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Sample records for generalized power-law fluid

  1. Existence Theory for Stochastic Power Law Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breit, Dominic

    2015-06-01

    We consider the equations of motion for an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid in a bounded Lipschitz domain during the time interval (0, T) together with a stochastic perturbation driven by a Brownian motion W. The balance of momentum reads as where v is the velocity, the pressure and f an external volume force. We assume the common power law model and show the existence of martingale weak solution provided . Our approach is based on the -truncation and a harmonic pressure decomposition which are adapted to the stochastic setting.

  2. Optical monitoring for power law fluids during spin coating.

    PubMed

    Jardim, P L G; Michels, A F; Horowitz, F

    2012-01-30

    Optical monitoring is applied, in situ and in real time, to non-newtonian, power law fluids in the spin coating process. An analytical exact solution is presented for thickness evolution that well fits to most measurement data. As result, typical rheological parameters are obtained for several CMC (carboximetilcelullose) concentrations and rotation speeds. Optical monitoring thus precisely indicates applicability of the model to power law fluids under spin coating.

  3. Relaxation Dynamics of Non-Power-Law Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qi; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liang, Zhan-Peng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2013-12-01

    The relaxation of non-Newtonian liquids with non-power-law rheology on partially wetted surfaces is rarely investigated. This study assesses the relaxation behavior of 14 partial wetting systems with non-power-law fluids by sessile drop method. These systems are two carboxymethylcellulose sodium solutions on two kinds of slides, cover glass, and silicon wafer surfaces; three polyethylene glycol (PEG400) + silica nanoparticle suspensions on polymethyl methacrylate and polystyrene surfaces. The dynamic contact angle and moving velocity of contact line relationship data for relaxation drops of the 14 tested systems demonstrate a power-law fluid-like behavior, and the equivalent power exponent for a certain fluid on different solid substrates are uniform. By analyzing the relationship between the equivalent power exponent and shear rate, it is proposed that a fluid regime with shear rates of a few tens of s controls relaxation dynamics.

  4. MHD micropumping of power-law fluids: A numerical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Saied

    2013-02-01

    The performance of MHD micropumps is studied numerically assuming that the viscosity of the fluid is shear-dependent. Using power-law model to represent the fluid of interest, the effect of power-law exponent, N, is investigated on the volumetric flow rate in a rectangular channel. Assuming that the flow is laminar, incompressible, two-dimensional, but (approximately) unidirectional, finite difference method (FDM) is used to solve the governing equations. It is found that shear-thinning fluids provide a larger flow rate as compared to Newtonian fluids provided that the Hartmann number is above a critical value. There exists also an optimum Hartmann number (which is larger than the critical Hartmann number) at which the flow rate is maximum. The power-law exponent, N, strongly affects the optimum geometry depending on the Hartmann number being smaller or larger than the critical Hartmann number.

  5. Electrokinetically modulated peristaltic transport of power-law fluids.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Prakash; Chakraborty, Jeevanjyoti; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-01-01

    The electrokinetically modulated peristaltic transport of power-law fluids through a narrow confinement in the form of a deformable tube is investigated. The fluid is considered to be divided into two regions - a non-Newtonian core region (described by the power-law behavior) which is surrounded by a thin wall-adhering layer of Newtonian fluid. This division mimics the occurrence of a wall-adjacent cell-free skimming layer in blood samples typically handled in microfluidic transport. The pumping characteristics and the trapping of the fluid bolus are studied by considering the effect of fluid viscosities, power-law index and electroosmosis. It is found that the zero-flow pressure rise is strongly dependent on the relative viscosity ratio of the near-wall depleted fluid and the core fluid as well as on the power-law index. The effect of electroosmosis on the pressure rise is strongly manifested at lower occlusion values, thereby indicating its importance in transport modulation for weakly peristaltic flow. It is also established that the phenomenon of trapping may be controlled on-the-fly by tuning the magnitude of the electric field: the trapping vanishes as the magnitude of the electric field is increased. Similarly, the phenomenon of reflux is shown to disappear due to the action of the applied electric field. These findings may be applied for the modulation of pumping in bio-physical environments by means of external electric fields.

  6. Coalescence of Drops of a Power-law Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2014-11-01

    Drop coalescence is crucial in a host of industrial, household, and natural processes that involve dispersions. Coalescence is a rate-controlling process in breaking emulsions and strongly influences drop-size-distributions in sprays. In a continuum approach, coalescence begins by the formation of a microscopic, non-slender bridge connecting the two drops. Indefinitely large axial curvature at the neck results in local lowering of pressure that drives fluid from the bulk of the drops toward the neck, thereby causing the bridge radius r (t) and height z (t) to increase in time t. The coalescence of Newtonian drops in air has heretofore been thoroughly studied. Here, we extend these earlier studies by analyzing the coalescence of drops of power-law fluids because many fluids encountered in real applications, including cosmetic creams, shampoos, grease, and paint, exhibit power-law (deformation-rate thinning) rheology. On account of the non-slender geometry of the liquid bridge connecting the two drops (z << r) , we analyze the resulting free surface flow problem by numerical simulation. Among other results, we present and discuss the nature of flows and scaling behaviors for r and z as functions of the initial viscosity and power-law index (0 < n <= 1) .

  7. Spreading of completely wetting, non-Newtonian fluids with non-power-law rheology.

    PubMed

    Min, Qi; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liang, Zhan-Peng; Lee, Duu-Jong; Su, Ay

    2010-08-01

    Spreading non-Newtonian liquids with non-power-law rheology on completely wetting surfaces are seldom investigated. This study assessed the wetting behavior of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a Newtonian fluid, two carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sodium solutions, a PDMS+2%w/w silica nanoparticle suspension and three polyethylene glycol (PEG400)+5-10%w/w silica nanoparticle suspensions (non-power-law fluids) on a mica surface. The theta(D)-U and R-t data for spreading drops of the six tested, non-power-law fluids can be described by power-law wetting models. We propose that this behavior is attributable to a uniform shear rate (a few tens to a few hundreds of s(-1)) distributed over the thin-film regime that controls spreading dynamics. Estimated film thickness was below the resolution of an optical microscope for direct observation. Approximating a general non-Newtonian fluid spreading as a power-law fluid greatly simplifies theoretical analysis and data interpretation.

  8. Analysis of electroosmotic flow of power-law fluids in a slit microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Zholkovskij, Emilijk; Masliyah, Jacob H; Yang, Chun

    2008-10-15

    Electroosmotic flow of power-law fluids in a slit channel is analyzed. The governing equations including the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation, and the continuity equation are solved to seek analytical expressions for the shear stress, dynamic viscosity, and velocity distribution. Specifically, exact solutions of the velocity distributions are explicitly found for several special values of the flow behavior index. Furthermore, with the implementation of an approximate scheme for the hyperbolic cosine function, approximate solutions of the velocity distributions are obtained. In addition, a generalized Smoluchowski velocity is introduced by taking into account contributions due to the finite thickness of the electric double layer and the flow behavior index of power-law fluids. Calculations are performed to examine the effects of kappaH, flow behavior index, double layer thickness, and applied electric field on the shear stress, dynamic viscosity, velocity distribution, and average velocity/flow rate of the electroosmotic flow of power-law fluids.

  9. A generalization of the power law distribution with nonlinear exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Faustino; Sarabia, José María

    2017-01-01

    The power law distribution is usually used to fit data in the upper tail of the distribution. However, commonly it is not valid to model data in all the range. In this paper, we present a new family of distributions, the so-called Generalized Power Law (GPL), which can be useful for modeling data in all the range and possess power law tails. To do that, we model the exponent of the power law using a non-linear function which depends on data and two parameters. Then, we provide some basic properties and some specific models of that new family of distributions. After that, we study a relevant model of the family, with special emphasis on the quantile and hazard functions, and the corresponding estimation and testing methods. Finally, as an empirical evidence, we study how the debt is distributed across municipalities in Spain. We check that power law model is only valid in the upper tail; we show analytically and graphically the competence of the new model with municipal debt data in the whole range; and we compare the new distribution with other well-known distributions including the Lognormal, the Generalized Pareto, the Fisk, the Burr type XII and the Dagum models.

  10. Hybrid solution for the laminar flow of power-law fluids inside rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A.; Pereira, L. M.; Macêdo, E. N.; Chaves, C. L.; Quaresma, J. N. N.

    The so-called generalized integral transform technique (GITT) is employed in the hybrid numerical-analytical solution of two-dimensional fully-developed laminar flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids inside rectangular ducts. The characteristic of the automatic and straightforward global error control procedure inherent to this approach, permits the determination of fully converged benchmark results to assess the performance of purely numerical techniques. Therefore, numerical results for the product Fanning friction factor-generalized Reynolds number are computed for different values of power-law index and aspect ratio, which are compared with previously reported results in the literature, providing critical comparisons among them as well as illustrating the powerfulness of the integral transform approach. The resulting velocity profiles computed by using this methodology are also compared with those calculated by approximated methods for power-law fluids, within the range of governing parameters studied.

  11. General 2.5 power law of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiaoshi; Lin, Yu; Liu, Yijin; Zeng, Zhidan; Shi, Crystal Y.; Zhang, Bo; Lou, Hongbo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Yang, Wenge; Wang, Weihua; Sheng, Hongwei; Mao, Ho-kwang; Mao, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass (MG) is an important new category of materials, but very few rigorous laws are currently known for defining its “disordered” structure. Recently we found that under compression, the volume (V) of an MG changes precisely to the 2.5 power of its principal diffraction peak position (1/q1). In the present study, we find that this 2.5 power law holds even through the first-order polyamorphic transition of a Ce68Al10Cu20Co2 MG. This transition is, in effect, the equivalent of a continuous “composition” change of 4f-localized “big Ce” to 4f-itinerant “small Ce,” indicating the 2.5 power law is general for tuning with composition. The exactness and universality imply that the 2.5 power law may be a general rule defining the structure of MGs. PMID:26831105

  12. Interception efficiency in flow of power-law fluids past confined porous bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahsavari, Setareh; McKinley, Gareth

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the flow of power-law fluids through porous media is important for a wide range of filtration and sedimentation processes. In this study, the mobility of power-law fluids through porous media is investigated numerically and we use parametric studies to systematically understand the individual roles of geometrical characteristics, rheological properties as well as flow conditions. In addition, an analytical solution is presented that can be used as a modified Darcy law for generalized Newtonian fluids. Building on this modified Darcy law, the incompressible laminar flow of power-law and Carreau fluids past a confined porous body is modeled numerically. From the simulations we calculate the flow interception efficiency, which provides a measure of the fraction of streamlines that intercept a porous collector. Finally, the interception efficiency of power-law fluids are compared with the case of a Newtonian fluid. The focus of this work is principally for flow of inelastic fluids in fibrous media; however, the methodology can also be extended to other porous media.

  13. Fluid flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid in an internally finned tube with different fin lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabski, Jakub Krzysztof; Kołodziej, Jan Adam

    2016-06-01

    In the paper an analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid in an internally finned tube with different fin length is conducted. Nonlinear momentum equation of a power-law fluid flow and nonlinear energy equation are solved using the Picard iteration method. Then on each iteration step the solution of inhomogeneous equation consists of two parts: the general solution and the particular solution. Firstly the particular solution is obtained by interpolation of the inhomogeneous term by means of the radial basis functions and monomials. Then the general solution is obtained using the method of fundamental solutions and by fulfilling boundary conditions.

  14. Bubble coalescence in a power-law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2015-11-01

    As two spherical gas bubbles in a liquid are slowly brought together, the liquid film or sheet between them drains and ultimately ruptures, forming a circular hole that connects them. The high curvature near the edge of the liquid sheet drives flow radially outward, causing the film to retract and the radius of the hole to increase with time. Recent experimental and theoretical work in this area has uncovered self-similarity and universal scaling regimes when two bubbles coalesce in a Newtonian fluid. Motivated by applications such as polymer and composites processing, food and drug manufacture, and aeration/deaeration systems where the liquids often exhibit deformation-rate thinning rheology, we extend the recent Newtonian studies to bubble coalescence in power-law fluids. In our work, we use a combination of thin-film theory and full 3D, axisymmetric computations to probe the dynamics in the aftermath of the singularity.

  15. Passive mechanical behavior of human neutrophils: power-law fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M A; Frank, R S; Waugh, R E

    1993-01-01

    = 130 +/- 23 Pa.s and b = 0.52 +/- 0.09 for normal neutrophils. The power-law approximation has a remarkable ability to reconcile discrepancies among published values of the cytoplasmic viscosity measured using different techniques, even though these values differ by nearly two orders of magnitude. Thus, the power-law fluid model is a promising candidate for describing the passive mechanical behavior of human neutrophils in large deformation. It can also account for some discrepancies between cellular behavior in single-cell micromechanical experiments and predictions based on the assumption that the cytoplasm is a simple Newtonian fluid. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:8298037

  16. Nonlinear Smoluchowski velocity for electroosmosis of Power-law fluids over a surface with arbitrary zeta potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2010-03-01

    Electroosmotic flow of Power-law fluids over a surface with arbitrary zeta potentials is analyzed. The governing equations including the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation and the continuity equation are solved to seek exact solutions for the electroosmotic velocity, shear stress, and dynamic viscosity distributions inside the electric double layer. Specifically, an expression for the general Smoluchowski velocity is obtained for electroosmosis of Power-law fluids in a fashion similar to the classic Smoluchowski velocity for Newtonian fluids. The existing Smoluchowski slip velocities under two special cases, (i) for Newtonian fluids with arbitrary zeta potentials and (ii) for Power-law fluids with small zeta potentials, can be recovered from our derived formula. It is interesting to note that the general Smoluchowski velocity for non-Newtonian Power-law fluids is a nonlinear function of the electric field strength and surface zeta potentials; this is due to the coupling electrostatics and non-Newtonian fluid behavior, which is different from its counterpart for Newtonian fluids. This general Smoluchowski velocity is of practical significance in determining the flow rates in microfluidic devices involving non-Newtonian Power-law fluids.

  17. Mobility of power-law and Carreau fluids through fibrous media.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Setareh; McKinley, Gareth H

    2015-12-01

    The flow of generalized Newtonian fluids with a rate-dependent viscosity through fibrous media is studied, with a focus on developing relationships for evaluating the effective fluid mobility. Three methods are used here: (i) a numerical solution of the Cauchy momentum equation with the Carreau or power-law constitutive equations for pressure-driven flow in a fiber bed consisting of a periodic array of cylindrical fibers, (ii) an analytical solution for a unit cell model representing the flow characteristics of a periodic fibrous medium, and (iii) a scaling analysis of characteristic bulk parameters such as the effective shear rate, the effective viscosity, geometrical parameters of the system, and the fluid rheology. Our scaling analysis yields simple expressions for evaluating the transverse mobility functions for each model, which can be used for a wide range of medium porosity and fluid rheological parameters. While the dimensionless mobility is, in general, a function of the Carreau number and the medium porosity, our results show that for porosities less than ɛ≃0.65, the dimensionless mobility becomes independent of the Carreau number and the mobility function exhibits power-law characteristics as a result of the high shear rates at the pore scale. We derive a suitable criterion for determining the flow regime and the transition from a constant viscosity Newtonian response to a power-law regime in terms of a new Carreau number rescaled with a dimensionless function which incorporates the medium porosity and the arrangement of fibers.

  18. Mobility of power-law and Carreau fluids through fibrous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahsavari, Setareh; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2015-12-01

    The flow of generalized Newtonian fluids with a rate-dependent viscosity through fibrous media is studied, with a focus on developing relationships for evaluating the effective fluid mobility. Three methods are used here: (i) a numerical solution of the Cauchy momentum equation with the Carreau or power-law constitutive equations for pressure-driven flow in a fiber bed consisting of a periodic array of cylindrical fibers, (ii) an analytical solution for a unit cell model representing the flow characteristics of a periodic fibrous medium, and (iii) a scaling analysis of characteristic bulk parameters such as the effective shear rate, the effective viscosity, geometrical parameters of the system, and the fluid rheology. Our scaling analysis yields simple expressions for evaluating the transverse mobility functions for each model, which can be used for a wide range of medium porosity and fluid rheological parameters. While the dimensionless mobility is, in general, a function of the Carreau number and the medium porosity, our results show that for porosities less than ɛ ≃0.65 , the dimensionless mobility becomes independent of the Carreau number and the mobility function exhibits power-law characteristics as a result of the high shear rates at the pore scale. We derive a suitable criterion for determining the flow regime and the transition from a constant viscosity Newtonian response to a power-law regime in terms of a new Carreau number rescaled with a dimensionless function which incorporates the medium porosity and the arrangement of fibers.

  19. Hydrodynamics of Newtonian and power-law fluids in microchannel with superhydrophobic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagner, S. A.; Patlazhan, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The flow peculiarities of the Newtonian and Carreau-Yasuda power-law fluids in a microchannel with the striped superhydrophobic wall is studied numerically. The driving forces leading to deviation of streamlines from the channel axis are analyzed.

  20. Vertical-channel free convection with a power-law fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, T.F. Jr.; Wu, K.C.; Schneider, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    A finite-difference solution is presented of the velocity and temperature fields for the flow of an Ostwald-de-Waele (power law) fluid between two vertical isothermal parallel plates under the influence of free convection. Two quantities are of particular interest: the total heat transferred from the plates and the average velocity between the plates. Although these quantities can be presented in a dimensionless manner as related to the generalized Grashof and Prandtl numbers, there is an important difference compared to the similar problem involving Newtonian fluids. In the present case, the generalized Prandtl number is not a fluid property but contains a geometric factor and thus the geometry of the system must be specified before the Prandtl number is fixed. The results and the manner in which they can be used are illustrated by a numerical example.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann method for non-Newtonian (power-law) fluids.

    PubMed

    Gabbanelli, Susana; Drazer, German; Koplik, Joel

    2005-10-01

    We study an ad hoc extension of the lattice Boltzmann method that allows the simulation of non-Newtonian fluids described by generalized Newtonian models. We extensively test the accuracy of the method for the case of shear-thinning and shear-thickening truncated power-law fluids in the parallel plate geometry, and show that the relative error compared to analytical solutions decays approximately linear with the lattice resolution. Finally, we also tested the method in the reentrant-flow geometry, in which the shear rate is no longer a scalar and the presence of two singular points requires high accuracy in order to obtain satisfactory resolution in the local stress near these points. In this geometry, we also found excellent agreement with the solutions obtained by standard finite-element methods, and the agreement improves with higher lattice resolution.

  2. Study on local resistance of non-Newtonian power law fluid in elbow pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Tiantian; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Yuxiang; Wang, Yuancheng; Liu, Xueting

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on the flow characteristic and local resistance of non-Newtonian power law fluid in a curved 90° bend pipe with circular cross-sections, which are widely used in industrial applications. By employing numerical simulation and theoretical analysis the properties of the flow and local resistance of power law fluid under different working conditions are obtained. To explore the change rule the experiment is carried out by changing the Reynolds number, the wall roughness and different diameter ratio of elbow pipe. The variation of the local resistance coefficient with the Reynolds number, the diameter ratio and the wall roughness is presented comprehensively in the paper. The results show that the local resistance force coefficient hardly changes with Reynolds number of the power law fluid; the wall roughness has a significant impact on the local resistance coefficient. As the pipe wall roughness increasing, the coefficient of local resistance force will increase. The main reason of the influence of the roughness on the local resistance coefficient is the increase of the eddy current region in the power law fluid flow, which increases the kinetic energy dissipation of the main flow. This paper provides theoretical and numerical methods to understand the local resistance property of non-Newtonian power law fluid in elbow pipes.

  3. Group invariant solution for a pre-existing fracture driven by a power-law fluid in permeable rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fareo, A. G.; Mason, D. P.

    2016-06-01

    Group invariant analytical and numerical solutions for the evolution of a two-dimensional fracture with nonzero initial length in permeable rock and driven by an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid of power-law rheology are obtained. The effect of fluid leak-off on the evolution of the power-law fluid fracture is investigated.

  4. Contracting bubbles in Hele-Shaw cells with a power-law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, Scott W.; King, John R.

    2011-02-01

    The problem of bubble contraction in a Hele-Shaw cell is studied for the case in which the surrounding fluid is of power-law type. A small perturbation of the radially symmetric problem is first considered, focussing on the behaviour just before the bubble vanishes, it being found that for shear-thinning fluids the radially symmetric solution is stable, while for shear-thickening fluids the aspect ratio of the bubble boundary increases. The borderline (Newtonian) case considered previously is neutrally stable, the bubble boundary becoming elliptic in shape with the eccentricity of the ellipse depending on the initial data. Further light is shed on the bubble contraction problem by considering a long thin Hele-Shaw cell: for early times the leading-order behaviour is one-dimensional in this limit; however, as the bubble contracts its evolution is ultimately determined by the solution of a Wiener-Hopf problem, the transition between the long thin limit and the extinction limit in which the bubble vanishes being described by what is in effect a similarity solution of the second kind. This same solution describes the generic (slit-like) extinction behaviour for shear-thickening fluids, the interface profiles that generalize the ellipses that characterize the Newtonian case being constructed by the Wiener-Hopf calculation.

  5. Phenomenological Blasius-type friction equation for turbulent power-law fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbarlooei, H. R.; Cruz, D. O. A.; Ramos, F.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a friction formula for turbulent power-law fluid flows, a class of purely viscous non-Newtonian fluids commonly found in applications. Our model is derived through an extension of the friction factor analysis based on Kolmogorov's phenomenology, recently proposed by Gioia and Chakraborty. Tests against classical empirical data show excellent agreement over a significant range of Reynolds number. Limits of the model are also discussed.

  6. Numerical simulation of nanofluids based on power-law fluids with flow and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Jiang, Yongyue; Chen, Aixin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the heat transfer of nanofluids based on power-law fluids and movement of nanoparticles with the effect of thermophoresis in a rotating circular groove. The velocity of circular groove rotating is a constant and the temperature on the wall is kept to be zero all the time which is different from the temperature of nanofluids in the initial time. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian diffusion are considered in temperature and concentration equations, and it is assumed that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids is a function of concentration of nanoparticles. Based on numerical results, it can be found that nanofluids improve the process of heat transfer than base fluids in a rotating circular groove. The enhancement of heat transfer increases as the power law index of base fluids decreases.

  7. Electroosmotic flows of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in a cylindrical microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2013-03-01

    EOF of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in a cylindrical microchannel is analyzed theoretically. Specially, exact solutions of electroosmotic velocity corresponding to two special fluid behavior indices (n = 0.5 and 1.0) are found, while approximate solutions are derived for arbitrary values of fluid behavior index. It is found that because of the approximation for the first-order modified Bessel function of the first kind, the approximate solutions introduce largest errors for predicting electroosmotic velocity when the thickness of electric double layer is comparable to channel radius, but can accurately predict the electroosmotic velocity when the thickness of electric double layer is much smaller or larger than the channel radius. Importantly, the analysis reveals that the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity of power-law fluids in cylindrical microchannels becomes dependent on geometric dimensions (radius of channel), standing in stark contrast to the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity over planar surfaces or in parallel-plate microchannels. Such interesting and counterintuitive effects can be attributed to the nonlinear coupling among the electrostatics, channel geometry, and non-Newtonian hydrodynamics. Furthermore, a method for enhancement of EOFs of power-law fluids is proposed under a combined DC and AC electric field. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Further contributions on the flow past a stationary and confined cylinder: Creeping and slowly moving flow of Power law fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biluš, Ignacijo; Ternik, Primož; Žunič, Zoran

    2011-11-01

    The steady flow of generalized Newtonian fluid around a stationary cylinder placed between two parallel plates was studied numerically. Finite volume method was applied to solve the momentum equations along with the continuity equation and the Power law rheological model within the laminar flow regime for a range of the Reynolds number Re and the Power law index n values. The values of the Reynolds number, based on physical and rheological properties, cylinder radius and bulk velocity, were varied between 0.0001≤Re≤10, while the Power law index values mapped the 0.50≤n≤1.50 range, allowing for the investigation of both shear-thinning and shear-thickening effects at the creeping as well as slowly moving fluid flow conditions. We report accurate results of a systematic study with a focus on the most important characteristics of fluid flow past circular cylinder. It is shown that for the creeping flow regime there exist finite sized redevelopment length, drag and loss coefficient. Last but not least, the present numerical results indicate that the shear-thinning viscous behaviour decreases the onset of flow separation.

  9. Transition in the Flow of Power-Law Fluids through Isotropic Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Zami-Pierre, F; de Loubens, R; Quintard, M; Davit, Y

    2016-08-12

    We use computational fluid dynamics to explore the creeping flow of power-law fluids through isotropic porous media. We find that the flow pattern is primarily controlled by the geometry of the porous structure rather than by the nonlinear effects in the rheology of the fluid. We further highlight a macroscale transition between a Newtonian and a non-Newtonian regime, which is the signature of a coupling between the viscosity of the fluid and the structure of the porous medium. These complex features of the flow can be condensed into an effective length scale, which defines both the non-Newtonian transition and the Newtonian permeability.

  10. Viscous-elastic dynamics of power-law fluids within an elastic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran; Gat, Amir D.

    2017-07-01

    In a wide range of applications, microfluidic channels are implemented in soft substrates. In such configurations, where fluidic inertia and compressibility are negligible, the propagation of fluids in channels is governed by a balance between fluid viscosity and elasticity of the surrounding solid. The viscous-elastic interactions between elastic substrates and non-Newtonian fluids are particularly of interest due to the dependence of viscosity on the state of the system. In this work, we study the fluid-structure interaction dynamics between an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid and a slender linearly elastic cylinder under the creeping flow regime. Considering power-law fluids and applying the thin shell approximation for the elastic cylinder, we obtain a nonhomogeneous p-Laplacian equation governing the viscous-elastic dynamics. We present exact solutions for the pressure and deformation fields for various initial and boundary conditions for both shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. We show that in contrast to Stokes' problem where a compactly supported front is obtained for shear-thickening fluids, here the role of viscosity is inversed and such fronts are obtained for shear-thinning fluids. Furthermore, we demonstrate that for the case of a step in inlet pressure, the propagation rate of the front has a tn/n +1 dependence on time (t ), suggesting the ability to indirectly measure the power-law index (n ) of shear-thinning liquids through measurements of elastic deformation.

  11. Experimental investigation on the spray characteristics of power-law fluid in a swirl injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Fuqiang; Chang, Qing; Chen, Shixing; Guo, Jinpeng; Jiao, Kui; Du, Qing

    2017-06-01

    High-speed photography and 3D phase Doppler methods are used to obtain the swirl jet images, 3D velocities and size distribution of different droplets (including deionized water and two kinds of power-law fluid). For the power-law fluids, a short circular jet is formed after the nozzle exit at low pressure. Along the X direction, the distributions of axial velocity w and Sauter mean diameter (SMD) are symmetrical and increase from the center to both sides. The effect of injection pressure on the radial velocity u is not obvious. Along the Z axis, the absolute value of 3D velocities decreases to some extent with droplets moving downstream. The SMD decreases apparently with the increment of the distance along the Z axis at 1.0 MPa.

  12. Finite and Infinite Width Stokes Layers in a Power-Law Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen; Pritchard, David; McArdle, Catriona

    2011-11-01

    Self-similar solutions for the oscillatory boundary layer (the ``Stokes layer'') in a semi-infinite power-law fluid bounded by an oscillating wall (the so-called Stokes problem) are obtained and analysed. These semi-analytical solutions differ qualitatively from the classical solution for a Newtonian fluid, both in the non-sinusoidal form of the velocity oscillations and in the manner at which their amplitude decays with distance from the wall. In particular, for shear-thickening fluids the velocity reaches zero at a finite distance from the wall, and for shear-thinning fluids it decays algebraically with distance, in contrast to the exponential decay for a Newtonian fluid. We demonstrate numerically that these self-similar solutions provide a good approximation to the flow driven by a sinusoidally oscillating wall. Further details can be found in the recent paper by D. Pritchard, C. R. McArdle and S. K. Wilson entitled ``The Stokes boundary layer for a power-law fluid,'' in Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics 166, 745-753 (2011).

  13. Viscous-elastic dynamics of power-law fluids within an elastic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Amir; Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran

    2016-11-01

    We study the fluid-structure interaction dynamics of non-Newtonian flow through a slender linearly elastic cylinder at the creeping flow regime. Specifically, considering power-law fluids and applying the thin shell approximation for the elastic cylinder, we obtain a non-homogeneous p-Laplacian equation governing the viscous-elastic dynamics. We obtain exact solutions for the pressure and deformation fields for various initial and boundary conditions, for both shear thinning and shear thickening fluids. In particular, impulse or a step in inlet pressure yield self-similar solutions, which exhibit a compactly supported propagation front solely for shear thinning fluids. Applying asymptotic expansions, we provide approximations for weakly non-Newtonian behavior showing good agreement with the exact solutions sufficiently far from the front.

  14. Spin-coating process evolution and reproducibility for power-law fluids.

    PubMed

    Jardim, P L G; Michels, A F; Horowitz, F

    2014-03-20

    A distinct development of an exact analytical solution for power-law fluids during the spin-coating process is presented for temporal and spatial thickness evolution, after steady state conditions are attained. This solution leads to the definition of a characteristic time, related to the memory of the initial thickness profile. Previously obtained experimental data, for several rotation speeds and carboxymetilcellulose concentrations in water, are quantitatively analyzed through the evaluation of their characteristic times and compared with theoretical predictions, thus allowing better understanding of thickness profile evolution and of process reproducibility.

  15. Forces acting on a stationary sphere in power-law fluid flow near the wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, O. B.; Kushnir, D. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis and evaluation of the forces acting on the particle in a linear shear flow of power-law fluid (PLF) in the presence of the wall were performed. Using the results of a series of computations for a model problem with a spherical particle near a flat wall in the Reynolds number range of 0-200 and the distance to the wall from 0 to 20 particle diameters, the correlation formulas for calculating the coefficients of drag force and lift force were obtained. Special attention was paid to the behavior of the forces acting on the particle approaching the wall.

  16. Self-similar rupture of thin free films of power law fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thete, Sumeet; Anthony, Christopher; Basaran, Osman; Doshi, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of a thin sheet (free film) of a power law fluid under the competing influences of destabilizing van der Waals pressure (vdWP) and stabilizing surface tension pressure (STP) is analyzed. In such a fluid, viscosity is not constant but decreases with the deformation rate raised to the n - 1 power where 0 < n <= 1 is the power law exponent (n = 1 for a Newtonian fluid). It is shown that when 1 > n > 6 / 7 , film rupture occurs under a balance between vdWP, inertial stress (IS), and viscous stress (VS), and the film thickness decreases as τ n / 3 and the lateral length scale as τ 1 - n / 2 where τ is time remaining to rupture. When n < 6 / 7 , the dominant balance changes so that VS becomes negligible and the film ruptures under the competition between vdWP, IS, and STP. In this new regime, film thickness and lateral length vary as τ 2 / 7 and τ 4 / 7.

  17. MHD thermosolutal marangoni convection heat and mass transport of power law fluid driven by temperature and concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chengru; Zheng, Liancun; Ma, Lianxi

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermosolutal Marangoni convection heat and mass transfer of power-law fluids driven by a power law temperature and a power law concentration which is assumed that the surface tension varies linearly with both the temperature and concentration. Heat and mass transfer constitutive equation is proposed based on N-diffusion proposed by Philip and the abnormal convection-diffusion model proposed by Pascal in which we assume that the heat diffusion depends non-linearly on both the temperature and the temperature gradient and the mass diffusion depends non-linearly on both the concentration and the concentration gradient with modified Fourier heat conduction for power law fluid. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using suitable similarity transformations. Approximate analytical solution is obtained using homotopy analytical method (HAM). The transport characteristics of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are analyzed in detail.

  18. The flow of a power-law fluid in the near-wake of a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Ladeinde, Foluso; Bluestein, Danny

    2006-08-01

    The analysis of the near-wake flow downstream of a flat plate is reported in this paper for the case of a non-Newtonian (power-law) constitutive model. To our knowledge, the present paper is the first to address this problem, as previous work on near-wakes has been limited to the use of a Newtonian model. The motivation for this work comes from the biomedical engineering problem of blood flow around the bileaflet of a mechanical heart valve. In the present paper, the series method has been used to calculate the flow near the centerline of the wake, while an asymptotic method has been used for larger distances from the centerline. The effects of power-law inlet conditions on the wake flow are reported for various values of the power-law index n, within the range 0.7≤n ≤1.3. The present analysis has been successfully validated by comparing the results for n =1 to the near-wake results by Goldstein [Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 26, 1 (1930)]. We generalized the equations for arbitrary values of n, without any special considerations for n =1. Therefore, the accurate results observed for n =1 validate our procedure as a whole. The first major finding is that a fluid with smaller n develops faster downstream, such that decreasing n leads to monotonically increasing velocities compared to fluids with large n values. Another finding is that the non-Newtonian effects become more significant as the downstream distance increases. Finally, these effects tend to be more pronounced in the vicinity of the wake centerline compared to larger y locations.

  19. Peristaltic Creeping Flow of Power Law Physiological Fluids through a Nonuniform Channel with Slip Effect.

    PubMed

    Chaube, M K; Tripathi, D; Bég, O Anwar; Sharma, Shashi; Pandey, V S

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical study on creeping flow of non-Newtonian fluids (power law model) through a nonuniform peristaltic channel, in which amplitude is varying across axial displacement, is presented, with slip effects included. The governing equations are simplified by employing the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The expressions for axial velocity, stream function, pressure gradient, and pressure difference are obtained. Computational and numerical results for velocity profile, pressure gradient, and trapping under the effects of slip parameter, fluid behavior index, angle between the walls, and wave number are discussed with the help of Mathematica graphs. The present model is applicable to study the behavior of intestinal flow (chyme movement from small intestine to large intestine). It is also relevant to simulations of biomimetic pumps conveying hazardous materials, polymers, and so forth.

  20. Peristaltic Creeping Flow of Power Law Physiological Fluids through a Nonuniform Channel with Slip Effect

    PubMed Central

    Chaube, M. K.; Tripathi, D.; Bég, O. Anwar; Sharma, Shashi; Pandey, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical study on creeping flow of non-Newtonian fluids (power law model) through a nonuniform peristaltic channel, in which amplitude is varying across axial displacement, is presented, with slip effects included. The governing equations are simplified by employing the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The expressions for axial velocity, stream function, pressure gradient, and pressure difference are obtained. Computational and numerical results for velocity profile, pressure gradient, and trapping under the effects of slip parameter, fluid behavior index, angle between the walls, and wave number are discussed with the help of Mathematica graphs. The present model is applicable to study the behavior of intestinal flow (chyme movement from small intestine to large intestine). It is also relevant to simulations of biomimetic pumps conveying hazardous materials, polymers, and so forth. PMID:27057132

  1. Inertial migration of elastic particles in a pressure-driven power-law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowie, Samuel; Alexeev, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using three-dimensional computer simulations, we study the cross-stream migration of deformable particles in a channel filled with a non-Newtonian fluid driven by a pressure gradient. Our numerical approach integrates lattice Boltzmann method and lattice spring method in order to model fluid structural interactions of the elastic particle and the surrounding power fluid in the channel. The particles are modeled as elastic shells filled with a viscous fluid that are initially spherical. We focus on the regimes where the inertial effects cannot be neglected and cause cross-stream drift of particles. We probe the flow with different power law indexes including both the shear thickening and thinning fluids. We also examine migration of particles of with different elasticity and relative size. To isolate the non-Newtonian effects on particle migration, we compare the results with the inertial migration results found in the case where the channel is filled with a simple Newtonian fluid. The results can be useful for applications requiring high throughput separation, sorting, and focusing of both synthetic particles and biological cells in microfluidic devices. Financial support provided by National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. CMMI1538161.

  2. A computational analysis of natural convection in a vertical channel with a modified power law non-Newtonian fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.; Greene, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    An implicit finite difference method was applied to analyze laminar natural convection in a vertical channel with a modified power law fluid. This fluid model was chosen because it describes the viscous properties of a pseudoplastic fluid over the entire shear rate range likely to be found in natural convection flows since it covers the shear rate range from Newtonian through transition to simple power law behavior. In addition, a dimensionless similarity parameter is identified which specifies in which of the three regions a particular system is operating. The results for the average channel velocity and average Nusselt number in the asymptotic Newtonian and power law regions are compared with numerical data in the literature. Also, graphical results are presented for the velocity and temperature fields and entrance lengths. The results of average channel velocity and Nusselt number are given in the three regions including developing and fully developed flows. As an example, a pseudoplastic fluid (carboxymethyl cellulose) was chosen to compare the different results of average channel velocity and Nusselt number between a modified power law fluid and the conventional power law model. The results show, depending upon the operating conditions, that if the correct model is not used, gross errors can result.

  3. A generalized power-law detection algorithm for humpback whale vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; Ierley, Glenn R; D'Spain, Gerald L; Roch, Marie A; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-04-01

    Conventional detection of humpback vocalizations is often based on frequency summation of band-limited spectrograms under the assumption that energy (square of the Fourier amplitude) is the appropriate metric. Power-law detectors allow for a higher power of the Fourier amplitude, appropriate when the signal occupies a limited but unknown subset of these frequencies. Shipping noise is non-stationary and colored and problematic for many marine mammal detection algorithms. Modifications to the standard power-law form are introduced to minimize the effects of this noise. These same modifications also allow for a fixed detection threshold, applicable to broadly varying ocean acoustic environments. The detection algorithm is general enough to detect all types of humpback vocalizations. Tests presented in this paper show this algorithm matches human detection performance with an acceptably small probability of false alarms (P(FA) < 6%) for even the noisiest environments. The detector outperforms energy detection techniques, providing a probability of detection P(D) = 95% for P(FA) < 5% for three acoustic deployments, compared to P(FA) > 40% for two energy-based techniques. The generalized power-law detector also can be used for basic parameter estimation and can be adapted for other types of transient sounds.

  4. Propagation of Gravity Currents of non-Newtonian Power-Law Fluids in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Federico, V.; Longo, S.; Ciriello, V.; Chiapponi, L.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental framework is presented to describe gravity-driven motions of rheologically complex fluids through porous media. These phenomena are relevant in geophysical, environmental, industrial and biological applications. The fluid is characterized by an Ostwald-DeWaele constitutive equation with behaviour index n. The flow is driven by the release of fluid at the origin of an infinite porous domain. In order to represent several possible spreading scenarios, we consider: i) different domain geometries: plane, radial, and channelized, with the channel shape parameterized by k; ii) instantaneous or continuous injection, depending on the time exponent of the volume of fluid in the current, α; iii) horizontal or inclined impermeable boundaries. Systematic heterogeneity along the streamwise and/or transverse direction is added to the conceptualization upon considering a power-law permeability variation governed by two additional parameters ω and β. Scalings for current length and thickness are derived in self similar form coupling the modified Darcy's law accounting for the fluid rheology with the mass balance equation. The length, thickness, and aspect ratio of the current are studied as functions of model parameters; several different critical values of α emerge and govern the type of dependency, as well as the tendency of the current to accelerate or decelerate and become thicker or thinner at a given point. The asymptotic validity of the solutions is limited to certain ranges of model parameters. Experimental validation is performed under constant volume, constant and variable flux regimes in tanks/channels filled with transparent glass beads of uniform or variable diameter, using shear-thinning suspensions and Newtonian mixtures. The experimental results for the length and profile of the current agree well with the self-similar solutions at intermediate and late times.

  5. The flow of power law fluids in elastic networks and porous media.

    PubMed

    Sochi, Taha

    2016-02-01

    The flow of power law fluids, which include shear thinning and shear thickening as well as Newtonian as a special case, in networks of interconnected elastic tubes is investigated using a residual-based pore scale network modeling method with the employment of newly derived formulae. Two relations describing the mechanical interaction between the local pressure and local cross-sectional area in distensible tubes of elastic nature are considered in the derivation of these formulae. The model can be used to describe shear dependent flows of mainly viscous nature. The behavior of the proposed model is vindicated by several tests in a number of special and limiting cases where the results can be verified quantitatively or qualitatively. The model, which is the first of its kind, incorporates more than one major nonlinearity corresponding to the fluid rheology and conduit mechanical properties, that is non-Newtonian effects and tube distensibility. The formulation, implementation, and performance indicate that the model enjoys certain advantages over the existing models such as being exact within the restricting assumptions on which the model is based, easy implementation, low computational costs, reliability, and smooth convergence. The proposed model can, therefore, be used as an alternative to the existing Newtonian distensible models; moreover, it stretches the capabilities of the existing modeling approaches to reach non-Newtonian rheologies.

  6. Effect of magnetic field in power-law fluid with mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Amira Husni; Abdullah, Ilyani; Sabri, Izzati

    2017-08-01

    Study of non-Newtonian blood flow under the influence of magnetic field through a stenosed artery is carried out. Blood stream is modelled by power-law fluid since the rate of shear stress for blood and shear strain is not linear. Mass transfer refers to the movement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) between the blood flow and arterial wall. The process of LDL movement brings up to localization of stenosis in the arterial segment. Magnetic field is applied to decrease blood velocity and reduce the risk of stenosis ruptures. The governing equations of blood flow are coupled with convection-diffusion equation of mass transfer. Marker and Cell (MAC) method is used in solving the problem in order to obtain the quantities of the axial velocity (w), radial velocity (u), mass concentration (C) and pressure (p) are calculated at different locations. The results are presented in the graph and discussed in details. The application of magnetic field decreases the axial velocity and mass concentration profiles.

  7. Power-law decay of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state.

    PubMed

    Brey, J Javier; Ruiz-Montero, M J

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamic part of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state has been calculated by using mode-coupling theory for a finite system with periodic boundary conditions. The existence of the shearing instability, leading to a divergent behavior of the velocity flow fluctuations, is taken into account. A time region in which the velocity autocorrelation function exhibits a power-law decay, when time is measured by the number of collisions per particle, has been been identified. Also the explicit form of the exponential asymptotic long time decay has been obtained. The theoretical prediction for the power-law decay is compared with molecular dynamics simulation results, and a good agreement is found, after taking into account finite size corrections. The effects of approaching the shearing instability are also explored.

  8. Sliding friction in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime for a power-law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. B.

    2017-02-01

    A scaling analysis is undertaken for the load balance in sliding friction in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime, with a particular emphasis on power-law shear-thinning typical of a structured liquid. It is argued that the shear-thinning regime is mechanically unstable if the power-law index n  <  1/2, where n is the exponent that relates the shear stress to the shear rate. Consequently the Stribeck (friction) curve should be discontinuous, with possible hysteresis. Further analysis suggests that normal stress and flow transience (stress overshoot) do not destroy this basic picture, although they may provide stabilising mechanisms at higher shear rates. Extensional viscosity is also expected to be insignificant unless the Trouton ratio is large. A possible application to shear thickening in non-Brownian particulate suspensions is indicated.

  9. Power-law rheology and flow behavior of low-invasion coring fluids

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    An improved pressure coring system has been developed in which an extremely viscous polymer mud is extruded by the core and is used to seal and protect the core from flushing by drilling fluids. The polymer mud must be extremely viscous to minimize invasion, yet must be extruded through a long, narrow annular gap with a minimum of pressure buildup. A highly non-Newtonian shear-thinning polymer is utilized in the low invasion coring fluid. This paper describes the measurement and modeling of non-Newtonian rheology from rotary viscometer data in detail since the simplified equations which are generally used with these instruments can be grossly in error. The development of both an approximate analytical solution and an exact numerical solution of the non-Newtonian extrusion process is presented. These solutions were used to optimize the non-Newtonian rheology of the low-invasion fluid which will be used in actual coring operations.

  10. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability. PMID:23687391

  11. MHD mixed convection analysis of non-Newtonian power law fluid in an open channel with round cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Pritom; Rakib, Tawfiqur; Das, Sourav; Rabbi, Khan Md.; Mojumder, Satyajit

    2017-06-01

    In this study, magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow through a channel with a round cavity at bottom wall using non-Newtonian power law fluid is analysed numerically. The cavity is kept at uniformly high temperature whereas rest of the bottom wall is insulated and top wall of the channel is maintained at a temperature lower than cavity temperature. Grid independency test and code validation are performed to justify the computational accuracy before solving the present problem. Galerkin weighted residual method is appointed to solve the continuity, momentum and energy equations. The problem is solved for wide range of pertinent parameters like Rayleigh number (Ra= 103 - 105), Hartmann number (Ha= 0 - 60) and power law index (n= 0.5 - 1.5) at constant Richardson number Ri= 1.0. The flow and thermal field have been thoroughly discussed through streamline and isothermal lines respectively. The heat transfer performance of the given study is illustrated by average Nusselt number plots. Result of this investigation indicates that heat transfer is highest for dilatant fluids at this configuration and they perform better (47% more heat transfer) in absence of magnetic field. The retardation of heat transfer is offset by shear thickening nature of non-Newtonian fluid.

  12. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2012-07-15

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability.

  13. Learning curves in highly skilled chess players: a test of the generality of the power law of practice.

    PubMed

    Howard, Robert W

    2014-09-01

    The power law of practice holds that a power function best interrelates skill performance and amount of practice. However, the law's validity and generality are moot. Some researchers argue that it is an artifact of averaging individual exponential curves while others question whether the law generalizes to complex skills and to performance measures other than response time. The present study tested the power law's generality to development over many years of a very complex cognitive skill, chess playing, with 387 skilled participants, most of whom were grandmasters. A power or logarithmic function best fit grouped data but individuals showed much variability. An exponential function usually was the worst fit to individual data. Groups differing in chess talent were compared and a power function best fit the group curve for the more talented players while a quadratic function best fit that for the less talented. After extreme amounts of practice, a logarithmic function best fit grouped data but a quadratic function best fit most individual curves. Individual variability is great and the power law or an exponential law are not the best descriptions of individual chess skill development.

  14. A permeability model for power-law fluids in fractal porous media composed of arbitrary cross-section capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shifang; Wu, Tao; Qi, Hongyan; Zheng, Qiusha; Zheng, Qian

    2015-11-01

    The fractal theory and technology has been applied to determine the flow rate, the average flow velocity, and the effective permeability for the power-law fluid in porous media composed of a number of tortuous capillaries/pores with arbitrary shapes, incorporating the tortuosity characteristic of flow paths. The fractal permeability and average flow velocity expressions are found to be a function of geometrical shape factors of capillaries, material constants, the fractal dimensions, microstructural parameters. The effects of the porosity, the tortuosity fractal dimension, material constants, and geometrical shape factors on the effective permeability are also analyzed in detail. To verify the validity of the present model, our proposed model is compared with the available macroscopic model and experimental data and there is good agreement between them.

  15. Contact Line Instability of Gravity-Driven Flow of Power-Law Fluids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    The moving contact line of a thin fluid film can often corrugate into fingers, which is also known as a fingering instability. Although the fingering instability of Newtonian fluids has been studied extensively, there are few studies published on contact line fingering instability of non-Newtonian fluids. In particular, it is still unknown how shear-thinning rheological properties can affect the formation, growth, and shape of a contact line instability. Our previous study (Hu and Kieweg, 2012) showed a decreased capillary ridge formation for more shear-thinning fluids in a 2D model (i.e. 1D thin film spreading within the scope of lubrication theory). Those results motivated this study's hypothesis: more shear-thinning fluids should have suppressed finger growth and longer finger wavelength, and this should be evident in linear stability analysis (LSA) and 3D (i.e. 2D spreading) numerical simulations. In this study, we developed a LSA model for the gravity-driven flow of shear-thinning films, and carried out a parametric study to investigate the impact of shear-thinning on the growth rate of the emerging fingering pattern. A fully 3D model was also developed to compare and verify the LSA results using single perturbations, and to explore the result of multiple-mode, randomly imposed perturbations. Both the LSA and 3D numerical results confirmed that the contact line fingers grow faster for Newtonian fluids than the shear-thinning fluids on both vertical and inclined planes. In addition, both the LSA and 3D model indicated that the Newtonian fluids form fingers with shorter wavelengths than the shear-thinning fluids when the plane is inclined; no difference in the most unstable (i.e. emerging) wavelength was observed at vertical. This study also showed that the distance between emerging fingers was smaller on a vertical plane than on a less-inclined plane for shear-thinning fluids, as previously shown for Newtonian fluids. For the first time for shear

  16. Natural convection of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder using modified power-law model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thohura, Sharaban; Molla, Md. Mamun; Sarker, M. M. A.

    2016-07-01

    A study on the natural convection flow of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder with constant wall temperature using modified power law viscosity model has been done. The basic equations are transformed to non dimensional boundary layer equations and the resulting systems of nonlinear partial differential equations are then solved employing marching order implicit finite difference method. The evolution of the surface shear stress in terms of local skin-friction, the rate of heat transfer in terms of local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles for shear thinning as well as shear-thickening fluid considering the different values of Prandtl number have been focused. For the Newtonian fluids the present numerical results are compared with available published results which show a good agreement indeed. From the results it can be concluded that, at the leading edge, a Newtonian-like solution exists as the shear rate is not large enough to trigger non-Newtonian effects. Non-Newtonian effects can be found when the shear-rate increases beyond a threshold value.

  17. Heat Transfer Analysis for Stationary Boundary Layer Slip Flow of a Power-Law Fluid in a Darcy Porous Medium with Plate Suction/Injection

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Asim; Ali, Yasir; Aziz, Taha; Siddique, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the slip effects on the boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics of a power-law fluid past a porous flat plate embedded in the Darcy type porous medium. The nonlinear coupled system of partial differential equations governing the flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid is transformed into a system of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations by applying a suitable similarity transformation. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using Matlab bvp4c solver. Numerical results are presented in the form of graphs and the effects of the power-law index, velocity and thermal slip parameters, permeability parameter, suction/injection parameter on the velocity and temperature profiles are examined. PMID:26407162

  18. The effect of body acceleration on the generalized power law model of blood flow in a stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakheet, Ahmed; Alnussairy, Esam A.; Ismail, Zuhaila; Amin, Norsarahaida

    2017-04-01

    Unsteady blood flow characterized by the generalized power law model in a stenosed artery subject to external body acceleration is considered numerically using the Marker and Cell finite difference discretization on staggered grid, where the pressure is calculated iteratively using the successive-over-relaxation method. The codes have been developed and the results analysed using Matlab. The focus of discussion is on the effects of body acceleration on the flow characteristics, in particular its effects on the wall pressure, pressure drop and the streamlines as these results have not yet been presented and discussed in previous works.

  19. Various Exact Soliton Solutions and Bifurcations of a Generalized Dullin-Gottwald-Holm Equation with a Power Law Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leta, Temesgen Desta; Li, Jibin

    In this paper, we study a model of generalized Dullin-Gottwald-Holm equation, depending on the power law nonlinearity, that derives a series of planar dynamical systems. The study of the traveling wave solutions for this model derives a planar Hamiltonian system. By investigating the dynamical behavior and bifurcation of solutions of the traveling wave system, we derive all possible exact explicit traveling wave solutions, under different parametric conditions. These results completely improve the study of traveling wave solutions to the mentioned model stated in [Biswas & Kara, 2010].

  20. MHD mixed convection analysis in an open channel by obstructed Poiseuille flow of non-Newtonian power law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbi, Khan Md.; Rakib, Tawfiqur; Das, Sourav; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    This paper demonstrates magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow through a channel with a rectangular obstacle at the entrance region using non-Newtonian power law fluid. The obstacle is kept at uniformly high temperature whereas the inlet and top wall of the channel are maintained at a temperature lower than obstacle temperature. Poiseuille flow is implemented as the inlet velocity boundary condition. Grid independency test and code validation are performed to justify the computational accuracy before solving the present problem. Galerkin weighted residual method has been appointed to solve the continuity, momentum and energy equations. The problem has been solved for wide range of pertinent parameters like Richardson number (Ri = 0.1 - 10) at a constant Reynolds number (Re = 100), Hartmann number (Ha = 0 - 100), power index (n = 0.6 - 1.6). The flow and thermal field have been thoroughly discussed through streamline and isothermal lines respectively. The heat transfer performance of the given study has been illustrated by average Nusselt number plots. It is observed that increment of Hartmann number (Ha) tends to decrease the heat transfer rate up to a critical value (Ha = 20) and then let increase the heat transfer performance. Thus maximum heat transfer rate has been recorded for higher Hartmann number and Rayleigh number in case of pseudo-plastic (n = 0.6) non-Newtonian fluid flow.

  1. Exact, E = 0, classical and quantum solutions for general power-law oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.; Daboul, J.

    1994-07-01

    For zero energy, E = 0, we derive exact, classical and quantum solutions for all power-law oscillators with potentials V(r) = {minus}{gamma}/r{sup {nu}}, {gamma} > 0 and {minus}{infinity} < {nu} < {infinity}. When the angular momentum is non-zero, these solutions lead to the classical orbits {rho}(t) = [cos {mu}({var_phi}(t) {minus} {var_phi}{sub 0}(t))]{sup 1/{mu}}, with {mu} = {nu}/2 {minus} 1 {ne} 0. For {nu} > 2, the orbits are bound and go through the origin. We calculate the periods and precessions of these bound orbits, and graph a number of specific examples. The unbound orbits are also discussed in detail. Quantum mechanically, this system is also exactly solvable. We find that when {nu} > 2 the solutions are normalizable (bound), as in the classical case. Also, there are normalizable discrete, yet unbound, state which correspond to unbound classical particles which reach infinity in a finite time. These and other interesting comparisons to the classical system will be discussed.

  2. Exact, E = 0, classical and quantum solutions for general power-law oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Daboul, Jamil

    1995-01-01

    For zero energy, E = 0, we derive exact, classical and quantum solutions for all power-law oscillators with potentials V(r) = -gamma/r(exp nu), gamma greater than 0 and -infinity less than nu less than infinity. When the angular momentum is non-zero, these solutions lead to the classical orbits (p(t) = (cos mu(phi(t) - phi(sub 0)t))(exp 1/mu) with mu = nu/2 - 1 does not equal 0. For nu greater than 2, the orbits are bound and go through the origin. We calculate the periods and precessions of these bound orbits, and graph a number of specific examples. The unbound orbits are also discussed in detail. Quantum mechanically, this system is also exactly solvable. We find that when nu is greater than 2 the solutions are normalizable (bound), as in the classical case. Further, there are normalizable discrete, yet unbound, states. They correspond to unbound classical particles which reach infinity in a finite time. Finally, the number of space dimensions of the system can determine whether or not an E = 0 state is bound. These and other interesting comparisons to the classical system will be discussed.

  3. Stability of plane Couette flow of a power-law fluid past a neo-Hookean solid at arbitrary Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giribabu, D.; Shankar, V.

    2017-07-01

    The linear stability of plane Couette flow of a power-law fluid past a deformable solid is analyzed at arbitrary Reynolds number (Re). For flow of a Newtonian fluid past a deformable solid, at high Re, there are two different modes of instability: (i) "wall modes" (Γ ∝R e-1 /3) and (ii) "inviscid modes" (Γ ∝R e-1) where Γ =V/μf G R is the non-dimensional shear-rate in the fluid (V, μf, G, and R denote the top-plate velocity, fluid viscosity, shear modulus of the solid, and fluid thickness, respectively). In this work, we consider the power-law model for the fluid to elucidate the effect of shear-thickening/shear-thinning behaviour on the modes of instability present in the flow, especially at moderate and high Re. At high Re, our numerical results show that wall modes exhibit different scalings in Γ (V/ηf G R , where ηf is Newtonian-like constant viscosity) vs Re for different values of the power-law index (n), and the scaling exponents are different from that for a Newtonian fluid. This drastic modification in the scaling of wall modes is not observed in viscoelastic (modelled as upper-convected Maxwell or Oldroyd-B fluids) plane Couette flow past a deformable solid. We show that the difference in scaling exponents can be explained by postulating that the wall modes in a power-law fluid are determined by the actual viscosity corresponding to the shear rate of the laminar flow denoted by ηa p p. A non-dimensional shear rate based on this viscosity Γa p p=V/ηa p p G R can be defined, and we show that the postulate Γa p p˜R e-1 /3 (motivated by the wall-mode scaling in a Newtonian fluid) captures all the numerically observed scalings for Γ vs Re for different values of n >0.3 , which is found to be Γ ˜R e-1/2 n +1. Further, we numerically evaluated the wall layer thickness and this agreed with the theoretical scaling of δ ˜R e-n/2 n +1. Interestingly, the theoretical and numerical prediction of wall modes is found to be valid for power-law index

  4. A Generalized Power-law Diagnostic for Infrared Galaxies at z > 1: Active Galactic Nuclei and Hot Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputi, K. I.

    2013-05-01

    I present a generalized power-law (PL) diagnostic which allows one to identify the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in infrared (IR) galaxies at z > 1, down to flux densities at which the extragalactic IR background is mostly resolved. I derive this diagnostic from the analysis of 174 galaxies with S ν(24 μm)>80 μJy and spectroscopic redshifts z spec > 1 in the Chandra Deep Field South, for which I study the rest-frame UV/optical/near-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs), after subtracting a hot-dust, PL component with three possible spectral indices α = 1.3, 2.0, and 3.0. I obtain that 35% of these 24 μm sources are power-law composite galaxies (PLCGs), which I define as those galaxies for which the SED fitting with stellar templates, without any previous PL subtraction, can be rejected with >2σ confidence. Subtracting the PL component from the PLCG SEDs produces stellar mass correction factors <1.5 in >80% of cases. The PLCG incidence is especially high (47%) at 1.0 < z < 1.5. To unveil which PLCGs host AGNs, I conduct a combined analysis of 4 Ms X-ray data, galaxy morphologies, and a graybody modeling of the hot dust. I find that (1) 77% of all the X-ray AGNs in my 24 μm sample at 1.0 < z < 1.5 are recognized by the PLCG criterion; (2) PLCGs with α = 1.3 or 2.0 have regular morphologies and T dust >~ 1000 K, indicating nuclear activity. Instead, PLCGs with α = 3.0 are characterized by disturbed galaxy dynamics, and a hot interstellar medium can explain their dust temperatures T dust ~ 700-800 K. Overall, my results indicate that the fraction of AGNs among 24 μm sources is between ~30% and 52% at 1.0 < z < 1.5.

  5. Laminar flow heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of power-law fluids inside tubes with varying width twisted tape inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, A.G.

    2000-02-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow friction of a generalized power-law fluid in tape generated swirl flow inside a 25.0 mm i.d. circular tube, are presented. In order to reduce excessive pressure drops associated with full width twisted tapes, with less corresponding reduction in heat transfer coefficients, reduced width twisted tapes of widths ranging from 11.0 to 23.8 mm, which are lower than the tube inside diameter are used. Reduced width twisted tape inserts give 18%--56% lower isothermal friction factors than the full width tapes. Uniform wall temperature Nusselt numbers decrease only slightly by 5%--25%, for tape widths of 19.7 and 11.0 mm, respectively. Based on the constant pumping power criterion, the tapes of width 19.7 mm perform more or less like full width tapes. Correlations are presented for isothermal and heating friction factors and Nusselt numbers (under uniform wall temperature condition) for a fully developed laminar swirl flow, which are applicable to full width as well as reduced width twisted tapes, using a modified twist ratio as pitch to width ratio of the tape. The reduced width tapes offer 20%--50% savings in the tape material as compared to the full width tapes.

  6. MHD Effects on Non-Newtonian Power-Law Fluid Past a Continuously Moving Porous Flat Plate with Heat Flux and Viscous Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishan, N.; Shashidar Reddy, B.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of a magneto-hydro dynamic flow and heat transfer to a non-Newtonian power-law fluid flow past a continuously moving flat porous plate in the presence of sucion/injection with heat flux by taking into consideration the viscous dissipation is analysed. The non-linear partial differential equations governing the flow and heat transfer are transformed into non-linear ordinary differential equations using appropriate transformations and then solved numerically by an implicit finite difference scheme. The solution is found to be dependent on various governing parameters including the magnetic field parameter M, power-law index n, suction/injection parameter ƒw, Prandtl number Pr and Eckert number Ec. A systematical study is carried out to illustrate the effects of these major parameters on the velocity profiles, temperature profile, skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer and the local Nusslet number.

  7. Forced convection heat transfer of power law non-Newtonian fluids between two semi-infinite plates with variable thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Botong; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Liangliang

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation of forced convection heat transfer in power-law non-Newtonian fluids between two semi-infinite plates with variable thermal conductivity. Three cases of different thermal conductivity models are considered: (i) thermal conductivity is a constant, (ii) thermal conductivity is a linear function of temperature, (iii) thermal conductivity is a power-law function of temperature gradient (Zheng's model). Governing equations are solved using the finite element method with the ‘ghost’ time introduced to the control equations, which does not affect the results because the velocity and temperature will remain unchanged when the steady state is reached. Results for the solutions of different variable models are presented as well as the analysis of the associated heat transfer characteristics. It is shown that the heat transfer behaviours are strongly dependent on the power-law index (n) in all models. For example, when n < 1, the temperature in model (iii) is higher than that in model (i) and (ii), while the situation is reversed when n > 1.

  8. Capillary rise of a non-Newtonian power law liquid: impact of the fluid rheology and dynamic contact angle.

    PubMed

    Digilov, Rafael M

    2008-12-02

    The impact of non-Newtonian behavior and the dynamic contact angle on the rise dynamics of a power law liquid in a vertical capillary is studied theoretically and experimentally for quasi-steady-state flow. An analytical solution for the time evolution of the meniscus height is obtained in terms of a Gaussian hypergeometric function, which in the case of a Newtonian liquid reduces to the Lucas-Washburn equation modified by the dynamic contact angle correction. The validity of the solution is checked against experimental data on the rise dynamics of a shear-thinning cmc solution in a glass microcapillary, and excellent agreement is found.

  9. Alterations in streaming potential in presence of time periodic pressure-driven flow of a power law fluid in narrow confinements with nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    We study the coupled effect of electrokinetic phenomena and fluid rheology in altering the induced streaming potential in narrow fluidic confinements, which is manifested by establishing a time periodic pressure-driven flow in presence of electrical double layer phenomenon. However, in sharp contrast with reported literature, we take into account nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions toward estimating the same in addition to electrostatic interactions and steric effects. We employ power law based rheological model for estimating the induced streaming potential. We bring out an intricate interaction between nonelectrostatic interactions and fluid rheology on the concerned electrokinetic phenomena, bearing immense consequences toward designing of integrated lab-on-a-chip-based microdevices and nanodevices. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Investigation on average void fraction for air/non-Newtonian power-law fluids two-phase flow in downward inclined pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing-yu

    2010-11-15

    The present work has been carried out to investigate on the average void fraction of gas/non-Newtonian fluids flow in downward inclined pipes. The influences of pipe inclination angle on the average void fraction were studied experimentally. A simple correlation, which incorporated the method of Vlachos et al. for gas/Newtonain fluid horizontal flow, the correction factor of Farooqi and Richardson and the pipe inclination angle, was proposed to predict the average void fraction of gas/non-Newtonian power-law stratified flow in downward inclined pipes. The correlation was based on 470 data points covering a wide range of flow rates for different systems at diverse angles. A good agreement was obtained between theory and data and the fitting results could describe the majority of the experimental data within {+-}20%. (author)

  11. Electro-osmotic flow of power-law fluid and heat transfer in a micro-channel with effects of Joule heating and thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Mondal, A.; Sinha, A.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for studying the electro-osmotic flow and heat transfer of bio-fluids in a micro-channel in the presence of Joule heating effects. The flow of bio-fluid is governed by the non-Newtonian power-law fluid model. The effects of thermal radiation and velocity slip condition have been examined in the case of hydrophobic channel. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation governing the electrical double layer field and a body force generated by the applied electric potential field are taken into consideration. The results presented here pertain to the case where the height of the channel is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer comprising the Stern and diffuse layers. The expressions for flow characteristics such as velocity, temperature, shear stress and Nusselt number have been derived analytically under the purview of the present model. The results estimated on the basis of the data available in the existing scientific literatures are presented graphically. The effects of thermal radiation have an important bearing on the therapeutic procedure of hyperthermia, particularly in understanding the heat transfer in micro-channel in the presence of electric potential. The dimensionless Joule heating parameter has a reducing impact on Nusselt number for both pseudo-plastic and dilatant fluids, nevertheless its impact on Nusselt number is more pronounced for dilatant fluid. Furthermore, the effect of viscous dissipation has a significant role in controlling heat transfer and should not be neglected.

  12. Joule heating effects on MHD mixed convection of a Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet with power law heat flux: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, D. Harish; Narayana, P. V. Satya

    2016-08-01

    An analysis has been carried out to study the Joule heating effect on MHD heat transfer of an incompressible Jeffrey fluid due to a stretching porous sheet with power law heat flux and heat source. A constant magnetic field is applied normal to the stretching surface. The basic governing equations are reduced into the coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformations. The resulting equations are then solved numerically by shooting method with fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme. The effects of various physical parameters entering into the problem on dimensionless velocity and temperature distribution are discussed through graphs and tables. The results reveal that the momentum and thermal boundary layer thickness are significantly influenced by Deborah number (β), ratio of relaxation and retardation times parameter (λ), heat generation parameter (β*), Eckert number (Ec) and magnetic field parameter (M). A comparison with the previously published works shows excellent agreement.

  13. Modeling of non-Newtonian Free-Surface and Confined Flow in Porous Media: a Review of Theoretical and Experimental Results for Power-Law Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Federico, V.; Longo, S.; Ciriello, V.; Chiapponi, L.

    2016-12-01

    Several environmental contaminants and remediation agents exhibit rheological complexity. Crude oil and displacing agents in EOR operations are rheologically nonlinear. These applications prompt the need for a theoretical analysis of non-Newtonian flow in natural porous and fractured media, considering gravity-driven and confined flows, different geometries and diverse boundary conditions. We present a review of the results obtained by our group concerning the modeling of power-law fluids, as this constitutive law is amenable to self-similar solutions which may act as benchmarks even for more complex rheology. First, closed form results were obtained for gravity currents advancing in plane or cylindrical geometry, deriving scalings for current length and thickness. Analogous results were obtained for confined flows in various geometries; here, scalings were obtained for pressure front and pressure field. Based on these benchmarks, the analytical models were refined introducing two additional factors: medium heterogeneity and topographic control. The inherent hetehrogeneity of natural media was modeled within a simplified framework considering continuous variations of spatial properties. Topographic control was introduced considering flows in porous channels of different shapes. Both factors proved relevant for the spreading of gravity currents as they influence the extent and shape of porous domain invaded by the contaminant, or reached by the remediation agent. Our theoretical results were validated against multiple sets of experiments, conducted with different combinations of spreading scenarios and types of heterogeneity or channelization. Two basic experimental setups were employed, adopting either reconstructed porous media made of glass beads, or Hele-Shaw analogues. To this end, existing Hele-Shaw analogies for porous flow of power-law fluids were extended to heterogeneous media. All scalings derived for the current front and thickness were confirmed by our

  14. MHD flow and heat transfer of a viscous fluid over a radially stretching power-law sheet with suction/injection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Munir, A.; Shahzad, A.; Shah, A.

    2015-03-01

    A steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a radially stretching isothermal porous sheet is analyzed. Stretching is assumed to follow a radial power law, and the fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with a very small magnetic Reynolds number. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using appropriate similarity transformations, which are solved analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and numerically by employing the shooting method with the adaptive Runge-Kutta method and Broyden's method in the domain [0,∞). Analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature fields are derived. The influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles is discussed in detail. The skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are calculated as functions of several influential parameters. The results predicted by both methods are demonstrated to be in excellent agreement. Moreover, HAM results for a particular problem are also compared with exact solutions.

  15. Effect of multiple slip on a chemically reactive MHD non-Newtonian nanofluid power law fluid flow over a stretching sheet with microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basir, Mohammad Faisal Mohd; Ismail, Fazreen Amira; Amirsom, Nur Ardiana; Latiff, Nur Amalina Abdul; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of multiple slip on a chemically reactive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) non-Newtonian power law fluid flow over a stretching sheet with microorganism was numerically investigated. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using the similarity transformations developed by Lie group analysis. The reduced governing nonlinear ordinary differential equations were then numerically solved using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method. Good agreement was found between the present numerical solutions with the existing published results to support the validity and the accuracy of the numerical computations. The influences of the velocity, thermal, mass and microorganism slips, the magnetic field parameter and the chemical reaction parameter on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, nanoparticle volume fraction, microorganism concentration, the distribution of the density of motile microorganisms have been illustrated graphically. The effects of the governing parameters on the physical quantities, namely, the local heat transfer rate, the local mass transfer rate and the local microorganism transfer rate were analyzed and discussed.

  16. Sufficient conditions for local regularity to the generalized Newtonian fluid with shear thinning viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyeong-Ohk; Wolf, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    We prove the local regularity of a weak solution {\\varvec{u}} to the equations of a generalized Newtonian fluid with power law 1< q ≤ 2 if {\\varvec{u}} belongs to a suitable Lebesgue space. This result extends the well-known Serrin condition for weak solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations to the shear-thinning fluids.

  17. Flows induced by power-law stretching surface motion modulated by transverse or orthogonal surface shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Boundary-layer solutions to Banks' problem for the flow induced by power-law stretching of a plate are obtained for two generalizations that include arbitrary transverse plate shearing motion. In one extension an arbitrary transverse shearing motion is the product of the power-law stretching. In the other extension the streamwise stretching coordinate is added to an arbitrary transverse shearing and together raised to the power of stretching. In addition we find that Banks' power law stretching may be accompanied by orthogonal power-law shear. In all cases, the original boundary-value problem of Banks [1] is recovered. Results are illustrated with velocity profiles both at the plate and at fixed height in the fluid above the plate.

  18. Modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity: Hamiltonian analysis of the general theory and accelerating FRW cosmology in a power-law F(R) model

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, Sante; Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, Anca; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Oksanen, Markku

    2010-09-15

    We propose the most general modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity, whose action does not contain time derivatives higher than the second order. The Hamiltonian structure of this theory is studied in all the details in the case of the spatially-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, demonstrating many of the features of the general theory. It is shown that, with some plausible assumptions, including the projectability of the lapse function, this model is consistent. As a large class of such theories, the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity is introduced. The study of its ultraviolet properties shows that its z=3 version seems to be renormalizable in the same way as the original Horava-Lifshitz proposal. The Hamiltonian analysis of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity shows that it is in general a consistent theory. The F(R) gravity action is also studied in the fixed-gauge form, where the appearance of a scalar field is particularly illustrative. Then the spatially-flat FRW cosmology for this F(R) gravity is investigated. It is shown that a special choice of parameters for this theory leads to the same equations of motion as in the case of traditional F(R) gravity. Nevertheless, the cosmological structure of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity turns out to be much richer than for its traditional counterpart. The emergence of multiple de Sitter solutions indicates the possibility of unification of early-time inflation with late-time acceleration within the same model. Power-law F(R) theories are also investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that they have a quite rich cosmological structure: early-/late-time cosmic acceleration of quintessence, as well as of phantom types. Also it is demonstrated that all the four known types of finite-time future singularities may occur in the power-law Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity. Finally, a covariant proposal for (renormalizable) F(R) gravity within the Horava-Lifshitz spirit is presented.

  19. Evidence of a general 2/3-power law of scaling leaf nitrogen to phosphorus among major plant groups and biomes

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Peter B.; Oleksyn, Jacek; Wright, Ian J.; Niklas, Karl J.; Hedin, Lars; Elser, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relations among plant traits are both cause and consequence of processes at organ-to-ecosystem scales. The relationship between leaf nitrogen and phosphorus is of particular interest, as both elements are essential for plant metabolism; their limited availabilities often constrain plant growth, and general relations between the two have been documented. Herein, we use a comprehensive dataset of more than 9300 observations of approximately 2500 species from 70 countries to examine the scaling of leaf nitrogen to phosphorus within and across taxonomical groups and biomes. Power law exponents derived from log–log scaling relations were near 2/3 for all observations pooled, for angiosperms and gymnosperms globally, and for angiosperms grouped by biomes, major functional groups, orders or families. The uniform 2/3 scaling of leaf nitrogen to leaf phosphorus exists along a parallel continuum of rising nitrogen, phosphorus, specific leaf area, photosynthesis and growth, as predicted by stoichiometric theory which posits that plants with high growth rates require both high allocation of phosphorus-rich RNA and a high metabolic rate to support the energy demands of macromolecular synthesis. The generality of this finding supports the view that this stoichiometric scaling relationship and the mechanisms that underpin it are foundational components of the living world. Additionally, although abundant variance exists within broad constraints, these results also support the idea that surprisingly simple rules regulate leaf form and function in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:19906667

  20. Evidence of a general 2/3-power law of scaling leaf nitrogen to phosphorus among major plant groups and biomes.

    PubMed

    Reich, Peter B; Oleksyn, Jacek; Wright, Ian J; Niklas, Karl J; Hedin, Lars; Elser, James J

    2010-03-22

    Scaling relations among plant traits are both cause and consequence of processes at organ-to-ecosystem scales. The relationship between leaf nitrogen and phosphorus is of particular interest, as both elements are essential for plant metabolism; their limited availabilities often constrain plant growth, and general relations between the two have been documented. Herein, we use a comprehensive dataset of more than 9300 observations of approximately 2500 species from 70 countries to examine the scaling of leaf nitrogen to phosphorus within and across taxonomical groups and biomes. Power law exponents derived from log-log scaling relations were near 2/3 for all observations pooled, for angiosperms and gymnosperms globally, and for angiosperms grouped by biomes, major functional groups, orders or families. The uniform 2/3 scaling of leaf nitrogen to leaf phosphorus exists along a parallel continuum of rising nitrogen, phosphorus, specific leaf area, photosynthesis and growth, as predicted by stoichiometric theory which posits that plants with high growth rates require both high allocation of phosphorus-rich RNA and a high metabolic rate to support the energy demands of macromolecular synthesis. The generality of this finding supports the view that this stoichiometric scaling relationship and the mechanisms that underpin it are foundational components of the living world. Additionally, although abundant variance exists within broad constraints, these results also support the idea that surprisingly simple rules regulate leaf form and function in terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. Power-law cosmic expansion in f(R) gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Goheer, Naureen; Larena, Julien; Dunsby, Peter K. S.

    2009-09-15

    We show that within the class of f(R) gravity theories, Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker power-law perfect fluid solutions only exist for R{sup n} gravity. This significantly restricts the set of exact cosmological solutions which have similar properties to what is found in standard general relativity.

  2. Anisotropic power-law inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Watanabe, Masa-aki E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-12-01

    We study an inflationary scenario in supergravity model with a gauge kinetic function. We find exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solutions when both the potential function for an inflaton and the gauge kinetic function are exponential type. The dynamical system analysis tells us that the anisotropic power-law inflation is an attractor for a large parameter region.

  3. Power-law regularities in human language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, Ali; Lashkari, Sahar Mohammadpour

    2016-11-01

    Complex structure of human language enables us to exchange very complicated information. This communication system obeys some common nonlinear statistical regularities. We investigate four important long-range features of human language. We perform our calculations for adopted works of seven famous litterateurs. Zipf's law and Heaps' law, which imply well-known power-law behaviors, are established in human language, showing a qualitative inverse relation with each other. Furthermore, the informational content associated with the words ordering, is measured by using an entropic metric. We also calculate fractal dimension of words in the text by using box counting method. The fractal dimension of each word, that is a positive value less than or equal to one, exhibits its spatial distribution in the text. Generally, we can claim that the Human language follows the mentioned power-law regularities. Power-law relations imply the existence of long-range correlations between the word types, to convey an especial idea.

  4. Power law analysis of the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhanshan Sam

    2015-11-01

    Taylor's (1961, Nature, 189:732) power law, a power function (V = am(b) ) describing the scaling relationship between the mean and variance of population abundances of organisms, has been found to govern the population abundance distributions of single species in both space and time in macroecology. It is regarded as one of few generalities in ecology, and its parameter b has been widely applied to characterize spatial aggregation (i.e. heterogeneity) and temporal stability of single-species populations. Here, we test its applicability to bacterial populations in the human microbiome using extensive data sets generated by the US-NIH Human Microbiome Project (HMP). We further propose extending Taylor's power law from the population to the community level, and accordingly introduce four types of power-law extensions (PLEs): type I PLE for community spatial aggregation (heterogeneity), type II PLE for community temporal aggregation (stability), type III PLE for mixed-species population spatial aggregation (heterogeneity) and type IV PLE for mixed-species population temporal aggregation (stability). Our results show that fittings to the four PLEs with HMP data were statistically extremely significant and their parameters are ecologically sound, hence confirming the validity of the power law at both the population and community levels. These findings not only provide a powerful tool to characterize the aggregations of population and community in both time and space, offering important insights into community heterogeneity in space and/or stability in time, but also underscore the three general properties of power laws (scale invariance, no average and universality) and their specific manifestations in our four PLEs.

  5. Fractional power-law spatial dispersion in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.; Trujillo, Juan J.

    2013-07-15

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type. -- Highlights: •Plasma-like non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion. •Fractional differential equations for electric fields in the media. •The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for the media.

  6. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-04-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines—from astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified.

  7. Variational Principle for the Pareto Power Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Anirban; Patriarca, Marco

    2009-11-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the appearance of power-law distributions in various complex systems. It is shown that in a conservative mechanical system composed of subsystems with different numbers of degrees of freedom a robust power-law tail can appear in the equilibrium distribution of energy as a result of certain superpositions of the canonical equilibrium energy densities of the subsystems. The derivation only uses a variational principle based on the Boltzmann entropy, without assumptions outside the framework of canonical equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two examples are discussed, free diffusion on a complex network and a kinetic model of wealth exchange. The mechanism is illustrated in the general case through an exactly solvable mechanical model of a dimensionally heterogeneous system.

  8. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  9. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  10. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  11. Helmholtz solitons in power-law optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. M.; McDonald, G. S.; Potton, R. J.; Chamorro-Posada, P.

    2007-09-15

    A nonlinear Helmholtz equation for optical materials with regimes of power-law type of nonlinearity is proposed. This model captures the evolution of broad beams at any angle with respect to the reference direction in a wide range of media, including some semiconductors, doped glasses, and liquid crystals. Exact analytical soliton solutions are presented for a generic nonlinearity, within which known Kerr solitons comprise a subset. Three general conservation laws are also reported. Analysis and numerical simulations examine the stability of the Helmholtz power-law solitons. A propagation feature, associated with spatial solitons in power-law media, constituting a class of oscillatory solution, is identified.

  12. Power Law Distribution in Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Hari M.; Campanha, José R.; Prado, Fernando D.

    We studied the statistical distribution of candidate's performance which is measured through their marks in university entrance examination (Vestibular) of UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista) for years 1998, 1999, and 2000. All students are divided in three groups: Physical, Biological and Humanities. We paid special attention to the examination of Portuguese language which is common for all and examinations for the particular area. We observed long ubiquitous power law tails in Physical and Biological sciences. This indicate the presence of strong positive feedback in sciences. We are able to explain completely these statistical distributions through Gradually Truncated Power law distributions which we developed recently to explain statistical behavior of financial market. The statistical distribution in case of Portuguese language and humanities is close to normal distribution. We discuss the possible reason for this peculiar behavior.

  13. Power law inflation with electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xianghui; Isenberg, James

    2013-07-15

    We generalize Ringström’s global future causal stability results (Ringström 2009) [11] for certain expanding cosmological solutions of the Einstein-scalar field equations to solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell-scalar field system. In particular, after noting that the power law inflationary spacetimes (M{sup n+1},g{sup -hat}, ϕ{sup -hat}) considered by Ringström (2009) in [11] are solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell-scalar field system (with exponential potential) as well as of the Einstein-scalar field system (with the same exponential potential), we consider (nonlinear) perturbations of initial data sets of these spacetimes which include electromagnetic perturbations as well as gravitational and scalar perturbations. We show that if (as in Ringström (2009) [11]) we focus on pairs of relatively scaled open sets U{sub R{sub 0}}⊂U{sub 4R{sub 0}} on an initial slice of (M{sup n+1},g{sup -hat}), and if we choose a set of perturbed data which on U{sub 4R{sub 0}} is sufficiently close to that of (M{sup n+1},g{sup -hat},ϕ{sup -hat}, A{sup -hat} = 0), then in the maximal globally hyperbolic spacetime development (M{sup n+1},g,ϕ,A) of this data via the Einstein–Maxwell-scalar field equations, all causal geodesics emanating from U{sub R{sub 0}} are future complete (just as in (M{sup n+1},g{sup -hat})). We also verify that, in a certain sense, the future asymptotic behavior of the fields in the spacetime developments of the perturbed data sets does not differ significantly from the future asymptotic behavior of (M{sup n+1},g{sup -hat}, ϕ{sup -hat}, A{sup -hat} = 0). -- Highlights: •We prove stability of expanding solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell-scalar field equations. •All nearby solutions are geodesically complete. •The topology of the initial slice is irrelevant to our stability results.

  14. Systematic harmonic power laws inter-relating multiple fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakeres, Donald; Buckhanan, Wayne; Andrianarijaona, Vola

    2017-01-01

    Power laws and harmonic systems are ubiquitous in physics. We hypothesize that 2, π, the electron, Bohr radius, Rydberg constant, neutron, fine structure constant, Higgs boson, top quark, kaons, pions, muon, Tau, W, and Z when scaled in a common single unit are all inter-related by systematic harmonic powers laws. This implies that if the power law is known it is possible to derive a fundamental constant's scale in the absence of any direct experimental data of that constant. This is true for the case of the hydrogen constants. We created a power law search engine computer program that randomly generated possible positive or negative powers searching when the product of logical groups of constants equals 1, confirming they are physically valid. For 2, π, and the hydrogen constants the search engine found Planck's constant, Coulomb's energy law, and the kinetic energy law. The product of ratios defined by two constants each was the standard general format. The search engine found systematic resonant power laws based on partial harmonic fraction powers of the neutron for all of the constants with products near 1, within their known experimental precision, when utilized with appropriate hydrogen constants. We conclude that multiple fundamental constants are inter-related within a harmonic power law system.

  15. Deformation of a Capsule in a Power-Law Shear Flow.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang-Bao

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method is developed for fluid-structure interactions involving non-Newtonian fluids (e.g., power-law fluid). In this method, the flexible structure (e.g., capsule) dynamics and the fluid dynamics are coupled by using the immersed boundary method. The incompressible viscous power-law fluid motion is obtained by solving the lattice Boltzmann equation. The non-Newtonian rheology is achieved by using a shear rate-dependant relaxation time in the lattice Boltzmann method. The non-Newtonian flow solver is then validated by considering a power-law flow in a straight channel which is one of the benchmark problems to validate an in-house solver. The numerical results present a good agreement with the analytical solutions for various values of power-law index. Finally, we apply this method to study the deformation of a capsule in a power-law shear flow by varying the Reynolds number from 0.025 to 0.1, dimensionless shear rate from 0.004 to 0.1, and power-law index from 0.2 to 1.8. It is found that the deformation of the capsule increases with the power-law index for different Reynolds numbers and nondimensional shear rates. In addition, the Reynolds number does not have significant effect on the capsule deformation in the flow regime considered. Moreover, the power-law index effect is stronger for larger dimensionless shear rate compared to smaller values.

  16. Development and Implementation of Non-Newtonian Rheology Into the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiSalvo, Roberto; Deaconu, Stelu; Majumdar, Alok

    2006-01-01

    One of the goals of this program was to develop the experimental and analytical/computational tools required to predict the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through the various system components of a propulsion system: pipes, valves, pumps etc. To achieve this goal we selected to augment the capabilities of NASA's Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) software. GFSSP is a general-purpose computer program designed to calculate steady state and transient pressure and flow distributions in a complex fluid network. While the current version of the GFSSP code is able to handle various systems components the implicit assumption in the code is that the fluids in the system are Newtonian. To extend the capability of the code to non-Newtonian fluids, such as silica gelled fuels and oxidizers, modifications to the momentum equations of the code have been performed. We have successfully implemented in GFSSP flow equations for fluids with power law behavior. The implementation of the power law fluid behavior into the GFSSP code depends on knowledge of the two fluid coefficients, n and K. The determination of these parameters for the silica gels used in this program was performed experimentally. The n and K parameters for silica water gels were determined experimentally at CFDRC's Special Projects Laboratory, with a constant shear rate capillary viscometer. Batches of 8:1 (by weight) water-silica gel were mixed using CFDRC s 10-gallon gelled propellant mixer. Prior to testing the gel was allowed to rest in the rheometer tank for at least twelve hours to ensure that the delicate structure of the gel had sufficient time to reform. During the tests silica gel was pressure fed and discharged through stainless steel pipes ranging from 1", to 36", in length and three diameters; 0.0237", 0.032", and 0.047". The data collected in these tests included pressure at tube entrance and volumetric flowrate. From these data the uncorrected shear rate, shear stress, residence time

  17. Deposition from evaporating drops: Power laws and new morphologies in coffee stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed-Brown, Julian E.

    We investigate the structure of stains formed through evaporative deposition in sessile drops. Commonly, the deposited stain has a high surface density near the three phase contact line of the drying drop and much less solute in the bulk of the drop. This is known as the ``coffee ring effect'' and primarily arises due to contact line pinning. While many features of the stain depend on subtle physical phenomena within the drop, the coffee ring effect stands out as a robust feature that persists in many varied experimental realizations. In 2009, Witten predicted another robust feature of deposited stains: an asymptotic regime where a robust power law governs the fadeout profile of the stain into the interior of the drop. This power law is only controlled by geometric properties at a single point and the power does not vary along the contact line. We investigate the approach to this power law using numerical methods. For many evaporation profiles (including common experimental ones) the numerics show good agreement with the power law prediction. However, we demonstrate an intuitive scheme to construct evaporation profiles that subvert the power law prediction. We find that, in general, the approach to the power law cannot be known without full knowledge of the evaporation and height profile. We also extend this work in another way. We apply the basic arguments of the coffee ring effect to the case where the drop has a receding contact line. Here, we develop a new theoretical framework for deposition that has not previously been studied. In this context, the surface density profile can be directly calculated. Unlike a pinned contact line, receding contact lines push fluid into the interior of the drop. This effect can be overcome by strong evaporation near the contact line, but in general the intuition from contact line pinning is reversed. Following Witten's example, we find that the surface density of the stain near the center of the drop goes as eta ∝ rnu, where

  18. Power-law relations in random networks with communities.

    PubMed

    Stegehuis, Clara; van der Hofstad, Remco; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S H

    2016-07-01

    Most random graph models are locally tree-like-do not contain short cycles-rendering them unfit for modeling networks with a community structure. We introduce the hierarchical configuration model (HCM), a generalization of the configuration model that includes community structures, while properties such as the size of the giant component, and the size of the giant percolating cluster under bond percolation can still be derived analytically. Viewing real-world networks as realizations of HCM, we observe two previously undiscovered power-law relations: between the number of edges inside a community and the community sizes, and between the number of edges going out of a community and the community sizes. We also relate the power-law exponent τ of the degree distribution with the power-law exponent of the community-size distribution γ. In the case of extremely dense communities (e.g., complete graphs), this relation takes the simple form τ=γ-1.

  19. Statistical Models of Power-law Distributions in Homogeneous Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Ilan

    2011-01-04

    A variety of in-situ measurements in space plasmas point out to an intermittent formation of distribution functions with elongated tails and power-law at high energies. Power-laws form ubiquitous signature of many complex systems, plasma being a good example of a non-Boltzmann behavior for distribution functions of energetic particles. Particles, which either undergo mutual collisions or are scattered in phase space by electromagnetic fluctuations, exhibit statistical properties, which are determined by the transition probability density function of a single interaction, while their non-asymptotic evolution may determine the observed high-energy populations. It is shown that relaxation of the Brownian motion assumptions leads to non-analytical characteristic functions and to generalization of the Fokker-Planck equation with fractional derivatives that result in power law solutions parameterized by the probability density function.

  20. Universal power law behaviors in genomic sequences and evolutionary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignetti, Loredana; Caselle, Michele

    2007-08-01

    We study the length distribution of a particular class of DNA sequences known as the 5' untranslated regions exons. These exons belong to the messenger RNA of protein coding genes, but they are not coding (they are located upstream of the coding portion of the mRNA) and are thus less constrained from an evolutionary point of view. We show that in both mice and humans these exons show a very clean power law decay in their length distribution and suggest a simple evolutionary model, which may explain this finding. We conjecture that this power law behavior could indeed be a general feature of higher eukaryotes.

  1. Transient ultrasonic fields in power law attenuation media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, James F.

    Ultrasonic waves in biological media experience frequency dependent attenuation. Extensive measurement of the attenuation coefficient in human and mammalian tissue in the ultrasonic range has revealed a power law dependence on frequency, where the power law exponent ranges between 0 and 2. For most tissue, the power law exponent ranges between 1 and 1.7, which cannot be explained by classical theories for ultrasonic absorption, such as thermo-viscosity or molecular relaxation. The purpose of this thesis is threefold: (1) to understand the analytical structure of transient fields in power law media, (2) to provide a possible description of the physical mechanism responsible for power law attenuation in biological media, and (3) to develop analytical models for transient, three-dimensional sound beams in power law media. Insight into general dissipative media is gained by studying the approximations available in viscous media. The Stokes wave equation is considered in the time domain, and an asymptotic, causal Green's function is rigorously derived and verified using the material impulse response function (MIRF) approach. A lossy impulse response for the Stokes wave equation is derived for calculations of transient fields generated by finite aperture radiators. Expressions for the uniform circular aperture (in both the nearfield and the farfield), the uniform rectangular aperture in the nearfield, and the spherical shell in the nearfield are then derived. Power-law media is then studied using fractional partial differential equations (FPDEs), which add loss to the wave equation with a time-fractional or space-fractional derivative. A FPDE is derived that exactly describes power law attenuation, and analytical, time-domain James F. Kelly Green's functions in power law media are derived for exponents between 0 and 2. To construct solutions, stable law probability distributions are utilized, which are widely used in the study of anomalous diffusion and in the study of

  2. On the apparent power law in CDM halo pseudo-phase space density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadler, Ethan O.; Oh, S. Peng; Ji, Suoqing

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the apparent power-law scaling of the pseudo-phase space density (PPSD) in cold dark matter (CDM) haloes. We study fluid collapse, using the close analogy between the gas entropy and the PPSD in the fluid approximation. Our hydrodynamic calculations allow for a precise evaluation of logarithmic derivatives. For scale-free initial conditions, entropy is a power law in Lagrangian (mass) coordinates, but not in Eulerian (radial) coordinates. The deviation from a radial power law arises from incomplete hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE), linked to bulk inflow and mass accretion, and the convergence to the asymptotic central power-law slope is very slow. For more realistic collapse, entropy is not a power law with either radius or mass due to deviations from HSE and scale-dependent initial conditions. Instead, it is a slowly rolling power law that appears approximately linear on a log-log plot. Our fluid calculations recover PPSD power-law slopes and residual amplitudes similar to N-body simulations, indicating that deviations from a power law are not numerical artefacts. In addition, we find that realistic collapse is not self-similar; scalelengths such as the shock radius and the turnaround radius are not power-law functions of time. We therefore argue that the apparent power-law PPSD cannot be used to make detailed dynamical inferences or extrapolate halo profiles inwards, and that it does not indicate any hidden integrals of motion. We also suggest that the apparent agreement between the PPSD and the asymptotic Bertschinger slope is purely coincidental.

  3. Power laws of wealth, market order volumes and market returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sorin; Richmond, Peter

    2001-10-01

    Using the Generalized Lotka Volterra model adapted to deal with mutiagent systems we can investigate economic systems from a general viewpoint and obtain generic features common to most economies. Assuming only weak generic assumptions on capital dynamics, we are able to obtain very specific predictions for the distribution of social wealth. First, we show that in a ‘fair’ market, the wealth distribution among individual investors fulfills a power law. We then argue that ‘fair play’ for capital and minimal socio-biological needs of the humans traps the economy within a power law wealth distribution with a particular Pareto exponent α∼ {3}/{2}. In particular, we relate it to the average number of individuals L depending on the average wealth: α∼ L/( L-1). Then we connect it to certain power exponents characterizing the stock markets. We find that the distribution of volumes of the individual (buy and sell) orders follows a power law with similar exponent β∼α∼ {3}/{2}. Consequently, in a market where trades take place by matching pairs of such sell and buy orders, the corresponding exponent for the market returns is expected to be of order γ∼2 α∼3. These results are consistent with recent experimental measurements of these power law exponents (S. Maslov, M. Mills, Physica A 299 (2001) 234 for β; P. Gopikrishnan et al., Phys. Rev. E 60 (1999) 5305 for γ).

  4. Deformation of a Capsule in a Power-Law Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method is developed for fluid-structure interactions involving non-Newtonian fluids (e.g., power-law fluid). In this method, the flexible structure (e.g., capsule) dynamics and the fluid dynamics are coupled by using the immersed boundary method. The incompressible viscous power-law fluid motion is obtained by solving the lattice Boltzmann equation. The non-Newtonian rheology is achieved by using a shear rate-dependant relaxation time in the lattice Boltzmann method. The non-Newtonian flow solver is then validated by considering a power-law flow in a straight channel which is one of the benchmark problems to validate an in-house solver. The numerical results present a good agreement with the analytical solutions for various values of power-law index. Finally, we apply this method to study the deformation of a capsule in a power-law shear flow by varying the Reynolds number from 0.025 to 0.1, dimensionless shear rate from 0.004 to 0.1, and power-law index from 0.2 to 1.8. It is found that the deformation of the capsule increases with the power-law index for different Reynolds numbers and nondimensional shear rates. In addition, the Reynolds number does not have significant effect on the capsule deformation in the flow regime considered. Moreover, the power-law index effect is stronger for larger dimensionless shear rate compared to smaller values. PMID:27840656

  5. General Transient Fluid Flow Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A. A.; Ruppel, H. M.; Hirt, C. W.

    1992-03-12

    SALE2D calculates two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a two-dimensional network of quadrilateral cells for either cylindrical or Cartesian coordinates, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.

  6. Spectral geometry of power-law potentials in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Richard L.

    1989-06-01

    It is supposed that a single particle moves in openR3 in an attractive central power-law potential V(q)(r)=sgn(q)rq, q>-2, and obeys nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. This paper is concerned with the question: How do the discrete eigenvalues Enl(q) of the Hamiltonian H=-Δ+V(q) depend on the power parameter q\\? Pure power-law potentials have the elementary property that, for pgeneral operators of the form H'=-Δ+, A(q)∈openR. This geometrical approach greatly simplifies the description of the spectra and also facilitates the construction of some general eigenvalue bounds and approximation formulas.

  7. Chimera patterns induced by distance-dependent power-law coupling in ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of several chimera patterns and the associated transitions among them in a network of coupled oscillators, which are connected by a long-range interaction that obeys a distance-dependent power law. This type of interaction is common in physics and biology and constitutes a general form of coupling scheme, where by tuning the power-law exponent of the long-range interaction the coupling topology can be varied from local via nonlocal to global coupling. To explore the effect of the power-law coupling on collective dynamics, we consider a network consisting of a realistic ecological model of oscillating populations, namely the Rosenzweig-MacArthur model, and show that the variation of the power-law exponent mediates transitions between spatial synchrony and various chimera patterns. We map the possible spatiotemporal states and their scenarios that arise due to the interplay between the coupling strength and the power-law exponent.

  8. Chimera patterns induced by distance-dependent power-law coupling in ecological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of several chimera patterns and the associated transitions among them in a network of coupled oscillators, which are connected by a long-range interaction that obeys a distance-dependent power law. This type of interaction is common in physics and biology and constitutes a general form of coupling scheme, where by tuning the power-law exponent of the long-range interaction the coupling topology can be varied from local via nonlocal to global coupling. To explore the effect of the power-law coupling on collective dynamics, we consider a network consisting of a realistic ecological model of oscillating populations, namely the Rosenzweig-MacArthur model, and show that the variation of the power-law exponent mediates transitions between spatial synchrony and various chimera patterns. We map the possible spatiotemporal states and their scenarios that arise due to the interplay between the coupling strength and the power-law exponent.

  9. Hierarchical networks, power laws, and neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Eric J; Landsberg, Adam S

    2013-03-01

    We show that in networks with a hierarchical architecture, critical dynamical behaviors can emerge even when the underlying dynamical processes are not critical. This finding provides explicit insight into current studies of the brain's neuronal network showing power-law avalanches in neural recordings, and provides a theoretical justification of recent numerical findings. Our analysis shows how the hierarchical organization of a network can itself lead to power-law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, scaling laws between anomalous exponents, and universal functions-even in the absence of self-organized criticality or critical points. This hierarchy-induced phenomenon is independent of, though can potentially operate in conjunction with, standard dynamical mechanisms for generating power laws.

  10. Search in power-law networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamic, Lada A.; Lukose, Rajan M.; Puniyani, Amit R.; Huberman, Bernardo A.

    2001-10-01

    Many communication and social networks have power-law link distributions, containing a few nodes that have a very high degree and many with low degree. The high connectivity nodes play the important role of hubs in communication and networking, a fact that can be exploited when designing efficient search algorithms. We introduce a number of local search strategies that utilize high degree nodes in power-law graphs and that have costs scaling sublinearly with the size of the graph. We also demonstrate the utility of these strategies on the GNUTELLA peer-to-peer network.

  11. Withdrawal and drainage of thin film flow of a generalized Oldroyd-B fluid on non-isothermal cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Saif; Ullah, Arshad; Iqbal, Mohsan

    2015-12-01

    This investigation deals with analytical solutions of thin film flow for withdrawal and drainage of an incompressible generalized Oldroyd-B fluid on a vertical cylinder under the influence of non-isothermal effects. The derived solutions are presented under series form for velocity profile, temperature distribution, volume flux, average film velocity and shear stress in both cases. These solutions satisfy both the governing equations and all imposed initial and boundary conditions. The corresponding exact solutions for Newtonian fluid are also obtained as a special case of our derived solutions. Moreover, solutions for generalized Maxwell fluid and Power Law model, performing the same motion, can be obtained as limiting cases of our general solutions. The influence of pertinent parameters on the fluid motion is also underlined by graphical illustration.

  12. COSMOLOGY OF CHAMELEONS WITH POWER-LAW COUPLINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A.

    2011-05-20

    In chameleon field theories, a scalar field can couple to matter with gravitational strength and still evade local gravity constraints due to a combination of self-interactions and the couplings to matter. Originally, these theories were proposed with a constant coupling to matter; however, the chameleon mechanism also extends to the case where the coupling becomes field dependent. We study the cosmology of chameleon models with power-law couplings and power-law potentials. It is found that these generalized chameleons, when viable, have a background expansion very close to {Lambda}CDM, but can in some special cases enhance the growth of the linear perturbations at low redshifts. For the models we consider, it is found that this region of the parameter space is ruled out by local gravity constraints. Imposing a coupling to dark matter only, the local constraints are avoided, and it is possible to have observable signatures on the linear matter perturbations.

  13. Power law Kohn anomalies and the excitonic transition in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Juan, F.; Fertig, H. A.

    2012-08-01

    Dirac electrons in graphene in the presence of Coulomb interactions of strength β have been shown to display power law behavior with β dependent exponents in certain correlation functions, which we call the mass susceptibilities of the system. In this work, we first discuss how this phenomenon is intimately related to the excitonic insulator transition, showing the explicit relation between the gap equation and response function approaches to this problem. We then provide a general computation of these mass susceptibilities in the ladder approximation, and present an analytical computation of the static exponent within a simplified kernel model, obtaining η0=√{1-β/βc}. Finally we emphasize that the behavior of these susceptibilities provides new experimental signatures of interactions, such as power law Kohn anomalies in the dispersion of several phonons, which could potentially be used as a measurement of β.

  14. Interacting discrete Markov processes with power-law probability distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Kevin D.; Jakeman, Eric

    2017-09-01

    During recent years there has been growing interest in the occurrence of long-tailed distributions, also known as heavy-tailed or fat-tailed distributions, which can exhibit power-law behaviour and often characterise physical systems that undergo very large fluctuations. In this paper we show that the interaction between two discrete Markov processes naturally generates a time-series characterised by such a distribution. This possibility is first demonstrated by numerical simulation and then confirmed by a mathematical analysis that enables the parameter range over which the power-law occurs to be quantified. The results are supported by comparison of numerical results with theoretical predictions and general conclusions are drawn regarding mechanisms that can cause this behaviour.

  15. Heat transfer analysis in an annular cone subjected to power law variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Yunus Khan, T. M.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Athani, Abdulgaphur; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2016-09-01

    Present study deals with the analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow behavior in an annular cone fixed with saturated porous medium. The inner surface of the cone is assumed to have power law variable wall temperature. The governing partial differential equations are solved using well known Finite Element Method (FEM). The coupled nonlinear differential equations are converted into the algebraic equations by using Galerkin method. A 3 noded triangular element is used to divide the porous domain into smaller segments. The effects of various geometrical parameters on the cone angle are presented. It is found that the effect of cone angle on the heat transfer characteristics and fluid flow behavior is considerably significant. The fluid moment is found to shift towards the upper side of cone with increase in the power law coefficient. The fluid velocity decreases with increase in the power law coefficient.

  16. Spectrum of power laws for curved hand movements.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongsung; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2015-07-21

    In a planar free-hand drawing of an ellipse, the speed of movement is proportional to the -1/3 power of the local curvature, which is widely thought to hold for general curved shapes. We investigated this phenomenon for general curved hand movements by analyzing an optimal control model that maximizes a smoothness cost and exhibits the -1/3 power for ellipses. For the analysis, we introduced a new representation for curved movements based on a moving reference frame and a dimensionless angle coordinate that revealed scale-invariant features of curved movements. The analysis confirmed the power law for drawing ellipses but also predicted a spectrum of power laws with exponents ranging between 0 and -2/3 for simple movements that can be characterized by a single angular frequency. Moreover, it predicted mixtures of power laws for more complex, multifrequency movements that were confirmed with human drawing experiments. The speed profiles of arbitrary doodling movements that exhibit broadband curvature profiles were accurately predicted as well. These findings have implications for motor planning and predict that movements only depend on one radian of angle coordinate in the past and only need to be planned one radian ahead.

  17. Spectrum of power laws for curved hand movements

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Dongsung; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2015-01-01

    In a planar free-hand drawing of an ellipse, the speed of movement is proportional to the −1/3 power of the local curvature, which is widely thought to hold for general curved shapes. We investigated this phenomenon for general curved hand movements by analyzing an optimal control model that maximizes a smoothness cost and exhibits the −1/3 power for ellipses. For the analysis, we introduced a new representation for curved movements based on a moving reference frame and a dimensionless angle coordinate that revealed scale-invariant features of curved movements. The analysis confirmed the power law for drawing ellipses but also predicted a spectrum of power laws with exponents ranging between 0 and −2/3 for simple movements that can be characterized by a single angular frequency. Moreover, it predicted mixtures of power laws for more complex, multifrequency movements that were confirmed with human drawing experiments. The speed profiles of arbitrary doodling movements that exhibit broadband curvature profiles were accurately predicted as well. These findings have implications for motor planning and predict that movements only depend on one radian of angle coordinate in the past and only need to be planned one radian ahead. PMID:26150514

  18. Power-law connections: From Zipf to Heaps and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we explore the asymptotic statistics of a general model of rank distributions in the large-ensemble limit; the construction of the general model is motivated by recent empirical studies of rank distributions. Applying Lorenzian, oligarchic, and Heapsian asymptotic analyses we establish a comprehensive set of closed-form results linking together rank distributions, probability distributions, oligarchy sizes, and innovation rates. In particular, the general results reveal the fundamental underlying connections between Zipf’s law, Pareto’s law, and Heaps’ law—three elemental empirical power-laws that are ubiquitously observed in the sciences.

  19. Power-law connections: From Zipf to Heaps and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we explore the asymptotic statistics of a general model of rank distributions in the large-ensemble limit; the construction of the general model is motivated by recent empirical studies of rank distributions. Applying Lorenzian, oligarchic, and Heapsian asymptotic analyses we establish a comprehensive set of closed-form results linking together rank distributions, probability distributions, oligarchy sizes, and innovation rates. In particular, the general results reveal the fundamental underlying connections between Zipf's law, Pareto's law, and Heaps' law—three elemental empirical power-laws that are ubiquitously observed in the sciences.

  20. Scaling range of power laws that originate from fluctuation analysis.

    PubMed

    Grech, Dariusz; Mazur, Zygmunt

    2013-05-01

    We extend our previous study of scaling range properties performed for detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) [Physica A 392, 2384 (2013)] to other techniques of fluctuation analysis (FA). The new technique, called modified detrended moving average analysis (MDMA), is introduced, and its scaling range properties are examined and compared with those of detrended moving average analysis (DMA) and DFA. It is shown that contrary to DFA, DMA and MDMA techniques exhibit power law dependence of the scaling range with respect to the length of the searched signal and with respect to the accuracy R^{2} of the fit to the considered scaling law imposed by DMA or MDMA methods. This power law dependence is satisfied for both uncorrelated and autocorrelated data. We find also a simple generalization of this power law relation for series with a different level of autocorrelations measured in terms of the Hurst exponent. Basic relations between scaling ranges for different techniques are also discussed. Our findings should be particularly useful for local FA in, e.g., econophysics, finances, or physiology, where the huge number of short time series has to be examined at once and wherever the preliminary check of the scaling range regime for each of the series separately is neither effective nor possible.

  1. Scaling range of power laws that originate from fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, Dariusz; Mazur, Zygmunt

    2013-05-01

    We extend our previous study of scaling range properties performed for detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) [Physica A0378-437110.1016/j.physa.2013.01.049 392, 2384 (2013)] to other techniques of fluctuation analysis (FA). The new technique, called modified detrended moving average analysis (MDMA), is introduced, and its scaling range properties are examined and compared with those of detrended moving average analysis (DMA) and DFA. It is shown that contrary to DFA, DMA and MDMA techniques exhibit power law dependence of the scaling range with respect to the length of the searched signal and with respect to the accuracy R2 of the fit to the considered scaling law imposed by DMA or MDMA methods. This power law dependence is satisfied for both uncorrelated and autocorrelated data. We find also a simple generalization of this power law relation for series with a different level of autocorrelations measured in terms of the Hurst exponent. Basic relations between scaling ranges for different techniques are also discussed. Our findings should be particularly useful for local FA in, e.g., econophysics, finances, or physiology, where the huge number of short time series has to be examined at once and wherever the preliminary check of the scaling range regime for each of the series separately is neither effective nor possible.

  2. Universal inverse power-law distribution for temperature and rainfall in the UK region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, A. M.

    2014-06-01

    Meteorological parameters, such as temperature, rainfall, pressure, etc., exhibit selfsimilar space-time fractal fluctuations generic to dynamical systems in nature such as fluid flows, spread of forest fires, earthquakes, etc. The power spectra of fractal fluctuations display inverse power-law form signifying long-range correlations. A general systems theory model predicts universal inverse power-law form incorporating the golden mean for the fractal fluctuations. The model predicted distribution was compared with observed distribution of fractal fluctuations of all size scales (small, large and extreme values) in the historic month-wise temperature (maximum and minimum) and total rainfall for the four stations Oxford, Armagh, Durham and Stornoway in the UK region, for data periods ranging from 92 years to 160 years. For each parameter, the two cumulative probability distributions, namely cmax and cmin starting from respectively maximum and minimum data value were used. The results of the study show that (i) temperature distributions (maximum and minimum) follow model predicted distribution except for Stornowy, minimum temperature cmin. (ii) Rainfall distribution for cmin follow model predicted distribution for all the four stations. (iii) Rainfall distribution for cmax follows model predicted distribution for the two stations Armagh and Stornoway. The present study suggests that fractal fluctuations result from the superimposition of eddy continuum fluctuations.

  3. Power laws governing epidemics in isolated populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, C. J.; Anderson, R. M.

    1996-06-01

    TEMPORAL changes in the incidence of measles virus infection within large urban communities in the developed world have been the focus of much discussion in the context of the identification and analysis of nonlinear and chaotic patterns in biological time series1-11. In contrast, the measles records for small isolated island populations are highly irregular, because of frequent fade-outs of infection12-14, and traditional analysis15 does not yield useful insight. Here we use measurements of the distribution of epidemic sizes and duration to show that regularities in the dynamics of such systems do become apparent. Specifically, these biological systems are characterized by well-defined power laws in a manner reminiscent of other nonlinear, spatially extended dynamical systems in the physical sciences16-19. We further show that the observed power-law exponents are well described by a simple lattice-based model which reflects the social interaction between individual hosts.

  4. Relativity, nonextensivity, and extended power law distributions.

    PubMed

    Silva, R; Lima, J A S

    2005-11-01

    A proof of the relativistic theorem by including nonextensive effects is given. As it happens in the nonrelativistic limit, the molecular chaos hypothesis advanced by Boltzmann does not remain valid, and the second law of thermodynamics combined with a duality transformation implies that the parameter lies on the interval [0,2]. It is also proven that the collisional equilibrium states (null entropy source term) are described by the relativistic power law extension of the exponential Juttner distribution which reduces, in the nonrelativistic domain, to the Tsallis power law function. As a simple illustration of the basic approach, we derive the relativistic nonextensive equilibrium distribution for a dilute charged gas under the action of an electromagnetic field . Such results reduce to the standard ones in the extensive limit, thereby showing that the nonextensive entropic framework can be harmonized with the space-time ideas contained in the special relativity theory.

  5. Fractal power law in literary English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, L. L.; Gonçalves, L. B.

    2006-02-01

    We present in this paper a numerical investigation of literary texts by various well-known English writers, covering the first half of the twentieth century, based upon the results obtained through corpus analysis of the texts. A fractal power law is obtained for the lexical wealth defined as the ratio between the number of different words and the total number of words of a given text. By considering as a signature of each author the exponent and the amplitude of the power law, and the standard deviation of the lexical wealth, it is possible to discriminate works of different genres and writers and show that each writer has a very distinct signature, either considered among other literary writers or compared with writers of non-literary texts. It is also shown that, for a given author, the signature is able to discriminate between short stories and novels.

  6. Extension of Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program's Fluid Property Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Kishan

    2011-01-01

    This internship focused on the development of additional capabilities for the General Fluid Systems Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a thermo-fluid code used to evaluate system performance by a finite volume-based network analysis method. The program was developed primarily to analyze the complex internal flow of propulsion systems and is capable of solving many problems related to thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. GFSSP is integrated with thermodynamic programs that provide fluid properties for sub-cooled, superheated, and saturation states. For fluids that are not included in the thermodynamic property program, look-up property tables can be provided. The look-up property tables of the current release version can only handle sub-cooled and superheated states. The primary purpose of the internship was to extend the look-up tables to handle saturated states. This involves a) generation of a property table using REFPROP, a thermodynamic property program that is widely used, and b) modifications of the Fortran source code to read in an additional property table containing saturation data for both saturated liquid and saturated vapor states. Also, a method was implemented to calculate the thermodynamic properties of user-fluids within the saturation region, given values of pressure and enthalpy. These additions required new code to be written, and older code had to be adjusted to accommodate the new capabilities. Ultimately, the changes will lead to the incorporation of this new capability in future versions of GFSSP. This paper describes the development and validation of the new capability.

  7. Fitting power-laws in empirical data with estimators that work for all exponents

    PubMed Central

    Hanel, Rudolf; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Liu, Bo; Thurner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Most standard methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of power-law exponents can only be reliably used to identify exponents smaller than minus one. The argument that power laws are otherwise not normalizable, depends on the underlying sample space the data is drawn from, and is true only for sample spaces that are unbounded from above. Power-laws obtained from bounded sample spaces (as is the case for practically all data related problems) are always free of such limitations and maximum likelihood estimates can be obtained for arbitrary powers without restrictions. Here we first derive the appropriate ML estimator for arbitrary exponents of power-law distributions on bounded discrete sample spaces. We then show that an almost identical estimator also works perfectly for continuous data. We implemented this ML estimator and discuss its performance with previous attempts. We present a general recipe of how to use these estimators and present the associated computer codes. PMID:28245249

  8. Fitting power-laws in empirical data with estimators that work for all exponents.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Rudolf; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Liu, Bo; Thurner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Most standard methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of power-law exponents can only be reliably used to identify exponents smaller than minus one. The argument that power laws are otherwise not normalizable, depends on the underlying sample space the data is drawn from, and is true only for sample spaces that are unbounded from above. Power-laws obtained from bounded sample spaces (as is the case for practically all data related problems) are always free of such limitations and maximum likelihood estimates can be obtained for arbitrary powers without restrictions. Here we first derive the appropriate ML estimator for arbitrary exponents of power-law distributions on bounded discrete sample spaces. We then show that an almost identical estimator also works perfectly for continuous data. We implemented this ML estimator and discuss its performance with previous attempts. We present a general recipe of how to use these estimators and present the associated computer codes.

  9. Power-law modeling based on least-squares minimization criteria.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bermejo, B; Fairén, V; Sorribas, A

    1999-10-01

    The power-law formalism has been successfully used as a modeling tool in many applications. The resulting models, either as Generalized Mass Action or as S-systems models, allow one to characterize the target system and to simulate its dynamical behavior in response to external perturbations and parameter changes. The power-law formalism was first derived as a Taylor series approximation in logarithmic space for kinetic rate-laws. The especial characteristics of this approximation produce an extremely useful systemic representation that allows a complete system characterization. Furthermore, their parameters have a precise interpretation as local sensitivities of each of the individual processes and as rate-constants. This facilitates a qualitative discussion and a quantitative estimation of their possible values in relation to the kinetic properties. Following this interpretation, parameter estimation is also possible by relating the systemic behavior to the underlying processes. Without leaving the general formalism, in this paper we suggest deriving the power-law representation in an alternative way that uses least-squares minimization. The resulting power-law mimics the target rate-law in a wider range of concentration values than the classical power-law. Although the implications of this alternative approach remain to be established, our results show that the predicted steady-state using the least-squares power-law is closest to the actual steady-state of the target system.

  10. Further validation to the variational method to obtain flow relations for generalized Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochi, Taha

    2015-05-01

    We continue our investigation to the use of the variational method to derive flow relations for generalized Newtonian fluids in confined geometries. While in the previous investigations we used the straight circular tube geometry with eight fluid rheological models to demonstrate and establish the variational method, the focus here is on the plane long thin slit geometry using those eight rheological models, namely: Newtonian, power law, Ree-Eyring, Carreau, Cross, Casson, Bingham and Herschel-Bulkley. We demonstrate how the variational principle based on minimizing the total stress in the flow conduit can be used to derive analytical expressions, which are previously derived by other methods, or used in conjunction with numerical procedures to obtain numerical solutions which are virtually identical to the solutions obtained previously from well established methods of fluid dynamics. In this regard, we use the method of Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch- Mooney-Schofield (WRMS), with our adaptation from the circular pipe geometry to the long thin slit geometry, to derive analytical formulae for the eight types of fluid where these derived formulae are used for comparison and validation of the variational formulae and numerical solutions. Although some examples may be of little value, the optimization principle which the variational method is based upon has a significant theoretical value as it reveals the tendency of the flow system to assume a configuration that minimizes the total stress. Our proposal also offers a new methodology to tackle common problems in fluid dynamics and rheology.

  11. Self-dual quasiperiodic systems with power-law hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Sarang

    2017-08-01

    We introduce and explore a family of self-dual models of single-particle motion in quasiperiodic potentials, with hopping amplitudes that fall off as a power law with exponent p . These models are generalizations of the familiar Aubry-André model. For large enough p , their static properties are similar to those of the Aubry-André model, although the low-frequency conductivity in the localized phase is sensitive to p . For p ≲2.1 the Aubry-André localization transition splits into three transitions; two distinct intermediate regimes with both localized and delocalized states appear near the self-dual point of the Aubry-André model. In the intermediate regimes, the density of states is singular continuous in much of the spectrum, and is approximately self-similar: states form narrow energy bands, which are divided into yet narrower subbands; we find no clear sign of a mobility edge. When p <1 , localized states are not stable in random potentials; in the present model, however, tightly localized states are present for relatively large systems. We discuss the frequency-dependence and strong sample-to-sample fluctuations of the low-frequency optical conductivity, although a suitably generalized version of Mott's law is recovered when the power law is slowly decaying. We present evidence that many of these features persist in models that are away from self-duality.

  12. Spectra that behave like power-laws are not necessarily power-laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, John J.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that measured power spectral densities (spectra) that closely resemble power-law spectra may, in fact, have mathematical forms that are not power laws in the mathematical sense. If power spectral estimates show a good fit to a straight line on a log-log plot over a finite frequency range, that is not sufficient evidence to conclude that the mathematical form of the spectrum is, in fact, a power-law over that range. It is also pointed out that to accurately fit a power-law function to experimental data using linear least squares techniques in log-log space, as is often done in practice, it is essential that the data is uniformly distributed along the abscissa in log-space (in the stochastic sense) or, otherwise, the data must be linearly interpolated onto a uniform grid to ensure that the data employed in the fitting procedure is equally weighted along the abscissa. These two important points are not widely appreciated by researchers in the field and the pitfalls associated with commonly used fitting techniques are often overlooked in the analysis of solar wind data.

  13. Power laws and fragility in flow networks☆

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Jesse; Chu, Catherine J.; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2015-01-01

    What makes economic and ecological networks so unlike other highly skewed networks in their tendency toward turbulence and collapse? Here, we explore the consequences of a defining feature of these networks: their nodes are tied together by flow. We show that flow networks tend to the power law degree distribution (PLDD) due to a self-reinforcing process involving position within the global network structure, and thus present the first random graph model for PLDDs that does not depend on a rich-get-richer function of nodal degree. We also show that in contrast to non-flow networks, PLDD flow networks are dramatically more vulnerable to catastrophic failure than non-PLDD flow networks, a finding with potential explanatory power in our age of resource- and financial-interdependence and turbulence. PMID:26082568

  14. Universal Power Law Governing Pedestrian Interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Karamouzas, Ioannis; Skinner, Brian; Guy, Stephen J.

    2014-12-02

    Human crowds often bear a striking resemblance to interacting particle systems, and this has prompted many researchers to describe pedestrian dynamics in terms of interaction forces and potential energies. The correct quantitative form of this interaction, however, has remained an open question. Here, we introduce a novel statistical-mechanical approach to directly measure the interaction energy between pedestrians. This analysis, when applied to a large collection of human motion data, reveals a simple power-law interaction that is based not on the physical separation between pedestrians but on their projected time to a potential future collision, and is therefore fundamentally anticipatory in nature. Remarkably, this simple law is able to describe human interactions across a wide variety of situations, speeds, and densities. We further show, through simulations, that the interaction law we identify is sufficient to reproduce many known crowd phenomena.

  15. Classical orbits in power-law potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Aaron K.; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1994-04-01

    The motion of bodies in power-law potentials of the form V(r)=λrα has been of interest ever since the time of Newton and Hooke. Aspects of the relation between powers α and ᾱ, where (α+2)(ᾱ+2)=4, are derived for classical motion and the relation to the quantum-mechanical problem is given. An improvement on a previous expression for the WKB quantization condition for nonzero orbital angular momenta is obtained. Relations with previous treatments, such as those of Newton, Bertrand, Bohlin, Fauré, and Arnold, are noted, and a brief survey of the literature on the problem over more than three centuries is given.

  16. Poissonian renormalizations, exponentials, and power laws.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive "renormalization study" of Poisson processes governed by exponential and power-law intensities. These Poisson processes are of fundamental importance, as they constitute the very bedrock of the universal extreme-value laws of Gumbel, Fréchet, and Weibull. Applying the method of Poissonian renormalization we analyze the emergence of these Poisson processes, unveil their intrinsic dynamical structures, determine their domains of attraction, and characterize their structural phase transitions. These structural phase transitions are shown to be governed by uniform and harmonic intensities, to have universal domains of attraction, to uniquely display intrinsic invariance, and to be intimately connected to "white noise" and to "1/f noise." Thus, we establish a Poissonian explanation to the omnipresence of white and 1/f noises.

  17. Universal Power Law Governing Pedestrian Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamouzas, Ioannis; Skinner, Brian; Guy, Stephen J.

    2014-12-01

    Human crowds often bear a striking resemblance to interacting particle systems, and this has prompted many researchers to describe pedestrian dynamics in terms of interaction forces and potential energies. The correct quantitative form of this interaction, however, has remained an open question. Here, we introduce a novel statistical-mechanical approach to directly measure the interaction energy between pedestrians. This analysis, when applied to a large collection of human motion data, reveals a simple power-law interaction that is based not on the physical separation between pedestrians but on their projected time to a potential future collision, and is therefore fundamentally anticipatory in nature. Remarkably, this simple law is able to describe human interactions across a wide variety of situations, speeds, and densities. We further show, through simulations, that the interaction law we identify is sufficient to reproduce many known crowd phenomena.

  18. Power Law Distributions of Patents as Indicators of Innovation

    PubMed Central

    O’Neale, Dion R. J.; Hendy, Shaun C.

    2012-01-01

    The total number of patents produced by a country (or the number of patents produced per capita) is often used as an indicator for innovation. Here we present evidence that the distribution of patents amongst applicants within many countries is well-described by power laws with exponents that vary between 1.66 (Japan) and 2.37 (Poland). We suggest that this exponent is a useful new metric for studying innovation. Using simulations based on simple preferential attachment-type rules that generate power laws, we find we can explain some of the variation in exponents between countries, with countries that have larger numbers of patents per applicant generally exhibiting smaller exponents in both the simulated and actual data. Similarly we find that the exponents for most countries are inversely correlated with other indicators of innovation, such as research and development intensity or the ubiquity of export baskets. This suggests that in more advanced economies, which tend to have smaller values of the exponent, a greater proportion of the total number of patents are filed by large companies than in less advanced countries. PMID:23227144

  19. Power law distributions of patents as indicators of innovation.

    PubMed

    O'Neale, Dion R J; Hendy, Shaun C

    2012-01-01

    The total number of patents produced by a country (or the number of patents produced per capita) is often used as an indicator for innovation. Here we present evidence that the distribution of patents amongst applicants within many countries is well-described by power laws with exponents that vary between 1.66 (Japan) and 2.37 (Poland). We suggest that this exponent is a useful new metric for studying innovation. Using simulations based on simple preferential attachment-type rules that generate power laws, we find we can explain some of the variation in exponents between countries, with countries that have larger numbers of patents per applicant generally exhibiting smaller exponents in both the simulated and actual data. Similarly we find that the exponents for most countries are inversely correlated with other indicators of innovation, such as research and development intensity or the ubiquity of export baskets. This suggests that in more advanced economies, which tend to have smaller values of the exponent, a greater proportion of the total number of patents are filed by large companies than in less advanced countries.

  20. Implitcation of a Power-Law Climate Response Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, R.

    2015-12-01

    A study of global mean temperature is presented assuming that the climate response function to anthropogenic forcing is a power law. This general form allows for long-range dependancies with only 3 parameter while remaining within the linear forcing paradigm. This establish a one-to-one relation between the scaling exponent H and the ratio of the Transient Climate Response, TCR, and the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity, ECS. The scaling exponent of the power law is estimated by a regression of temperature as a function of forcing and by a spectral analysis of the temperature and the forcing. We consider for the analysis 5 different datasets of historical global mean temperature and 100 CMIP5 RCP runs distributed among the 4 scenarios. We find that the error function for the estimate on historical temperature is very wide and thus, many scaling exponent can be used without meaningful changes in the fit residuals of historical temperatures; their response in the year 2100 on the other hand, is very broad. CMIP5 runs allow a narrower estimate of H which can then be used to estimate the ECS by dividing the TCR estimated from the historical data.

  1. A Generalized Fluid Formulation for Turbomachinery Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Dorney, Daniel J.; Sondak, Douglas L.

    2003-01-01

    A generalized formulation of the equations of motion of an arbitrary fluid are developed for the purpose of defining a common iterative algorithm for computational procedures. The method makes use of the equations of motion in conservation form with separate pseudo-time derivatives used for defining the numerical flux for a Riemann solver and the convergence algorithm. The partial differential equations are complemented by an thermodynamic and caloric equations of state of a complexity necessary for describing the fluid. Representative solutions with a new code based on this general equation formulation are provided for three turbomachinery problems. The first uses air as a working fluid while the second uses gaseous oxygen in a regime in which real gas effects are of little importance. These nearly perfect gas computations provide a basis for comparing with existing perfect gas code computations. The third case is for the flow of liquid oxygen through a turbine where real gas effects are significant. Vortex shedding predictions with the LOX formulations reduce the discrepancy between perfect gas computations and experiment by approximately an order of magnitude, thereby verifying the real gas formulation as well as providing an effective case where its capabilities are necessary.

  2. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) Version 6 - General Purpose Thermo-Fluid Network Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Leclair, Andre; Moore, Ric; Schallhorn, Paul

    2011-01-01

    GFSSP stands for Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program. It is a general-purpose computer program to compute pressure, temperature and flow distribution in a flow network. GFSSP calculates pressure, temperature, and concentrations at nodes and calculates flow rates through branches. It was primarily developed to analyze Internal Flow Analysis of a Turbopump Transient Flow Analysis of a Propulsion System. GFSSP development started in 1994 with an objective to provide a generalized and easy to use flow analysis tool for thermo-fluid systems.

  3. Power-law spatial dispersion from fractional Liouville equation

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2013-10-15

    A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.

  4. Generalized Langevin Theory for Inhomogeneous Fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Martin Garth

    This thesis presents a molecular theory of the dynamics of inhomogeneous fluids. Dynamical correlations in a nonuniform system are studied through the generalized Langevin approach. The equations of motion (formally exact) are obtained for the number density, momentum density, energy density, stress tensor and heat flux. We evaluate all the relevant sum rules appearing in the frequency matrix exactly in terms of microscopic pair potentials and an external field. We show using functional derivatives how these microscopic sum rules relate to more familiar, though now nonlocal, hydrodynamic-like quantities. The set of equations is closed by a Markov approximation in the equations for stress tensor and heat flux. As a result, these equations become analogous to Grad's 13-moment equations for low density fluids and constitute a generalization to inhomogeneous fluids of the work of Schofield and Akcasu-Daniels. We apply this formalism to several problems. We study the correlation of currents orthogonal to a diffuse planar, liquid-vapour, interface, introducing new nonlocal elastic moduli and new nonlocal, frequency dependent, viscosities. Novel symmetry breaking contributions are obtained, which are related to the Young-Laplace equation for pressure balance. The normal modes, associated with the symmetry breaking interface in the liquid-vapour system, are analyzed, taking into account the nonlocal nature of the diffuse planar interface. We obtain the classical dispersion relation for capillary waves, observed in light scattering experiments, from an adiabatic (molecular) approach. We consider the 'capillary wave model' (CWM) of the equilibrium liquid-vapour interface. CWM is reformulated to be consistent with capillary waves; corrections to the standard CWM results, due to self-consistent long range coupling, are obtained for finite surface area and nonzero gravitational acceleration. Finally, we obtain the Landau-Lifshitz theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics from the

  5. Stochastic dynamics and a power law for measles variability.

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, M; Grenfell, B

    1999-01-01

    Since the discovery of a power law scaling between the mean and variance of natural populations, this phenomenon has been observed for a variety of species. Here, we show that the same form of power law scaling also occurs in measles case reports in England and Wales. Remarkably this power law holds over four orders of magnitude. We consider how the natural experiment of vaccination affects the slope of the power law. By examining simple generic models, we are able to predict the effects of stochasticity and coupling and we propose a new phenomenon associated with the critical community size. PMID:10365402

  6. Power law models of stock indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Man Kit

    Viewing the stock market as a self-organized system, Sornette and Johansen introduced physics-based models to study the dynamics of stock market crashes from the perspective of complex systems. This involved modeling stock market Indices using a mathematical power law exhibiting log-periodicity as the system approaches a market crash, which acts like a critical point in a thermodynamic system. In this dissertation, I aim to investigate stock indices to determine whether or not they exhibit log-periodic oscillations, according to the models proposed by Sornette, as they approach a crash. In addition to analyzing stock market crashes in the frequency domain using the discrete Fourier transform and the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, I perform a detailed analysis of the stock market crash models through parameter estimation and model testing. I find that the probability landscapes have a complex topography and that there is very little evidence that these phase transition-based models accurately describe stock market crashes.

  7. A mechanism producing power law etc. distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heling; Shen, Hongjun; Yang, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Power law distribution is playing an increasingly important role in the complex system study. Based on the insolvability of complex systems, the idea of incomplete statistics is utilized and expanded, three different exponential factors are introduced in equations about the normalization condition, statistical average and Shannon entropy, with probability distribution function deduced about exponential function, power function and the product form between power function and exponential function derived from Shannon entropy and maximal entropy principle. So it is shown that maximum entropy principle can totally replace equal probability hypothesis. Owing to the fact that power and probability distribution in the product form between power function and exponential function, which cannot be derived via equal probability hypothesis, can be derived by the aid of maximal entropy principle, it also can be concluded that maximal entropy principle is a basic principle which embodies concepts more extensively and reveals basic principles on motion laws of objects more fundamentally. At the same time, this principle also reveals the intrinsic link between Nature and different objects in human society and principles complied by all.

  8. A Universal Power Law Governing Pedestrian Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamouzas, Ioannis; Skinner, Brian; Guy, Stephen J.

    2015-03-01

    Human crowds often bear a striking resemblance to interacting particle systems, and this has prompted many researchers to describe pedestrian dynamics in terms of interaction forces and potential energies. The correct quantitative form of this interaction, however, has remained an open question. Here, we introduce a novel statistical-mechanical approach to directly measure the interaction energy between pedestrians. This analysis, when applied to a large collection of human motion data, reveals a simple power law interaction that is based not on the physical separation between pedestrians but on their projected time to a potential future collision, and is therefore fundamentally anticipatory in nature. Remarkably, this simple law is able to describe human interactions across a wide variety of situations, speeds and densities. We further show, through simulations, that the interaction law we identify is sufficient to reproduce many known crowd phenomena. Work at Argonne National Laboratory is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. Work at the University of Minnesota is supported by MnDRIVE Initiative on Robotics, Sensors, and Advanced Manufacturing.

  9. The invariances of power law size distributions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances.

  10. The invariances of power law size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances. PMID:27928497

  11. Power law exponents characterizing human DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provata, A.; Oikonomou, Th.

    2007-05-01

    The size distributions of all known coding and noncoding DNA sequences are studied in all human chromosomes. In a unified approach, both introns and intergenic regions are treated as noncoding regions. The distributions of noncoding segments Pnc(S) of size S present long tails Pnc(S)˜S-1-μnc , with exponents μnc ranging between 0.71 (for chromosome 13) and 1.2 (for chromosome 19). On the contrary, the exponential, short-range decay terms dominate in the distributions of coding (exon) segments Pc(S) in all chromosomes. Aiming to address the emergence of these statistical features, minimal, stochastic, mean-field models are proposed, based on randomly aggregating DNA strings with duplication, influx and outflux of genomic segments. These minimal models produce both the short-range statistics in the coding and the observed power law and fractal statistics in the noncoding DNA. The minimal models also demonstrate that although the two systems (coding and noncoding) coexist, alternating on the same linear chain, they act independently: the coding as a closed, equilibrium system and the noncoding as an open, out-of-equilibrium one.

  12. Power Law Distributions in Two Community Currencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichiji, N.; Nishibe, M.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight certain newly discovered social phenomena that accord with Zipf's law, in addition to the famous natural and social phenomena including word frequencies, earthquake magnitude, city size, income1 etc. that are already known to follow it. These phenomena have recently been discovered within the transaction amount (payments or receipts) distributions within two different Community Currencies (CC) that had been initiated as social experiments. One is a local CC circulating in a specific geographical area, such as a town. The other is a virtual CC used among members who belong to a certain community of interest (COI) on the Internet. We conducted two empirical studies to estimate the economic vitalization effects they had on their respective local economies. The results we found were that the amount of transactions (payments and receipts) of the two CCs was distributed according to a power-law distribution with a unity rank exponent. In addition, we found differences between the two CCs with regard to the shapes of their distribution over a low-transaction range. The result may originate from the difference in methods of issuing CCs or in the magnitudes of the minimum-value unit; however, this result calls for further investigation.

  13. Piecewise power laws in individual learning curves.

    PubMed

    Donner, Yoni; Hardy, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    The notion that human learning follows a smooth power law (PL) of diminishing gains is well-established in psychology. This characteristic is observed when multiple curves are averaged, potentially masking more complex dynamics underpinning the curves of individual learners. Here, we analyzed 25,280 individual learning curves, each comprising 500 measurements of cognitive performance taken from four cognitive tasks. A piecewise PL (PPL) model explained the individual learning curves significantly better than a single PL, controlling for model complexity. The PPL model allows for multiple PLs connected at different points in the learning process. We also explored the transition dynamics between PL curve component pieces. Performance in later pieces typically surpassed that in earlier pieces, after a brief drop in performance at the transition point. The transition rate was negatively associated with age, even after controlling for overall performance. Our results suggest at least two processes at work in individual learning curves: locally, a gradual, smooth improvement, with diminishing gains within a specific strategy, which is modeled well as a PL; and globally, a discrete sequence of strategy shifts, in which each strategy is better in the long term than the ones preceding it. The piecewise extension of the classic PL of practice has implications for both individual skill acquisition and theories of learning.

  14. Discovery of power-laws in chemical space.

    PubMed

    Benz, Ryan W; Swamidass, S Joshua; Baldi, Pierre

    2008-06-01

    Power-law distributions have been observed in a wide variety of areas. To our knowledge however, there has been no systematic observation of power-law distributions in chemoinformatics. Here, we present several examples of power-law distributions arising from the features of small, organic molecules. The distributions of rigid segments and ring systems, the distributions of molecular paths and circular substructures, and the sizes of molecular similarity clusters all show linear trends on log-log rank/ frequency plots, suggesting underlying power-law distributions. The number of unique features also follow Heaps'-like laws. The characteristic exponents of the power-laws lie in the 1.5-3 range, consistently with the exponents observed in other power-law phenomena. The power-law nature of these distributions leads to several applications including the prediction of the growth of available data through Heaps' law and the optimal allocation of experimental or computational resources via the 80/20 rule. More importantly, we also show how the power-laws can be leveraged to efficiently compress chemical fingerprints in a lossless manner, useful for the improved storage and retrieval of molecules in large chemical databases.

  15. Rate-Controlling Mechanisms in Five-Power-Law Creep

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. Kassner

    2004-04-20

    OAK-B135 Rate-Controlling Mechanisms in Five-Power-Law Creep. The initial grant emphasized the rate-controlling processes for five power-law creep. The effort has six aspects: (1) Theory of Taylor hardening from the Frank dislocation network in five power law substructures. (2) The dual dynamical and hardening nature of dislocations in five power law substructures. (3) Determination of the existence of long-range internal stress in five-power law creep dislocation substructures. (4) Dynamic recovery mechanisms associated with dislocation heterogeneities during five power law creep. (5) Versatility of five power law creep concept to other (hcp) crystal structures. (6) Writing of a book on ''Fundamental of Creep in Metals and Alloys'' by M.E. Kassner and Maria-Teresa Perez-Frado (postdoctoral scholar, funded by this project) Elsevier Press, 2004, in press. These areas are consistent with the original goals of this project as delineated in the original proposal to Basic Energy Sciences. The progress in each of these areas will be discussed separately and there will be an attempt to tie each aspect together so as to allow a summary regarding the conclusions with respect to the rate-controlling mechanisms of five power-law creep.

  16. Phase diagram of power law and Lennard-Jones systems: Crystal phases

    SciTech Connect

    Travesset, Alex

    2014-10-28

    An extensive characterization of the low temperature phase diagram of particles interacting with power law or Lennard-Jones potentials is provided from Lattice Dynamical Theory. For power law systems, only two lattice structures are stable for certain values of the exponent (or softness) (A15, body centered cube (bcc)) and two more (face centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close packed (hcp)) are always stable. Among them, only the fcc and bcc are equilibrium states. For Lennard-Jones systems, the equilibrium states are either hcp or fcc, with a coexistence curve in pressure and temperature that shows reentrant behavior. The hcp solid never coexists with the liquid. In all cases analyzed, for both power law and Lennard-Jones potentials, the fcc crystal has higher entropy than the hcp. The role of anharmonic terms is thoroughly analyzed and a general thermodynamic integration to account for them is proposed.

  17. Pascal (Yang Hui) triangles and power laws in the logistic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, Carlos; Robledo, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    We point out the joint occurrence of Pascal triangle patterns and power-law scaling in the standard logistic map, or more generally, in unimodal maps. It is known that these features are present in its two types of bifurcation cascades: period and chaotic-band doubling of attractors. Approximate Pascal triangles are exhibited by the sets of lengths of supercycle diameters and by the sets of widths of opening bands. Additionally, power-law scaling manifests along periodic attractor supercycle positions and chaotic band splitting points. Consequently, the attractor at the mutual accumulation point of the doubling cascades, the onset of chaos, displays both Gaussian and power-law distributions. Their combined existence implies both ordinary and exceptional statistical-mechanical descriptions of dynamical properties.

  18. Statistical evidence for power law temporal correlations in exploratory behaviour of rats.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Chetan K; Verma, Mahendra K; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2010-01-01

    Dynamics of exploratory behaviour of rats and home base establishment is investigated. Time series of instantaneous speed of rats was computed from their position during exploration. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the speed obeys a power law distribution with exponents ranging from 2.1 to 2.32. The PDF of the recurrence time of large speed also exhibits a power law, P(τ) ~ τ(⁻β) with β from 1.56 to 2.30. The power spectrum of the speed is in general agreement with the 1/f spectrum reported earlier. These observations indicate that the acquisition of spatial information during exploration is self-organized with power law temporal correlations. This provides a possible explanation for the home base behaviour of rats during exploration. The exploratory behaviour of rats resembles other systems exhibiting self-organized criticality, e.g., earthquakes, solar flares etc. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phase diagram of power law and Lennard-Jones systems: Crystal phases

    SciTech Connect

    Travesset, Alex

    2014-10-28

    An extensive characterization of the low temperature phase diagram of particles interacting with power law or Lennard-Jones potentials is provided from Lattice Dynamical Theory. For power law systems, only two lattice structures are stable for certain values of the exponent (or softness) (A15, body centered cube (bcc)) and two more (face centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close packed (hcp)) are always stable. Among them, only the fcc and bcc are equilibrium states. For Lennard-Jones systems, the equilibrium states are either hcp or fcc, with a coexistence curve in pressure and temperature that shows reentrant behavior. The hcp solid never coexists with the liquid. In all cases analyzed, for both power law and Lennard-Jones potentials, the fcc crystal has higher entropy than the hcp. The role of anharmonic terms is thoroughly analyzed and a general thermodynamic integration to account for them is proposed.

  20. Phase diagram of power law and Lennard-Jones systems: Crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travesset, Alex

    2014-10-01

    An extensive characterization of the low temperature phase diagram of particles interacting with power law or Lennard-Jones potentials is provided from Lattice Dynamical Theory. For power law systems, only two lattice structures are stable for certain values of the exponent (or softness) (A15, body centered cube (bcc)) and two more (face centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close packed (hcp)) are always stable. Among them, only the fcc and bcc are equilibrium states. For Lennard-Jones systems, the equilibrium states are either hcp or fcc, with a coexistence curve in pressure and temperature that shows reentrant behavior. The hcp solid never coexists with the liquid. In all cases analyzed, for both power law and Lennard-Jones potentials, the fcc crystal has higher entropy than the hcp. The role of anharmonic terms is thoroughly analyzed and a general thermodynamic integration to account for them is proposed.

  1. Phase diagram of power law and Lennard-Jones systems: crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Travesset, Alex

    2014-10-28

    An extensive characterization of the low temperature phase diagram of particles interacting with power law or Lennard-Jones potentials is provided from Lattice Dynamical Theory. For power law systems, only two lattice structures are stable for certain values of the exponent (or softness) (A15, body centered cube (bcc)) and two more (face centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close packed (hcp)) are always stable. Among them, only the fcc and bcc are equilibrium states. For Lennard-Jones systems, the equilibrium states are either hcp or fcc, with a coexistence curve in pressure and temperature that shows reentrant behavior. The hcp solid never coexists with the liquid. In all cases analyzed, for both power law and Lennard-Jones potentials, the fcc crystal has higher entropy than the hcp. The role of anharmonic terms is thoroughly analyzed and a general thermodynamic integration to account for them is proposed.

  2. Time-dependent Kramers escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanjun; Yin, Cangtao

    2016-05-01

    The probability distribution of Brownian particles moving in an overdamped complex system follows the generalized Smoluchowski equation, which can be rigorously proven that the exact time-dependent solution for this equation follows Tsallis form. Time-dependent escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distributions is then established based on the flux over population theory. The stationary state escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution which has been obtained before based on mean first passage time theory is recovered from time-dependent escape rate as time toward infinity.

  3. Power-law confusion: You say incremental, I say differential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1993-01-01

    Power-law distributions are commonly used to describe the frequency of occurrences of crater diameters, stellar masses, ring particle sizes, planetesimal sizes, and meteoroid masses to name a few. The distributions are simple, and this simplicity has led to a number of misstatements in the literature about the kind of power-law that is being used: differential, cumulative, or incremental. Although differential and cumulative power-laws are mathematically trivial, it is a hybrid incremental distribution that is often used and the relationship between the incremental distribution and the differential or cumulative distributions is not trivial. In many cases the slope of an incremental power-law will be nearly identical to the slope of the cumulative power-law of the same distribution, not the differential slope. The discussion that follows argues for a consistent usage of these terms and against the oft-made implicit claim that incremental and differential distributions are indistinguishable.

  4. Resurrecting power law inflation in the light of Planck results

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Sanil; Sahni, Varun E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2013-10-01

    It is well known that a canonical scalar field with an exponential potential can drive power law inflation (PLI). However, the tensor-to-scalar ratio in such models turns out to be larger than the stringent limit set by recent Planck results. We propose a new model of power law inflation for which the scalar spectra index, the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the non-gaussianity parameter f{sub N{sub L}{sup equil}} are in excellent agreement with Planck results. Inflation, in this model, is driven by a non-canonical scalar field with an inverse power law potential. The Lagrangian for our model is structurally similar to that of a canonical scalar field and has a power law form for the kinetic term. A simple extension of our model resolves the graceful exit problem which usually afflicts models of power law inflation.

  5. Power laws in citation distributions: evidence from Scopus.

    PubMed

    Brzezinski, Michal

    Modeling distributions of citations to scientific papers is crucial for understanding how science develops. However, there is a considerable empirical controversy on which statistical model fits the citation distributions best. This paper is concerned with rigorous empirical detection of power-law behaviour in the distribution of citations received by the most highly cited scientific papers. We have used a large, novel data set on citations to scientific papers published between 1998 and 2002 drawn from Scopus. The power-law model is compared with a number of alternative models using a likelihood ratio test. We have found that the power-law hypothesis is rejected for around half of the Scopus fields of science. For these fields of science, the Yule, power-law with exponential cut-off and log-normal distributions seem to fit the data better than the pure power-law model. On the other hand, when the power-law hypothesis is not rejected, it is usually empirically indistinguishable from most of the alternative models. The pure power-law model seems to be the best model only for the most highly cited papers in "Physics and Astronomy". Overall, our results seem to support theories implying that the most highly cited scientific papers follow the Yule, power-law with exponential cut-off or log-normal distribution. Our findings suggest also that power laws in citation distributions, when present, account only for a very small fraction of the published papers (less than 1 % for most of science fields) and that the power-law scaling parameter (exponent) is substantially higher (from around 3.2 to around 4.7) than found in the older literature.

  6. Power laws of complex systems from extreme physical information.

    PubMed

    Frieden, B Roy; Gatenby, Robert A

    2005-09-01

    Many complex systems obey allometric, or power, laws y=Y x(a) . Here y > or = 0 is the measured value of some system attribute a , Y> or =0 is a constant, and x is a stochastic variable. Remarkably, for many living systems the exponent a is limited to values n/4 , n=0, +/-1, +/-2.... Here x is the mass of a randomly selected creature in the population. These quarter-power laws hold for many attributes, such as pulse rate (n=-1) . Allometry has, in the past, been theoretically justified on a case-by-case basis. An ultimate goal is to find a common cause for allometry of all types and for both living and nonliving systems. The principle I-J=extremum of extreme physical information is found to provide such a cause. It describes the flow of Fisher information J-->I from an attribute value a on the cell level to its exterior observation y . Data y are formed via a system channel function y identical to f (x,a) , with f (x,a) to be found. Extremizing the difference I-J through variation of f (x,a) results in a general allometric law f (x,a) identical to y=Y x(a) . Darwinian evolution is presumed to cause a second extremization of I-J , now with respect to the choice of a . The solution is a=n/4 , n=0,+/-1,+/-2..., defining the particular powers of biological allometry. Under special circumstances, the model predicts that such biological systems are controlled by only two distinct intracellular information sources. These sources are conjectured to be cellular DNA and cellular transmembrane ion gradients.

  7. Power-law modeling based on least-squares criteria: consequences for system analysis and simulation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bermejo, B; Fairén, V; Sorribas, A

    2000-10-01

    The power-law formalism was initially derived as a Taylor series approximation in logarithmic space for kinetic rate-laws. The resulting models, either as generalized mass action (GMA) or as S-systems models, allow to characterize the target system and to simulate its dynamical behavior in response to external perturbations and parameter changes. This approach has been succesfully used as a modeling tool in many applications from cell metabolism to population dynamics. Without leaving the general formalism, we recently proposed to derive the power-law representation in an alternative way that uses least-squares (LS) minimization instead of the traditional derivation based on Taylor series [B. Hernández-Bermejo, V. Fairén, A. Sorribas, Math. Biosci. 161 (1999) 83-94]. It was shown that the resulting LS power-law mimics the target rate-law in a wider range of concentration values than the classical power-law, and that the prediction of the steady-state using the LS power-law is closer to the actual steady-state of the target system. However, many implications of this alternative approach remained to be established. We explore some of them in the present work. Firstly, we extend the definition of the LS power-law within a given operating interval in such a way that no preferred operating point is selected. Besides providing an alternative to the classical Taylor power-law, that can be considered a particular case when the operating interval is reduced to a single point, the LS power-law so defined is consistent with the results that can be obtained by fitting experimental data points. Secondly, we show that the LS approach leads to a system description, either as an S-system or a GMA model, in which the systemic properties (such as the steady-state prediction or the log-gains) appear averaged over the corresponding interval when compared with the properties that can be computed from Taylor-derived models in different operating points within the considered operating

  8. Timing of continuous motor imagery: the two-thirds power law originates in trajectory planning

    PubMed Central

    Flash, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The two-thirds power law, v = γκ−1/3, expresses a robust local relationship between the geometrical and temporal aspects of human movement, represented by curvature κ and speed v, with a piecewise constant γ. This law is equivalent to moving at a constant equi-affine speed and thus constitutes an important example of motor invariance. Whether this kinematic regularity reflects central planning or peripheral biomechanical effects has been strongly debated. Motor imagery, i.e., forming mental images of a motor action, allows unique access to the temporal structure of motor planning. Earlier studies have shown that imagined discrete movements obey Fitts's law and their durations are well correlated with those of actual movements. Hence, it is natural to examine whether the temporal properties of continuous imagined movements comply with the two-thirds power law. A novel experimental paradigm for recording sparse imagery data from a continuous cyclic tracing task was developed. Using the likelihood ratio test, we concluded that for most subjects the distributions of the marked positions describing the imagined trajectory were significantly better explained by the two-thirds power law than by a constant Euclidean speed or by two other power law models. With nonlinear regression, the β parameter values in a generalized power law, v = γκ−β, were inferred from the marked position records. This resulted in highly variable yet mostly positive β values. Our results imply that imagined trajectories do follow the two-thirds power law. Our findings therefore support the conclusion that the coupling between velocity and curvature originates in centrally represented motion planning. PMID:25609105

  9. Timing of continuous motor imagery: the two-thirds power law originates in trajectory planning.

    PubMed

    Karklinsky, Matan; Flash, Tamar

    2015-04-01

    The two-thirds power law, v = γκ(-1/3), expresses a robust local relationship between the geometrical and temporal aspects of human movement, represented by curvature κ and speed v, with a piecewise constant γ. This law is equivalent to moving at a constant equi-affine speed and thus constitutes an important example of motor invariance. Whether this kinematic regularity reflects central planning or peripheral biomechanical effects has been strongly debated. Motor imagery, i.e., forming mental images of a motor action, allows unique access to the temporal structure of motor planning. Earlier studies have shown that imagined discrete movements obey Fitts's law and their durations are well correlated with those of actual movements. Hence, it is natural to examine whether the temporal properties of continuous imagined movements comply with the two-thirds power law. A novel experimental paradigm for recording sparse imagery data from a continuous cyclic tracing task was developed. Using the likelihood ratio test, we concluded that for most subjects the distributions of the marked positions describing the imagined trajectory were significantly better explained by the two-thirds power law than by a constant Euclidean speed or by two other power law models. With nonlinear regression, the β parameter values in a generalized power law, v = γκ(-β), were inferred from the marked position records. This resulted in highly variable yet mostly positive β values. Our results imply that imagined trajectories do follow the two-thirds power law. Our findings therefore support the conclusion that the coupling between velocity and curvature originates in centrally represented motion planning. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Power-law models of signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Vera, Julio; Balsa-Canto, Eva; Wellstead, Peter; Banga, Julio R; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2007-07-01

    The mathematical modelling of signal transduction pathways has become a valuable aid to understanding the complex interactions involved in intracellular signalling mechanisms. An important aspect of the mathematical modelling process is the selection of the model type and structure. Until recently, the convention has been to use a standard kinetic model, often with the Michaelis-Menten steady state assumption. However this model form, although valuable, is only one of a number of choices, and the aim of this article is to consider the mathematical structure and essential features of an alternative model form--the power-law model. Specifically, we analyse how power-law models can be applied to increase our understanding of signal transduction pathways when there may be limited prior information. We distinguish between two kinds of power law models: a) Detailed power-law models, as a tool for investigating pathways when the structure of protein-protein interactions is completely known, and; b) Simplified power-law models, for the analysis of systems with incomplete structural information or insufficient quantitative data for generating detailed models. If sufficient data of high quality are available, the advantage of detailed power-law models is that they are more realistic representations of non-homogenous or crowded cellular environments. The advantages of the simplified power-law model formulation are illustrated using some case studies in cell signalling. In particular, the investigation on the effects of signal inhibition and feedback loops and the validation of structural hypotheses are discussed.

  11. Maximum likelihood estimators for truncated and censored power-law distributions show how neuronal avalanches may be misevaluated.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Dominic; Cousineau, Denis; Thivierge, J P

    2014-01-01

    The coordination of activity amongst populations of neurons in the brain is critical to cognition and behavior. One form of coordinated activity that has been widely studied in recent years is the so-called neuronal avalanche, whereby ongoing bursts of activity follow a power-law distribution. Avalanches that follow a power law are not unique to neuroscience, but arise in a broad range of natural systems, including earthquakes, magnetic fields, biological extinctions, fluid dynamics, and superconductors. Here, we show that common techniques that estimate this distribution fail to take into account important characteristics of the data and may lead to a sizable misestimation of the slope of power laws. We develop an alternative series of maximum likelihood estimators for discrete, continuous, bounded, and censored data. Using numerical simulations, we show that these estimators lead to accurate evaluations of power-law distributions, improving on common approaches. Next, we apply these estimators to recordings of in vitro rat neocortical activity. We show that different estimators lead to marked discrepancies in the evaluation of power-law distributions. These results call into question a broad range of findings that may misestimate the slope of power laws by failing to take into account key aspects of the observed data.

  12. Maximum likelihood estimators for truncated and censored power-law distributions show how neuronal avalanches may be misevaluated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, Dominic; Cousineau, Denis; Thivierge, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The coordination of activity amongst populations of neurons in the brain is critical to cognition and behavior. One form of coordinated activity that has been widely studied in recent years is the so-called neuronal avalanche, whereby ongoing bursts of activity follow a power-law distribution. Avalanches that follow a power law are not unique to neuroscience, but arise in a broad range of natural systems, including earthquakes, magnetic fields, biological extinctions, fluid dynamics, and superconductors. Here, we show that common techniques that estimate this distribution fail to take into account important characteristics of the data and may lead to a sizable misestimation of the slope of power laws. We develop an alternative series of maximum likelihood estimators for discrete, continuous, bounded, and censored data. Using numerical simulations, we show that these estimators lead to accurate evaluations of power-law distributions, improving on common approaches. Next, we apply these estimators to recordings of in vitro rat neocortical activity. We show that different estimators lead to marked discrepancies in the evaluation of power-law distributions. These results call into question a broad range of findings that may misestimate the slope of power laws by failing to take into account key aspects of the observed data.

  13. Statistical Analyses Support Power Law Distributions Found in Neuronal Avalanches

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Andreas; Yu, Shan; Plenz, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    The size distribution of neuronal avalanches in cortical networks has been reported to follow a power law distribution with exponent close to −1.5, which is a reflection of long-range spatial correlations in spontaneous neuronal activity. However, identifying power law scaling in empirical data can be difficult and sometimes controversial. In the present study, we tested the power law hypothesis for neuronal avalanches by using more stringent statistical analyses. In particular, we performed the following steps: (i) analysis of finite-size scaling to identify scale-free dynamics in neuronal avalanches, (ii) model parameter estimation to determine the specific exponent of the power law, and (iii) comparison of the power law to alternative model distributions. Consistent with critical state dynamics, avalanche size distributions exhibited robust scaling behavior in which the maximum avalanche size was limited only by the spatial extent of sampling (“finite size” effect). This scale-free dynamics suggests the power law as a model for the distribution of avalanche sizes. Using both the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic and a maximum likelihood approach, we found the slope to be close to −1.5, which is in line with previous reports. Finally, the power law model for neuronal avalanches was compared to the exponential and to various heavy-tail distributions based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance and by using a log-likelihood ratio test. Both the power law distribution without and with exponential cut-off provided significantly better fits to the cluster size distributions in neuronal avalanches than the exponential, the lognormal and the gamma distribution. In summary, our findings strongly support the power law scaling in neuronal avalanches, providing further evidence for critical state dynamics in superficial layers of cortex. PMID:21720544

  14. Statistical analyses support power law distributions found in neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Andreas; Yu, Shan; Plenz, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    The size distribution of neuronal avalanches in cortical networks has been reported to follow a power law distribution with exponent close to -1.5, which is a reflection of long-range spatial correlations in spontaneous neuronal activity. However, identifying power law scaling in empirical data can be difficult and sometimes controversial. In the present study, we tested the power law hypothesis for neuronal avalanches by using more stringent statistical analyses. In particular, we performed the following steps: (i) analysis of finite-size scaling to identify scale-free dynamics in neuronal avalanches, (ii) model parameter estimation to determine the specific exponent of the power law, and (iii) comparison of the power law to alternative model distributions. Consistent with critical state dynamics, avalanche size distributions exhibited robust scaling behavior in which the maximum avalanche size was limited only by the spatial extent of sampling ("finite size" effect). This scale-free dynamics suggests the power law as a model for the distribution of avalanche sizes. Using both the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic and a maximum likelihood approach, we found the slope to be close to -1.5, which is in line with previous reports. Finally, the power law model for neuronal avalanches was compared to the exponential and to various heavy-tail distributions based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance and by using a log-likelihood ratio test. Both the power law distribution without and with exponential cut-off provided significantly better fits to the cluster size distributions in neuronal avalanches than the exponential, the lognormal and the gamma distribution. In summary, our findings strongly support the power law scaling in neuronal avalanches, providing further evidence for critical state dynamics in superficial layers of cortex.

  15. Power-law connections: From Zipf to Heaps and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2013-05-15

    In this paper we explore the asymptotic statistics of a general model of rank distributions in the large-ensemble limit; the construction of the general model is motivated by recent empirical studies of rank distributions. Applying Lorenzian, oligarchic, and Heapsian asymptotic analyses we establish a comprehensive set of closed-form results linking together rank distributions, probability distributions, oligarchy sizes, and innovation rates. In particular, the general results reveal the fundamental underlying connections between Zipf’s law, Pareto’s law, and Heaps’ law—three elemental empirical power-laws that are ubiquitously observed in the sciences. -- Highlights: ► The large-ensemble asymptotic statistics of rank distributions are explored. ► Lorenzian, oligarchic, and Heapsian asymptotic analyses are applied. ► Associated oligarchy sizes and induced innovation rates are analyzed. ► General elemental statistical connections are established. ► The underlying connections between Zipf’s, Pareto’s and Heaps’ laws are unveiled.

  16. Evolution of power law distributions in science and society.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Pyo; McCoy, Benjamin J

    2005-09-01

    Power law distributions have been observed in numerous physical and social systems; for example, the size distributions of particles, aerosols, corporations, and cities are often power laws. Each system is an ensemble of clusters, comprising units that combine with or dissociate from the cluster. Constructing models and investigating their properties are needed to understand how such clusters evolve. To describe the growth of clusters, we hypothesize that a distribution obeys a governing population dynamics equation based on a reversible association-dissociation process. The rate coefficients are considered to depend on the cluster size as power expressions, thus providing an explanation for the asymptotic evolution of power law distributions.

  17. Power-law distribution of family names in Japanese societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazima, Sasuke; Lee, Youngki; Nagamine, Tomomasa; Miyajima, Hiroaki

    2000-04-01

    We study the frequency distribution of family names. From a common data base, we count the number of people who share the same family name. This is the size of the family. We find that (i) the total number of different family names in a society scales as a power law of the population, (ii) the total number of family names of the same size decreases as the size increases with a power law and (iii) the relation between size and rank of a family name also shows a power law. These scaling properties are found to be consistent for five different regional communities in Japan.

  18. Evolution of power law distributions in science and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Young-Pyo; McCoy, Benjamin J.

    2005-09-01

    Power law distributions have been observed in numerous physical and social systems; for example, the size distributions of particles, aerosols, corporations, and cities are often power laws. Each system is an ensemble of clusters, comprising units that combine with or dissociate from the cluster. Constructing models and investigating their properties are needed to understand how such clusters evolve. To describe the growth of clusters, we hypothesize that a distribution obeys a governing population dynamics equation based on a reversible association-dissociation process. The rate coefficients are considered to depend on the cluster size as power expressions, thus providing an explanation for the asymptotic evolution of power law distributions.

  19. Fractal ladder models and power law wave equations

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, James F.; McGough, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic attenuation coefficient in mammalian tissue is approximated by a frequency-dependent power law for frequencies less than 100 MHz. To describe this power law behavior in soft tissue, a hierarchical fractal network model is proposed. The viscoelastic and self-similar properties of tissue are captured by a constitutive equation based on a lumped parameter infinite-ladder topology involving alternating springs and dashpots. In the low-frequency limit, this ladder network yields a stress-strain constitutive equation with a time-fractional derivative. By combining this constitutive equation with linearized conservation principles and an adiabatic equation of state, a fractional partial differential equation that describes power law attenuation is derived. The resulting attenuation coefficient is a power law with exponent ranging between 1 and 2, while the phase velocity is in agreement with the Kramers–Kronig relations. The fractal ladder model is compared to published attenuation coefficient data, thus providing equivalent lumped parameters. PMID:19813816

  20. Fractal ladder models and power law wave equations.

    PubMed

    Kelly, James F; McGough, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    The ultrasonic attenuation coefficient in mammalian tissue is approximated by a frequency-dependent power law for frequencies less than 100 MHz. To describe this power law behavior in soft tissue, a hierarchical fractal network model is proposed. The viscoelastic and self-similar properties of tissue are captured by a constitutive equation based on a lumped parameter infinite-ladder topology involving alternating springs and dashpots. In the low-frequency limit, this ladder network yields a stress-strain constitutive equation with a time-fractional derivative. By combining this constitutive equation with linearized conservation principles and an adiabatic equation of state, a fractional partial differential equation that describes power law attenuation is derived. The resulting attenuation coefficient is a power law with exponent ranging between 1 and 2, while the phase velocity is in agreement with the Kramers-Kronig relations. The fractal ladder model is compared to published attenuation coefficient data, thus providing equivalent lumped parameters.

  1. Simple power law for transport ratio with bimodal distributions of coarse sediments under waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, Joseph; Thaxton, Christopher S.

    2008-03-01

    Morphodynamic models of coastal evolution require relatively simple parameterizations of sediment transport for application over larger scales. Here we present a transport parameterization for bimodal distributions of coarse quartz grains using simulations from a discrete particle model for sheet flow and near sheet flow conditions. The discrete particle model simulates the simplest one-dimensional fluid using a turbulent eddy viscosity determined from a mixing length coupled to particle motions. The motions of individual sand grains are simulated using spherical elements. Newton's second law in translational and rotational forms is solved for every particle in the domain as determined by both grain-grain and grain-fluid interactions. The forcing from idealized monochromatic waves is accomplished by specifying a spatially constant, time varying horizontal pressure gradient acting on the simulation domain. Consequently, the time series of the free-stream fluid acceleration and velocity are also fixed. Simulations cover a range of wave forcing, diameter ratios for the large and small grains in the bimodal size distribution, and mass ratios of large to small grains in the simulation domain, for a total of 243 unique simulation conditions. The simulation results are successfully parameterized with a simple power law that allows for the prediction of the transport rates of each size fraction in the bimodal distribution. The simple power law determined from simulations provides favorable predictions of transport rates for each size fraction when applied to available laboratory data for sheet flow with bimodal size distributions. It is important to note that rapid vertical kinematic sorting of grains by size is explicitly simulated with the model and thus implicitly captured by the power law. Discussion focuses on practical application of the power law.

  2. Hidden power law patterns in the top European football leagues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Sergio; Matsushita, Raul; Silveira, Eliza

    2013-11-01

    Because sports are stylized combat, sports may follow power laws similar to those found for wars, individual clashes, and acts of terrorism. We show this fact for football (soccer) by adjusting power laws that show a close relationship between rank and points won by the clubs participating in the latest seasons of the top fifteen European football leagues. In addition, we use Shannon entropy for gauging league competitive balance. As a result, we are able to rank the leagues according to competitiveness.

  3. Singularity problems of the power law for modeling creep compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Hiel, C.

    1985-01-01

    An explanation is offered for the extreme sensitivity that has been observed in the power law parameters of the T300/934 graphite epoxy material systems during experiments to evaluate the system's viscoelastic response. It is shown that the singularity associated with the power law can explain the sensitivity as well as the observed variability in the calculated parameters. Techniques for minimizing errors are suggested.

  4. Saffman-Taylor instability for generalized Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Mora, S; Manna, M

    2009-07-01

    We study theoretically the linear Saffman-Taylor instability for non-Newtonian fluids in a Hele-Shaw cell. After introducing the notion of generalized Newtonian fluid we calculate the associated Darcy's law. We derive the relation governing the growth rate of normal modes for a large class of non-Newtonian flows. For shear-thinning fluids at high shear rate our theory provides Darcy's laws free of the nonphysical divergences appearing in the classical approaches. We characterize fluids which develop instabilities faster than Newtonian fluids under the same hydrodynamical conditions. Another primary result that this paper provides is that for some shear-thickening fluids, all normal modes are stable.

  5. THE FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTIONS FOR MULTI-TERM MODIFIED POWER LAW WAVE EQUATIONS IN A FINITE DOMAIN

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H.; Liu, F.; Meerschaert, M. M.; McGough, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Fractional partial differential equations with more than one fractional derivative term in time, such as the Szabo wave equation, or the power law wave equation, describe important physical phenomena. However, studies of these multi-term time-space or time fractional wave equations are still under development. In this paper, multi-term modified power law wave equations in a finite domain are considered. The multi-term time fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals (1, 2], [2, 3), [2, 4) or (0, n) (n > 2), respectively. Analytical solutions of the multi-term modified power law wave equations are derived. These new techniques are based on Luchko’s Theorem, a spectral representation of the Laplacian operator, a method of separating variables and fractional derivative techniques. Then these general methods are applied to the special cases of the Szabo wave equation and the power law wave equation. These methods and techniques can also be extended to other kinds of the multi-term time-space fractional models including fractional Laplacian. PMID:26425384

  6. THE FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTIONS FOR MULTI-TERM MODIFIED POWER LAW WAVE EQUATIONS IN A FINITE DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Liu, F; Meerschaert, M M; McGough, R J

    2013-01-01

    Fractional partial differential equations with more than one fractional derivative term in time, such as the Szabo wave equation, or the power law wave equation, describe important physical phenomena. However, studies of these multi-term time-space or time fractional wave equations are still under development. In this paper, multi-term modified power law wave equations in a finite domain are considered. The multi-term time fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals (1, 2], [2, 3), [2, 4) or (0, n) (n > 2), respectively. Analytical solutions of the multi-term modified power law wave equations are derived. These new techniques are based on Luchko's Theorem, a spectral representation of the Laplacian operator, a method of separating variables and fractional derivative techniques. Then these general methods are applied to the special cases of the Szabo wave equation and the power law wave equation. These methods and techniques can also be extended to other kinds of the multi-term time-space fractional models including fractional Laplacian.

  7. A theory of scintillation for two-component power law irregularity spectra: Overview and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Rino, Charles L.

    2016-06-01

    We extend the power law phase screen theory for ionospheric scintillation to account for the case where the refractive index irregularities follow a two-component inverse power law spectrum. The two-component model includes, as special cases, an unmodified power law and a modified power law with spectral break that may assume the role of an outer scale, intermediate break scale, or inner scale. As such, it provides a framework for investigating the effects of a spectral break on the scintillation statistics. Using this spectral model, we solve the fourth moment equation governing intensity variations following propagation through two-dimensional field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere. A specific normalization is invoked that exploits self-similar properties of the structure to achieve a universal scaling, such that different combinations of perturbation strength, propagation distance, and frequency produce the same results. The numerical algorithm is validated using new theoretical predictions for the behavior of the scintillation index and intensity correlation length under strong scatter conditions. A series of numerical experiments are conducted to investigate the morphologies of the intensity spectrum, scintillation index, and intensity correlation length as functions of the spectral indices and strength of scatter; retrieve phase screen parameters from intensity scintillation observations; explore the relative contributions to the scintillation due to large- and small-scale ionospheric structures; and quantify the conditions under which a general spectral break will influence the scintillation statistics.

  8. Power-law velocity profile in turbulent boundary layers: An integral reynolds-number dependent solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Orgaz, Oscar; Dey, Subhasish

    2011-10-01

    Geophysical flows of practical interest encompass turbulent boundary layer flows. The velocity profile in turbulent flows is generally described by a log- or a power-law applicable to certain zones of the boundary layer, or by wall-wake law for the entire zone of the boundary layer. In this study, a novel theory is proposed from which the power-law velocity profile is obtained for the turbulent boundary layer flow. The new power-law profile is based on the conservation of mass and the skin friction within the boundary layer. From the proposed theory, analytical expressions for the power-law velocity profile are presented, and their Reynolds-number dependency is highlighted. The velocity profile, skin friction coefficient and boundary layer thickness obtained from the proposed theory are validated by the reliable experimental data for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. The expressions for Reynolds shear stress and eddy viscosity distributions across the boundary layer are also obtained and validated by the experimental data.

  9. Phase diagram of softly repulsive systems: the Gaussian and inverse-power-law potentials.

    PubMed

    Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Giaquinta, Paolo V

    2005-10-08

    We redraw, using state-of-the-art methods for free-energy calculations, the phase diagrams of two reference models for the liquid state: the Gaussian and inverse-power-law repulsive potentials. Notwithstanding the different behaviors of the two potentials for vanishing interparticle distances, their thermodynamic properties are similar in a range of densities and temperatures, being ruled by the competition between the body-centered-cubic (bcc) and face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structures and the fluid phase. We confirm the existence of a reentrant bcc phase in the phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model, just above the triple point. We also trace the bcc-fcc coexistence line of the inverse-power-law model as a function of the power exponent n and relate the common features in the phase diagrams of such systems to the softness degree of the interaction.

  10. One loop back reaction on power law inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramo, L. R.; Woodard, R. P.

    1999-08-01

    We consider quantum-mechanical corrections to a homogeneous, isotropic, and spatially flat geometry whose scale factor expands classically as a general power of the comoving time. The effects of both gravitons and the scalar inflaton are computed at one loop using the manifestly causal formalism of Schwinger [J. Math. Phys. 2, 407 (1961); Particles, Sources and Fields (Addison, Wesley, Reading, MA, 1970)] with the Feynman rules recently developed by Iliopoulos et al. [Nucl. Phys. B 534, 419 (1998)]. We find no significant effect, in marked contrast to the result obtained by Mukhanov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1624 (1998); Phys. Rev. D 56, 3248 (1997)] for chaotic inflation based on a quadratic potential. By applying the canonical technique of Mukhanov and co-workers to the exponential potentials of power law inflation, we show that the two methods produce the same results, within the approximations employed, for these backgrounds. We therefore conclude that the shape of the inflaton potential can have an enormous impact on the one loop back reaction.

  11. Taking Fluid Mechanics to the General Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Etienne; Guyon, Marie Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Fluid flow phenomena are omnipresent; they can be observed and described in many locations and circumstances. However, in most cases, their presence does not stimulate an interest in science. We consider successively domains of activities in which the presence of fluid flow phenomena can be used: natural sites, industrial ones, sporting events, artistic creations and presentations, the production of images and books, science museums, cultural centers, and also popular mass media. The last section is devoted to outreach activities that can be practiced within the educational system.

  12. Tachyon with an inverse power-law potential in a braneworld cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilić, Neven; Domazet, Silvije; Djordjevic, Goran S.

    2017-08-01

    We study a tachyon cosmological model based on the dynamics of a 3-brane in the bulk of the second Randall-Sundrum model extended to more general warp functions. A well known prototype of such a generalization is the bulk with a selfinteracting scalar field. As a consequence of a generalized bulk geometry the cosmology on the observer brane is modified by the scale dependent four-dimensional gravitational constant. In particular, we study a power law warp factor which generates an inverse power-law potential V\\propto \\varphi-n of the tachyon field φ. We find a critical power n cr that divides two subclasses with distinct asymptotic behaviors: a dust universe for n>n_cr and a quasi de Sitter universe for 0.

  13. Distortion of power law blinking with binning and thresholding

    SciTech Connect

    Amecke, Nicole; Heber, André; Cichos, Frank

    2014-03-21

    Fluorescence intermittency is a random switching between emitting (on) and non-emitting (off) periods found for many single chromophores such as semiconductor quantum dots and organic molecules. The statistics of the duration of on- and off-periods are commonly determined by thresholding the emission time trace of a single chromophore and appear to be power law distributed. Here we test with the help of simulations if the experimentally determined power law distributions can actually reflect the underlying statistics. We find that with the experimentally limited time resolution real power law statistics with exponents α{sub on/off} ≳ 1.6, especially if α{sub on} ≠ α{sub off} would not be observed as such in the experimental data after binning and thresholding. Instead, a power law appearance could simply be obtained from the continuous distribution of intermediate intensity levels. This challenges much of the obtained data and the models describing the so-called power law blinking.

  14. Characterising rock fracture aperture-spacing relationships using power-law relationships: some considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Martin; Hebblewhite, Bruce; Mitra, Rudrajit

    2016-04-01

    The size-scaling of rock fractures is a well-studied problem in geology, especially for permeability quantification. The intensity of fractures may control the economic exploitation of fractured reservoirs because fracture intensity describes the abundance of fractures potentially available for fluid flow. Moreover, in geotechnical engineering, fractures are important for parameterisation of stress models and excavation design. As fracture data is often collected from widely-spaced boreholes where core recovery is often incomplete, accurate interpretation and representation of fracture aperture-frequency relationships from sparse datasets is important. Fracture intensity is the number of fractures encountered per unit length along a sample scanline oriented perpendicular to the fractures in a set. Cumulative frequency of fractures (F) is commonly related to fracture aperture (A) in the form of a power-law (F = aA-b), with variations in the size of the a coefficient between sites interpreted to equate to fracture frequency for a given aperture (A). However, a common flaw in this approach is that even a small change in b can have a large effect on the response of the fracture frequency (F) parameter. We compare fracture data from the Late Permian Rangal Coal Measures from Australia's Bowen Basin, with fracture data from Jurassic carbonates from the Sierra Madre Oriental, northeastern Mexico. Both power-law coefficient a and exponent b control the fracture aperture-frequency relationship in conjunction with each other; that is, power-laws with relatively low a coefficients have relatively high b exponents and vice versa. Hence, any comparison of different power-laws must take both a and b into consideration. The corollary is that different sedimentary beds in the Sierra Madre carbonates do not show ˜8× the fracture frequency for a given fracture aperture, as based solely on the comparison of coefficient a. Rather, power-law "sensitivity factors" developed from both

  15. Edge effect on the power law distribution of granular avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Kinga A; Wijngaarden, Rinke J

    2007-10-01

    Many punctuated phenomena in nature are claimed [e.g., by the theory of self-organized criticality (SOC)] to be power-law distributed. In our experiments on a three-dimensional pile of long-grained rice, we find that by only changing the boundary condition of the system, we switch from such power-law-distributed avalanche sizes to quasiperiodic system-spanning avalanches. Conversely, by removing ledges the incidence of system-spanning avalanches is significantly reduced. This may offer a perspective on new avalanche prevention schemes. In addition, our findings may help to explain why the archetype of SOC, the sandpile, was found to have power-law-distributed avalanches in some experiments, while in other experiments quasiperiodic system-spanning avalanches were found.

  16. Power-law hereditariness of hierarchical fractal bones.

    PubMed

    Deseri, Luca; Di Paola, Mario; Zingales, Massimiliano; Pollaci, Pietro

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce a hierarchic fractal model to describe bone hereditariness. Indeed, experimental data of stress relaxation or creep functions obtained by compressive/tensile tests have been proved to be fit by power law with real exponent 0 ⩽ β ⩽1. The rheological behavior of the material has therefore been obtained, using the Boltzmann-Volterra superposition principle, in terms of real order integrals and derivatives (fractional-order calculus). It is shown that the power laws describing creep/relaxation of bone tissue may be obtained by introducing a fractal description of bone cross-section, and the Hausdorff dimension of the fractal geometry is then related to the exponent of the power law.

  17. Robust Statistical Detection of Power-Law Cross-Correlation.

    PubMed

    Blythe, Duncan A J; Nikulin, Vadim V; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2016-06-02

    We show that widely used approaches in statistical physics incorrectly indicate the existence of power-law cross-correlations between financial stock market fluctuations measured over several years and the neuronal activity of the human brain lasting for only a few minutes. While such cross-correlations are nonsensical, no current methodology allows them to be reliably discarded, leaving researchers at greater risk when the spurious nature of cross-correlations is not clear from the unrelated origin of the time series and rather requires careful statistical estimation. Here we propose a theory and method (PLCC-test) which allows us to rigorously and robustly test for power-law cross-correlations, correctly detecting genuine and discarding spurious cross-correlations, thus establishing meaningful relationships between processes in complex physical systems. Our method reveals for the first time the presence of power-law cross-correlations between amplitudes of the alpha and beta frequency ranges of the human electroencephalogram.

  18. Between disorder and order: A case study of power law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yong; Zhao, Youjie; Yue, Xiaoguang; Xiong, Fei; Sun, Yongke; He, Xin; Wang, Lichao

    2016-08-01

    Power law is an important feature of phenomena in long memory behaviors. Zipf ever found power law in the distribution of the word frequencies. In physics, the terms order and disorder are Thermodynamic or statistical physics concepts originally and a lot of research work has focused on self-organization of the disorder ingredients of simple physical systems. It is interesting what make disorder-order transition. We devise an experiment-based method about random symbolic sequences to research regular pattern between disorder and order. The experiment results reveal power law is indeed an important regularity in transition from disorder to order. About these results the preliminary study and analysis has been done to explain the reasons.

  19. A power law approach to orifice flow rate calibration.

    PubMed

    Rhinehart, R Russell; Gebreyohannes, Solomon; Sridhar, Upasana Manimegalai; Patrachari, Anirudh; Rahaman, M S

    2011-04-01

    Although standards for orifice flow meter design, installation, and calibration are supported herein, noncompliant devices exist in many pilot-, lab-scale, and on-board applications. For these, a common calibration practice is to preserve the ideal square root relation and determine a device specific discharge coefficient value. This work provides theoretical and empirical analyses to support relaxing the square root relation between orifice pressure drop and flow rate for noncompliant devices. The resulting power law relation is shown to improve accuracy, precision, and rangeability. Whether a device specific square root or power law model is used, it requires off-line or in-line calibration data. As such, a power law calibration model may only be useful for on-board and small-scale applications.

  20. Robust Statistical Detection of Power-Law Cross-Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, Duncan A. J.; Nikulin, Vadim V.; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2016-06-01

    We show that widely used approaches in statistical physics incorrectly indicate the existence of power-law cross-correlations between financial stock market fluctuations measured over several years and the neuronal activity of the human brain lasting for only a few minutes. While such cross-correlations are nonsensical, no current methodology allows them to be reliably discarded, leaving researchers at greater risk when the spurious nature of cross-correlations is not clear from the unrelated origin of the time series and rather requires careful statistical estimation. Here we propose a theory and method (PLCC-test) which allows us to rigorously and robustly test for power-law cross-correlations, correctly detecting genuine and discarding spurious cross-correlations, thus establishing meaningful relationships between processes in complex physical systems. Our method reveals for the first time the presence of power-law cross-correlations between amplitudes of the alpha and beta frequency ranges of the human electroencephalogram.

  1. Scaling and power-laws in ecological systems.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Pablo A; Quiñones, Renato A; Abades, Sebastian; Labra, Fabio; Tognelli, Marcelo; Arim, Matias; Rivadeneira, Marcelo

    2005-05-01

    Scaling relationships (where body size features as the independent variable) and power-law distributions are commonly reported in ecological systems. In this review we analyze scaling relationships related to energy acquisition and transformation and power-laws related to fluctuations in numbers. Our aim is to show how individual level attributes can help to explain and predict patterns at the level of populations that can propagate at upper levels of organization. We review similar relationships also appearing in the analysis of aquatic ecosystems (i.e. the biomass spectra) in the context of ecological invariant relationships (i.e. independent of size) such as the 'energetic equivalence rule' and the 'linear biomass hypothesis'. We also discuss some power-law distributions emerging in the analysis of numbers and fluctuations in ecological attributes as they point to regularities that are yet to be integrated with traditional scaling relationships and which we foresee as an exciting area of future research.

  2. Power Laws, Flicker Noise, and the Barkhausen Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A274 702 AD TECHNICAL REPORT ARCCB-TR-93038 POWER LAWS, FLICKER NOISE, AND THE BARKHAUSEN EFFECT DTIC ELECTE JA~N 211994 3 L.V. MEISEL S D P.J...CATES C&MORD October 1993 Fuel 4. TITLE AND SUBTITU S. FUNDING NUMBERS POWER LAWS. FUCKER NOISE. AND THE BARKHAUSEN EFFECT AMCMS: 611L02.H61L1 6. AUTHOR... Barkhausen effect was studied in three ferromagnetic metals: an amorphous alloy, iron. and alumel. The data exhibit all the characteristics of self

  3. Soliton solutions with power-law nonlinearity in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Chao-Qing; Yu, Fang-Bo

    2013-04-01

    We construct the relation between the variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equations with power-law nonlinearity and the constant coefficient one via a transformation. Based on this transformation, we analytically obtain the closed-form bright and dark soliton solutions for variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equations with power-law nonlinearity, third-order dispersion and self-steepening effect. The dynamic behaviors of bright and dark solitons in dispersion-decreasing fibers with hyperbolic, exponential, linear, logarithmic and Gaussian profiles are analyzed.

  4. Power-law statistics for avalanches in a martensitic transformation.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, R; Ananthakrishna, G

    2001-04-30

    We devise a two-dimensional model that mimics the recently observed power-law distributions for the amplitudes and durations of the acoustic emission signals observed during martensitic transformation [Vives et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1694 (1994)]. We include a threshold mechanism, long-range interaction between the transformed domains, inertial effects, and dissipation arising due to the motion of the interface. The model exhibits thermal hysteresis and, more importantly, it shows that the energy is released in the form of avalanches with power-law distributions for their amplitudes and durations. Computer simulations also reveal morphological features similar to those observed in real systems.

  5. Power-law relaxation in human violent conflicts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoli, Sergio; Antonio, Fernando J.; Itami, Andreia S.; Mendes, Renio S.

    2017-08-01

    We study relaxation patterns of violent conflicts after bursts of activity. Data were obtained from available catalogs on the conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan and Northern Ireland. We find several examples in each catalog for which the observed relaxation curves can be well described by an asymptotic power-law decay (the analog of the Omori's law in geophysics). The power-law exponents are robust, nearly independent of the conflict. We also discuss the exogenous or endogenous nature of the shocks. Our results suggest that violent conflicts share with earthquakes and other natural and social phenomena a common feature in the dynamics of aftershocks.

  6. Particle capture in axial magnetic filters with power law flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasov, T.; Herdem, S.; Köksal, M.

    1999-05-01

    A theory of capture of magnetic particle carried by laminar flow of viscous non-Newtonian (power law) fluid in axially ordered filters is presented. The velocity profile of the fluid flow is determined by the Kuwabara-Happel cell model. For the trajectory of the particle, the capture area and the filter performance simple analytical expressions are obtained. These expressions are valid for particle capture processes from both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For this reason the obtained theoretical results make it possible to widen the application of high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF) to other industrial areas. For Newtonian fluids the theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental ones reported in the literature.

  7. Generalized dark energy interactions with multiple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Mifsud, Jurgen; Mimoso, José P.; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2016-11-01

    In the search for an explanation for the current acceleration of the Universe, scalar fields are the most simple and useful tools to build models of dark energy. This field, however, must in principle couple with the rest of the world and not necessarily in the same way to different particles or fluids. We provide the most complete dynamical system analysis to date, consisting of a canonical scalar field conformally and disformally coupled to both dust and radiation. We perform a detailed study of the existence and stability conditions of the systems and comment on constraints imposed on the disformal coupling from Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and given current limits on the variation of the fine-structure constant.

  8. Observing Power-Law Dynamics of Position-Velocity Correlation in Anomalous Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afek, Gadi; Coslovsky, Jonathan; Courvoisier, Arnaud; Livneh, Oz; Davidson, Nir

    2017-08-01

    In this Letter, we present a measurement of the phase-space density distribution (PSDD) of ultracold 87Rb atoms performing 1D anomalous diffusion. The PSDD is imaged using a direct tomographic method based on Raman velocity selection. It reveals that the position-velocity correlation function Cx v(t ) builds up on a time scale related to the initial conditions of the ensemble and then decays asymptotically as a power law. We show that the decay follows a simple scaling theory involving the power-law asymptotic dynamics of position and velocity. The generality of this scaling theory is confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations of two distinct models of anomalous diffusion.

  9. Universal power-law and partial condensation in aggregation-chipping processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Toshiya

    2010-06-01

    The asymptotic behaviour of a distribution function P(X) for X clusters is investigated in aggregation-chipping processes, where aggregation and chipping off of a finite unit of size less than L take place simultaneously. Numerical simulations show that above a certain threshold ⟨X⟩c of an average cluster size, the system exhibits partial condensation where one condensed cluster coexists with a universal power-law distribution with the exponent -5/2 . The critical value ⟨X⟩c is calculated and turns out to increase monotonously with L . The z -transform technique is used to analyze the case L=2 in detail. Obtained results agree well with numerical ones. Finally, universality of the asymptotic power law is discussed for general cases. It becomes evident that universality holds as long as the size of chipped off unit is finite.

  10. Formation of hard power laws in the energetic particle spectra resulting from relativistic magnetic reconnection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Daughton, William; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2014-10-10

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we demonstrate that magnetic reconnection in relativistic plasmas is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process resulting from the curvature drift of particles in the direction of the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra in parameter regimes where the energy density in the reconnecting field exceeds the rest mass energy density σ ≡ B(2)/(4πnm(e)c(2))>1 and when the system size is sufficiently large. In the limit σ ≫ 1, the spectral index approaches p = 1 and most of the available energy is converted into nonthermal particles. A simple analytic model is proposed which explains these key features and predicts a general condition under which hard power-law spectra will be generated from magnetic reconnection.

  11. Comparison of fractional wave equations for power law attenuation in ultrasound and elastography.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sverre; Näsholm, Sven Peter

    2014-04-01

    A set of wave equations with fractional loss operators in time and space are analyzed. The fractional Szabo equation, the power law wave equation and the causal fractional Laplacian wave equation are all found to be low-frequency approximations of the fractional Kelvin-Voigt wave equation and the more general fractional Zener wave equation. The latter two equations are based on fractional constitutive equations, whereas the former wave equations have been derived from the desire to model power law attenuation in applications like medical ultrasound. This has consequences for use in modeling and simulation, especially for applications that do not satisfy the low-frequency approximation, such as shear wave elastography. In such applications, the wave equations based on constitutive equations are the viable ones. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Power-Law Entanglement Spectrum in Many-Body Localized Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbyn, Maksym; Michailidis, Alexios A.; Abanin, Dmitry A.; Papić, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The entanglement spectrum of the reduced density matrix contains information beyond the von Neumann entropy and provides unique insights into exotic orders or critical behavior of quantum systems. Here, we show that strongly disordered systems in the many-body localized phase have power-law entanglement spectra, arising from the presence of extensively many local integrals of motion. The power-law entanglement spectrum distinguishes many-body localized systems from ergodic systems, as well as from ground states of gapped integrable models or free systems in the vicinity of scale-invariant critical points. We confirm our results using large-scale exact diagonalization. In addition, we develop a matrix-product state algorithm which allows us to access the eigenstates of large systems close to the localization transition, and discuss general implications of our results for variational studies of highly excited eigenstates in many-body localized systems.

  13. Power-Law Entanglement Spectrum in Many-Body Localized Phases.

    PubMed

    Serbyn, Maksym; Michailidis, Alexios A; Abanin, Dmitry A; Papić, Z

    2016-10-14

    The entanglement spectrum of the reduced density matrix contains information beyond the von Neumann entropy and provides unique insights into exotic orders or critical behavior of quantum systems. Here, we show that strongly disordered systems in the many-body localized phase have power-law entanglement spectra, arising from the presence of extensively many local integrals of motion. The power-law entanglement spectrum distinguishes many-body localized systems from ergodic systems, as well as from ground states of gapped integrable models or free systems in the vicinity of scale-invariant critical points. We confirm our results using large-scale exact diagonalization. In addition, we develop a matrix-product state algorithm which allows us to access the eigenstates of large systems close to the localization transition, and discuss general implications of our results for variational studies of highly excited eigenstates in many-body localized systems.

  14. Medical practices display power law behaviors similar to spoken languages.

    PubMed

    Paladino, Jonathan D; Crooke, Philip S; Brackney, Christopher R; Kaynar, A Murat; Hotchkiss, John R

    2013-09-04

    Medical care commonly involves the apprehension of complex patterns of patient derangements to which the practitioner responds with patterns of interventions, as opposed to single therapeutic maneuvers. This complexity renders the objective assessment of practice patterns using conventional statistical approaches difficult. Combinatorial approaches drawn from symbolic dynamics are used to encode the observed patterns of patient derangement and associated practitioner response patterns as sequences of symbols. Concatenating each patient derangement symbol with the contemporaneous practitioner response symbol creates "words" encoding the simultaneous patient derangement and provider response patterns and yields an observed vocabulary with quantifiable statistical characteristics. A fundamental observation in many natural languages is the existence of a power law relationship between the rank order of word usage and the absolute frequency with which particular words are uttered. We show that population level patterns of patient derangement: practitioner intervention word usage in two entirely unrelated domains of medical care display power law relationships similar to those of natural languages, and that-in one of these domains-power law behavior at the population level reflects power law behavior at the level of individual practitioners. Our results suggest that patterns of medical care can be approached using quantitative linguistic techniques, a finding that has implications for the assessment of expertise, machine learning identification of optimal practices, and construction of bedside decision support tools.

  15. Constraints on cosmological parameters in power-law cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Sarita; Altaibayeva, A.; Shahalam, M.; Singh, J. K.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we examine observational constraints on the power law cosmology; essentially dependent on two parameters H0 (Hubble constant) and q (deceleration parameter). We investigate the constraints on these parameters using the latest 28 points of H(z) data and 580 points of Union2.1 compilation data and, compare the results with the results of ΛCDM . We also forecast constraints using a simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey. Our studies give better insight into power law cosmology than the earlier done analysis by Kumar [arXiv:1109.6924] indicating it tuning well with Union2.1 compilation data but not with H(z) data. However, the constraints obtained on and i.e. H0 average and q average using the simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey are found to be inconsistent with the values obtained from the H(z) and Union2.1 compilation data. We also perform the statefinder analysis and find that the power-law cosmological models approach the standard ΛCDM model as q → -1. Finally, we observe that although the power law cosmology explains several prominent features of evolution of the Universe, it fails in details.

  16. The power laws of nanoscale forces under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia-Yun; Olukan, Tuza; Santos, Sergio; Al Ghaferi, Amal; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-12-25

    We report a power law derived from experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) data suggesting a nano to mesoscale transition in force-distance dependencies. Our results are in relative agreement with the Hamaker and Lifshitz theories for van der Waals forces for the larger tip radii only.

  17. Power law corrections to BTZ black hole entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharm Veer

    2015-11-01

    We study the quantum scalar field in the background of BTZ black hole and evaluate the entanglement entropy of the nonvacuum states. The entropy is proportional to the area of event horizon for the ground state, but the area law is violated in the case of nonvacuum states (first excited state and mixed states) and the corrections scale as power law.

  18. Back-reaction effects in power-law inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, M.

    2004-02-01

    I consider a power-law inflationary model taking into account back-reaction effects. The interesting result is that the spectrum for the scalar-field fluctuations does not depend on the expansion rate of the Universe p and that it results to be scale invariant for cosmological scales. However, the amplitude for these fluctuations depends on p.

  19. Avalanches and power-law behaviour in lung inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suki, Béla; Barabási, Albert-László; Hantos, Zoltán; Peták, Ferenc; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1994-04-01

    WHEN lungs are emptied during exhalation, peripheral airways close up1. For people with lung disease, they may not reopen for a significant portion of inhalation, impairing gas exchange2,3. A knowledge of the mechanisms that govern reinflation of collapsed regions of lungs is therefore central to the development of ventilation strategies for combating respiratory problems. Here we report measurements of the terminal airway resistance, Rt , during the opening of isolated dog lungs. When inflated by a constant flow, Rt decreases in discrete jumps. We find that the probability distribution of the sizes of the jumps and of the time intervals between them exhibit power-law behaviour over two decades. We develop a model of the inflation process in which 'avalanches' of airway openings are seen-with power-law distributions of both the size of avalanches and the time intervals between them-which agree quantitatively with those seen experimentally, and are reminiscent of the power-law behaviour observed for self-organized critical systems4. Thus power-law distributions, arising from avalanches associated with threshold phenomena propagating down a branching tree structure, appear to govern the recruitment of terminal airspaces.

  20. Constraints on cosmological parameters in power-law cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Sarita; Singh, J.K.; Altaibayeva, A.; Myrzakulov, R.; Shahalam, M. E-mail: aziza.bibol@mail.ru E-mail: jainendrrakumar@rediffmail.com

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we examine observational constraints on the power law cosmology; essentially dependent on two parameters H{sub 0} (Hubble constant) and q (deceleration parameter). We investigate the constraints on these parameters using the latest 28 points of H(z) data and 580 points of Union2.1 compilation data and, compare the results with the results of ΛCDM . We also forecast constraints using a simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey. Our studies give better insight into power law cosmology than the earlier done analysis by Kumar [arXiv:1109.6924] indicating it tuning well with Union2.1 compilation data but not with H(z) data. However, the constraints obtained on and i.e. H{sub 0} average and q average using the simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey are found to be inconsistent with the values obtained from the H(z) and Union2.1 compilation data. We also perform the statefinder analysis and find that the power-law cosmological models approach the standard ΛCDM model as q → −1. Finally, we observe that although the power law cosmology explains several prominent features of evolution of the Universe, it fails in details.

  1. Medical practices display power law behaviors similar to spoken languages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical care commonly involves the apprehension of complex patterns of patient derangements to which the practitioner responds with patterns of interventions, as opposed to single therapeutic maneuvers. This complexity renders the objective assessment of practice patterns using conventional statistical approaches difficult. Methods Combinatorial approaches drawn from symbolic dynamics are used to encode the observed patterns of patient derangement and associated practitioner response patterns as sequences of symbols. Concatenating each patient derangement symbol with the contemporaneous practitioner response symbol creates “words” encoding the simultaneous patient derangement and provider response patterns and yields an observed vocabulary with quantifiable statistical characteristics. Results A fundamental observation in many natural languages is the existence of a power law relationship between the rank order of word usage and the absolute frequency with which particular words are uttered. We show that population level patterns of patient derangement: practitioner intervention word usage in two entirely unrelated domains of medical care display power law relationships similar to those of natural languages, and that–in one of these domains–power law behavior at the population level reflects power law behavior at the level of individual practitioners. Conclusions Our results suggest that patterns of medical care can be approached using quantitative linguistic techniques, a finding that has implications for the assessment of expertise, machine learning identification of optimal practices, and construction of bedside decision support tools. PMID:24007376

  2. Generalized Archimedes' principle in active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razin, Nitzan; Voituriez, Raphael; Elgeti, Jens; Gov, Nir S.

    2017-09-01

    We show how a gradient in the motility properties of noninteracting pointlike active particles can cause a pressure gradient that pushes a large inert object. We calculate the force on an object inside a system of active particles with position-dependent motion parameters, in one and two dimensions, and show that a modified Archimedes' principle is satisfied. We characterize the system, both in terms of the model parameters and in terms of experimentally measurable quantities: the spatial profiles of the density, velocity and pressure. This theoretical analysis is motivated by recent experiments, which showed that the nucleus of a mouse oocyte (immature egg cell) moves from the cortex to the center due to a gradient of activity of vesicles propelled by molecular motors; it more generally applies to artificial systems of controlled localized activity.

  3. On the use of log-transformation vs. nonlinear regression for analyzing biological power laws.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; White, Ethan P; Hooten, Mevin B; Durham, Susan L

    2011-10-01

    Power-law relationships are among the most well-studied functional relationships in biology. Recently the common practice of fitting power laws using linear regression (LR) on log-transformed data has been criticized, calling into question the conclusions of hundreds of studies. It has been suggested that nonlinear regression (NLR) is preferable, but no rigorous comparison of these two methods has been conducted. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the error distribution determines which method performs better, with NLR better characterizing data with additive, homoscedastic, normal error and LR better characterizing data with multiplicative, heteroscedastic, lognormal error. Analysis of 471 biological power laws shows that both forms of error occur in nature. While previous analyses based on log-transformation appear to be generally valid, future analyses should choose methods based on a combination of biological plausibility and analysis of the error distribution. We provide detailed guidelines and associated computer code for doing so, including a model averaging approach for cases where the error structure is uncertain.

  4. High-index asymptotics of spherical Bessel products averaged with modulated Gaussian power laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2014-12-01

    Bessel integrals of type are investigated, where the kernel g( k) is a modulated Gaussian power-law distribution , and the jl ( m) are multiple derivatives of spherical Bessel functions. These integrals define the multipole moments of Gaussian random fields on the unit sphere, arising in multipole fits of temperature and polarization power spectra of the cosmic microwave background. Two methods allowing efficient numerical calculation of these integrals are presented, covering Bessel indices l in the currently accessible multipole range 0 ≤ l ≤ 104 and beyond. The first method is based on a representation of spherical Bessel functions by Lommel polynomials. Gaussian power-law averages can then be calculated in closed form as finite Hankel series of parabolic cylinder functions, which allow high-precision evaluation. The second method is asymptotic, covering the high- l regime, and is applicable to general distribution functions g( k) in the integrand; it is based on the uniform Nicholson approximation of the Bessel derivatives in conjunction with an integral representation of squared Airy functions. A numerical comparison of these two methods is performed, employing Gaussian power laws and Kummer distributions to average the Bessel products.

  5. On the use of log-transformation vs. nonlinear regression for analyzing biological power laws

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xiao, X.; White, E.P.; Hooten, M.B.; Durham, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Power-law relationships are among the most well-studied functional relationships in biology. Recently the common practice of fitting power laws using linear regression (LR) on log-transformed data has been criticized, calling into question the conclusions of hundreds of studies. It has been suggested that nonlinear regression (NLR) is preferable, but no rigorous comparison of these two methods has been conducted. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the error distribution determines which method performs better, with NLR better characterizing data with additive, homoscedastic, normal error and LR better characterizing data with multiplicative, heteroscedastic, lognormal error. Analysis of 471 biological power laws shows that both forms of error occur in nature. While previous analyses based on log-transformation appear to be generally valid, future analyses should choose methods based on a combination of biological plausibility and analysis of the error distribution. We provide detailed guidelines and associated computer code for doing so, including a model averaging approach for cases where the error structure is uncertain. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Power-law scaling in daily rainfall patterns and consequences in urban stream discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeryang; Krueger, Elisabeth H.; Kim, Dongkyun; Rao, Suresh C.

    2016-04-01

    Poissonian rainfall has been frequently used for modelling stream discharge in a catchment at the daily scale. Generally, it is assumed that the daily rainfall depth is described by memoryless exponential distribution which is transformed to stream discharge, resulting in an analytical pdf for discharge [Gamma distribution]. While it is true that catchment hydrological filtering processes (censored by constant rate ET losses, and first-order recession) increases "memory", reflected in 1/f noise in discharge time series. Here, we show that for urban watersheds in South Korea: (1) the observation of daily rainfall depths follow power-law pdfs, and spectral slopes range between 0.2 ~ 0.4; and (2) the stream discharge pdfs have power-law tails. These observation results suggest that multiple hydro-climatic factors (e.g., non-stationarity of rainfall patterns) and hydrologic filtering (increasing impervious area; more complex urban drainage networks) influence the catchment hydrologic responses. We test the role of such factors using a parsimonious model, using different types of daily rainfall patterns (e.g., power-law distributed rainfall depth with Poisson distribution in its frequency) and urban settings to reproduce patterns similar to those observed in empirical records. Our results indicate that fractality in temporally up-scaled rainfall, and the consequences of large extreme events are preserved as high discharge events in urbanizing catchments. Implications of these results to modeling urban hydrologic responses and impacts on receiving waters are discussed.

  7. Statistical Properties of Maximum Likelihood Estimators of Power Law Spectra Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index, sigma(sub 2), is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at the knee energy, E(sub k), to a steeper spectral index sigma(sub 2) greater than sigma(sub 1) above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood (ML) procedure was developed for estimating the single parameter sigma(sub 1) of a simple power law energy spectrum and generalized to estimate the three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses and real cosmic-ray data. The statistical properties of the ML estimator were investigated and shown to have the three desirable properties: (Pl) consistency (asymptotically unbiased), (P2) efficiency (asymptotically attains the Cramer-Rao minimum variance bound), and (P3) asymptotically normally distributed, under a wide range of potential detector response functions. Attainment of these properties necessarily implies that the ML estimation procedure provides the best unbiased estimator possible. While simulation studies can easily determine if a given estimation procedure provides an unbiased estimate of the spectra information, and whether or not the estimator is approximately normally distributed, attainment of the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) can only be ascertained by calculating the CRB for an assumed energy spectrum- detector response function combination, which can be quite formidable in practice. However, the effort in calculating the CRB is very worthwhile because it provides the necessary means to compare the efficiency of competing estimation techniques and, furthermore, provides a stopping rule in the search for the best unbiased estimator. Consequently, the CRB for both the simple and broken power law energy spectra are derived herein and the conditions under which they are stained in practice are investigated.

  8. Computed tomography-based diagnosis of diffuse compensatory enlargement of coronary arteries using scaling power laws

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong; Choy, Jenny Susana; Wischgoll, Thomas; Luo, Tong; Teague, Shawn D.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2013-01-01

    Glagov's positive remodelling in the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis often results in plaque rupture and acute events. Because positive remodelling is generally diffused along the epicardial coronary arterial tree, it is difficult to diagnose non-invasively. Hence, the objective of the study is to assess the use of scaling power law for the diagnosis of positive remodelling of coronary arteries based on computed tomography (CT) images. Epicardial coronary arterial trees were reconstructed from CT scans of six Ossabaw pigs fed on a high-fat, high-cholesterol, atherogenic diet for eight months as well as the same number of body-weight-matched farm pigs fed on a lean chow (101.9±16.1 versus 91.5±13.1 kg). The high-fat diet Ossabaw pig model showed diffuse positive remodelling of epicardial coronary arteries. Good fit of measured coronary data to the length–volume scaling power law ( where Lc and Vc are crown length and volume) were found for both the high-fat and control groups (R2 = 0.95±0.04 and 0.99±0.01, respectively). The coefficient, KLV, decreased significantly in the high-fat diet group when compared with the control (14.6±2.6 versus 40.9±5.6). The flow–length scaling power law, however, was nearly unaffected by the positive remodelling. The length–volume and flow–length scaling power laws were preserved in epicardial coronary arterial trees after positive remodelling. KLV < 18 in the length–volume scaling relation is a good index of positive remodelling of coronary arteries. These findings provide a clinical rationale for simple, accurate and non-invasive diagnosis of positive remodelling of coronary arteries, using conventional CT scans. PMID:23365197

  9. Deviation from Power Law Behavior in Landslide Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lan, H.; Wu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Power law distribution of magnitude is widely observed in many natural hazards (e.g., earthquake, floods, tornadoes, and forest fires). Landslide is unique as the size distribution of landslide is characterized by a power law decrease with a rollover in the small size end. Yet, the emergence of the rollover, i.e., the deviation from power law behavior for small size landslides, remains a mystery. In this contribution, we grouped the forces applied on landslide bodies into two categories: 1) the forces proportional to the volume of failure mass (gravity and friction), and 2) the forces proportional to the area of failure surface (cohesion). Failure occurs when the forces proportional to volume exceed the forces proportional to surface area. As such, given a certain mechanical configuration, the failure volume to failure surface area ratio must exceed a corresponding threshold to guarantee a failure. Assuming all landslides share a uniform shape, which means the volume to surface area ratio of landslide regularly increase with the landslide volume, a cutoff of landslide volume distribution in the small size end can be defined. However, in realistic landslide phenomena, where heterogeneities of landslide shape and mechanical configuration are existent, a simple cutoff of landslide volume distribution does not exist. The stochasticity of landslide shape introduce a probability distribution of the volume to surface area ratio with regard to landslide volume, with which the probability that the volume to surface ratio exceed the threshold can be estimated regarding values of landslide volume. An experiment based on empirical data showed that this probability can induce the power law distribution of landslide volume roll down in the small size end. We therefore proposed that the constraints on the failure volume to failure surface area ratio together with the heterogeneity of landslide geometry and mechanical configuration attribute for the deviation from power law

  10. Intraoperative Fluids and Fluid Management for Ambulatory Dental Sedation and General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Saraghi, Mana

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous fluids are administered in virtually every parenteral sedation and general anesthetic. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of body-water distribution and fluid dynamics at the vascular endothelium, evaluation of fluid status, calculation of fluid requirements, and the clinical rationale for the use of various crystalloid and colloid solutions. In the setting of elective dental outpatient procedures with minor blood loss, isotonic balanced crystalloid solutions are the fluids of choice. Colloids, on the other hand, have no use in outpatient sedation or general anesthesia for dental or minor oral surgery procedures but may have several desirable properties in long and invasive maxillofacial surgical procedures where advanced hemodynamic monitoring may assess the adequacy of intravascular volume. PMID:26650497

  11. Intraoperative Fluids and Fluid Management for Ambulatory Dental Sedation and General Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Saraghi, Mana

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous fluids are administered in virtually every parenteral sedation and general anesthetic. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of body-water distribution and fluid dynamics at the vascular endothelium, evaluation of fluid status, calculation of fluid requirements, and the clinical rationale for the use of various crystalloid and colloid solutions. In the setting of elective dental outpatient procedures with minor blood loss, isotonic balanced crystalloid solutions are the fluids of choice. Colloids, on the other hand, have no use in outpatient sedation or general anesthesia for dental or minor oral surgery procedures but may have several desirable properties in long and invasive maxillofacial surgical procedures where advanced hemodynamic monitoring may assess the adequacy of intravascular volume.

  12. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program, Version 6.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.; LeClair, A. C.; Moore, A.; Schallhorn, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) is a finite-volume based general-purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and time-dependant flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations in a complex flow network. The program is capable of modeling real fluids with phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics, conjugate heat transfer between solid and fluid, fluid transients, pumps, compressors and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The thermo-fluid system to be analyzed is discretized into nodes, branches, and conductors. The scalar properties such as pressure, temperature, and concentrations are calculated at nodes. Mass flow rates and heat transfer rates are computed in branches and conductors. The graphical user interface allows users to build their models using the 'point, drag, and click' method; the users can also run their models and post-process the results in the same environment. The integrated fluid library supplies thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of 36 fluids, and 24 different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. This Technical Memorandum illustrates the application and verification of the code through 25 demonstrated example problems.

  13. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) - Version 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; LeClair, Andre; Moore, Ric; Schallhorn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) is a finite-volume based general-purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and time-dependent flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations in a complex flow network. The program is capable of modeling real fluids with phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics, conjugate heat transfer between solid and fluid, fluid transients, pumps, compressors, flow control valves and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The thermo-fluid system to be analyzed is discretized into nodes, branches, and conductors. The scalar properties such as pressure, temperature, and concentrations are calculated at nodes. Mass flow rates and heat transfer rates are computed in branches and conductors. The graphical user interface allows users to build their models using the 'point, drag, and click' method; the users can also run their models and post-process the results in the same environment. The integrated fluid library supplies thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of 36 fluids, and 24 different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. Users can introduce new physics, non-linear and time-dependent boundary conditions through user-subroutine.

  14. Power Laws and Market Crashes ---Empirical Laws on Bursting Bubbles---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizoji, T.

    In this paper, we quantitatively investigate the statistical properties of a statistical ensemble of stock prices. We selected 1200 stocks traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, and formed a statistical ensemble of daily stock prices for each trading day in the 3-year period from January 4, 1999 to December 28, 2001, corresponding to the period of the forming of the internet bubble in Japn, and its bursting in the Japanese stock market. We found that the tail of the complementary cumulative distribution function of the ensemble of stock prices in the high value of the price is well described by a power-law distribution, P (S > x) ˜ x^{-α}, with an exponent that moves in the range of 1.09 < α < 1.27. Furthermore, we found that as the power-law exponents α approached unity, the bubbles collapsed. This suggests that Zipf's law for stock prices is a sign that bubbles are going to burst.

  15. The origin of power-law rheology in foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyun Joo; Riggleman, Robert; Crocker, John

    Soft glassy matter (SGM) such as foams, emulsions, and colloids, exhibit interesting rheological properties that have long defied explanation. In particular, the shear modulus of these materials displays weak power law frequency dependence. To understand the origin of this property in more depth, we have built a three-dimensional, modified Bubble Dynamics model. The bubbles interact with a purely repulsive harmonic potential and ripen according to diffusion-based governing equations. Notably, the bubble motion has a Levy flight character, in addition to being spatially correlated in the form of avalanches. Microrheology studies reveal that the power-law shear modulus is the result of constraint release driven by the bubbles' super-diffusive motion combined with simple yield of the resulting stress. The super-diffusive motion of the bubbles, in turn, is the result of the system taking a fractal path in configuration space. We shall discuss the origins of this fractal scaling.

  16. Power-law distribution in Japanese racetrack betting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi

    2006-08-01

    Gambling is one of the basic economic activities that humans indulge in. An investigation of gambling activities provides deep insights into the economic actions of people and sheds lights on the study of econophysics. In this paper we present an analysis of the distribution of the final odds of the races organized by the Japan Racing Association. The distribution of the final odds Po(x) indicates a clear power-law Po(x)∝1/x, where x represents the final odds. This power-law can be explained on the basis of the assumption that every bettor bets his money on the horse that appears to be the strongest in a race.

  17. Power law behavior of the zigzag transition in Yukawa clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Magyar, Andrew L.

    2010-11-15

    We provide direct experimental evidence that the width of a Yukawa cluster exhibits power law behavior during the one-dimensional (1D) to two-dimensional (2D) zigzag transition. Configurations of small dusty (complex) plasma clusters confined in a biharmonic potential well are characterized as the well anisotropy is varied. When the anisotropy is large the particles are in a 1D straight-line configuration. As the anisotropy is decreased the cluster undergoes a zigzag transition to a 2D configuration. The measured dependence of cluster width on anisotropy follows a power law. A second transition from the zigzag to an elliptical configuration is also observed. The results are in very good agreement with a model of identical particles interacting through a Yukawa potential.

  18. Lévy flights with power-law absorption.

    PubMed

    Cattivelli, Luca; Agliari, Elena; Sartori, Fabio; Cassi, Davide

    2015-10-01

    We consider a particle performing a stochastic motion on a one-dimensional lattice with jump lengths distributed according to a power law with exponent μ+1. Assuming that the walker moves in the presence of a distribution a(x) of targets (traps) depending on the spatial coordinate x, we study the probability that the walker will eventually find any target (will eventually be trapped). We focus on the case of power-law distributions a(x)∼x(-α) and we find that, as long as μ<α, there is a finite probability that the walker will never be trapped, no matter how long the process is. This result is shown via analytical arguments and numerical simulations which also evidence the emergence of slow searching (trapping) times in finite-size system. The extension of this finding to higher-dimensional structures is also discussed.

  19. Power-law cosmology, SN Ia, and BAO

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, Aleksander; Halenka, Vitali; Tkachev, Igor E-mail: vithal@umich.edu

    2014-10-01

    We revise observational constraints on the class of models of modified gravity which at low redshifts lead to a power-law cosmology. To this end we use available public data on Supernova Ia and on baryon acoustic oscillations. We show that the expansion regime a(t) ∼ t{sup β} with β close to 3/2 in a spatially flat universe is a good fit to these data.

  20. Power law relationships for rain attenuation and reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasirvatham, D. M. J.; Hodge, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    The equivalent reflectivity, specific attenuation and volumetric backscatter cross section of rain are calculated and tabulated at a number of frequencies from 1 to 500 GHz using classical Mie theory. The first two parameters are shown to be closely approximated as functions of rain rate by the power law aR to the b power. The a's and b's are also tabulated and plotted for convenient reference.

  1. Power law cosmology model comparison with CMB scale information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutusaus, Isaac; Lamine, Brahim; Blanchard, Alain; Dupays, Arnaud; Zolnierowski, Yves; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ealet, Anne; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Ilić, Stéphane; Pisani, Alice; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Sakr, Ziad; Salvatelli, Valentina; Schücker, Thomas; Tilquin, André; Virey, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model (Λ CDM ) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius, R (t )∝tn, has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO can be well reproduced by both Λ CDM and power law expansion models with n ˜1.5 , while the constant expansion rate model (n =1 ) is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data are well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular, through the position of the first peak of the temperature angular power spectrum, corresponding to the sound horizon at recombination, a scale physically related to the BAO scale. Models with n ≥1 lead to a divergence of the sound horizon and do not naturally provide the relevant scales for the BAO and the CMB. We retain an empirical footing to overcome this issue: we let the data choose the preferred values for these scales, while we recompute the ionization history in power law models, to obtain the distance to the CMB. In doing so, we find that the scale coming from the BAO data is not consistent with the observed position of the first peak of the CMB temperature angular power spectrum for any power law cosmology. Therefore, we conclude that when the three standard probes (SNIa, BAO, and CMB) are combined, the Λ CDM model is very strongly favored over any of these alternative models, which are then essentially ruled out.

  2. Power law distribution of dividends in horse races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Domany, E.

    2001-02-01

    We discovered that the distribution of dividends in Korean horse races follows a power law. A simple model of betting is proposed, which reproduces the observed distribution. The model provides a mechanism to arrive at the true underlying winning probabilities, which are initially unknown, in a self-organized collective fashion, through the dynamic process of betting. Numerical simulations yield excellent agreement with the empirical data.

  3. Power-law behavior in social and economical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keizo; Miyazima, Sasuke

    2004-12-01

    We have already found power-law behavior in various phenomena such as high-tax payer, population distribution, name distribution, passenger number at stations, student number in a university from high schools, and so on. We can explain why these phenomena show such interesting behaviors by doing simulations based on adequate models. We have come to the conclusion that there are fractal structures underlying those phenomena.

  4. Robust Statistical Detection of Power-Law Cross-Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Blythe, Duncan A. J.; Nikulin, Vadim V.; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2016-01-01

    We show that widely used approaches in statistical physics incorrectly indicate the existence of power-law cross-correlations between financial stock market fluctuations measured over several years and the neuronal activity of the human brain lasting for only a few minutes. While such cross-correlations are nonsensical, no current methodology allows them to be reliably discarded, leaving researchers at greater risk when the spurious nature of cross-correlations is not clear from the unrelated origin of the time series and rather requires careful statistical estimation. Here we propose a theory and method (PLCC-test) which allows us to rigorously and robustly test for power-law cross-correlations, correctly detecting genuine and discarding spurious cross-correlations, thus establishing meaningful relationships between processes in complex physical systems. Our method reveals for the first time the presence of power-law cross-correlations between amplitudes of the alpha and beta frequency ranges of the human electroencephalogram. PMID:27250630

  5. Power-law citation distributions are not scale-free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golosovsky, Michael

    2017-09-01

    We analyze time evolution of statistical distributions of citations to scientific papers published in the same year. While these distributions seem to follow the power-law dependence we find that they are nonstationary and the exponent of the power-law fit decreases with time and does not come to saturation. We attribute the nonstationarity of citation distributions to different longevity of the low-cited and highly cited papers. By measuring citation trajectories of papers we found that citation careers of the low-cited papers come to saturation after 10-15 years while those of the highly cited papers continue to increase indefinitely: The papers that exceed some citation threshold become runaways. Thus, we show that although citation distribution can look as a power-law dependence, it is not scale free and there is a hidden dynamic scale associated with the onset of runaways. We compare our measurements to our recently developed model of citation dynamics based on copying-redirection-triadic closure and find explanations to our empirical observations.

  6. Bounds of memory strength for power-law series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fangjian; Yang, Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhou, Tao

    2017-05-01

    Many time series produced by complex systems are empirically found to follow power-law distributions with different exponents α . By permuting the independently drawn samples from a power-law distribution, we present nontrivial bounds on the memory strength (first-order autocorrelation) as a function of α , which are markedly different from the ordinary ±1 bounds for Gaussian or uniform distributions. When 1 <α ≤3 , as α grows bigger, the upper bound increases from 0 to +1 while the lower bound remains 0; when α >3 , the upper bound remains +1 while the lower bound descends below 0. Theoretical bounds agree well with numerical simulations. Based on the posts on Twitter, ratings of MovieLens, calling records of the mobile operator Orange, and the browsing behavior of Taobao, we find that empirical power-law-distributed data produced by human activities obey such constraints. The present findings explain some observed constraints in bursty time series and scale-free networks and challenge the validity of measures such as autocorrelation and assortativity coefficient in heterogeneous systems.

  7. Volume transport and generalized hydrodynamic equations for monatomic fluids.

    PubMed

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2008-10-07

    In this paper, the effects of volume transport on the generalized hydrodynamic equations for a pure simple fluid are examined from the standpoint of statistical mechanics and, in particular, kinetic theory of fluids. First, we derive the generalized hydrodynamic equations, namely, the constitutive equations for the stress tensor and heat flux for a single-component monatomic fluid, from the generalized Boltzmann equation in the presence of volume transport. Then their linear steady-state solutions are derived and examined with regard to the effects of volume transport on them. The generalized hydrodynamic equations and linear constitutive relations obtained for nonconserved variables make it possible to assess Brenner's proposition [Physica A 349, 11 (2005); Physica A 349, 60 (2005)] for volume transport and attendant mass and volume velocities as well as the effects of volume transport on the Newtonian law of viscosity, compression/dilatation (bulk viscosity) phenomena, and Fourier's law of heat conduction. On the basis of study made, it is concluded that the notion of volume transport is sufficiently significant to retain in irreversible thermodynamics of fluids and fluid mechanics.

  8. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    DOE PAGES

    Izacard, Olivier

    2017-03-29

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas come mainly from the use of very central processing unit (CPU)-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closuresmore » from the nonlinear Landau Fokker–Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function. One of the main differences with the literature is our analytic representation of the distribution function in the velocity phase space with as few hidden variables as possible thanks to the use of non-orthogonal basis sets. These new non-Maxwellian fluid equations could initiate the next generation of fluid codes including kinetic effects and can be expanded to other scientific disciplines such as astrophysics, condensed matter or hydrodynamics. As a validation test, we perform a numerical simulation based on a minimal reduced INMDF fluid model. The result of this test is the discovery of the origin of particle and heat diffusion. The diffusion is due to the competition between a growing INMDF on short time scales due to spatial gradients and the thermalization on longer time scales. Here, the results shown here could provide the insights to break some of the unsolved puzzles of turbulence.« less

  9. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas come mainly from the use of very central processing unit (CPU)-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker-Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g. the INMDF (Izacard, O. 2016b Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas. Phys. Plasmas 23, 082504) that stands for interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function). One of the main differences with the literature is our analytic representation of the distribution function in the velocity phase space with as few hidden variables as possible thanks to the use of non-orthogonal basis sets. These new non-Maxwellian fluid equations could initiate the next generation of fluid codes including kinetic effects and can be expanded to other scientific disciplines such as astrophysics, condensed matter or hydrodynamics. As a validation test, we perform a numerical simulation based on a minimal reduced INMDF fluid model. The result of this test is the discovery of the origin of particle and heat diffusion. The diffusion is due to the competition between a growing INMDF on short time scales due to spatial gradients and the thermalization on longer time scales. The results

  10. General-relativistic rotation laws in rotating fluid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, Patryk; Malec, Edward

    2015-06-01

    We formulate new general-relativistic extensions of Newtonian rotation laws for self-gravitating stationary fluids. They have been used to rederive, in the first post-Newtonian approximation, the well-known geometric dragging of frames. We derive two other general-relativistic weak-field effects within rotating tori: the recently discovered dynamic antidragging and a new effect that measures the deviation from the Keplerian motion and/or the contribution of the fluids self-gravity. One can use the rotation laws to study the uniqueness and the convergence of the post-Newtonian approximations as well as the existence of the post-Newtonian limits.

  11. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program, Version 5.0-Educational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) is a finite-volume based general-purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and time-dependent flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations in a complex flow network. The program is capable of modeling real fluids with phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics, conjugate heat transfer between solid and fluid, fluid transients, pumps, compressors and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The thermofluid system to be analyzed is discretized into nodes, branches, and conductors. The scalar properties such as pressure, temperature, and concentrations are calculated at nodes. Mass flow rates and heat transfer rates are computed in branches and conductors. The graphical user interface allows users to build their models using the point, drag and click method; the users can also run their models and post-process the results in the same environment. The integrated fluid library supplies thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of 36 fluids and 21 different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. This Technical Memorandum illustrates the application and verification of the code through 12 demonstrated example problems.

  12. Mimicking static anisotropic fluid spheres in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We argue that an arbitrary general relativistic static anisotropic fluid sphere, (static and spherically symmetric but with transverse pressure not equal to radial pressure), can nevertheless be successfully mimicked by suitable linear combinations of theoretically attractive and quite simple classical matter: a classical (charged) isotropic perfect fluid, a classical electromagnetic field and a classical (minimally coupled) scalar field. While the most general decomposition is not unique, a preferred minimal decomposition can be constructed that is unique. We show how the classical energy conditions for the anisotropic fluid sphere can be related to energy conditions for the isotropic perfect fluid, electromagnetic field, and scalar field components of the model. Furthermore, we show how this decomposition relates to the distribution of both electric charge density and scalar charge density throughout the model. The generalized TOV equation implies that the perfect fluid component in this model is automatically in internal equilibrium, with pressure forces, electric forces, and scalar forces balancing the gravitational pseudo-force. Consequently, we can build theoretically attractive matter models that can be used to mimic almost any static spherically symmetric spacetime.

  13. On the thermodynamics of some generalized second-grade fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Man CS, Massoudi M

    2010-01-01

    The generalized second-grade fluids, which have been used for modeling the creep of ice and the flow of coal-water and coal-oil slurries, are among the simplest non-Newtonian fluid models that can describe shear-thinning/thickening and exhibit normal stress effects. In this article, we conduct thermodynamic analysis on a class of generalized second-grade fluids, one distinguishing feature of which is the existence of a constitutive function that describes frictional heating. We work within the framework of Serrin’s original formulation of neoclassical thermodynamics, where internal energy and entropy functions, if they exist for a continuous body at all, are to be derived from the classical First Law and (quantitatively reformulated) Second Law of thermodynamics for cycles. For the class of generalized second-grade fluids in question, we show from the First Law that an internal energy density u exists, and we derive the equation of energy balance; from the Second Law, we demonstrate the existence of an entropy density s and derive the Clausius–Duhem inequality that it satisfies.We obtain explicit expressions for u, s and the frictional heating , and derive thermodynamic restrictions on thematerial functions of temperature μ, α1, and α2 that appear in the constitutive relation for the Cauchy stress. For the special case of second-grade fluids, our expressions for u and s agree with those which Dunn and Fosdick [6] derived under the theoretical framework of the rational thermodynamics of Coleman and Noll.

  14. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law mud under surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Bai, Yuchuan; Xu, Dong

    2017-02-01

    The mass transport velocity in a two-layer system is studied theoretically. The wave motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free water surface, and mud in the lower layer is described by a power-law rheological model. Perturbation analysis is performed to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity. A numerical iteration method is employed to solve the non-linear governing equation at the leading order. The influence of rheological properties on fluid motion characteristics including the flow field, the surface displacement, the mass transport velocity, and the net discharge rates are investigated based on theoretical results. Theoretical analysis shows that under the action of interfacial shearing, a recirculation structure may appear near the interface in the upper water layer. A higher mass transport velocity at the interface does not necessarily mean a higher discharge rate for a pseudo-plastic fluid mud.

  15. Spinning fluids in general relativity. II - Self-consistent formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, John R.; Smalley, Larry, L.; Krisch, Jean P.

    1987-01-01

    Methods used earlier to derive the equations of motion for a spinning fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory are specialized to the case of general relativity. The main idea is to include the spin as a thermodynamic variable in the theory.

  16. Spinning fluids in general relativity. II - Self-consistent formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, John R.; Smalley, Larry, L.; Krisch, Jean P.

    1987-01-01

    Methods used earlier to derive the equations of motion for a spinning fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory are specialized to the case of general relativity. The main idea is to include the spin as a thermodynamic variable in the theory.

  17. General dynamical density functional theory for classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Benjamin D; Nold, Andreas; Savva, Nikos; Pavliotis, Grigorios A; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2012-09-21

    We study the dynamics of a colloidal fluid including inertia and hydrodynamic interactions, two effects which strongly influence the nonequilibrium properties of the system. We derive a general dynamical density functional theory which shows very good agreement with full Langevin dynamics. In suitable limits, we recover existing dynamical density functional theories and a Navier-Stokes-like equation with additional nonlocal terms.

  18. Estimation of the hydraulic conductivity of a two-dimensional fracture network using effective medium theory and power-law averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. W.; Leung, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through generated stochastically two-dimensional fracture networks. The centers and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow a lognormal distribution. The aperture of each fracture is correlated with its length, either through direct proportionality, or through a nonlinear relationship. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this value by starting with the individual fracture conductances, and using various upscaling methods. Kirkpatrick’s effective medium approximation, which works well for pore networks on a core scale, generally underestimates the conductivity of the fracture networks. We attribute this to the fact that the conductances of individual fracture segments (between adjacent intersections with other fractures) are correlated with each other, whereas Kirkpatrick’s approximation assumes no correlation. The power-law averaging approach proposed by Desbarats for porous media is able to match the numerical value, using power-law exponents that generally lie between 0 (geometric mean) and 1 (harmonic mean). The appropriate exponent can be correlated with statistical parameters that characterize the fracture density.

  19. Densification forming of alumina powder -- Effects of power law creep and friction

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y.S.; Kim, K.T.

    1996-10-01

    High temperature forming processes of alumina powder compacts were analyzed by using constitutive equations which are capable of predicting densification and grain growth under diffusional creep and power law creep. Experimental results for alumina powder compacts were compared with finite element calculations by using the constitutive equations. The effects of friction between alumina powder compact and punches during sinter forging of alumina powder compacts were also investigated. Densification mechanism maps of alumina powder, which can be used for the optimization of various process variables, were constructed under hot pressing and general states of stresses.

  20. Langevin equation for a free particle driven by power law type of noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandev, Trifce; Tomovski, Živorad

    2014-01-01

    We study a generalized Langevin equation for a free particle driven by N internal noises. The mean square displacement and velocity autocorrelation function are derived in case of a mixture of Dirac delta, power law and Mittag-Leffler noises. Additionally, a frictional memory kernel of distributed order is considered. The long time limit and short time limit are analyzed, and the dominant contributions of noises on particle dynamics is discussed. Various different diffusive behaviors (subdiffusion, superdiffusion, normal diffusion, ultraslow diffusion) are obtained. The considered problem may be used in the theory of anomalous diffusion in complex environment.

  1. Vibration analysis of FG cylindrical shells with power-law index using discrete singular convolution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercan, Kadir; Demir, Çiǧdem; Civalek, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    In the present manuscript, free vibration response of circular cylindrical shells with functionally graded material (FGM) is investigated. The method of discrete singular convolution (DSC) is used for numerical solution of the related governing equation of motion of FGM cylindrical shell. The constitutive relations are based on the Love's first approximation shell theory. The material properties are graded in the thickness direction according to a volume fraction power law indexes. Frequency values are calculated for different types of boundary conditions, material and geometric parameters. In general, close agreement between the obtained results and those of other researchers has been found.

  2. Anomalous wave function statistics on a one-dimensional lattice with power-law disorder.

    PubMed

    Titov, M; Schomerus, H

    2003-10-24

    Within a general framework, we discuss the wave function statistics in the Lloyd model of Anderson localization on a one-dimensional lattice with a Cauchy distribution for random on-site potential. We demonstrate that already in leading order in the disorder strength, there exists a hierarchy of anomalies in the probability distributions of the wave function, the conductance, and the local density of states, for every energy which corresponds to a rational ratio of wavelength to lattice constant. Power-law rather than log-normal tails dominate the short-distance wave-function statistics.

  3. The effects of anomalous diffusion on power-law blinking statistics of CdSe nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jau

    2008-08-28

    In this study of fluorescence blinking statistics for nanorods, we present a diffusion-controlled reaction model that leads to a more general formula: t(-m) exp[-(Gammat)(n)]. This formula describes a short-time power law with a crossover to a stretched exponential decay at later times. Based on quantum Brownian motion for a coupled central harmonic oscillator coupled to heat bath oscillators, we show that the position distribution follows anomalous diffusion with time-dependent diffusion coefficient and drift coefficient. The first and the second moments of the energy fluctuations are shown to be related to the exponent m and n for the blinking statistics.

  4. Event-scale power law recession analysis: quantifying methodological uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dralle, David N.; Karst, Nathaniel J.; Charalampous, Kyriakos; Veenstra, Andrew; Thompson, Sally E.

    2017-01-01

    The study of single streamflow recession events is receiving increasing attention following the presentation of novel theoretical explanations for the emergence of power law forms of the recession relationship, and drivers of its variability. Individually characterizing streamflow recessions often involves describing the similarities and differences between model parameters fitted to each recession time series. Significant methodological sensitivity has been identified in the fitting and parameterization of models that describe populations of many recessions, but the dependence of estimated model parameters on methodological choices has not been evaluated for event-by-event forms of analysis. Here, we use daily streamflow data from 16 catchments in northern California and southern Oregon to investigate how combinations of commonly used streamflow recession definitions and fitting techniques impact parameter estimates of a widely used power law recession model. Results are relevant to watersheds that are relatively steep, forested, and rain-dominated. The highly seasonal mediterranean climate of northern California and southern Oregon ensures study catchments explore a wide range of recession behaviors and wetness states, ideal for a sensitivity analysis. In such catchments, we show the following: (i) methodological decisions, including ones that have received little attention in the literature, can impact parameter value estimates and model goodness of fit; (ii) the central tendencies of event-scale recession parameter probability distributions are largely robust to methodological choices, in the sense that differing methods rank catchments similarly according to the medians of these distributions; (iii) recession parameter distributions are method-dependent, but roughly catchment-independent, such that changing the choices made about a particular method affects a given parameter in similar ways across most catchments; and (iv) the observed correlative relationship

  5. Generalized Langevin theory for inhomogeneous fluids: The equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Martin; Desai, Rashmi C.

    1982-05-01

    We use the generalized Langevin approach to study the dynamical correlations in an inhomogeneous system. The equations of motion (formally exact) are obtained for the number density, momentum density, energy density, stress tensor, and heat flux. We evaluate all the relevant sum rules appearing in the frequency matrix exactly in terms of microscopic pair potentials and an external field. We show using functional derivatives how these microscopic sum rules relate to more familiar, though now nonlocal, hydrodynamiclike quantities. The set of equations is closed by a Markov approximation in the equations for stress tensor and heat flux. As a result, these equations become analogous to Grad's 13-moment equations for low-density fluids and constitute a generalization to inhomogeneous fluids of the work of Schofield and Akcasu-Daniels. We also indicate how the resulting general set of equations would simplify for systems in which the inhomogeneity is unidirectional, e.g., a liquid-vapor interface.

  6. Power laws, discontinuities and regional city size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, C.R.; Gallagher, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Urban systems are manifestations of human adaptation to the natural environment. City size distributions are the expression of hierarchical processes acting upon urban systems. In this paper, we test the entire city size distributions for the southeastern and southwestern United States (1990), as well as the size classes in these regions for power law behavior. We interpret the differences in the size of the regional city size distributions as the manifestation of variable growth dynamics dependent upon city size. Size classes in the city size distributions are snapshots of stable states within urban systems in flux. ?? 2008.

  7. Firms growth dynamics, competition and power-law scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Hari M.; Campanha, José R.

    2003-05-01

    We study the growth dynamics of the size of manufacturing firms considering competition and normal distribution of competency. We start with the fact that all components of the system struggle with each other for growth as happened in real competitive business world. The detailed quantitative agreement of the theory with empirical results of firms growth based on a large economic database spanning over 20 years is good with a single set of the parameters for all the curves. Further, the empirical data of the variation of the standard deviation of the growth rate with the size of the firm are in accordance with the present theory rather than a simple power law.

  8. Power-law tails in the distribution of order imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Gu, Gao-Feng; Xu, Hai-Chuan; Xiong, Xiong; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the probability distribution of order imbalance calculated from the order flow data of 43 Chinese stocks traded on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. Two definitions of order imbalance are considered based on the order number and the order size. We find that the order imbalance distributions of individual stocks have power-law tails. However, the tail index fluctuates remarkably from stock to stock. We also investigate the distributions of aggregated order imbalance of all stocks at different timescales Δt. We find no clear trend in the tail index with respect Δt. All the analyses suggest that the distributions of order imbalance are asymmetric.

  9. Elastohydrodynamic analysis using a power law pressure-viscosity relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    An isothermal elastohydrodynamic (EHD) inlet analysis of the Grubin type which considers a power law pressure-viscosity relation and a finite pressure at the inlet edge of the Hertzian contact zone was performed. Comparisons made with published X-ray EHD film thickness data for a synthetic paraffinic oil and when conventional EHD theory showed that the present theory exhibits a slightly stronger film thickness load dependence than do previous isothermal EHD theories but far less than that exhibited by the measured data.

  10. Power-law time distribution of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mega, Mirko S; Allegrini, Paolo; Grigolini, Paolo; Latora, Vito; Palatella, Luigi; Rapisarda, Andrea; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2003-05-09

    We study the statistical properties of time distribution of seismicity in California by means of a new method of analysis, the diffusion entropy. We find that the distribution of time intervals between a large earthquake (the main shock of a given seismic sequence) and the next one does not obey Poisson statistics, as assumed by the current models. We prove that this distribution is an inverse power law with an exponent mu=2.06+/-0.01. We propose the long-range model, reproducing the main properties of the diffusion entropy and describing the seismic triggering mechanisms induced by large earthquakes.

  11. Analytical Limit Distributions from Random Power-Law Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Irwin; Mizuno, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Nature is full of power-law interactions, e.g., gravity, electrostatics, and hydrodynamics. When sources of such fields are randomly distributed in space, the superposed interaction, which is what we observe, is naively expected to follow a Gauss or Lévy distribution. Here, we present an analytic expression for the actual distributions that converge to novel limits that are in between these already-known limit distributions, depending on physical parameters, such as the concentration of field sources and the size of the probe used to measure the interactions. By comparing with numerical simulations, the origin of non-Gauss and non-Lévy distributions are theoretically articulated.

  12. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program, Version 6.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.; LeClair, A. C.; Moore, R.; Schallhorn, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) is a general purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and time-dependent flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations in a complex flow network. The program is capable of modeling real fluids with phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics, conjugate heat transfer between solid and fluid, fluid transients, pumps, compressors, and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The thermofluid system to be analyzed is discretized into nodes, branches, and conductors. The scalar properties such as pressure, temperature, and concentrations are calculated at nodes. Mass flow rates and heat transfer rates are computed in branches and conductors. The graphical user interface allows users to build their models using the 'point, drag, and click' method; the users can also run their models and post-process the results in the same environment. Two thermodynamic property programs (GASP/WASP and GASPAK) provide required thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for 36 fluids: helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen, parahydrogen, water, kerosene (RP-1), isobutene, butane, deuterium, ethane, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, krypton, propane, xenon, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134A, R-152A, nitrogen trifluoride, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, and air. The program also provides the options of using any incompressible fluid with constant density and viscosity or ideal gas. The users can also supply property tables for fluids that are not in the library. Twenty-four different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. These options include pipe flow, flow through a restriction, noncircular duct, pipe flow with entrance and/or exit losses, thin sharp orifice, thick orifice, square edge reduction, square edge expansion, rotating annular duct, rotating radial duct

  13. Power laws from linear neuronal cable theory: power spectral densities of the soma potential, soma membrane current and single-neuron contribution to the EEG.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Klas H; Lindén, Henrik; Tetzlaff, Tom; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2014-11-01

    Power laws, that is, power spectral densities (PSDs) exhibiting 1/f(α) behavior for large frequencies f, have been observed both in microscopic (neural membrane potentials and currents) and macroscopic (electroencephalography; EEG) recordings. While complex network behavior has been suggested to be at the root of this phenomenon, we here demonstrate a possible origin of such power laws in the biophysical properties of single neurons described by the standard cable equation. Taking advantage of the analytical tractability of the so called ball and stick neuron model, we derive general expressions for the PSD transfer functions for a set of measures of neuronal activity: the soma membrane current, the current-dipole moment (corresponding to the single-neuron EEG contribution), and the soma membrane potential. These PSD transfer functions relate the PSDs of the respective measurements to the PSDs of the noisy input currents. With homogeneously distributed input currents across the neuronal membrane we find that all PSD transfer functions express asymptotic high-frequency 1/f(α) power laws with power-law exponents analytically identified as α∞(I) = 1/2 for the soma membrane current, α∞(p) = 3/2 for the current-dipole moment, and α∞(V) = 2 for the soma membrane potential. Comparison with available data suggests that the apparent power laws observed in the high-frequency end of the PSD spectra may stem from uncorrelated current sources which are homogeneously distributed across the neural membranes and themselves exhibit pink (1/f) noise distributions. While the PSD noise spectra at low frequencies may be dominated by synaptic noise, our findings suggest that the high-frequency power laws may originate in noise from intrinsic ion channels. The significance of this finding goes beyond neuroscience as it demonstrates how 1/f(α) power laws with a wide range of values for the power-law exponent α may arise from a simple, linear partial differential equation.

  14. Power Laws from Linear Neuronal Cable Theory: Power Spectral Densities of the Soma Potential, Soma Membrane Current and Single-Neuron Contribution to the EEG

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Klas H.; Lindén, Henrik; Tetzlaff, Tom; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2014-01-01

    Power laws, that is, power spectral densities (PSDs) exhibiting behavior for large frequencies f, have been observed both in microscopic (neural membrane potentials and currents) and macroscopic (electroencephalography; EEG) recordings. While complex network behavior has been suggested to be at the root of this phenomenon, we here demonstrate a possible origin of such power laws in the biophysical properties of single neurons described by the standard cable equation. Taking advantage of the analytical tractability of the so called ball and stick neuron model, we derive general expressions for the PSD transfer functions for a set of measures of neuronal activity: the soma membrane current, the current-dipole moment (corresponding to the single-neuron EEG contribution), and the soma membrane potential. These PSD transfer functions relate the PSDs of the respective measurements to the PSDs of the noisy input currents. With homogeneously distributed input currents across the neuronal membrane we find that all PSD transfer functions express asymptotic high-frequency power laws with power-law exponents analytically identified as for the soma membrane current, for the current-dipole moment, and for the soma membrane potential. Comparison with available data suggests that the apparent power laws observed in the high-frequency end of the PSD spectra may stem from uncorrelated current sources which are homogeneously distributed across the neural membranes and themselves exhibit pink () noise distributions. While the PSD noise spectra at low frequencies may be dominated by synaptic noise, our findings suggest that the high-frequency power laws may originate in noise from intrinsic ion channels. The significance of this finding goes beyond neuroscience as it demonstrates how power laws with a wide range of values for the power-law exponent α may arise from a simple, linear partial differential equation. PMID:25393030

  15. Influence of DBT reconstruction algorithm on power law spectrum coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancamberg, Laurence; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Abderrahmane, Ilyes H.; Palma, Giovanni; Milioni de Carvalho, Pablo; Iordache, Rǎzvan; Muller, Serge

    2015-03-01

    In breast X-ray images, texture has been characterized by a noise power spectrum (NPS) that has an inverse power-law shape described by its slope β in the log-log domain. It has been suggested that the magnitude of the power-law spectrum coefficient β is related to mass lesion detection performance. We assessed β in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images to evaluate its sensitivity to different typical reconstruction algorithms including simple back projection (SBP), filtered back projection (FBP) and a simultaneous iterative reconstruction algorithm (SIRT 30 iterations). Results were further compared to the β coefficient estimated from 2D central DBT projections. The calculations were performed on 31 unilateral clinical DBT data sets and simulated DBT images from 31 anthropomorphic software breast phantoms. Our results show that β highly depends on the reconstruction algorithm; the highest β values were found for SBP, followed by reconstruction with FBP, while the lowest β values were found for SIRT. In contrast to previous studies, we found that β is not always lower in reconstructed DBT slices, compared to 2D projections and this depends on the reconstruction algorithm. All β values estimated in DBT slices reconstructed with SBP were larger than β values from 2D central projections. Our study also shows that the reconstruction algorithm affects the symmetry of the breast texture NPS; the NPS of clinical cases reconstructed with SBP exhibit the highest symmetry, while the NPS of cases reconstructed with SIRT exhibit the highest asymmetry.

  16. Power Laws in Real Estate Prices during Bubble Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takaaki; Mizuno, Takayuki; Shimizu, Chihiro; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    How can we detect real estate bubbles? In this paper, we propose making use of information on the cross-sectional dispersion of real estate prices. During bubble periods, prices tend to go up considerably for some properties, but less so for others, so that price inequality across properties increases. In other words, a key characteristic of real estate bubbles is not the rapid price hike itself but a rise in price dispersion. Given this, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether developments in the dispersion in real estate prices can be used to detect bubbles in property markets as they arise, using data from Japan and the U.S. First, we show that the land price distribution in Tokyo had a power-law tail during the bubble period in the late 1980s, while it was very close to a lognormal before and after the bubble period. Second, in the U.S. data we find that the tail of the house price distribution tends to be heavier in those states which experienced a housing bubble. We also provide evidence suggesting that the power-law tail observed during bubble periods arises due to the lack of price arbitrage across regions.

  17. Power-law distributions from additive preferential redistributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, Suhan

    2006-02-01

    We introduce a nongrowth model that generates the power-law distribution with the Zipf exponent. There are N elements, each of which is characterized by a quantity, and at each time step these quantities are redistributed through binary random interactions with a simple additive preferential rule, while the sum of quantities is conserved. The situation described by this model is similar to those of closed N -particle systems when conservative two-body collisions are only allowed. We obtain stationary distributions of these quantities both analytically and numerically while varying parameters of the model, and find that the model exhibits the scaling behavior for some parameter ranges. Unlike well-known growth models, this alternative mechanism generates the power-law distribution when the growth is not expected and the dynamics of the system is based on interactions between elements. This model can be applied to some examples such as personal wealths, city sizes, and the generation of scale-free networks when only rewiring is allowed.

  18. Beyond the power law: Uncovering stylized facts in interbank networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermarliere, Benjamin; Karas, Alexei; Ryckebusch, Jan; Schoors, Koen

    2015-06-01

    We use daily data on bilateral interbank exposures and monthly bank balance sheets to study network characteristics of the Russian interbank market over August 1998-October 2004. Specifically, we examine the distributions of (un)directed (un)weighted degree, nodal attributes (bank assets, capital and capital-to-assets ratio) and edge weights (loan size and counterparty exposure). We search for the theoretical distribution that fits the data best and report the "best" fit parameters. We observe that all studied distributions are heavy tailed. The fat tail typically contains 20% of the data and can be mostly described well by a truncated power law. Also the power law, stretched exponential and log-normal provide reasonably good fits to the tails of the data. In most cases, however, separating the bulk and tail parts of the data is hard, so we proceed to study the full range of the events. We find that the stretched exponential and the log-normal distributions fit the full range of the data best. These conclusions are robust to (1) whether we aggregate the data over a week, month, quarter or year; (2) whether we look at the "growth" versus "maturity" phases of interbank market development; and (3) with minor exceptions, whether we look at the "normal" versus "crisis" operation periods. In line with prior research, we find that the network topology changes greatly as the interbank market moves from a "normal" to a "crisis" operation period.

  19. An Evaluation of Power Law Breakdown in Metals, Alloys, Dispersion Hardened Materials and Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Sherby, O.D.

    1999-10-20

    Creep at high stresses often produces strain rates that exceed those that would be predicted by a power law relationship. In this paper, we examine available high stress creep data for pure metals, solid solution alloys, dispersion strengthened powder metallurgy materials and compounds for power law breakdown (PLB). The results show that, if PLB is observed, then the onset of PLB is generally observed at about {epsilon}/D{sub eff} = 10{sup 13} m{sup -2}, where D{sub eff} is the effective diffusion coefficient incorporating lattice and dislocation pipe diffusion. The common origins of PLB for the various systems studied can be found in the production of excess vacancies by plastic deformation. Anomalous behavior in two pure metals (nickel and tungsten) and a solid solution alloy (Fe-25Cr and Fe-26Cr-1Mo) has been analyzed and provides insight into this excess vacancy mechanism. In metal systems, the onset of PLB is related to a change in the nature of the subgrain structure developed. In the PLB region, subgrains become imperfect containing dislocation tangles adjacent to the sub-boundary, and dislocation cells are evident. The dislocation tangles and cells are the source of excess vacancies and increase the creep rate above that predicted from power law creep. If subgrains do not form then PLB is not observed. In solid solution alloys, in which the dominant deformation resistance results from the interaction of solute atoms with moving dislocations, excess vacancies influence the diffusion of these solute atoms. PLB is not observed in many systems. This is attributed either to the presence of a high equilibrium vacancy concentration (because of a low activation energy for vacancy formation) or to the inability to form subgrains.

  20. The effect of power-law body forces on a thermally driven flow between concentric rotating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally-driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, which use an electrostatic force on a dielectric fluid to simulate gravity; this force exhibits a (1/r)sup 5 distribution. Meridional velocity is found to increase when the electrostatic body force is imposed, relative to when the body force is uniform. Correlation among flow fields with uniform, inverse-square, and inverse-quintic force fields is obtained using a modified Grashof number.

  1. The effect of power law body forces on a thermally-driven flow between concentric rotating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally-driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, which use an electrostatic force on a dielectric fluid to simulate gravity; this force exhibits a (1/r)sup 5 distribution. Meridional velocity is found to increase when the electrostatic body force is imposed, relative to when the body force is uniform. Correlation among flow fields with uniform, inverse-square, and inverse-quintic force fields is obtained using a modified Grashof number.

  2. Theory and applications of drilling fluid hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    A reference on drilling fluid hydraulics, this text provides information, nomenclature and equations. Chapter 1 introduces the basic principles of fluid properties. Chapter 2 discusses the general principles, models and measurements related to fluid flow. Newtonian, Bingham, Power Law, Casson, Robertson-Stiff and Herschel-Bulkley models are all discussed. Chapters 3 through 10 analyze hydraulic problems specific to drilling fluids and the drilling process including: viscometric measurements, pressure losses, swab and surge pressures, cuttings transport, and hydraulics optimization. Each chapter concludes with a bibliography. For consistency, nomenclature remains constant and SI units are used throughout the text. All key equations using oilfield units are listed in the appendices.

  3. Power-Law Type Solutions of Fourth-Order Gravity for Multidimensional Bianchi i Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprasse, H.; Demaret, J.; Gatermann, K.; Melenk, H.

    This paper is devoted to the application of computer algebra to the study of solutions of the field equations derived from a non-linear Lagrangian, as suggested by recently proposed unified theories. More precisely, we restrict ourselves to the most general quadratic Lagrangian, i.e. containing quadratic contributions in the different curvature tensors exclusively. The corresponding field equations are then fourth-order in the metric tensor components. The cosmological models studied are the simplest ones in the class of spatially homogeneous but anisotropic models, i.e. Bianchi I models. For these models, we consider only power-law type solutions of the field equations. All the solutions of the associated system of algebraic equations are found, using computer algebra, from a search of its Groebner bases. While, in space dimension d=3, the Einsteinian-Kasner metric is still the most general power-law type solution, for d>3, no solution, other than the Minkowski space-time, is common to the three systems of equations corresponding to the three contributions to the Lagrangian density. In the case of a pure Riemann-squared contribution to the Lagrangian (suggested by a recent calculation of the effective action for the heterotic string), the possibility exists to realize a splitting of the d-dimensional space into a (d-3)-dimensional internal space and a physical 3-dimensional space, the latter expanding in time as a power bigger than 2 (about 4.5 when d=9).

  4. “Slimming” of power-law tails by increasing market returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.

    2002-06-01

    We introduce a simple generalization of rational bubble models which removes the fundamental problem discovered by Lux and Sornette (J. Money, Credit and Banking, preprint at http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/cond-mat/9910141) that the distribution of returns is a power law with exponent <1, in contradiction with empirical data. The idea is that the price fluctuations associated with bubbles must on average grow with the mean market return r. When r is larger than the discount rate rδ, the distribution of returns of the observable price, sum of the bubble component and of the fundamental price, exhibits an intermediate tail with an exponent which can be larger than 1. This regime r> rδ corresponds to a generalization of the rational bubble model in which the fundamental price is no more given by the discounted value of future dividends. We explain how this is possible. Our model predicts that, the higher is the market remuneration r above the discount rate, the larger is the power-law exponent and thus the thinner is the tail of the distribution of price returns.

  5. Mathematical modeling of genome evolution: Where do the power laws come from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koonin, Eugene

    2003-03-01

    Power law distributions appear in numerous biological, physical, social and other contexts, which appear to be fundamentally different. In biology, power laws have been claimed to describe the distributions of the connections of enzymes and metabolites in metabolic networks, the number of interaction partners of a given protein, the number of members in paralogous families, and other quantities. In network analysis, power laws imply evolution of the network with preferential attachment, i.e. a greater likelihood of nodes being added to pre-existing hubs. Exploration of different types of evolutionary models in an attempt to determine which of them lead to power law distributions has the potential of revealing non-trivial aspects of genome evolution. A simple model of evolution of the domain composition of proteomes was developed, with the following elementary processes: i) domain birth (duplication with divergence), ii) death (inactivation and/or deletion), and iii) innovation (emergence from non-coding or non-globular sequences or acquisition via horizontal gene transfer). This formalism can be described as a birth, death and innovation model (BDIM). The formulas for equilibrium frequencies of domain families of different size and the total number of families at equilibrium were derived for a general BDIM. All asymptotics of equilibrium frequencies of domain families possible for the given type of models were found and their appearance depending on model parameters was investigated. It was proved that the power law asymptotics appears if, and only if, the model is balanced, i.e., domain duplication (birth) and deletion (death) rates are asymptotically equal up to the second order. It was further proved that any power asymptotic with the degree not equal to -1 can appear only if the assumption of independence of the birth/death rates on the size of a domain family is rejected. Specific cases of BDIMs, namely simple, linear, polynomial and rational models, were

  6. Statistical Properties of Maximum Likelihood Estimators of Power Law Spectra Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2002-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index, a is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at the knee energy, E(sub k), to a steeper spectral index alpha(sub 2) greater than alpha(sub 1) above E(sub k). The Maximum likelihood (ML) procedure was developed for estimating the single parameter alpha(sub 1) of a simple power law energy spectrum and generalized to estimate the three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses and real cosmic-ray data. The statistical properties of the ML estimator were investigated and shown to have the three desirable properties: (P1) consistency (asymptotically unbiased). (P2) efficiency asymptotically attains the Cramer-Rao minimum variance bound), and (P3) asymptotically normally distributed, under a wide range of potential detector response functions. Attainment of these properties necessarily implies that the ML estimation procedure provides the best unbiased estimator possible. While simulation studies can easily determine if a given estimation procedure provides an unbiased estimate of the spectra information, and whether or not the estimator is approximately normally distributed, attainment of the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) can only he ascertained by calculating the CRB for an assumed energy spectrum-detector response function combination, which can be quite formidable in practice. However. the effort in calculating the CRB is very worthwhile because it provides the necessary means to compare the efficiency of competing estimation techniques and, furthermore, provides a stopping rule in the search for the best unbiased estimator. Consequently, the CRB for both the simple and broken power law energy spectra are derived herein and the conditions under which they are attained in practice are investigated. The ML technique is then extended to estimate spectra information from

  7. Resetting of fluctuating interfaces at power-law times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shamik; Nagar, Apoorva

    2016-11-01

    What happens when the time evolution of a fluctuating interface is interrupted by resetting to a given initial configuration after random time intervals τ distributed as a power-law ˜ {τ }-(1+α ); α \\gt 0? For an interface of length L in one dimension, and an initial flat configuration, we show that depending on α, the dynamics in the limit L\\to ∞ exhibit a spectrum of rich long-time behavior. It is known that without resetting, the interface width grows unbounded with time as {t}β in this limit, where β is the so-called growth exponent characteristic of the universality class for a given interface dynamics. We show that introducing resetting leads to fluctuations that are bounded at large times for α \\gt 1. Corresponding to such a reset-induced stationary state is a distribution of fluctuations that is strongly non-Gaussian, with tails decaying as a power-law. The distribution exhibits a distinctive cuspy behavior for a small argument, implying that the stationary state is out of equilibrium. For α \\lt 1, on the contrary, resetting to the flat configuration is unable to counter the otherwise unbounded growth of fluctuations in time, so that the distribution of fluctuations remains time dependent with an ever-increasing width, even at long times. Although stationary for α \\gt 1, the width of the interface grows forever with time as a power-law for 1\\lt α \\lt {α }({{w})}, and converges to a finite constant only for larger α, thereby exhibiting a crossover at {α }({{w})}=1 + 2β . The time-dependent distribution of fluctuations exhibits for α \\lt 1 and for small arguments further interesting crossover behavior from cusp to divergence across {α }({{d})}=1-β . We demonstrate these results by exact analytical results for the paradigmatic Edwards-Wilkinson (EW) dynamical evolution of the interface, and further corroborate our findings by extensive numerical simulations of interface models in the EW and Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class.

  8. Counterflow diffusion flames of general fluids: Oxygen/hydrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ribert, Guillaume; Zong, Nan; Yang, Vigor; Pons, Laetitia; Darabiha, Nasser; Candel, Sebastien

    2008-08-15

    A comprehensive framework has been established for studying laminar counterflow diffusion flames for general fluids over the entire regime of thermodynamic states. The model incorporates a unified treatment of fundamental thermodynamic and transport theories into an existing flow solver DMCF to treat detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms and multispecies transport. The resultant scheme can thus be applied to fluids in any state. Both subcritical and supercritical conditions are considered. As a specific example, diluted and undiluted H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flames are investigated at pressures of 1-25 MPa and oxygen inlet temperatures of 100 and 300 K. The effects of pressure p and strain rate {epsilon}{sub s} on the heat release rate q{sub s}-dot, extinction limit, and flame structure are examined. In addition, the impact of cross-diffusion terms, such as the Soret and Dufour effects, on the flame behavior is assessed. Results indicate that the flame thickness {delta}{sub f} and heat release rate correlate well with the square root of the pressure multiplied by the strain rate. The strain rate at the extinction limit exhibits a quasi-linear dependence on p. Significant real-fluid effects take place in the transcritical regimes, as evidenced by the steep property variations in the local flowfield. However, their net influence on the flame properties appears to be limited due to the ideal-gas behavior of fluids in the high-temperature zone. (author)

  9. Power-law weighted networks from local attachments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriano, P.; Finke, J.

    2012-07-01

    This letter introduces a mechanism for constructing, through a process of distributed decision-making, substrates for the study of collective dynamics on extended power-law weighted networks with both a desired scaling exponent and a fixed clustering coefficient. The analytical results show that the connectivity distribution converges to the scaling behavior often found in social and engineering systems. To illustrate the approach of the proposed framework we generate network substrates that resemble steady state properties of the empirical citation distributions of i) publications indexed by the Institute for Scientific Information from 1981 to 1997; ii) patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office from 1975 to 1999; and iii) opinions written by the Supreme Court and the cases they cite from 1754 to 2002.

  10. Exponential and power laws in public procurement markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Skuhrovec, Jiri

    2012-07-01

    We analyze for the first time a unique public procurement database, which includes information about a number of bidders for a contract, a final price, an identification of a winner and an identification of a contracting authority for each of more than 40000 public procurements in the Czech Republic between 2006 and 2011, focusing on the distributional properties of the variables of interest. We uncover several scaling laws —the exponential law for the number of bidders, and the power laws for the total revenues and total spendings of the participating companies, which even follows Zipf's law for the 100 most spending institutions. We propose an analogy between extensive and non-extensive systems in physics and the public procurement market situations. Through an entropy maximization, such analogy yields some interesting results and policy implications with respect to the Maxwell-Boltzmann and Pareto distributions in the analyzed quantities.

  11. Power-law rheology controls aftershock triggering and decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Shcherbakov, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of aftershocks is a signature of physical systems exhibiting relaxation phenomena. They are observed in various natural or experimental systems and usually obey several non-trivial empirical laws. Here we consider a cellular automaton realization of a nonlinear viscoelastic slider-block model in order to infer the physical mechanisms of triggering responsible for the occurrence of aftershocks. We show that nonlinear viscoelasticity plays a critical role in the occurrence of aftershocks. The model reproduces several empirical laws describing the statistics of aftershocks. In case of earthquakes, the proposed model suggests that the power-law rheology of the fault gauge, underlying lower crust, and upper mantle controls the decay rate of aftershocks. This is verified by analysing several prominent aftershock sequences for which the rheological properties of the underlying crust and upper mantle were established.

  12. Power-law rheology controls aftershock triggering and decay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Shcherbakov, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of aftershocks is a signature of physical systems exhibiting relaxation phenomena. They are observed in various natural or experimental systems and usually obey several non-trivial empirical laws. Here we consider a cellular automaton realization of a nonlinear viscoelastic slider-block model in order to infer the physical mechanisms of triggering responsible for the occurrence of aftershocks. We show that nonlinear viscoelasticity plays a critical role in the occurrence of aftershocks. The model reproduces several empirical laws describing the statistics of aftershocks. In case of earthquakes, the proposed model suggests that the power-law rheology of the fault gauge, underlying lower crust, and upper mantle controls the decay rate of aftershocks. This is verified by analysing several prominent aftershock sequences for which the rheological properties of the underlying crust and upper mantle were established. PMID:27819355

  13. Deviation from power law of the global seismic moment distribution

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Isabel; Corral, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of seismic moment is of capital interest to evaluate earthquake hazard, in particular regarding the most extreme events. We make use of likelihood-ratio tests to compare the simple Gutenberg-Richter power-law (PL) distribution with two statistical models that incorporate an exponential tail, the so-called tapered Gutenberg-Richter (Tap) and the truncated gamma, when fitted to the global CMT earthquake catalog. Although the Tap distribution does not introduce any significant improvement of fit respect the PL, the truncated gamma does. Simulated samples of this distribution, with parameters β = 0.68 and mc = 9.15 and reshuffled in order to mimic the time occurrence of the order statistics of the empirical data, are able to explain the temporal heterogeneity of global seismicity both before and after the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 2004. PMID:28053311

  14. Deviation from power law of the global seismic moment distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Isabel; Corral, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of seismic moment is of capital interest to evaluate earthquake hazard, in particular regarding the most extreme events. We make use of likelihood-ratio tests to compare the simple Gutenberg-Richter power-law (PL) distribution with two statistical models that incorporate an exponential tail, the so-called tapered Gutenberg-Richter (Tap) and the truncated gamma, when fitted to the global CMT earthquake catalog. Although the Tap distribution does not introduce any significant improvement of fit respect the PL, the truncated gamma does. Simulated samples of this distribution, with parameters β = 0.68 and mc = 9.15 and reshuffled in order to mimic the time occurrence of the order statistics of the empirical data, are able to explain the temporal heterogeneity of global seismicity both before and after the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 2004.

  15. Unexpected power-law stress relaxation of entangled ring polymers

    PubMed Central

    KAPNISTOS, M.; LANG, M.; PYCKHOUT-HINTZEN, W.; RICHTER, D.; CHO, D.; CHANG, T.

    2016-01-01

    After many years of intense research, most aspects of the motion of entangled polymers have been understood. Long linear and branched polymers have a characteristic entanglement plateau and their stress relaxes by chain reptation or branch retraction, respectively. In both mechanisms, the presence of chain ends is essential. But how do entangled polymers without ends relax their stress? Using properly purified high-molar-mass ring polymers, we demonstrate that these materials exhibit self-similar dynamics, yielding a power-law stress relaxation. However, trace amounts of linear chains at a concentration almost two decades below their overlap cause an enhanced mechanical response. An entanglement plateau is recovered at higher concentrations of linear chains. These results constitute an important step towards solving an outstanding problem of polymer science and are useful for manipulating properties of materials ranging from DNA to polycarbonate. They also provide possible directions for tuning the rheology of entangled polymers. PMID:18953345

  16. Deviations from uniform power law scaling in nonstationary time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, G. M.; Peng, C. K.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A classic problem in physics is the analysis of highly nonstationary time series that typically exhibit long-range correlations. Here we test the hypothesis that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems are more stable than those of pathological systems by studying beat-to-beat fluctuations in the human heart rate. We develop techniques based on the Fano factor and Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis, for quantifying deviations from uniform power-law scaling in nonstationary time series. By analyzing extremely long data sets of up to N = 10(5) beats for 11 healthy subjects, we find that the fluctuations in the heart rate scale approximately uniformly over several temporal orders of magnitude. By contrast, we find that in data sets of comparable length for 14 subjects with heart disease, the fluctuations grow erratically, indicating a loss of scaling stability.

  17. Optimized dynamical decoupling for power-law noise spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pasini, S.; Uhrig, G. S.

    2010-01-15

    We analyze the suppression of decoherence by means of dynamical decoupling in the pure-dephasing spin-boson model for baths with power law spectra. The sequence of ideal pi pulses is optimized according to the power of the bath. We expand the decoherence function and separate the canceling divergences from the relevant terms. The proposed sequence is chosen to be the one minimizing the decoherence function. By construction, it provides the best performance. We analytically derive the conditions that must be satisfied. The resulting equations are solved numerically. The solutions are very close to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence for a soft cutoff of the bath while they approach the Uhrig dynamical-decoupling sequence as the cutoff becomes harder.

  18. Power-law creep and residual stresses in carbopol microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidon, Pierre; Manneville, Sebastien

    We report on the interplay between creep and residual stresses in carbopol microgels. When a constant shear stress σ is applied below the yield stress σc, the strain is shown to increase as a power law of time, γ (t) =γ0 +(t / τ) α , with and exponent α ~= 0 . 38 that is strongly reminiscent of Andrade creep in hard solids. For applied shear stresses lower than some characteristic value of about σc / 10 , the microgels experience a more complex creep behavior that we link to the existence of residual stresses and to weak aging of the system after preshear. The influence of the preshear protocol, of boundary conditions and of microgel concentration on residual stresses is investigated. We discuss our results in light of previous works on colloidal glasses and other soft glassy systems.

  19. Power-law resistivity, magnetic relaxation and ac susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrist, J.; van der Beek, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    The nonlinear diffusion of magnetic flux into a superconducting sample can be studied by measuring the relaxation of the magnetisation after application of a step field or by measuring the ac susceptibility, {chi}{sub 1} and its third harmonic, {chi}{sub 3}, or preferably both methods covering different time scales. Each has been analysed recently for a field-cooled sample of a material whose creep activation energy depends logarithmically on current density, J corresponding to a power-law relation between electric field, E and J. Here, results are compared, using a universal scaling depth. Maximum {chi}{sub 1}{double_prime} {vert_bar}{chi}{sub 3}{vert_bar} and values occur, and also the magnetisation has relaxed to half its initial value when the scaling depth is comparable to the sample half-thickness.

  20. Deviations from uniform power law scaling in nonstationary time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, G. M.; Peng, C. K.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A classic problem in physics is the analysis of highly nonstationary time series that typically exhibit long-range correlations. Here we test the hypothesis that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems are more stable than those of pathological systems by studying beat-to-beat fluctuations in the human heart rate. We develop techniques based on the Fano factor and Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis, for quantifying deviations from uniform power-law scaling in nonstationary time series. By analyzing extremely long data sets of up to N = 10(5) beats for 11 healthy subjects, we find that the fluctuations in the heart rate scale approximately uniformly over several temporal orders of magnitude. By contrast, we find that in data sets of comparable length for 14 subjects with heart disease, the fluctuations grow erratically, indicating a loss of scaling stability.

  1. Brain Network Dynamics Adhere to a Power Law

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo G.; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Volkow, Nora D.

    2017-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of complex networks such as the Internet are characterized by a power scaling between the temporal mean and dispersion of signals at each network node. Here we tested the hypothesis that the temporal dynamics of the brain networks are characterized by a similar power law. This realization could be useful to assess the effects of randomness and external modulators on the brain network dynamics. Simulated data using a well-stablished random diffusion model allowed us to predict that the temporal dispersion of the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and that of the local functional connectivity density (lFCD) scale with their temporal means. We tested this hypothesis in open-access resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets from 66 healthy subjects. A robust power law emerged from the temporal dynamics of ALFF and lFCD metrics, which was insensitive to the methods used for the computation of the metrics. The scaling exponents (ALFF: 0.8 ± 0.1; lFCD: 1.1 ± 0.1; mean ± SD) decreased with age and varied significantly across brain regions; multimodal cortical areas exhibited lower scaling exponents, consistent with a stronger influence of external inputs, than limbic and subcortical regions, which exhibited higher scaling exponents, consistent with a stronger influence of internal randomness. Findings are consistent with the notion that external inputs govern neuronal communication in the brain and that their relative influence differs between brain regions. Further studies will assess the potential of this metric as biomarker to characterize neuropathology. PMID:28261049

  2. Validity of a power law approach to model tablet strength as a function of compaction pressure.

    PubMed

    Kloefer, Bastian; Henschel, Pascal; Kuentz, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Designing quality into dosage forms should not be only based on qualitative or purely heuristic relations. A knowledge space must be generated, in which at least some mechanistic understanding is included. This is of particular interest for critical dosage form parameters like the strength of tablets. In line with this consideration, the scope of the work is to explore the validity range of a theoretically derived power law for the tensile strength of tablets. Different grades of microcrystalline cellulose and lactose, as well as mixtures thereof, were used to compress model tablets. The power law was found to hold true in a low pressure range, which agreed with theoretical expectation. This low pressure range depended on the individual material characteristics, but as a rule of thumb, the tablets having a porosity of more than about 30% or being compressed below 100 MPa were generally well explained by the tensile strength relationship. Tablets at higher densities were less adequately described by the theory that is based on large-scale heterogeneity of the relevant contact points in the compact. Tablets close to the unity density therefore require other theoretical approaches. More research is needed to understand tablet strength in a wider range of compaction pressures.

  3. Thermodynamics of (2 +1 )-dimensional charged black holes with power-law Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional nonlinearly charged black holes have been considered with a power-law modified electromagnetic theory. The black hole solutions to Einstein's three-dimensional field equations with a negative cosmological constant have been constructed in the presence of power-law nonlinear electrodynamics. Through the physical and mathematical interpretation of the solutions, a new class of asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole solutions has been introduced. The area law, surface gravity, and Gauss's law are utilized to obtain the entropy, temperature, and electric charge of the new AdS black holes, respectively. The quasilocal mass of the solutions has been calculated based on the counterterm method. A Smarr-type formula for the mass as a function of entropy and charge has been obtained. It has been shown that the thermodynamical quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics for the new AdS black holes. Also, it has been found that in order for the Smarr mass formula to be compatible with the first law of black hole thermodynamics, the cosmological parameter Λ should be treated as a thermodynamical variable and the generalized first law of thermodynamics has been introduced. Through the canonical ensemble method, the black hole remnant or phase transitions have been investigated regarding the black hole heat capacity. It has been found that the AdS black hole solutions we just obtained are thermodynamically stable.

  4. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.

    2002-01-01

    The method of Maximum Likelihood (ML) is used to estimate the spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. This methodology, which requires the complete specificity of all cosmic-ray detector design parameters, is shown to provide approximately unbiased, minimum variance, and normally distributed spectra information for events detected by an instrument having a wide range of commonly used detector response functions. The ML procedure, coupled with the simulated performance of a proposed space-based detector and its planned life cycle, has proved to be of significant value in the design phase of a new science instrument. The procedure helped make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope. This ML methodology is then generalized to estimate broken power law spectral parameters from real cosmic-ray data sets.

  5. New York city taxi trips: Dynamic networks following inconsistent power law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianjun; Zheng, Maohui

    The present paper maps the records of urban taxi trips into dynamic networks, where nodes are the communities and links represent the recorded taxi trips between them. The dynamic urban taxi trip networks, where nodes are the communities and links represent the recorded taxi trips between them, are formulated here as a special type of large-scale traffic system with an enormous impact on the city, in which the existence of uncertainties together with the spatial and temporal variation in the distribution of the taxi trips are considered. Three types of indicators are proposed to facilitate the measurement of the activities between and inside the communities (nodes of the network) from qualitative and quantitative perspectives. It could be found from the analysis of the records within the New York city that these indicators are inconsistent to each other, and nevertheless, none of them distributes uniformly within the city but generally follows the power law in spite of their time-dependent properties. Further, the unusually low values of the scaling parameters from the curve fitting with power law for all the proposed indicators illustrate the severe inhomogeneity of the networks (also the city).

  6. A general framework for robust control in fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Thomas R.; Temam, Roger; Ziane, Mohammed

    2000-04-01

    The application of optimal control theory to complex problems in fluid mechanics has proven to be quite effective when complete state information from high-resolution numerical simulations is available [P. Moin, T.R. Bewley, Appl. Mech. Rev., Part 2 47 (6) (1994) S3-S13; T.R. Bewley, P. Moin, R. Temam, J. Fluid Mech. (1999), submitted for publication]. In this approach, an iterative optimization algorithm based on the repeated computation of an adjoint field is used to optimize the controls for finite-horizon nonlinear flow problems [F. Abergel, R. Temam, Theoret. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 1 (1990) 303-325]. In order to extend this infinite-dimensional optimization approach to control externally disturbed flows in which the controls must be determined based on limited noisy flow measurements alone, it is necessary that the controls computed be insensitive to both state disturbances and measurement noise. For this reason, robust control theory, a generalization of optimal control theory, has been examined as a technique by which effective control algorithms which are insensitive to a broad class of external disturbances may be developed for a wide variety of infinite-dimensional linear and nonlinear problems in fluid mechanics. An aim of the present paper is to put such algorithms into a rigorous mathematical framework, for it cannot be assumed at the outset that a solution to the infinite-dimensional robust control problem even exists. In this paper, conditions on the initial data, the parameters in the cost functional, and the regularity of the problem are established such that existence and uniqueness of the solution to the robust control problem can be proven. Both linear and nonlinear problems are treated, and the 2D and 3D nonlinear cases are treated separately in order to get the best possible estimates. Several generalizations are discussed and an appropriate numerical method is proposed.

  7. Generalization of Darcy's law for Bingham fluids in porous media: from flow-field statistics to the flow-rate regimes.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Thibaud; Talon, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the statistical properties of the nonflowing areas of Bingham fluid in two-dimensional porous media. First, we demonstrate that the size probability distribution of the unyielded clusters follows a power-law decay with a large size cutoff. This cutoff is shown to diverge following a power law as the imposed pressure drop tends to a critical value. In addition, we observe that the exponents are almost identical for two different types of porous media. Finally, those scaling properties allow us to account for the quadratic relationship between the pressure gradient and velocity.

  8. Modeling nonlinear ultrasound propagation in heterogeneous media with power law absorption using a k-space pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Treeby, Bradley E; Jaros, Jiri; Rendell, Alistair P; Cox, B T

    2012-06-01

    The simulation of nonlinear ultrasound propagation through tissue realistic media has a wide range of practical applications. However, this is a computationally difficult problem due to the large size of the computational domain compared to the acoustic wavelength. Here, the k-space pseudospectral method is used to reduce the number of grid points required per wavelength for accurate simulations. The model is based on coupled first-order acoustic equations valid for nonlinear wave propagation in heterogeneous media with power law absorption. These are derived from the equations of fluid mechanics and include a pressure-density relation that incorporates the effects of nonlinearity, power law absorption, and medium heterogeneities. The additional terms accounting for convective nonlinearity and power law absorption are expressed as spatial gradients making them efficient to numerically encode. The governing equations are then discretized using a k-space pseudospectral technique in which the spatial gradients are computed using the Fourier-collocation method. This increases the accuracy of the gradient calculation and thus relaxes the requirement for dense computational grids compared to conventional finite difference methods. The accuracy and utility of the developed model is demonstrated via several numerical experiments, including the 3D simulation of the beam pattern from a clinical ultrasound probe.

  9. The first experimental confirmation of the fractional kinetics containing the complex-power-law exponents: Dielectric measurements of polymerization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatullin, R. R.; Arbuzov, A. A.; Salehli, F.; Giz, A.; Bayrak, I.; Catalgil-Giz, H.

    2007-01-01

    For the first time we achieved incontestable evidence that the real process of dielectric relaxation during the polymerization reaction of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is described in terms of the fractional kinetic equations containing complex-power-law exponents. The possibility of the existence of the fractional kinetics containing non-integer complex-power-law exponents follows from the general theory of dielectric relaxation that has been suggested recently by one of the authors (R.R.N). Based on the physical/geometrical meaning of the fractional integral with complex exponents there is a possibility to develop a general theory of dielectric relaxation based on the self-similar (fractal) character of the reduced (averaged) microprocesses that take place in the mesoscale region. This theory contains some essential predictions related to existence of the non-integer power-law kinetics and the results of this paper can be considered as the first confirmation of existence of the kinetic phenomena that are described by fractional derivatives with complex-power-law exponents. We want to stress here that with the help of a new complex fitting function for the complex permittivity it becomes possible to describe the whole process for real and imaginary parts simultaneously throughout the admissible frequency range (30 Hz-13 MHz). The fitting parameters obtained for the complex permittivity function for three temperatures (70, 90 and 110 °C) confirm in general the picture of reaction that was known qualitatively before. They also reveal some new features, which improve the interpretation of the whole polymerization process. We hope that these first results obtained in the paper will serve as a good stimulus for other researches to find the traces of the existence of new fractional kinetics in other relaxation processes unrelated to the dielectric relaxation. These results should lead to the reconsideration and generalization of irreversibility and kinetic phenomena that

  10. Correction of the power law of ac conductivity in ion-conducting materials due to the electrode polarization effect.

    PubMed

    Khamzin, A A; Popov, I I; Nigmatullin, R R

    2014-03-01

    Based on the supposition related to fractal nature of transport processes in ion-conducting materials, an expression for the low-frequency ac conductivity dependence was derived. This expression for the ac conductivity generalizes the power-law dependence and gives a possibility to take into account the influence of the electrode polarization effect. The ac conductivity expression obtained is in excellent agreement with experimental data for a wide frequency range.

  11. A Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program to Model Flow Distribution in Fluid Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Bailey, John W.; Schallhorn, Paul; Steadman, Todd

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a general purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex network. The program is capable of modeling phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The program's preprocessor allows the user to interactively develop a fluid network simulation consisting of nodes and branches. Mass, energy and specie conservation equations are solved at the nodes; the momentum conservation equations are solved in the branches. The program contains subroutines for computing "real fluid" thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for 33 fluids. The fluids are: helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen, parahydrogen, water, kerosene (RP-1), isobutane, butane, deuterium, ethane, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, krypton, propane, xenon, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134A, R-152A, nitrogen trifluoride and ammonia. The program also provides the options of using any incompressible fluid with constant density and viscosity or ideal gas. Seventeen different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. These options include: pipe flow, flow through a restriction, non-circular duct, pipe flow with entrance and/or exit losses, thin sharp orifice, thick orifice, square edge reduction, square edge expansion, rotating annular duct, rotating radial duct, labyrinth seal, parallel plates, common fittings and valves, pump characteristics, pump power, valve with a given loss coefficient, and a Joule-Thompson device. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a hybrid numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. This paper also illustrates the application and verification of the code by comparison with Hardy Cross method for steady state flow and analytical solution for unsteady flow.

  12. The time-domain behavior of power-law noises. [of many geophysical phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan C.

    1992-01-01

    The power spectra of many geophysical phenomena are well approximated by a power-law dependence on frequency or wavenumber. A simple expression for the root-mean-square variability of a process with such a spectrum over an interval of time or space is derived. The resulting expression yields the powerlaw time dependence characteristic of fractal processes, but can be generalized to give the temporal variability for more general spectral behaviors. The method is applied to spectra of crustal strain (to show what size of strain events can be detected over periods of months to seconds) and of sea level (to show the difficulty of extracting long-term rates from short records).

  13. The time-domain behavior of power-law noises. [of many geophysical phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan C.

    1992-01-01

    The power spectra of many geophysical phenomena are well approximated by a power-law dependence on frequency or wavenumber. A simple expression for the root-mean-square variability of a process with such a spectrum over an interval of time or space is derived. The resulting expression yields the powerlaw time dependence characteristic of fractal processes, but can be generalized to give the temporal variability for more general spectral behaviors. The method is applied to spectra of crustal strain (to show what size of strain events can be detected over periods of months to seconds) and of sea level (to show the difficulty of extracting long-term rates from short records).

  14. Generalized approach to global renormalization-group theory for fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, A. Sai Venkata; Menon, S. V. G.

    2012-04-01

    The global renormalization-group theory (GRGT) for fluids is derived starting with the square-gradient approximation for the Helmholtz free energy functional such that any mean-field free energy density and direct correlation function can be employed. The new derivation uses Wilson's functions for representing density fluctuations, thereby relaxing the assumption of cosine variation of density fluctuations used in earlier approaches. The generality of the present approach is shown by deriving the relationships to the earlier developments. A qualitative way to infer the free parameters in the present form of GRGT is also suggested. The new theory is applied to square-well fluids of ranges 1.5 and 3.0 (in units of hard-sphere diameter) and Lennard-Jones fluids. It is shown that the present theory produces a flat isotherm in the two-phase region. Thus the theory accounts for fluctuations at all length scales and avoids the use of Maxwell's construction. An analysis of the liquid-vapor phase diagrams and the critical constants obtained for different potentials shows that, with a mean-field free energy density that is accurate away from the critical region and an appropriate coarse graining length for the mean-field theory, GRGT can provide results in good agreement with the simulation and experimental results.

  15. Expanding perfect fluid generalizations of the C metric

    SciTech Connect

    Wylleman, Lode; Beke, David

    2010-05-15

    Petrov type D gravitational fields, generated by a perfect fluid with spatially homogeneous energy density and with flow lines which form a nonshearing and nonrotating timelike congruence, are reexamined. It turns out that the anisotropic such spacetimes, which comprise the vacuum C metric as a limit case, can have nonzero expansion, contrary to the conclusion in the original investigation by Barnes [A. Barnes, Gen. Relativ. Gravit. 4, 105 (1973).]. Apart from the static members, this class consists of cosmological models with precisely one symmetry. The general line element is constructed and some important properties are discussed. It is also shown that purely electric Petrov type D vacuum spacetimes admit shear-free normal timelike congruences everywhere, even in the nonstatic regions. This result incited to deduce intrinsic, easily testable criteria regarding shear-free normality and staticity of Petrov type D spacetimes in general, which are added in an appendix.

  16. Lifetime assessment by intermittent inspection under the mixture Weibull power law model with application to XLPE cables.

    PubMed

    Hirose, H

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes a new treatment for electrical insulation degradation. Some types of insulation which have been used under various circumstances are considered to degrade at various rates in accordance with their stress circumstances. The cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulated cables inspected by major Japanese electric companies clearly indicate such phenomena. By assuming that the inspected specimen is sampled from one of the clustered groups, a mixed degradation model can be constructed. Since the degradation of the insulation under common circumstances is considered to follow a Weibull distribution, a mixture model and a Weibull power law can be combined. This is called The mixture Weibull power law model. By using the maximum likelihood estimation for the newly proposed model to Japanese 22 and 33 kV insulation class cables, they are clustered into a certain number of groups by using the AIC and the generalized likelihood ratio test method. The reliability of the cables at specified years are assessed.

  17. Rethinking hospital general ward ventilation design using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yam, R; Yuen, P L; Yung, R; Choy, T

    2011-01-01

    Indoor ventilation with good air quality control minimises the spread of airborne respiratory and other infections in hospitals. This article considers the role of ventilation in preventing and controlling infection in hospital general wards and identifies a simple and cost-effective ventilation design capable of reducing the chances of cross-infection. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is used to simulate and compare the removal of microbes using a number of different ventilation systems. Instead of the conventional corridor air return arrangement used in most general wards, air return is rearranged so that ventilation is controlled from inside the ward cubicle. In addition to boosting the air ventilation rate, the CFD results reveal that ventilation performance and the removal of microbes can be significantly improved. These improvements are capable of matching the standards maintained in a properly constructed isolation room, though at much lower cost. It is recommended that the newly identified ventilation parameters be widely adopted in the design of new hospital general wards to minimise cross-infection. The proposed ventilation system can also be retrofitted in existing hospital general wards with far less disruption and cost than a full-scale refurbishment. Copyright © 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Universal fractional noncubic power law for density of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiaoshi; Kono, Yoshio; Lin, Yu; Zeng, Zhidan; Wang, Junyue; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V; Park, Changyong; Meng, Yue; Yang, Wenge; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Mao, Wendy L

    2014-05-09

    As a fundamental property of a material, density is controlled by the interatomic distances and the packing of microscopic constituents. The most prominent atomistic feature in a metallic glass (MG) that can be measured is its principal diffraction peak position (q1) observable by x-ray, electron, or neutron diffraction, which is closely associated with the average interatomic distance in the first shell. Density (and volume) would naturally be expected to vary under compression in proportion to the cube of the one-dimensional interatomic distance. However, by using high pressure as a clean tuning parameter and high-resolution in situ techniques developed specifically for probing the density of amorphous materials, we surprisingly found that the density of a MG varies with the 5/2 power of q1, instead of the expected cubic relationship. Further studies of MGs of different compositions repeatedly produced the same fractional power law of 5/2 in all three MGs we investigated, suggesting a universal feature in MG.

  19. Evaluation of detection model performance in power-law noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    2001-06-01

    Two alternative forced-choice (2AFC) nodule detection performances of a number of model observers were evaluated for detection of simulated nodules in filtered power-law (1/f3) noise. The models included the ideal observer, the channelized Fisher-Hotelling (FH) model with two different basis function sets, the non-prewhitening matched filter with an eye filter (NPWE), and the Rose model with no DC response (RoseNDC). Detectability of the designer nodule signal was investigated. It has equation s((rho) )equalsA*Rect((rho) /2)(1-(rho) 2)v, where (rho) is a normalized distance (r/R), R is the nodule radius and A is signal amplitude. The nodule profile can be changed (designed) by changing the value of v. For example, the result is a sharp-edged, flat-topped disc for v equal to zero and the projection of a sphere for v equal to 0.5. Human observer experiments were done with nodules based on v equal to 0, 0.5 and 1.5. For the v equal to 1.5 case, human results could be well fitted using a variety of models. The human CD diagram slopes were -0.12, +0.27 and +0.44 for v equal to 0, 0.5 and 1.5 respectively.

  20. There is More than a Power Law in Zipf

    PubMed Central

    Cristelli, Matthieu; Batty, Michael; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The largest cities, the most frequently used words, the income of the richest countries, and the most wealthy billionaires, can be all described in terms of Zipf’s Law, a rank-size rule capturing the relation between the frequency of a set of objects or events and their size. It is assumed to be one of many manifestations of an underlying power law like Pareto’s or Benford’s, but contrary to popular belief, from a distribution of, say, city sizes and a simple random sampling, one does not obtain Zipf’s law for the largest cities. This pathology is reflected in the fact that Zipf’s Law has a functional form depending on the number of events N. This requires a fundamental property of the sample distribution which we call ‘coherence’ and it corresponds to a ‘screening’ between various elements of the set. We show how it should be accounted for when fitting Zipf’s Law. PMID:23139862

  1. Mutually cooperative epidemics on power-law networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Peng-Bi; Colaiori, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The spread of an infectious disease can, in some cases, promote the propagation of other pathogens favoring violent outbreaks, which cause a discontinuous transition to an endemic state. The topology of the contact network plays a crucial role in these cooperative dynamics. We consider a susceptible-infected-removed-type model with two mutually cooperative pathogens: An individual already infected with one disease has an increased probability of getting infected by the other. We present a heterogeneous mean-field theoretical approach to the coinfection dynamics on generic uncorrelated power-law degree-distributed networks and validate its results by means of numerical simulations. We show that, when the second moment of the degree distribution is finite, the epidemic transition is continuous for low cooperativity, while it is discontinuous when cooperativity is sufficiently high. For scale-free networks, i.e., topologies with diverging second moment, the transition is instead always continuous. In this way we clarify the effect of heterogeneity and system size on the nature of the transition, and we validate the physical interpretation about the origin of the discontinuity.

  2. Power-law cross-correlations estimation under heavy tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2016-11-01

    We examine the performance of six estimators of the power-law cross-correlations-the detrended cross-correlation analysis, the detrending moving-average cross-correlation analysis, the height cross-correlation analysis, the averaged periodogram estimator, the cross-periodogram estimator and the local cross-Whittle estimator-under heavy-tailed distributions. The selection of estimators allows to separate these into the time and frequency domain estimators. By varying the characteristic exponent of the α-stable distributions which controls the tails behavior, we report several interesting findings. First, the frequency domain estimators are practically unaffected by heavy tails bias-wise. Second, the time domain estimators are upward biased for heavy tails but they have lower estimator variance than the other group for short series. Third, specific estimators are more appropriate depending on distributional properties and length of the analyzed series. In addition, we provide a discussion of implications of these results for empirical applications as well as theoretical explanations.

  3. Power law distributions and dynamic behaviour of stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, P.

    2001-04-01

    A simple agent model is introduced by analogy with the mean field approach to the Ising model for a magnetic system. Our model is characterised by a generalised Langevin equation = F ϕ + G ϕ t where t is the usual Gaussian white noise, i.e.: t t' = 2Dδ t-t' and t = 0. Both the associated Fokker Planck equation and the long time probability distribution function can be obtained analytically. A steady state solution may be expressed as P ϕ = exp{ - Ψ ϕ - ln G(ϕ)} where Ψ ϕ = - F/ G dϕ and Z is a normalization factor. This is explored for the simple case where F ϕ = Jϕ + bϕ2 - cϕ3 and fluctuations characterised by the amplitude G ϕ = ϕ + ɛ when it readily yields for ϕ>>ɛ, a distribution function with power law tails, viz: P ϕ = exp{ 2bϕ-cϕ2 /D}. The parameter c ensures convergence of the distribution function for large values of ϕ. It might be loosely associated with the activity of so-called value traders. The parameter J may be associated with the activity of noise traders. Output for the associated time series show all the characteristics of familiar financial time series providing J < 0 and D | J|.

  4. The speed–curvature power law in Drosophila larval locomotion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery that the locomotor trajectories of Drosophila larvae follow the power-law relationship between speed and curvature previously found in the movements of human and non-human primates. Using high-resolution behavioural tracking in controlled but naturalistic sensory environments, we tested the law in maggots tracing different trajectory types, from reaching-like movements to scribbles. For most but not all flies, we found that the law holds robustly, with an exponent close to three-quarters rather than to the usual two-thirds found in almost all human situations, suggesting dynamic effects adding on purely kinematic constraints. There are different hypotheses for the origin of the law in primates, one invoking cortical computations, another viscoelastic muscle properties coupled with central pattern generators. Our findings are consistent with the latter view and demonstrate that the law is possible in animals with nervous systems orders of magnitude simpler than in primates. Scaling laws might exist because natural selection favours processes that remain behaviourally efficient across a wide range of neural and body architectures in distantly related species. PMID:28120807

  5. Statistical tests for power-law cross-correlated processes.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Boris; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-12-01

    For stationary time series, the cross-covariance and the cross-correlation as functions of time lag n serve to quantify the similarity of two time series. The latter measure is also used to assess whether the cross-correlations are statistically significant. For nonstationary time series, the analogous measures are detrended cross-correlations analysis (DCCA) and the recently proposed detrended cross-correlation coefficient, ρ(DCCA)(T,n), where T is the total length of the time series and n the window size. For ρ(DCCA)(T,n), we numerically calculated the Cauchy inequality -1 ≤ ρ(DCCA)(T,n) ≤ 1. Here we derive -1 ≤ ρ DCCA)(T,n) ≤ 1 for a standard variance-covariance approach and for a detrending approach. For overlapping windows, we find the range of ρ(DCCA) within which the cross-correlations become statistically significant. For overlapping windows we numerically determine-and for nonoverlapping windows we derive--that the standard deviation of ρ(DCCA)(T,n) tends with increasing T to 1/T. Using ρ(DCCA)(T,n) we show that the Chinese financial market's tendency to follow the U.S. market is extremely weak. We also propose an additional statistical test that can be used to quantify the existence of cross-correlations between two power-law correlated time series.

  6. Reciprocity and the Emergence of Power Laws in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Michael

    Research in network science has shown that many naturally occurring and technologically constructed networks are scale free, that means a power law degree distribution emerges from a growth model in which each new node attaches to the existing network with a probability proportional to its number of links (= degree). Little is known about whether the same principles of local attachment and global properties apply to societies as well. Empirical evidence from six ethnographic case studies shows that complex social networks have significantly lower scaling exponents γ ~ 1 than have been assumed in the past. Apparently humans do not only look for the most prominent players to play with. Moreover cooperation in humans is characterized through reciprocity, the tendency to give to those from whom one has received in the past. Both variables — reciprocity and the scaling exponent — are negatively correlated (r = -0.767, sig = 0.075). If we include this effect in simulations of growing networks, degree distributions emerge that are much closer to those empirically observed. While the proportion of nodes with small degrees decreases drastically as we introduce reciprocity, the scaling exponent is more robust and changes only when a relatively large proportion of attachment decisions follow this rule. If social networks are less scale free than previously assumed this has far reaching implications for policy makers, public health programs and marketing alike.

  7. Statistical tests for power-law cross-correlated processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobnik, Boris; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-12-01

    For stationary time series, the cross-covariance and the cross-correlation as functions of time lag n serve to quantify the similarity of two time series. The latter measure is also used to assess whether the cross-correlations are statistically significant. For nonstationary time series, the analogous measures are detrended cross-correlations analysis (DCCA) and the recently proposed detrended cross-correlation coefficient, ρDCCA(T,n), where T is the total length of the time series and n the window size. For ρDCCA(T,n), we numerically calculated the Cauchy inequality -1≤ρDCCA(T,n)≤1. Here we derive -1≤ρDCCA(T,n)≤1 for a standard variance-covariance approach and for a detrending approach. For overlapping windows, we find the range of ρDCCA within which the cross-correlations become statistically significant. For overlapping windows we numerically determine—and for nonoverlapping windows we derive—that the standard deviation of ρDCCA(T,n) tends with increasing T to 1/T. Using ρDCCA(T,n) we show that the Chinese financial market's tendency to follow the U.S. market is extremely weak. We also propose an additional statistical test that can be used to quantify the existence of cross-correlations between two power-law correlated time series.

  8. The speed-curvature power law in Drosophila larval locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zago, Myrka; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Gomez-Marin, Alex

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery that the locomotor trajectories of Drosophila larvae follow the power-law relationship between speed and curvature previously found in the movements of human and non-human primates. Using high-resolution behavioural tracking in controlled but naturalistic sensory environments, we tested the law in maggots tracing different trajectory types, from reaching-like movements to scribbles. For most but not all flies, we found that the law holds robustly, with an exponent close to three-quarters rather than to the usual two-thirds found in almost all human situations, suggesting dynamic effects adding on purely kinematic constraints. There are different hypotheses for the origin of the law in primates, one invoking cortical computations, another viscoelastic muscle properties coupled with central pattern generators. Our findings are consistent with the latter view and demonstrate that the law is possible in animals with nervous systems orders of magnitude simpler than in primates. Scaling laws might exist because natural selection favours processes that remain behaviourally efficient across a wide range of neural and body architectures in distantly related species. © 2016 The Authors.

  9. Nonlinear quenches of power-law confining traps in quantum critical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Collura, Mario; Karevski, Dragi

    2011-02-15

    We describe the coherent quantum evolution of a quantum many-body system with a time-dependent power-law confining potential. The amplitude of the inhomogeneous potential is driven in time along a nonlinear ramp which crosses a critical point. Using Kibble-Zurek-like scaling arguments we derive general scaling laws for the density of excitations and energy excess generated during the nonlinear sweep of the confining potential. It is shown that, with respect to the sweeping rate, the densities follow algebraic laws with exponents that depend on the space-time properties of the potential and on the scaling dimensions of the densities. We support our scaling predictions with both analytical and numerical results on the Ising quantum chain with an inhomogeneous transverse field varying in time.

  10. Collision-dependent power law scalings in two dimensional gyrokinetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Cerri, S. S. Bañón Navarro, A.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.

    2014-08-15

    Nonlinear gyrokinetics provides a suitable framework to describe short-wavelength turbulence in magnetized laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In the electrostatic limit, this system is known to exhibit a free energy cascade towards small scales in (perpendicular) real and/or velocity space. The dissipation of free energy is always due to collisions (no matter how weak the collisionality), but may be spread out across a wide range of scales. Here, we focus on freely decaying two dimensional electrostatic turbulence on sub-ion-gyroradius scales. An existing scaling theory for the turbulent cascade in the weakly collisional limit is generalized to the moderately collisional regime. In this context, non-universal power law scalings due to multiscale dissipation are predicted, and this prediction is confirmed by means of direct numerical simulations.

  11. Analytical probability density function for the statistics of the ENSO phenomenon: Asymmetry and power law tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, M.

    2016-01-01

    This letter has two main goals. The first one is to give a physically reasonable explanation for the use of stochastic models for mimicking the apparent random features of the El Ninõ-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. The second one is to obtain, from the theory, an analytical expression for the equilibrium density function of the anomaly sea surface temperature, an expression that fits the data from observations well, reproducing the asymmetry and the power law tail of the histograms of the NIÑO3 index. We succeed in these tasks exploiting some recent theoretical results of the author in the field of the dynamical origin of the stochastic processes. More precisely, we apply this approach to the celebrated recharge oscillator model (ROM), weakly interacting by a multiplicative term, with a general deterministic complex forcing (Madden-Julian Oscillations, westerly wind burst, etc.), and we obtain a Fokker-Planck equation that describes the statistical behavior of the ROM.

  12. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating the three spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses and their statistical properties investigated. The estimation procedure is then generalized for application to real cosmic-ray data. To illustrate the procedure and its utility, analytical methods were developed in conjunction with a Monte Carlo simulation to explore the combination of the expected cosmic-ray environment with a generic space-based detector and its planned life cycle, allowing us to explore various detector features and their subsequent influence on estimating the spectral parameters. This study permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  13. Theoretical studies of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu.

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. This work is divided into three parts: development of numerical and analytical solutions; theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media; and applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement involving non-Newtonian fluids in porous media has been developed. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in porous media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms involved in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in porous media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. Transient flow of a general pseudoplastic fluid has been studied numerically. 125 refs., 91 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Power-law Distributions of Offspring and Generation Numbers in Branching Models of Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, A.; Helmstetter, A.; Sornette, D.

    2005-06-01

    We consider a general stochastic branching process,which is relevant to earthquakes as well as to many other systems, and we study the distributions of the total number of offsprings (direct and indirect aftershocks in seismicity) and of the total number of generations before extinction. We apply our results to a branching model of triggered seismicity, the ETAS (epidemic-type aftershock sequence) model. The ETAS model assumes that each earthquake can trigger other earthquakes (“aftershocks”). An aftershock sequence results in this model from the cascade of aftershocks of each past earthquake. Due to the large fluctuations of the number of aftershocks triggered directly by any earthquake (“fertility”), there is a large variability of the total number of aftershocks from one sequence to another, for the same mainshock magnitude. We study the regime in which the distribution of fertilities μ is characterized by a power law ~1/μ1+γ. For earthquakes we expect such a power-distribution of fertilities with γ=b/α based on the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution ~ 10-bm and on the increase ~ 10-αm of the number of aftershocks with the mainshock magnitude m. We derive the asymptotic distributions pr(r) and pg(g) of the total number r of offsprings and of the total number g of generations until extinction following a mainshock. In the regime γ < 2 for which the distribution of fertilities has an infinite variance, we find This should be compared with the distributions obtained for standard branching processes with finite variance. These predictions are checked by numerical simulations. Our results apply directly to the ETAS model whose preferred values α=0.8 1 and b=1 puts it in the regime where the distribution of fertilities has an infinite variance. More generally, our results apply to any stochastic branching process with a power-law distribution of offsprings per mother

  15. Numerical tools for obtaining power-law representations of heavy-tailed datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2016-01-01

    Many empirical datasets have highly skewed, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed distributions, dominated by a relatively small number of data points at the high end of the distribution. Consistent with their role as stable distributions, power laws have frequently been proposed to model such datasets. However there are physical situations that require distributions with finite means. Such situations may call for power laws with high-end cutoffs. Here, I present a maximum-likelihood technique for determining an optimal cut-off power law to represent a given dataset. I also develop a new statistical test of the quality of fit. Results are demonstrated for a number of benchmark datasets. Non-power-law datasets can frequently be represented by power laws, but this is a trivial result unless the dataset spans a broad domain. Nevertheless, I demonstrate that there are non-power-law distributions, including broad log-normal distributions, whose tails can be fit to power laws over many orders of magnitude. Therefore, caution is called for whenever power laws are invoked to represent empirical data. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2015-60452-3

  16. Power-law tail probabilities of drainage areas in river basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veitzer, S.A.; Troutman, B.M.; Gupta, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    The significance of power-law tail probabilities of drainage areas in river basins was discussed. The convergence to a power law was not observed for all underlying distributions, but for a large class of statistical distributions with specific limiting properties. The article also discussed about the scaling properties of topologic and geometric network properties in river basins.

  17. Power-Law Distributions Based on Exponential Distributions: Latent Scaling, Spurious Zipf's Law, and Fractal Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-03-01

    The difference between the inverse power function and the negative exponential function is significant. The former suggests a complex distribution, while the latter indicates a simple distribution. However, the association of the power-law distribution with the exponential distribution has been seldom researched. This paper is devoted to exploring the relationships between exponential laws and power laws from the angle of view of urban geography. Using mathematical derivation and numerical experiments, I reveal that a power-law distribution can be created through a semi-moving average process of an exponential distribution. For the distributions defined in a one-dimension space (e.g. Zipf's law), the power exponent is 1; while for those defined in a two-dimension space (e.g. Clark's law), the power exponent is 2. The findings of this study are as follows. First, the exponential distributions suggest a hidden scaling, but the scaling exponents suggest a Euclidean dimension. Second, special power-law distributions can be derived from exponential distributions, but they differ from the typical power-law distributions. Third, it is the real power-law distributions that can be related with fractal dimension. This study discloses an inherent link between simplicity and complexity. In practice, maybe the result presented in this paper can be employed to distinguish the real power laws from spurious power laws (e.g. the fake Zipf distribution).

  18. Viscous generalized Chaplygin gas as a unified dark fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Lixin

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we revisit viscous generalized Chaplygin gas (VGCG) as a unified dark fluid, which modifies the pressure only by redefining the effective pressure p eff, according to p_{eff}=p-√{3}ζ0ρ, where ζ 0 is the newly added model parameter which characterizes the viscous property and can be determined by the cosmic observations. By using the currently available cosmic observational data from WMAP, BAO, and SN Ia, the model parameter space is obtained via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method: ζ0=0.000708_{- 0.00155- 0.00311- 0.00503}^{+ 0.00151+ 0.00275+ 0.00425} in 1, 2, 3 σ regions. The results show that the viscous effect is very small due the value ζ 0≈0 and the VGCG model can match observational data points as well as ΛCDM model.

  19. Generalized Newtonian fluid flow through fibrous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzwiczak, Magdalena; Kołodziej, Jan Adam; Grabski, Jakub Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    The numerical calculations of the velocity field and the component of transverse permeability in the filtration equation for steady, incompressible flow of the generalized Newtonian fluid through the assemblages of cylindrical fibers are presented in this paper. The fibers are arranged regularly in arrays. Flow is transverse with respect to the fibers. The non-linear governing equation in the repeated element of the array is solved using iteration method. At each iteration step the method of fundamental solutions and the method of particular solutions are used. The bundle of fibers is treated as a porous media and on the base of velocity field the permeability coefficients are calculated as a function of porosity.

  20. Peptide kinetics from picoseconds to microseconds using boxed molecular dynamics: power law rate coefficients in cyclisation reactions.

    PubMed

    Shalashilin, Dmitrii V; Beddard, Godfrey S; Paci, Emanuele; Glowacki, David R

    2012-10-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) methods are increasingly widespread, but simulation of rare events in complex molecular systems remains a challenge. We recently introduced the boxed molecular dynamics (BXD) method, which accelerates rare events, and simultaneously provides both kinetic and thermodynamic information. We illustrate how the BXD method may be used to obtain high-resolution kinetic data from explicit MD simulations, spanning picoseconds to microseconds. The method is applied to investigate the loop formation dynamics and kinetics of cyclisation for a range of polypeptides, and recovers a power law dependence of the instantaneous rate coefficient over six orders of magnitude in time, in good agreement with experimental observations. Analysis of our BXD results shows that this power law behaviour arises when there is a broad and nearly uniform spectrum of reaction rate coefficients. For the systems investigated in this work, where the free energy surfaces have relatively small barriers, the kinetics is very sensitive to the initial conditions: strongly non-equilibrium conditions give rise to power law kinetics, while equilibrium initial conditions result in a rate coefficient with only a weak dependence on time. These results suggest that BXD may offer us a powerful and general algorithm for describing kinetics and thermodynamics in chemical and biochemical systems.

  1. Energy Fluctuation of Ideal Fermi Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential U=\\sum_{i=1}^{d} c_i\\vert x_{i}/a_{i}\\vert^{n_{i} } in d Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Muktadir Rahman, Md.; Debnath, Dwaipayan; Sakhawat Hossain Himel, Md.

    2016-04-01

    Energy fluctuation of ideal Fermi gas trapped under generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1d ci \\vertxi/ai \\vert n_i has been calculated in arbitrary dimensions. Energy fluctuation is scrutinized further in the degenerate limit μ ≫ KBT with the help of Sommerfeld expansion. The dependence of energy fluctuation on dimensionality and power law potential is studied in detail. Most importantly our general result can not only exactly reproduce the recently published result regarding free and harmonically trapped ideal Fermi gas in d = 3 but also can describe the outcome for any power law potential in arbitrary dimension.

  2. Linear combination of power-law functions for detecting multiscaling using detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, J. C.; Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2016-10-01

    In many instances, the fluctuation function obtained from detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) cannot be described by a uniform power-law function along scales. In fact, the manifestation of crossover scales may reflect the simultaneous action of different stochastic mechanisms displayed predominantly within certain scale ranges. This note proposes the use of a linear combination of power-law functions for adjusting DFA data. The idea is that each power-law function recast the dominance of certain stochastic mechanisms (e.g., the mean-reversion and long-term trends) at specific scale domains. Different values of the scaling exponents are numerically estimated by means of a nonlinear least-squares fitting of power-law functions. Examples of crude oil market and heart rate variability are discussed with some detail for illustrating the advantages of taking a linear combination of power-law functions for describing scaling behavior from DFA.

  3. Do wealth distributions follow power laws? Evidence from ‘rich lists’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Michal

    2014-07-01

    We use data on the wealth of the richest persons taken from the 'rich lists' provided by business magazines like Forbes to verify if the upper tails of wealth distributions follow, as often claimed, a power-law behaviour. The data sets used cover the world's richest persons over 1996-2012, the richest Americans over 1988-2012, the richest Chinese over 2006-2012, and the richest Russians over 2004-2011. Using a recently introduced comprehensive empirical methodology for detecting power laws, which allows for testing the goodness of fit as well as for comparing the power-law model with rival distributions, we find that a power-law model is consistent with data only in 35% of the analysed data sets. Moreover, even if wealth data are consistent with the power-law model, they are usually also consistent with some rivals like the log-normal or stretched exponential distributions.

  4. Power law distribution in high frequency financial data? An econometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova, Lora; Vogt, Bodo

    2011-11-01

    Power law distributions are very common in natural sciences. We analyze high frequency financial data from XETRA and the NYSE using maximum likelihood estimation and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic to test whether the power law hypothesis holds also for these data. We find that the universality and scale invariance properties of the power law are violated. Furthermore, the returns of Daimler Chrysler and SAP traded simultaneously on both exchanges follow a power law at one exchange, but not at the other. These results raise some questions about the no-arbitrage condition. Finally, we find that an exponential function provides a better fit for the tails of the sample distributions than a power law function.

  5. POWER-LAW TEMPLATE FOR INFRARED POINT-SOURCE CLUSTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Addison, Graeme E.; Dunkley, Joanna; Hajian, Amir; Das, Sudeep; Hincks, Adam D.; Page, Lyman A.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Viero, Marco; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Reese, Erik D.; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Hlozek, Renee; Marriage, Tobias A.; Spergel, David N.; Moodley, Kavilan; Wollack, Edward

    2012-06-20

    We perform a combined fit to angular power spectra of unresolved infrared (IR) point sources from the Planck satellite (at 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz, over angular scales 100 {approx}< l {approx}< 2200), the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST; 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m; 1000 {approx}< l {approx}< 9000), and from correlating BLAST and Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT; 148 and 218 GHz) maps. We find that the clustered power over the range of angular scales and frequencies considered is well fitted by a simple power law of the form C{sup clust}{sub l}{proportional_to}l{sup -n} with n = 1.25 {+-} 0.06. While the IR sources are understood to lie at a range of redshifts, with a variety of dust properties, we find that the frequency dependence of the clustering power can be described by the square of a modified blackbody, {nu}{sup {beta}} B({nu}, T{sub eff}), with a single emissivity index {beta} = 2.20 {+-} 0.07 and effective temperature T{sub eff} = 9.7 K. Our predictions for the clustering amplitude are consistent with existing ACT and South Pole Telescope results at around 150 and 220 GHz, as is our prediction for the effective dust spectral index, which we find to be {alpha}{sub 150-220} = 3.68 {+-} 0.07 between 150 and 220 GHz. Our constraints on the clustering shape and frequency dependence can be used to model the IR clustering as a contaminant in cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements. The combined Planck and BLAST data also rule out a linear bias clustering model.

  6. Power-Law Template for Infrared Point-Source Clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addison, Graeme E; Dunkley, Joanna; Hajian, Amir; Viero, Marco; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renee; Marriage, Tobias A.; Moodley, Kavilan; Page, Lyman A.; Reese, Erik D.; Scott, Douglas; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    We perform a combined fit to angular power spectra of unresolved infrared (IR) point sources from the Planck satellite (at 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz, over angular scales 100 approx < l approx < 2200), the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST; 250, 350, and 500 micron; 1000 approx < l approx < 9000), and from correlating BLAST and Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT; 148 and 218 GHz) maps. We find that the clustered power over the range of angular scales and frequencies considered is well fitted by a simple power law of the form C(sup clust)(sub l) varies as l (sub -n) with n = 1.25 +/- 0.06. While the IR sources are understood to lie at a range of redshifts, with a variety of dust properties, we find that the frequency dependence of the clustering power can be described by the square of a modified blackbody, ?(sup Beta)B(?, T(sub eff) ), with a single emissivity index Beta = 2.20 +/- 0.07 and effective temperature T(sub eff) = 9.7 K. Our predictions for the clustering amplitude are consistent with existing ACT and South Pole Telescope results at around 150 and 220 GHz, as is our prediction for the effective dust spectral index, which we find to be alpha(sub 150-220) = 3.68 +/- 0.07 between 150 and 220 GHz. Our constraints on the clustering shape and frequency dependence can be used to model the IR clustering as a contaminant in cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements. The combined Planck and BLAST data also rule out a linear bias clustering model.

  7. Power-Law Template for IR Point Source Clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addison, Graeme E.; Dunkley, Joanna; Hajian, Amir; Viero, Marco; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam; Hlozek, Renee; Marriage, Tobias A.; Moodley, Kavilan; Page, Lyman A.; Reese, Erik D.; Scott, Douglass; Spergel, David N.; Staggs,Suzanne T.; Wollack, Edward

    2011-01-01

    We perform a combined fit to angular power spectra of unresolved infrared (IR) point sources from the Planck satellite (at 217,353,545 and 857 GHz, over angular scales 100 < I < 2200), the Balloonborne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST; 250, 350 and 500 microns; 1000 < I < 9000), and from correlating BLAST and Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT; 148 and 218 GHz) maps. We find that the clustered power over the range of angular scales and frequencies considered is well fit by a simple power law of the form C_l\\propto I(sup -n) with n = 1.25 +/- 0.06. While the IR sources are understood to lie at a range of redshifts, with a variety of dust properties, we find that the frequency dependence of the clustering power can be described by the square of a modified blackbody, nu(sup beta) B(nu,T_eff), with a single emissivity index beta = 2.20 +/- 0.07 and effective temperature T_eff= 9.7 K. Our predictions for the clustering amplitude are consistent with existing ACT and South Pole Telescope results at around 150 and 220 GHz, as is our prediction for the effective dust spectral index, which we find to be alpha_150-220 = 3.68 +/- 0.07 between 150 and 220 GHz. Our constraints on the clustering shape and frequency dependence can be used to model the IR clustering as a contaminant in Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy measurements. The combined Planck and BLAST data also rule out a linear bias clustering model.

  8. Exponential and power-law mass distributions in brittle fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Linna, R. P.; Timonen, J.; Møller, Peder Friis; Oddershede, Lene

    2004-08-01

    Generic arguments, a minimal numerical model, and fragmentation experiments with gypsum disk are used to investigate the fragment-size distribution that results from dynamic brittle fragmentation. Fragmentation is initiated by random nucleation of cracks due to material inhomogeneities, and its dynamics are pictured as a process of propagating cracks that are unstable against side-branch formation. The initial cracks and side branches both merge mutually to form fragments. The side branches have a finite penetration depth as a result of inherent damping. Generic arguments imply that close to the minimum strain (or impact energy) required for fragmentation, the number of fragments of size s scales as s-(2D-1)/Df1(-(2/λ)Ds)+f2(-s0-1(λ+s1/D)D) , where D is the Euclidean dimension of the space, λ is the penetration depth, and f1 and f2 can be approximated by exponential functions. Simulation results and experiments can both be described by this theoretical fragment-size distribution. The typical largest fragment size s0 was found to diverge at the minimum strain required for fragmentation as it is inversely related to the density of initially formed cracks. Our results also indicate that scaling of s0 close to this divergence depends on, e.g., loading conditions, and thus is not universal. At the same time, the density of fragment surface vanishes as L-1 , L being the linear dimension of the brittle solid. The results obtained provide an explanation as to why the fragment-size distributions found in nature can have two components, an exponential as well as a power-law component, with varying relative weights.

  9. Power law olivine crystal size distributions in lithospheric mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Tarquini, S.

    2002-12-01

    Olivine crystal size distributions (CSDs) have been measured in three suites of spinel- and garnet-bearing harzburgites and lherzolites found as xenoliths in alkaline basalts from Canary Islands, Africa; Victoria Land, Antarctica; and Pali Aike, South America. The xenoliths derive from lithospheric mantle, from depths ranging from 80 to 20 km. Their textures vary from coarse to porphyroclastic and mosaic-porphyroclastic up to cataclastic. Data have been collected by processing digital images acquired optically from standard petrographic thin sections. The acquisition method is based on a high-resolution colour scanner that allows image capturing of a whole thin section. Image processing was performed using the VISILOG 5.2 package, resolving crystals larger than about 150 μm and applying stereological corrections based on the Schwartz-Saltykov algorithm. Taking account of truncation effects due to resolution limits and thin section size, all samples show scale invariance of crystal size distributions over almost three orders of magnitude (0.2-25 mm). Power law relations show fractal dimensions varying between 2.4 and 3.8, a range of values observed for distributions of fragment sizes in a variety of other geological contexts. A fragmentation model can reproduce the fractal dimensions around 2.6, which correspond to well-equilibrated granoblastic textures. Fractal dimensions >3 are typical of porphyroclastic and cataclastic samples. Slight bends in some linear arrays suggest selective tectonic crushing of crystals with size larger than 1 mm. The scale invariance shown by lithospheric mantle xenoliths in a variety of tectonic settings forms distant geographic regions, which indicate that this is a common characteristic of the upper mantle and should be taken into account in rheological models and evaluation of metasomatic models.

  10. A deformable plate interacting with a non-Newtonian fluid in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Luoding; Yu, Xijun; Liu, Nansheng; Cheng, Yongguang; Lu, Xiyun

    2017-08-01

    We consider a deformable plate interacting with a non-Newtonian fluid flow in three dimensions as a simple model problem for fluid-structure-interaction phenomena in life sciences (e.g., red blood cell interacting with blood flow). A power-law function is used for the constitutive equation of the non-Newtonian fluid. The lattice Boltzmann equation (the D3Q19 model) is used for modeling the fluid flow. The immersed boundary (IB) method is used for modeling the flexible plate and handling the fluid-plate interaction. The plate drag and its scaling are studied; the influences of three dimensionless parameters (power-law exponent, bending modulus, and generalized Reynolds number) are investigated.

  11. Nonvisual motor learning improves visual motion perception: evidence from violating the two-thirds power law.

    PubMed

    Beets, I A M; Rösler, F; Fiehler, K

    2010-09-01

    Few studies have reported direct effects of motor learning on visual perception, especially when using novel movements for the motor system. Atypical motor behaviors that violate movement constraints provide an excellent opportunity to study action-to-perception transfer. In our study, we passively trained blindfolded participants on movements violating the 2/3 power law. Before and after motor training, participants performed a visual discrimination task in which they decided whether two consecutive movements were same or different. For motor training, we randomly assigned the participants to two motor training groups or a control group. The motor training group experienced either a weak or a strong elliptic velocity profile on a circular trajectory that matched one of the visual test stimuli. The control group was presented with linear trajectories unrelated to the viewed movements. After each training session, participants actively reproduced the movement to assess motor learning. The group trained on the strong elliptic velocity profile reproduced movements with increasing elliptic velocity profiles while circular geometry remained constant. Furthermore, both training groups improved in visual discrimination ability for the learned movement as well as for highly similar movements. Participants in the control group, however, did not show any improvements in the visual discrimination task nor did participants who did not acquire the trained movement. The present results provide evidence for a transfer from action to perception which generalizes to highly related movements and depends on the success of motor learning. Moreover, under specific conditions, it seems to be possible to acquire movements deviating from the 2/3 power law.

  12. Speed-curvature relations in speech production challenge the 1/3 power law.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Pascal; Fuchs, Susanne

    2008-09-01

    Relations between tangential velocity and trajectory curvature are analyzed for tongue movements during speech production in the framework of the 1/3 power law, discovered by Viviani and colleagues for arm movements. In 2004, Tasko and Westbury found for American English that the power function provides a good account of speech kinematics, but with an exponent that varies across articulators. The present work aims at broadening Tasko and Westbury's study 1) by analyzing speed-curvature relations for various languages (French, German, Mandarin) and for a biomechanical tongue model simulating speech gestures at various speaking rates and 2) by providing for each speaker or each simulated speaking rate a comparison of results found for the complete set of movements with those found for each movement separately. It is found that the 1/3 power law offers a fair description of the global speed-curvature relations for all speakers and all languages, when articulatory speech data are considered in their whole. This is also observed in the simulations, where the motor control model does not specify any kinematic property of the articulatory paths. However, the refined analysis for individual movements reveals numerous exceptions to this law: the velocity always decreases when curvature increases, but the slope in the log-log representation is variable. It is concluded that the speed-curvature relation is not controlled in speech movements and that it accounts only for general properties of the articulatory movements, which could arise from vocal tract dynamics or/and from stochastic characteristics of the measured signals.

  13. Power-law relationships for estimating mass, fuel consumption and costs of energy conversion equipments.

    PubMed

    Caduff, Marloes; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Althaus, Hans-Joerg; Hendriks, A Jan

    2011-01-15

    To perform life-cycle assessment studies, data on the production and use of the products is required. However, often only few data or measurements are available. Estimation of properties can be performed by applying scaling relationships. In many disciplines, they are used to either predict data or to search for underlying patterns, but they have not been considered in the context of product assessments hitherto. The goal of this study was to explore size scaling for commonly used energy conversion equipment, that is, boilers, engines, and generators. The variables mass M, fuel consumption Q, and costs C were related to power P. The established power-law relationships were M = 10(0.73.. 1.89)P(0.64.. 1.23) (R(2) ≥ 0.94), Q = 10(0.06.. 0.68)P(0.82.. 1.02) (R(2) ≥ 0.98) and C = 10(2.46.. 2.86)P(0.83.. 0.85) (R(2) ≥ 0.83). Mass versus power and costs versus power showed that none of the equipment types scaled isometrically, that is, with a slope of 1. Fuel consumption versus power scaled approximately isometrically for steam boilers, the other equipments scaled significantly lower than 1. This nonlinear scaling behavior induces a significant size effect. The power laws we established can be applied to scale the mass, fuel consumption and costs of energy conversion equipments up or down. Our findings suggest that empirical scaling laws can be used to estimate properties, particularly relevant in studies focusing on early product development for which generally only little information is available.

  14. AEGIS: A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF SPITZER POWER-LAW GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. Q.; Barmby, P.; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Georgakakis, A.; Ivison, R. J.; Konidaris, N. P.; Rosario, D. J.; Nandra, K.

    2010-07-10

    This paper analyzes a sample of 489 Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) sources in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS), whose spectral energy distributions fit a red power law (PL) from 3.6 to 8.0 {mu}m. The median redshift for sources with known redshifts is (z) = 1.6. Though all or nearly all of the sample galaxies are likely to be active galactic nuclei (AGNs), only 33% were detected in the EGS X-ray survey (AEGIS-X) using 200 ks Chandra observations. The detected sources are X-ray luminous with L {sub X}>10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} and moderately to heavily obscured with N {sub H}>10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. Stacking the X-ray-undetected sample members yields a statistically significant X-ray signal, suggesting that they are on average more distant or more obscured than sources with X-ray detections. The ratio of X-ray to mid-infrared fluxes suggests that a substantial fraction of the sources undetected in X-rays are obscured at the Compton-thick level, in contrast to the X-ray-detected sources, all of which appear to be Compton thin. For the X-ray-detected PL sources with redshifts, an X-ray luminosity L {sub X} {approx} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} marks a transition between low-luminosity, blue sources dominated by the host galaxy to high-luminosity, red PL sources dominated by nuclear activity. X-ray-to-optical ratios, infrared variability, and 24 {mu}m properties of the sample are consistent with the identification of infrared PL sources as active nuclei, but a rough estimate is that only 22% of AGNs are selected by the PL criteria. Comparison of the PL selection technique and various IRAC color criteria for identifying AGNs confirms that high-redshift samples selected via simple IRAC colors may be heavily contaminated by starlight-dominated objects.

  15. Scale Invariance in Landscape Evolution Models Using Stream Power Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang, J. S.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape evolution models (LEM) commonly utilize stream power laws to simulate river incision with formulations such as E = KAmSn, where E is a vertical incision rate [L/T], K is an erodibility constant [L1-2m/T], A is an upstream drainage area [L2], S is a local channel gradient [-], and m and n are positive exponents that describe the basin hydrology. In our reduced complexity model, the landscape approached equilibrium by balancing an incision rate with a constant, uniform, vertical rock uplift rate at every location in the landscape. From our simulations, for a combination of m and n, the landscape exhibited scale invariance. That is, regardless of the size and scale of the basin, the relief and vertical structure of the landscape remained constant. Therefore, the relief and elevation profile of the landscape at equilibrium were only dependent on the coefficients for erodibility and uplift and an equation that described how upstream area, A, increased as the length of a stream increased. In our analytical 1D models, we utilized two equations that described upslope area, (a) A = Bl, where B is the profile width [L], and l is the stream length from the ridge [L] and (b) A = Clh, Hack's Law, where C is a constant [L2-h] and h is a positive exponent. With these equations, (a) m = n and (b) hm = n resulted in scale invariance. In our numerical 2D models, the relationship between A and l was inherent in the actual structure of the drainage network. From our numerical 2D results, scale invariance occurred when 2m = n. Additionally, using reasonable values from the literature for exponents, n, m and h, resulted in singularities at the ridges in the landscape, which caused truncation error. In consequence, the elevation of the ridge increased as the number of grid cells in the domain increased in the numerical model, and the model was unable to converge. These singularities at the ridges appeared when (a) m ≥ n and (b) hm ≥ n in the analytical model and 2m ≥ n in

  16. Simple inflationary quintessential model. II. Power law potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-09-01

    The present work is a sequel of our previous work [Phys. Rev. D 93, 084018 (2016)] which depicted a simple version of an inflationary quintessential model whose inflationary stage was described by a Higgs-type potential and the quintessential phase was responsible due to an exponential potential. Additionally, the model predicted a nonsingular universe in past which was geodesically past incomplete. Further, it was also found that the model is in agreement with the Planck 2013 data when running is allowed. But, this model provides a theoretical value of the running which is far smaller than the central value of the best fit in ns , r , αs≡d ns/d l n k parameter space where ns, r , αs respectively denote the spectral index, tensor-to-scalar ratio and the running of the spectral index associated with any inflationary model, and consequently to analyze the viability of the model one has to focus in the two-dimensional marginalized confidence level in the allowed domain of the plane (ns,r ) without taking into account the running. Unfortunately, such analysis shows that this model does not pass this test. However, in this sequel we propose a family of models runs by a single parameter α ∈[0 ,1 ] which proposes another "inflationary quintessential model" where the inflation and the quintessence regimes are respectively described by a power law potential and a cosmological constant. The model is also nonsingular although geodesically past incomplete as in the cited model. Moreover, the present one is found to be more simple compared to the previous model and it is in excellent agreement with the observational data. In fact, we note that, unlike the previous model, a large number of the models of this family with α ∈[0 ,1/2 ) match with both Planck 2013 and Planck 2015 data without allowing the running. Thus, the properties in the current family of models compared to its past companion justify its need for a better cosmological model with the successive

  17. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-15

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information.

  18. On the origin of power-law X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosman, I.; Shaham, J.; Shaviv, G.

    1984-01-01

    In the present analytical model for a power law X-ray continuum production in active galactic nuclei, the dissipation of turbulent energy flux above the accretion disk forms an optically thin transition layer with an inverted temperature gradient. The emitted thermal radiation has a power law spectrum in the 0.1-100 keV range, with a photon energy spectral index gamma of about 0.4-1.0. Thermal X-ray contribution from the layer is 5-10 percent of the total disk luminosity. The gamma value of 0.75 is suggested as a 'natural' power law index for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs.

  19. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-01

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information.

  20. The double power law in human collaboration behavior: The case of Wikipedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Okyu; Son, Woo-Sik; Jung, Woo-Sung

    2016-11-01

    We study human behavior in terms of the inter-event time distribution of revision behavior on Wikipedia, an online collaborative encyclopedia. We observe a double power law distribution for the inter-editing behavior at the population level and a single power law distribution at the individual level. Although interactions between users are indirect or moderate on Wikipedia, we determine that the synchronized editing behavior among users plays a key role in determining the slope of the tail of the double power law distribution.

  1. Blinking in quantum dots: The origin of the grey state and power law statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C.

    2011-09-01

    Quantum dot (QD) blinking is characterized by switching between an “on” state and an “off” state, and a power-law distribution of on and off times with exponents from 1.0 to 2.0. The origin of blinking behavior in QDs, however, has remained a mystery. Here we describe an energy-band model for QDs that captures the full range of blinking behavior reported in the literature and provides new insight into features such as the gray state, the power-law distribution of on and off times, and the power-law exponents.

  2. Power-law relaxation in a complex system: Omori law after a financial market crash.

    PubMed

    Lillo, F; Mantegna, R N

    2003-07-01

    We study the relaxation dynamics of a financial market just after the occurrence of a crash by investigating the number of times the absolute value of an index return is exceeding a given threshold value. We show that the empirical observation of a power law evolution of the number of events exceeding the selected threshold (a behavior known as the Omori law in geophysics) is consistent with the simultaneous occurrence of (i) a return probability density function characterized by a power law asymptotic behavior and (ii) a power-law relaxation decay of its typical scale. Our empirical observation cannot be explained within the framework of simple and widespread stochastic volatility models.

  3. Gaussian-type light bullets in power-law nonlinear media with PT-symmetric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Xiang; Dai, Chao-Qing

    2015-03-01

    The (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with power-law nonlinearities in two kinds of PT-symmetric potentials is investigated, and two kinds of Gaussian-type light bullet (LB) solutions are analytically derived. Based on these analytical solutions, the powers, power-flow densities and the phase switches are discussed. The linear stability analysis and the direct numerical simulation show that LB solutions are stable only when the imaginary parts of PT-symmetric potentials are below some thresholds in the focusing power-law nonlinear media, while they are always unstable in the defocusing power-law nonlinear media.

  4. On the origin of power-law X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosman, I.; Shaham, J.; Shaviv, G.

    1984-01-01

    In the present analytical model for a power law X-ray continuum production in active galactic nuclei, the dissipation of turbulent energy flux above the accretion disk forms an optically thin transition layer with an inverted temperature gradient. The emitted thermal radiation has a power law spectrum in the 0.1-100 keV range, with a photon energy spectral index gamma of about 0.4-1.0. Thermal X-ray contribution from the layer is 5-10 percent of the total disk luminosity. The gamma value of 0.75 is suggested as a 'natural' power law index for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs.

  5. Two universal physical principles shape the power-law statistics of real-world networks.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Tom; Gomez, Florian; Stoop, Ruedi

    2015-07-23

    The study of complex networks has pursued an understanding of macroscopic behaviour by focusing on power-laws in microscopic observables. Here, we uncover two universal fundamental physical principles that are at the basis of complex network generation. These principles together predict the generic emergence of deviations from ideal power laws, which were previously discussed away by reference to the thermodynamic limit. Our approach proposes a paradigm shift in the physics of complex networks, toward the use of power-law deviations to infer meso-scale structure from macroscopic observations.

  6. The logarithmic and power law behaviors of the accelerating, turbulent thermal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Luciano; Hussain, Fazle

    2017-02-01

    Direct numerical simulation of spatially evolving thermal turbulent boundary layers with strong favorable pressure gradient (FPG) shows that the thermal fluctuation intensity, θ' + and the Reynolds shear stress, u'v'¯+ exhibit a logarithmic behavior spanning the meso-layer (e.g., 50 ≤y+≤170 ). However, the mean thermal profile is not logarithmic even in the zero pressure gradient (ZPG) region; instead, it follows a power law. The maxima of u' 2 ¯+ and v'θ'¯+ change little with the strength of acceleration, while v'+, w'+, and u'v'¯+ continue to decay in the flow direction. Furthermore, θ'+ and u'θ'¯+ surprisingly experience changes from constants in ZPG to sharp rises in the FPG region. Such behavior appears to be due to squashing of the streaks which decreases the streak flank angle below the critical value for "transient growth" generation of streamwise vortices, shutting down production [W. Schoppa and F. Hussain, "Coherent structure generation near-wall turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 453, 57-108 (2002)]. The streamwise vortices near the wall, although shrink because of stretching, simultaneously, also become weaker as the structures are progressively pushed farther down to the more viscous region near the wall. While the vortical structures decay rapidly in accelerating flows, the thermal field does not—nullifying the myth that both the thermal and velocity fields are similar.

  7. Comparing smooth arm movements with the two-thirds power law and the related segmented-control hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Magnus J E; Flash, Tamar

    2002-09-15

    The movements of the human arm have been extensively studied for a variety of goal-directed experimental tasks. Analyses of the trajectory and velocity of the arm have led to many hypotheses for the planning strategies that the CNS might use. One family of control hypotheses, including minimum jerk, snap and their generalizations to higher orders, comprises those that favor smooth movements through the optimization of an integral cost function. The predictions of each order of this family are examined for two standard experimental tasks: point-to-point movements and the periodic tracing of figural forms, and compared both with experiment and the two-thirds power law. The aim of the analyses is to generalize previous numerical observations as well as to examine movement segmentation. It is first shown that contrary to recent statements in the literature, the only members of this family of control theories that match reaching movement experiments well are minimum jerk and snap. Then, for the case of periodic drawing, both the ellipse and cloverleaf are examined and the experimentally observed power law is derived from a first-principles approach. The results for the ellipse are particularly general, representing a unification of the two-thirds power law and smoothness hypotheses for ellipses of all reasonable eccentricities. For complex shapes it is shown that velocity profiles derived from the cost-function approach exhibit the same experimental features that were interpreted as segmented control by the CNS. Because the cost function contains no explicit segmented control, this result casts doubt on such an interpretation of the experimental data.

  8. A note on the Fermi energy of an ideal Fermi gas trapped under a generic power law potential in d-dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir

    2015-09-01

    The average energy per fermion in the case of a Fermi gas with any kinematic characteristic, trapped under the most general power law potential in d-dimension has been calculated at zero temperature. In a previous paper (Acharyya M 2010 Eur. J Phys. 31 L89) it was shown, in the case of a free ideal Fermi gas, as the dimension increases the average energy approaches the Fermi energy and in infinite dimension the average energy becomes equal to the Fermi energy at T = 0. In this letter it is shown that, for a trapped system at finite dimension the average energy depends on a power law exponent, but as the dimension tends to infinity the average energy coincides with the Fermi energy for any power law exponent. The result obtained in this manuscript is more general, as we can describe the free system as well as any trapped system with an appropriate choice of power law exponent, and is true for any kinematic parameter.

  9. Charged Noncommutative Wormhole Solutions via Power-Law f(T) Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Shamaila; Jawad, Abdul; Bilal Amin, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we explore static spherically symmetric charged wormhole solutions in extended teleparallel gravity taking power-law f(T) models. We consider noncommutative geometry under Lorentzian distribution. In order to obtain matter components, we develop field equations using effective energy-momentum tensor for non-diagonal tetrad. We explore solutions by considering various viable power-law f(T) models, which also include teleparallel gravity case. The violation of energy conditions obtain by exotic matter to form wormhole solutions in teleparallel case while, physical acceptable wormhole solutions exist for charged noncommutative wormhole solutions for some cases of power-law models. The effective energy-momentum tensor and charge are responsible for the violation of the energy conditions. Also, we check the equilibrium condition for these solutions. The equilibrium condition meets for the teleparallel case and some power-law solutions while remaining solutions are either in less equilibrium or in disequilibrium situation.

  10. Exploring the effect of power law social popularity on language evolution.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the effect of a power-law-distributed social popularity on the origin and change of language, based on three artificial life models meticulously tracing the evolution of linguistic conventions including lexical items, categories, and simple syntax. A cross-model analysis reveals an optimal social popularity, in which the λ value of the power law distribution is around 1.0. Under this scaling, linguistic conventions can efficiently emerge and widely diffuse among individuals, thus maintaining a useful level of mutual understandability even in a big population. From an evolutionary perspective, we regard this social optimality as a tradeoff among social scaling, mutual understandability, and population growth. Empirical evidence confirms that such optimal power laws exist in many large-scale social systems that are constructed primarily via language-related interactions. This study contributes to the empirical explorations and theoretical discussions of the evolutionary relations between ubiquitous power laws in social systems and relevant individual behaviors.

  11. Research on power-law acoustic transient signal detection based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian-hui; Yang, Ri-jie; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of acoustic transient signal emitted from antisubmarine weapon which is being dropped into water (torpedo, aerial sonobuoy and rocket assisted depth charge etc.), such as short duration, low SNR, abruptness and instability, based on traditional power-law detector, a new method to detect acoustic transient signal is proposed. Firstly wavelet transform is used to de-noise signal, removes random spectrum components and improves SNR. Then Power- Law detector is adopted to detect transient signal. The simulation results show the method can effectively extract envelop characteristic of transient signal on the condition of low SNR. The performance of WT-Power-Law markedly outgoes that of traditional Power-Law detection method.

  12. Convex and concave successions of power-law decays in small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The small-angle scattering (SAS) structure factor from a new model of a 3D deterministic fractal in which the relative positions and the number of structural units vary with fractal iteration number is calculated. It is shown that, depending on the relative positions of scattering units inside the fractal, we can obtain various types of power-law successions, such as: convex/concave - when the absolute value of the scattering exponent of the first power-law decay is higher/smaller than that of the subsequent power- law decay, or any combination of them (i.e. convex-concave or concave-convex). The obtained results can explain experimental SAS (neutron or X-rays) data which are characterized by a succession of power-law decays of arbitrary length.

  13. Explanation of power law behavior of autoregressive conditional duration processes based on the random multiplicative process.

    PubMed

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2004-04-01

    Autoregressive conditional duration (ACD) processes, which have the potential to be applied to power law distributions of complex systems found in natural science, life science, and social science, are analyzed both numerically and theoretically. An ACD(1) process exhibits the singular second order moment, which suggests that its probability density function (PDF) has a power law tail. It is verified that the PDF of the ACD(1) has a power law tail with an arbitrary exponent depending on a model parameter. On the basis of theory of the random multiplicative process a relation between the model parameter and the power law exponent is theoretically derived. It is confirmed that the relation is valid from numerical simulations. An application of the ACD(1) to intervals between two successive transactions in a foreign currency market is shown.

  14. Explanation of power law behavior of autoregressive conditional duration processes based on the random multiplicative process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2004-04-01

    Autoregressive conditional duration (ACD) processes, which have the potential to be applied to power law distributions of complex systems found in natural science, life science, and social science, are analyzed both numerically and theoretically. An ACD(1) process exhibits the singular second order moment, which suggests that its probability density function (PDF) has a power law tail. It is verified that the PDF of the ACD(1) has a power law tail with an arbitrary exponent depending on a model parameter. On the basis of theory of the random multiplicative process a relation between the model parameter and the power law exponent is theoretically derived. It is confirmed that the relation is valid from numerical simulations. An application of the ACD(1) to intervals between two successive transactions in a foreign currency market is shown.

  15. The power law for the perception of rotation by airline pilots.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Stewart, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the power laws for the perception of rotation about the three major body axes. Eighteen airline pilots made magnitude estimates of 5-sec pulses of nine angular accelerations having a range of acceleration x time of 10-150 deg/sec. The results showed that (1) the power law with an exponent of 1.4 describes the subjective motion of these pilots for all three major body axes, (2) the power law also describes the perception of motion for individual pilots with a substantial range of exponents, (3) there were significant correlations among the exponents for the three body axes, and (4) the data suggest that the power law over the wide range used may be more complex than implied by a formula with a single exponent.

  16. Stochastic model of Zipf's law and the universality of the power-law exponent.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2014-04-01

    We propose a stochastic model of Zipf's law, namely a power-law relation between rank and size, and clarify as to why a specific value of its power-law exponent is quite universal. We focus on the successive total of a multiplicative stochastic process. By employing properties of a well-known stochastic process, we concisely show that the successive total follows a stationary power-law distribution, which is directly related to Zipf's law. The formula of the power-law exponent is also derived. Finally, we conclude that the universality of the rank-size exponent is brought about by symmetry between an increase and a decrease in the random growth rate.

  17. Apparent Power-Law Behavior of Conductance in Disordered Quasi-One-Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Aleksandr; Fogler, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Observation of power-law dependence of conductance on temperature and voltage has been reported for a wide variety of low-dimensional systems(nano-wires, nano-tubes, and conducting polymers). This behavior has been attributed to the Luttinger liquid effects expected in a pure one-dimensional wire. However, the systems studied were neither one-dimensional nor defect-free. Using numerical simulations we show that the power-law behavior can arise from variable-range hopping in an ensemble of non-interacting disordered wires connected in parallel. This power-law behavior holds in restricted ranges of voltage and temperature, typical of experimental situations. Physically, it comes from rare, but highly conducting hopping paths that appear by chance in some members of the ensemble. The power-law exponents and their dependence on system parameters are consistent with the great majority of available empirical data. Supported by Grant NSF DMR-0706654.

  18. Tunable power law in the desynchronization events of coupled chaotic electronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Gilson F. de Lorenzo, Orlando di; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Oriá, Marcos; Souza Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de

    2014-03-15

    We study the statistics of the amplitude of the synchronization error in chaotic electronic circuits coupled through linear feedback. Depending on the coupling strength, our system exhibits three qualitatively different regimes of synchronization: weak coupling yields independent oscillations; moderate to strong coupling produces a regime of intermittent synchronization known as attractor bubbling; and stronger coupling produces complete synchronization. In the regime of moderate coupling, the probability distribution for the sizes of desynchronization events follows a power law, with an exponent that can be adjusted by changing the coupling strength. Such power-law distributions are interesting, as they appear in many complex systems. However, most of the systems with such a behavior have a fixed value for the exponent of the power law, while here we present an example of a system where the exponent of the power law is easily tuned in real time.

  19. An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law Wave Height Decay.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    34I ANALYtTICAL MODEL OF NAVE-INDUCED LON6SHORE CURRENT BASED ON PONE* LAW.. (U) COASTAL ENG INEERING RESEAKNH CENTER VICKSBURG NS J N SMITH ET AL...j . - .L .V . : ; * AN ANALYTICAL MODEL OF WAVE-INDUCED ~ z * LONGSHORE CURRENT BASED ON POWER LAW * - WAVE HEIGHT DECAY by Jane McKee...I_ I IF 31592 11. TITLE (Include Security Classfication) • An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law . Wave

  20. Power-Law Dynamics of Membrane Conductances Increase Spiking Diversity in a Hodgkin-Huxley Model

    PubMed Central

    Teka, Wondimu; Stockton, David; Santamaria, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effects of non-Markovian power-law voltage dependent conductances on the generation of action potentials and spiking patterns in a Hodgkin-Huxley model. To implement slow-adapting power-law dynamics of the gating variables of the potassium, n, and sodium, m and h, conductances we used fractional derivatives of order η≤1. The fractional derivatives were used to solve the kinetic equations of each gate. We systematically classified the properties of each gate as a function of η. We then tested if the full model could generate action potentials with the different power-law behaving gates. Finally, we studied the patterns of action potential that emerged in each case. Our results show the model produces a wide range of action potential shapes and spiking patterns in response to constant current stimulation as a function of η. In comparison with the classical model, the action potential shapes for power-law behaving potassium conductance (n gate) showed a longer peak and shallow hyperpolarization; for power-law activation of the sodium conductance (m gate), the action potentials had a sharp rise time; and for power-law inactivation of the sodium conductance (h gate) the spikes had wider peak that for low values of η replicated pituitary- and cardiac-type action potentials. With all physiological parameters fixed a wide range of spiking patterns emerged as a function of the value of the constant input current and η, such as square wave bursting, mixed mode oscillations, and pseudo-plateau potentials. Our analyses show that the intrinsic memory trace of the fractional derivative provides a negative feedback mechanism between the voltage trace and the activity of the power-law behaving gate variable. As a consequence, power-law behaving conductances result in an increase in the number of spiking patterns a neuron can generate and, we propose, expand the computational capacity of the neuron. PMID:26937967

  1. Power-Law Dynamics of Membrane Conductances Increase Spiking Diversity in a Hodgkin-Huxley Model.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu; Stockton, David; Santamaria, Fidel

    2016-03-01

    We studied the effects of non-Markovian power-law voltage dependent conductances on the generation of action potentials and spiking patterns in a Hodgkin-Huxley model. To implement slow-adapting power-law dynamics of the gating variables of the potassium, n, and sodium, m and h, conductances we used fractional derivatives of order η≤1. The fractional derivatives were used to solve the kinetic equations of each gate. We systematically classified the properties of each gate as a function of η. We then tested if the full model could generate action potentials with the different power-law behaving gates. Finally, we studied the patterns of action potential that emerged in each case. Our results show the model produces a wide range of action potential shapes and spiking patterns in response to constant current stimulation as a function of η. In comparison with the classical model, the action potential shapes for power-law behaving potassium conductance (n gate) showed a longer peak and shallow hyperpolarization; for power-law activation of the sodium conductance (m gate), the action potentials had a sharp rise time; and for power-law inactivation of the sodium conductance (h gate) the spikes had wider peak that for low values of η replicated pituitary- and cardiac-type action potentials. With all physiological parameters fixed a wide range of spiking patterns emerged as a function of the value of the constant input current and η, such as square wave bursting, mixed mode oscillations, and pseudo-plateau potentials. Our analyses show that the intrinsic memory trace of the fractional derivative provides a negative feedback mechanism between the voltage trace and the activity of the power-law behaving gate variable. As a consequence, power-law behaving conductances result in an increase in the number of spiking patterns a neuron can generate and, we propose, expand the computational capacity of the neuron.

  2. Conductivity scaling in supercritical percolation of nanoparticles--not a power law.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Östling, Mikael

    2015-02-28

    The power-law behavior widely observed in supercritical percolation systems of conductive nanoparticles may merely be a phenomenological approximation to the true scaling law not yet discovered. In this work, we derive a comprehensive yet simple scaling law and verify its extensive applicability to various experimental and numerical systems. In contrast to the power law which lacks theoretical backing, the new scaling law is explanatory and predictive, and thereby helpful to gain more new insights into percolation systems of conductive nanoparticles.

  3. Analytical study of solitons in the fiber waveguide with power law nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Ekici, Mehmet; Zhou, Qin; Sonmezoglu, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the existence of exact soliton solutions in fiber waveguide with power law nonlinearity. The propagation equation that is the resonant dispersive nonlinear Schrödinger's equation with power law nonlinearity is studied by three analytical methods. The integration tools are the extended trial equation method, exp(-Φ(ξ)) -expansion method and extended G‧ / G - expansion method. The presented results show that analytical optical solitons can exist in this setting.

  4. Power law relationships between health care utilization and symptom assessment among people with panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Katerndahl, David

    2010-06-01

    Although people with panic attacks are high utilizers of health care, the role of symptom assessment in care-seeking is unclear. Previous studies suggest that symptom perceptions are linearly related to utilization but panic appraisal is not. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the relationships between symptom assessment and utilization are non-linear, displaying power law distributions. This community-based study of 97 subjects with panic attacks assessed utilization of family doctor offices, total ambulatory utilization, and hospitalizations as well as symptom perceptions and panic appraisals. Matrices of symptom assessment versus utilization were created, and log-log plots were constructed. To minimize the risk of overestimation of power law distributions, linear, quadratic and cubic regression models were computed. None of the utilization versus symptom perceptions displayed power law distributions. However, all three measures of utilization showed power law relationships with panic appraisals, but in unique patterns. Although power law relationships were not found between symptom perceptions and utilization, unique patterns of power laws were identified between panic appraisals and all three measures of utilization.

  5. On the origin of power-law rheology during the evolution of damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Yusuke; Naylor, Mark; Touati, Sarah; Main, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Many composite materials, including rocks undergoing semi-brittle failure by stress-enhanced corrosion reactions, exhibit power law scaling between bulk stress and strain rate. Chemical reaction rate theory on a uniform material predicts instead an exponential dependence, so mean field models to account for power law behaviour usually require a specific (often power-law) underlying distribution of local material properties to account for this, ideally conditioned on experimental and theoretical studies of microstructures. This mean field approach however breaks down at higher crack density, where bulk properties also depend on the collective dynamics or interaction of a population of microstructures. To examine the relative contribution of material heterogeneity and crack-crack interactions, we develop a 2-dimensional spring-dashpot network with breaking bonds, and investigate the influence of the distribution of microscopic relaxation times generate a macroscopic rheology of power-law form. Specifically, we examine the possibility of non-power-law microscopic heterogeneity, e.g. a Gaussian distribution of relaxation times, leading to macroscopic power-law rheology.

  6. van der Waals dispersion power laws for cleavage, exfoliation, and stretching in multiscale, layered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Tim; Gray, Evan; Dobson, John F.

    2009-03-01

    Layered and nanotubular systems that are metallic or graphitic are known to exhibit unusual dispersive van der Waals (vdW) power laws under some circumstances. In this Brief Report we investigate the vdW power laws of bulk and finite layered systems and their interactions with other layered systems and atoms in the electromagnetically nonretarded case. The investigation reveals substantial difference between “cleavage” and “exfoliation” of graphite and metals where cleavage obeys a C2D-2 vdW power law while exfoliation obeys a C3log(D/D0)D-3 law for graphitics and a C5/2D-5/2 law for layered metals. This leads to questions of relevance in the interpretation of experimental results for these systems which have previously assumed more trivial differences. Furthermore we gather further insight into the effect of scale on the vdW power laws of systems that simultaneously exhibit macroscopic and nanoscopic dimensions. We show that, for metallic and graphitic layered systems, the known “unusual” power laws can be reduced to standard or near standard power laws when the effective scale of one or more dimension is changed. This allows better identification of the systems for which the commonly employed “sum of C6D-6 ” type vdW methods might be valid such as layered bulk to layered bulk and layered bulk to atom.

  7. Renormalization group approach to power-law modeling of complex metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bermejo, Benito

    2010-08-07

    In the modeling of complex biological systems, and especially in the framework of the description of metabolic pathways, the use of power-law models (such as S-systems and GMA systems) often provides a remarkable accuracy over several orders of magnitude in concentrations, an unusually broad range not fully understood at present. In order to provide additional insight in this sense, this article is devoted to the renormalization group analysis of reactions in fractal or self-similar media. In particular, the renormalization group methodology is applied to the investigation of how rate-laws describing such reactions are transformed when the geometric scale is changed. The precise purpose of such analysis is to investigate whether or not power-law rate-laws present some remarkable features accounting for the successes of power-law modeling. As we shall see, according to the renormalization group point of view the answer is positive, as far as power-laws are the critical solutions of the renormalization group transformation, namely power-law rate-laws are the renormalization group invariant solutions. Moreover, it is shown that these results also imply invariance under the group of concentration scalings, thus accounting for the reported power-law model accuracy over several orders of magnitude in metabolite concentrations. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anomalous power law distribution of total lifetimes of branching processes: application to earthquake aftershock sequences.

    PubMed

    Saichev, A; Sornette, D

    2004-10-01

    We consider a general stochastic branching process, which is relevant to earthquakes, and study the distributions of global lifetimes of the branching processes. In the earthquake context, this amounts to the distribution of the total durations of aftershock sequences including aftershocks of arbitrary generation number. Our results extend previous results on the distribution of the total number of offspring (direct and indirect aftershocks in seismicity) and of the total number of generations before extinction. We consider a branching model of triggered seismicity, the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model, which assumes that each earthquake can trigger other earthquakes ("aftershocks"). An aftershock sequence results in this model from the cascade of aftershocks of each past earthquake. Due to the large fluctuations of the number of aftershocks triggered directly by any earthquake ("productivity" or "fertility"), there is a large variability of the total number of aftershocks from one sequence to another, for the same mainshock magnitude. We study the regime where the distribution of fertilities mu is characterized by a power law approximately 1/ mu(1+gamma) and the bare Omori law for the memory of previous triggering mothers decays slowly as approximately 1/ t(1+theta;) , with 0

  9. The Rayleigh-Stokes problem for an edge in a generalized Oldroyd-B fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetecau, Corina; Jamil, Muhammad; Fetecau, Constantin; Vieru, Dumitru

    2009-09-01

    The velocity field corresponding to the Rayleigh-Stokes problem for an edge, in an incompressible generalized Oldroyd-B fluid has been established by means of the double Fourier sine and Laplace transforms. The fractional calculus approach is used in the constitutive relationship of the fluid model. The obtained solution, written in terms of the generalized G-functions, is presented as a sum of the Newtonian solution and the corresponding non-Newtonian contribution. The solution for generalized Maxwell fluids, as well as those for ordinary Maxwell and Oldroyd-B fluids, performing the same motion, is obtained as a limiting case of the present solution. This solution can be also specialized to give the similar solution for generalized second grade fluids. However, for simplicity, a new and simpler exact solution is established for these fluids. For β → 1, this last solution reduces to a previous solution obtained by a different technique.

  10. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Jesse; Velazquez, Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task). There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa), which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviors.

  11. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-03-23

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy-Chapman solution to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases.

  12. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy–Chapman solution to the Poisson–Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases. PMID:21503161

  13. Stochastic modeling of the migration of Cs-137 in the soil considering a power law tailing in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hiroki; Hatano, Yuko

    2016-04-01

    We develop a theoretical model to reproduce the measured data of Cs-137 in the soil due to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. In our past study, we derived the analytic solution under the generalized Robin boundary condition (Oka-Yamamoto solution). This is a generalization of the He-Walling solution (1996). We compared our solution with the Fukushima soil data of for 3 years after the accident and found that the concentration of Cs-137 has a discrepancy from our solution, specifically in a deep part because the depth profiles have a power law tailing. Therefore, we improved our model in the following aspect. When Cs particle (or Cs solution) migrate in the soil, the diffusion coefficient should be the results of many processes in the soil. These processes include the effect of various materials which constitute the soil (clay, litter, sand), or the variations of pore size in the soil. Hence we regard the diffusion coefficient as the stochastic variable, we derive the model. Specifically, we consider the solution of ADE to be the conditional probability C(x,t|D) in terms of the diffusion coefficient D and calculate C(x,t)=∫_(0~∞) C(x,t|D)*f(D)*dD, where f(D) is the probability density function of D. This model has a power law tailing in space like the space-fractional ADE.

  14. Inhomogeneous generalizations of Bianchi type VIh models with perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Prasad, A.

    1991-07-01

    Inhomogeneous universes admitting an Abelian G2 of isometry and filled with perfect fluid have been derived. These contain as special cases exact homogeneous universes of Bianchi type VIh. Many of these universes asymptotically tend to homogeneous Bianchi VIh universes. The models have been discussed for their physical and kinematical behaviors.

  15. SALE2D. General Transient Fluid Flow Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.; Hirt, C.W.

    1981-06-01

    SALE2D calculates two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a two-dimensional network of quadrilateral cells for either cylindrical or Cartesian coordinates, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of prairie wetland networks: power-law scaling and implications for conservation planning.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher K

    2010-07-01

    Although habitat networks show promise for conservation planning at regional scales, their spatiotemporal dynamics have not been well studied, especially in climate-sensitive landscapes. Here I use satellite remote sensing to compile wetland habitat networks from the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America. An ensemble of networks assembled across a hydrologic gradient from deluge to drought and a range of representative dispersal distances exhibits power-law scaling of important topological parameters. Prairie wetland networks are "meso-worlds" with mean topological distance increasing faster with network size than small-world networks, but slower than a regular lattice (or "large world"). This scaling implies rapid dispersal through wetland networks without some of the risks associated with "small worlds" (e.g., extremely rapid propagation of disease or disturbance). Retrospective analysis of wetland networks establishes a climatic envelope for landscape connectivity in the PPR, where I show that a changing climate might severely impact metapopulation viability and restrict long-distance dispersal and range shifts. More generally, this study demonstrates an efficient approach to conservation planning at a level of abstraction addressing key drivers of the global biodiversity crisis: habitat fragmentation and climatic change.

  17. Adjustment to Subtle Time Constraints and Power Law Learning in Rapid Serial Visual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jacqueline C; Chang, Seah; Cho, Yang Seok

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether attention could be modulated through the implicit learning of temporal information in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task. Participants identified two target letters among numeral distractors. The stimulus-onset asynchrony immediately following the first target (SOA1) varied at three levels (70, 98, and 126 ms) randomly between trials or fixed within blocks of trials. Practice over 3 consecutive days resulted in a continuous improvement in the identification rate for both targets and attenuation of the attentional blink (AB), a decrement in target (T2) identification when presented 200-400 ms after another target (T1). Blocked SOA1s led to a faster rate of improvement in RSVP performance and more target order reversals relative to random SOA1s, suggesting that the implicit learning of SOA1 positively affected performance. The results also reveal "power law" learning curves for individual target identification as well as the reduction in the AB decrement. These learning curves reflect the spontaneous emergence of skill through subtle attentional modulations rather than general attentional distribution. Together, the results indicate that implicit temporal learning could improve high level and rapid cognitive processing and highlights the sensitivity and adaptability of the attentional system to subtle constraints in stimulus timing.

  18. A Recommended Procedure for Estimating the Cosmic Ray Spectral Parameter of a Simple Power Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index a(f(sub i)) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic ray (GQ proton flux at energies below 1013 eV. Two procedures for estimating a(f(sub i)), referred as (1) the method of moments, and (2) maximum likelihood, are developed and their statistical performance compared. I concluded that the maximum likelihood procedure attains the most desirable statistical properties and is hence the recommended statistic estimation procedure for estimating a1. The maximum likelihood procedure is then generalized for application to a set of real cosmic ray data and thereby makes this approach applicable to existing cosmic ray data sets. Several other important results, such as the relationship between collecting power and detector energy resolution, as well as inclusion of a non-Gaussian detector response function, are presented. These results have many practical benefits in the design phase of a cosmic ray detector because they permit instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of one of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose practical limits to the design envelope.

  19. Wave-speed dispersion associated with an attenuation obeying a frequency power law.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    An attenuation scaling as a power of frequency, |ω|(β), over an infinite bandwidth is neither analytic nor square-integrable, thus calling into question the application of the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations for determining the frequency dependence of the associated phase speed. In this paper, three different approaches are developed, all of which return the dispersion formula for the wavenumber, K(ω). The first analysis relies on the properties of generalized functions and the causality requirement that the impulse response, k(t), the inverse Fourier transform of -iK(ω), must vanish for t < 0. Second, a wave equation is introduced that yields the phase-speed dispersion associated with a frequency-power-law attenuation. Finally, it is shown that, with minor modification, the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations with no subtractions (the Plemelj formulas) do in fact hold for an attenuation scaling as |ω|(β), yielding the same dispersion formula as the other two derivations. From this dispersion formula, admissible values of the exponent β are established. Physically, the inadmissible values of β, which include all the integers, correspond to attenuation-dispersion pairs whose Fourier components cannot combine in such a way as to make the impulse response, k(t), vanish for t < 0. There is no upper or lower limit on the value that β may take.

  20. Estimation of drought and flood recurrence interval from historical discharge data: a case study utilising the power law distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eadie, Chris; Favis-Mortlock, David

    2010-05-01

    distribution is fitted, but a much longer recurrence interval — on the order of 1000 years — using the USA's standard LP3 method. In addition Pandey et al. (1998) found that fitting a power-law distribution, compared with fitting a Generalized Extreme Value distribution, can lead to a large decrease in the predicted return period for a given flood event. Both these findings have obvious implications for river management design. Power-law distributions have been fitted to fluvial discharge data by many authors (most notably by Malamud et al., 1996 and Pandey et al., 1998), who then use these fitted distributions to estimate flow probabilities. These authors found that the power-law performed as well or better than many of the distributions currently used around the world, despite utilising fewer parameters. The power-law has not, however, been officially adopted by any country for fitting to fluvial discharge data. This paper demonstrates a statistically robust method, based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation, for fitting a power-law distribution to mean daily streamflows. The fitted distribution is then used to calculate return periods, which are compared to the return periods obtained by other, more commonly used, distributions. The implications for river management, extremes of flow in particular, are then explored.

  1. Riemannian geometry of thermodynamics and systems with repulsive power-law interactions.

    PubMed

    Ruppeiner, George

    2005-07-01

    A Riemannian geometric theory of thermodynamics based on the postulate that the curvature scalar R is proportional to the inverse free energy density is used to investigate three-dimensional fluid systems of identical classical point particles interacting with each other via a power-law potential energy gamma r(-alpha) . Such systems are useful in modeling melting transitions. The limit alpha-->infinity corresponds to the hard sphere gas. A thermodynamic limit exists only for short-range (alpha>3) and repulsive (gamma>0) interactions. The geometric theory solutions for given alpha>3 , gamma>0 , and any constant temperature T have the following properties: (1) the thermodynamics follows from a single function b (rho T(-3/alpha) ) , where rho is the density; (2) all solutions are equivalent up to a single scaling constant for rho T(-3/alpha) , related to gamma via the virial theorem; (3) at low density, solutions correspond to the ideal gas; (4) at high density there are solutions with pressure and energy depending on density as expected from solid state physics, though not with a Dulong-Petit heat capacity limit; (5) for 33.7913 a phase transition is required to go between these regimes; (7) for any alpha>3 we may include a first-order phase transition, which is expected from computer simulations; and (8) if alpha-->infinity, the density approaches a finite value as the pressure increases to infinity, with the pressure diverging logarithmically in the density difference.

  2. Riemannian geometry of thermodynamics and systems with repulsive power-law interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppeiner, George

    2005-07-01

    A Riemannian geometric theory of thermodynamics based on the postulate that the curvature scalar R is proportional to the inverse free energy density is used to investigate three-dimensional fluid systems of identical classical point particles interacting with each other via a power-law potential energy γr-α . Such systems are useful in modeling melting transitions. The limit α→∞ corresponds to the hard sphere gas. A thermodynamic limit exists only for short-range (α>3) and repulsive (γ>0) interactions. The geometric theory solutions for given α>3 , γ>0 , and any constant temperature T have the following properties: (1) the thermodynamics follows from a single function b(ρT-3/α) , where ρ is the density; (2) all solutions are equivalent up to a single scaling constant for ρT-3/α , related to γ via the virial theorem; (3) at low density, solutions correspond to the ideal gas; (4) at high density there are solutions with pressure and energy depending on density as expected from solid state physics, though not with a Dulong-Petit heat capacity limit; (5) for 3<α<3.7913 , the solution goes from the low to the expected high density limit smoothly; (6) for α>3.7913 a phase transition is required to go between these regimes; (7) for any α>3 we may include a first-order phase transition, which is expected from computer simulations; and (8) if α→∞ , the density approaches a finite value as the pressure increases to infinity, with the pressure diverging logarithmically in the density difference.

  3. Direct simulation Monte Carlo of rarefied hypersonic flow on power law shaped leading edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Wilson Fernando Nogueira Dos

    A numerical study of several parameters that influence the flowfield structure, aerodynamic surface quantities and shock wave structure at rarefied hypersonic flow conditions is conducted on power law shaped leading edges. The calculations are performed with a detailed computer code that properly accounts for nonequilibrium effects and that has been demonstrated to yield excellent comparisons with flight- and ground-test data. The flowfield structure, aerodynamic surface quantities and shock wave structure of power law shaped leading edges are examined in order to provide information on how well these shapes could stand as possible candidates for blunting geometries of hypersonic leading edges. Newtonian flow analysis has shown that these shapes exhibit both blunt and sharp aerodynamic properties. Moreover, computational investigation of minimum-drag bodies at supersonic and moderate hypersonic speeds has indicated that power law shapes for certain exponents yield the lowest wave drag. These qualities make power law shapes strong candidates for leading edge design. A very detailed description of the impact on the flow properties, such as velocity, density, temperature and pressure, has been presented separately in the vicinity of the nose of the leading edges due to changes in their shapes. Numerical solutions show that the shape of the leading edge disturbed the flowfield far upstream, where the domain of influence decreased as the leading edge became aerodynamically sharp. A detailed procedure is presented to predict the pressure gradient along the body surface in a rarefied environment. Numerical solutions show that the pressure gradient behavior follows that predicted by Newtonian theory. It is found that the pressure gradient along the body surface goes to zero at the nose of the leading edge for power law exponents less than 2/3, a characteristic of a blunt body. It is finite for power law exponent of 2/3 and goes to minus infinite for power law exponents

  4. Flow of Power-Law Liquids in a Hele-Shaw Cell Driven by Non-Uniform Electroosmotic Slip in the Case of Strong Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran; Gat, Amir

    2016-11-01

    We analyze flow of a non-Newtonian fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell, subjected to spatially non-uniform electroosmotic flow. We specifically focus on power-law fluids with wall depletion properties and derive a p-Poisson equation governing the pressure field, as well as a set of linearized equations representing its asymptotic approximation for weakly non-Newtonian behavior. To investigate the effect of non-Newtonian properties on the resulting fluidic pressure and velocity, we consider several configurations in one and two dimensions, and calculate both exact and approximate solutions. We show that the asymptotic approximation is in good agreement with exact solutions even for fluids with significant non-Newtonian behavior. The asymptotic model thus enables prediction of the flow and pressure fields for non-Newtonian fluids, and may be particularly useful for the analysis and design of microfluidic systems involving electro-kinetic transport of such fluids.

  5. Constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio for non-power-law models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, J. Alberto; Bridges, M.; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Hobson, M. P.

    2013-08-01

    Recent cosmological observations hint at a deviation from the simple power-law form of the primordial spectrum of curvature perturbations. In this paper we show that in the presence of a tensor component, a turn-over in the initial spectrum is preferred by current observations, and hence non-power-law models ought to be considered. For instance, for a power-law parameterisation with both a tensor component and running parameter, current data show a preference for a negative running at more than 2.5σ C.L. As a consequence of this deviation from a power-law, constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r are slightly broader. We also present constraints on the inflationary parameters for a model-independent reconstruction and the Lasenby & Doran (LD) model. In particular, the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio from the LD model are: rLD = 0.11±0.024. In addition to current data, we show expected constraints from Planck-like and CMB-Pol sensitivity experiments by using Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo sampling chains. For all the models, we have included the Bayesian Evidence to perform a model selection analysis. The Bayes factor, using current observations, shows a strong preference for the LD model over the standard power-law parameterisation, and provides an insight into the accuracy of differentiating models through future surveys.

  6. Self-similar nonequilibrium dynamics of a many-body system with power-law interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Garrahan, Juan P.; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The influence of power-law interactions on the dynamics of many-body systems far from equilibrium is much less explored than their effect on static and thermodynamic properties. To gain insight into this problem we introduce and analyze here an out-of-equilibrium deposition process in which the deposition rate of a given particle depends as a power law on the distance to previously deposited particles. This model draws its relevance from recent experimental progress in the domain of cold atomic gases, which are studied in a setting where atoms that are excited to high-lying Rydberg states interact through power-law potentials that translate into power-law excitation rates. The out-of-equilibrium dynamics of this system turns out to be surprisingly rich. It features a self-similar evolution which leads to a characteristic power-law time dependence of observables such as the particle concentration, and results in a scale invariance of the structure factor. Our findings show that in dissipative Rydberg gases out of equilibrium the characteristic distance among excitations—often referred to as the blockade radius—is not a static but rather a dynamic quantity.

  7. Self-similar nonequilibrium dynamics of a many-body system with power-law interactions.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Garrahan, Juan P; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The influence of power-law interactions on the dynamics of many-body systems far from equilibrium is much less explored than their effect on static and thermodynamic properties. To gain insight into this problem we introduce and analyze here an out-of-equilibrium deposition process in which the deposition rate of a given particle depends as a power law on the distance to previously deposited particles. This model draws its relevance from recent experimental progress in the domain of cold atomic gases, which are studied in a setting where atoms that are excited to high-lying Rydberg states interact through power-law potentials that translate into power-law excitation rates. The out-of-equilibrium dynamics of this system turns out to be surprisingly rich. It features a self-similar evolution which leads to a characteristic power-law time dependence of observables such as the particle concentration, and results in a scale invariance of the structure factor. Our findings show that in dissipative Rydberg gases out of equilibrium the characteristic distance among excitations-often referred to as the blockade radius-is not a static but rather a dynamic quantity.

  8. Double Power Laws in the Event-integrated Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lulu; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-04-01

    A double power law or a power law with exponential rollover at a few to tens of MeV nucleon-1 of the event-integrated differential spectra has been reported in many solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The rollover energies per nucleon of different elements correlate with a particle's charge-to-mass ratio (Q/A). The probable causes are suggested as residing in shock finite lifetimes, shock finite sizes, shock geometry, and an adiabatic cooling effect. In this work, we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate a particle's transport process in the inner heliosphere. We solve the focused transport equation using a time-backward Markov stochastic approach. The convection, magnetic focusing, adiabatic cooling effect, and pitch-angle scattering are included. The effects that the interplanetary turbulence imposes on the shape of the resulting SEP spectra are examined. By assuming a pure power-law differential spectrum at the Sun, a perfect double-power-law feature with a break energy ranging from 10 to 120 MeV nucleon-1 is obtained at 1 au. We found that the double power law of the differential energy spectrum is a robust result of SEP interplanetary propagation. It works for many assumptions of interplanetary turbulence spectra that give various forms of momentum dependence of a particle's mean free path. The different spectral shapes in low-energy and high-energy ends are not just a transition from the convection-dominated propagation to diffusion-dominated propagation.

  9. Enhanced discriminability for nonbiological motion violating the two-thirds power law.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Roy; Goldstein, Ariel; Vuillaume, Laurène; Faivre, Nathan; Hassin, Ran R; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-06-01

    The two-thirds power law describes the relationship between velocity and curvature in human motor movements. Interestingly, this motor law also affects visual motion perception, in which stimuli moving according to the two-thirds power law are perceived to have a constant velocity compared to stimuli actually moving at constant velocity. Thus, visual motion adhering to biological motion principles causes a kinematic illusion of smooth and velocity-invariant motion. However, it is yet unclear how this motion law affects the discrimination of visual stimuli and if its encoding requires attention. Here we tested the perceptual discrimination of stimuli following biological (two-thirds power law) or nonbiological movement under conditions in which the stimuli were degraded or masked through continuous flash suppression. Additionally, we tested subjective perception of naturalness and velocity consistency. Our results show that the discriminability of a visual target is inversely related to the perceived "naturalness" of its movement. Discrimination of stimuli following the two-thirds power law required more time than the same stimuli moving at constant velocity or nonecological variants of the two-thirds power law and was present for both masked and degraded stimuli.

  10. Fluid spheres of uniform density in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    1986-01-01

    A number of exact solutions for spherically symmetric nonstatic fluids of uniform density, surrounded by empty space, are derived and investigated. Solutions that represent expanding and contracting spheres, which tend asymptotically to static configurations described by the Schwarzschild interior solution ( rho = const), are obtained In some cases the motion of contraction or expansion is reversed, while in other cases there is no bouncing at all. Oscillating solutions are presented.

  11. The JKR-type adhesive contact problems for power-law shaped axisymmetric punches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodich, Feodor M.; Galanov, Boris A.; Suarez-Alvarez, Maria M.

    2014-08-01

    The JKR (Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts) and Boussinesq-Kendall models describe adhesive frictionless contact between two isotropic elastic spheres, and between a flat-ended axisymmetric punch and an elastic half-space respectively. However, the shapes of contacting solids may be more general than spherical or flat ones. In addition, the derivation of the main formulae of these models is based on the assumption that the material points within the contact region can move along the punch surface without any friction. However, it is more natural to assume that a material point that came to contact with the punch sticks to its surface, i.e. to assume that the non-slipping boundary conditions are valid. It is shown that the frictionless JKR model may be generalized to arbitrary convex, blunt axisymmetric body, in particular to the case of the punch shape being described by monomial (power-law) punches of an arbitrary degree d≥1. The JKR and Boussinesq-Kendall models are particular cases of the problems for monomial punches, when the degree of the punch d is equal to two or it goes to infinity respectively. The generalized problems for monomial punches are studied under both frictionless and non-slipping (or no-slip) boundary conditions. It is shown that regardless of the boundary conditions, the solution to the problems is reduced to the same dimensionless relations among the actual force, displacements and contact radius. The explicit expressions are derived for the values of the pull-off force and for the corresponding critical contact radius. Connections of the results obtained for problems of nanoindentation in the case of the indenter shape near the tip has some deviation from its nominal shape and the shape function can be approximated by a monomial function of radius, are discussed.

  12. Power-law distributions for the areas of the basins of attraction on a potential energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Massen, Claire P; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2007-03-01

    Energy landscape approaches have become increasingly popular for analyzing a wide variety of chemical physics phenomena. Basic to many of these applications has been the inherent structure mapping, which divides up the potential energy landscape into basins of attraction surrounding the minima. Here, we probe the nature of this division by introducing a method to compute the basin area distribution and applying it to some archetypal supercooled liquids. We find that this probability distribution is a power law over a large number of decades with the lower-energy minima having larger basins of attraction. Interestingly, the exponent for this power law is approximately the same as that for a high-dimensional Apollonian packing, providing further support for the suggestion that there is a strong analogy between the way the energy landscape is divided into basins, and the way that space is packed in self-similar, space-filling hypersphere packings, such as the Apollonian packing. These results suggest that the basins of attraction provide a fractal-like tiling of the energy landscape, and that a scale-free pattern of connections between the minima is a general property of energy landscapes.

  13. Anomalous diffusion and power-law relaxation of the time averaged mean squared displacement in worm-like micellar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B.; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of single tracer particle tracking by optical tweezers and video microscopy in micellar solutions. From careful analysis in terms of different stochastic models, we show that the polystyrene tracer beads of size 0.52-2.5 μm after short-time normal diffusion turn over to perform anomalous diffusion of the form ≃ tα with α ≈ 0.3. This free anomalous diffusion is ergodic and consistent with a description in terms of the generalized Langevin equation with a power-law memory kernel. With optical tweezers tracking, we unveil a power-law relaxation over several decades in time to the thermal plateau value under the confinement of the harmonic tweezer potential, as predicted previously (Phys. Rev. E 85 021147 (2012)). After the subdiffusive motion in the millisecond range, the motion becomes faster and turns either back to normal Brownian diffusion or to even faster superdiffusion, depending on the size of the tracer beads.

  14. Power-law decay of the spatial correlation function in exciton-polariton condensates

    PubMed Central

    Roumpos, Georgios; Lohse, Michael; Nitsche, Wolfgang H.; Keeling, Jonathan; Szymańska, Marzena Hanna; Littlewood, Peter B.; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    We create a large exciton-polariton condensate and employ a Michelson interferometer setup to characterize the short- and long-distance behavior of the first order spatial correlation function. Our experimental results show distinct features of both the two-dimensional and nonequilibrium characters of the condensate. We find that the gaussian short-distance decay is followed by a power-law decay at longer distances, as expected for a two-dimensional condensate. The exponent of the power law is measured in the range 0.9–1.2, larger than is possible in equilibrium. We compare the experimental results to a theoretical model to understand the features required to observe a power law and to clarify the influence of external noise on spatial coherence in nonequilibrium phase transitions. Our results indicate that Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless-like phase order survives in open-dissipative systems. PMID:22496595

  15. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity.

    PubMed

    Tippett, Michael K; Cohen, Joel E

    2016-02-29

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from 'outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954-2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related.

  16. The fractal nature of nature: power laws, ecological complexity and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Brown, James H; Gupta, Vijay K; Li, Bai-Lian; Milne, Bruce T; Restrepo, Carla; West, Geoffrey B

    2002-05-29

    Underlying the diversity of life and the complexity of ecology is order that reflects the operation of fundamental physical and biological processes. Power laws describe empirical scaling relationships that are emergent quantitative features of biodiversity. These features are patterns of structure or dynamics that are self-similar or fractal-like over many orders of magnitude. Power laws allow extrapolation and prediction over a wide range of scales. Some appear to be universal, occurring in virtually all taxa of organisms and types of environments. They offer clues to underlying mechanisms that powerfully constrain biodiversity. We describe recent progress and future prospects for understanding the mechanisms that generate these power laws, and for explaining the diversity of species and complexity of ecosystems in terms of fundamental principles of physical and biological science.

  17. Minimum variance projection for direct measurements of power-law spectra in the wavenumber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Yasuhito; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Hada, Tohru

    2017-05-01

    Minimum variance projection is widely used in geophysical and space plasma measurements to identify the wave propagation direction and the wavenumber of the wave fields. The advantage of the minimum variance projection is its ability to estimate the energy spectra directly in the wavenumber domain using only a limited number of spatial samplings. While the minimum variance projection is constructed for discrete signals in the data, we find that the minimum variance projection can reasonably reproduce the spectral slope of the power-law spectrum if the data represent continuous power-law signals. The spectral slope study using the minimum variance projection is tested against synthetic random data with a power-law spectrum. The method is applicable even for a small number of spatial samplings. Conversely, the spatial aliasing causes a flattening of the spectrum.

  18. Power laws from individual differences in learning and forgetting: mathematical analyses.

    PubMed

    Murre, Jaap M J; Chessa, Antonio G

    2011-06-01

    It has frequently been claimed that learning performance improves with practice according to the so-called "Power Law of Learning." Similarly, forgetting may follow a power law. It has been shown on the basis of extensive simulations that such power laws may emerge through averaging functions with other, nonpower function shapes. In the present article, we supplement these simulations with a mathematical proof that power functions will indeed emerge as a result of averaging over exponential functions, if the distribution of learning rates follows a gamma distribution, a uniform distribution, or a half-normal function. Through a number of simulations, we further investigate to what extent these findings may affect empirical results in practice.

  19. Power-law distribution of phase-locking intervals does not imply critical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botcharova, M.; Farmer, S. F.; Berthouze, L.

    2012-11-01

    Neural synchronization plays a critical role in information processing, storage, and transmission. Characterizing the pattern of synchronization is therefore of great interest. It has recently been suggested that the brain displays broadband criticality based on two measures of synchronization, phase-locking intervals and global lability of synchronization, showing power-law statistics at the critical threshold in a classical model of synchronization. In this paper, we provide evidence that, within the limits of the model selection approach used to ascertain the presence of power-law statistics, the pooling of pairwise phase-locking intervals from a noncritically interacting system can produce a distribution that is similarly assessed as being power law. In contrast, the global lability of synchronization measure is shown to better discriminate critical from noncritical interaction.

  20. Statistical interpretation of transient current power-law decay in colloidal quantum dot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibatov, R. T.

    2011-08-01

    A new statistical model of the charge transport in colloidal quantum dot arrays is proposed. It takes into account Coulomb blockade forbidding multiple occupancy of nanocrystals and the influence of energetic disorder of interdot space. The model explains power-law current transients and the presence of the memory effect. The fractional differential analogue of the Ohm law is found phenomenologically for nanocrystal arrays. The model combines ideas that were considered as conflicting by other authors: the Scher-Montroll idea about the power-law distribution of waiting times in localized states for disordered semiconductors is applied taking into account Coulomb blockade; Novikov's condition about the asymptotic power-law distribution of time intervals between successful current pulses in conduction channels is fulfilled; and the carrier injection blocking predicted by Ginger and Greenham (2000 J. Appl. Phys. 87 1361) takes place.

  1. Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and the growth-rate theorem.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel E

    2013-09-01

    Taylor's law (TL), a widely verified empirical relationship in ecology, states that the variance of population density is approximately a power-law function of mean density. The growth-rate theorem (GR) states that, in a subdivided population, the rate of change of the overall growth rate is proportional to the variance of the subpopulations' growth rates. We show that continuous-time exponential change implies GR at every time and, asymptotically for large time, TL with power-law exponent 2. We also show why diverse population-dynamic models predict TL in the limit of large time by identifying simple features these models share: If the mean population density and the variance of population density are (exactly or asymptotically) non-constant exponential functions of a parameter (e.g., time), then the variance of density is (exactly or asymptotically) a power-law function of mean density. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Power-law distribution of phase-locking intervals does not imply critical interaction.

    PubMed

    Botcharova, M; Farmer, S F; Berthouze, L

    2012-11-01

    Neural synchronization plays a critical role in information processing, storage, and transmission. Characterizing the pattern of synchronization is therefore of great interest. It has recently been suggested that the brain displays broadband criticality based on two measures of synchronization, phase-locking intervals and global lability of synchronization, showing power-law statistics at the critical threshold in a classical model of synchronization. In this paper, we provide evidence that, within the limits of the model selection approach used to ascertain the presence of power-law statistics, the pooling of pairwise phase-locking intervals from a noncritically interacting system can produce a distribution that is similarly assessed as being power law. In contrast, the global lability of synchronization measure is shown to better discriminate critical from noncritical interaction.

  3. Power law distribution of the duration and magnitude of recessions in capitalist economies: breakdown of scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Paul; Mounfield, Craig

    2001-04-01

    Power law distributions of macroscopic observables are ubiquitous in both the natural and social sciences. They are indicative of correlated, cooperative phenomena between groups of interacting agents at the microscopic level. In this paper, we argue that when one is considering aggregate macroeconomic data (annual growth rates in real per capita GDP in the seventeen leading capitalist economies from 1870 through to 1994) the magnitude and duration of recessions over the business cycle do indeed follow power law like behaviour for a significant proportion of the data (demonstrating the existence of cooperative phenomena amongst economic agents). Crucially, however, there are systematic deviations from this behaviour when one considers the frequency of occurrence of large recessions. Under these circumstances the power law scaling breaks down. It is argued that it is the adaptive behaviour of the agents (their ability to recognise the changing economic environment) which modifies their cooperative behaviour.

  4. The fractal nature of nature: power laws, ecological complexity and biodiversity.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James H; Gupta, Vijay K; Li, Bai-Lian; Milne, Bruce T; Restrepo, Carla; West, Geoffrey B

    2002-01-01

    Underlying the diversity of life and the complexity of ecology is order that reflects the operation of fundamental physical and biological processes. Power laws describe empirical scaling relationships that are emergent quantitative features of biodiversity. These features are patterns of structure or dynamics that are self-similar or fractal-like over many orders of magnitude. Power laws allow extrapolation and prediction over a wide range of scales. Some appear to be universal, occurring in virtually all taxa of organisms and types of environments. They offer clues to underlying mechanisms that powerfully constrain biodiversity. We describe recent progress and future prospects for understanding the mechanisms that generate these power laws, and for explaining the diversity of species and complexity of ecosystems in terms of fundamental principles of physical and biological science. PMID:12079523

  5. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohen, Joel E.

    2016-02-01

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from `outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954-2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related.

  6. Power-law X-ray and gamma-ray emission from relativistic thermal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    A common characteristic of cosmic sources is power-law X-ray emission. Extragalactic sources of this type include compact components of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The present study is concerned with a theoretical model of such sources, taking into account the assumption that the power-law spectra are produced by repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic thermal electrons. This is one of several possible physical mechanisms leading to the formation of a power-law spectrum. Attention is given to the Comptonization of soft photon sources, the rates of pair processes, the solution of the pair equilibrium equation, and the constraints on a soft photon source and an energy source. It is concluded that the compactness parameters L/R of most of the cosmic sources observed to date lie below the maximum luminosity curves considered.

  7. Power-law and exponential rank distributions: A panoramic Gibbsian perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-04-15

    Rank distributions are collections of positive sizes ordered either increasingly or decreasingly. Many decreasing rank distributions, formed by the collective collaboration of human actions, follow an inverse power-law relation between ranks and sizes. This remarkable empirical fact is termed Zipf’s law, and one of its quintessential manifestations is the demography of human settlements — which exhibits a harmonic relation between ranks and sizes. In this paper we present a comprehensive statistical-physics analysis of rank distributions, establish that power-law and exponential rank distributions stand out as optimal in various entropy-based senses, and unveil the special role of the harmonic relation between ranks and sizes. Our results extend the contemporary entropy-maximization view of Zipf’s law to a broader, panoramic, Gibbsian perspective of increasing and decreasing power-law and exponential rank distributions — of which Zipf’s law is one out of four pillars.

  8. Congress’s Contempt Power: Law, History, Practice, and Procedure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-24

    subcommittee of a contempt citation against an executive branch official. 200 Mr. Quinn was directed by President Clinton to assert a “protective claim of...Superfund dispute, contempt citations have been voted against White House Counsel John M. Quinn (1996) and Attorney General Janet Reno (1998). In every...instance, save for John M. Quinn ,200 a claim of executive privilege was asserted, and in each instance there was either full or substantial compliance

  9. Pleth variability index-directed fluid management in abdominal surgery under combined general and epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinan; Dong, Jing; Xu, Zifeng; Shen, Hao; Zheng, Jijian

    2015-02-01

    Pleth variability index (PVI), a noninvasive dynamic indicator of fluid responsiveness has been demonstrated to be useful in the management of the patients with goal directed fluid therapy under general anesthesia, but whether PVI can be used to optimize fluid management under combined general and epidural anesthesia (GEN-EPI) remains to be elucidated. The aim of our study was to explore the impact of PVI as a goal-directed fluid therapy parameter on the tissue perfusion for patients with GEN-EPI. Thirty ASA I-II patients scheduled for major abdominal surgeries under GEN-EPI were randomized into PVI-directed fluid management group (PVI group) and non PVI-directed fluid management group (control group). 2 mL/kg/h crystalloid fluid infusion was maintained in PVI group, once PVI>13%, a 250 mL colloid or crystalloid was rapidly infused. 4-8 mL/kg/h crystalloid fluid infusion was maintained in control group, and quick fluid infusion was initiated if mean arterial blood pressure (BP)<65 mmHg. Small doses of norepinephrine were given to keep mean arterial BP above 65 mmHg as needed in both groups. Perioperative lactate levels, hemodynamic changes were recorded individually. The total amount of intraoperative fluids, the amount of crystalloid fluid and the first hour blood lactate levels during surgery were significantly lower in PVI than control group, P<0.05. PVI-based goal-directed fluid management can reduce the intraoperative fluid amount and blood lactate levels in patients under GEN-EPI, especially the crystalloid. Furthermore, the first hour following GEN-EPI might be the critical period for anesthesiologist to optimize the fluid management.

  10. Effect of Body Perturbations on Hypersonic Flow Over Slender Power Law Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold; Thornton, Philip R.

    1959-01-01

    Hypersonic-slender-body theory, in the limit as the free-stream Mach number becomes infinite, is used to find the effect of slightly perturbing the surface of slender two-dimensional and axisymmetric power law bodies, The body perturbations are assumed to have a power law variation (with streamwise distance downstream of the nose of the body). Numerical results are presented for (1) the effect of boundary-layer development on two dimensional and axisymmetric bodies, (2) the effect of very small angles of attack (on tow[dimensional bodies), and (3) the effect of blunting the nose of very slender wedges and cones.

  11. Spherical collapse model and cluster number counts in power-law f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekjani, M.; Basilakos, S.; Heidari, N.

    2017-04-01

    We study the spherical collapse model in the framework of spatially flat power law f(T) ∝ (- T)b gravity model. We find that the linear and non-linear growth of spherical overdensities of this particular f(T) model are affected by the power-law parameter b. Finally, we compute the predicted number counts of virialized haloes in order to distinguish the current f(T) model from the expectations of the concordance Λ cosmology. Specifically, the present analysis suggests that the f(T) gravity model with positive (negative) b predicts more (less) virialized objects with respect to those of Λ cold dark matter.

  12. Modified power law equations for vertical wind profiles. [in investigation of windpower plant siting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Richards, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    In an investigation of windpower plant siting, equations are presented and evaluated for a wind profile model which incorporates both roughness and wind speed effects, while retaining the basic simplicity of the Hellman power law. These equations recognize the statistical nature of wind profiles and are compatible with existing analytical models and recent wind profile data. Predictions of energy output based on the proposed profile equations are 10% to 20% higher than those made with the 1/7 power law. In addition, correlation between calculated and observed blade loads is significantly better at higher wind speeds when the proposed wind profile model is used than when a constant power model is used.

  13. Power-law electrokinetic behavior as a direct probe of effective surface viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Yuki; Netz, Roland R.; Bonthuis, Douwe Jan

    2017-02-01

    An exact solution to the Poisson-Boltzmann and Stokes equations is derived to describe the electric double layer with inhomogeneous dielectric and viscosity profiles in a lateral electric field. In the limit of strongly charged surfaces and low salinity, the electrokinetic flow magnitude follows a power law as a function of the surface charge density. Remarkably, the power-law exponent is determined by the interfacial dielectric constant and viscosity, the latter of which has eluded experimental determination. Our approach provides a novel method to extract the effective interfacial viscosity from standard electrokinetic experiments. We find good agreement between our theory and experimental data.

  14. One-dimensional quantum liquids with power-law interactions: the Luttinger staircase.

    PubMed

    Dalmonte, M; Pupillo, G; Zoller, P

    2010-10-01

    We study one-dimensional fermionic and bosonic gases with repulsive power-law interactions 1/|x|(β), with β>1, in the framework of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory. We obtain an accurate analytical expression linking the TLL parameter to the microscopic Hamiltonian, for arbitrary β and strength of the interactions. In the presence of a small periodic potential, power-law interactions make the TLL unstable towards the formation of a cascade of lattice solids with fractional filling, a "Luttinger staircase." Several of these quantum phases and phase transitions are realized with ground state polar molecules and weakly bound magnetic Feshbach molecules.

  15. The extent of power-law energy spectra in collisionless relativistic magnetic reconnection in pair plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.; Begelman, M. C.

    2015-12-30

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we characterize the energy spectra of particles accelerated by relativistic magnetic reconnection (without guide field) in collisionless electron–positron plasmas, for a wide range of upstream magnetizations σ and system sizes L. The particle spectra are well-represented by a power law ${\\gamma }^{-\\alpha }$, with a combination of exponential and super-exponential high-energy cutoffs, proportional to σ and L, respectively. As a result, for large L and σ, the power-law index α approaches about 1.2.

  16. Non-Gaussian Fluctuations Resulting from Power-Law Trapping in a Lipid Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Takuma; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yasui, Masato

    2011-10-01

    Anomalous diffusion in lipid bilayers is usually attributed to viscoelastic behavior. We compute the scaling exponent of relative fluctuations of the time-averaged mean square displacement in a lipid bilayer, by using a molecular dynamics simulation. According to the continuous time random walk theory, this exponent indicates non-Gaussian behavior caused by a power-law trapping time. Our results provide the first evidence that a lipid bilayer has not only viscoelastic properties but also trapping times distributed according to a power law.

  17. Power-law behavior of power spectra in low Prandtl number Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Paul, M R; Cross, M C; Fischer, P F; Greenside, H S

    2001-10-08

    The origin of the power-law decay measured in the power spectra of low Prandtl number Rayleigh-Bénard convection near the onset of chaos is addressed using long time numerical simulations of the three-dimensional Boussinesq equations in cylindrical domains. The power law is found to arise from quasidiscontinuous changes in the slope of the time series of the heat transport associated with the nucleation of dislocation pairs and roll pinch-off events. For larger frequencies, the power spectra decay exponentially as expected for time continuous deterministic dynamics.

  18. On the origin and robustness of power-law species–area relationships in ecology

    PubMed Central

    García Martín, Héctor; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-01-01

    We present an explanation for the widely reported power-law species–area relationship (SAR), which relates the area occupied by a biome to the number of species that it supports. We argue that power-law SARs are a robust consequence of a skewed species abundance distribution resembling a lognormal with higher rarity, together with the observation that individuals of a given species tend to cluster. We show that the precise form of the SAR transcends the specific details of organism interactions, enabling us to characterize its broad trends across taxa. PMID:16801556

  19. Evidence for power-law dominated noise in vacuum deposited CaF2.

    PubMed

    Luhman, D R; Hallock, R B

    2004-06-25

    We have studied the surface roughness of CaF2 vacuum deposited on glass using atomic force microscopy for film coverages spanning an order of magnitude. We find the roughness exponent alpha=0.88+/-0.03, the growth exponent beta=0.75+/-0.03, and the dynamic exponent z=alpha/beta=1.17+/-0.06. Multifractality is also present, along with power-law behavior in the nearest neighbor height difference probability distribution. The results indicate noise dominated by a power-law distribution with exponent micro+1 approximately 4.6.

  20. Transport coefficients in Lorentz plasmas with the power-law kappa-distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jiulin, Du

    2013-09-15

    Transport coefficients in Lorentz plasma with the power-law κ-distribution are studied by means of using the transport equation and macroscopic laws of Lorentz plasma without magnetic field. Expressions of electric conductivity, thermoelectric coefficient, and thermal conductivity for the power-law κ-distribution are accurately derived. It is shown that these transport coefficients are significantly modified by the κ-parameter, and in the limit of the parameter κ→∞ they are reduced to the standard forms for a Maxwellian distribution.

  1. Numerical Simulations of Power Law Heating Functions for Quiescent Loops: Stability and Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.; Winter, H. D.; Munetsi-Mugomba, K.

    2007-12-01

    We present the numerical simulations of quiescent coronal loops with heating functions that are power law functions of pressure and temperature. These simulations are made using a time-dependent, 1D hydrodynamics code with heating functions that are treated as dynamic variables which are constantly re- evaluated during the loops' lifetimes. These numerical simulations provide a stability test for the analytical solutions formulated by Martens (2007, submitted) for the same heating functions. TRACE and XRT datasets are simulated to determine if present observables can provide adequate information to discriminate between power law heating functions.

  2. Modified power law equations for vertical wind profiles. [in investigation of windpower plant siting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Richards, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    In an investigation of windpower plant siting, equations are presented and evaluated for a wind profile model which incorporates both roughness and wind speed effects, while retaining the basic simplicity of the Hellman power law. These equations recognize the statistical nature of wind profiles and are compatible with existing analytical models and recent wind profile data. Predictions of energy output based on the proposed profile equations are 10% to 20% higher than those made with the 1/7 power law. In addition, correlation between calculated and observed blade loads is significantly better at higher wind speeds when the proposed wind profile model is used than when a constant power model is used.

  3. Introducing Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Computations with Mathematica in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binous, Housam

    2007-01-01

    We study four non-Newtonian fluid mechanics problems using Mathematica[R]. Constitutive equations describing the behavior of power-law, Bingham and Carreau models are recalled. The velocity profile is obtained for the horizontal flow of power-law fluids in pipes and annuli. For the vertical laminar film flow of a Bingham fluid we determine the…

  4. Introducing Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Computations with Mathematica in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binous, Housam

    2007-01-01

    We study four non-Newtonian fluid mechanics problems using Mathematica[R]. Constitutive equations describing the behavior of power-law, Bingham and Carreau models are recalled. The velocity profile is obtained for the horizontal flow of power-law fluids in pipes and annuli. For the vertical laminar film flow of a Bingham fluid we determine the…

  5. 30 CFR 250.455 - What are the general requirements for a drilling fluid program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drilling fluid program? 250.455 Section 250.455 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Drilling Fluid Requirements § 250.455 What are the general requirements for...

  6. Age Differences in Fluid Intelligence: Contributions of General Slowing and Frontal Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugg, Julie M.; Zook, Nancy A.; DeLosh, Edward L.; Davalos, Deana B.; Davis, Hasker P.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined the contributions of general slowing and frontal decline to age differences in fluid intelligence. Participants aged 20-89 years completed Block Design, Matrix Reasoning, simple reaction time, choice reaction time, Wisconsin Card Sorting, and Tower of London tasks. Age-related declines in fluid intelligence, speed of…

  7. Age Differences in Fluid Intelligence: Contributions of General Slowing and Frontal Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugg, Julie M.; Zook, Nancy A.; DeLosh, Edward L.; Davalos, Deana B.; Davis, Hasker P.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined the contributions of general slowing and frontal decline to age differences in fluid intelligence. Participants aged 20-89 years completed Block Design, Matrix Reasoning, simple reaction time, choice reaction time, Wisconsin Card Sorting, and Tower of London tasks. Age-related declines in fluid intelligence, speed of…

  8. Sustained and generalized extracellular fluid expansion following heat acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark J; Stocks, Jodie M; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2004-01-01

    We measured intra- and extravascular body-fluid compartments in 12 resting males before (day 1; control), during (day 8) and after (day 22) a 3-week, exercise–heat acclimation protocol to investigate plasma volume (PV) changes. Our specific focus was upon the selective nature of the acclimation-induced PV expansion, and the possibility that this expansion could be sustained during prolonged acclimation. Acclimation was induced by cycling in the heat, and involved 16 treatment days (controlled hyperthermia (90 min); core temperature = 38.5°C) and three experimental exposures (40 min rest, 96.9 min (s.d. 9.5 min) cycling), each preceded by a rest day. The environmental conditions were a temperature of 39.8°C (s.d. 0.5°C) and relative humidity of 59.2% (s.d. 0.8%). On days 8 and 22, PV was expanded and maintained relative to control values (day 1: 44.0 ± 1.8; day 8: 48.8 ± 1.7; day 22: 48.8 ± 2.0 ml kg−1; P < 0.05). The extracellular fluid compartment (ECF) was equivalently expanded from control values on days 8 (279.6 ± 14.2versus 318.6 ± 14.3 ml kg−1; n = 8; P < 0.05) and 22 (287.5 ± 10.6 versus 308.4 ± 14.8 ml kg−1; n = 12; P < 0.05). Plasma electrolyte, total protein and albumin concentrations were unaltered following heat acclimation (P > 0.05), although the total plasma content of these constituents was elevated (P < 0.05). The PV and interstitial fluid (ISF) compartments exhibited similar relative expansions on days 8 (15.0 ± 2.2% versus 14.7 ± 4.1%; P > 0.05) and 22 (14.4 ± 3.6%versus 6.4 ± 2.2%; P = 0.10). It is concluded that the acclimation-induced PV expansion can be maintained following prolonged heat acclimation. In addition, this PV expansion was not selective, but represented a ubiquitous expansion of the extracellular compartment. PMID:15218070

  9. Mother's but not father's education predicts general fluid intelligence in emerging adulthood: Behavioral and neuroanatomical evidence.

    PubMed

    Kong, Feng; Chen, Zhencai; Xue, Song; Wang, Xu; Liu, Jia

    2015-11-01

    Lower parental education impairs cognitive abilities of their offspring such as general fluid intelligence dependent on the prefrontal cortex (PFC), but the independent contribution of mother's and father's education is unknown. We used an individual difference approach to test whether mother's and father's education independently affected general fluid intelligence in emerging adulthood at both the behavioral and neural level. Behaviorally, mother's but not father's education accounted for unique variance in general fluid intelligence in emerging adulthood (assessed by the Raven's advanced progressive matrices). Neurally, the whole-brain correlation analysis revealed that the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in the medial PFC was related to both mother's education and general fluid intelligence but not father's education. Furthermore, after controlling for mother's education, the association between general fluid intelligence and the rGMV in medial PFC was no longer significant, indicating that mother's education plays an important role in influencing the structure of the medial PFC associated with general fluid intelligence. Taken together, our study provides the first behavioral and neural evidence that mother's education is a more important determinant of general cognitive ability in emerging adulthood than father's education. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Conformal collineations and anisotropic fluids in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggal, K. L.; Sharma, R.

    1986-10-01

    Recently, Herrera et al. [L. Herrera, J. Jimenez, L. Leal, J. Ponce de Leon, M. Esculpi, and V. Galino, J. Math. Phys. 25, 3274 (1984)] studied the consequences of the existence of a one-parameter group of conformal motions for anisotropic matter. They concluded that for special conformal motions, the stiff equation of state (p=μ) is singled out in a unique way, provided the generating conformal vector field is orthogonal to the four-velocity. In this paper, the same problem is studied by using conformal collineations (which include conformal motions as subgroups). It is shown that, for a special conformal collineation, the stiff equation of state is not singled out. Non-Einstein Ricci-recurrent spaces are considered as physical models for the fluid matter.

  11. From gene families and genera to incomes and internet file sizes: why power laws are so common in nature.

    PubMed

    Reed, William J; Hughes, Barry D

    2002-12-01

    We present a simple explanation for the occurrence of power-law tails in statistical distributions by showing that if stochastic processes with exponential growth in expectation are killed (or observed) randomly, the distribution of the killed or observed state exhibits power-law behavior in one or both tails. This simple mechanism can explain power-law tails in the distributions of the sizes of incomes, cities, internet files, biological taxa, and in gene family and protein family frequencies.

  12. Limit order placement as an utility maximization problem and the origin of power law distribution of limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, F.

    2007-02-01

    I consider the problem of the optimal limit order price of a financial asset in the framework of the maximization of the utility function of the investor. The analytical solution of the problem gives insight on the origin of the recently empirically observed power law distribution of limit order prices. In the framework of the model, the most likely proximate cause of this power law is a power law heterogeneity of traders' investment time horizons.

  13. Degradation and healing in a generalized neo-Hookean solid due to infusion of a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karra, Satish; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical response and load bearing capacity of high performance polymer composites changes due to degradation or healing associated with diffusion of a fluid, temperature, oxidation or the extent of the deformation. Hence, there is a need to study the response of bodies under such degradation/healing mechanisms. In this paper, we study the effect of degradation and healing due to the diffusion of a fluid on the response of a solid which prior to the diffusion can be described by the generalized neo-Hookean model. We show that a generalized neo-Hookean solid—which behaves like an elastic body (i.e., it does not produce entropy) within a purely mechanical context—creeps and stress relaxes due to degradation/healing when infused with a fluid and behaves like a body whose material properties are time dependent. We specifically investigate the torsion of a degrading/healing generalized neo-Hookean circular cylindrical annulus infused with a fluid. The equations of equilibrium for a generalized neo-Hookean solid are solved together with the convection-diffusion equation for the fluid concentration. Different boundary conditions for the fluid concentration are also considered. We also solve the problem for the case when the diffusivity of the fluid depends on the deformation of the generalized neo-Hookean solid.

  14. Flow of power-law liquids in a Hele-Shaw cell driven by non-uniform electro-osmotic slip in the case of strong depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran; Gat, Amir D.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze flow of non-Newtonian fluids in a Hele-Shaw cell, subjected to spatially non-uniform electroosmotic slip. Motivated by their potential use for increasing the characteristic pressure fields, we specifically focus on power-law fluids with wall depletion properties. We derive a p-Poisson equation governing the pressure field, as well as a set of linearized equations representing its asymptotic approximation for weakly non-Newtonian behavior. To investigate the effect of non-Newtonian properties on the resulting fluidic pressure and velocity, we consider several configurations in one- and two-dimensions, and calculate both exact and approximate solutions. We show that the asymptotic approximation is in good agreement with exact solutions even for fluids with significant non-Newtonian behavior, allowing its use in the analysis and design of microfluidic systems involving electro-kinetic transport of such fluids.

  15. On Integral Upper Limits Assuming Power-law Spectra and the Sensitivity in High-energy Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, Max L.

    2017-02-01

    The high-energy non-thermal universe is dominated by power-law-like spectra. Therefore, results in high-energy astronomy are often reported as parameters of power-law fits, or, in the case of a non-detection, as an upper limit assuming the underlying unseen spectrum behaves as a power law. In this paper, I demonstrate a simple and powerful one-to-one relation of the integral upper limit in the two-dimensional power-law parameter space into the spectrum parameter space and use this method to unravel the so-far convoluted question of the sensitivity of astroparticle telescopes.

  16. The interrupted power law and the size of shadow banking.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Davide; Kondor, Imre; Marsili, Matteo; Volpati, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Using public data (Forbes Global 2000) we show that the asset sizes for the largest global firms follow a Pareto distribution in an intermediate range, that is "interrupted" by a sharp cut-off in its upper tail, where it is totally dominated by financial firms. This flattening of the distribution contrasts with a large body of empirical literature which finds a Pareto distribution for firm sizes both across countries and over time. Pareto distributions are generally traced back to a mechanism of proportional random growth, based on a regime of constant returns to scale. This makes our findings of an "interrupted" Pareto distribution all the more puzzling, because we provide evidence that financial firms in our sample should operate in such a regime. We claim that the missing mass from the upper tail of the asset size distribution is a consequence of shadow banking activity and that it provides an (upper) estimate of the size of the shadow banking system. This estimate-which we propose as a shadow banking index-compares well with estimates of the Financial Stability Board until 2009, but it shows a sharper rise in shadow banking activity after 2010. Finally, we propose a proportional random growth model that reproduces the observed distribution, thereby providing a quantitative estimate of the intensity of shadow banking activity.

  17. The Interrupted Power Law and the Size of Shadow Banking

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi, Davide; Kondor, Imre; Marsili, Matteo; Volpati, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Using public data (Forbes Global 2000) we show that the asset sizes for the largest global firms follow a Pareto distribution in an intermediate range, that is “interrupted” by a sharp cut-off in its upper tail, where it is totally dominated by financial firms. This flattening of the distribution contrasts with a large body of empirical literature which finds a Pareto distribution for firm sizes both across countries and over time. Pareto distributions are generally traced back to a mechanism of proportional random growth, based on a regime of constant returns to scale. This makes our findings of an “interrupted” Pareto distribution all the more puzzling, because we provide evidence that financial firms in our sample should operate in such a regime. We claim that the missing mass from the upper tail of the asset size distribution is a consequence of shadow banking activity and that it provides an (upper) estimate of the size of the shadow banking system. This estimate–which we propose as a shadow banking index–compares well with estimates of the Financial Stability Board until 2009, but it shows a sharper rise in shadow banking activity after 2010. Finally, we propose a proportional random growth model that reproduces the observed distribution, thereby providing a quantitative estimate of the intensity of shadow banking activity. PMID:24728096

  18. Stochastic Mixing Model with Power Law Decay of Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedotov, S.; Ihme, M.; Pitsch, H.

    2003-01-01

    Here we present a simple stochastic mixing model based on the law of large numbers (LLN). The reason why the LLN is involved in our formulation of the mixing problem is that the random conserved scalar c = c(t,x(t)) appears to behave as a sample mean. It converges to the mean value mu, while the variance sigma(sup 2)(sub c) (t) decays approximately as t(exp -1). Since the variance of the scalar decays faster than a sample mean (typically is greater than unity), we will introduce some non-linear modifications into the corresponding pdf-equation. The main idea is to develop a robust model which is independent from restrictive assumptions about the shape of the pdf. The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. In Section 2 we derive the integral equation from a stochastic difference equation describing the evolution of the pdf of a passive scalar in time. The stochastic difference equation introduces an exchange rate gamma(sub n) which we model in a first step as a deterministic function. In a second step, we generalize gamma(sub n) as a stochastic variable taking fluctuations in the inhomogeneous environment into account. In Section 3 we solve the non-linear integral equation numerically and analyze the influence of the different parameters on the decay rate. The paper finishes with a conclusion.

  19. Forced fluid dynamics from blackfolds in general supergravity backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay; Gath, Jakob; Niarchos, Vasilis; Obers, Niels A.; Pedersen, Andreas Vigand

    2016-10-01

    We present a general treatment of the leading order dynamics of the collective modes of charged dilatonic p-brane solutions of (super) gravity theories in arbitrary backgrounds. To this end we employ the general strategy of the blackfold approach which is based on a long-wavelength derivative expansion around an exact or approximate solution of the (super)gravity equations of motion. The resulting collective mode equations are formulated as forced hydrodynamic equations on dynamically embedded hypersurfaces. We derive them in full generality (including all possible asymptotic fluxes and dilaton profiles) in a far-zone analysis of the (super)gravity equations and in representative examples in a near-zone analysis. An independent treatment based on the study of external couplings in hydrostatic partition functions is also presented. Special emphasis is given to the forced collective mode equations that arise in type IIA/B and eleven-dimensional supergravities, where besides the standard Lorentz force couplings our analysis reveals additional couplings to the background, including terms that arise from Chern-Simons interactions. We also present a general overview of the blackfold approach and some of the key conceptual issues that arise when applied to arbitrary backgrounds.

  20. Why credit risk markets are predestined for exhibiting log-periodic power law structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnitza, Jan Henrik; Leker, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has established the existence of log-periodic power law (LPPL) patterns in financial institutions’ credit default swap (CDS) spreads. The main purpose of this paper is to clarify why credit risk markets are predestined for exhibiting LPPL structures. To this end, the credit risk prediction of two variants of logistic regression, i.e. polynomial logistic regression (PLR) and kernel logistic regression (KLR), are firstly compared to the standard logistic regression (SLR). In doing so, the question whether the performances of rating systems based on balance sheet ratios can be improved by nonlinear transformations of the explanatory variables is resolved. Building on the result that nonlinear balance sheet ratio transformations hardly improve the SLR’s predictive power in our case, we secondly compare the classification performance of a multivariate SLR to the discriminative powers of probabilities of default derived from three different capital market data, namely bonds, CDSs, and stocks. Benefiting from the prompt inclusion of relevant information, the capital market data in general and CDSs in particular increasingly outperform the SLR while approaching the time of the credit event. Due to the higher classification performances, it seems plausible for creditors to align their investment decisions with capital market-based default indicators, i.e., to imitate the aggregate opinion of the market participants. Since imitation is considered to be the source of LPPL structures in financial time series, it is highly plausible to scan CDS spread developments for LPPL patterns. By establishing LPPL patterns in governmental CDS spread trajectories of some European crisis countries, the LPPL’s application to credit risk markets is extended. This novel piece of evidence further strengthens the claim that credit risk markets are adequate breeding grounds for LPPL patterns.

  1. Tweedie convergence: A mathematical basis for Taylor's power law, 1/f noise, and multifractality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendal, Wayne S.; Jørgensen, Bent

    2011-12-01

    Plants and animals of a given species tend to cluster within their habitats in accordance with a power function between their mean density and the variance. This relationship, Taylor's power law, has been variously explained by ecologists in terms of animal behavior, interspecies interactions, demographic effects, etc., all without consensus. Taylor's law also manifests within a wide range of other biological and physical processes, sometimes being referred to as fluctuation scaling and attributed to effects of the second law of thermodynamics. 1/f noise refers to power spectra that have an approximately inverse dependence on frequency. Like Taylor's law these spectra manifest from a wide range of biological and physical processes, without general agreement as to cause. One contemporary paradigm for 1/f noise has been based on the physics of self-organized criticality. We show here that Taylor's law (when derived from sequential data using the method of expanding bins) implies 1/f noise, and that both phenomena can be explained by a central limit-like effect that establishes the class of Tweedie exponential dispersion models as foci for this convergence. These Tweedie models are probabilistic models characterized by closure under additive and reproductive convolution as well as under scale transformation, and consequently manifest a variance to mean power function. We provide examples of Taylor's law, 1/f noise, and multifractality within the eigenvalue deviations of the Gaussian unitary and orthogonal ensembles, and show that these deviations conform to the Tweedie compound Poisson distribution. The Tweedie convergence theorem provides a unified mathematical explanation for the origin of Taylor's law and 1/f noise applicable to a wide range of biological, physical, and mathematical processes, as well as to multifractality.

  2. Mathematical analysis of a power-law form time dependent vector-borne disease transmission model.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Tridip; Saha, Bapi

    2017-03-06

    In the last few years, fractional order derivatives have been used in epidemiology to capture the memory phenomena. However, these models do not have proper biological justification in most of the cases and lack a derivation from a stochastic process. In this present manuscript, using theory of a stochastic process, we derived a general time dependent single strain vector borne disease model. It is shown that under certain choice of time dependent transmission kernel this model can be converted into the classical integer order system. When the time-dependent transmission follows a power law form, we showed that the model converted into a vector borne disease model with fractional order transmission. We explicitly derived the disease-free and endemic equilibrium of this new fractional order vector borne disease model. Using mathematical properties of nonlinear Volterra type integral equation it is shown that the unique disease-free state is globally asymptotically stable under certain condition. We define a threshold quantity which is epidemiologically known as the basic reproduction number (R0). It is shown that if R0 > 1, then the derived fractional order model has a unique endemic equilibrium. We analytically derived the condition for the local stability of the endemic equilibrium. To test the model capability to capture real epidemic, we calibrated our newly proposed model to weekly dengue incidence data of San Juan, Puerto Rico for the time period 30th April 1994 to 23rd April 1995. We estimated several parameters, including the order of the fractional derivative of the proposed model using aforesaid data. It is shown that our proposed fractional order model can nicely capture real epidemic.

  3. Solitons in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with two power-law nonlinear terms modulated in time and space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triki, Houria; Porsezian, K.; Choudhuri, Amitava

    2017-06-01

    A nonlinear Schrödinger equation that includes two terms with power-law nonlinearity and external potential modulated both on time and on the spatial coordinates is considered. The model appears in various branches of contemporary physics, especially in the case of lower values of the nonlinearity power. A significant generalization of the similarity transformations approach to construct explicit localized solutions for the model with arbitrary power-law nonlinearities is introduced. We obtain the exact analytical bright and kink soliton solutions of the governing equation for different nonlinearities and potentials that are of particular interest in applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics. Necessary conditions on the physical parameters for propagating envelope formation are presented. The obtained results can be straightforwardly applied to a large variety of nonlinear Schrödinger models and hence would be of value to understand nonlinear phenomena in a diversity of nonlinear media.

  4. Solitons in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with two power-law nonlinear terms modulated in time and space.

    PubMed

    Triki, Houria; Porsezian, K; Choudhuri, Amitava

    2017-06-01

    A nonlinear Schrödinger equation that includes two terms with power-law nonlinearity and external potential modulated both on time and on the spatial coordinates is considered. The model appears in various branches of contemporary physics, especially in the case of lower values of the nonlinearity power. A significant generalization of the similarity transformations approach to construct explicit localized solutions for the model with arbitrary power-law nonlinearities is introduced. We obtain the exact analytical bright and kink soliton solutions of the governing equation for different nonlinearities and potentials that are of particular interest in applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics. Necessary conditions on the physical parameters for propagating envelope formation are presented. The obtained results can be straightforwardly applied to a large variety of nonlinear Schrödinger models and hence would be of value to understand nonlinear phenomena in a diversity of nonlinear media.

  5. Branching random walk with step size coming from a power law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ayan; Subhra Hazra, Rajat; Roy, Parthanil

    2015-09-01

    In their seminal work, Brunet and Derrida made predictions on the random point configurations associated with branching random walks. We shall discuss the limiting behavior of such point configurations when the displacement random variables come from a power law. In particular, we establish that two prediction of remains valid in this setup and investigate various other issues mentioned in their paper.

  6. Model-based discrete relaxation process representation of band-limited power-law attenuation.

    PubMed

    Näsholm, Sven Peter

    2013-03-01

    Frequency-dependent acoustical loss due to a multitude of physical mechanisms is commonly modeled by multiple relaxations. For discrete relaxation distributions, such models correspond with causal wave equations of integer-order temporal derivatives. It has also been shown that certain continuous distributions may give causal wave equations with fractional-order temporal derivatives. This paper demonstrates analytically that if the wave-frequency ω satisfies ΩL≪ω  ≪ΩH, a continuous relaxation distribution populating only Ω∈[ΩL,ΩH] gives the same effective wave equation as for a fully populated distribution. This insight sparks the main contribution: the elaboration of a method to determine discrete relaxation parameters intended for mimicking a desired attenuation behavior for band-limited waves. In particular, power-law attenuation is discussed as motivated by its prevalence in complex media, e.g., biological tissue. A Mittag-Leffler function related distribution of relaxation mechanisms has previously been shown to be related to the fractional Zener wave equation of three power-law attenuation regimes. Because these regimes correspond to power-law regimes in the relaxation distribution, the idea is to sample the distribution's compressibility contributions evenly in logarithmic frequency while appropriately taking the stepsize into account. This work thence claims to provide a model-based approach to determination of discrete relaxation parameters intended to adequately model attenuation power-laws.

  7. Realization of power law inflation & variants via variation of the strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect

    AlHallak, M.; Chamoun, N.

    2016-09-05

    We present a model of power law inflation generated by variation of the strong coupling constant. We then extend the model to two varying coupling constants which leads to a potential consisting of a linear combination of exponential terms. Some variants of the latter may be self-consistent and can accommodate the experimental data of the Planck 2015 and other recent experiments.

  8. Fractal approach towards power-law coherency to measure cross-correlations between time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2017-09-01

    We focus on power-law coherency as an alternative approach towards studying power-law cross-correlations between simultaneously recorded time series. To be able to study empirical data, we introduce three estimators of the power-law coherency parameter Hρ based on popular techniques usually utilized for studying power-law cross-correlations - detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA), detrending moving-average cross-correlation analysis (DMCA) and height cross-correlation analysis (HXA). In the finite sample properties study, we focus on the bias, variance and mean squared error of the estimators. We find that the DMCA-based method is the safest choice among the three. The HXA method is reasonable for long time series with at least 104 observations, which can be easily attainable in some disciplines but problematic in others. The DCCA-based method does not provide favorable properties which even deteriorate with an increasing time series length. The paper opens a new venue towards studying cross-correlations between time series.

  9. Imaging viscoelastic properties of live cells by AFM: power-law rheology on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Fabian M; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schierbaum, Nicolas; Goldmann, Wolfgang H; Fabry, Ben; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2015-06-21

    We developed force clamp force mapping (FCFM), an atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique for measuring the viscoelastic creep behavior of live cells with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. FCFM combines force-distance curves with an added force clamp phase during tip-sample contact. From the creep behavior measured during the force clamp phase, quantitative viscoelastic sample properties are extracted. We validate FCFM on soft polyacrylamide gels. We find that the creep behavior of living cells conforms to a power-law material model. By recording short (50-60 ms) force clamp measurements in rapid succession, we generate, for the first time, two-dimensional maps of power-law exponent and modulus scaling parameter. Although these maps reveal large spatial variations of both parameters across the cell surface, we obtain robust mean values from the several hundreds of measurements performed on each cell. Measurements on mouse embryonic fibroblasts show that the mean power-law exponents and the mean modulus scaling parameters differ greatly among individual cells, but both parameters are highly correlated: stiffer cells consistently show a smaller power-law exponent. This correlation allows us to distinguish between wild-type cells and cells that lack vinculin, a dominant protein of the focal adhesion complex, even though the mean values of viscoelastic properties between wildtype and knockout cells did not differ significantly. Therefore, FCFM spatially resolves viscoelastic sample properties and can uncover subtle mechanical signatures of proteins in living cells.

  10. Exponential and power-law contact distributions represent different atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A M

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that the dynamics of plant disease epidemics are very sensitive to the functional form of the contact distribution?the probability distribution function for the distance of viable fungal spore movement until deposition. Epidemics can take the form of a constant-velocity travelling wave when the contact distribution is exponentially bounded. Fat-tailed contact distributions, on the other hand, lead to epidemic spreads that accelerate over time. Some empirical data for contact distributions can be well represented by negative exponentials while other data are better represented by fat-tailed inverse power laws. Here we present data from numerical simulations that suggest that negative exponentials and inverse power laws are not competing candidate forms of the contact distribution but are instead representative of different atmospheric conditions. Contact distributions for atmospheric boundary-layers with stabilities ranging from strongly convective (a hot windless day time scenario) to stable stratification (a cold windy night time scenario) but without precipitation events are calculated using well-established state-of-the-art Lagrangian stochastic (particle tracking) dispersal models. Contact distributions are found to be well represented by exponentials for strongly convective conditions; a -3/2 inverse power law for convective boundary-layers with wind shear; and by a -2/3 inverse power law for stably stratified conditions.

  11. Fokker-Planck equation of distributions of financial returns and power laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, Didier

    2001-02-01

    Our purpose is to relate the Fokker-Planck formalism proposed by [Friedrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 5224] for the distribution of stock market returns to the empirically well-established power-law distribution with an exponent in the range 3-5. We show how to use Friedrich et al.'s formalism to predict that the distribution of returns is indeed asymptotically a power law with an exponent μ that can be determined from the Kramers-Moyal coefficients determined by Friedrich et al. However, with their values determined for the U.S. dollar-German mark exchange rates, the exponent μ predicted from their theory is found to be around 12, in disagreement with the often-quoted value between 3 and 5. This could be explained by the fact that the large asymptotic value of 12 does not apply to real data that lie still far from the stationary state of the Fokker-Planck description. Another possibility is that power laws are inadequate. The mechanism for the power law is based on the presence of multiplicative noise across time-scales, which is different from the multiplicative noise at fixed time-scales implicit in the ARCH models developed in the Finance literature.

  12. Graph Structure in Three National Academic Webs: Power Laws with Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike; Wilkinson, David

    2003-01-01

    Explains how the Web can be modeled as a mathematical graph and analyzes the graph structures of three national university publicly indexable Web sites from Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. Topics include commercial search engines and academic Web link research; method-analysis environment and data sets; and power laws. (LRW)

  13. Does Stevens's Power Law for Brightness Extend to Perceptual Brightness Averaging?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Stevens's power law ([Psi][infinity][Phi][beta]) captures the relationship between physical ([Phi]) and perceived ([Psi]) magnitude for many stimulus continua (e.g., luminance and brightness, weight and heaviness, area and size). The exponent ([beta]) indicates whether perceptual magnitude grows more slowly than physical magnitude ([beta] less…

  14. Power-law spatial correlations in arrays of locally coupled lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, Fabien; Thornburg, K. S., Jr.; Fabiny, Larry; Moller, Michael; Roy, Rajarshi

    2004-09-01

    We investigate correlations of the intensity fluctuations of two-dimensional arrays of non-identical, locally-coupled lasers, numerically and experimentally. We find evidence of a power-law dependence of spatial correlations as a function of laser pair distance (or coupling strength) near the phase-locking threshold.

  15. Power-Law Spatial Correlations in Arrays of Locally Coupled Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, Fabien; Thornburg, K. Scott; Fabiny, L.; Möller, Michael; Roy, Rajarshi

    2004-03-01

    We investigate correlations of the intensity fluctuations of two-dimensional arrays of nonidentical, locally coupled lasers, numerically and experimentally. We find evidence of a power-law dependence of spatial correlations as a function of laser pair distance (or coupling strength) near the phase-locking threshold.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Stability of the Estimated Parameters of the Binary Power Law

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The binary power law has become a standard approach for describing and quantifying spatial patterns of disease incidence and summarizing the spatial dynamics of disease over the course of an epidemic. However, the portability and temporal stability of parameter estimates of the binary form of the p...

  17. Comments Regarding the Binary Power Law for Heterogeneity of Disease Incidence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The binary power law (BPL) has been successfully used to characterize heterogeneity (over dispersion or small-scale aggregation) of disease incidence for many plant pathosystems. With the BPL, the log of the observed variance is a linear function of the log of the theoretical variance for a binomial...

  18. Graph Structure in Three National Academic Webs: Power Laws with Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike; Wilkinson, David

    2003-01-01

    Explains how the Web can be modeled as a mathematical graph and analyzes the graph structures of three national university publicly indexable Web sites from Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. Topics include commercial search engines and academic Web link research; method-analysis environment and data sets; and power laws. (LRW)

  19. Power laws reveal phase transitions in landscape controls of fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Donald McKenzie; Maureen C. Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the environmental controls on historical wildfires, and how they changed across spatial scales, is difficult because there are no surviving explicit records of either weather or vegetation (fuels). Here we show how power laws associated with fire-event time series arise in limited domains of parameters that represent critical transitions in the controls...

  20. Does Stevens's Power Law for Brightness Extend to Perceptual Brightness Averaging?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Stevens's power law ([Psi][infinity][Phi][beta]) captures the relationship between physical ([Phi]) and perceived ([Psi]) magnitude for many stimulus continua (e.g., luminance and brightness, weight and heaviness, area and size). The exponent ([beta]) indicates whether perceptual magnitude grows more slowly than physical magnitude ([beta] less…

  1. Simulation of mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple: a power law approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi Souraki, B.; Tondro, H.; Ghavami, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, unsteady one-dimensional mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple was modeled using an approximate mathematical model. The mathematical model has been developed based on a power law profile approximation for moisture and solute concentrations in the spatial direction. The proposed model was validated by the experimental water loss and solute gain data, obtained from osmotic dehydration of infinite slab and cylindrical shape samples of apple in sucrose solutions (30, 40 and 50 % w/w), at different temperatures (30, 40 and 50 °C). The proposed model's predictions were also compared with the exact analytical and also a parabolic approximation model's predictions. The values of mean relative errors respect to the experimental data were estimated between 4.5 and 8.1 %, 6.5 and 10.2 %, and 15.0 and 19.1 %, for exact analytical, power law and parabolic approximation methods, respectively. Although the parabolic approximation leads to simpler relations, the power law approximation method results in higher accuracy of average concentrations over the whole domain of dehydration time. Considering both simplicity and precision of the mathematical models, the power law model for short dehydration times and the simplified exact analytical model for long dehydration times could be used for explanation of the variations of the average water loss and solute gain in the whole domain of dimensionless times.

  2. Power-law-like distributions in biomedical publications and research funding.

    PubMed

    Su, Andrew I; Hogenesch, John B

    2007-01-01

    Gene annotation, as measured by links to the biomedical literature and funded grants, is governed by a power law, indicating that researchers favor the extensive study of relatively few genes. This emphasizes the need for data-driven science to accomplish genome-wide gene annotation.

  3. Apparent power-law behavior of conductance in disordered quasi-one-dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Rodin, A S; Fogler, M M

    2010-09-03

    The dependence of hopping conductance on temperature and voltage for an ensemble of modestly long one-dimensional wires is studied numerically using the shortest-path algorithm. In a wide range of parameters this dependence can be approximated by a power law rather than the usual stretched-exponential form. The relation to recent experiments and prior analytical theory is discussed.

  4. The effect of a power-law mantle viscosity on trench retreat rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Adam F.; Becker, Thorsten W.

    2017-01-01

    The subduction of lithospheric plates is partitioned between subducting plate motion and lateral slab migration (i.e. trench retreat and advance). We use 3-D, dynamic models of subduction to address the role of a power-law mantle viscosity on subduction dynamics and, in particular, rates of trench retreat. For all numerical models tested, we find that a power-law rheology results in reduced rates of trench retreat, and elevated slab dip angles, relative to the equivalent isoviscous mantle model. We analyse the asthenospheric pressure distribution and the style of mantle flow, which exhibits only limited variability as a function of mantle rheology, in order to compute estimates of the mantle forces associated with subduction. The inclusion of a power-law rheology reduces the mantle shear force (which resists subducting plate motion) to a greater degree than it reduces the dynamic pressure gradient across the slab (which resists trench retreat). Therefore, the inclusion of a power-law mantle rheology favours a shift towards a subduction mode with a reduced trench retreat component, typically a relative reduction of order 25 per cent in our 3-D models. We suggest that this mechanism may be of importance for reducing the high trench retreat rates observed in many previous models to levels more in line with the average subduction partitioning observed on Earth at present (i.e. trench velocity ≤ plate velocity), for most absolute plate motion reference frames.

  5. Geomorphological and hydrological implications of a given hydraulic geometry relationship, beyond the power-law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, JongChun; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Channel geometry and hydraulic characteristics of a given river network, i.e., spatio-temporal variability of width, depth, and velocity, can be described as power functional relationships of flow discharge, named 'hydraulic geometry' (Leopold and Maddock, 1953). Many studies have focused on the implication of this power-law itself, i.e., self-similarity, and accordingly its exponents. Coefficients of the power functional relationships, on the contrary, have received little attention. They are often regarded as empirical constants, determined by 'best fitting' to the power-law without significant scientific implications. Here, we investigate and claim that power-law coefficients of hydraulic geometry relationships carry vital information of a given river system. We approach the given problem on the basis of 'basin hydraulic geometry' formulation (Stall and Fok, 1968) which decomposes power-law coefficients into more elementary constants. The linkage between classical power-law relationship (Leopold and Maddock, 1953) and the basin hydraulic geometry is provided by Paik and Kumar (2004). On the basis of this earlier study, it can be shown that coefficients and exponents of power-law hydraulic geometry are interrelated. In this sense, we argue that more elementary constants that constitute both exponents and coefficients carry important messages. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how these elementary constants vary over a wide range of catchments provided from Stall and Fok (1968) and Stall and Yang (1970). Findings of this study can provide new insights on fundamental understanding about hydraulic geometry relationships. Further, we expect that this understanding can help interpretation of hydraulic geometry relationship in the context of flood propagation through a river system as well. Keywords: Hydraulic geometry; Power-law; River network References Leopold, L. B., & Maddock, T. J. (1953). The hydraulic geometry of stream channels and some physiographic

  6. Widespread occurrence of power-law distributions in inter-repeat distances shaped by genome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Klimopoulos, Alexandros; Sellis, Diamantis; Almirantis, Yannis

    2012-05-10

    Repetitive DNA sequences derived from transposable elements (TE) are distributed in a non-random way, co-clustering with other classes of repeat elements, genes and other genomic components. In a previous work we reported power-law-like size distributions (linearity in log-log scale) in the spatial arrangement of Alu and LINE1 elements in the human genome. Here we investigate the large-scale features of the spatial arrangement of all principal classes of TEs in 14 genomes from phylogenetically distant organisms by studying the size distribution of inter-repeat distances. Power-law-like size distributions are found to be widespread, extending up to several orders of magnitude. In order to understand the emergence of this distributional pattern, we introduce an evolutionary scenario, which includes (i) Insertions of DNA segments (e.g., more recent repeats) into the considered sequence and (ii) Eliminations of members of the studied TE family. In the proposed model we also incorporate the potential for transposition events (characteristic of the DNA transposons' life-cycle) and segmental duplications. Simulations reproduce the main features of the observed size distributions. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of various genomic features on the presence and extent of power-law size distributions including TE class and age, mode of parental TE transmission, GC content, deletion and recombination rates in the studied genomic region, etc. Our observations corroborate the hypothesis that insertions of genomic material and eliminations of repeats are at the basis of power-laws in inter-repeat distances. The existence of these power-laws could facilitate the formation of the recently proposed "fractal globule" for the confined chromatin organization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Power-law ansatz in complex systems: Excessive loss of information.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Chang, Chin-De; Chang, Ching-Hao; Tsai, Meng-Xue; Hsu, Nan-Jung; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquity of power-law relations in empirical data displays physicists' love of simple laws and uncovering common causes among seemingly unrelated phenomena. However, many reported power laws lack statistical support and mechanistic backings, not to mention discrepancies with real data are often explained away as corrections due to finite size or other variables. We propose a simple experiment and rigorous statistical procedures to look into these issues. Making use of the fact that the occurrence rate and pulse intensity of crumple sound obey a power law with an exponent that varies with material, we simulate a complex system with two driving mechanisms by crumpling two different sheets together. The probability function of the crumple sound is found to transit from two power-law terms to a bona fide power law as compaction increases. In addition to showing the vicinity of these two distributions in the phase space, this observation nicely demonstrates the effect of interactions to bring about a subtle change in macroscopic behavior and more information may be retrieved if the data are subject to sorting. Our analyses are based on the Akaike information criterion that is a direct measurement of information loss and emphasizes the need to strike a balance between model simplicity and goodness of fit. As a show of force, the Akaike information criterion also found the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes and the scale-free model for a brain functional network, a two-dimensional sandpile, and solar flare intensity to suffer an excessive loss of information. They resemble more the crumpled-together ball at low compactions in that there appear to be two driving mechanisms that take turns occurring.

  8. Power-law ansatz in complex systems: Excessive loss of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Chang, Chin-De; Chang, Ching-Hao; Tsai, Meng-Xue; Hsu, Nan-Jung; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquity of power-law relations in empirical data displays physicists' love of simple laws and uncovering common causes among seemingly unrelated phenomena. However, many reported power laws lack statistical support and mechanistic backings, not to mention discrepancies with real data are often explained away as corrections due to finite size or other variables. We propose a simple experiment and rigorous statistical procedures to look into these issues. Making use of the fact that the occurrence rate and pulse intensity of crumple sound obey a power law with an exponent that varies with material, we simulate a complex system with two driving mechanisms by crumpling two different sheets together. The probability function of the crumple sound is found to transit from two power-law terms to a bona fide power law as compaction increases. In addition to showing the vicinity of these two distributions in the phase space, this observation nicely demonstrates the effect of interactions to bring about a subtle change in macroscopic behavior and more information may be retrieved if the data are subject to sorting. Our analyses are based on the Akaike information criterion that is a direct measurement of information loss and emphasizes the need to strike a balance between model simplicity and goodness of fit. As a show of force, the Akaike information criterion also found the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes and the scale-free model for a brain functional network, a two-dimensional sandpile, and solar flare intensity to suffer an excessive loss of information. They resemble more the crumpled-together ball at low compactions in that there appear to be two driving mechanisms that take turns occurring.

  9. PLNoise: a package for exact numerical simulation of power-law noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, Edoardo

    2006-08-01

    Many simulations of stochastic processes require colored noises: here I describe a small program library that generates samples with a tunable power-law spectral density: the algorithm can be modified to generate more general colored noises, and is exact for all time steps, even when they are unevenly spaced (as may often happen in the case of astronomical data, see e.g. [N.R. Lomb, Astrophys. Space Sci. 39 (1976) 447]. The method is exact in the sense that it reproduces a process that is theoretically guaranteed to produce a range-limited power-law spectrum 1/f with -1<β⩽1. The algorithm has a well-behaved computational complexity, it produces a nearly perfect Gaussian noise, and its computational efficiency depends on the required degree of noise Gaussianity. Program summaryTitle of program: PLNoise Catalogue identifier:ADXV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Programming language used: ANSI C Computer: Any computer with an ANSI C compiler: the package has been tested with gcc version 3.2.3 on Red Hat Linux 3.2.3-52 and gcc version 4.0.0 and 4.0.1 on Apple Mac OS X-10.4 Operating system: All operating systems capable of running an ANSI C compiler No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:6238 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:52 387 Distribution format:tar.gz RAM: The code of the test program is very compact (about 50 Kbytes), but the program works with list management and allocates memory dynamically; in a typical run (like the one discussed in Section 4 in the long write-up) with average list length 2ṡ10, the RAM taken by the list is 200 Kbytes. External routines: The package needs external routines to generate uniform and exponential deviates. The implementation described here uses the random number generation library ranlib freely available from Netlib [B

  10. Comment on "Bose-Einstein condensation with a finite number of particles in a power-law trap"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha, José M. B.

    2015-07-01

    In Jaouadi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 83, 023616 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.023616] the authors derive an analytical finite-size expansion for the Bose-Einstein condensation critical temperature of an ideal Bose gas in a generic power-law trap. In the case of a harmonic trap, this expansion adds higher-order terms to the well-known first-order correction. We point out a delicate point in connection to these results, showing that the claims of Jaouadi et al. should be treated with caution. In particular, for a harmonic trap, the given expansion yields results that, depending on what is considered to be the critical temperature of the finite system, do not generally improve on the established first-order correction. For some nonharmonic traps, the results differ at first order from other results in the literature.

  11. SCATTER-DOMINATED INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN LARGE GRADUAL EVENTS AND THE FORMATION OF DOUBLE POWER-LAW DIFFERENTIAL FLUENCE SPECTRA OF GROUND-LEVEL EVENTS DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gen; Lee, Martin A.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of scatter-dominated interplanetary transport on the spectral properties of the differential fluence of large gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are investigated analytically. The model assumes for simplicity radial constant solar wind and radial magnetic field. The radial diffusion coefficient is calculated with quasilinear theory by assuming a spectrum of Alfvén waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field. Cross-field transport is neglected. The model takes into consideration several essential features of gradual event transport: nearly isotropic ion distributions, adiabatic deceleration in a divergent solar wind, and particle radial scattering mean free paths increasing with energy. Assuming an impulsive and spherically symmetric injection of SEPs with a power-law spectrum near the Sun, the predicted differential fluence spectrum exhibits at 1 AU three distinctive power laws for different energy domains. The model naturally reproduces the spectral features of the double power-law proton differential fluence spectra that tend to be observed in extremely large SEP events. We select nine western ground-level events (GLEs) out of the 16 GLEs during Solar Cycle 23 and fit the observed double power-law spectra to the analytical predictions. The compression ratio of the accelerating shock wave, the power-law index of the ambient wave intensity, and the proton radial scattering mean free path are determined for the nine GLEs. The derived parameters are generally in agreement with the characteristic values expected for large gradual SEP events.

  12. Power laws and self-organized criticality in theory and nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Dimitrije; Gros, Claudius

    2014-03-01

    Power laws and distributions with heavy tails are common features of many complex systems. Examples are the distribution of earthquake magnitudes, solar flare intensities and the sizes of neuronal avalanches. Previously, researchers surmised that a single general concept may act as an underlying generative mechanism, with the theory of self organized criticality being a weighty contender. The power-law scaling observed in the primary statistical analysis is an important, but by far not the only feature characterizing experimental data. The scaling function, the distribution of energy fluctuations, the distribution of inter-event waiting times, and other higher order spatial and temporal correlations, have seen increased consideration over the last years. Leading to realization that basic models, like the original sandpile model, are often insufficient to adequately describe the complexity of real-world systems with power-law distribution. Consequently, a substantial amount of effort has gone into developing new and extended models and, hitherto, three classes of models have emerged. The first line of models is based on a separation between the time scales of an external drive and an internal dissipation, and includes the original sandpile model and its extensions, like the dissipative earthquake model. Within this approach the steady state is close to criticality in terms of an absorbing phase transition. The second line of models is based on external drives and internal dynamics competing on similar time scales and includes the coherent noise model, which has a non-critical steady state characterized by heavy-tailed distributions. The third line of models proposes a non-critical self-organizing state, being guided by an optimization principle, such as the concept of highly optimized tolerance. We present a comparative overview regarding distinct modeling approaches together with a discussion of their potential relevance as underlying generative models for real

  13. Focus expansion and stability of the spread parameter estimate of the power law model for dispersal gradients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Empirical and mechanistic modeling indicate that aerially transmitted pathogens follow a power law, resulting in dispersive epidemic waves. The spread parameter (b) of the power law model, which defines the distance travelled by the epidemic wave front, has been found to be approximately 2 for sever...

  14. Power-law correlations in finance-related Google searches, and their cross-correlations with volatility and traded volume: Evidence from the Dow Jones Industrial components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2015-06-01

    We study power-law correlations properties of the Google search queries for Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) component stocks. Examining the daily data of the searched terms with a combination of the rescaled range and rescaled variance tests together with the detrended fluctuation analysis, we show that the searches are in fact power-law correlated with Hurst exponents between 0.8 and 1.1. The general interest in the DJIA stocks is thus strongly persistent. We further reinvestigate the cross-correlation structure between the searches, traded volume and volatility of the component stocks using the detrended cross-correlation and detrending moving-average cross-correlation coefficients. Contrary to the universal power-law correlations structure of the related Google searches, the results suggest that there is no universal relationship between the online search queries and the analyzed financial measures. Even though we confirm positive correlation for a majority of pairs, there are several pairs with insignificant or even negative correlations. In addition, the correlations vary quite strongly across scales.

  15. Localized modes of the (n+1)-dimensional Schrödinger equation with power-law nonlinearities in PT-symmetric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Chao-Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Fan, Yan; Chen, Liang

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the generalized (n+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with power-law nonlinearity in PT-symmetric potentials, and derive two families of analytical sech-type and Gaussian-type localized modes (soliton solutions). Based on these analytical solutions, the powers, power-flow densities and the phase jumps are analyzed. The linear stability analysis and the direct numerical simulation for these exact solutions indicate that sech-type and Gaussian-type solutions are both stable below some thresholds for the imaginary part of PT-symmetric potentials (except for the extended Rosen-Morse potential) in the focusing power-law nonlinear medium, while they are always unstable in the defocusing power-law nonlinear medium. The gain (loss) related to the values of the imaginary part of the potential (Wn) should be enough small compared with the fixed value of the real part of the potential (V0) in order to ensure the stability of exact solutions.

  16. Fractional-order leaky integrate-and-fire model with long-term memory and power law dynamics.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu W; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Mondal, Argha

    2017-09-01

    Pyramidal neurons produce different spiking patterns to process information, communicate with each other and transform information. These spiking patterns have complex and multiple time scale dynamics that have been described with the fractional-order leaky integrate-and-Fire (FLIF) model. Models with fractional (non-integer) order differentiation that generalize power law dynamics can be used to describe complex temporal voltage dynamics. The main characteristic of FLIF model is that it depends on all past values of the voltage that causes long-term memory. The model produces spikes with high interspike interval variability and displays several spiking properties such as upward spike-frequency adaptation and long spike latency in response to a constant stimulus. We show that the subthreshold voltage and the firing rate of the fractional-order model make transitions from exponential to power law dynamics when the fractional order α decreases from 1 to smaller values. The firing rate displays different types of spike timing adaptation caused by changes on initial values. We also show that the voltage-memory trace and fractional coefficient are the causes of these different types of spiking properties. The voltage-memory trace that represents the long-term memory has a feedback regulatory mechanism and affects spiking activity. The results suggest that fractional-order models might be appropriate for understanding multiple time scale neuronal dynamics. Overall, a neuron with fractional dynamics displays history dependent activities that might be very useful and powerful for effective information processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Cardiomyocytes Exhibit Beat Rate Variability and Power-Law Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Yael; Weissman, Amir; Schick, Revital; Barad, Lili; Novak, Atara; Meiry, Gideon; Goldberg, Stanislav; Lorber, Avraham; Rosen, Michael R.; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Binah, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Background The sinoatrial node is the main impulse-generating tissue in the heart. Atrioventricular conduction block and arrhythmias caused by sinoatrial node dysfunction are clinically important and generally treated with electronic pacemakers. Although an excellent solution, electronic pacemakers incorporate limitations that have stimulated research on biological pacing. To assess the suitability of potential biological pacemakers, we tested the hypothesis that the spontaneous electric activity of human embryonic stem cell– derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) and induced pluripotent stem cell– derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) exhibit beat rate variability and power-law behavior comparable to those of human sinoatrial node. Methods and Results We recorded extracellular electrograms from hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs under stable conditions for up to 15 days. The beat rate time series of the spontaneous activity were examined in terms of their power spectral density and additional methods derived from nonlinear dynamics. The major findings were that the mean beat rate of hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs was stable throughout the 15-day follow-up period and was similar in both cell types, that hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs exhibited intrinsic beat rate variability and fractal behavior, and that isoproterenol increased and carbamylcholine decreased the beating rate in both hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs. Conclusions This is the first study demonstrating that hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs exhibit beat rate variability and power-law behavior as in humans, thus supporting the potential capability of these cell sources to serve as biological pacemakers. Our ability to generate sinoatrial-compatible spontaneous cardiomyocytes from the patient’s own hair (via keratinocyte-derived iPSCs), thus eliminating the critical need for immunosuppression, renders these myocytes an attractive cell source as biological pacemakers. PMID:22261196

  18. Steady-state global optimization of metabolic non-linear dynamic models through recasting into power-law canonical models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Design of newly engineered microbial strains for biotechnological purposes would greatly benefit from the development of realistic mathematical models for the processes to be optimized. Such models can then be analyzed and, with the development and application of appropriate optimization techniques, one could identify the modifications that need to be made to the organism in order to achieve the desired biotechnological goal. As appropriate models to perform such an analysis are necessarily non-linear and typically non-convex, finding their global optimum is a challenging task. Canonical modeling techniques, such as Generalized Mass Action (GMA) models based on the power-law formalism, offer a possible solution to this problem because they have a mathematical structure that enables the development of specific algorithms for global optimization. Results Based on the GMA canonical representation, we have developed in previous works a highly efficient optimization algorithm and a set of related strategies for understanding the evolution of adaptive responses in cellular metabolism. Here, we explore the possibility of recasting kinetic non-linear models into an equivalent GMA model, so that global optimization on the recast GMA model can be performed. With this technique, optimization is greatly facilitated and the results are transposable to the original non-linear problem. This procedure is straightforward for a particular class of non-linear models known as Saturable and Cooperative (SC) models that extend the power-law formalism to deal with saturation and cooperativity. Conclusions Our results show that recasting non-linear kinetic models into GMA models is indeed an appropriate strategy that helps overcoming some of the numerical difficulties that arise during the global optimization task. PMID:21867520

  19. Exact solution of an electroosmotic flow for generalized Burgers fluid in cylindrical domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Farooq, Asma; Khan, Waqar Azeem; Hussain, Mazhar

    The present paper reports a theoretical study of the dynamics of an electroosmotic flow (EOF) in cylindrical domain. The Cauchy momentum equation is first simplified by incorporating the electrostatic body force in the electric double layer and the generalized Burgers fluid constitutive model. The electric potential distribution is given by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. After solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation with electrostatic body force is solved analytically by using the temporal Fourier and finite Hankel transforms. The effects of important involved parameters are examined and presented graphically. The results obtained reveal that the magnitude of velocity increases with increase of the Debye-Huckel and electrokinetic parameters. Further, it is shown that the results presented for generalized Burgers fluid are quite general so that results for the Burgers, Oldroyd-B, Maxwell and Newtonian fluids can be obtained as limiting cases.

  20. Correlations of Power-law Spectral and QPO Features In Black Hole Candidate Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorito, Ralph; Titarchuk, Lev

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between low frequency QPO s and the spectral power law index for a number of black hole candidate sources (BHCs), when these sources exhibit quasi-steady hard x-ray emission states. The dominant long standing interpretation of QPO's is that they are produced in and are the signature of the thermal accretion disk. Paradoxically, strong QPO's are present even in the cases where the thermal component is negligible. We present a model which identifies the origin of the QPO's and relates them directly to the properties of a compact coronal region which is bounded by the adjustment from Kepleriaa to sub-Kelperian inflow into the BH, and is primarily responsible for the observed power law spectrum. The model also predicts the relationship between high and low frequency QPO's and shows how BH's can be unique identified from observations of the soft states of NS's and BHC's.