, Sophie; Parker, Sam; Richards, Tessa

    2018-03-23

    While documented plans for patient and public involvement (PPI) in research are required in many grant applications, little is known about how frequently PPI occurs in practice. Low levels of reported PPI may mask actual activity due to limited PPI reporting requirements. This research analysed the frequency and types of reported PPI in the presence and absence of a journal requirement to include this information. A before and after comparison of PPI reported in research papers published in The BMJ before and 1 year after the introduction of a journal policy requiring authors to report if and how they involved patients and the public within their papers. Between 1 June 2013 and 31 May 2014, The BMJ published 189 research papers and 1 (0.5%) reported PPI activity. From 1 June 2015 to 31 May 2016, following the introduction of the policy, The BMJ published 152 research papers of which 16 (11%) reported PPI activity. Patients contributed to grant applications in addition to designing studies through to coauthorship and participation in study dissemination. Patient contributors were often not fully acknowledged; 6 of 17 (35%) papers acknowledged their contributions and 2 (12%) included them as coauthors. Infrequent reporting of PPI activity does not appear to be purely due to a failure of documentation. Reporting of PPI activity increased after the introduction of The BMJ 's policy, but activity both before and after was low and reporting was inconsistent in quality. Journals, funders and research institutions should collaborate to move us from the current situation where PPI is an optional extra to one where PPI is fully embedded in practice throughout the research process. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Time and frequency applications.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, H

    1993-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities of atomic clocks and quartz crystal oscillators in terms of available precision of time and frequency signals. The generation, comparison, and dissemination of time and frequency is then discussed. The principal focus is to survey uses of time and frequency in navigation, communication, and science. The examples given include the Global Positioning System, a satellite-based global navigation system, and general and dedicated communication networks, as well as experiments in general relativity and radioastronomy. The number of atomic clocks and crystal oscillators that are in actual use worldwide is estimated.

  17. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    DOE PAGES

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D 2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach ismore » used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.« less

  18. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, Paul C.; Thompson, Ward H., E-mail: wthompson@ku.edu; Laage, Damien, E-mail: damien.laage@ens.fr

    2016-05-21

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D{sub 2}O is considered. An empirical mapping approach ismore » used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. The simulated spectra indicates that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.« less

  19. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores.

    PubMed

    Burris, Paul C; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H

    2016-05-21

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. The simulated spectra indicates that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.

  20. Frequency and risk factors for malnutrition in children undergoing general anaesthesia in a French university hospital: A cross-sectional observational study.

    PubMed

    Gerbaud-Morlaes, Louis; Frison, Eric; Babre, Florence; De Luca, Arnaud; Didier, Anne; Borde, Maryline; Zaghet, Brigitte; Batoz, Hélène; Semjen, François; Nouette-Gaulain, Karine; Enaud, Raphael; Hankard, Régis; Lamireau, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    Malnutrition is often underdiagnosed in hospitalised children, although it is associated with postoperative complications, longer hospital lengths of stay and increased healthcare-related costs. We aimed to estimate the frequency of, and identify factors associated with, malnutrition in children undergoing anaesthesia. Cross-sectional observational study. Paediatric anaesthesia department at the University Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France. A total of 985 patients aged less than 18 years. Anthropometric measurements, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification score and the Pediatric Nutritional Risk Score (PNRS) recorded at the pre-anaesthesia evaluation. When assessed as a Waterlow index less than 80%, malnutrition was present in 7.6% children. This increased to 8.1% of children assessed by clinical signs and to 11% of children when defined by a BMI less than the third percentile. In a univariate analysis, children with a BMI less than the third percentile were more often born prematurely (22.4 vs 10.4%; P = 0.0008), were small for gestational age at birth (18.4 vs 4.5%; P < 0.0001), were admitted from the emergency department (12.0 vs 5.6%; P = 0.02), had a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score (P < 0.0001), or had a high Pediatric Nutritional Risk Score (P < 0.0001). Presence (P = 0.01) and type (P = 0.002) of chronic disease were also associated with malnutrition. In the multivariate analysis, a premature birth, a lower birth weight and a higher Pediatric Nutritional Risk Score were significantly associated with a higher odds of malnutrition when defined by BMI. All children should be screened routinely for malnutrition or the risk of malnutrition at the pre-anaesthesia visit, allowing a programme of preoperative and/or postoperative nutritional support to be initiated. We suggest that as well as weight and height, BMI and a pediatric nutritional risk score such as PNRS should be recorded

  1. Evaluation of burst-mode LDA spectra with implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velte, Clara; George, William

    2009-11-01

    Burst-mode LDA spectra, as described in [1], are compared to spectra obtained from corresponding HWA measurements using the FFT in a round jet and cylinder wake experiment. The phrase ``burst-mode LDA'' refers to an LDA which operates with at most one particle present in the measuring volume at a time. Due to the random sampling and velocity bias of the LDA signal, the Direct Fourier Transform with accompanying weighting by the measured residence times was applied to obtain a correct interpretation of the spectral estimate. Further, the self-noise was removed as described in [2]. In addition, resulting spectra from common interpolation and uniform resampling techniques are compared to the above mentioned estimates. The burst-mode LDA spectra are seen to concur well with the HWA spectra up to the emergence of the noise floor, caused mainly by the intermittency of the LDA signal. The interpolated and resampled counterparts yield unphysical spectra, which are buried in frequency dependent noise and step noise, except at very high LDA data rates where they perform well up to a limited frequency.[4pt] [1] Buchhave, P. PhD Thesis, SUNY/Buffalo, 1979.[0pt] [2] Velte, C.M. PhD Thesis, DTU/Copenhagen, 2009.

  2. FSFE: Fake Spectra Flux Extractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Simeon

    2017-10-01

    The fake spectra flux extractor generates simulated quasar absorption spectra from a particle or adaptive mesh-based hydrodynamic simulation. It is implemented as a python module. It can produce both hydrogen and metal line spectra, if the simulation includes metals. The cloudy table for metal ionization fractions is included. Unlike earlier spectral generation codes, it produces absorption from each particle close to the sight-line individually, rather than first producing an average density in each spectral pixel, thus substantially preserving more of the small-scale velocity structure of the gas. The code supports both Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO.

  3. Infrared spectra of molecules and materials of astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durig, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Vibrational spectra were studied from 400 to 33/cm for molecules which may be present in the atmosphere of Jovian planets. The microwave spectrum of cis glyoxal was studied. Sources of color variation in the Jovian atmosphere were analyzed in relation to molecular crystals. The low frequency modes of acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-d sub 4 are discussed.

  4. Development and implementation of an empirical frequency map for use in MD simulations of isotope-edited proteins, and, Development, implementation, and evaluation of an online student portal as a textbook replacement in an advanced general chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorb, Justin Matthew

    The first portion of this thesis describes an extension of work done in the Skinner group to develop an empirical frequency map for N-methylacetamide (NMA) in water. NMA is a peptide bond capped on either side by a methyl group and is therefore a common prototypical molecule used when studying complicated polypeptides and proteins. This amide bond is present along the backbone of every protein as it connects individual component amino acids. This amide bond also has a strong observable frequency in the IR due to the Amide-I mode (predominantly carbon-oxygen stretching motion). This project describes the simplification of the prior model for mapping the frequency of the Amide-I mode from the electric field due to the environment and develops a parallel implementation of this algorithm for use in larger biological systems, such as the trans-membrane portion of the tetrameric polypeptide bundle protein CD3zeta. The second portion of this thesis describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an online textbook within the context of a cohesive theoretical framework. The project begins by describing what is meant when discussing a digital textbook, including a survey of various types of digital media being used to deliver textbook-like content. This leads into the development of a theoretical framework based on constructivist pedagogical theory, hypertext learning theory, and chemistry visualization and representation frameworks. The implementation and design of ChemPaths, the general chemistry online text developed within the Chemistry Education Digital Library (ChemEd DL) is then described. The effectiveness of ChemPaths being used as a textbook replacement in an advanced general chemistry course is evaluated within the developed theoretical framework both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  5. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Reach, William T.; Harker, David E.

    2017-03-01

    Comet nuclei and D-type asteroids have several similarities at optical and near-IR wavelengths, including near-featureless red reflectance spectra, and low albedos. Mineral identifications based on these characteristics are fraught with degeneracies, although some general trends can be identified. In contrast, spectral emissivity features in the mid-infrared provide important compositional information that might not otherwise be achievable. Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 μm thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis reveals no evidence for a coma or tail at the time of observation, suggesting the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74-0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03 ± 0.11, derived from 16- and 22-μm photometry. We suggest this may be either an artifact of the spectral reduction, or the consequence of an emissivity low near 16 μm. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-μm silicate plateau is evident, with a shape similar to those seen in mid-infrared spectra of D-type asteroids. A silicate plateau is also evident in previously published Spitzer spectra of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. We compare, in detail, these comet nucleus emission features to those seen in spectra of the Jovian Trojan D-types (624) Hektor, (911) Agamemnon, and (1172) Aneas, as well

  6. Computer Processing Of Tunable-Diode-Laser Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1991-01-01

    Tunable-diode-laser spectrometer measuring transmission spectrum of gas operates under control of computer, which also processes measurement data. Measurements in three channels processed into spectra. Computer controls current supplied to tunable diode laser, stepping it through small increments of wavelength while processing spectral measurements at each step. Program includes library of routines for general manipulation and plotting of spectra, least-squares fitting of direct-transmission and harmonic-absorption spectra, and deconvolution for determination of laser linewidth and for removal of instrumental broadening of spectral lines.

  7. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  8. Multifractal spectra in shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, L. R.; Deane, Anil E.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of three-dimensional homogeneous shear flow and fully developed channel flow, are used to calculate the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation field. Only weak parameterization of the results with the nondimensional shear is found, and this only if the flow has reached its asymptotic development state. Multifractal spectra of these flows coincide with those from experiments only at the range alpha less than 1.

  9. Frequency Correction for MIRO Chirp Transformation Spectroscopy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    This software processes the flyby spectra of the Chirp Transform Spectrometer (CTS) of the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). The tool corrects the effect of Doppler shift and local-oscillator (LO) frequency shift during the flyby mode of MIRO operations. The frequency correction for CTS flyby spectra is performed and is integrated with multiple spectra into a high signal-to-noise averaged spectrum at the rest-frame RF frequency. This innovation also generates the 8 molecular line spectra by dividing continuous 4,096-channel CTS spectra. The 8 line spectra can then be readily used for scientific investigations. A spectral line that is at its rest frequency in the frame of the Earth or an asteroid will be observed with a time-varying Doppler shift as seen by MIRO. The frequency shift is toward the higher RF frequencies on approach, and toward lower RF frequencies on departure. The magnitude of the shift depends on the flyby velocity. The result of time-varying Doppler shift is that of an observed spectral line will be seen to move from channel to channel in the CTS spectrometer. The direction (higher or lower frequency) in the spectrometer depends on the spectral line frequency under consideration. In order to analyze the flyby spectra, two steps are required. First, individual spectra must be corrected for the Doppler shift so that individual spectra can be superimposed at the same rest frequency for integration purposes. Second, a correction needs to be applied to the CTS spectra to account for the LO frequency shifts that are applied to asteroid mode.

  10. Optical image and laser slope meter intercomparisons of high-frequency waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubard, S. C.; Krimmel, J. E.; Thebaud, L. R.; Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    Spectral analyses of optical images of the ocean surface, obtained by a digital video system, are presented and compared with wave data measured simultaneously by the JPL Waverider-mounted laser slope meter. The image analyses, which incorporate several new ideas, provide two-dimensional wave number spectra of slope, covering wavelengths from 10 cm to 10 m. These slope spectra are converted to wave height spectra by a new technique which includes the effects of sky radiance gradients. Space-time spectra are also presented for waves whose frequencies are less than 2 Hz. The JPL slope frequency spectra are compared with image wave number spectra which have been converted to frequency spectra by use of the gravity wave dispersion relation. Results of comparisons between the frequency spectra obtained from the two different measurements show reasonable agreement for frequencies less than 3 Hz.

  11. Can We Infer Ocean Dynamics from Altimeter Wavenumber Spectra?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, James; Shriver, Jay; Arbic, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and kinetic energy (KE) have been used to infer the dynamics of the ocean. When quasi-geostrophic dynamics (QG) or surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) turbulence dominate and an inertial subrange exists, a steep SSH wavenumber spectrum is expected with k-5 for QG turbulence and a flatter k-11/3 for SQG turbulence. However, inspection of the spectral slopes in the mesoscale band of 70 to 250 km shows that the altimeter wavenumber slopes typically are much flatter than the QG or SQG predictions over most of the ocean. Comparison of the altimeter wavenumber spectra with the spectra estimated from the output of an eddy resolving global ocean circulation model (the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM, at 1/25 resolution), which is forced by high frequency winds and includes the astronomical forcing of the sun and the moon, suggests that the flatter slopes of the altimeter may arise from three possible sources, the presence of internal waves, the lack of an inertial subrange in the 70 to 250 km band and noise or submesoscales at small scales. When the wavenumber spectra of SSH and KE are estimated near the internal tide generating regions, the resulting spectra are much flatter than the expectations of QG or SQG theory. If the height and velocity variability are separated into low frequency (periods greater than 2 days) and high frequency (periods less than a day), then a different pattern emerges with a relatively flat wavenumber spectrum at high frequency and a steeper wavenumber spectrum at low frequency. The stationary internal tides can be removed from the altimeter spectrum, which steepens the spectral slopes in the energetic internal wave regions. Away from generating regions where the internal waves

  12. Radio synchrotron spectra of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, U.; Lisenfeld, U.; Verley, S.

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the radio continuum spectra of 14 star-forming galaxies by fitting nonthermal (synchrotron) and thermal (free-free) radiation laws. The underlying radio continuum measurements cover a frequency range of 325 MHz to 24.5 GHz (32 GHz in case of M 82). It turns out that most of these synchrotron spectra are not simple power-laws, but are best represented by a low-frequency spectrum with a mean slope αnth = 0.59 ± 0.20 (Sν ∝ ν-α), and by a break or an exponential decline in the frequency range of 1-12 GHz. Simple power-laws or mildly curved synchrotron spectra lead to unrealistically low thermal flux densities, and/or to strong deviations from the expected optically thin free-free spectra with slope αth = 0.10 in the fits. The break or cutoff energies are in the range of 1.5-7 GeV. We briefly discuss the possible origin of such a cutoff or break. If the low-frequency spectra obtained here reflect the injection spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons, they comply with the mean spectral index of Galactic supernova remnants. A comparison of the fitted thermal flux densities with the (foreground-corrected) Hα fluxes yields the extinction, which increases with metallicity. The fraction of thermal emission is higher than believed hitherto, especially at high frequencies, and is highest in the dwarf galaxies of our sample, which we interpret in terms of a lack of containment in these low-mass systems, or a time effect caused by a very young starburst.

  13. Moment-Tensor Spectra of Source Physics Experiments (SPE) Explosions in Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Cleveland, M.

    2016-12-01

    We perform frequency-domain moment tensor inversions of Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions conducted in granite during Phase I of the experiment. We test the sensitivity of source moment-tensor spectra to factors such as the velocity model, selected dataset and smoothing and damping parameters used in the inversion to constrain the error bound of inverted source spectra. Using source moments and corner frequencies measured from inverted source spectra of these explosions, we develop a new explosion P-wave source model that better describes observed source spectra of these small and over-buried chemical explosions detonated in granite than classical explosion source models derived mainly from nuclear-explosion data. In addition to source moment and corner frequency, we analyze other features in the source spectra to investigate their physical causes.

  14. IRAS Low Resolution Spectra of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.

    2002-01-01

    Optical/near-infrared studies of asteroids are based on reflected sunlight and surface albedo variations create broad spectral features, suggestive of families of materials. There is a significant literature on these features, but there is very little work in the thermal infrared that directly probes the materials emitting on the surfaces of asteroids. We have searched for and extracted 534 thermal spectra of 245 asteroids from the original Dutch (Groningen) archive of spectra observed by the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). We find that, in general, the observed shapes of the spectral continua are inconsistent with that predicted by the standard thermal model used by IRAS. Thermal models such as proposed by Harris (1998) and Harris et al.(1998) for the near-earth asteroids with the "beaming parameter" in the range of 1.0 to 1.2 best represent the observed spectral shapes. This implies that the IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS, Tedesco, 1992) and the Supplementary IMPS (SIMPS, Tedesco, et al., 2002) derived asteroid diameters are systematically underestimated, and the albedos are overestimated. We have tentatively identified several spectral features that appear to be diagnostic of at least families of materials. The variation of spectral features with taxonomic class hints that thermal infrared spectra can be a valuable tool for taxonomic classification of asteroids.

  15. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  16. Hadron rapidity spectra within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2017-03-01

    A multistage hybrid model is constructed what joins the initial non-equilibrium stage of interaction, described by the hadron string dynamics (HSD) model, to subsequent evolution of the expanding system treated within ideal hydrodynamics (the second stage). Particles can still rescatter after hydrodynamical expansion that is the third interaction stage. The developed hybrid model is assigned to describe heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the NICA collider. Generally, the model is in reasonable agreement with the available data on proton rapidity spectra.

  17. Substituent and solvent effects on electronic spectra of some substituted phenoxyacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, M; Kabilan, S

    2007-06-01

    The effects of substituents and solvents have been studied through the absorption spectra of nearly 19 para- and ortho-substituted phenoxyacetic acids in the range of 200-400 nm. The effects of substituent on the absorption spectra of compounds under present investigation are interpreted by correlation of absorption frequencies with simple and extended Hammett equations. Effect of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of Kamlet equation and the results are discussed.

  18. Substituent and solvent effects on electronic spectra of some substituted phenoxyacetic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, M.; Kabilan, S.

    2007-06-01

    The effects of substituents and solvents have been studied through the absorption spectra of nearly 19 para- and ortho-substituted phenoxyacetic acids in the range of 200-400 nm. The effects of substituent on the absorption spectra of compounds under present investigation are interpreted by correlation of absorption frequencies with simple and extended Hammett equations. Effect of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of Kamlet equation and the results are discussed.

  19. Substituent and solvent effects on electronic absorption spectra of some N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganya, Krishnasamy; Kabilan, Senthamaraikannan

    2004-04-01

    The effects of substituents and solvents have been studied through the absorption spectra of nearly 23 ortho- and para-N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides in the range of 200-400 nm. The effects of substituents on the absorption spectra of compounds under present investigation are interpreted by correlation of absorption frequencies with simple and extended Hammett equations. Effect of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of Kamlet equation and the results are discussed.

  20. Similarity spectra analysis of high-performance jet aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Gee, Kent L; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2013-04-01

    Noise measured in the vicinity of an F-22A Raptor has been compared to similarity spectra found previously to represent mixing noise from large-scale and fine-scale turbulent structures in laboratory-scale jet plumes. Comparisons have been made for three engine conditions using ground-based sideline microphones, which covered a large angular aperture. Even though the nozzle geometry is complex and the jet is nonideally expanded, the similarity spectra do agree with large portions of the measured spectra. Toward the sideline, the fine-scale similarity spectrum is used, while the large-scale similarity spectrum provides a good fit to the area of maximum radiation. Combinations of the two similarity spectra are shown to match the data in between those regions. Surprisingly, a combination of the two is also shown to match the data at the farthest aft angle. However, at high frequencies the degree of congruity between the similarity and the measured spectra changes with engine condition and angle. At the higher engine conditions, there is a systematically shallower measured high-frequency slope, with the largest discrepancy occurring in the regions of maximum radiation.

  1. The composite load spectra project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H.; Kurth, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic methods and generic load models capable of simulating the load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components are being developed. Four engine component types (the transfer ducts, the turbine blades, the liquid oxygen posts and the turbopump oxidizer discharge duct) were selected as representative hardware examples. The composite load spectra that simulate the probabilistic loads for these components are typically used as the input loads for a probabilistic structural analysis. The knowledge-based system approach used for the composite load spectra project provides an ideal environment for incremental development. The intelligent database paradigm employed in developing the expert system provides a smooth coupling between the numerical processing and the symbolic (information) processing. Large volumes of engine load information and engineering data are stored in database format and managed by a database management system. Numerical procedures for probabilistic load simulation and database management functions are controlled by rule modules. Rules were hard-wired as decision trees into rule modules to perform process control tasks. There are modules to retrieve load information and models. There are modules to select loads and models to carry out quick load calculations or make an input file for full duty-cycle time dependent load simulation. The composite load spectra load expert system implemented today is capable of performing intelligent rocket engine load spectra simulation. Further development of the expert system will provide tutorial capability for users to learn from it.

  2. Dual-frequency dielectrophoretic levitation of Canola protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Karan V. I. S.; Xie, Jing-Ping; Jones, Thomas B.; Paul, Reginald

    1992-01-01

    A novel dual-frequency excitation technique is introduced which permits investigation of the low-frequency dispersion of Canola plant protoplasts using feedback-controlled dielectrophoretic levitation. The upper and intermediate frequency spectra obtained using the new technique are generally consistent with previous work. However, below some cross-over frequency fOL, the protoplasts exhibit an apparent positive dielectrophoretic response that is not predicted by conventional theory. This cross-over frequency is linearly related to suspension conductivity, virtually independent of the suspension pH, and inversely proportional to the square of the cell radius. Examination of the complex Clausius-Mossotti polarization coefficient reveals that the observed positive dielectrophoretic response can not be accounted for in terms of Maxwell-Wagner polarization associated with a conventional layered model for the protoplast. The failure of straightforward enhancements to the protoplast model in explaining the low frequency behavior may indicate the presence of an electrophoretic contribution to the net observable force on the particle. To account for such fluid mechanical effects, it will be necessary to modify the existing dielectrophoretic force formulation. PMID:19431842

  3. Dual-frequency dielectrophoretic levitation of Canola protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Kaler, K V; Xie, J P; Jones, T B; Paul, R

    1992-07-01

    A novel dual-frequency excitation technique is introduced which permits investigation of the low-frequency dispersion of Canola plant protoplasts using feedback-controlled dielectrophoretic levitation. The upper and intermediate frequency spectra obtained using the new technique are generally consistent with previous work. However, below some cross-over frequency f(OL), the protoplasts exhibit an apparent positive dielectrophoretic response that is not predicted by conventional theory. This cross-over frequency is linearly related to suspension conductivity, virtually independent of the suspension pH, and inversely proportional to the square of the cell radius. Examination of the complex Clausius-Mossotti polarization coefficient reveals that the observed positive dielectrophoretic response can not be accounted for in terms of Maxwell-Wagner polarization associated with a conventional layered model for the protoplast. The failure of straightforward enhancements to the protoplast model in explaining the low frequency behavior may indicate the presence of an electrophoretic contribution to the net observable force on the particle. To account for such fluid mechanical effects, it will be necessary to modify the existing dielectrophoretic force formulation.

  4. Maturation of EEG Power Spectra in Early Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cragg, Lucy; Kovacevic, Natasa; McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Poulsen, Catherine; Martinu, Kristina; Leonard, Gabriel; Paus, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the fine-grained development of the EEG power spectra in early adolescence, and the extent to which it is reflected in changes in peak frequency. It also sought to determine whether sex differences in the EEG power spectra reflect differential patterns of maturation. A group of 56 adolescents were tested at age 10 years and…

  5. General interference law for nonstationary, separable optical fields.

    PubMed

    Manea, Vladimir

    2009-09-01

    An approach to the theory of partial coherence for nonstationary optical fields is presented. Starting with a spectral representation, a favorable decomposition of the optical signals is discussed that supports a natural extension of the mathematical formalism. The coherence functions are redefined, but still as temporal correlation functions, allowing the obtaining of a more general form of the interference law for partially coherent optical signals. The general theory is applied in some relevant particular cases of nonstationary interference, namely, with quasi-monochromatic beams of different frequencies and with phase-modulated quasi-monochromatic beams of similar frequency spectra. All the results of the general treatment are reducible to the ones given in the literature for the case of stationary interference.

  6. Anharmonic effects in IR, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of alanine and proline zwitterions.

    PubMed

    Danecek, Petr; Kapitán, Josef; Baumruk, Vladimír; Bednárová, Lucie; Kopecký, Vladimír; Bour, Petr

    2007-06-14

    The difference spectroscopy of the Raman optical activity (ROA) provides extended information about molecular structure. However, interpretation of the spectra is based on complex and often inaccurate simulations. Previously, the authors attempted to make the calculations more robust by including the solvent and exploring the role of molecular flexibility for alanine and proline zwitterions. In the current study, they analyze the IR, Raman, and ROA spectra of these molecules with the emphasis on the force field modeling. Vibrational harmonic frequencies obtained with 25 ab initio methods are compared to experimental band positions. The role of anharmonic terms in the potential and intensity tensors is also systematically explored using the vibrational self-consistent field, vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), and degeneracy-corrected perturbation calculations. The harmonic approach appeared satisfactory for most of the lower-wavelength (200-1800 cm(-1)) vibrations. Modern generalized gradient approximation and hybrid density functionals, such as the common B3LYP method, provided a very good statistical agreement with the experiment. Although the inclusion of the anharmonic corrections still did not lead to complete agreement between the simulations and the experiment, occasional enhancements were achieved across the entire region of wave numbers. Not only the transitional frequencies of the C-H stretching modes were significantly improved but also Raman and ROA spectral profiles including N-H and C-H lower-frequency bending modes were more realistic after application of the VCI correction. A limited Boltzmann averaging for the lowest-frequency modes that could not be included directly in the anharmonic calculus provided a realistic inhomogeneous band broadening. The anharmonic parts of the intensity tensors (second dipole and polarizability derivatives) were found less important for the entire spectral profiles than the force field anharmonicities (third

  7. Anharmonic effects in IR, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of alanine and proline zwitterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daněček, Petr; Kapitán, Josef; Baumruk, Vladimír; Bednárová, Lucie; Kopecký, Vladimír; Bouř, Petr

    2007-06-01

    The difference spectroscopy of the Raman optical activity (ROA) provides extended information about molecular structure. However, interpretation of the spectra is based on complex and often inaccurate simulations. Previously, the authors attempted to make the calculations more robust by including the solvent and exploring the role of molecular flexibility for alanine and proline zwitterions. In the current study, they analyze the IR, Raman, and ROA spectra of these molecules with the emphasis on the force field modeling. Vibrational harmonic frequencies obtained with 25 ab initio methods are compared to experimental band positions. The role of anharmonic terms in the potential and intensity tensors is also systematically explored using the vibrational self-consistent field, vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), and degeneracy-corrected perturbation calculations. The harmonic approach appeared satisfactory for most of the lower-wavelength (200-1800cm-1) vibrations. Modern generalized gradient approximation and hybrid density functionals, such as the common B3LYP method, provided a very good statistical agreement with the experiment. Although the inclusion of the anharmonic corrections still did not lead to complete agreement between the simulations and the experiment, occasional enhancements were achieved across the entire region of wave numbers. Not only the transitional frequencies of the C-H stretching modes were significantly improved but also Raman and ROA spectral profiles including N-H and C-H lower-frequency bending modes were more realistic after application of the VCI correction. A limited Boltzmann averaging for the lowest-frequency modes that could not be included directly in the anharmonic calculus provided a realistic inhomogeneous band broadening. The anharmonic parts of the intensity tensors (second dipole and polarizability derivatives) were found less important for the entire spectral profiles than the force field anharmonicities (third and

  8. Raman spectra of solid benzene under high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiery, M.-M.; Kobashi, K.; Spain, I. L.

    1985-01-01

    Raman spectra of solid benzene have been measured at room temperature up to about 140 kbar, using the diamond anvil cell. Effort has been focused upon the lattice vibration spectra at pressures above that of phase II. It is found that a change in slopes occurs in the frequency-pressure curves at about 40 kbar. Furthermore, a new band appears above 90 kbar. These features probably correspond respectively to the II-III phase transition, which has been reported previously, and a III-IV phase transition, reported here for the first time.

  9. Raman spectra of thiolated arsenicals with biological importance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingwei; Sun, Yuzhen; Zhang, Xiaobin; McCord, Bruce; McGoron, Anthony J; Mebel, Alexander; Cai, Yong

    2018-03-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has great potential as an alternative tool for arsenic speciation in biological matrices. SERS measurements have advantages over other techniques due to its ability to maintain the integrity of arsenic species and its minimal requirements for sample preparation. Up to now, very few Raman spectra of arsenic compounds have been reported. This is particularly true for thiolated arsenicals, which have recently been found to be widely present in humans. The lack of data for Raman spectra in arsenic speciation hampers the development of new tools using SERS. Herein, we report the results of a study combining the analysis of experimental Raman spectra with that obtained from density functional calculations for some important arsenic metabolites. The results were obtained with a hybrid functional B3LYP approach using different basis sets to calculate Raman spectra of the selected arsenicals. By comparing experimental and calculated spectra of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA V ), the basis set 6-311++G** was found to provide computational efficiency and precision in vibrational frequency prediction. The Raman frequencies for the rest of organoarsenicals were studied using this basis set, including monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III ), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA III ), dimethylmonothioarinic acid (DMMTA V ), dimethyldithioarsinic acid (DMDTA V ), S-(Dimethylarsenic) cysteine (DMA III (Cys)) and dimethylarsinous glutathione (DMA III GS). The results were compared with fingerprint Raman frequencies from As─O, As─C, and As─S obtained under different chemical environments. These fingerprint vibrational frequencies should prove useful in future measurements of different species of arsenic using SERS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  11. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  12. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  13. Quasiparticle spectra from molecules to bulk

    DOE PAGES

    Vlček, Vojtěch; Rabani, Eran; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2018-03-16

    We present a stochastic cumulant GW method, allowing us to map the evolution of photoemission spectra, quasiparticle energies, lifetimes, and emergence of collective excitations from molecules to bulklike systems with up to thousands of valence electrons, including Si nanocrystals and nanoplatelets. The quasiparticle energies rise due to their coupling with collective shake-up (plasmon) excitations, and this coupling leads to significant spectral weight loss (up to 50% for the low-energy states), shortening the lifetimes and shifting the spectral features to lower energies by as much as 0.6 eV. Such features are common to all the systems studied irrespective of their sizesmore » and shapes. For small and low-dimensional systems the surface plasmon resonances affect the frequency of the collective excitation and position of the satellites.« less

  14. Quasiparticle spectra from molecules to bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Vlček, Vojtěch; Rabani, Eran; Neuhauser, Daniel

    We present a stochastic cumulant GW method, allowing us to map the evolution of photoemission spectra, quasiparticle energies, lifetimes, and emergence of collective excitations from molecules to bulklike systems with up to thousands of valence electrons, including Si nanocrystals and nanoplatelets. The quasiparticle energies rise due to their coupling with collective shake-up (plasmon) excitations, and this coupling leads to significant spectral weight loss (up to 50% for the low-energy states), shortening the lifetimes and shifting the spectral features to lower energies by as much as 0.6 eV. Such features are common to all the systems studied irrespective of their sizesmore » and shapes. For small and low-dimensional systems the surface plasmon resonances affect the frequency of the collective excitation and position of the satellites.« less

  15. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in "TPT". These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by…

  16. Discrimination of petroleum fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszewski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents studies of the total spectra (fluorescence-excitation matrix) of petroleum with regard to the utilization of fluorescence for determining petroleum pollutants. Thorough testing of one group, comprising almost forty lubricating oils in the form of their hexane solutions, points out their discrimination.

  17. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  18. Acoustic phonon dispersion at hypersonic frequencies in Si and Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuok, M. H.; Ng, S. C.; Rang, Z. L.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2000-11-01

    Brillouin spectra of the longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode, traveling along the [001] direction, in silicon and germanium have been recorded in 180° backscattering using 457.9-514.5-nm laser lines. The wave velocity of the LA phonon propagating in the [001] direction was determined at hypersonic frequencies, from the measured acoustic phonon dispersion in silicon and germanium. The elastic modulus c11 of the two semiconductors has been calculated from the respective measured hypersonic wave velocities and the results are compared with values determined from lower-frequency ultrasonic and other measurements. Interestingly, the hypersonic velocities are consistently lower by ~1-2 % than the ultrasonic ones, but they generally agree within the present experimental accuracy.

  19. Time dependent features in tremor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, T. W.; Neuberg, J.

    2003-11-01

    Harmonic spectral peaks are observed in the tremor spectra of many different volcanoes, and in some cases these spectral lines have been seen to change with time. This has also been observed for the tremor at the Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat, West Indies, where the spectral lines are sometimes seen to glide apart before an explosion. We propose a model of repeated triggering of low-frequency earthquakes to explain these gliding lines using the relationship δt=1/ δν, where δt and δν are time and frequency spacing, respectively, and investigate factors which can affect the observation of these spectral peaks. Noise and amplitude variation are shown to have little effect on the spectral peaks; however the time gap between events must be nearly constant over several events. An error with a standard deviation of 2% or less is required for the spectral lines to be observed in the frequency range 0.5-10 Hz. We can reproduce the gliding spectral lines from a specific tremor episode preceding an explosion by changing δt from 1 to 0.31 s over a time period of 12 min. Using this relationship and an Automated Event Classification Analysis Program (AECAP), we can monitor δt over a long time period. The AECAP also extracts other seismic parameters such as energy, duration and spectral characteristics. An initial comparison between low-frequency seismic energy and cyclic tilt shows a correlation between the two, but this does not hold for later cycles.

  20. Anharmonic Effects on Vibrational Spectra Intensities: Infrared, Raman, Vibrational Circular Dichroism and Raman Optical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bloino, Julien; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, we want to report the extension of our virtual multifrequency spectrometer (VMS) to anharmonic intensities for Raman Optical Activity (ROA) with the full inclusion of first- and second-order resonances for both frequencies and intensities in the framework of the generalized second-order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2) for all kinds of vibrational spectroscopies. Then, from a more general point of view, we want to present and validate the performance of VMS for the parallel analysis of different vibrational spectra for medium-sized molecules (IR, Raman, VCD, ROA) including both mechanical and electric/magnetic anharmonicity. For the well-known methyloxirane benchmark, careful selection of density functional, basis set, and resonance tresholds permitted to reach qualitative and quantitative vis-à-vis comparison between experimental and computed band positions and shapes. Next, the whole series of halogenated azetidinones is analyzed, showing that it is now possible to interpret different spectra in terms of electronegativity, polarizability, and hindrance variation between closely related substituents, chiral spectroscopies being particular effective in this connection. PMID:26580121

  1. Frequency spirals.

    PubMed

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  2. Frequency spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H., E-mail: strogatz@cornell.edu

    2016-09-15

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call “frequency spirals.” These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seenmore » in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.« less

  3. Focusing Leaky Waves: A Class of Electromagnetic Localized Waves with Complex Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuscaldo, Walter; Comite, Davide; Boesso, Alessandro; Baccarelli, Paolo; Burghignoli, Paolo; Galli, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    Localized waves, i.e., the wide class of limited-diffraction, limited-dispersion solutions to the wave equation are generally characterized by real wave numbers. We consider the role played by localized waves with generally complex "leaky" wave numbers. First, the impact of the imaginary part of the wave number (i.e., the leakage constant) on the diffractive (spatial broadening) features of monochromatic localized solutions (i.e., beams) is rigorously evaluated. Then general conditions are derived to show that only a restricted class of spectra (either real or complex) allows for generating a causal localized wave. It turns out that backward leaky waves fall into this category. On this ground, several criteria for the systematic design of wideband radiators, namely, periodic radial waveguides based on backward leaky waves, are established in the framework of leaky-wave theory. An effective design method is proposed to minimize the frequency dispersion of the proposed class of devices and the impact of the "leakage" on the dispersive (temporal broadening) features of polychromatic localized solutions (i.e., pulses) is accounted for. Numerical results corroborate the concept, clearly highlighting the advantages and limitations of the leaky-wave approach for the generation of localized pulses at millimeter-wave frequencies, where energy focusing is in high demand in modern applications.

  4. Path spectra derived from inversion of source and site spectra for earthquakes in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimasewski, A.; Sahakian, V. J.; Baltay, A.; Boatwright, J.; Fletcher, J. B.; Baker, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    A large source of epistemic uncertainty in Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) is derived from the path term, currently represented as a simple geometric spreading and intrinsic attenuation term. Including additional physical relationships between the path properties and predicted ground motions would produce more accurate and precise, region-specific GMPEs by reclassifying some of the random, aleatory uncertainty as epistemic. This study focuses on regions of Southern California, using data from the Anza network and Southern California Seismic network to create a catalog of events magnitude 2.5 and larger from 1998 to 2016. The catalog encompasses regions of varying geology and therefore varying path and site attenuation. Within this catalog of events, we investigate several collections of event region-to-station pairs, each of which share similar origin locations and stations so that all events have similar paths. Compared with a simple regional GMPE, these paths consistently have high or low residuals. By working with events that have the same path, we can isolate source and site effects, and focus on the remaining residual as path effects. We decompose the recordings into source and site spectra for each unique event and site in our greater Southern California regional database using the inversion method of Andrews (1986). This model represents each natural log record spectra as the sum of its natural log event and site spectra, while constraining each record to a reference site or Brune source spectrum. We estimate a regional, path-specific anelastic attenuation (Q) and site attenuation (t*) from the inversion site spectra and corner frequency from the inversion event spectra. We then compute the residuals between the observed record data, and the inversion model prediction (event*site spectra). This residual is representative of path effects, likely anelastic attenuation along the path that varies from the regional median attenuation. We examine the

  5. FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra, density functional computations of the vibrational spectra and molecular conformational analysis of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-hydroquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, N.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Dereli, Ö.; Türkkan, E.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of finding conformer among six different possible conformers of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-hydroquinone (DTBHQ), its equilibrium geometry and harmonic wavenumbers were calculated by the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The infrared and Raman spectra of DTBHQ were recorded in the region 400-4000 cm -1 and 50-3500 cm -1, respectively. In addition, the IR spectra in CCl 4 at various concentrations of DTBHQ are also recorded. The computed vibrational wavenumbers were compared with the IR and Raman experimental data. Computational calculations at B3LYP level with two different basis sets 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) are also employed in the study of the possible conformer of DTBHQ. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using VEDA 4 program. The general agreement between the observed and calculated frequencies was established.

  6. 1/f2 Characteristics and Isotropy in the Fourier Power Spectra of Visual Art, Cartoons, Comics, Mangas, and Different Categories of Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D) Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f2 characteristics), which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas), have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations), we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy) in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f2 characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic perception remains to be

  7. 1/f 2 Characteristics and isotropy in the fourier power spectra of visual art, cartoons, comics, mangas, and different categories of photographs.

    PubMed

    Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2010-08-19

    Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D) Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f(2) characteristics), which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas), have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations), we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy) in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f(2) characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic perception remains

  8. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Methyl Substitution and Loss of H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP approach, in conjunction with the 4-31G basis set, is used to compute the harmonic frequencies of 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracene, and their cations. The IR spectra of the methyl substituted species are very similar to the parent spectra, except for the addition of the methyl C-H stretch at lower frequency than the aromatic C-H stretch. The loss of a single hydrogen from naphthalene, anthracene, and their cations is shown to have a very small effect on the IR spectra. Loss of a methyl hydrogen from 1- or 2-methylnaphthalene, or their cations, is shown to shift the side group C-H frequencies from below aromatic hydrogen stretching frequencies to above them. The loss of IT from 2-methylenenaphthalene shows only a small shift in the side group C-H stretching frequency.

  9. Visual adaptation and the amplitude spectra of radiological images.

    PubMed

    Kompaniez-Dunigan, Elysse; Abbey, Craig K; Boone, John M; Webster, Michael A

    2018-01-01

    We examined how visual sensitivity and perception are affected by adaptation to the characteristic amplitude spectra of X-ray mammography images. Because of the transmissive nature of X-ray photons, these images have relatively more low-frequency variability than natural images, a difference that is captured by a steeper slope of the amplitude spectrum (~ - 1.5) compared to the ~ 1/f (slope of - 1) spectra common to natural scenes. Radiologists inspecting these images are therefore exposed to a different balance of spectral components, and we measured how this exposure might alter spatial vision. Observers (who were not radiologists) were adapted to images of normal mammograms or the same images sharpened by filtering the amplitude spectra to shallower slopes. Prior adaptation to the original mammograms significantly biased judgments of image focus relative to the sharpened images, demonstrating that the images are sufficient to induce substantial after-effects. The adaptation also induced strong losses in threshold contrast sensitivity that were selective for lower spatial frequencies, though these losses were very similar to the threshold changes induced by the sharpened images. Visual search for targets (Gaussian blobs) added to the images was also not differentially affected by adaptation to the original or sharper images. These results complement our previous studies examining how observers adapt to the textural properties or phase spectra of mammograms. Like the phase spectrum, adaptation to the amplitude spectrum of mammograms alters spatial sensitivity and visual judgments about the images. However, unlike the phase spectrum, adaptation to the amplitude spectra did not confer a selective performance advantage relative to more natural spectra.

  10. NIST Databases on Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, J.; Wiese, W. L.; Martin, W. C.; Musgrove, A.; Fuhr, J. R.

    2002-11-01

    The NIST atomic and molecular spectroscopic databases now available on the World Wide Web through the NIST Physics Laboratory homepage include Atomic Spectra Database, Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms, Spectrum of Platinum Lamp for Ultraviolet Spectrograph Calibration, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Transition Probabilities, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Spectral Line Broadening, and Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database. The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) [1] offers evaluated data on energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities for atoms and atomic ions. Data are given for some 950 spectra and 70,000 energy levels. About 91,000 spectral lines are included, with transition probabilities for about half of these. Additional data resulting from our ongoing critical compilations will be included in successive new versions of ASD. We plan to include, for example, our recently published data for some 16,000 transitions covering most ions of the iron-group elements, as well as Cu, Kr, and Mo [2]. Our compilations benefit greatly from experimental and theoretical atomic-data research being carried out in the NIST Atomic Physics Division. A new compilation covering spectra of the rare gases in all stages of ionization, for example, revealed a need for improved data in the infrared. We have thus measured these needed data with our high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer [3]. An upcoming new database will give wavelengths and intensities for the stronger lines of all neutral and singly-ionized atoms, along with energy levels and transition probabilities for the persistent lines [4]. A critical compilation of the transition probabilities of Ba I and Ba II [5] has been completed and several other compilations of atomic transition probabilities are nearing completion. These include data for all spectra of Na, Mg, Al, and Si [6]. Newly compiled data for selected ions of Ne, Mg, Si and S, will form the basis for a new

  11. ACCELERATED FITTING OF STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-20

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating amore » sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.« less

  12. Variable spectra of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of EXOSAT spectra of active galaxies are presented. The objects examined for X-ray spectral variability were MR 2251-178 and 3C 120. The results of these investigations are described, as well as additional results on X-ray spectral variability related to EXOSAT observations of active galaxies. Additionally, the dipping X-ray source 4U1624-49 was also investigated.

  13. Correlation-Induced Changes of Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    tances has been one of the central have been observed etperimental- other end of the frequency spec- issues of debate among astrono - ly could be...limited consideration by astrono - I mers. in the updated theory, described in the Nov. 13 PHYSICAL REVIEw LETTERS, Wolf outlines a more general - and...billions of light-years apart. Many astrono - mers-ncluding Christopher L. Carilli of Harvard University, who with two colleagues found the most recent

  14. Comparisons between wave directional spectra from SAR and pressure sensor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawka, S. S.; Inman, D. L.; Hsiao, S. V.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    Simultaneous directional wave measurements were made at Torrey Pines Beach, California, by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and a linear array of pressure sensors. The measurements were conducted during the West Coast Experiment in March 1977. Quantitative comparisons of the normalized directional spectra from the two systems were made for wave periods of 6.9-17.0 s. The comparison results were variable but generally showed good agreement of the primary mode of the normalized directional energy. An attempt was made to quantify the physical criteria for good wave imaging in the SAR. A frequency band analysis of wave parameters such as band energy, slope, and orbital velocity did not show good correlation with the directional comparisons. It is noted that absolute values of the wave height spectrum cannot be derived from the SAR images yet and, consequently, no comparisons of absolute energy levels with corresponding array measurements were intended.

  15. Analysis of Earthquake Source Spectra in Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Shearer, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies of the source spectra of small earthquakes in southern California show that average Brune-type stress drops vary among different regions, with particularly low stress drops observed in the Salton Trough (Shearer et al., 2006). The Salton Trough marks the southern end of the San Andreas Fault and is prone to earthquake swarms, some of which are driven by aseismic creep events (Lohman and McGuire, 2007). In order to learn the stress state and understand the physical mechanisms of swarms and slow slip events, we analyze the source spectra of earthquakes in this region. We obtain Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) waveforms for earthquakes from 1977 to 2009 archived at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) data center, which includes over 17,000 events. After resampling the data to a uniform 100 Hz sample rate, we compute spectra for both signal and noise windows for each seismogram, and select traces with a P-wave signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5 between 5 Hz and 15 Hz. Using selected displacement spectra, we isolate the source spectra from station terms and path effects using an empirical Green’s function approach. From the corrected source spectra, we compute corner frequencies and estimate moments and stress drops. Finally we analyze spatial and temporal variations in stress drop in the Salton Trough and compare them with studies of swarms and creep events to assess the evolution of faulting and stress in the region. References: Lohman, R. B., and J. J. McGuire (2007), Earthquake swarms driven by aseismic creep in the Salton Trough, California, J. Geophys. Res., 112, B04405, doi:10.1029/2006JB004596 Shearer, P. M., G. A. Prieto, and E. Hauksson (2006), Comprehensive analysis of earthquake source spectra in southern California, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B06303, doi:10.1029/2005JB003979.

  16. Chandra Observations of Associates of η Carinae. II. Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Schlegel, Eric M.; Waldron, Wayne L.; Seward, Frederick D.; Krauss, Miriam I.; Nichols, Joy; Wolk, Scott J.

    2004-09-01

    The low-resolution X-ray spectra around η Car covering Trumpler 16 and part of Trumpler 14 have been extracted from a Chandra CCD ACIS image. Various analysis techniques have been applied to the spectra based on their count rates. The spectra with the greatest number of counts (HD 93162 = WR 25, HD 93129 AB, and HD 93250) have been fitted with a wind model, which uses several components with different temperatures and depths in the wind. Weaker spectra have been fitted with Raymond-Smith models. The weakest spectra are simply intercompared with strong spectra. In general, fits produce reasonable parameters based on knowledge of the extinction from optical studies and on the range of temperatures for high- and low-mass stars. Direct comparisons of spectra confirm the consistency of the fitting results and also hardness ratios for cases of unusually large extinction in the clusters. The spectra of the low-mass stars are harder than the more massive stars. Stars in the sequence evolving from the main sequence (HD 93250) through the system containing the O supergiant (HD 93129 AB) and then through the Wolf-Rayet stage (HD 93162), presumably ending in the extreme example of η Car, share the property of being unusually luminous and hard in X-rays. For these X-ray-luminous stars, their high mass and evolutionary status (from the very last stages of the main sequence and beyond) is the common feature. Their binary status is mixed, and their magnetic status is still uncertain. Based on observations made with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory.

  17. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61).

  18. Spectra of Cas A's Highest Velocity Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan

    2010-08-01

    The young age and close distance of the Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) make it perhaps our best case study and clearest look at the explosion dynamics of a core-collapse supernova (CCSN). Interestingly, Cas A exhibits two nearly opposing streams of high velocity ejecta or `jets' in its NE and SW regions racing outward at speeds more than twice that of the main shell. The nature of these jets, however, and their possible association with an aspherical supernova explosion mechanism is controversial. A handful of existing low-resolution spectra of outer knots in the NE jet display chemical abundances hinting at an origin from the S-Si-Ca- Ar rich layer deep inside the progenitor. If these abundances could be firmly established in both the NE and SW jets, it would be very strong evidence in support of a highly asymmetrical explosion engine for Cas A's progenitor and, in turn, for CCSNe in general. We request KPNO 4m telescope + MARS time to obtain high quality multi-object spectroscopy of Cas A's highest velocity ejecta to measure their nitrogen, sulfur, oxygen, calcium, and argon abundances. These spectra will be analyzed with the metal-rich shock models of J. Raymond and then compared to current sets of CCSN models paying particular attention to knot composition vs. ejection velocity and ejecta mixing.

  19. An atlas of selected calibrated stellar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Russell G.; Cohen, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Five hundred and fifty six stars in the IRAS PSC-2 that are suitable for stellar radiometric standards and are brighter than 1 Jy at 25 microns were identified. In addition, 123 stars that meet all of our criteria for calibration standards, but which lack a luminosity class were identified. An approach to absolute stellar calibration of broadband infrared filters based upon new models of Vega and Sirius due to Kurucz (1992) is presented. A general technique used to assemble continuous wide-band calibrated infrared spectra is described and an absolutely calibrated 1-35 micron spectrum of alpha(Tau) is constructed and the method using new and carefully designed observations is independently validated. The absolute calibration of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) database is investigated by comparing the observed spectrum of alpha(Tau) with that assumed in the original LRS calibration scheme. Neglect of the SiO fundamental band in alpha(Tau) has led to the presence of a specious 'emission' feature in all LRS spectra near 8.5 microns, and to an incorrect spectral slope between 8 and 12 microns. Finally, some of the properties of asteroids that effect their utility as calibration objects for the middle and far infrared region are examined. A technique to determine, from IRAS multiwaveband observations, the basic physical parameters needed by various asteroid thermal models that minimize the number of assumptions required is developed.

  20. [Raman, FTIR spectra and normal mode analysis of acetanilide].

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui-Qin; Tao, Ya-Ping; Han, Li-Gang; Han, Yun-Xia; Mo, Yu-Jun

    2012-10-01

    The Raman and FTIR spectra of acetanilide (ACN) were measured experimentally in the regions of 3 500-50 and 3 500-600 cm(-1) respectively. The equilibrium geometry and vibration frequencies of ACN were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT) method (B3LYP/6-311G(d, p)). The results showed that the theoretical calculation of molecular structure parameters are in good agreement with previous report and better than the ones calculated based on 6-31G(d), and the calculated frequencies agree well with the experimental ones. Potential energy distribution of each frequency was worked out by normal mode analysis, and based on this, a detailed and accurate vibration frequency assignment of ACN was obtained.

  1. Time-frequency analysis of phonocardiogram signals using wavelet transform: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ergen, Burhan; Tatar, Yetkin; Gulcur, Halil Ozcan

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of phonocardiogram (PCG) signals provides a non-invasive means to determine the abnormalities caused by cardiovascular system pathology. In general, time-frequency representation (TFR) methods are used to study the PCG signal because it is one of the non-stationary bio-signals. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is especially suitable for the analysis of non-stationary signals and to obtain the TFR, due to its high resolution, both in time and in frequency and has recently become a favourite tool. It decomposes a signal in terms of elementary contributions called wavelets, which are shifted and dilated copies of a fixed mother wavelet function, and yields a joint TFR. Although the basic characteristics of the wavelets are similar, each type of the wavelets produces a different TFR. In this study, eight real types of the most known wavelets are examined on typical PCG signals indicating heart abnormalities in order to determine the best wavelet to obtain a reliable TFR. For this purpose, the wavelet energy and frequency spectrum estimations based on the CWT and the spectra of the chosen wavelets were compared with the energy distribution and the autoregressive frequency spectra in order to determine the most suitable wavelet. The results show that Morlet wavelet is the most reliable wavelet for the time-frequency analysis of PCG signals.

  2. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  3. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  4. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  5. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency bands for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review and...

  6. On the spectra of Pisot-cyclotomic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Kevin G.; Masáková, Zuzana; Vávra, Tomáš

    2018-07-01

    We investigate the complex spectra X^A(β )= \\sum _{j=0}^na_jβ ^j : n\\in N, a_j\\in A where β is a quadratic or cubic Pisot-cyclotomic number and the alphabet A is given by 0 along with a finite collection of roots of unity. Such spectra are discrete aperiodic structures with crystallographically forbidden symmetries. We discuss in general terms under which conditions they possess the Delone property required for point sets modeling quasicrystals. We study the corresponding Voronoi tilings and we relate these structures to quasilattices arising from the cut-and-project method.

  7. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  8. Identified hadron spectra from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Gábor I.; the PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons and protons, as well as antiparticle to particle ratios near mid-rapidity from d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{sNN} = 200 GeV have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The transverse momentum range of particle identification was extended to beyond 3 GeV/c using the TOF detector and a new trigger system. The pseudorapidity dependence of the nuclear modification factor for charged hadrons in d+Au collisions is presented.

  9. Identified hadron spectra from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Gábor I.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons and protons, as well as antiparticle to particle ratios near mid-rapidity from d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 200\\,{\\rm GeV} have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The transverse momentum range of particle identification was extended to beyond 3 GeV/c using the TOF detector and a new trigger system. The pseudorapidity dependence of the nuclear modification factor for charged hadrons in d+Au collisions is presented.

  10. Reflection spectra of solids of planetary interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.; Carm, O.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reproduces the spectra of solids which might be found on the surfaces of planetary bodies or as solid condensates in the upper planetary atmosphere. Among these are spectra of various iron compounds of interest in the study of the clouds of Venus. Other spectra (some at low temperature) are included for various sulfides relevant to the planet Jupiter. Meteorite and coal spectra are also included to illustrate dark carbon compounds.

  11. Terahertz spectroscopic polarimetry of generalized anisotropic media composed of Archimedean spiral arrays: Experiments and simulations.

    PubMed

    Aschaffenburg, Daniel J; Williams, Michael R C; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2016-05-07

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopic polarimetry has been used to measure the polarization state of all spectral components in a broadband THz pulse upon transmission through generalized anisotropic media consisting of two-dimensional arrays of lithographically defined Archimedean spirals. The technique allows a full determination of the frequency-dependent, complex-valued transmission matrix and eigenpolarizations of the spiral arrays. Measurements were made on a series of spiral array orientations. The frequency-dependent transmission matrix elements as well as the eigenpolarizations were determined, and the eigenpolarizations were found be to elliptically corotating, as expected from their symmetry. Numerical simulations are in quantitative agreement with measured spectra.

  12. High-resolution vertical velocities and their power spectrum observed with the MAARSY radar - Part 1: frequency spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus; Stober, Gunter; Latteck, Ralph

    2018-04-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) installed at the island of Andøya has been run for continuous probing of atmospheric winds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region. In the current study, we present high-resolution wind measurements during the period between 2010 and 2013 with MAARSY. The spectral analysis applying the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method has been carried out to determine the frequency spectra of vertical wind velocity. From a total of 522 days of observations, the statistics of the spectral slope have been derived and show a dependence on the background wind conditions. It is a general feature that the observed spectra of vertical velocity during active periods (with wind velocity > 10 m s-1) are much steeper than during quiet periods (with wind velocity < 10 m s-1). The distribution of spectral slopes is roughly symmetric with a maximum at -5/3 during active periods, whereas a very asymmetric distribution with a maximum at around -1 is observed during quiet periods. The slope profiles along altitudes reveal a significant height dependence for both conditions, i.e., the spectra become shallower with increasing altitudes in the upper troposphere and maintain roughly a constant slope in the lower stratosphere. With both wind conditions considered together the general spectra are obtained and their slopes are compared with the background horizontal winds. The comparisons show that the observed spectra become steeper with increasing wind velocities under quiet conditions, approach a spectral slope of -5/3 at a wind velocity of 10 m s-1 and then roughly maintain this slope (-5/3) for even stronger winds. Our findings show an overall agreement with previous studies; furthermore, they provide a more complete climatology of frequency spectra of vertical wind velocities under different wind conditions.

  13. On the formation of anions: frequency-, angle-, and time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the menadione radical anion† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A summary of the ground-state geometries and molecular orbitals from the ab initio calculations; fitted residuals from the FA-PI simulation; plots of all spectra included in the frequency-resolved two-dimensional figure; and example time-resolved PE spectra from the 3.10 + 1.55 eV pump-probe experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc03491k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James N.; West, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-, angle-, and time-resolved photoelectron imaging of gas-phase menadione (vitamin K3) radical anions was used to show that quasi-bound resonances of the anion can act as efficient doorway states to produce metastable ground electronic state anions on a sub-picosecond timescale. Several anion resonances have been experimentally observed and identified with the assistance of ab initio calculations, and ground state anion recovery was observed across the first 3 eV above threshold. Time-resolved measurements revealed the mechanism of electronic ground state anion formation, which first involves a cascade of very fast internal conversion processes to a bound electronic state that, in turn, decays by slower internal conversion to the ground state. Autodetachment processes from populated resonances are inefficient compared with electronic relaxation through internal conversion. The mechanistic understanding gained provides insight into the formation of radical anions in biological and astrochemical systems. PMID:29560245

  14. Spectra Handling from AIRS and IRIS for Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Lau, M.; Aumann, H. H.; Yung, Y. L.

    2010-12-01

    Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements over a long period from satellites provide valuable information for the climate change research. Due to the different coverage, spectral resolution and instrument sensitivities, the data comparisons between different satellites could be problematic and possible artifacts could be easily introduced. In this paper, we have analyzed the data taken by IRIS in 1970 and by AIRS from 2002 to 2010. IRIS (Prabhakara, 1988) was a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and it flew on the NASA Nimbus 4 satellite which was launched in April 1970 into an 1100km altitude sun-synchronous polar orbit. It collected data from the nadir track between 400cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 from April 1970 until January 1971. AIRS (Aumann, 2003) is a grating spectrometer launched on the EOS-Aqua satellite in May 2002 and it measures spectra from 650cm-1 to 2700cm-1. AIRS scans to ±49.5o cross track as the satellite moves forwards taking 90 spectra each with an instantaneous field of view of 1.1o in a row perpendicular to the direction of motion of the satellite. This results in a ground footprint of 13km diameter at nadir. In this paper, we analyzed the spectra between 650 cm-1 and 1350 cm-1 for nadir view footprints in order to match the IRIS’s measurements. Most of the possible sources of error or biases have been carefully handled, these include the errors from the data editing, spatial coverage, missing data (spatial gap), and spectral resolution, spectra frequency shift due to the fields of view, sea surface temperature fluctuations, clear sky determination, and spectra response function symmetry. It is extremely important when comparing spectra in the high slope spectra regions where possible large artifacts could be introduced. We have used a radiative model to simulate the spectra as observed in both IRIS and AIRS by using US Standard Atmospheric Profiles. The tropospheric warming and stratospheric warming are introduced in the model as well. The

  15. Vibrational spectra from atomic fluctuations in dynamics simulations. I. Theory, limitations, and a sample application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Tavan, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Hybrid molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which combine density functional theory (DFT) descriptions of a molecule with a molecular mechanics (MM) modeling of its solvent environment, have opened the way towards accurate computations of solvation effects in the vibrational spectra of molecules. Recently, Wheeler et al. [ChemPhysChem 4, 382 (2002)] have suggested to compute these spectra from DFT/MM-MD trajectories by diagonalizing the covariance matrix of atomic fluctuations. This so-called principal mode analysis (PMA) allegedly can replace the well-established approaches, which are based on Fourier transform methods or on conventional normal mode analyses. By scrutinizing and revising the PMA approach we identify five conditions, which must be guaranteed if PMA is supposed to render exact vibrational frequencies. Besides specific choices of (a) coordinates and (b) coordinate systems, these conditions cover (c) a harmonic intramolecular potential, (d) a complete thermal equilibrium within the molecule, and (e) a molecular Hamiltonian independent of time. However, the PMA conditions [(c)-(d)] and [(c)-(e)] are generally violated in gas phase DFT-MD and liquid phase DFT/MM-MD trajectories, respectively. Based on a series of simple analytical model calculations and on the analysis of MD trajectories calculated for the formaldehyde molecule in the gas phase (DFT) and in liquid water (DFT/MM) we show that in both phases the violation of condition (d) can cause huge errors in PMA frequency computations, whereas the inevitable violations of conditions (c) and (e), the latter being generic to the liquid phase, imply systematic and sizable underestimates of the vibrational frequencies by PMA. We demonstrate that the huge errors, which are caused by an incomplete thermal equilibrium violating (d), can be avoided if one introduces mode-specific temperatures Tj and calculates the frequencies from a "generalized virial" (GV) expression instead from PMA. Concerning ways to

  16. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGES

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    The gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. We found that a dependence of the gamma-raymore » spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Finally, global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  17. Definition of energy-calibrated spectra for national reachback

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Christopher L.; Hertz, Kristin L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the timeliness and accuracy of analysis results of spectra submitted to National Reachback, particularly for the detection of threat items. Many spectra submitted for analysis include either a calibration spectrum using 137Cs or no calibration spectrum at all. The single line provided by 137Cs is insufficient to adequately calibrate nonlinear spectra. A calibration source that provides several lines that are well-spaced, from the low energy cutoff to the full energy range of the detector, is needed for a satisfactory energy calibration. This paper defines the requirements of an energy calibration for the purposes ofmore » National Reachback, outlines a method to validate whether a given spectrum meets that definition, discusses general source considerations, and provides a specific operating procedure for calibrating the GR-135.« less

  18. An RGB approach to extraordinary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusche, Sascha; Theilmann, Florian

    2015-09-01

    After Newton had explained a series of ordinary spectra and Goethe had pointed out its complementary counterpart, Nussbaumer discovered a series of extraordinary spectra which are geometrically identical and colourwise analogous to Newton’s and Goethe’s spectra. To understand the geometry and colours of extraordinary spectra, the wavelength composition is explored with filters and spectroscopic setups. Visualized in a dispersion diagram, the wavelength composition is interpreted in terms of additive colour mixing. Finally, all spectra are simulated as the superposition of red, green, and blue images that are shifted apart. This RGB approach makes it easy to understand the complex relationship between wavelengths and colours.

  19. Noise power spectra of images from digital mammography detectors.

    PubMed

    Williams, M B; Mangiafico, P A; Simoni, P U

    1999-07-01

    Noise characterization through estimation of the noise power spectrum (NPS) is a central component of the evaluation of digital x-ray systems. We begin with a brief review of the fundamentals of NPS theory and measurement, derive explicit expressions for calculation of the one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) NPS, and discuss some of the considerations and tradeoffs when these concepts are applied to digital systems. Measurements of the NPS of two detectors for digital mammography are presented to illustrate some of the implications of the choices available. For both systems, two-dimensional noise power spectra obtained over a range of input fluence exhibit pronounced asymmetry between the orthogonal frequency dimensions. The 2D spectra of both systems also demonstrate dominant structures both on and off the primary frequency axes indicative of periodic noise components. Although the two systems share many common noise characteristics, there are significant differences, including markedly different dark-noise magnitudes, differences in NPS shape as a function of both spatial frequency and exposure, and differences in the natures of the residual fixed pattern noise following flat fielding corrections. For low x-ray exposures, quantum noise-limited operation may be possible only at low spatial frequency. Depending on the method of obtaining the 1D NPS (i.e., synthetic slit scanning or slice extraction from the 2D NPS), on-axis periodic structures can be misleadingly smoothed or missed entirely. Our measurements indicate that for these systems, 1D spectra useful for the purpose of detective quantum efficiency calculation may be obtained from thin cuts through the central portion of the calculated 2D NPS. On the other hand, low-frequency spectral values do not converge to an asymptotic value with increasing slit length when 1D spectra are generated using the scanned synthetic slit method. Aliasing can contribute significantly to the digital NPS, especially near the

  20. The mid-infrared transmission spectra of Antarctic ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-IR (4000-450/cm; 2.5-22.2 microns) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000/cm (10 microns) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-IR ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites.

  1. Guide to solar reference spectra and irradiance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    The international standard for determining solar irradiances was published by the International Standards Organization (ISO) in May 2007. The document, ISO 21348 Space Environment (natural and artificial) - Process for determining solar irradiances, describes the process for representing solar irradiances. We report on the next progression of standards work, i.e., the development of a guide that identifies solar reference spectra and irradiance models for use in engineering design or scientific research. This document will be produced as an AIAA Guideline and ISO Technical Report. It will describe the content of the reference spectra and models, uncertainties and limitations, technical basis, data bases from which the reference spectra and models are formed, publication references, and sources of computer code for reference spectra and solar irradiance models, including those which provide spectrally-resolved lines as well as solar indices and proxies and which are generally recognized in the solar sciences. The document is intended to assist aircraft and space vehicle designers and developers, heliophysicists, geophysicists, aeronomers, meteorologists, and climatologists in understanding available models, comparing sources of data, and interpreting engineering and scientific results based on different solar reference spectra and irradiance models.

  2. The spectra and periodograms of anti-correlated discrete fractional Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Raymond, G M; Percival, D B; Bassingthwaighte, J B

    2003-05-01

    Discrete fractional Gaussian noise (dFGN) has been proposed as a model for interpreting a wide variety of physiological data. The form of actual spectra of dFGN for frequencies near zero varies as f(1-2H), where 0 < H < 1 is the Hurst coefficient; however, this form for the spectra need not be a good approximation at other frequencies. When H approaches zero, dFGN spectra exhibit the 1 - 2H power-law behavior only over a range of low frequencies that is vanishingly small. When dealing with a time series of finite length drawn from a dFGN process with unknown H, practitioners must deal with estimated spectra in lieu of actual spectra. The most basic spectral estimator is the periodogram. The expected value of the periodogram for dFGN with small H also exhibits non-power-law behavior. At the lowest Fourier frequencies associated with a time series of N values sampled from a dFGN process, the expected value of the periodogram for H approaching zero varies as f(0) rather than f(1-2H). For finite N and small H, the expected value of the periodogram can in fact exhibit a local power-law behavior with a spectral exponent of 1 - 2H at only two distinct frequencies.

  3. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  4. Correction of electrode modelling errors in multi-frequency EIT imaging.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Markus; Holder, David

    2016-06-01

    The differentiation of haemorrhagic from ischaemic stroke using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) requires measurements at multiple frequencies, since the general lack of healthy measurements on the same patient excludes time-difference imaging methods. It has previously been shown that the inaccurate modelling of electrodes constitutes one of the largest sources of image artefacts in non-linear multi-frequency EIT applications. To address this issue, we augmented the conductivity Jacobian matrix with a Jacobian matrix with respect to electrode movement. Using this new algorithm, simulated ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes in a realistic head model were reconstructed for varying degrees of electrode position errors. The simultaneous recovery of conductivity spectra and electrode positions removed most artefacts caused by inaccurately modelled electrodes. Reconstructions were stable for electrode position errors of up to 1.5 mm standard deviation along both surface dimensions. We conclude that this method can be used for electrode model correction in multi-frequency EIT.

  5. The Global Signature of Ocean Wave Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portilla-Yandún, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    A global atlas of ocean wave spectra is developed and presented. The development is based on a new technique for deriving wave spectral statistics, which is applied to the extensive ERA-Interim database from European Centre of Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Spectral statistics is based on the idea of long-term wave systems, which are unique and distinct at every geographical point. The identification of those wave systems allows their separation from the overall spectrum using the partition technique. Their further characterization is made using standard integrated parameters, which turn out much more meaningful when applied to the individual components than to the total spectrum. The parameters developed include the density distribution of spectral partitions, which is the main descriptor; the identified wave systems; the individual distribution of the characteristic frequencies, directions, wave height, wave age, seasonal variability of wind and waves; return periods derived from extreme value analysis; and crossing-sea probabilities. This information is made available in web format for public use at http://www.modemat.epn.edu.ec/#/nereo. It is found that wave spectral statistics offers the possibility to synthesize data while providing a direct and comprehensive view of the local and regional wave conditions.

  6. Track Structure Model for Radial Distributions of Electron Spectra and Event Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    An analytic method is described for evaluating the average radial electron spectrum and the radial and total frequency-event spectrum for high-energy ions. For high-energy ions, indirect events make important contributions to frequency-event spectra. The method used for evaluating indirect events is to fold the radial electron spectrum with measured frequency-event spectrum for photons or electrons. The contribution from direct events is treated using a spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET). We find that high-energy heavy ions have a significantly reduced frequency-averaged final energy (yF) compared to LET, while relativistic protons have a significantly increased yF and dose-averaged lineal energy (yD) for typical site sizes used in tissue equivalent proportional counters. Such differences represent important factors in evaluating event spectra with laboratory beams, in space- flight, or in atmospheric radiation studies and in validation of radiation transport codes. The inadequacy of LET as descriptor because of deviations in values of physical quantities, such as track width, secondary electron spectrum, and yD for ions of identical LET is also discussed.

  7. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  8. Spectra of Baroclinic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1996-01-01

    Baroclinic inertia-gravity (IG) waves form a persistent background of thermocline depth and sea surface height oscillations. They also contribute to the kinetic energy of horizontal motions in the subsurface layer. Measured by the ratio of water particle velocity to wave phase speed, the wave nonlinearity may be rather high. Given a continuous supply of energy from external sources, nonlinear wave-wave interactions among IG waves would result in inertial cascades of energy, momentum, and wave action. Based on a recently developed theory of wave turbulence in scale-dependent systems, these cascades are investigated and IG wave spectra are derived for an arbitrary degree of wave nonlinearity. Comparisons with satellite-altimetry-based spectra of surface height variations and with energy spectra of horizontal velocity fluctuations show good agreement. The well-known spectral peak at the inertial frequency is thus explained as a result of the inverse cascade. Finally, we discuss a possibility of inferring the internal Rossby radius of deformation and other dynamical properties of the upper thermocline from the spectra of SSH (sea surface height) variations based on altimeter measurements.

  9. Polarized Power Spectra from HERA-19 Commissioning Data: Instrument Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox Fortino, Austin; Chichura, Paul; Igarashi, Amy; Kohn, Saul; Aguirre, James; HERA Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Epoch of Reionization (EoR) is a key period in the universe’s history, containing the formation of the first galaxies and large scale structures. Foreground emission is the limiting factor in detecting the 21 cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The HERA-19 low frequency radio interferometer aims to reduce the obfuscation from the foreground emission with its dish shaped antennae. We generate polarized 2D (cylindrically averaged) power spectra from seven days of observation from the HERA-19 2016 observation season in each of the four Stokes parameters I, Q, U, and V. These power spectra serve as a potent diagnostic tool that allow us to understand the instrument stability by comparison between nominally redundant baselines, and between observations of nominally the same astrophysical sky on successive days. The power spectra are expected to vary among nominally redundant measurements due to ionosphere fluctuations and thermal changes in the electronics and instrument beam patterns, as well as other factors. In this work we investigate the stability over time of these polarized power spectra, and use them to quantify the variation due to these effects.

  10. Planetary spectra for anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    Some effects on planetary spectra that would be produced by departures from isotropic scattering are examined. The phase function is the simplest departure to handle analytically and the only phase function, other than the isotropic one, that can be incorporated into a Chandrasekhar first approximation. This approach has the advantage of illustrating effects resulting from anisotropies while retaining the simplicity that yields analytic solutions. The curve of growth is the sine qua non of planetary spectroscopy. The discussion emphasizes the difficulties and importance of ascertaining curves of growth as functions of observing geometry. A plea is made to observers to analyze their empirical curves of growth, whenever it seems feasible, in terms of coefficients of which are the leading terms in radiative-transfer analysis. An algebraic solution to the two sets of anisotropic H functions is developed which gives emergent intensities accurate to 0.3%.

  11. Gigahertz-peaked Spectra Pulsars and Thermal Absorption Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kijak, J.; Basu, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2017-05-10

    We present the results of our radio interferometric observations of pulsars at 325 and 610 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. We used the imaging method to estimate the flux densities of several pulsars at these radio frequencies. The analysis of the shapes of the pulsar spectra allowed us to identify five new gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Using the hypothesis that the spectral turnovers are caused by thermal free–free absorption in the interstellar medium, we modeled the spectra of all known objects of this kind. Using the model, we were able to put some observational constraints on the physicalmore » parameters of the absorbing matter, which allows us to distinguish between the possible sources of absorption. We also discuss the possible effects of the existence of GPS pulsars on future search surveys, showing that the optimal frequency range for finding such objects would be from a few GHz (for regular GPS sources) to possibly 10 GHz for pulsars and radio magnetars exhibiting very strong absorption.« less

  12. Theory of Parabolic Arcs in Interstellar Scintillation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.; Rickett, Barney J.; Stinebring, Daniel R.; Coles, William A.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), observed as time variation in the intensity of a compact radio source, is caused by small-scale structure in the electron density of the interstellar plasma. Dynamic spectra of ISS show modulation in radio frequency and time. Here we relate the (two-dimensional) power spectrum of the dynamic spectrum-the secondary spectrum-to the scattered image of the source. Recent work has identified remarkable parabolic arcs in secondary spectra. Each point in a secondary spectrum corresponds to interference between points in the scattered image with a certain Doppler shift and a certain delay. The parabolic arc corresponds to the quadratic relation between differential Doppler shift and delay through their common dependence on scattering angle. We show that arcs will occur in all media that scatter significant power at angles larger than the rms angle. Thus, effects such as source diameter, steep spectra, and dissipation scales, which truncate high angle scattering, also truncate arcs. Arcs are equally visible in simulations of nondispersive scattering. They are enhanced by anisotropic scattering when the spatial structure is elongated perpendicular to the velocity. In weak scattering the secondary spectrum is directly mapped from the scattered image, and this mapping can be inverted. We discuss additional observed phenomena including multiple arcs and reverse arclets oriented oppositely to the main arc. These phenomena persist for many refractive scattering times, suggesting that they are due to large-scale density structures, rather than low-frequency components of Kolmogorov turbulence.

  13. Study of solar wind spectra by nonlinear waves interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Navin; Sharma, Rampal; Narita, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    The nature of small-scale turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind (SW) turbulence is a topic that is being investigated extensively nowadays, both theoretically and observationally. Although recent observations predict the evidence of the dominance of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAW) at sub-ion scales with frequency below than ion cyclotron frequency, while other studies suggest that the KAW mode cannot carry the turbulence cascade down to electron scales and that the whistler mode is more relevant. In the present work, nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfvén wave with whistler wave is considered as one of the possible cause responsible for the solar wind turbulence. A set of coupled dimensionless equations are derived for the intermediate beta plasmas and the nonlinear interaction between these two wave modes has been studied. As a consequence of ponderomotive nonlinearity, the pump KAW becomes filamented when its power exceeds the threshold for the filamentation instability. Whistler is considered to be weak and thus doesn't have enough intensity to initiate its own localization. It gets localized while propagating through the density channel created by KAW localization. In addition, spectral scales of power spectra of KAW and whistler are also calculated. The steeper spectra are found with scaling greater than -5/3. This type of nonlinear interaction between different wave modes and steeper spectra is one of the reasons for the solar wind turbulence and particles acceleration. This work is partially supported by DST (India) and FP7/STORM (313038)

  14. Quantum noise spectra for periodically driven cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranas, E. B.; Akram, M. Javed; Malz, Daniel; Monteiro, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    A growing number of experimental setups in cavity optomechanics exploit periodically driven fields. However, such setups are not amenable to analysis by using simple, yet powerful, closed-form expressions of linearized optomechanics, which have provided so much of our present understanding of experimental optomechanics. In the present paper, we formulate a method to calculate quantum noise spectra in modulated optomechanical systems, which we analyze, compare, and discuss with two other recently proposed solutions: we term these (i) frequency-shifted operators, (ii) Floquet [Phys. Rev. A 94, 023803 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.023803], and (iii) iterative analysis [New J. Phys. 18, 113021 (2016), 10.1088/1367-2630/18/11/113021]. We prove that (i) and (ii) yield equivalent noise spectra and find that (iii) is an analytical approximation to (i) for weak modulations. We calculate the noise spectra of a doubly modulated system describing experiments of levitated particles in hybrid electro-optical traps. We show excellent agreement with Langevin stochastic simulations in the thermal regime and predict squeezing in the quantum regime. Finally, we reveal how otherwise-inaccessible spectral components of a modulated system can be measured in heterodyne detection through an appropriate choice of modulation frequencies.

  15. Smoothed Spectra, Ogives, and Error Estimates for Atmospheric Turbulence Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Nelson Luís

    2018-01-01

    A systematic evaluation is conducted of the smoothed spectrum, which is a spectral estimate obtained by averaging over a window of contiguous frequencies. The technique is extended to the ogive, as well as to the cross-spectrum. It is shown that, combined with existing variance estimates for the periodogram, the variance—and therefore the random error—associated with these estimates can be calculated in a straightforward way. The smoothed spectra and ogives are biased estimates; with simple power-law analytical models, correction procedures are devised, as well as a global constraint that enforces Parseval's identity. Several new results are thus obtained: (1) The analytical variance estimates compare well with the sample variance calculated for the Bartlett spectrum and the variance of the inertial subrange of the cospectrum is shown to be relatively much larger than that of the spectrum. (2) Ogives and spectra estimates with reduced bias are calculated. (3) The bias of the smoothed spectrum and ogive is shown to be negligible at the higher frequencies. (4) The ogives and spectra thus calculated have better frequency resolution than the Bartlett spectrum, with (5) gradually increasing variance and relative error towards the low frequencies. (6) Power-law identification and extraction of the rate of dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy are possible directly from the ogive. (7) The smoothed cross-spectrum is a valid inner product and therefore an acceptable candidate for coherence and spectral correlation coefficient estimation by means of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. The quadrature, phase function, coherence function and spectral correlation function obtained from the smoothed spectral estimates compare well with the classical ones derived from the Bartlett spectrum.

  16. Spectral manipulation and complementary spectra with birefringence polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pan-Feng; Han, Pin

    2017-03-01

    A polarization control method using crystal birefringence is suggested to manipulate polychromatic light. This scheme can be used with narrower bandwidth to produce various spectral effects, such as a notch filter, a flat top, and triangle-type, nipple-type, and central-frequency-dominant distributions. A modulated spectrum with greater bandwidth can be used as an optical frequency ruler, and phenomena called complementary spectra are also proposed, where the two spectral distributions, produced by rotating the polarizer, complement each other in the sense that the peaks and valleys in one spectrum are the reverse in the other. These results benefit the controlling of the spectral shape and the measurement of an unknown optical frequency.

  17. Cooling Flow Spectra in Ginga Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1997-01-01

    The primary focus of this research project has been a joint analysis of Ginga LAC and Einstein SSS X-ray spectra of the hot gas in galaxy clusters with cooling flows is reported. We studied four clusters (A496, A1795, A2142 & A2199) and found their central temperatures to be cooler than in the exterior, which is expected from their having cooling flows. More interestingly, we found central metal abundance enhancements in two of the clusters, A496 and A2142. We have been assessing whether the abundance gradients (or lack thereof) in intracluster gas is correlated with galaxy morphological gradients in the host clusters. In rich, dense galaxy clusters, elliptical and SO galaxies are generally found in the cluster cores, while spiral galaxies are found in the outskirts. If the metals observed in clusters came from proto-ellipticals and proto-S0s blowing winds, then the metal distribution in intracluster gas may still reflect the distribution of their former host galaxies. In a research project which was inspired by the success of the Ginga LAC/Einstein SSS work, we analyzed X-ray spectra from the HEAO-A2 MED and the Einstein SSS to look for temperature gradients in cluster gas. The HEAO-A2 MED was also a non-imaging detector with a large field of view compared to the SSS, so we used the differing fields of view of the two instruments to extract spatial information. We found some evidence of cool gas in the outskirts of clusters, which may indicate that the nominally isothermal mass density distributions in these clusters are steepening in the outer parts of these clusters.

  18. Diagrammatic expansion for positive density-response spectra: Application to the electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uimonen, A.-M.; Stefanucci, G.; Pavlyukh, Y.; van Leeuwen, R.

    2015-03-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. B 90, 115134 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.115134] we put forward a diagrammatic expansion for the self-energy which guarantees the positivity of the spectral function. In this work we extend the theory to the density-response function. We write the generic diagram for the density-response spectrum as the sum of "partitions." In a partition the original diagram is evaluated using time-ordered Green's functions on the left half of the diagram, antitime-ordered Green's functions on the right half of the diagram, and lesser or greater Green's function gluing the two halves. As there exists more than one way to cut a diagram in two halves, to every diagram corresponds more than one partition. We recognize that the most convenient diagrammatic objects for constructing a theory of positive spectra are the half-diagrams. Diagrammatic approximations obtained by summing the squares of half-diagrams do indeed correspond to a combination of partitions which, by construction, yield a positive spectrum. We develop the theory using bare Green's functions and subsequently extend it to dressed Green's functions. We further prove a connection between the positivity of the spectral function and the analytic properties of the polarizability. The general theory is illustrated with several examples and then applied to solve the long-standing problem of including vertex corrections without altering the positivity of the spectrum. In fact already the first-order vertex diagram, relevant to the study of gradient expansion, Friedel oscillations, etc., leads to spectra which are negative in certain frequency domain. We find that the simplest approximation to cure this deficiency is given by the sum of the zeroth-order bubble diagram, the first-order vertex diagram, and a partition of the second-order ladder diagram. We evaluate this approximation in the three-dimensional homogeneous electron gas and show the positivity of the spectrum for all frequencies and

  19. Analysis of protein circular dichroism spectra for secondary structure using a simple matrix multiplication.

    PubMed

    Compton, L A; Johnson, W C

    1986-05-15

    Inverse circular dichroism (CD) spectra are presented for each of the five major secondary structures of proteins: alpha-helix, antiparallel and parallel beta-sheet, beta-turn, and other (random) structures. The fraction of the each secondary structure in a protein is predicted by forming the dot product of the corresponding inverse CD spectrum, expressed as a vector, with the CD spectrum of the protein digitized in the same way. We show how this method is based on the construction of the generalized inverse from the singular value decomposition of a set of CD spectra corresponding to proteins whose secondary structures are known from X-ray crystallography. These inverse spectra compute secondary structure directly from protein CD spectra without resorting to least-squares fitting and standard matrix inversion techniques. In addition, spectra corresponding to the individual secondary structures, analogous to the CD spectra of synthetic polypeptides, are generated from the five most significant CD eigenvectors.

  20. Kinetic energy and scalar spectra in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic energy and scalar spectra from the measurements in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulent flow are presented. Kinetic energy and concentration (scalar) spectra are obtained from the experiments wherein density difference is created using brine and fresh water and temperature spectra are obtained from the experiments in which heat is used. Scaling of the frequency spectra of lateral and longitudinal velocity near the tube axis is closer to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov scaling, while the scalar spectra show some evidence of dual scaling, Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling followed by Obukhov-Corrsin scaling. These scalings are also observed in the corresponding second order spatial structure functions of velocity and concentration fluctuations.

  1. Multi-scale roughness spectra of Mount St. Helens debris flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Richard T.; England, Anthony W.

    1993-01-01

    A roughness spectrum allows surface structure to be interpreted as a sum of sinusoidal components with differing wavelengths. Knowledge of the roughness spectrum gives insight into the mechanisms responsible for electromagnetic scattering at a given wavelength. Measured spectra from 10-year-old primary debris flow surfaces at Mount St. Helens conform to a power-law spectral model, suggesting that these surfaces are scaling over the measured range of spatial frequencies. Measured spectra from water-deposited surfaces deviate from this model.

  2. Investigation of the Mössbauer Spectrum Quality as a Dependence on the Frequency of the Velocity Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechousek, J.; Prochazka, R.; Cuda, J.; Frydrych, J.; Jancik, D.

    2010-07-01

    This paper is focused on a quality characterizing the Mössbauer spectra measured for various frequencies of the velocity signal. Standard electromechanical double-loudspeaker drive and digital PID velocity controller were used for calibration spectra measurement in the frequency interval from 4 up to 100 Hz. Several parameters were evaluated for recommendation of the suitable velocity signal frequency.

  3. Infrared absorption spectra of metal carbides, nitrides and sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammori, O.; Sato, K.; Kurosawa, F.

    1981-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of 12 kinds of metal carbides, 11 kinds of nitrides, and 7 kinds of sulfides, a total of 30 materials, were measured and the application of the infrared spectra of these materials to analytical chemistry was discussed. The measurements were done in the frequency (wave length) range of (1400 to 400/cm (7 to 25 mu). The carbides Al4C3, B4C, the nitrides AlN, BN, Si3N4, WB, and the sulfides Al2S3, FeS2, MnS, NiS and PbS were noted to have specific absorptions in the measured region. The sensitivity of Boron nitride was especially good and could be detected at 2 to 3 micrograms in 300 mg of potassium bromide.

  4. Photonic band gap spectra in Octonacci metamaterial quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we study theoretically the photonic band gap spectra for a one-dimensional quasicrystal made up of SiO2 (layer A) and a metamaterial (layer B) organized following the Octonacci sequence, where its nth-stage Sn is given by the inflation rule Sn =Sn - 1Sn - 2Sn - 1 for n ≥ 3 , with initial conditions S1 = A and S2 = B . The metamaterial is characterized by a frequency dependent electric permittivity ε(ω) and magnetic permeability μ(ω) . The polariton dispersion relation is obtained analytically by employing a theoretical calculation based on a transfer-matrix approach. A quantitative analysis of the spectra is then discussed, stressing the distribution of the allowed photonic band widths for high generations of the Octonacci structure, which depict a self-similar scaling property behavior, with a power law depending on the common in-plane wavevector kx .

  5. A time-frequency analysis method to obtain stable estimates of magnetotelluric response function based on Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianhua

    2017-05-01

    The time-frequency analysis method represents signal as a function of time and frequency, and it is considered a powerful tool for handling arbitrary non-stationary time series by using instantaneous frequency and instantaneous amplitude. It also provides a possible alternative to the analysis of the non-stationary magnetotelluric (MT) signal. Based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), a time-frequency analysis method is proposed to obtain stable estimates of the magnetotelluric response function. In contrast to conventional methods, the response function estimation is performed in the time-frequency domain using instantaneous spectra rather than in the frequency domain, which allows for imaging the response parameter content as a function of time and frequency. The theory of the method is presented and the mathematical model and calculation procedure, which are used to estimate response function based on HHT time-frequency spectrum, are discussed. To evaluate the results, response function estimates are compared with estimates from a standard MT data processing method based on the Fourier transform. All results show that apparent resistivities and phases, which are calculated from the HHT time-frequency method, are generally more stable and reliable than those determined from the simple Fourier analysis. The proposed method overcomes the drawbacks of the traditional Fourier methods, and the resulting parameter minimises the estimation bias caused by the non-stationary characteristics of the MT data.

  6. Substituent and solvent effects on electronic absorption spectra of some N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Krishnasamy; Kabilan, Senthamaraikannan

    2004-04-01

    The effects of substituents and solvents have been studied through the absorption spectra of nearly 23 ortho- and para-N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides in the range of 200-400 nm. The effects of substituents on the absorption spectra of compounds under present investigation are interpreted by correlation of absorption frequencies with simple and extended Hammett equations. Effect of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of Kamlet equation and the results are discussed. Copyright 2003 Elsevier B.V.

  7. On the suitability of ISO 16717-1 reference spectra for rating airborne sound insulation.

    PubMed

    Mašović, Draško B; Pavlović, Dragana S Šumarac; Mijić, Miomir M

    2013-11-01

    A standard proposal for rating airborne sound insulation in buildings [ISO 16717-1 (2012)] defines the reference noise spectra. Since their shapes influence the calculated values of single-number descriptors, reference spectra should approximate well typical noise spectra in buildings. There is, however, very little data in the existing literature on a typical noise spectrum in dwellings. A spectral analysis of common noise sources in dwellings is presented in this paper, as a result of an extensive monitoring of various noisy household activities. Apart from music with strong bass content, the proposed "living" reference spectrum overestimates noise levels at low frequencies.

  8. Absorption and resonance Raman spectra of Pb2, Pb3, and Pb4 in xenon matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stranz, D. D.; Khanna, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    Matrix isolation techniques are used to investigate the spectra of lead molecules and, in particular, to obtain resonance Raman spectra of lead vapors isolated in solid xenon matrices. The presence of Pb2 is confirmed by the visible adsorption, and Raman spectra yield a vibrational frequency for the ground state of 108 per cm and a dissociation energy of 8200 per cm. A second resonance Raman progression indicates a Pb3 species of D3h symmetry. Finally, two additional Raman features at approximately 111 per cm spacing are evidence for a third species, tentatively identified as Pb4.

  9. FTIR, FT-Raman spectra and ab initio, DFT vibrational analysis of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Sundaraganesan, N; Ayyappan, S; Umamaheswari, H; Joshua, B Dominic

    2007-01-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) has been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 3500-50cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of 2,4-DNPH were obtained by the ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory with complete relaxation in the potential energy surface using 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically constructed bar type spectrograms.

  10. FTIR, FT-Raman spectra and ab initio, DFT vibrational analysis of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaraganesan, N.; Ayyappan, S.; Umamaheswari, H.; Dominic Joshua, B.

    2007-01-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) has been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 3500-50 cm -1, respectively. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of 2,4-DNPH were obtained by the ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory with complete relaxation in the potential energy surface using 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically constructed bar type spectrograms.

  11. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  12. Galactic cosmic ray abundances and spectra behind defined shielding.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, W; Benton, E V; Wiegel, B; Zens, R; Rusch, G

    1994-10-01

    LET spectra have been measured for lunar missions and for several near Earth orbits ranging from 28 degrees to 83 degrees inclination. In some of the experiments the flux of GCR was determined separately from contributions caused by interactions in the detector material. Results of these experiments are compared to model calculations. The general agreement justifies the use of the model to calculate GCR fluxes. The magnitude of variations caused by solar modulation, geomagnetic shielding, and shielding by matter determined from calculated LET spectra is generally in agreement with experimental data. However, more detailed investigations show that there are some weak points in modeling solar modulation and shielding by material. These points are discussed in more detail.

  13. Determination of the optical absorption spectra of thin layers from their photoacoustic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychto, Leszek; Maliński, Mirosław; Patryn, Aleksy; Tivanov, Mikhail; Gremenok, Valery

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a new method for computations of the optical absorption coefficient spectra from the normalized photoacoustic amplitude spectra of thin semiconductor samples deposited on the optically transparent and thermally thick substrates. This method was tested on CuIn(Te0.7Se0.3)2 thin films. From the normalized photoacoustic amplitude spectra, the optical absorption coefficient spectra were computed with the new formula as also with the numerical iterative method. From these spectra, the value of the energy gap of the thin film material and the type of the optical transitions were determined. From the experimental optical transmission spectra, the optical absorption coefficient spectra were computed too, and compared with the optical absorption coefficient spectra obtained from photoacoustic spectra.

  14. Important influence of respiration on human R-R interval power spectra is largely ignored

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Koh, J.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency-domain analyses of R-R intervals are used widely to estimate levels of autonomic neural traffic to the human heart. Because respiration modulates autonomic activity, we determined for nine healthy subjects the influence of breathing frequency and tidal volume on R-R interval power spectra (fast-Fourier transform method). We also surveyed published literature to determine current practices in this burgeoning field of scientific inquiry. Supine subjects breathed at rates of 6, 7.5, 10, 15, 17.1, 20, and 24 breaths/min and with nominal tidal volumes of 1,000 and 1,500 ml. R-R interval power at respiratory and low (0.06-0.14 Hz) frequencies declined significantly as breathing frequency increased. R-R interval power at respiratory frequencies was significantly greater at a tidal volume of 1,500 than 1,000 ml. Neither breathing frequency nor tidal volume influenced average R-R intervals significantly. Our review of studies reporting human R-R interval power spectra showed that 51% of the studies controlled respiratory rate, 11% controlled tidal volume, and 11% controlled both respiratory rate and tidal volume. The major implications of our analyses are that breathing parameters strongly influence low-frequency as well as respiratory frequency R-R interval power spectra and that this influence is largely ignored in published research.

  15. Non-linear power spectra in the synchronous gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim; Jeong, Donghui

    2015-05-01

    We study the non-linear corrections to the matter and velocity power spectra in the synchronous gauge (SG). For the leading correction to the non-linear power spectra, we consider the perturbations up to third order in a zero-pressure fluid in a flat cosmological background. Although the equations in the SG happen to coincide with those in the comoving gauge (CG) to linear order, they differ from second order. In particular, the second order hydrodynamic equations in the SG are apparently in the Lagrangian form, whereas those in the CG are in the Eulerian form. The non-linear power spectra naively presented inmore » the original SG show rather pathological behavior quite different from the result of the Newtonian theory even on sub-horizon scales. We show that the pathology in the nonlinear power spectra is due to the absence of the convective terms in, thus the Lagrangian nature of, the SG. We show that there are many different ways of introducing the corrective convective terms in the SG equations. However, the convective terms (Eulerian modification) can be introduced only through gauge transformations to other gauges which should be the same as the CG to the second order. In our previous works we have shown that the density and velocity perturbation equations in the CG exactly coincide with the Newtonian equations to the second order, and the pure general relativistic correction terms starting to appear from the third order are substantially suppressed compared with the relativistic/Newtonian terms in the power spectra. As a result, we conclude that the SG per se is an inappropriate coordinate choice in handling the non-linear matter and velocity power spectra of the large-scale structure where observations meet with theories.« less

  16. Reflection spectra of solids of planetary interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1973-01-01

    The spectra of solids are reproduced which might be found on the surfaces of planetary bodies or as solid condensates in the upper planetary atmosphere. Among these are spectra of various iron compounds of interest in the study of the clouds of Venus. Other spectra are included of various sulfides, some at low temperature, relevant to the planet Jupiter. Meteorite and coal abstracts are also included, to illustrate dark carbon compounds.

  17. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  18. Gigahertz-peaked spectra pulsars in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, R.; RoŻko, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2018-04-01

    We have carried out a detailed study of the spectral nature of six pulsars surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). The pulsar flux density was estimated using the interferometric imaging technique of the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at three frequencies 325, 610, and 1280 MHz. The spectra showed a turnover around gigahertz frequency in four out of six pulsars. It has been suggested that the gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) in pulsars arises due to thermal absorption of the pulsar emission in surrounding medium like PWNe, H II regions, supernova remnants, etc. The relatively high incidence of GPS behaviour in pulsars surrounded by PWNe imparts further credence to this view. The pulsar J1747-2958 associated with the well-known Mouse nebula was also observed in our sample and exhibited GPS behaviour. The pulsar was detected as a point source in the high-resolution images. However, the pulsed emission was not seen in the phased-array mode. It is possible that the pulsed emission was affected by extreme scattering causing considerable smearing of the emission at low radio frequencies. The GPS spectra were modelled using the thermal free-free absorption and the estimated absorber properties were largely consistent with PWNe. The spatial resolution of the images made it unlikely that the point source associated with J1747-2958 was the compact head of the PWNe, but the synchrotron self-absorption seen in such sources was a better fit to the estimated spectral shape.

  19. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  20. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  1. Hemoglobin spectra affect measurement of tissue oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostojic, Daniel; Kleiser, Stefan; Nasseri, Nassim; Isler, Helene; Scholkmann, Felix; Karen, Tanja; Wolf, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is a valuable clinical parameter e.g. for intensive care applications or monitoring during surgery. Studies showed that near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) based tissue oximeters of different brands give systematically different readings of StO2. Usually these readings are linearly correlated and therefore StO2 readings from one instrument can easily be converted to those of another instrument. However, it is interesting to understand why there is this difference. One reason may be that different brands employ different spectra of hemoglobin. The aim here was to investigate how these different absorption spectra of hemoglobin affect the StO2 readings. Therefore, we performed changes in StO2 in a phantom experiment with real human hemoglobin at three different concentrations (26.5, 45 and 70 μM): desaturation by yeast consuming the oxygen and re-saturation by bubbling oxygen gas. The partial pressure of O2 in the liquid changed from at least 10 kPa to 0 kPa and ISS OxiplexTS, a frequency-domain NIRS instrument, was used to monitor changes of StO2. When we employed two different absorption spectra for hemoglobin, StO2 values were comparable in the normal physiological range. However, particularly at high and low StO2 values, a difference of >6% between these two spectra were noticed. Such a difference of >6% is substantial and relevant for medical applications. This may partly explain why different brands of NIRS instruments provide different StO2 readings. The hemoglobin spectra are therefore a factor to be considered for future developments and applications of NIRS oximeters.

  2. Dimeric spectra analysis in Microsoft Excel: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gilani, A Ghanadzadeh; Moghadam, M; Zakerhamidi, M S

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce the reader to an Add-in implementation, Decom. This implementation provides the whole processing requirements for analysis of dimeric spectra. General linear and nonlinear decomposition algorithms were integrated as an Excel Add-in for easy installation and usage. In this work, the results of several samples investigations were compared to those obtained by Datan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  4. Energy spectra of quantum rings.

    PubMed

    Fuhrer, A; Lüscher, S; Ihn, T; Heinzel, T; Ensslin, K; Wegscheider, W; Bichler, M

    2001-10-25

    Quantum mechanical experiments in ring geometries have long fascinated physicists. Open rings connected to leads, for example, allow the observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the best examples of quantum mechanical phase coherence. The phase coherence of electrons travelling through a quantum dot embedded in one arm of an open ring has also been demonstrated. The energy spectra of closed rings have only recently been studied by optical spectroscopy. The prediction that they allow persistent current has been explored in various experiments. Here we report magnetotransport experiments on closed rings in the Coulomb blockade regime. Our experiments show that a microscopic understanding of energy levels, so far limited to few-electron quantum dots, can be extended to a many-electron system. A semiclassical interpretation of our results indicates that electron motion in the rings is governed by regular rather than chaotic motion, an unexplored regime in many-electron quantum dots. This opens a way to experiments where even more complex structures can be investigated at a quantum mechanical level.

  5. Near infrared Raman spectra of Rhizoma dioscoreae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenshuo; Chen, Rong; Chen, Guannan; Feng, Sangyuan; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Zufang; Li, Yongsen

    2008-03-01

    A novel and compact near-infrared (NIR) Raman system is developed using 785-nm diode laser, volume-phase technology holographic system, and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD). Raman spectra and first derivative spectra of Rhizoma Dioscoreae are obtained. Raman spectra of Rhizoma Dioscoreae showed three strong characteristic peaks at 477.4cm -1, 863.9cm -1, and 936.0cm -1. The major ingredients are protein, amino acid, starch, polysaccharides and so on, matched with the known basic biochemical composition of Rhizoma Dioscoreae. In the first derivative spectra of Rhizoma Dioscoreae, distinguishing characteristic peaks appeared at 467.674cm -1, 484.603cm -1, 870.37cm -1, 943.368cm -1. Contrasted with Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman spectra, in 600cm -1 to 800cm -1, 1000cm -1 to 1400cm -1 regions, changes in Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra are represented more clearly than Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman spectra. So Rhizoma Dioscoreae raman first derivative spectra can be an accurate supplementary analysis method to Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman spectra.

  6. User's manual SIG: a general-purpose signal processing program

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1983-10-25

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Many of the basic operations one would perform on digitized data are contained in the core SIG package. Out of these core commands, more powerful signal processing algorithms may be built. Many different operations on time- and frequency-domain signals can be performed by SIG. They include operations on the samples of a signal, such as adding a scalar tomore » each sample, operations on the entire signal such as digital filtering, and operations on two or more signals such as adding two signals. Signals may be simulated, such as a pulse train or a random waveform. Graphics operations display signals and spectra.« less

  7. Frequency response of electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Impedance concepts can be applied to the analysis of battery electrodes, yielding information about the structure of the electrode and the processes occurring in the electrode. Structural parameters such as the specific area (surface area per gram of electrode) can be estimated. Electrode variables such as surface overpotential, ohmic losses, and diffusion limitations may be studied. Nickel and cadmium electrodes were studied by measuring the ac impedance as a function of frequency, and the specific areas that were determined were well within the range of specific areas determined from BET measurements. Impedance spectra were measured for the nickel and cadmium electrodes, and for a 20 A-hr NiCd battery as functions of the state of charge. More work is needed to determine the feasibility of using frequency response as a nondestructive testing technique for batteries.

  8. Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.

    2017-04-01

    We report a detailed spectroscopic investigation of the interstellar aminoacetonitrile, a possible precursor molecule of glycine. Using a combination of Stark and frequency-modulation microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopies, we observed and analyzed the room-temperature rotational spectra of 29 excited states with energies up to 1000 cm{sup −1}. We also observed the {sup 13}C isotopologues in the ground vibrational state in natural abundance (1.1%). The extensive data set of more than 2000 new rotational transitions will support further identifications of aminoacetonitrile in the interstellar medium.

  9. Specdata: Automated Analysis Software for Broadband Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Jasmine N.; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2017-06-01

    With the advancement of chirped-pulse techniques, broadband rotational spectra with a few tens to several hundred GHz of spectral coverage are now routinely recorded. When studying multi-component mixtures that might result, for example, with the use of an electrical discharge, lines of new chemical species are often obscured by those of known compounds, and analysis can be laborious. To address this issue, we have developed SPECdata, an open source, interactive tool which is designed to simplify and greatly accelerate the spectral analysis and discovery. Our software tool combines both automated and manual components that free the user from computation, while giving him/her considerable flexibility to assign, manipulate, interpret and export their analysis. The automated - and key - component of the new software is a database query system that rapidly assigns transitions of known species in an experimental spectrum. For each experiment, the software identifies spectral features, and subsequently assigns them to known molecules within an in-house database (Pickett .cat files, list of frequencies...), or those catalogued in Splatalogue (using automatic on-line queries). With suggested assignments, the control is then handed over to the user who can choose to accept, decline or add additional species. Data visualization, statistical information, and interactive widgets assist the user in making decisions about their data. SPECdata has several other useful features intended to improve the user experience. Exporting a full report of the analysis, or a peak file in which assigned lines are removed are among several options. A user may also save their progress to continue at another time. Additional features of SPECdata help the user to maintain and expand their database for future use. A user-friendly interface allows one to search, upload, edit or update catalog or experiment entries.

  10. PGOPHER: A program for simulating rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    The PGOPHER program is a general purpose program for simulating and fitting molecular spectra, particularly the rotational structure. The current version can handle linear molecules, symmetric tops and asymmetric tops and many possible transitions, both allowed and forbidden, including multiphoton and Raman spectra in addition to the common electric dipole absorptions. Many different interactions can be included in the calculation, including those arising from electron and nuclear spin, and external electric and magnetic fields. Multiple states and interactions between them can also be accounted for, limited only by available memory. Fitting of experimental data can be to line positions (in many common formats), intensities or band contours and the parameters determined can be level populations as well as rotational constants. PGOPHER is provided with a powerful and flexible graphical user interface to simplify many of the tasks required in simulating, understanding and fitting molecular spectra, including Fortrat diagrams and energy level plots in addition to overlaying experimental and simulated spectra. The program is open source, and can be compiled with open source tools. This paper provides a formal description of the operation of version 9.1.

  11. Radiation Belt Electron Energy Spectra Characterization and Evolution Based on the Van Allen Probes Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blum, L. W.; Schiller, Q. A.; Leonard, T. W.; Elkington, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    The electron energy spectra, as an important characteristic of radiation belt electrons, provide valuable information on the physical mechanisms affecting different electron populations. Based on the measurements of 30 keV - 10 MeV electrons from MagEIS and REPT instruments on the Van Allen Probes, case studies and statistical analysis of the radiation belt electron energy spectra characterization and evolution have been performed. Generally the radiation belt electron energy spectra can be represented by one of the three types of distributions: exponential, power law, and bump-on-tail. Statistical analysis shows that the exponential spectra are usually dominant in the outer radiation belt; as the geomagnetic storms occur, energy spectra in the outer belt soften at first due to injection of lower-energy electrons and loss of higher-energy electrons, and gradually get harder due to loss of lower-energy electrons and delayed enhancement of higher energy electron fluxes. Power law spectra generally dominate the inner belt and higher L region (L>6) during injections. Bump-on-tail spectra commonly exist inside the plasmasphere following the geomagnetic storms and/or the compression of plasmasphere, while the energy of flux maxima is usually 1.8 MeV as the bump-on-tail spectra form and gradually moves to higher energies as the spectra evolve, with the ratio of flux maxima to minima up to >10. Detailed event study indicates that the appearance of bump-on-tail spectra are mainly due to energy-dependent losses caused by the plasmaspheric hiss wave scattering, while the disappearance of these spectra can be attributed to fast flux enhancements of lower-energy electrons during storms.

  12. Improved real-time dynamics from imaginary frequency lattice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Jan M.; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The computation of real-time properties, such as transport coefficients or bound state spectra of strongly interacting quantum fields in thermal equilibrium is a pressing matter. Since the sign problem prevents a direct evaluation of these quantities, lattice data needs to be analytically continued from the Euclidean domain of the simulation to Minkowski time, in general an ill-posed inverse problem. Here we report on a novel approach to improve the determination of real-time information in the form of spectral functions by setting up a simulation prescription in imaginary frequencies. By carefully distinguishing between initial conditions and quantum dynamics one obtains access to correlation functions also outside the conventional Matsubara frequencies. In particular the range between ω0 and ω1 = 2πT, which is most relevant for the inverse problem may be more highly resolved. In combination with the fact that in imaginary frequencies the kernel of the inverse problem is not an exponential but only a rational function we observe significant improvements in the reconstruction of spectral functions, demonstrated in a simple 0+1 dimensional scalar field theory toy model.

  13. Mutation Spectra of Common Cancer-Associated Genes in Different Phenotypes of Colorectal Carcinoma Without Distant Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Ching; Lin, Pei-Ching; Lin, Jen-Kou; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Yang, Shung-Haur; Liang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Wei-Shone; Jiang, Jeng-Kai

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to describe the mutation frequency of 12 genes in different CRC phenotypes. Patients who underwent surgery at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital during 2000-2010 for CRC (n = 1249) were enrolled. The endpoint was overall survival. The prognostic value was determined with the log-rank test and Cox regression analysis. We found 1836 mutations of 12 genes in 997 (79.8%) tumors. Mutations were most frequently in KRAS (485, 38.8%), TP53 (373, 29.9%), APC (363, 29.0%), and PIK3CA (179, 14.3%); 137 (11.0%) cancers had high microsatellite instability (MSI). Women had significantly higher high MSI (14.3%) and BRAF mutation (6.3%) frequencies. The abnormal MSI (21.7%) and KRAS (44.6%), BRAF (8.6%), PIK3CA (19.4%), AKT1 (2.2%), and TGF - βR (9.6%) mutation frequencies were significantly higher in proximal colon cancer. The high MSI (35.6%) and BRAF (20.3%), TGF - βR (18.6%), PTEN (5.1%), and AKT1 (3.4%) mutation frequencies were significantly higher in 59 (4.7%) poorly differentiated tumors. The high MSI (21.3%) and KRAS (51.9%), BRAF (8.3%), PIK3CA (25.0%), AKT1 (4.6%), and SMAD4 (8.3%) mutation frequencies were significantly higher in 108 mucinous tumors. TNM stage, lymphovascular invasion, and mucinous histology were significantly associated with patient outcomes in univariate and multivariate analyses. Only NRAS mutation (hazard ratio 1.59, 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.38) affected patient survival. Mutational spectra differ significantly between CRC subtypes, implying diverse carcinogenetic pathways. The NRAS mutation is important, despite its low frequency.

  14. Tunneling Spectra of a Quasifreestanding Graphene Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Yu; Bai, Ke-Ke; Zuo, Wei-Jie; Liu, Yi-Wen; Fu, Zhong-Qiu; Wang, Wen-Xiao; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Long-Jing; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2018-05-01

    Considering the great success of scanning-tunneling-microscopy (STM) studies of graphene in the past ten years, it is quite surprising to notice that there is still a fundamental contradiction in the reported tunneling spectra of the quasifreestanding graphene monolayer. Many groups observed "V -shaped" spectra with linearly vanishing density of states at the Dirac point, whereas others reported spectra with a gap of ±60 meV pinned to the Fermi level in the quasifreestanding graphene monolayer. Here, we systematically study the two contradicting tunneling spectra of the quasifreestanding graphene monolayer on various substrates in the presence of different magnetic fields and demonstrate that both spectra are the "correct" spectra. However, the V -shaped spectrum exhibits only the contribution of the low-energy Dirac fermions, whereas the gapped spectrum is contributed by both the low-energy Dirac fermions and the high-energy nearly free-electron states due to the existence of the inelastic tunneling process. Our results indicate that interaction with substrates plays a vital role in affecting the spectra of graphene. We also show that it is possible to switch the tunneling spectra between the two distinct features at the nanoscale through voltage pulses applied to the STM tip.

  15. Influence of crystal fields on the quasimetallic reflection spectra of crystals: Optical spectra of polymorphs of a squarylium dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristani-Kendra, M.; Eckhardt, C. J.

    1984-08-01

    The reflection and Kramers-Kronig absorption spectra have been obtained from the monoclinic and triclinic polymorphs of a squarylium dye, 2,4-bis(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxy phenyl) cyclobutadienediylium-1,3-diolate. The extremely different optical responses were found to arise from two molecular singlet transitions of essentially long axis polarization. Successful application of a four oscillator molecular exciton-polariton theory required the use of point charge densities rather than point dipoles in an extension of the theory which employed both interactions between the two singlets as well as a frequency dependent lattice damping. An intermolecular charge transfer transition is also assigned.

  16. 47 CFR 2.102 - Assignment of frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assignment of frequencies. 2.102 Section 2.102 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL... authorized the use of any frequency or frequency band not exclusively allocated to the passive services...

  17. Development of Infrared Library Search Prefilters for Automotive Clear Coats from Simulated Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Spectra.

    PubMed

    Perera, Undugodage Don Nuwan; Nishikida, Koichi; Lavine, Barry K

    2018-06-01

    A previously published study featuring an attenuated total reflection (ATR) simulation algorithm that mitigated distortions in ATR spectra was further investigated to evaluate its efficacy to enhance searching of infrared (IR) transmission libraries. In the present study, search prefilters were developed from transformed ATR spectra to identify the assembly plant of a vehicle from ATR spectra of the clear coat layer. A total of 456 IR transmission spectra from the Paint Data Query (PDQ) database that spanned 22 General Motors assembly plants and served as a training set cohort were transformed into ATR spectra by the simulation algorithm. These search prefilters were formulated using the fingerprint region (1500 cm -1 to 500 cm -1 ). Both the transformed ATR spectra (training set) and the experimental ATR spectra (validation set) were preprocessed for pattern recognition analysis using the discrete wavelet transform, which increased the signal-to-noise of the ATR spectra by concentrating the signal in specific wavelet coefficients. Attenuated total reflection spectra of 14 clear coat samples (validation set) measured with a Nicolet iS50 Fourier transform IR spectrometer were correctly classified as to assembly plant(s) of the automotive vehicle from which the paint sample originated using search prefilters developed from 456 simulated ATR spectra. The ATR simulation (transformation) algorithm successfully facilitated spectral library matching of ATR spectra against IR transmission spectra of automotive clear coats in the PDQ database.

  18. Chemical composition of matrix-embedded ternary II-VI nanocrystals derived from first- and second-order Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhniuk, Yu. M.; Hutych, Yu. I.; Lopushansky, V. V.; Prymak, M. V.; Gomonnai, A. V.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2016-12-01

    A one- and multiphonon Raman scattering study is performed for an extensive set of CdS1-xSex, Cd1-yZnyS, Cd1-yZnySe, and CdSe1-xTex nanocrystals to investigate the applicability of first- and second-order Raman spectra for the determination of the matrix-embedded ternary nanocrystal composition. For one-mode ternary systems both the LO and 2LO phonon frequencies in the Raman spectra are shown to be a good measure of the nanocrystal composition. For two-mode systems, the approaches based on the difference of the LO phonon frequencies (first-order Raman spectra) or double LO overtone and combination tone frequencies (second-order Raman spectra) as well as on the LO phonon band intensity ratios are analysed. The weak electron-phonon coupling in the II-VI nanocrystals and the polaron constant values for the nanocrystal sublattices are discussed.

  19. Isotope effects on the optical spectra of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel; Thewalt, M. L. W.

    2005-10-01

    Since the end of the cold war, macroscopic amounts of separated stable isotopes of most elements have been available “off the shelf” at affordable prices. Using these materials, single crystals of many semiconductors have been grown and the dependence of their physical properties on isotopic composition has been investigated. The most conspicuous effects observed have to do with the dependence of phonon frequencies and linewidths on isotopic composition. These affect the electronic properties of solids through the mechanism of electron-phonon interaction, in particular, in the corresponding optical excitation spectra and energy gaps. This review contains a brief introduction to the history, availability, and characterization of stable isotopes, including their many applications in science and technology. It is followed by a concise discussion of the effects of isotopic composition on the vibrational spectra, including the influence of average isotopic masses and isotopic disorder on the phonons. The final sections deal with the effects of electron-phonon interaction on energy gaps, the concomitant effects on the luminescence spectra of free and bound excitons, with particular emphasis on silicon, and the effects of isotopic composition of the host material on the optical transitions between the bound states of hydrogenic impurities.

  20. THz spectra of cortisone and the related medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shihua; Ge, Min; Liu, Guifeng; Song, Xiyu; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Wenfeng

    2009-07-01

    THz-TDS are used to study four kinds of drug: cortisone, hydrocortisone, prednisone and prednisolone. The THz spectra of them are obtained and analyzed from 0.2 - 1.6 THz. The experimental results shows the four samples have the different THz spectra. Cortisone has a peak at 1.5 THz and a broad absorption peak at 0.96 THz, while hydrocortisone has a weak absorption peak that lies at 1.27 THz. At the same time the prednisone has the stronger absorption peaks than the others, and its two peaks shows at 1.24 THz and 1.5 THz. Prednisolone has a weak broad peak at 1.43 THz. The results of the theoretical calculation were performed using Gaussian 03 software with Density Functional Theory at the basis set of 6-31+G (d, p). The theoretical vibrational frequencies are compared with the experimental results, and the deviations are discussed. The THz spectra of the medicine show THz technique may be help to distinguish some different chemical bond and functional group.

  1. Flat microwave spectra seen at X-class flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Gary, Dale E.; Zirin, H.

    1994-01-01

    We report peculiar spectral activity of four large microwave bursts as obtained from the Solar Arrays at the Owens Valey Radio Observatory during observations of X-class flares on 24 May 1990 and 7, 8, 22 March 1991. Main observational points that we newly uncovered are: (1) flat flux spectra over 1-18 GHz in large amounts of flux ranging from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4) s.f.u. at the maximum phase, (2) a common evolutionary pattern in which the spectral region of dominant flux shifts from high frequencies at the initial rise to low frequencies at the decaying phase, and (3) unusual time profiles that are impulsive at high frequencies but more extended at lower frequencies. We carry out the model calculations of microwave spectra under assumptions of gyrosynchrotron mechanism and a dipole field configuration to reproduce the observational characteristics. Our results are summarized as follows. First, a flat microwave spectrum reaching up to 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 4) s.f.u. may occur in a case where a magnetic loop is extended to an angular size of approximately (0.7-7.0) x 10(exp -7) sterad and contains a huge number (N(E greater than 10 keV) approx. 10(exp 36) - 10(exp 38)) of nonthermal electrons with power-law index approx. 3-3.5 over the entire volume. Second, the observed spectral activity could adequately be accounted for by the shrinking of the region of nonthermal electrons to the loop top and by the softening of the power-law spectrum of electrons in a time scale ranging 3-45 min depending on the event. Third, the extended microwave activity at lower frequencies is probably due to electrons trapped in the loop top where magnetic fields are low. Finally, we clarify the physical distinction between these large, extended microwave bursts and the gradual/post-microwave bursts often seen in weak events, both of which are characterized by long-period activity and broadband spectra.

  2. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  3. Quantitative analysis of dinuclear manganese(II) EPR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, Adina P.; Hendrich, Michael P.

    2003-11-01

    A quantitative method for the analysis of EPR spectra from dinuclear Mn(II) complexes is presented. The complex [(Me 3TACN) 2Mn(II) 2(μ-OAc) 3]BPh 4 ( 1) (Me 3TACN= N, N', N''-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane; OAc=acetate 1-; BPh 4=tetraphenylborate 1-) was studied with EPR spectroscopy at X- and Q-band frequencies, for both perpendicular and parallel polarizations of the microwave field, and with variable temperature (2-50 K). Complex 1 is an antiferromagnetically coupled dimer which shows signals from all excited spin manifolds, S=1 to 5. The spectra were simulated with diagonalization of the full spin Hamiltonian which includes the Zeeman and zero-field splittings of the individual manganese sites within the dimer, the exchange and dipolar coupling between the two manganese sites of the dimer, and the nuclear hyperfine coupling for each manganese ion. All possible transitions for all spin manifolds were simulated, with the intensities determined from the calculated probability of each transition. In addition, the non-uniform broadening of all resonances was quantitatively predicted using a lineshape model based on D- and r-strain. As the temperature is increased from 2 K, an 11-line hyperfine pattern characteristic of dinuclear Mn(II) is first observed from the S=3 manifold. D- and r-strain are the dominate broadening effects that determine where the hyperfine pattern will be resolved. A single unique parameter set was found to simulate all spectra arising for all temperatures, microwave frequencies, and microwave modes. The simulations are quantitative, allowing for the first time the determination of species concentrations directly from EPR spectra. Thus, this work describes the first method for the quantitative characterization of EPR spectra of dinuclear manganese centers in model complexes and proteins. The exchange coupling parameter J for complex 1 was determined ( J=-1.5±0.3 cm-1; H ex=-2J S1· S2) and found to be in agreement with a previous

  4. Kinetic damping in the spectra of the spherical impedance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, J.

    2018-04-01

    The impedance probe is a measurement device to measure plasma parameters, such as electron density. It consists of one electrode connected to a network analyzer via a coaxial cable and is immersed into a plasma. A bias potential superposed with an alternating potential is applied to the electrode and the response of the plasma is measured. Its dynamical interaction with the plasma in an electrostatic, kinetic description can be modeled in an abstract notation based on functional analytic methods. These methods provide the opportunity to derive a general solution, which is given as the response function of the probe–plasma system. It is defined by the matrix elements of the resolvent of an appropriate dynamical operator. Based on the general solution, a residual damping for vanishing pressure can be predicted and can only be explained by kinetic effects. In this paper, an explicit response function of the spherical impedance probe is derived. Therefore, the resolvent is determined by its algebraic representation based on an expansion in orthogonal basis functions. This allows one to compute an approximated response function and its corresponding spectra. These spectra show additional damping due to kinetic effects and are in good agreement with former kinetically determined spectra.

  5. Lightning electromagnetic radiation field spectra in the interval from 0. 2 to 20 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, J.C.; Bailey, J.C.; Leteinturier, C.

    1990-11-20

    Average energy spectral densities are presented for the fast transitions in most of the components that produce large radiation field impulses from cloud-to-ground lightning; first and subsequent return strokes; stepped, dart-stepped, and 'chaotic' leaders; and 'characteristic' cloud pulses. A disagreement in the previous literature about the spectral energy radiated by return strokes at high frequencies is noted and explained. The authors show that the spectral amplitudes are not seriously distorted by propagation over less than 35 km of seawater, although as much as 45 km of such propagation does appear to produce significant attenuation above about 10 MHz. First andmore » subsequent return strokes produce identical spectra between 0.2 and 20 MHz. The spectra of stepped and dart-stepped leader steps are nearly identical and are very similar to that of characteristic pulses. The spectra of leader steps also match return stroke spectra above 2-3 MHz after the former are increased by about 7 dB. The shapes of individual spectra do not depend on their amplitude, so the shapes of the average spectra are probably not distorted by the trigger thresholds used in the data acquisition. Return strokes are the strongest sources of radiation from cloud-to-ground lightning in the 0.2- to 20-MHz frequency range, although certain intracloud processes are stronger radiators above 8 MHz.« less

  6. The Mid-Infrared Transmission Spectra of Antarctic Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-infrared (4000-450 1/cm; 2.5-22.2 micron) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000 1/cm (10 micron) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-infrared ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites. At present, the best candidates include the subset of S-type asteroids having low albedos and weak absorption features in the near infrared.

  7. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectancemore » spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.« less

  8. Infrared reflectance spectra: effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, J. E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-10-01

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  9. Use of mutation spectra analysis software.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I; Kondrashov, F; Glazko, G

    2001-02-01

    The study and comparison of mutation(al) spectra is an important problem in molecular biology, because these spectra often reflect on important features of mutations and their fixation. Such features include the interaction of DNA with various mutagens, the function of repair/replication enzymes, and properties of target proteins. It is known that mutability varies significantly along nucleotide sequences, such that mutations often concentrate at certain positions, called "hotspots," in a sequence. In this paper, we discuss in detail two approaches for mutation spectra analysis: the comparison of mutation spectra with a HG-PUBL program, (FTP: sunsite.unc.edu/pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations/hyperg) and hotspot prediction with the CLUSTERM program (www.itba.mi.cnr.it/webmutation; ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/dbms/clusterm.zip). Several other approaches for mutational spectra analysis, such as the analysis of a target protein structure, hotspot context revealing, multiple spectra comparisons, as well as a number of mutation databases are briefly described. Mutation spectra in the lacI gene of E. coli and the human p53 gene are used for illustration of various difficulties of such analysis. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Influence of molecular electronic properties on the IR spectra of dimeric hydrogen bond systems: polarized spectra of 2-hydroxybenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flakus, Henryk T.; Miros, Artur; Jones, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals of 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (HBT) and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT). The crystal structure of 2-hydroxybenzothiazole was determined by X-ray diffraction. The polarized spectra of the crystals were measured, in the frequency ranges of the νN-H and νN-D bands, at room temperature, and at 77 K. In both systems an extremely strong H/D isotopic effect in the spectra was observed, involving reduction of the well-developed νN-H band fine structure to a single prominent νN-D line only. The two νN-H bands were also shown to exhibit almost identical properties, band shapes, temperature and dichroic properties included. The spectra were quantitatively reconstituted, along with the strong isotopic effect, when calculated using the 'strong-coupling' theory, assuming the centrosymmetric dimers of HBT or MBT to be the structural units responsible for the crystalline spectral properties. The similarity of the spectra of the two crystalline systems was considered to be a result of longer-distance couplings between the proton vibrations in the dimers, via the aromatic ring electrons. When investigating the 'residual' νN-H band shapes for crystals isotopically diluted by deuterium, we observed some 'self-organization' effects in the spectra, indicating the energetically favored presence of two identical hydrogen isotopes in each hydrogen bond dimer.

  11. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana L.; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D.; Smart, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. Materials and Methods An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10–100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50–100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse’s temperature approached the set target. Conclusion The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality. PMID:27806062

  12. Statistical properties of Fermi GBM GRBs' spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, István I.; Balázs, Lajos G.; Horvath, Istvan; Tóth, L. Viktor; Bagoly, Zsolt

    2018-03-01

    Statistical studies of gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra may result in important information on the physics of GRBs. The Fermi GBM catalogue contains GRB parameters (peak energy, spectral indices, and intensity) estimated fitting the gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of the total emission (fluence, flnc), and during the time of the peak flux (pflx). Using contingency tables, we studied the relationship of the models best-fitting pflx and flnc time intervals. Our analysis revealed an ordering of the spectra into a power law - Comptonized - smoothly broken power law - Band series. This result was further supported by a correspondence analysis of the pflx and flnc spectra categorical variables. We performed a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to find a relationship between categorical (spectral) and model independent physical data. LDA resulted in highly significant physical differences among the spectral types, that is more pronounced in the case of the pflx spectra, than for the flnc spectra. We interpreted this difference as caused by the temporal variation of the spectrum during the outburst. This spectral variability is confirmed by the differences in the low-energy spectral index and peak energy, between the pflx and flnc spectra. We found that the synchrotron radiation is significant in GBM spectra. The mean low-energy spectral index is close to the canonical value of α = -2/3 during the peak flux. However, α is ˜ -0.9 for the spectra of the fluences. We interpret this difference as showing that the effect of cooling is important only for the fluence spectra.

  13. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo, E-mail: mvp@sejong.ac.kr

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is onemore » order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.« less

  14. Calculation of ferromagnetic resonance spectra for chains of magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a taxonomically diverse group of bacteria that have chains of ferromagnetic crystals inside. These bacteria mostly live in the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) of aquatic environments. The magnetic chains orient the bacteria parallel to the Earth's magnetic field and help them to maintain their position near the OAI. These chains show the fingerprint of natural selection acting to optimize the magnetic moment per unit iron. This is achieved in a number of ways: the alignment in chains, a narrow size range, crystallographic perfection and chemical purity. Because of these distinctive characteristics, the particles can still be identified after the bacteria have died. Such magnetofossils are useful both as records of bacterial evolution and environmental markers. They can most reliably be identified by microscopy, but that is very labor-intensive. A number of magnetic measurements have been developed to identify magnetofossils quickly and non-invasively. However, the only test that can specifically identify the chain structure is ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), which measures the response to a magnetic field oscillating at microwave frequencies. Although the experimental side of ferromagnetic resonance is well developed, the theoretical models for interpreting them have been limited. A new method is presented for calculating resonance frequencies as well as complete power spectra for chains of interacting magnetic particles. Spectra are calculated and compared with data for magnetotactic bacteria.

  15. Photoemission spectra and band structures of simple metals

    SciTech Connect

    Shung, K.W.; Mahan, G.D.

    1988-08-15

    We present a detailed calculation of the angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Na. The calculation follows a theory by Mahan, which allows for the inclusion of various bulk and surface effects. We find it important to take into account various broadening effects in order to explain the anomalous structure at E/sub F/, which was found by Jensen and Plummer in the spectra of Na. The broadening effects also help to resolve the discrepancy of the conduction-band width. Efforts are made to compare our results with new measurements of Plummer and Lyo. We discuss the ambiguity concerning the sign of the crystalmore » potential and comment on charge-density waves in the systems. We have also generalized our discussions to other simple metals like K.« less

  16. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  17. IDEOS: Fitting Infrared Spectra from Dusty Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Vincent; Rupke, D.

    2014-01-01

    We fit models to heavily obscured infrared spectra taken by the Spitzer Space Telescope and prepare them for cataloguing in the Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS). When completed, IDEOS will contain homogeneously measured mid-infrared spectroscopic observables of more than 4200 galaxies beyond the Local Group. The software we use, QUESTFit, models the spectra using up to three extincted blackbodies (including silicate, water ice, and hydrocarbon absorption) and PAH templates. We present results from a sample of the approximately 200 heavily obscured spectra that will be present in IDEOS.

  18. Systolic Processor Array For Recognition Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Peterson, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral signatures of materials detected and identified quickly. Spectral Analysis Systolic Processor Array (SPA2) relatively inexpensive and satisfies need to analyze large, complex volume of multispectral data generated by imaging spectrometers to extract desired information: computational performance needed to do this in real time exceeds that of current supercomputers. Locates highly similar segments or contiguous subsegments in two different spectra at time. Compares sampled spectra from instruments with data base of spectral signatures of known materials. Computes and reports scores that express degrees of similarity between sampled and data-base spectra.

  19. Extreme red shifted SERS nanotags† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: General experimental details for the synthesis and characterization of dyes 1–14, intermediates 15–17, and HGNs; general description of the chemometrics used for principal component analysis; figures of SERS spectra of dye/HGN nanotags with 1280 nm excitation; extinction spectrum for HGNs; SERS spectra of Au and Ag nanoparticles and dye 13 aggregated with KCl; SERS spectra of dyes 13 and 14 on HGN not aggregated with KCl; details of mean plane angle calculations, tables of crystallographic data, atomic coordinates and equivalent isotropic displacement parameters, anisotropic placement parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, and hydrogen atom coordinates and isotropic displacement parameters for dye 14. CCDC 1040064. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4sc03917c Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Bedics, Matthew A.; Kearns, Hayleigh; Cox, Jordan M.; Mabbott, Sam; Ali, Fatima; Shand, Neil C.; Faulds, Karen; Benedict, Jason B.

    2015-01-01

    Surfaced enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanotags operating with 1280 nm excitation were constructed from reporter molecules selected from a library of 14 chalcogenopyrylium dyes containing phenyl, 2-thienyl, and 2-selenophenyl substituents and a surface of hollow gold nanoshells (HGNs). These 1280 SERS nanotags are unique as they have multiple chalcogen atoms available which allow them to adsorb strongly onto the gold surface of the HGN thus producing exceptional SERS signals at this long excitation wavelength. Picomolar limits of detection (LOD) were observed and individual reporters of the library were identified by principal component analysis and classified according to their unique structure and SERS spectra. PMID:29308144

  20. A model for gravity-wave spectra observed by Doppler sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    A model for Mesosphere - Stratosphere - Troposphere (MST) radar spectra is developed following the formalism presented by Pinkel (1981). Expressions for the one-dimensional spectra of radial velocity versus frequency and versus radial wave number are presented. Their dependence on the parameters of the gravity-wave spectrum and on the experimental parameters, radar zenith angle and averaging time are described and the conditions for critical tests of the gravity-wave hypothesis are discussed. The model spectra is compared with spectra observed in the Arctic summer mesosphere by the Poker Flat radar. This model applies to any monostatic Doppler sounding system, including MST radar, Doppler lidar and Doppler sonar in the atmosphere, and Doppler sonar in the ocean.

  1. Cross spectra between temperature and pressure in a constant area duct downstream of a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Krejsa, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring pressure temperature cross spectra and coherence and temperature-temperature cross spectra and coherence at spatially separated points along with pressure and temperature auto-spectra in a combustion rig was investigated. The measurements were made near the inlet and exit of a 6.44 m long duct attached to a J-47 combustor. The fuel used was Jet A. The cross spectra and coherence measurements show the pressure and temperature fluctuations correlate best at low frequencies. At the inlet the phenomena controlling the phase relationship between pressure and temperature could not be identified. However, at the duct exit the phase angle of the pressure is related to the phase angle of the temperature by the convected flow time delay.

  2. Underdetermined blind separation of three-way fluorescence spectra of PAHs in water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifang; Zhao, Nanjing; Xiao, Xue; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Yunan; Yin, Gaofang; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2018-06-15

    In this work, underdetermined blind decomposition method is developed to recognize individual components from the three-way fluorescent spectra of their mixtures by using sparse component analysis (SCA). The mixing matrix is estimated from the mixtures using fuzzy data clustering algorithm together with the scatters corresponding to local energy maximum value in the time-frequency domain, and the spectra of object components are recovered by pseudo inverse technique. As an example, using this method three and four pure components spectra can be blindly extracted from two samples of their mixture, with similarities between resolved and reference spectra all above 0.80. This work opens a new and effective path to realize monitoring PAHs in water by three-way fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Underdetermined blind separation of three-way fluorescence spectra of PAHs in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruifang; Zhao, Nanjing; Xiao, Xue; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Yunan; Yin, Gaofang; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2018-06-01

    In this work, underdetermined blind decomposition method is developed to recognize individual components from the three-way fluorescent spectra of their mixtures by using sparse component analysis (SCA). The mixing matrix is estimated from the mixtures using fuzzy data clustering algorithm together with the scatters corresponding to local energy maximum value in the time-frequency domain, and the spectra of object components are recovered by pseudo inverse technique. As an example, using this method three and four pure components spectra can be blindly extracted from two samples of their mixture, with similarities between resolved and reference spectra all above 0.80. This work opens a new and effective path to realize monitoring PAHs in water by three-way fluorescence spectroscopy technique.

  4. Co2+Ti4+ substituted Z-type barium ferrite with enhanced imaginary permeability and resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. W.; Guoqing, Lin; Chen, Linfeng; Yuping, Wu; Ong, C. K.

    2006-03-01

    Co2+Ti4+ substitution for Fe3+ in Co2Z (Ba3Co2Fe24O41) has been prepared. The crystal structure and static and high-frequency magnetic properties have been studied for Ba3Co2+xTixFe24-2xO41 and the corresponding ferrite/polymer composites. As compared to the general Co2Z ferrite/polymer composite, the CoTi substituted ferrite/polymer composite with x=1.0 has a high natural resonance frequency (4.5 GHz), due to its large out-of-plane anisotropy fields Hθ. Furthermore, the maximum imaginary permeability μmax'' is increased by about 50%. The increase is attributed to a decreased damping coefficient, based on the curve-fitted results to the complex permeability spectra. The composites are good electromagnetic attenuation materials with low reflectivity and broad bandwidth at microwave frequencies.

  5. Theoretical studies on absorption, emission, and resonance Raman spectra of Coumarin 343 isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenpeng; Cao, Zexing; Zhao, Yi

    2012-03-01

    The vibrationally resolved spectral method and quantum chemical calculations are employed to reveal the structural and spectral properties of Coumarin 343 (C343), an ideal candidate for organic dye photosensitizers, in vacuum and solution. The results manifest that the ground-state energies are dominantly determined by different placements of hydrogen atom in carboxylic group of C343 conformations. Compared to those in vacuum, the electronic absorption spectra in methanol solvent show a hyperchromic property together with the redshift and blueshift for the neutral C343 isomers and their deprotonated anions, respectively. From the absorption, emission, and resonance Raman spectra, it is found that the maximal absorption and emission come from low-frequency modes whereas the high-frequency modes have high Raman activities. The detailed spectra are further analyzed for the identification of the conformers and understanding the potential charge transfer mechanism in their photovoltaic applications.

  6. Vibrational spectra of cyclopentadienyl chlorides of titanium, zirconium and hafnium. internal rotation and thermodynamic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balducci, G.; Bencivenni, L.; De Rosa, G.; Gigli, R.; Martine, B.; Cesaro, S. Nunziante

    1980-05-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of some cyclopentadienyl compounds of the transition metals, namely Ti(C 5H 5)Cl 3 and M(C 5H 5) 2Cl 2 (M = Ti, Zr and Hf), are reported and discussed. The infrared spectra of the gaseous species isolated in argon matrices at 10 K provide structural information about the single molecules. Particular attention has been paid to the low-frequency region in order to achieve more reliable assignments for the internal-rotation modes. The structural data and the fundamental frequencies derived from the spectra are employed in a calculation of the thermodynamic functions for these compounds in the ideal gas state.

  7. Infrared spectra of rotating protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, F. C.; Shu, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Earlier calculations of the infrared emission expected from stars in the process of being made are corrected to include the most important observable effects of rotation and generalized. An improved version of the spherical model of a previous paper is developed, and the corresponding emergent spectral energy distributions are calculated for the theoretically expected mass infall rate in the cores of cool and quiescent molecular clouds. The dust grain opacity model and the temperature profile parameterization are improved. It is shown that the infrared spectrum of the IRAS source 04264+2426, which is associated with a Herbig-Haro object, can be adequately represented in terms of a rotating and accreting protostar. This strengthens the suggestion that collimated outflows in young stellar objects originate when a stellar wind tries to emerge and reverse the swirling pattern of infall which gave birth to the central star.

  8. Investigations of interhydrogen bond dynamical coupling effects in the polarized IR spectra of acetanilide crystals.

    PubMed

    Flakus, Henryk T; Michta, Anna

    2010-02-04

    This Article presents the investigation results of the polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen bond in acetanilide (ACN) crystals measured in the frequency range of the proton and deuteron stretching vibration bands, nu(N-H) and nu(N-D). The basic spectral properties of the crystals were interpreted quantitatively in terms of the "strong-coupling" theory. The model of the centrosymmetric dimer of hydrogen bonds postulated by us facilitated the explanation of the well-developed, two-branch structure of the nu(N-H) and nu(N-D) bands as well as the isotopic dilution effects in the spectra. On the basis of the linear dichroic and temperature effects in the polarized IR spectra of ACN crystals, the H/D isotopic "self-organization" effects were revealed. A nonrandom distribution of hydrogen isotope atoms (H or D) in the lattice was deduced from the spectra of isotopically diluted ACN crystals. It was also determined that identical hydrogen isotope atoms occupy both hydrogen bonds in the dimeric systems, where each hydrogen bond belongs to a different chain. A more complex fine structure pattern of nu(N-H) and nu(N-D) bands in ACN spectra in comparison with the spectra of other secondary amides (e.g., N-methylacetamide) can be explained in terms of the "relaxation" theory of the IR spectra of hydrogen-bonded systems.

  9. Directional spectra of hurricane-generated waves in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kelin; Chen, Qin

    2011-10-01

    Hurricane-induced directional wave spectra in the Gulf of Mexico are investigated based on the measurements collected at 12 buoys during 7 hurricane events in recent years. Focusing on hurricane-generated wave spectra, we only consider the wave measurements at the buoys within eight times the radius of the hurricane maximum wind speed (Rmax) from the hurricane center. A series of numerical experiments using a third-generation spectral wave prediction model were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism controlling the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. It is found that hurricane wave spectra are almost swell-dominated except for the right-rear quadrant of a hurricane with respect to the forward direction, where the local strong winds control the spectra. Despite the complexity of a hurricane wind field, most of the spectra are mono-modal, similar to those under fetch-limited, unidirectional winds. However, bi-modal spectra were also found in both measurements and model results. Four types of bi-modal spectra have been observed. Type I happens far away (>6 × Rmax) from a hurricane. Type II is bi-modal in frequency with significant differences in direction. It happens in the two left quadrants when the direction of hurricane winds deviates considerably from the swell direction. Type III is bi-modal in frequency in almost the same wave direction with two close peaks. It occurs when the energy of locally-generated wind-sea is only partially transferred to the swell energy by non-linear wave-wave interactions. Type IV was observed in shallow waters owing to coastal effects.

  10. Theoretical prediction of the vibrational spectra of group IB trimers

    PubMed Central

    Richtsmeier, Steven C.; Gole, James L.; Dixon, David A.

    1980-01-01

    The molecular structures of the group IB trimers, Cu3, Ag3, and Au3, have been determined by using the semi-empirical diatomics-in-molecules theory. The trimers are found to have C2v symmetry with bond angles between 65° and 80°. The trimers are bound with respect to dissociation to the asymptotic limit of an atom plus a diatom. The binding energies per atom for Cu3, Ag3, and Au3 are 1.08, 0.75, and 1.16 eV, respectively. The vibrational frequencies of the trimers have been determined for comparison with experimental results. The vibrational frequencies are characterized by low values for the bending and asymmetric stretch modes. The frequency of the symmetric stretch of the trimer is higher than the stretching frequency of the corresponding diatomic. A detailed comparison of the theoretical results with the previously measured Raman spectra of matrix isolated Ag3 is presented. PMID:16592885

  11. Constrained energy minimization applied to apparent reflectance and single-scattering albedo spectra: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmini, Ronald G.; Graver, William R.; Kappus, Mary E.; Anderson, Mark E.

    1996-11-01

    Constrained energy minimization (CEM) has been applied to the mapping of the quantitative areal distribution of the mineral alunite in an approximately 1.8 km2 area of the Cuprite mining district, Nevada. CEM is a powerful technique for rapid quantitative mineral mapping which requires only the spectrum of the mineral to be mapped. A priori knowledge of background spectral signatures is not required. Our investigation applies CEM to calibrated radiance data converted to apparent reflectance (AR) and to single scattering albedo (SSA) spectra. The radiance data were acquired by the 210 channel, 0.4 micrometers to 2.5 micrometers airborne Hyperspectral Digital Imagery Collection Experiment sensor. CEM applied to AR spectra assumes linear mixing of the spectra of the materials exposed at the surface. This assumption is likely invalid as surface materials, which are often mixtures of particulates of different substances, are more properly modeled as intimate mixtures and thus spectral mixing analyses must take account of nonlinear effects. One technique for approximating nonlinear mixing requires the conversion of AR spectra to SSA spectra. The results of CEM applied to SSA spectra are compared to those of CEM applied to AR spectra. The occurrence of alunite is similar though not identical to mineral maps produced with both the SSA and AR spectra. Alunite is slightly more widespread based on processing with the SSA spectra. Further, fractional abundances derived from the SSA spectra are, in general, higher than those derived from AR spectra. Implications for the interpretation of quantitative mineral mapping with hyperspectral remote sensing data are discussed.

  12. Absolute Transition Probabilities of Lines in the Spectra of Astrophysical Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Smith, P. L.; Yoshino, K.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in the investigation of absolute transition probabilities (A-values or F values) for ultraviolet lines is reported. A radio frequency ion trap was used for measurement of transition probabilities for intersystem lines seen in astronomical spectra. The intersystem line at 2670 A in Al II, which is seen in pre-main sequence stars and symbiotic stars, was studied.

  13. EFFECT OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON THE SPONTANEOUS MUTATION SPECTRA OF SALMONELLA TA104

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on the / Spontaneous Mutation Spectra of Salmonella TAlO4

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that, when added to assay plates, reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella typhi...

  14. An assessment of prewhitening in estimating power spectra of atmospheric turbulence at long wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keisler, S. R.; Rhyne, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Synthetic time histories were generated and used to assess the effects of prewhitening on the long wavelength portion of power spectra of atmospheric turbulence. Prewhitening is not recommended when using the narrow spectral windows required for determining power spectral estimates below the 'knee' frequency, that is, at very long wavelengths.

  15. Lyman Limit Absorbers in GALEX Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williger, Gerard M.; Haberzettl, Lutz G.; Ribaudo, Joseph; Kuchner, Marc J.; Burchett, Joseph; Clowes, Roger G.; Lauroesch, James T.; Mills, Brianna; Borden, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    We describe the method and early results for crowdsourcing a search for low-redshift partial and complete Lyman Limit Systems (pLLSs and LLSs) in the GALEX spectral archive. LLSs have been found in large numbers at z>3 and traced to lower redshift through a relatively small number of QSO spectra from spaced-based telescopes. From a sample of 44 pLLSs and 11 LLSs at 0.1 = -0.32 +/- 0.07 and the low-metallicity portion centered at <[X/H]> = -1.87 +/- 0.11.The GALEX spectral archive offers a vast dataset potentially containing hundreds of LLSs, which may be leveraged to search for such a bimodality and track its evolution within the unconstrained near-UV gap at 1general public. The resulting data set would then provide the best available link between the HST-selected far-UV and ground-based pLLS+LLS samples and provide an ideal sample for consequent metallicity determinations.

  16. Fast acquisition of multidimensional NMR spectra of solids and mesophases using alternative sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Lafon, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Unique information about the atom-level structure and dynamics of solids and mesophases can be obtained by the use of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Nevertheless, the acquisition of these experiments often requires long acquisition times. We review here alternative sampling methods, which have been proposed to circumvent this issue in the case of solids and mesophases. Compared to the spectra of solutions, those of solids and mesophases present some specificities because they usually display lower signal-to-noise ratios, non-Lorentzian line shapes, lower spectral resolutions and wider spectral widths. We highlight herein the advantages and limitations of these alternative sampling methods. A first route to accelerate the acquisition time of multidimensional NMR spectra consists in the use of sparse sampling schemes, such as truncated, radial or random sampling ones. These sparsely sampled datasets are generally processed by reconstruction methods differing from the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). A host of non-DFT methods have been applied for solids and mesophases, including the G-matrix Fourier transform, the linear least-square procedures, the covariance transform, the maximum entropy and the compressed sensing. A second class of alternative sampling consists in departing from the Jeener paradigm for multidimensional NMR experiments. These non-Jeener methods include Hadamard spectroscopy as well as spatial or orientational encoding of the evolution frequencies. The increasing number of high field NMR magnets and the development of techniques to enhance NMR sensitivity will contribute to widen the use of these alternative sampling methods for the study of solids and mesophases in the coming years. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  18. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  19. Towards a full reference library of MS(n) spectra. Testing of a library containing 3126 MS2 spectra of 1743 compounds.

    PubMed

    Milman, Boris L

    2005-01-01

    A library consisting of 3766 MS(n) spectra of 1743 compounds, including 3126 MS2 spectra acquired mainly using ion trap (IT) and triple-quadrupole (QqQ) instruments, was composed of numerous collections/sources. Ionization techniques were mainly electrospray ionization and also atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and chemical ionization. The library was tested for the performance in identification of unknowns, and in this context this work is believed to be the largest of all known tests of product-ion mass spectral libraries. The MS2 spectra of the same compounds from different collections were in turn divided into spectra of 'unknown' and reference compounds. For each particular compound, library searches were performed resulting in selection by taking into account the best matches for each spectral collection/source. Within each collection/source, replicate MS2 spectra differed in the collision energy used. Overall, there were up to 950 search results giving the best match factors and their ranks in corresponding hit lists. In general, the correct answers were obtained as the 1st rank in up to 60% of the search results when retrieved with (on average) 2.2 'unknown' and 6.2 reference replicates per compound. With two or more replicates of both 'unknown' and reference spectra (the average numbers of replicates were 4.0 and 7.8, respectively), the fraction of correct answers in the 1st rank increased to 77%. This value is close to the performance of established electron ionization mass spectra libraries (up to 79%) found by other workers. The hypothesis that MS2 spectra better match reference spectra acquired using the same type of tandem mass spectrometer (IT or QqQ) was neither strongly proved nor rejected here. The present work shows that MS2 spectral libraries containing sufficiently numerous different entries for each compound are sufficiently efficient for identification of unknowns and suitable for use with different tandem mass spectrometers. 2005 John

  20. Common substructure in otoacoustic emission spectra of land vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, Geoffrey A.; Köppl, Christine; Bergevin, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In humans, a similar spectral periodicity is found in all otoacoustic emission types and in threshold fine structure. This may reflect travelling wave phase and reflectance from "structural roughness" in the organ of Corti, or entrainment and suppressive interactions between emissions. To further understand these phenomena, we have examined spontaneous otoacoustic emission (SOAE) spectra in 9 lizard species and the barn owl and find a comparable periodicity. Importantly, the frequency spacing between SOAE peaks was independent of the physical spacing and of the frequency space constants in hearing organs. In 9 lizard species, median spectral gaps lay between 219 and 461 Hz, with no correlation to papillar length (0.3 to 2.1 mm). Similarly in much longer organs: In humans (35 mm), SOAE spectral gaps vary up to 220 Hz at 4 kHz; in the barn owl (11 mm), the median SOAE peak spacing was 395Hz. In the barn owl, a very large space constant between 5 and 10 kHz (5 mm/octave) contrasts with stable SOAE spacing between 1 and 11 kHz. Similar SOAE spectral gaps across all species suggests they represent a basic frequency grating revealing local phase-dependent interactions between active hair cells, a feature not determined by macro-structural anatomy. Emission spectral spacing is independent of cochlear length, of the frequency space constant, of the existence of travelling waves or of a tectorial membrane. Our data suggest that there are greater similarities between frequency selectivity reflected at the level of the hair cells' spontaneous mechanical output (OAEs) than there are at the level of the auditory nerve, where macro-structural anatomy links hair-cell activity differentially to the neural output. Apparently, all hair-cell arrays show a similar frequency substructure not directly replicated in neural tuning.

  1. Theoretical vibrational spectra of diformates: Diformate anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, Jan Cz.; Jamróz, Michał H.; Kazimirski, Jan K.; Bajdor, Krzysztof; Borowiak, Marek A.; Larsson, Ragnar

    1999-05-01

    The IR spectrum of the most stable diformate anion was calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(3df, 3pd), RHF/6-311++G **, and B3PW91/6-311++G ** levels. The internal coordinates were defined for the diformate anion and used in potential energy distribution (PED) analysis. The PED analysis of the theoretical spectra form the basis for elucidation of the future matrix isolation IR spectra.

  2. RER SPECTRA OBTAINED WITH A MULTICRYSTAL SPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.E.; Champion, W.R.

    1959-11-01

    Relative gamma spectra were obtained twenty feet from the Hadiation Effects Reactor. The measurements were made using a multicry-stal spectrometer. This design incorporates pair and anticompton spectrometers in combination. Two reactor configurations were used; with shield tanks empty- and water filled. The spectra were obtained before the fuel elements were run at high power. Consequently very little of the fission product spectrum is tntermined. (J.R.D.)

  3. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  4. Spectra library assisted de novo peptide sequencing for HCD and ETD spectra pairs.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Zhang, Kaizhong

    2016-12-23

    De novo peptide sequencing via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed rapidly in recent years. With the use of spectra pairs from the same peptide under different fragmentation modes, performance of de novo sequencing is greatly improved. Currently, with large amount of spectra sequenced everyday, spectra libraries containing tens of thousands of annotated experimental MS/MS spectra become available. These libraries provide information of the spectra properties, thus have the potential to be used with de novo sequencing to improve its performance. In this study, an improved de novo sequencing method assisted with spectra library is proposed. It uses spectra libraries as training datasets and introduces significant scores of the features used in our previous de novo sequencing method for HCD and ETD spectra pairs. Two pairs of HCD and ETD spectral datasets were used to test the performance of the proposed method and our previous method. The results show that this proposed method achieves better sequencing accuracy with higher ranked correct sequences and less computational time. This paper proposed an advanced de novo sequencing method for HCD and ETD spectra pair and used information from spectra libraries and significant improved previous similar methods.

  5. Frequency-Rank Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Bertram C.; Griffiths, Jose M.

    1978-01-01

    Frequency, rank, and frequency rank distributions are defined. Extensive discussion on several aspects of frequency rank distributions includes the Poisson process as a means of exploring the stability of ranks; the correlation of frequency rank distributions; and the transfer coefficient, a new measure in frequency rank distribution. (MBR)

  6. Low frequency events on Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, K.; Neuberg, J.

    2003-04-01

    Earthquake swarms observed on volcanoes consist generally of low frequency events. The low frequency content of these events indicates the presence of interface waves at the boundary of the magma filled conduit and the surrounding country rock. The observed seismic signal at the surface shows therefore a complicated interference pattern of waves originating at various parts of the magma filled conduit, interacting with the free surface and interfaces in the volcanic edifice. This research investigates the applicability of conventional seismic tools on these low frequency events, focusing on hypocenter location analysis using arrival times and particle motion analysis for the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat. Both single low frequency events and swarms are observed on this volcano. Synthetic low frequency events are used for comparison. Results show that reliable hypocenter locations and particle motions can only be obtained if the low frequency events are single events with an identifiable P wave onset, for example the single events preceding swarms on Montserrat or the first low frequency event of a swarm. Consecutive events of the same swarm are dominated by interface waves which are converted at the top of the conduit into weak secondary P waves and surface waves. Conventional seismic tools fail to correctly analyse these events.

  7. General paresis

    MedlinePlus

    General paresis of the insane; General paralysis of the insane; Paralytic dementia ... General paresis is one form of neurosyphilis . It usually occurs in people who have had untreated syphilis for many ...

  8. Frequency-dependent sexual selection.

    PubMed

    O'Donald, P; Majerus, M E

    1988-07-06

    Sexual selection by female choice is expected to give rise to a frequency-dependent sexual advantage in favour of preferred male phenotypes: the rarer the preferred phenotypes, the more often they are chosen as mates. This 'rare-male advantage' can maintain a polymorphism when two or more phenotypes are mated preferentially: each phenotype gains an advantage when it is rarer than the others; no preferred phenotype can then be lost from the population. Expression of preference may be complete or partial. In models of complete preference, females with a preference always mate preferentially. Models of partial preference are more realistic: in these models, the probability that a female mates preferentially depends on the frequency with which she encounters the males she prefers. Two different 'encounter models' of partial preference have been derived: the O'Donald model and the Charlesworth model. The encounter models contain the complete preference model as a limiting case. In this paper, the Charlesworth model is generalized to allow for female preference of more than one male phenotype. Levels of frequency dependence can then be compared in the O'Donald and Charlesworth models. The complete preference model and both encounter models are formulated in the same genetical terms of preferences for dominant and recessive male phenotypes. Polymorphic equilibria and conditions for stability are derived for each of the three models. The models are then fitted to data of frequencies of matings observed in experiments with the two-spot ladybird. The complete preference model gives as good a fit as the encounter models to the data of these and other experiments. The O'Donald and Charlesworth encounter models are shown to produce a very similar frequency-dependent relation. Generally, as females become less choosy, they express their preference with more dependence on male frequency, whereas the resulting selection of the males becomes less frequency dependent. More choosy

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, M. R.; Shahriari, M.; Sarkar, S.; Adib, M.; Zaidi, H.

    2004-11-01

    The general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C) was used for the simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography. The electrons were transported until they slow down and stop in the target. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-ray production were considered in this work. We focus on the simulation of various target/filter combinations to investigate the effect of tube voltage, target material and filter thickness on x-ray spectra in the diagnostic radiology and mammography energy ranges. The simulated x-ray spectra were compared with experimental measurements and spectra calculated by IPEM report number 78. In addition, the anode heel effect and off-axis x-ray spectra were assessed for different anode angles and target materials and the results were compared with EGS4-based Monte Carlo simulations and measured data. Quantitative evaluation of the differences between our Monte Carlo simulated and comparison spectra was performed using student's t-test statistical analysis. Generally, there is a good agreement between the simulated x-ray and comparison spectra, although there are systematic differences between the simulated and reference spectra especially in the K-characteristic x-rays intensity. Nevertheless, no statistically significant differences have been observed between IPEM spectra and the simulated spectra. It has been shown that the difference between MCNP simulated spectra and IPEM spectra in the low energy range is the result of the overestimation of characteristic photons following the normalization procedure. The transmission curves produced by MCNP4C have good agreement with the IPEM report especially for tube voltages of 50 kV and 80 kV. The systematic discrepancy for higher tube voltages is the result of systematic differences between the corresponding spectra.

  10. CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, and CCl4: Infrared spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallington, Timothy J.; Pivesso, Bruno Pasquini; Lira, Alane Moura; Anderson, James E.; Nielsen, Claus Jørgen; Andersen, Niels Højmark; Hodnebrog, Øivind

    2016-05-01

    Infrared spectra for the title compounds were measured experimentally in 700 Torr of air at 295 K and systematically modeled in B3LYP, M06-2X and MP2 calculations employing various basis sets. Calibrated infrared spectra over the wavenumber range 600-3500 cm-1 are reported and combined with literature data to provide spectra for use in experimental studies and radiative transfer calculations. Integrated absorption cross sections are (units of cm-1 molecule-1): CH3Cl, 660-780 cm-1, (3.89±0.19)×10-18; CH2Cl2, 650-800 cm-1, (2.16±0.11)×10-17; CHCl3, 720-810 cm-1, (4.08±0.20)×10-17; and CCl4, 730-825 cm-1, (6.30±0.31)×10-17. CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, and CCl4 have radiative efficiencies of 0.004, 0.028, 0.070, and 0.174 W m-2 ppb-1 and global warming potentials (100 year horizon) of 5, 8, 15, and 1775, respectively. Quantum chemistry calculations generally predict larger band intensities than the experimental values. The best agreement with experiments is obtained in MP2(Full) calculations employing basis sets of at least triple-zeta quality augmented by diffuse functions. The B3LYP functional is found ill-suited for calculating vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of halocarbons.

  11. FHILs in Seyferts and Liners in the optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, R. J. C.; Rodriguez, A. M.; Portilla, J. G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the main results from a selection of optical spectra of Seyfert and LINER galaxies taken from the 9^{th} release of the SDSS with detectable emission of forbidden high ionization lines (FHILs), better known as coronal lines. A catalog of 345 Seyfert 1 (Sy1) and Seyfert 2 (Sy2) galaxies with FHILs emission is presented. By analyzing their spectra and utilizing data from the literature we found the following results: (1) The flux ratios between FHILs suggests anisotropy of emission between Sy1 and Sy2 galaxies, which agrees with the results found by Nagao et al. (2002) and Portilla (2012). Sy1 seems to emit more FHILs than Sy2. (2) This anisotropy suggests the idea that an important, but not the majority, of the emission of FHILs comes from the inner part of the obscuring torus. (3) We present diagnostic diagrams between FHILs lines which indicate clear correlations between the flux ratios. (4) It is observed that the ratio of Ne V/Fe VII is of the order of 3 to 10, while the ratios between iron lines (i.e., Fe VII, Fe X, Fe XI) are roughly around the unity. (5) At least in the optical spectra, the present study continues to support the general idea that LINERs are not energetic enough to present FHILs. A complete version of this study including the catalog with the objects of study, and diagnosis diagrams using only this kind of lines can be found in Vera & Portilla (in prep).

  12. Data reduction of isotope-resolved LC-MS spectra.

    PubMed

    Du, Peicheng; Sudha, Rajagopalan; Prystowsky, Michael B; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2007-06-01

    Data reduction of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) spectra can be a challenge due to the inherent complexity of biological samples, noise and non-flat baseline. We present a new algorithm, LCMS-2D, for reliable data reduction of LC-MS proteomics data. LCMS-2D can reliably reduce LC-MS spectra with multiple scans to a list of elution peaks, and subsequently to a list of peptide masses. It is capable of noise removal, and deconvoluting peaks that overlap in m/z, in retention time, or both, by using a novel iterative peak-picking step, a 'rescue' step, and a modified variable selection method. LCMS-2D performs well with three sets of annotated LC-MS spectra, yielding results that are better than those from PepList, msInspect and the vendor software BioAnalyst. The software LCMS-2D is available under the GNU general public license from http://www.bioc.aecom.yu.edu/labs/angellab/as a standalone C program running on LINUX.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet spectra of multiply charged tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Momoe; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-11-01

    We present extreme ultraviolet spectra of multiply charged tungsten ions observed with an electron beam ion trap. The observed spectra are compared with previous experimental results and theoretical spectra obtained with a collisional radiative model.

  14. Type 2 solar radio events observed in the interplanetary medium. Part 1: General characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve type 2 solar radio events were observed in the 2 MHz to 30 kHz frequency range by the radio astronomy experiment on the ISEE-3 satellite over the period from September 1978 to December 1979. These data provide the most comprehensive sample of type 2 radio bursts observed at kilometer wavelengths. Dynamic spectra of a number of events are presented. Where possible, the 12 events were associated with an initiating flare, ground based radio data, the passage of a shock at the spacecraft, and the sudden commencement of a geomagnetic storm. The general characteristics of kilometric type 2 bursts are discussed.

  15. Electromagnetic perturbations of black holes in general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshmatov, Bobir; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan; Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2018-04-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) perturbations of the black hole solutions in general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics (NED) are studied for both electrically and magnetically charged black holes, assuming that the EM perturbations do not alter the spacetime geometry. It is shown that t