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Sample records for generate reparative dentin

  1. Pulp stem cells: implication in reparative dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova-Nakov, Sasha; Baudry, Anne; Harichane, Yassine; Kellermann, Odile; Goldberg, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Many dental pulp stem cells are neural crest derivatives essential for lifelong maintenance of tooth functions and homeostasis as well as tooth repair. These cells may be directly implicated in the healing process or indirectly involved in cell-to-cell diffusion of paracrine messages to resident (pulpoblasts) or nonresident cells (migrating mesenchymal cells). The identity of the pulp progenitors and the mechanisms sustaining their regenerative capacity remain largely unknown. Taking advantage of the A4 cell line, a multipotent stem cell derived from the molar pulp of mouse embryo, we investigated the capacity of these pulp-derived precursors to induce in vivo the formation of a reparative dentin-like structure upon implantation within the pulp of a rodent incisor or a first maxillary molar after surgical exposure. One month after the pulp injury alone, a nonmineralized fibrous matrix filled the mesial part of the coronal pulp chamber. Upon A4 cell implantation, a mineralized osteodentin was formed in the implantation site without affecting the structure and vitality of the residual pulp in the central and distal parts of the pulp chamber. These results show that dental pulp stem cells can induce the formation of reparative dentin and therefore constitute a useful tool for pulp therapies. Finally, reparative dentin was also built up when A4 progenitors were performed by alginate beads, suggesting that alginate is a suitable carrier for cell implantation in teeth. PMID:24698687

  2. In Vitro Reparative Dentin: a Biochemical and Morphological Study

    PubMed Central

    Teti, G.; Salvatore, V.; Ruggeri, A.; Manzoli, L.; Gesi, M.; Orsini, G.; Falconi, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, starting from human dental pulp cells cultured in vitro, we simulated reparative dentinogenesis using a medium supplemented with different odontogenic inductors. The differentiation of dental pulp cells in odontoblast-like cells was evaluated by means of staining, and ultramorphological, biochemical and biomolecular methods. Alizarin red staining showed mineral deposition while transmission electron microscopy revealed a synthesis of extracellular matrix fibers during the differentiation process. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the differentiated phenotype expressed odontoblast markers, such as Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) and Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP), as well as type I collagen. Quantitative data regarding the mRNA expression of DMP1, DSP and type I collagen were obtained by Real Time PCR. Immunofluorescence data demonstrated the various localizations of DSP and DMP1 during odontoblast differentiation. Based on our results, we obtained odontoblast-like cells which simulated the reparative dentin processes in order to better investigate the mechanism of odontoblast differentiation, and dentin extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization. PMID:24085272

  3. Osteopontin Is Essential for Type I Collagen Secretion in Reparative Dentin.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Nakatomi, M; Ida-Yonemochi, H; Ohshima, H

    2016-08-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that is a prominent component of the mineralized extracellular matrix of bone. The secretion of OPN by immunocompetent cells plays a role in the differentiation of odontoblast-like cells during pulpal healing following tooth transplantation. This study aimed to clarify the role of OPN during reparative dentinogenesis. A groove-shaped cavity was prepared on the mesial surface of the upper first molars of wild-type (WT) and Opn knockout (KO) mice, and the samples were collected at intervals of 1 to 14 d. The demineralized sections were processed for immunohistochemistry for Ki67, nestin, OPN, dentin sialoprotein (DSP), integrin αvβ3, and type I collagen; in situ hybridization for Opn, col1a1, and dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp); and apoptosis assay. For the loss and gain of function experiments, an in vitro culture assay for evaluating dentin-pulp complex regeneration was performed. On day 1 in WT mice, odontoblasts beneath the affected dentin lost nestin immunoreactivity. On day 3, the expression of Opn was recognized at the mesial dental pulp, and OPN was deposited along the predentin-dentin border. Nestin-positive newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells expressed both Dspp and col1a1 and showed positive immunoreactivity for integrin αvβ3, DSP, and type I collagen. Until day 14, reparative dentin formation continued next to the preexisting dentin at the mesial coronal pulp. In contrast, there was no reparative dentin in the Opn KO mice where nestin- and DSP-positive newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells lacked immunoreaction for type I collagen. The in vitro organ culture demonstrated that the administration of recombinant OPN rescued the type I collagen secretion by odontoblast-like cells in the Opn KO mice. The results suggested that the deposition of OPN at the calcification front is essential for the type I collagen secretion by newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells to form

  4. Effects of human vascular endothelial growth factor on reparative dentin formation

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUAN; LIU, XIA; YU, WEIXIAN; ZHANG, YINGLI; SHI, CE; NI, SHILEI; LIU, QILIN; LI, XIANGWEI; SUN, YINGJIAN; ZHENG, CHANGYU; SUN, HONGCHEN

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge for dentists to save dental pulp in patients with pulp disease without resorting to root canal therapy. Formation of tertiary dentin to maintain pulp vitality is a key odontoblast response to dental pulp injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most potent angiogenic and vasculogenic factor involved in tertiary dentin formation. It was hypothesized that VEGF may be used to treat pulp diseases such as pulpitis. To explore this hypothesis, the first step was to assess whether VEGF affects dental pulp cells to promote reparative dentin formation. In the current study, an AdCMV-hVEGF vector was constructed to deliver hVEGF into dental pulp cells of exfoliated deciduous teeth (hDPCs) in vitro and dental pulp cells in a rat model in vivo. The collected data clearly demonstrated that hVEGF increased alkaline phosphatase and mineralization by enzymatic activity. RT-qPCR data demonstrated that hVEGF significantly increased the expression levels of genes commonly involved in osteogenesis/odontogenesis. Data from the in vivo assays indicated that hVEGF enhanced pulp cell proliferation and neovascularization, and markedly increased formation of reparative dentin in dental pulp. The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that hVEGF may have potential clinical applications, thus may aid in the development of novel treatment strategies for dental pulpitis. PMID:26647730

  5. Effects of human vascular endothelial growth factor on reparative dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Xia; Yu, Weixian; Zhang, Yingli; Shi, Ce; Ni, Shilei; Liu, Qilin; Li, Xiangwei; Sun, Yingjian; Zheng, Changyu; Sun, Hongchen

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge for dentists to save dental pulp in patients with pulp disease without resorting to root canal therapy. Formation of tertiary dentin to maintain pulp vitality is a key odontoblast response to dental pulp injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most potent angiogenic and vasculogenic factor involved in tertiary dentin formation. It was hypothesized that VEGF may be used to treat pulp diseases such as pulpitis. To explore this hypothesis, the first step was to assess whether VEGF affects dental pulp cells to promote reparative dentin formation. In the current study, an AdCMV‑hVEGF vector was constructed to deliver hVEGF into dental pulp cells of exfoliated deciduous teeth (hDPCs) in vitro and dental pulp cells in a rat model in vivo. The collected data clearly demonstrated that hVEGF increased alkaline phosphatase and mineralization by enzymatic activity. RT‑qPCR data demonstrated that hVEGF significantly increased the expression levels of genes commonly involved in osteogenesis/odontogenesis. Data from the in vivo assays indicated that hVEGF enhanced pulp cell proliferation and neovascularization, and markedly increased formation of reparative dentin in dental pulp. The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that hVEGF may have potential clinical applications, thus may aid in the development of novel treatment strategies for dental pulpitis. PMID:26647730

  6. Synthetic octacalcium phosphate-enhanced reparative dentine formation via induction of odontoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogu; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Miyauchi, Tomohiko; Zhao, Baohong; Yasuhara, Rika; Anada, Takahisa; Nakamura, Masanori; Suzuki, Osamu; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic octacalcium phosphate (OCP) has been suggested to be a useful biomaterial for the regeneration of hard tissues, including bone. However, it remains unknown whether OCP induces dentine formation by dental pulp. We investigated biomineralization of dental pulp exposed to synthetic OCP in vitro and in vivo. When dental pulp was exposed directly to OCP, rapid formation of reparative dentine (RD) was induced and expression of dentine sialoprotein synthesis was observed in dental pulp adjacent to newly synthesized RD. OCP inhibited the proliferation of rat pulp cells and also promoted their odontoblastic differentiation in vitro, as alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization of pulp cells and the expression level of dentine sialophosphoprotein were enhanced. Direct contact between OCP and pulp cells is required for OCP to exhibit its effects in vitro. The expression level of Runx2, a transcription factor whose downregulation is closely related to odontoblast differentiation, was downregulated in pulp cells cultured with OCP. Structural changes of OCP during culture were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. OCP tended to be converted to carbonate hydroxyapatite after incubation with or without pulp cells, which may be analogous to biological apatite crystals. Taken together, our data suggest that synthetic OCP supports RD formation by dental pulp and downregulation of Runx2 may be involved in that stimulatory activity. Furthermore, OCP-apatite conversion is involved in this stimulatory capacity of OCP. PMID:23355511

  7. Evaluation of reparative dentin formation of ProRoot MTA, Biodentine and BioAggregate using micro-CT and immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jia; Song, Young-Sang; Min, Kyung-San; Kim, Sun-Hun; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of two new calcium silicate-based pulp-capping materials (Biodentine and BioAggregate) to induce healing in a rat pulp injury model and to compare them with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods Eighteen rats were anesthetized, cavities were prepared and the pulp was capped with either of ProRoot MTA, Biodentine, or BioAggregate. The specimens were scanned using a high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system and were prepared and evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically using dentin sialoprotein (DSP). Results On micro-CT analysis, the ProRoot MTA and Biodentine groups showed significantly thicker hard tissue formation (p < 0.05). On H&E staining, ProRoot MTA showed complete dentin bridge formation with normal pulpal histology. In the Biodentine and BioAggregate groups, a thick, homogeneous hard tissue barrier was observed. The ProRoot MTA specimens showed strong immunopositive reaction for DSP. Conclusions Our results suggest that calcium silicate-based pulp-capping materials induce favorable effects on reparative processes during vital pulp therapy and that both Biodentine and BioAggregate could be considered as alternatives to ProRoot MTA. PMID:26877988

  8. Tertiary Dentin Formation after Indirect Pulp Capping Using Protein CPNE7.

    PubMed

    Choung, H W; Lee, D S; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shon, W J; Lee, Jong-Ho; Ku, Y; Park, J C

    2016-07-01

    If there is a partial loss of dentin, the exposed dentinal surface should be protected by an indirect pulp capping (IPC) procedure to preserve pulp vitality and prevent symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity. In our previous study, copine7 (CPNE7) induced odontoblast differentiation in vitro and promoted dentin formation in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of IPC therapy using the CPNE7 protein at the exposed dentinal surface and the resulting effects on tertiary dentin formation in a beagle model. CPNE7 promoted mineralization of odontoblasts and had high calcium ion-binding capacity. The in vivo IPC model with canine teeth showed that regeneration of physiologic reactionary dentin with dentinal tubule structures was clearly observed beneath the remaining dentin in the CPNE7 group, whereas irregular features of reparative dentin were generated in the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) group. The CPNE7+MTA group also showed typical reactionary dentin without reparative dentin, showing synergistic effects of CPNE7 with MTA. A scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that dentinal tubules beneath the original dentin were occluded by the deposition of peritubular dentin in the CPNE7 and CPNE7+MTA groups, whereas those in the control group were opened. Therefore, CPNE7 may be able to serve as a novel IPC material and improve symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:27013639

  9. Reparative Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarc, Aparna Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Supporting learners' public engagement with traumatic histories of mass human violence can develop and sustain reparative relations across and between strained social collectives. In this article I theorize the intrapersonal and inter-political dynamics of psychical and social reparation through a classroom case of reparative learning. I analyze…

  10. Astacin Proteases Cleave Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) to Generate Dentin Phosphoprotein (Dpp)

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C; Richardson, Amelia S; Yamakoshi, Fumiko; Yamakoshi, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) is critical for proper dentin biomineralization because genetic defects in DSPP cause dentin dysplasia type II and dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III. Dspp is processed by proteases into smaller subunits; the initial cleavage releases dentin phosphoprotein (Dpp). We incubated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides containing the amino acid context of the Dpp cleavage site (YEFDGKSMQGDDPN, designated Dspp-FRET) or a mutant version of that context (YEFDGKSIEGDDPN, designated mutDspp-FRET) with BMP-1, MEP1A, MEP1B, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, MT3-MMP, Klk4, MMP-20, plasmin, or porcine Dpp and characterized the peptide cleavage products. Only BMP-1, MEP1A, and MEP1B cleaved Dspp-FRET at the G–D peptide bond that releases Dpp from Dspp in vivo. We isolated Dspp proteoglycan from dentin power and incubated it with the three enzymes that cleaved Dspp-FRET at the G–D bond. In each case, the released Dpp domain was isolated, and its N-terminus was characterized by Edman degradation. BMP-1 and MEP1A both cleaved native Dspp at the correct site to generate Dpp, making both these enzymes prime candidates for the protease that cleaves Dspp in vivo. MEP1B was able to degrade Dpp when the Dpp was at sufficiently high concentration to deplete free calcium ion concentration. Immunohistochemistry of developing porcine molars demonstrated that astacins are expressed by odontoblasts, a result that is consistent with RT-PCR analyses. We conclude that during odontogenesis, astacins in the predentin matrix cleave Dspp before the DDPN sequence at the N-terminus of Dpp to release Dpp from the parent Dspp protein. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20687161

  11. Reading the Reparations Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    This essay examines the ways in which the rhetoric of the reparations debate elucidates the varying accounts of history favored by Americans of different backgrounds, the political and ideological foundations underlying different perspectives on the nature and uses of history, and the norms guiding public deliberation in the contemporary U.S.…

  12. Analysis of the Contribution of Nonresident Progenitor Cells and Hematopoietic Cells to Reparative Dentinogenesis Using Parabiosis Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Frozoni, Marcos; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Line, Sergio Roberto Peres; Mina, Mina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to analyze the contribution of nonresident progenitor/stem cells and hematopoietic cells to reparative dentinogenesis. Methods Parabiosis was established between C57BL/6-TgN(ACTbEGFP)10sb/J transgenic mice (GFP+) and C57BL/6 wild-type mice (GFP−) to ensure blood cross-circulation between animals. Reparative dentinogenesis was stimulated by pulp exposures and capping on the first maxillary molar in the GFP− mice. Histologic sections of injured molars from GFP− mice were analyzed by epifluorescence microscopy to examine the contributions of GFP+ cells (nonresident progenitor cells and hematopoietic cells originating from GFP+ mice) to reparative dentinogenesis. Results GFP+ cells were detected in close association with reparative dentin formed at the site of pulp exposure in the maxillary first molars of the GFP− mice. Conclusions The present study suggests the participation of the nonresident progenitor cells and hematopoietic cells in reparative dentinogenesis. PMID:22892738

  13. Race, Reparations, and Free Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownstein, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Describes how a controversial newspaper ad opposing slavery reparations and the subsequent trashing of the student daily have set off a debate at Brown University about the competing values of sensitivity and free expression. (EV)

  14. Dentin Sialophophoprotein (DSPP) and Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Yamakoshi, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    The revolution in genetics disclosed the types of malformations that occur when expression of a particular gene is lost. In the case of tooth dentin, mutations in the two genes encoding type I collagen cause osteogenesis imperfecta, a bone condition that often includes dentin malformations. Besides collagen, there are a number of non-collagenous proteins in dentin. Among the genes encoding the dentin non-collagenous proteins, only mutations in DSPP (dentin sialophosphoprotein) cause inherited dental malformations. DSPP mutations cause dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III, and dentin dysplasia type II. DSPP is the most abundant non-collagenous protein in dentin. DSPP protein is necessary for proper dentin formation, and understanding its structure and function should yield important insights into how dentin forms and biomineralization is controlled. DSPP is expressed and secreted by odontoblasts, the cells that make tooth dentin and that also maintain cell processes extending into the mineralized tissue. Following its secretion, DSPP is cleaved into smaller pieces by multiple extracellular proteases. For the last five years I have devoted myself to characterizing DSPP-derived proteins. DSPP is cleaved by proteases into three main parts : dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP), and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). We have learned that DSP is a proteoglycan that forms covalent dimers, DGP is a phosphorylated glycoprotein, and DPP is a highly phosphorylated intrinsically disordered protein that shows extensive length polymorphisms due to the genetic heterogeneity of its coding region. PMID:20037676

  15. Impact of Streptococcus mutans on the generation of fluorescence from artificially induced enamel and dentin carious lesions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shigetani, Yoshimi; Takenaka, Shoji; Okamoto, Akira; Abu-Bakr, Neamat; Iwaku, Masaaki; Okiji, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether Streptococcus mutans is implicated in the generation of fluorescence detected in carious lesions. Enamel surfaces and dentin cavities of extracted human teeth were subjected to artificial caries generation by exposing them either to a culture medium containing S. mutans or to a lactic acid buffer for 2 weeks. Fluorescence from the lesions was detected with confocal laser scanning microscopy or fluorescence microscopy at various excitation wavelengths, and maximum fluorescence radiance was computed using imageanalyzing software. Culture media of S. mutans were also examined for fluorescence generation. The results demonstrated that S. mutans-induced enamel and dentin lesions exhibited increased fluorescence in the red and green spectral regions, with the signal stronger in the red region. In the blue region, however, fluorescence signals in the corresponding area were below the background level. Significantly weaker or virtually no fluorescence was detected in lactic acid-demineralized lesions at all excitation wavelengths. Neither bacterial cells nor culture media generated any fluorescence. These results indicate that, although the presence of S. mutans may be a prerequisite for the emission of fluorescence from carious lesions, some interaction of S. mutans with exposed tooth matrix elements may also be required for the generation or unmasking of fluorophores. PMID:18661200

  16. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products. PMID:22313979

  17. Influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Taranjeet Kaur; Asrani, Hemant; Banga, Harpreet; Jain, Aditi; Rawlani, Sudhir S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty caries-free human premolars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each and bonding was done using seventh-generation bonding agents Adper Easy One (3M ESPE) and Xeno V (Dentsply). Following the bonding procedure, resin composite was bonded to the surfaces using a plastic mould. The prepared specimen with composite cylinders attached were placed in 37°C distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) with 0 h universal testing machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t-test. Results: Statistical significant difference between the Groups I, II and III in which Adper Easy One was used and similarly for Groups IV, V, and VI in which Xeno V was used. When an intergroup comparison was made using unpaired t-test Group II and Group V showed the nonsignificant difference. Conclusion: Salivary contamination significantly affects the SBS of both the seventh generation dentin bonding agents. However, 2-hydroxyethyl methacryate based adhesive has higher bond strength. PMID:26752841

  18. The Reparative Motive in Surrogate Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanefield, Linda

    1999-01-01

    Explores the motivations of surrogate mothers, focusing on underlying reparative motive--to compensate for or repair an earlier loss or sense of damage. Provides an overview of the typical surrogate's characteristics and personality, discusses the theoretical underpinnings of the reparative motive, and considers the tension between reparation and…

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Superficial, Intermediate and Deep Dentin In Vitro with Recent Generation Self-etching Primers and Single Nano Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kulshrest; Naik, Rajaram; Hegde, Srinidhi; Damda, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    Background: This in vitro study is intended to compare the shear bond strength of recent self-etching primers to superficial, intermediate, and deep dentin levels. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels and grouped randomly into two experimental groups and two control groups having three subgroups. The experimental groups consisted of two different dentin bonding system. The positive control group consisted of All Bond 2 and the negative control group was without the bonding agent. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under Instron machine. The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Comparing the shear bond strength values, All Bond 2 (Group III) demonstrated fairly higher bond strength values at different levels of dentin. Generally comparing All Bond 2 with the other two experimental groups revealed highly significant statistical results. Conclusion: In the present investigation with the fourth generation, higher mean shear bond strength values were recorded compared with the self-etching primers. When intermediate dentin shear bond strength was compared with deep dentin shear bond strength statistically significant results were found with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, All Bond 2 and the negative control. There was a statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values both with self-etching primers and control groups (fourth generation bonding system and without bonding system) at superficial, intermediate, and deep dentin. There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to intermediate to deep. PMID:26225101

  20. Biomaterials and scaffolds in reparative medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikof, Elliot L.; Matthew, Howard; Kohn, Joachim; Mikos, Antonios G.; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Yip, Christopher M.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Most approaches currently pursued or contemplated within the framework of reparative medicine, including cell-based therapies, artificial organs, and engineered living tissues, are dependent on our ability to synthesize or otherwise generate novel materials, fabricate or assemble materials into appropriate 2-D and 3-D forms, and precisely tailor material-related physical and biological properties so as to achieve a desired clinical response. This paper summarizes the scientific and technological opportunities within the fields of biomaterials science and molecular engineering that will likely establish new enabling technologies for cellular and molecular therapies directed at the repair, replacement, or reconstruction of diseased or damaged organs and tissues.

  1. Bond Strength of 5th, 6th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Baradaran Nakhjavani, Yahya; Rahro Taban, Sedighe; Baniameri, Zahra; Nahvi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study sought to assess the push-out bond strength of a total etch and 2 self-etch bonding systems to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth (PAT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 5th generation (Single Bond 2), 6th generation (Clearfil SE) and 7th generation (Single Bond Universal) bonding agents. The canal orifice was restored with composite resin and the push-out test was carried out to assess the bond strength. After applying the push-out load, specimens were evaluated under a light microscope at 40X magnification. One-way ANOVA and log-rank test on Kaplan-Meier curves were applied for the comparison of bond strength among the 3 groups. Results: The mean± standard deviation (SD) bond strength was 13.6±5.33 MPa for Single Bond 2, 13.85±5.86 MPa for Clearfil SE and 12.28±5.24 MPa for Single Bond Universal. The differences in bond strength among the 3 groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: All three bonding agents are recommended for use with composite posts in PAT. However, due to high technical sensitivity of the Total Etch system, single or two-step self etch systems may be preferred for uncooperative children. PMID:26056518

  2. [The level of DNA damage and DNA reparation rate in cells of earthworms sampled from natural populations for numerous generations inhabited territories with anthropogenically enhanced levels of radionuclides in soil].

    PubMed

    Kaneva, A V; Belykh, E S; Maystrenko, T A; Shadrin, D M; Pylina, Ya I; Velegzhaninov, I O

    2015-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation and chemical toxic agent effects on biological systems on different organization levels have been studied by numerous researchers. But there is a clear lack of experimental data that allow one to reveal molecular and cellular adaptations of plants and animals from natural populations to adverse effects of environmental factors. The present study was aimed to assess genotoxic effects in earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister sampled from the populations that during numerous generations inhabited the territories with a technogeneously enhanced content of natural origin radionuclides and heavy metals in soil. The levels ofthe DNA damage detected with alkaline and neutral versions of Comet-assay in invertebrates from contaminated territories were established not to differ from the spontaneous level found in the animals from the reference population. At the same time the rate of the DNA damage reparation induced in A. caliginosa sampled from the contaminated sites with additional acute γ-irradiation (4 Gy) was found to be considerably higher as compared with earthworms from the reference population. PMID:25962273

  3. Rationale of the REPARATOR study

    PubMed Central

    Eefting, F.D.; Cramer, M.J.; Stella, P.R.S.; Rensing, B.J.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    The REPARATOR study is a multicentre clinical trial in which the effect of 80 mg atorvastatin on microvascular (re)perfusion and late ventricular remodelling, and infarct size in patients presenting with an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction is studied. Primary endpoint is end-systolic volume index at three months measured by quantitative cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Secondary endpoints are cardiac MI (CMR) measurements of global and regional left ventricular function, MRI measurements of infarct size on admission, one week and three months as well as changes between MRI investigations, biochemical markers of infarct size, blush grade, and TIMI frame count. A total of 50 patients will be enrolled. Including three months follow-up, the study will last for six months. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696602

  4. Dentin regeneration using deciduous pulp stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Wang, X Y; Wang, Y M; Liu, X Y; Zhang, C M; Hou, B X; Wang, S L

    2012-07-01

    Reparative dentin formation is essential for maintaining the integrity of dentin structure during disease or trauma. In this study, we investigated stem/progenitor cell-based tissue engineering for dentin regeneration in a large animal model. Porcine deciduous pulp stem/progenitor cells (PDPSCs) were mixed with a beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold for dentin regeneration. Different concentrations of PDPSCs were tested to determine the optimal density for dentin regeneration. Aliquots of 5×10(5) PDPSCs in 1 mL resulted in the highest number of cells attached to the scaffold and the greatest alkaline phosphatase activity. We labeled PDPSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and used the optimal cell numbers mixed with β-TCP to repair pulp chamber roof defects in the premolars of swine. Four weeks after transplantation, GFP-positive PDPSCs were observed in PDPSC-embedded scaffold constructs. At 16 weeks after transplantation, the PDPSCs mixed with β-TCP significantly regenerated the dentin-like structures and nearly completely restored the pulp chamber roof defects. This study demonstrated that the PDPSC/scaffold construct was useful in direct pulp-capping and provides pre-clinical evidence for stem/progenitor cell-based dentin regeneration. PMID:22660968

  5. An in-vitro investigation into the sealing ability of two fourth generation dentine bonding agents and two resin modified glass polyalkenoate restoratives.

    PubMed

    Quinn, F

    1995-03-01

    To determine the in-vitro sealing ability of two resin modified glass polyalkenoate cements and two fourth generation dentine bonding systems, fifty mixed class V cavities were filled with each material and evaluated for leakage. At enamel margins, no significant differences in leakage extent was noted; however, at cemental margins the two resin modified glass polyalkenoates performed significantly better than the resin based systems. Crazing was frequently noted on enamel margins with both glass polyalkenoate materials. Surface application of unfilled glaze did not affect the leakage at either enamel or cemental margins for one of the polyalkenoate restorative materials. PMID:8603154

  6. 46 CFR 502.253 - Interest in reparation proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interest in reparation proceedings. 502.253 Section 502.253 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation § 502.253 Interest in reparation proceedings. Except as to applications for refund...

  7. 46 CFR 502.253 - Interest in reparation proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interest in reparation proceedings. 502.253 Section 502.253 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation § 502.253 Interest in reparation proceedings. Except as to applications for refund...

  8. 46 CFR 502.253 - Interest in reparation proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interest in reparation proceedings. 502.253 Section 502.253 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation § 502.253 Interest in reparation proceedings. Except as to applications for refund...

  9. Permeability of Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it. PMID:23365497

  10. Use of Poly (Amidoamine) Dendrimer for Dentinal Tubule Occlusion: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianda; Yang, Sheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity, a significant health problem in dentistry and daily life. The in situ mineralization within dentinal tubules is a promising treatment for dentin hypersensitivity as it induces the formation of mineral on the sensitive regions and occludes the dentinal tubules. This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro effect of a whole generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (G3.0) on dentinal tubule occlusion by inducing mineralization within dentinal tubules. Dentin discs were treated with PAMAM dendrimers using two methods, followed by the in vitro characterization using Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). These results showed that G3.0 PAMAM dendrimers coated on dentin surface and infiltrated in dentinal tubules could induce hydroxyapatite formation and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, crosslinked PAMAM dendrimers could induce the remineralization of demineralized dentin and thus had the potential in dentinal tubule occlusion. In this in vitro study, dentinal tubules occlusion could be achieved by using PAMAM dendrimers. This could lead to the development of a new therapeutic technique for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:25885090

  11. Use of poly (amidoamine) dendrimer for dentinal tubule occlusion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianda; Yang, Sheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity, a significant health problem in dentistry and daily life. The in situ mineralization within dentinal tubules is a promising treatment for dentin hypersensitivity as it induces the formation of mineral on the sensitive regions and occludes the dentinal tubules. This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro effect of a whole generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (G3.0) on dentinal tubule occlusion by inducing mineralization within dentinal tubules. Dentin discs were treated with PAMAM dendrimers using two methods, followed by the in vitro characterization using Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). These results showed that G3.0 PAMAM dendrimers coated on dentin surface and infiltrated in dentinal tubules could induce hydroxyapatite formation and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, crosslinked PAMAM dendrimers could induce the remineralization of demineralized dentin and thus had the potential in dentinal tubule occlusion. In this in vitro study, dentinal tubules occlusion could be achieved by using PAMAM dendrimers. This could lead to the development of a new therapeutic technique for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:25885090

  12. MMP2-CLEAVAGE OF DMP1 GENERATES A BIOACTIVE PEPTIDE PROMOTING DIFFERENTIATION OF DENTAL PULP STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Chaussain, Catherine; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Huet, Eric; Floris, Caroline; Ravindran, Sriram; Hao, Jianjun; Menashi, Suzanne; George, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) plays a regulatory role in dentin mineralization and can also function as a signaling molecule. MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) is a predominant protease in the dentin matrix that plays a prominent role in tooth formation and a potential role during the carious process. The possibility that MMP-2 can cleave DMP1 to release biologically active peptides was investigated in this study. DMP1, both in the recombinant form and in its native state within the dentin matrix, was shown to be a substrate for MMP-2. Proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 produced two major peptides, one that contains the C-terminal region of the protein known to carry both the ASARM (aspartic acid and serine rich domain) domain involved in biomineralization and the DNA binding site of DMP1. In vitro experiments with recombinant N- and C-terminal polypeptides mimicking the MMP-2 cleavage products of DMP1 demonstrated an effect of the C-polypeptide on the differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells to a putative odontoblast phenotype. In vivo implantation of this peptide in a rat injured pulp model induced a rapid formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge covered by a palisade of orientated cells expressing dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and DMP1, attesting an efficient repair process. These data suggest that a peptide generated through the proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 can regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cells during dentinogenesis and thus sustain reparative dentin formation in pathological situations such as carious decay. In addition, these data open a new therapeutic possibility of using this peptide to regenerate dentin after an injury. PMID:19908197

  13. MMP2-cleavage of DMP1 generates a bioactive peptide promoting differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cell.

    PubMed

    Chaussain, Catherine; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Huet, Eric; Floris, Caroline; Ravindran, Sriram; Hao, Jianjun; Menashi, Suzanne; George, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) plays a regulatory role in dentin mineralization and can also function as a signaling molecule. MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) is a predominant protease in the dentin matrix that plays a prominent role in tooth formation and a potential role during the carious process. The possibility that MMP-2 can cleave DMP1 to release biologically active peptides was investigated in this study. DMP1, both in the recombinant form and in its native state within the dentin matrix, was shown to be a substrate for MMP-2. Proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 produced two major peptides, one that contains the C-terminal region of the protein known to carry both the ASARM (aspartic acid and serine rich domain) domain involved in biomineralization and the DNA binding site of DMP1. In vitro experiments with recombinant N- and C-terminal polypeptides mimicking the MMP-2 cleavage products of DMP1 demonstrated an effect of the C-polypeptide on the differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells to a putative odontoblast phenotype. In vivo implantation of this peptide in a rat injured pulp model induced a rapid formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge covered by a palisade of orientated cells expressing dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and DMP1, attesting an efficient repair process. These data suggest that a peptide generated through the proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 can regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cells during dentinogenesis and thus sustain reparative dentin formation in pathological situations such as carious decay. In addition, these data open a new therapeutic possibility of using this peptide to regenerate dentin after an injury. PMID:19908197

  14. Biomimetic remineralization of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-na; Zhang, Wei; Pashley, David H.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mao, Jing; Chen, Ji-hua; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Remineralization of demineralized dentin is important for improving dentin bonding stability and controlling primary and secondary caries. Nevertheless, conventional dentin remineralization strategy is not suitable for remineralizing completely-demineralized dentin within hybrid layers created by etch-and-rinse and moderately aggressive self-etch adhesive systems, or the superficial part of a caries-affected dentin lesion left behind after minimally invasive caries removal. Biomimetic remineralization represents a different approach to this problem by attempting to backfill the demineralized dentin collagen with liquid-like amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor particles that are stabilized by biomimetic analogs of noncollagenous proteins. Methods This paper reviewed the changing concepts in calcium phosphate mineralization of fibrillar collagen, including the recently discovered, non-classical particle-based crystallization concept, formation of polymer-induced liquid- precursors (PILP), experimental collagen models for mineralization, and the need for using phosphate-containing biomimetic analogs for biomimetic mineralization of collagen. Published work on the remineralization of resin-dentin bonds and artificial caries-like lesions by various research groups was then reviewed. Finally, the problems and progress associated with the translation of a scientifically-sound concept into a clinically-applicable approach are discussed. Results and Significance The particle-based biomimetic remineralization strategy based on the PILP process demonstrates great potential in remineralizing faulty hybrid layers or caries-like dentin. Based on this concept, research in the development of more clinically feasible dentin remineralization strategy, such as incorporating poly(anionic) acid-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor-containing mesoporous silica nanofillers in dentin adhesives, may provide a promising strategy for increasing of the

  15. Gross human rights violations and reparation under international law: approaching rehabilitation as a form of reparation

    PubMed Central

    Sveaass, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The strengthening of international criminal law through an increased focus on the right to reparation and rehabilitation for victims of crimes against humanity represents an important challenge to health professionals, particularly to those in the field of trauma research and treatment. A brief outline of some developments in the field of international law and justice for victims of gross human rights violations is presented, with a focus on the right to reparation including the means for rehabilitation. The fulfillment of this right is a complex endeavor which raises many questions. The road to justice and reparation for those whose rights have been brutally violated is long and burdensome. The active presence of trauma-informed health professionals in this process is a priority. Some of the issues raised within the context of states’ obligations to provide and ensure redress and rehabilitation to those subjected to torture and gross human rights violations are discussed, and in particular how rehabilitation can be understood and responded to by health professionals. PMID:23671765

  16. Gross human rights violations and reparation under international law: approaching rehabilitation as a form of reparation.

    PubMed

    Sveaass, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The strengthening of international criminal law through an increased focus on the right to reparation and rehabilitation for victims of crimes against humanity represents an important challenge to health professionals, particularly to those in the field of trauma research and treatment. A brief outline of some developments in the field of international law and justice for victims of gross human rights violations is presented, with a focus on the right to reparation including the means for rehabilitation. The fulfillment of this right is a complex endeavor which raises many questions. The road to justice and reparation for those whose rights have been brutally violated is long and burdensome. The active presence of trauma-informed health professionals in this process is a priority. Some of the issues raised within the context of states' obligations to provide and ensure redress and rehabilitation to those subjected to torture and gross human rights violations are discussed, and in particular how rehabilitation can be understood and responded to by health professionals. PMID:23671765

  17. The therapeutic nature of art in self reparation.

    PubMed

    Hymer, S M

    1983-01-01

    While psychoanalysts have extensively explored the interplay between art and artist, few have examined the functions of art for the patient-participant observer or patient-producer. Art references made by patients during therapy can be reparative to the damaged self. Klein's concept of reparation to the object is expanded upon in order to understand the ways in which the patient makes reparation to his self. This paper focuses on two specific reparative functions (Oxford Dictionary, 1926) that the art source brings to bear on the patient's self: (1) "the restoration or renewal of a thing or part." As the patient reparatively integrates repressed impulses and/or the grandiose self, he comes to experience himself in a renewed way as a whole object who is better able to regulate his self-esteem. (2) "the restoration of a person." Once the patient develops the capacity to maintain a more-or-less stable self and object representation, he may then be ready to reparatively adapt to higher order transformations of self involved in creativity. This paper attempts to demonstrate that the analyst, sensitized to the reparative possibilities inherent in art sources, can therapeutically utilize this material both to facilitate the removal of resistances and to help the patient developmentally attain and maintain a well-regulated, adaptive self. PMID:6192457

  18. Psychological Africanity (Racial Identity) and Its Influence on Support for Reparations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azibo, Daudi Ajani ya

    2008-01-01

    Undergraduates at a historically Black university completed the 1997 N'COBRA Reparations Survey. N'COBRA stands for the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America. Five domains of reparations are covered: education, economic development, personal reparations (i.e., payments to individuals), political prisoners, and African-U.S.…

  19. A slow release calcium delivery system for the study of reparative dentine formation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A R; Kirk, E E; Robinson, D H; Kardos, T B

    1998-06-01

    Several liquid, semi-solid and solid delivery systems were formulated and tested to devise a method of reproducibly administering accurate micro-doses of calcium into a 700 microns diameter cavity in a rat maxillary incisor tooth, in the absence of hydroxyl ions. Development of this delivery system was necessary to facilitate studies of the mechanisms of pulpal repair and odontoblast differentiation. The principal requirements for the delivery system were that it should be easily administered into a small pulp exposure in the rat incisor and that a greater than 1000-fold range in calcium ion concentrations could be incorporated and delivered for a period of 2-3 days, preferably in an acidic environment to minimize the effect of non-specific nucleation under alkaline conditions. Poly- (ethylene) glycol microspheres were found to be an ideal vehicle. Under the in vitro dissolution conditions used, complete release of all calcium salts occurred within 12-15 hours, except for the very water-insoluble calcium stearate. It was anticipated that the release of calcium ions would be significantly more prolonged in vivo because of the physical constraints of the prepared cavity as well as the restricted access to fluid flow. PMID:9863419

  20. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin - a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear. PMID:24294356

  1. Porcine Dentin Sialophosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Lu, Yuhe; Hu, Jan C.-C.; Kim, Jung-Wook; Iwata, Takanori; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Nagano, Takatoshi; Yamakoshi, Fumiko; Hu, Yuanyuan; Fukae, Makoto; Simmer, James P.

    2008-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is critical for proper mineralization of tooth dentin, and mutations in DSPP cause inherited dentin defects. Dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) is the C-terminal cleavage product of DSPP that binds collagen and induces intrafibrillar mineralization. We isolated DPP from individual pigs and determined that its N-terminal and C-terminal domains are glycosylated and that DPP averages 155 phosphates per molecule. Porcine DPP is unstable at low pH and high temperatures, and complexing with collagen improves its stability. Surprisingly, we observed DPP size variations on SDS-PAGE for DPP isolated from individual pigs. These variations are not caused by differences in proteolytic processing or degrees of phosphorylation or glycosylation, but rather to allelic variations in Dspp. Characterization of the DPP coding region identified 4 allelic variants. Among the 4 alleles, 27 sequence variations were identified, including 16 length polymorphisms ranging from 3 to 63 nucleotides. None of the length variations shifted the reading frame, and all localized to the highly redundant region of the DPP code. The 4 alleles encode DPP domains having 551, 575, 589, or 594 amino acids and completely explain the DPP size variations. DPP length variations are polymorphic and are not associated with dentin defects. PMID:18359767

  2. Infected Dentine Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Edwina; Fejerskov, Ole; Nyvad, Bente

    2015-11-01

    Dentine becomes infected as a result of caries lesion formation on root surfaces and when lesions progress following cavitation of enamel lesions. However, this infection is unimportant because the driving force for lesion formation and progression is the overlying biofilm. This explains why root surface caries can be controlled by mechanical plaque control and fluoride, and restorations are not needed to arrest these lesions. Similarly, the infected dentine in cavitated coronal lesions does not have to be removed to arrest the lesion. If the lesion is either accessible or opened for cleaning by the patient or parent, the lesion can be arrested. Sealing of infected dentine within the tooth, either by a Hall crown in the primary dentition or by partial caries removal prior to placing a well-sealed filling, will also arrest the lesion. When restoring deep lesions in symptomless, vital teeth, vigorous excavation of infected dentine is likely to expose the pulp and make root canal treatment necessary. Thus complete excavation'is not needed and should be avoided. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Root surface caries can be arrested by cleaning and fluoride application. Restorations are not essential. Vigorous excavation of softened dentine in deep cavities of symptomless, vital teeth is contra-indicated. It is not needed and increases the risk of pulp exposure. PMID:26749788

  3. Current strategies in dentin remineralization.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Marcela; Cobb, Deborah; Swift, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Partial caries removal procedures are used clinically in an attempt to conserve tooth structure and prevent pulp damage. Within this approach, the caries-infected dentin is removed, and the partially demineralized caries-affected dentin is preserved and sealed with materials that enhance remineralization. Fluoride-releasing glass ionomers have been commonly used for this purpose. Recent studies have shown potential for other cements and bioactive adhesive materials to promote dentin repair through various strategies. These strategies include ion releasing of Ca-P and the guided tissue remineralization or biomimetic remineralization of dentin. The latter is potentially useful in the remineralization of the demineralized acid-etched dentin that is incompletely infiltrated by adhesives in dentin bonding. The purpose of this Critical Appraisal is to provide the clinician with a summary of current literature that clarifies understanding of the process of dentin remineralization and to describe current strategies in this area. PMID:24612484

  4. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Newer Bonding Systems on Superficial and Deep Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Siddaraju, Kishore; Nagaraj, Hema; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to superficial dentin and deep dentin using two different dentin bonding systems. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels (superficial dentin: Dentin within 0.5-1 mm of dentinoenamel junction; deep dentin: Dentin within 0.5 mm of the highest pulp horn) using a Carborundum Disc and embedded in acrylic block of specific size. Selected specimens (60 premolar teeth) were grouped randomly into three groups, the groups were differentiated into superficial dentin, deep dentin, and control group which were further divided into sub Group A and Subgroup B containing 10 teeth each, depending on the bonding agents used. In Subgroup A, Tetric N Bond, and in Subgroup B Single Bond Universal were used. In the control group no bonding agent was used. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5°C and 55°C water bath for 40 s. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under INSTRON machine (Universal Testing Machine). The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture (de-bonding) of the restorative material. Results were analyzed using ANOVA test, Bonferroni test, and paired t-test. Results: Bond strength values of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) showed higher mean shear bond strength compared to seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to deep dentin. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) and seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). Decrease in the bond strength values is seen for the deeper level of dentin as compared to superficial dentin. PMID:26435613

  5. 17 CFR 12.407 - Satisfaction of reparation award; enforcement; sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Satisfaction of reparation... Satisfaction of reparation award; enforcement; sanctions. (a) Satisfaction of reparation award—(1) Where... satisfaction of an award (as prescribed in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section) expires, file with...

  6. Dentinogenesis and Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)

    PubMed Central

    Yamakoshi, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is critical for proper mineralization of tooth dentin, and understanding its structure and function should yield important insights into how dentin biomineralization is controlled. During the recent six years, I have focused on characterizing DSPP-derived proteins isolated from developing porcine teeth. Porcine DSPP is expressed and secreted by odontoblasts and is processed by BMP-1, MMP-20 and MMP-2 into three main parts: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP), and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). We have learned that DSP is a proteoglycan that forms covalent dimers, DGP is a phosphorylated glycoprotein, and DPP is a highly phosphorylated intrinsically disordered protein that shows extensive length polymorphisms due to the genetic heterogeneity of its coding region. PMID:20157636

  7. What's Next?: Japanese American Redress and African American Reparations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamoto, Eric K.

    1999-01-01

    Explores the commitment of Japanese Americans to support other groups seeking redress for historic injustice, and considers the lessons that might be drawn from the process of Japanese American redress. Offers a view of reparations as "repair" rather than compensation. (SLD)

  8. Reparable, high-density microelectronic module provides effective heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, K. J.; Maytone, F. F.

    1967-01-01

    Reparable modular system is used for packaging microelectronic flat packs and miniature discrete components. This three-dimensional compartmented structure incorporates etched phosphor bronze sheets and frames with etched wire conductors. It provides an effective heat sink for electric power dissipation in the absence of convective cooling means.

  9. Dead Tracts in Dentine 1

    PubMed Central

    Fish, E. W.

    1928-01-01

    (1) When the dentinal tubules are opened or sufficiently irritated, their contents coagulate and die. (2) Following this, the pulp lays down an impermeable barrier of lime salts (secondary dentine) to protect itself from contact with the dead tubules. Alternatively the pulp itself dies. (3) The evidence that exposed dentine always dies is as follows: (a) Such dentine is insensitive right through to the secondary dentine. (b) The injured dentine is found experimentally to be shut off from the pulp in such a way that fluids cannot enter it. It thus lacks the necessary body fluids to support life. (c) Under an injury the primary dentine is seen to stop abruptly at the original pulp margin, and to be sealed off with a homogeneous barrier of lime salts before the tubules of the secondary dentine start. The tubules of the secondary dentine take origin below this homogeneous layer in fine branches and obviously have no connexion with the injured primary tubules. (d) The injured tubules although walled off from the pulp remain permeable from the mouth and have therefore not died by slow calcification. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:19986764

  10. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  11. Resin–Dentin Bonding Interface After Photochemical Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Kazunobu; Ichinose, Shizuko; Araki, Kouji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study is to elucidate the structure of the resin–dentin interface formed by photochemical dentin treatment using an argon fluoride (ArF) excimer laser. Background data The ArF excimer laser processes material by photochemical reaction without generating heat, while also providing surface conditioning that enhances material adhesion. In the case of bonding between resin and dentin, we demonstrated in a previous study that laser etching using an ArF excimer laser produced bonding strength comparable to that of the traditional bonding process; however, conditions of the bonding interface have not been fully investigated. Methods A dentin surface was irradiated in air with an ArF excimer laser followed by bonding treatment. Cross sections were observed under light microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM), and scanning electron microscope, then analyzed using an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS): EDS line profiles of the elements C, O, Si, Cl, P, and Ca at the resin–dentin interface were obtained. Results The density of C in resin decreased as it approached the interface, reaching its lowest level within the dentin at a depth of 2 μm from the resin–dentin interface on EDS. There was no hybrid layer observed at the interface on TEM. Therefore, it was suggested that the resin monomer infiltrated into the microspaces produced on the dentin surface by laser abrasion. Conclusions The monomer infiltration without hybrid layer is thought to be the adhesion mechanism after laser etching. Therefore, the photochemical processes at the bonding interface achieved using the ArF excimer laser has great potential to be developed into a new bonding system in dentistry. PMID:25555032

  12. Histopathology of the pulp of primary molars with active and arrested dentinal caries.

    PubMed

    Di Nicolo, R; Guedes-Pinto, A C; Carvalho, Y R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the histological appearance of the pulp of human primary molars with active and arrested lesions. The sample consisted of 36 primary molars (18 with active lesions and 18 with arrested lesions) extracted from 35 children between 5 to 9 years of age. The histological diagnosis was classified in normal pulp, transitional stage, partial pulpitis, total pulpitis and total necrosis, and then subdivided in three subgroups: treatable, untreatable and questionable. Results showed that normal pulp or transitional stage (treatable category) was diagnosed in 50% of teeth with arrested lesions, compared to 11.1% of teeth with active lesions. Partial pulpitis (questionable category) was present in 38.8% with arrested lesions compared to 22.2% with active lesions. Total pulpitis and total necrosis (untreatable category) was diagnosed in 11.2% with arrested lesions compared to 66.7% with active lesions. The observed frequencies of histological categories between both groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Histologically, pulp reaction under active and arrested lesions in primary molars revealed the formation of a basophilic calcio-traumatic line at the junction of the primary and reparative dentin, formation of reparative dentin and a regular odontoblastic layer in 60% of the cases. Results indicated that the type of lesion (active or arrested) is a good indicator of the histological status of the pulp. PMID:11314352

  13. Effects of permafrost microorganisms on skin wound reparation.

    PubMed

    Kalenova, L F; Novikova, M A; Subbotin, A M

    2015-02-01

    Local application of ointment with Bacillus spp. strain MG8 (15,000-20,000 living bacterial cells), isolated from permafrost specimens, on the skin wound of about 60 mm(2) stimulated the reparation processes in experimental mice. A possible mechanism stimulating the regeneration of the damaged tissues under the effect of MG8 could be modulation of the immune system reactivity with more rapid switchover to humoral immunity anti-inflammatory mechanisms aimed at de novo synthesis of protein. PMID:25708330

  14. Reparative giant cell granuloma in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Duarte Ruiz, Blanca; Riba García, Francisco de Asís; Navarro Cuéllar, Carlos; Bucci, Tommaso; Cuesta Gil, Matías; Navarro Vila, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Reparative giant cell granulomas are benign, infrequent tumors, of non-odontogenic origin, that develop at central or peripheral level. Peripherally located lesions are frequently denominated "giant cell epulis", and never correspond to true neoplasia, but rather to inflammatory reactions secondary to another lesion (hemorrhage, etc.). It should be taken into account, that in general, head and neck tumors of infancy usually demonstrate an atypical biological behaviour. Furthermore, the anatomicopathologic diagnosis is often compromised in this type of lesion. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy, who, three weeks after suffering a slight facial trauma, developed a painless, exophytic swelling of approximately 4 cm, with bleeding on palpation, in the ipsilateral hemimaxilla. The lesion demonstrated rapid, progressive and continuous growth. The facial CT and incisional biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of reparative giant cell granuloma. The patient was surgically treated, carrying out a left marginal maxillectomy associated with the extirpation of the soft-tissue lesion. The resultant defect was reconstructed with a Bichat fat-pad providing the patient with optimal esthetic and functional results. The definitive anatomicopathologic report of the surgical piece is compatible with reparative giant cell granuloma. PMID:17664921

  15. Functional remineralization of carious dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugach, Megan Kardon

    A primary goal of dental tissue engineering is the biological reconstruction of tooth substrate destroyed by caries or other diseases affecting tooth mineralization. Traditionally, dentists treat caries by using invasive techniques to remove the diseased dental tissue and restore the lesion, ideally preventing further progression of decay. Success in strategies associated with remineralization of enamel and root caries have contributed to the less invasive prospect of remineralization of dentinal carious lesions. The central hypothesis of this dissertation is that carious dentin lesions can be remineralized if the lesions contain residual mineral. Caries Detector (CD) stained zones (pink, light pink, transparent and normal) of arrested carious dentin lesions were characterized according to microstructure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, mineral content by digital transverse microradiography, and nanomechanical properties by AFM-based nanoindentation. CD-stained and unstained zones had significantly different microstructure, mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Furthermore, the most demineralized carious zone contained residual mineral. To obtain reproducible, standardized dentin caries lesions, we characterized the lesions from an artificial carious dentin lesion model using a 0.05M acetate demineralization buffer. The artificial caries-like lesions produced by the buffer had similar mineral content and nanomechanical properties in the stained and unstained zones as natural dentin lesions. Both natural and artificial lesions had significant correlations between mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Mineral crystallite size and shape was examined by small angle x-ray scattering. Both natural and artificial carious dentin had different mineral sizes than normal dentin. Collagen in natural and artificial carious dentin lesions was examined by trichrome stain, AFM high-resolution imaging, and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy, to determine if

  16. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  17. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  18. Dentinal crazing and interpin distance.

    PubMed

    Khera, S C; Chan, K C; Rittman, B R

    1978-11-01

    All three types of self-threading plus cause dentinal crazing. The frequency and degree of damage done to the dentin varies significantly between the three types of pins and depends upon the differences in the diameters of the drill and the pin. When two or more pins are placed in dentin, the potential for dentinal damage increases. Minikin pins (0.019-inch diameter) caused the least damage, in terms of both degree and frequency. The optimum and safe interpin distance using Minikin pins suggested by this study is 3 mm. Minim and Regular pins (0.023- and 0.031-inch diameters, respectively) caused more injury than Minikin pins. The Regular pins showed more damaging effects on dentin than Minim pins, both in terms of degree and frequency. On the basis of this study, the minimum interpin distance using Minim or Regular pins should be 5 mm. These minimum interpin distances are applicable only in situations where the dentin is not dehydrated or embrittled due to endodontic treatment. In teeth that have been endodontically treated, it would be advisable to use only the smallest self-threading pins and possibly increase the interpin distance if two or more pins are to be used. PMID:281504

  19. Making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting for enhanced adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-11-01

    Good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is an important factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. In this study, we developed a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  20. The sensory mechanism in human dentin as revealed by evaporation and mechanical removal of dentin.

    PubMed

    Brännström, M; Johnson, G

    1978-01-01

    Dentinal pain in connection with mechanical stimulation i.e. probing, chiseling and initial drilling may be due to removal of fluid from the dentinal tubules. Loss of fluid due to "normal" evaporation from exposed dentin may produce an outward flow in the dentinal tubules rapid enough to cause pain and within a few minutes odontoblast aspiration. PMID:277500

  1. Sodium hypochlorite alterations of dentin and dentin collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, G. W.; Yücel, N.; Balooch, M.; Kinney, J. H.; Habelitz, S.; Marshall, S. J.

    2001-10-01

    NaOCl aq is used as a cleansing and non-specific deproteinizing agent in endodontic treatment, as a component of new chemomechanical caries treatment, and is under study for its alterations of dentin bonding characteristics. We sought to determine the microstructural and nanomechanical changes with such treatments and to test if NaOCl aq removed dentin collagen without microstructural or nanomechanical alteration of underlying mineralized dentin. Polished human dentin disks were prepared with a double reference technique that allowed changes to be determined following 10% citric acid etching for 15 s and subsequent treatment of the etched and unetched portions of the sample with 6.5% NaOCl aq, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Nanoscope III, Digital Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA). Images and measurements were made at intervals up to 1800 s. A Triboscope (Hysitron, Minneapolis, MN) on the AFM was used to measure nanohardness and the reduced elastic modulus. The double reference method allowed measurements immediately following etching and at intervals during deproteinization. Etching caused deep peritubular dentin removal and a small depth change of hydrated intertubular dentin as mineral was removed and left a remnant collagen matrix. NaOCl aq removed collagen over time, during which individual fibrils could be resolved; the underlying mineralized dentin was left with a unique porous surface containing numerous channels that are not normally observed in etched or fractured dentin. This could provide an attractive bonding substrate because of the increased surface area and high mineral content, if toughness is not reduced too much. Nanomechanical measurements showed that the reduced elastic modulus and hardness were 75% of original values after removal of the exposed collagen. Current dentin bonding systems rely on hybrid layer formation in which hydrophilic primers/polymers penetrate the opened collagen matrix exposed by etching. However some research suggests

  2. A galloylated dimeric proanthocyanidin from grape seed exhibits dentin biomodification potential

    PubMed Central

    Phansalkar, Rasika S.; Nam, Joo-Won; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B.; Napolitano, José G.; Leme, Ariene; Vidal, Cristina M. P.; Aguiar, Thaiane; Bedran Russo, Ana K.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    Grape seeds are a rich source of polyphenols, especially proanthocyanidins (PACs), and are also known for the presence of galloylated oligomeric PACs (OPACs). The present study focuses on phytochemical methodology for grape seed (O)PACs and their potential role as dentin bio-modifiers to be used in restorative and reparative dentistry. A new method using centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) was developed for the preparative separation of the grape seed (O)PACs. Orthogonal phytochemical profiling of the resulting CPC fractions was performed using C18 and diol HPLC, normal phase HPTLC, and IT-TOF MS analysis. A galloylated procyanidin dimer (1) was isolated from a CPC fraction in order to evaluate its potential to enhance dentin bio-mechanical properties. Moreover, it helped to evaluate the impact of the galloyl moiety on the observed bioactivity. Structure elucidation was performed using ESI-MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses. For the first time, 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA) was performed on this type of molecule, enabling a detailed proton chemical shift and coupling constant assignment. The CPC fractions as well as 1 showed promising results in the dentin stiffness bioassay and indicate that it may be used as dental intervention material. PMID:25542682

  3. Mutant DLX 3 disrupts odontoblast polarization and dentin formation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S.J.; Song, I.S.; Feng, J.Q.; Gao, T.; Haruyama, N.; Gautam, P.; Robey, P.G.; Hart, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Tricho-dento-osseous (TDO) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by abnormalities in the thickness and density of bones and teeth. A 4-bp deletion mutation in the Distal-Less 3 (DLX3) gene is etiologic for most cases of TDO. To investigate the in vivo role of mutant DLX3 (MT-DLX3) on dentin development, we generated transgenic (TG) mice expressing MT-DLX3 driven by a mouse 2.3 Col1A1 promoter. Dentin defects were radiographically evident in all teeth and the size of the nonmineralized pulp was enlarged in TG mice, consistent with clinical characteristics in patients with TDO. High-resolution radiography, microcomputed tomography, and SEM revealed a reduced zone of mineralized dentin with anomalies in the number and organization of dentinal tubules in MT-DLX3 TG mice. Histological and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the decreased dentin was accompanied by altered odontoblast cytology that included disruption of odontoblast polarization and reduced numbers of odontoblasts. TUNEL assays indicated enhanced odontoblast apoptosis. Expression levels of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 were increased in odontoblasts in TG mice as well as in odontoblastic-like MDPC-23 cells transfected with MT-DLX3 cDNA. Expression of Runx2, Wnt 10A, and TBC1D19 colocalized with DLX3 expression in odontoblasts, and MT-DLX3 significantly reduced expression of all three genes. TBC1D19 functions in cell polarity and decreased TBC1D19 expression may contribute to the observed disruption of odontoblast polarity and apoptosis. These data indicate that MT-DLX3 acts to disrupt odontoblast cytodifferentiation leading to odontoblast apoptosis, and aberrations of dentin tubule formation and dentin matrix production, resulting in decreased dentin and taurodontism. In summary, this TG model demonstrates that MT-DLX3 has differential effects on matrix production and mineralization in dentin and bone and provides a novel tool for the investigation of odontoblast biology

  4. Dentin Sialophosphoprotein-derived Proteins in the Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, R; Oida, S; Yamakoshi, Y

    2015-08-01

    Porcine dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), the most abundant noncollagenous protein in dentin, is critical for proper mineralization of tooth dentin. DSPP is processed by proteases into 3 major domains: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP), and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). There are at least 2 mRNA variants expressed from the Dspp gene: one encodes the full-length DSPP protein (DSP+DGP+DPP); the other encodes only DSP. The shorter transcript is generated through the use of a polyadenylation signal within intron 4, immediately following the DSP coding region (DGP and DPP are encoded by exon 5). We fractionated DSPP-derived proteins from the dental pulp of developing porcine incisors using heparin chromatography. DSP was identified, but little DPP could be detected in any fractions. BMP-1 digestion of DSPP-derived proteins extracted from dental pulp did not generate new DPP bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (indicating an absence of intact DSPP), although the results suggested another BMP-1 cleavage site within DSP. We further purified DSPP-derived protein by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Its amino acid composition was similar to DSP. Expression of the full-length Dspp mRNA by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was significantly higher in odontoblasts than in pulp, while expression of the DSP-only mRNA was almost equal in odontoblasts and in the body of the pulp. Expression of the full-length Dspp mRNA was also significantly higher than the expression of DSP-only mRNA in odontoblasts. Both the full-length and the DSP-only Dspp mRNA showed only trace expression in the pulp tip. We conclude that use of the 3' polyadenylation signal in exon 5 predominates in fully differentiated odontoblasts, while both polyadenylation signals are used throughout odontoblast differentiation. PMID:25951824

  5. Reparative neurogenesis after cerebral ischemia: Clinical application prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-11-17

    At the present time two main approaches are in the focus of neurobiological studies of brain recovery after a stroke. One of them is concerned with the infusion of stem cells in damaged brain. The second approach is directed at the stimulation of endogenous reparative processes, in particular, adult neurogenesis. This review considers alterations of adult neurogenesis caused by cerebral ischemia and possible pathways of its regulation. Multiple studies on animal models have shown that adult neurogenesis is mostly increased by cerebral ischemia. In spite of increasing proliferation and moving neural progenitors to infarct zone, most newborn neurons die before reaching maturity. Besides, an increase of neurogenesis in pathological conditions is mainly due to recruitment of new stem cells, but not due to an additional precursor-cells division that results in an overall decline of the regeneration capacity. Thus, the endogenous reparative mechanisms are not sufficient, and the search for new targets to promote proliferation, survival, and maturation of new neurons after a stroke is needed. Neurotransmitter systems and anti-inflammatory drugs are considered as potential regulators of post-ischemic neurogenesis growth factors.

  6. Reparative neurogenesis after cerebral ischemia: Clinical application prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    At the present time two main approaches are in the focus of neurobiological studies of brain recovery after a stroke. One of them is concerned with the infusion of stem cells in damaged brain. The second approach is directed at the stimulation of endogenous reparative processes, in particular, adult neurogenesis. This review considers alterations of adult neurogenesis caused by cerebral ischemia and possible pathways of its regulation. Multiple studies on animal models have shown that adult neurogenesis is mostly increased by cerebral ischemia. In spite of increasing proliferation and moving neural progenitors to infarct zone, most newborn neurons die before reaching maturity. Besides, an increase of neurogenesis in pathological conditions is mainly due to recruitment of new stem cells, but not due to an additional precursor-cells division that results in an overall decline of the regeneration capacity. Thus, the endogenous reparative mechanisms are not sufficient, and the search for new targets to promote proliferation, survival, and maturation of new neurons after a stroke is needed. Neurotransmitter systems and anti-inflammatory drugs are considered as potential regulators of post-ischemic neurogenesis growth factors.

  7. How Finnish Upper Secondary Students Conceive Transgenerational Responsibility and Historical Reparations: Implications for the History Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Löfström, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses how Finnish upper secondary school students ponder upon the questions of transgenerational responsibility and historical reparation. These questions have got a prominent place in the history culture in many societies in the last 20 years. The philosophical and political dimensions of reparations for historical injustices have…

  8. If a Tree Falls in the Wilderness: Reparations, Academic Silences, and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Rodney D.

    2004-01-01

    The history and dynamics of reparations for African Americans are explored. The lack of current research and writing on the subject in sociology and political sciences journals is contended to be a conspiracy of silence in academia on the subject of restitution for 500 years of oppression. A program of reparations of three kinds is suggested: 1)…

  9. Rootless teeth: Dentin dysplasia type I

    PubMed Central

    Fulari, Sangamesh G; Tambake, Deepti P

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of hereditary disturbance of dentine, Dentin dysplasia type I is presented, which is characterized by short or total absence of roots, obliterated pulp chambers, and peri-apical radiolucencies. It affects both primary and secondary dentition. Management of patients with dentinal dysplasia is difficult and requires a multidisciplinary approach. An overview of dentin dysplasia and its management along with a case report is discussed. PMID:24403801

  10. Technology and the use of acrylics for provisional dentine protection.

    PubMed

    Kapusevska, Biljana; Dereban, Nikola; Popovska, Mirjana; Nikolovska, Julijana; Radojkova Nikolovska, Vеrа; Zabokova Bilbilova, Efka; Mijoska, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Acrylics are compounds polymerized from monomers of acrylic, metacrylic acid or acrylonitrates. The purpose of this paper is to present the technology and use of acrylics for provisional dentine protection in the practice of dental prosthodontics. For this reason, we followed 120 clinical cases from the everyday clinical practice, divided into 4 groups of 30 patients who needed prosthetic reconstruction. The first group included cases in which we applied celluloid crowns for dentine protection, for the second group we used acrylic teeth from a set of teeth for complete dentures; in the third and fourth groups the fabrication was done with the system of an impression matrix and the acrylic resin block technique respectively. In all the examined patients, the gingival index by Silness and Loe and the vitality of the dental pulp were verified clinically, after preparation and 8 days from the placement of the provisional crown. The value for dental sensitivity measured after preparation was 2.59, and 8 days after the placement of the provisional crown it bwas 3.1. From these results we can conclude that after the 8th day from the placement of the provisional crown, there was an adaptation period, characterized by a decrease in the painful sensations. The value of the Silness and Loe gingival index measured after the preparation was 1.34, and 8 days from the placement of the provisional crown was 0.94. The results inclined us to the fact that the provisional acrylic crowns facilitated the reparation of the periodontal tissue. PMID:24566021

  11. Nuestra culpa: collective guilt and shame as predictors of reparation for historical wrongdoing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rupert; González, Roberto; Zagefka, Hanna; Manzi, Jorge; Cehajic, Sabina

    2008-01-01

    Three studies examined the hypothesis that collective guilt and shame have different consequences for reparation. In 2 longitudinal studies, the ingroup was nonindigenous Chileans (Study 1: N = 124/120, lag = 8 weeks; Study 2: N = 247/137, lag = 6 months), and the outgroup was Chile's largest indigenous group, the Mapuche. In both studies, it was found that collective guilt predicted reparation attitudes longitudinally. Collective shame had only cross-sectional associations with reparation and no direct longitudinal effects. In Study 2, collective shame moderated the longitudinal effects of collective guilt such that the effects of guilt were stronger for low-shame respondents. In Study 3 (N = 193 nonindigenous Chileans), the cross-sectional relationships among guilt, shame, and reparation attitudes were replicated. The relationship between shame and reparation attitudes was mediated by a desire to improve the ingroup's reputation. PMID:18179319

  12. Raising the dead: war, reparation, and the politics of memory.

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, D.

    1995-01-01

    All societies attach a different range of meanings to war than to natural disasters, and questions of societal recognition, reparation, and justice are generally central. Most modern conflict has been grounded in the use of terror to control and silence whole populations. Those abusing power typically refuse to acknowledge their dead victims, as if they had never existed and were mere wraiths in the memories of those left behind. This denial, and the impunity of those who maintain it, must be challenged if survivors are to make sense of their losses and the social fabric is to mend. For the names and fate of the dead to be properly lodged in the public record of their times also illuminates the costs that may flow from the philosophies and practices of the Western led world order, ones which health workers should be in a position to influence. Images p495-a p496-a p496-b PMID:7647648

  13. Reparative resynchronization in ischemic heart failure: an emerging strategy

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Satsuki; Terzic, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac dyssynchrony refers to disparity in cardiac wall motion, a serious consequence of myocardial infarction associated with poor outcome. Infarct-induced scar is refractory to device-based cardiac resynchronization therapy, which relies on viable tissue. Leveraging the prospect of structural and functional regeneration, reparative resynchronization has emerged as a potentially achievable strategy. In proof-of-concept studies, stem-cell therapy eliminates contractile deficit originating from infarcted regions and secures long-term synchronization with tissue repair. Limited clinical experience suggests benefit of cell interventions in acute and chronic ischemic heart disease as adjuvant to standard of care. A regenerative resynchronization option for dyssynchronous heart failure thus merits validation. PMID:24840208

  14. [Thrombin--a regulator of reparative processes in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Strukova, S M; Dugina, T N; Chistov, I V; Markvicheva, E A; Kuptsova, S V; Kolokol'chikova, E G; Rumsh, L D; Zubov, V P; Gluza, E

    1998-04-01

    Thrombin, binding to receptors of the protease activated receptor (PAR) family, is involved in wound healing by inducing the reparation processes and regulating the activity of mast cells, which secrete mediators of inflammation. Using thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP-6) for the activation of rat mast cells, effect of several receptors, including PAR-1, on mast cells was demonstrated. It was shown that TRAP increases the concentration of Ca2+ in the cytoplasm of mast cells and regulates cell degranulation, while releasing nitrogen oxide. Thrombin encapsulated in poly(N-vinyl caprolactam)-calcium alginate (PVCL-Ca-Alg) hydrogel films promotes wound healing in rats as demonstrated by the acceleration of fibroblast proliferation and neovascularization. PMID:9612571

  15. Cementum and dentin in hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, T; Handoko, G; Niehof, A; Ryan, L M; Coburn, S P; Whyte, M P; Beertsen, W

    2005-11-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) often leads to premature loss of deciduous teeth, due to disturbed cementum formation. We addressed the question to what extent cementum and dentin are similarly affected. To this end, we compared teeth from children with HPP with those from matched controls and analyzed them microscopically and chemically. It was observed that both acellular and cellular cementum formation was affected. For dentin, however, no differences in mineral content were recorded. To explain the dissimilar effects on cementum and dentin in HPP, we assessed pyrophosphate (an inhibitor of mineralization) and the expression/activity of enzymes related to pyrophosphate metabolism in both the periodontal ligament and the pulp of normal teeth. Expression of nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1) in pulp proved to be significantly lower than in the periodontal ligament. Also, the activity of NPP1 was less in pulp, as was the concentration of pyrophosphate. Our findings suggest that mineralization of dentin is less likely to be under the influence of the inhibitory action of pyrophosphate than mineralization of cementum. PMID:16246934

  16. Dentin dysplasia: single-tooth involvement?

    PubMed

    Naik, Veena V; Kale, Alka D

    2009-03-01

    Dentin dysplasia is a genetic defect of dentin formation inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation with abnormal pulpal morphology. Once thought to be a single entity, dentin dysplasia has now been divided into type I (radicular) and II (coronal). Type I is by far the more common. Both types include multiple/generalized involvement of primary and permanent dentition. Combinations of both types have also been described in the literature. Four distinct forms of dentin dysplasia type I and 1 form of dentin dysplasia type II are identified. Although there seems to be no need to identify more than 2 distinct types of this relatively rare inherited defect of human dentin, the possible existence of additional forms of the disease cannot be ruled out. Here is a case report of dentin dysplasia in a single tooth, with crown and roots of normal dimensions, associated with severe pain and mobility and histologically involving both coronal and radicular dentin. Focal odontoblastic dysplasia or dentin dysplasia type III could be the new entity. PMID:19417880

  17. Transgenic expression of dentin phosphoprotein inhibits skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Liu, P; Wang, S; Liu, C; Jani, P; Lu, Y; Qin, C

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is proteolytically processed into an NH2-terminal fragment called dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and a COOH-terminal fragment known as dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). These two fragments are believed to perform distinct roles in formation of bone and dentin. To investigate the functions of DPP in skeletal development, we generated transgenic mice to overexpress hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged DPP under the control of a 3.6 kb type I collagen (Col1a1) promoter (designated as Col1a1-HA-DPP). The Col1a1-HA-DPP transgenic mice were significantly smaller by weight, had smaller skeletons and shorter long bones than their wild type littermates, as demonstrated by X-ray radiography. They displayed reduced trabecular bone formation and narrower zones of proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plates of the long bones. Histological analyses showed that the transgenic mice had reduced cell proliferation in the proliferating zone, but lacked obvious defects in the chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, the transgenic mice with a high level of transgene expression developed spontaneous long bone fractures. In conclusion, overexpressing DPP inhibited skeletal development, suggesting that the balanced actions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of DSPP may be required for normal skeletal development. PMID:26972716

  18. Transgenic Expression of Dentin Phosphoprotein Inhibits Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Liu, P.; Wang, S.; Liu, C.; Jani, P.; Lu, Y.; Qin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is proteolytically processed into an NH2-terminal fragment called dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and a COOH-terminal fragment known as dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). These two fragments are believed to perform distinct roles in formation of bone and dentin. To investigate the functions of DPP in skeletal development, we generated transgenic mice to overexpress hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged DPP under the control of a 3.6 kb type I collagen (Col1a1) promoter (designated as Col1a1-HA-DPP). The Col1a1-HA-DPP transgenic mice were significantly smaller by weight, had smaller skeletons and shorter long bones than their wild type littermates, as demonstrated by X-ray radiography. They displayed reduced trabecular bone formation and narrower zones of proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plates of the long bones. Histological analyses showed that the transgenic mice had reduced cell proliferation in the proliferating zone, but lacked obvious defects in the chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, the transgenic mice with a high level of transgene expression developed spontaneous long bone fractures. In conclusion, overexpressing DPP inhibited skeletal development, suggesting that the balanced actions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of DSPP may be required for normal skeletal development. PMID:26972716

  19. 17 CFR 12.407 - Satisfaction of reparation award; enforcement; sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... shall remain in effect until the person required to pay the reparation award demonstrates to the... award of post-judgment interest is inadvertently omitted, such interest nevertheless shall run...

  20. [Dynamics of biochemical markers of reparative fibrosis in uncomplicated course of myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Kim, L B; Putiatina, A N

    2010-01-01

    Dynamics of biochemical markers of reparative fibrosis in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) with complicated course did not differ from that in the group of patients without complications. Development of complications was associated with elevation of blood serum content of glucosaminoglycans in phase 3 of reparative fibrosis compared with group of patients without complications. This elevation was significant in the group of patients with rhythm disturbances. Statistically significant increase of total urinal oxyproline was found in patients with cardiac aneurism in phase 1 and in patients with cardiogenic shock in phase 3 of reparative fibrosis. These subject allow to speak about participation of reparative fibrosis in development of complications. Complications of myocardial infarction developed in patients aged 58 years and older. PMID:21591385

  1. Contemporary research findings on dentine remineralization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Bo; Peng, Ce; Wang, Guanhong; Tian, Lili; Cai, Qiang; Cui, Fuzhai

    2015-09-01

    Dentine remineralization is important for the treatment of dentine caries and the bonding durability of dentine and resin materials in clinical practice. Early studies of dentine remineralization were mostly based on the classical pathway of crystallization, which involves large-scale deposition of calcium phosphate crystals on collagen and is achieved in a liquid environment containing mineral ions. Results from these studies were unsatisfactory and not suitable for clinical application because they did not simulate the ordering of hydroxyapatite in the collagen fibres of natural teeth. As studies on collagen type I and non-collagenous proteins have advanced, dentine biomimetic remineralization has become a popular research topic and has shifted to processes involving intrafibrillar remineralization, which is more similar to natural tooth formation. The objective of this review was to summarize current theory and research progress as it relates to dentine remineralization. PMID:23955967

  2. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  3. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; MacKie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  4. Role of microstructure on fracture of dentin.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Dentin possesses unique hierarchical structure, which has a significant influence on the mechanical properties. Understanding the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of dentin is essential for preventing and curing oral diseases, as well as, potentially for developing man-made engineering materials with superior mechanical performance. In this study, the effect of the two-layered structure, where hard peritubular dentin (PTD) containing dentin tubules are embedded in soft intertubular dentin (ITD), on the fracture behavior of dentin is investigated. A numerical model is developed, in which PTD cracking, ITD cracking and the debonding of the interface between PTD and ITD are all taken into account. Numerical simulations reveal that PTD fracture and interface debonding are the major failure mechanisms, which are consistent with experimental observation. It is identified that the cohesive strength and critical separation of interface are the key parameters controlling which of the mechanisms is active. The low cohesive strength of interface and small critical separation of interface can lead to interface debonding, while the large cohesive strength and critical separation give rise to PTD fracture. In addition, it is found that large volume fraction of dentin tubules and small volume fraction of PTD can enhance the toughness of dentin, which provides a new insight into the degraded mechanical properties of old dentin. PMID:27018833

  5. [Immunoregulatory role of mesenchymal stem cells in bone reparation processes].

    PubMed

    Zubov, D O

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) including osteoblast progenitor cells. When culturedunder conditions promoting an osteoblastic phenotype,MSC proliferate to form colonies that produce alkaline phosphatase and, subsequently, a mature osteoblastic phenotype. Transplantation of cultured autologous MSC to patients with non-healing bone fractures gives a good result leading to complete bone fracture consolidation. The aim of the study is to determine a quantitative production of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha by cultured uncommitted and committed osteogenic MSC. The results showed that the cytokine profile consisting of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha is secreted by cultured MSC. The secretion of IL-1beta and IL-2 by cultured MSC together with hyper production of IL-6 (up to 276.5 pg/ml, p<0.05) and IL-8 (up to 106.6 ng/ml, p<0.05) by osteoinducted MSC are firstly shown. The immunoregulatory role of transplanted autologous cells in inflammation and own bone reparation processes during posttraumatic bone fracture healing is highlighted. In conclusion, the data obtained allow examining of cultured autologous MSC as effective activators of bone resorption, inflammation and some immunological reactions in the process of altered osteoreparation. PMID:18756772

  6. Performance evaluation of the croissant production line with reparable machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarouhas, Panagiotis H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the analytical probability models for an automated serial production system, bufferless that consists of n-machines in series with common transfer mechanism and control system was developed. Both time to failure and time to repair a failure are assumed to follow exponential distribution. Applying those models, the effect of system parameters on system performance in actual croissant production line was studied. The production line consists of six workstations with different numbers of reparable machines in series. Mathematical models of the croissant production line have been developed using Markov process. The strength of this study is in the classification of the whole system in states, representing failures of different machines. Failure and repair data from the actual production environment have been used to estimate reliability and maintainability for each machine, workstation, and the entire line is based on analytical models. The analysis provides a useful insight into the system's behaviour, helps to find design inherent faults and suggests optimal modifications to upgrade the system and improve its performance.

  7. Performance evaluation of the croissant production line with reparable machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarouhas, Panagiotis H.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the analytical probability models for an automated serial production system, bufferless that consists of n-machines in series with common transfer mechanism and control system was developed. Both time to failure and time to repair a failure are assumed to follow exponential distribution. Applying those models, the effect of system parameters on system performance in actual croissant production line was studied. The production line consists of six workstations with different numbers of reparable machines in series. Mathematical models of the croissant production line have been developed using Markov process. The strength of this study is in the classification of the whole system in states, representing failures of different machines. Failure and repair data from the actual production environment have been used to estimate reliability and maintainability for each machine, workstation, and the entire line is based on analytical models. The analysis provides a useful insight into the system's behaviour, helps to find design inherent faults and suggests optimal modifications to upgrade the system and improve its performance.

  8. Reparable Cell Sonoporation in Suspension: Theranostic Potential of Microbubble

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, S. Moosavi; Hosseini, Hamid; Akiyama, Hidenori; Tachibana, Katsuro

    2016-01-01

    The conjunction of low intensity ultrasound and encapsulated microbubbles can alter the permeability of cell membrane, offering a promising theranostic technique for non-invasive gene/drug delivery. Despite its great potential, the biophysical mechanisms of the delivery at the cellular level remains poorly understood. Here, the first direct high-speed micro-photographic images of human lymphoma cell and microbubble interaction dynamics are provided in a completely free suspension environment without any boundary parameter defect. Our real-time images and theoretical analyses prove that the negative divergence side of the microbubble's dipole microstreaming locally pulls the cell membrane, causing transient local protrusion of 2.5 µm in the cell membrane. The linear oscillation of microbubble caused microstreaming well below the inertial cavitation threshold, and imposed 35.3 Pa shear stress on the membrane, promoting an area strain of 0.12%, less than the membrane critical areal strain to cause cell rupture. Positive transfected cells with pEGFP-N1 confirm that the interaction causes membrane poration without cell disruption. The results show that the overstretched cell membrane causes reparable submicron pore formation, providing primary evidence of low amplitude (0.12 MPa at 0.834 MHz) ultrasound sonoporation mechanism. PMID:26941839

  9. Dentine and enamel bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, R L; Tung, M S; Blosser, R L; Asmussen, E

    1987-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that sequential use of aqueous FO (ferric oxalate containing a small concentration of HNO3), acetone solutions of NPG (N-phenylglycine), and PMDM (the reaction product of pyromellitic dianhydride and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) yields strong adhesive bonding of composite resins to both dentine and enamel. The purpose of this study was to determine if aluminum ions could be substituted for ferric ions and if the procedure could be simplified. Aqueous solutions containing aluminum oxalate and aluminum nitrate, followed in sequence by acetone solutions of NPG and PMDM, gave strong tensile adhesive bond strengths between a composite and extracted human teeth. Comparable values have been obtained with FO, NPG and PMDM. Aluminum oxalate solutions containing no nitrate gave lower bond strengths, as was the case with FO. Aqueous solutions of acidified aluminum oxalate can dissolve NPG, thereby allowing a simplification of the procedure. Tested for comparison, commercially available dentine bonding agents gave lower average bond strengths on dentine than did some of the experimental materials. PMID:3316044

  10. Dentin: a dynamic substrate--a review.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H

    1989-03-01

    The structure of dentin is unusual in that the number and size of its tubules changes as one moves from the periphery toward the pulp chamber. Near the pulp, the tubules are very close together and the water content of this deep dentin is high. Near the enamel, the tubules are far apart, occupying less than 1% of the surface area. When enamel or dentin is cut, the surface becomes covered by an adherent layer of cutting debris called the smear layer. Its composition presumably reflects the composition of the underlying dentin. It is only about 1 micron thick but its presence modifies the function of the dentin a great deal. It lowers dentin permeability and therefore can be regarded as protective. However, it masks the underlying dentin and hence interferes with attempts to bond dental materials directly to dentin. If it is removed, the dentin becomes much more permeable and fluid shifts across the open tubules can cause sensitivity in vivo. As smear layers are very acid-labile, they often dissolve in oral fluids. Several attempts have been made to replace smear layers with acid resistant structures that accomplish the same function. Smear layer structure is being studied by using both scanning electron microscopy as well as electronic particle sizing equipment. The close adaptation of dental materials to smear layers and to underlying dentin is currently an area of very active research. Removal of smear layers increases adaptation and bonding strength but may increase the incidence of pulpal inflammation if the bonding is not uniform or permanent. The dynamics of dentin are just beginning to be understood. PMID:2662395

  11. Bioinspired toughening mechanism: lesson from dentin.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the unique microstructure of dentin, in which the hard peritubular dentin surrounding the dentin tubules is embedded in the soft intertubular dentin, we explore the crack propagation in the bioinspired materials with fracture process zone possessing a dentin-like microstructure, i.e. the composite structure consisting of a soft matrix and hard reinforcements with cylindrical voids. A micromechanical model under small-scale yielding conditions is developed, and numerical simulations are performed, showing that the rising resistant curve (R-curve) is observed for crack propagation caused by the plastic collapse of the intervoid ligaments in the fracture process zone. The dentin-like microstructure in the fracture process zone exhibits enhanced fracture toughness, compared with the case of voids embedded in the homogeneous soft matrix. Further computational simulations show that the dentin-like microstructure can retard void growth, thereby promoting fracture toughness. The typical fracture mechanism of the bioinspired materials with fracture process zone possessing the dentin-like structure is void by void growth, while it is the multiple void interaction in the case of voids in the homogeneous matrix. Based on the results, we propose a bioinspired material design principle, which is that the combination of a hard inner material encompassing voids and a soft outer material in the fracture process zone can give rise to exceptional fracture toughness, achieving damage tolerance. It is expected that the proposed design principle could shed new light on the development of novel man-made engineering materials. PMID:26158322

  12. Cysteine Cathepsins in Human Carious Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, F.D.; Minciotti, C.L.; Geraldeli, S.; Carrilho, M.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.; Nader, H.B.; Salo, T.; Tjäderhane, L.; Tersariol, I.L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in dentinal caries, and analysis of recent data demonstrates the presence of other collagen-degrading enzymes, cysteine cathepsins, in human dentin. This study aimed to examine the presence, source, and activity of cysteine cathepsins in human caries. Cathepsin B was detected with immunostaining. Saliva and dentin cysteine cathepsin and MMP activities on caries lesions were analyzed spectrofluorometrically. Immunostaining demonstrated stronger cathepsins B in carious than in healthy dentin. In carious dentin, cysteine cathepsin activity increased with increasing depth and age in chronic lesions, but decreased with age in active lesions. MMP activity decreased with age in both active and chronic lesions. Salivary MMP activities were higher in patients with active than chronic lesions and with increasing lesion depth, while cysteine cathepsin activities showed no differences. The results indicate that, along with MMPs, cysteine cathepsins are important, especially in active and deep caries. PMID:21248362

  13. Dentine caries: take it or leave it?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Watson, T F; Kidd, E A

    2001-04-01

    In modern dentistry the primary aim when excavating carious dentine is to eradicate only the highly infected, irreversibly demineralised and denatured biomass in order to allow effective restoration of the cavity, restoration of the surface anatomy of the tooth and to prevent disease progression. However, the boundary between this superficial zone of dentine requiring excavation and the deeper, affected but repairable tissue is not always obvious either in the clinic or in the research laboratory. The inherent subjectivity in detecting this excavation boundary can result in clinically significant differences in the quality and quantity of dentine removed by different operators and makes the in vitro comparison of newer excavation techniques more difficult. This article discusses the rationale behind carious dentine excavation and the criteria available to the dentist, both clinical and laboratory, to help identify the dentine requiring removal. PMID:11436234

  14. Dentine caries: take it or leave it?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Watson, T F; Kidd, E A

    2000-01-01

    In modern dentistry the primary aim when excavating carious dentine is to eradicate only the highly infected, irreversibly demineralized and denatured biomass in order to allow effective restoration of the cavity, restoration of the surface anatomy of the tooth and to prevent disease progression. However, the boundary between this superficial zone of dentine requiring excavation and the deeper, affected but repairable tissue is not always obvious either in the clinic or in the research laboratory. The inherent subjectivity in detecting this excavation boundary can result in clinically significant differences in the quality and quantity of dentine removed by different operators and makes the in vitro comparison of newer excavation techniques more difficult. This article discusses the rationale behind carious dentine excavation and the criteria available to the dentist, both clinical and laboratory, to help identify the dentine requiring removal. PMID:11218463

  15. Invasion of dentinal tubules by oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Jenkinson, H F

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules commonly occurs when dentin is exposed following a breach in the integrity of the overlying enamel or cementum. Bacterial products diffuse through the dentinal tubule toward the pulp and evoke inflammatory changes in the pulpo-dentin complex. These may eliminate the bacterial insult and block the route of infection. Unchecked, invasion results in pulpitis and pulp necrosis, infection of the root canal system, and periapical disease. While several hundred bacterial species are known to inhabit the oral cavity, a relatively small and select group of bacteria is involved in the invasion of dentinal tubules and subsequent infection of the root canal space. Gram-positive organisms dominate the tubule microflora in both carious and non-carious dentin. The relatively high numbers of obligate anaerobes present-such as Eubacterium spp., Propionibacterium spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Peptostreptococcus micros, and Veillonella spp.-suggest that the environment favors growth of these bacteria. Gram-negative obligate anaerobic rods, e.g., Porphyromonas spp., are less frequently recovered. Streptococci are among the most commonly identified bacteria that invade dentin. Recent evidence suggests that streptococci may recognize components present within dentinal tubules, such as collagen type I, which stimulate bacterial adhesion and intra-tubular growth. Specific interactions of other oral bacteria with invading streptococci may then facilitate the invasion of dentin by select bacterial groupings. An understanding the mechanisms involved in dentinal tubule invasion by bacteria should allow for the development of new control strategies, such as inhibitory compounds incorporated into oral health care products or dental materials, which would assist in the practice of endodontics. PMID:12097359

  16. Nanoleakage of dentin adhesive systems bonded to Carisolv-treated dentin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shisei; Li, Heping; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid layer created in caries-affected dentin has not been fully elucidated and may influence bond durability. This study investigated the nanoleakage patterns of caries-affected dentin after excavation with Carisolv or conventional instruments treated with one of three adhesive systems. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces, including carious lesions, were prepared from extracted human molars and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Carious dentin was removed with Carisolv or round steel burs in conjunction with Caries Detector. PermaQuik, Single Bond or One-Up Bond F was bonded to the excavated dentin surfaces and adjacent flat occlusal surfaces and it was covered with Silux Plus resin-based composite. After 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water, the bonded interfaces were polished to remove flash, and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. Specimens were immersed in 50% (w/v) silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, exposed to photo developing solution for eight hours, then sectioned longitudinally through the bonded, excavated dentin or "normal" dentin surfaces. The sectioned surfaces were polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using back scattered electrons. Silver deposition occurred along the base of the hybrid layer for all specimens. However, Single Bond showed a greater density of silver deposition in the caries-affected dentin compared with normal dentin. PermaQuik had a thicker hybrid layer in caries-affected dentin than normal dentin. One-Up Bond F exhibited a thin hybrid layer in normal dentin, but the hybrid layer was often difficult to detect in caries-affected dentin. PMID:12120777

  17. The charisma and deception of reparative therapies: when medical science beds religion.

    PubMed

    Grace, André P

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I examine the history and resurgence of interest in sexual reorientation or reparative therapies. I begin with a critique of the contemporary "ex-gay" movement, interrogating Exodus as the prototype of a politico-religious transformational ministry that works to "cure" homosexuals, and examine how Exodus utilizes ex-gay testimony to deceive harried homosexuals looking for escape from the effects of internalized and cultural homophobia. Next, I investigate how reparative therapies function as orthodox treatments that charismatically meld conservative religious perspectives with medical science to produce a pseudoscience promising to treat homosexuality effectively. In this regard, I assess the ongoing debate regarding gay-affirming versus reparative therapies by first looking at the history of medicalizing homosexuality and then surveying the debate spurred by Robert L. Spitzer's research. I conclude with a consideration of research needed to measure whether efficacious change in sexual orientation is possible. PMID:19064479

  18. Ecological Hypothesis of Dentin and Root Caries.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Nyvad, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances regarding the caries process indicate that ecological phenomena induced by bacterial acid production tilt the de- and remineralization balance of the dental hard tissues towards demineralization through bacterial acid-induced adaptation and selection within the microbiota - from the dynamic stability stage to the aciduric stage via the acidogenic stage [Takahashi and Nyvad, 2008]. Dentin and root caries can also be partly explained by this hypothesis; however, the fact that these tissues contain a considerable amount of organic material suggests that protein degradation is involved in caries formation. In this review, we compiled relevant histological, biochemical, and microbiological information about dentin/root caries and refined the hypothesis by adding degradation of the organic matrix (the proteolytic stage) to the abovementioned stages. Bacterial acidification not only induces demineralization and exposure of the organic matrix in dentin/root surfaces but also activation of dentin-embedded and salivary matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins. These phenomena initiate degradation of the demineralized organic matrix in dentin/root surfaces. While a bacterial involvement has never been confirmed in the initial degradation of organic material, the detection of proteolytic/amino acid-degrading bacteria and bacterial metabolites in dentin and root caries suggests a bacterial digestion and metabolism of partly degraded matrix. Moreover, bacterial metabolites might induce pulpitis as an inflammatory/immunomodulatory factor. Root and dentin surfaces are always at risk of becoming demineralized in the oral cavity, and exposed organic materials can be degraded by host-derived proteases contained in saliva and dentin itself. New approaches to the prevention and treatment of root/dentin caries are required. PMID:27458979

  19. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O... - Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252 No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation Pt. 502, Subpt O, Exh. 1 Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O...

  20. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O... - Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252 No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation Pt. 502, Subpt O, Exh. 1 Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O...

  1. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O... - Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252 No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation Pt. 502, Subpt O, Exh. 1 Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O...

  2. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O... - Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252 No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation Pt. 502, Subpt O, Exh. 1 Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O...

  3. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O... - Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reparation Statement To Be Filed Pursuant to Rule 252 No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Reparation Pt. 502, Subpt O, Exh. 1 Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart O...

  4. Oxalate desensitising treatment of dentinal surface.

    PubMed

    Mongiorgi, R; Prati, C; Toschi, E; Riva di Sanseverino, L

    1991-04-01

    It is well known that a typical painful feeling is caused by impact of different agents and by thermodynamic conditions upon the dentine layer of the tooth. Therefore the action by artificial solutions should be tested to study how the induced modifications might inhibit the pain. The aim of the present study is to evaluate by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the morphology of dentine surface after different chemical treatments. Oxalate solutions are able to produce a layer of large crystals, while acid solutions remove the smear layer and open the dentinal tubules. PMID:1910743

  5. Hypersensitive dentinal pain attenuation with potassium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Touyz, L Z; Stern, J

    1999-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity occurs when gingival recession exposes dentin at the cervical margins of teeth. Twenty-four periodontal patients, with postoperative hypersensitive dentin were treated by burnishing saturated potassium nitrate (KNO3) to relieve pain. Using a visual analogue scale with participants acting as their own control, a subjective assessment of pain was measured and compared before and after KNO3 application. Thirty-six regions involving 98 teeth were assessed. A significant reduction of sensitivity and pain was achieved by using a saturated KNO3 solution (p < .0001 Student-t). PMID:10321150

  6. Integrated coherent Raman scattering and multiphoton microscopy for label-free imaging of the dentin in the tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Hsu, Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-01

    We report the implementation of a unique multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG) and two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF)) platform for label-free imaging of dentin. A picosecond tunable laser together with an OPO is used as the excitation source for simultaneously multimodal imaging. CARS shows similar information as TPEF in dentin, but it has a higher sectioning performance than TPEF and thus it is a good alternative for TPEF. Microtubule structure is revealed nearby dentin enamel junction (DEJ) from the multimodal images. This work demonstrates that combining different nonlinear optical imaging modalities can provide new insights into the understanding of morphological structures and biochemical/biomolecular distributions of the dentine without the need of labeling.

  7. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  8. Promotion of adhesive penetration and resin bond strength to dentin using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Chang-Keun; Oh, Kyu-Hwan; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas (NT-APPs) have been shown to improve the bond strength of resin composites to demineralized dentin surfaces. Based on a wet-bonding philosophy, it is believed that a rewetting procedure is necessary after treatment with NT-APP because of its air-drying effect. This study investigated the effect of 'plasma-drying' on the bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin by comparison with the wet-bonding technique. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were acid-etched and divided into four groups according to the adhesion procedure: wet bonding, plasma-drying, plasma-drying/rewetting, and dry bonding. In plasma treatment groups, the demineralized dentin surfaces were treated with a plasma plume generated using a pencil-type low-power plasma torch. After the adhesion procedures, resin composite/dentin-bonded specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond-strength test. The hybrid layer formation was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The plasma-drying group presented significantly higher bond strength than the wet-bonding and dry-bonding groups. Micro-Raman spectral analysis indicated that plasma-drying improved the penetration and polymerization efficacy of the adhesive. Plasma-drying could be a promising method to control the moisture of demineralized dentin surfaces and improve the penetration of adhesive and the mechanical property of the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:26714586

  9. An in vitro investigation of penetration depth of dentine bonding agents into carious dentine.

    PubMed

    Hahn, P; Hellwig, E

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to determine the penetration depth of dentine bonding agents into carious dentine as a possible strategy in caries treatment of deep lesions. Forty-eight extracted carious teeth were used for the experiments and divided in four groups. In a split-tooth design, one half of each tooth was treated without caries excavation, and the second half after caries excavation. In group 1 the teeth were treated with Prime & Bond 2.0 without phosphoric acid etching, and in group 2 with phosphoric acid etching. In group 3, the teeth were treated with All-Bond 2 without phosphoric acid etching, and in group 4 with phosphoric acid etching. Bonding agents were marked with an orange dye prior to application. The composition of the bonding agents had no significant influence on penetration depths. The mean thickness of the outer, necrotic caries zone in unexcavated specimens was 117 microm (+/-126). Bonding agents penetrated significantly deeper into unexcavated carious dentine (mean 124 +/- 76 microm) compared with excavated dentine (11 +/- 14 microm) and sound dentine (3 +/- 4 microm). Acid etching significantly reduced the thickness of the outer caries zone, and the penetration depth of the bonding agents into unexcavated carious specimens by approximately 50%, and increased it into sound dentine. The results indicate that dentine bonding agents could completely penetrate the unexcavated outer carious dentine in 90% of specimens. Further studies are required to determine whether further caries activity is arrested after treatment with dentine bonding procedures. PMID:15525382

  10. Dentinal composition and Knoop hardness measurements of cavity floor following carious dentin removal with Carisolv.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mozammal; Nakamura, Yukio; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Yamada, Yoshishige; Jayawardena, Jayanetti Asiri; Matsumoto, Koukichi

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the dentinal composition and Knoop hardness measurements of the cavity floor following the removal of carious dentin by the Carisolv chemo-mechanical caries removal system, in vitro. The carious dentin of 25 extracted human teeth was removed by using Carisolv for one minute with instruments and excavation that was performed until the gel was clear. Caries removal with a sharp explorer was verified according to the color and hardness of the lesion, then, by means of DIAGNOdent. Atomic analysis of treated cavities was performed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and the Knoop hardness number (KHN) of the cavity floor was determined. Surface characteristics were observed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Adjacent sound dentin was used as a control reference. No significant differences were found between the quantities of calcium content (Ca weight %), phosphorus content (P weight %) and the Ca/P weight ratio of Carisolv cavities with that of the adjacent, sound dentin (p<0.01). KHN of the Carisolv cavity floor was almost similar to that of the adjacent sound dentin. SEM analysis revealed an extremely rough or irregular surface, and there remained a minimal debris-like smear layer; most of the dentinal tubules were opened. The results indicated that Carisolv does not produce any adverse side effects on dentinal compositions of the treated cavities. The possibility of remaining residual softened dentin was also minimal in this study. PMID:12877418

  11. Isolated dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia: revision of the classification.

    PubMed

    de La Dure-Molla, Muriel; Philippe Fournier, Benjamin; Berdal, Ariane

    2015-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by severe hypomineralization of dentin and altered dentin structure. Dentin extra cellular matrix is composed of 90% of collagen type I and 10% of non-collagenous proteins among which dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) are crucial in dentinogenesis. These proteins are encoded by a single gene: dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and undergo several post-translational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation to contribute and to control mineralization. Human mutations of this DSPP gene are responsible for three isolated dentinal diseases classified by Shield in 1973: type II and III dentinogenesis imperfecta and type II dentin dysplasia. Shield classification was based on clinical phenotypes observed in patient. Genetics results show now that these three diseases are a severity variation of the same pathology. So this review aims to revise and to propose a new classification of the isolated forms of DI to simplify diagnosis for practitioners. PMID:25118030

  12. Identification of dentin phosphophoryn localization by histochemical stainings.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Y; Fujisawa, R; Sasaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Phosphophoryn, the most abundant of the dentin non-collagenous proteins, has been considered to be related in function to the mineralization process. In the present study, identification of dentin phosphophoryn localization was attempted using newly developed, precautionary histological methods by which phosphophoryn was retained in the sections during the specimen preparation and stained selectively in situ. Phosphophoryn was found to be present widely in all of the calcified dentin except the mantle dentin, the external, first-formed portion of dentin, but was not found in the predentin, the inner, uncalcified layer of dentin. These results indicate that phosphophoryn is apparently related to the mineral phase of calcified dentin and that the mineralization process of mantle dentin, which is formed before the odontoblasts are fully differentiated, may be different from that of circumpulpal dentin. PMID:2421974

  13. Identification of the Microbiota in Carious Dentin Lesions Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Junko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Yamanaka, Wataru; Unemori, Masako; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    While mutans streptococci have long been assumed to be the specific pathogen responsible for human dental caries, the concept of a complex dental caries-associated microbiota has received significant attention in recent years. Molecular analyses revealed the complexity of the microbiota with the predominance of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in carious dentine lesions. However, characterization of the dentin caries-associated microbiota has not been extensively explored in different ethnicities and races. In the present study, the bacterial communities in the carious dentin of Japanese subjects were analyzed comprehensively with molecular approaches using the16S rRNA gene. Carious dentin lesion samples were collected from 32 subjects aged 4–76 years, and the 16S rRNA genes, amplified from the extracted DNA with universal primers, were sequenced with a pyrosequencer. The bacterial composition was classified into clusters I, II, and III according to the relative abundance (high, middle, low) of Lactobacillus. The bacterial composition in cluster II was composed of relatively high proportions of Olsenella and Propionibacterium or subdominated by heterogeneous genera. The bacterial communities in cluster III were characterized by the predominance of Atopobium, Prevotella, or Propionibacterium with Streptococcus or Actinomyces. Some samples in clusters II and III, mainly related to Atopobium and Propionibacterium, were novel combinations of microbiota in carious dentin lesions and may be characteristic of the Japanese population. Clone library analysis revealed that Atopobium sp. HOT-416 and P. acidifaciens were specific species associated with dentinal caries among these genera in a Japanese population. We summarized the bacterial composition of dentinal carious lesions in a Japanese population using next-generation sequencing and found typical Japanese types with Atopobium or Propionibacterium predominating. PMID:25083880

  14. Dspp-independent Effects of Transgenic Trps1 Overexpression on Dentin Formation.

    PubMed

    Mobley, C G; Kuzynski, M; Zhang, H; Jani, P; Qin, C; Napierala, D

    2015-08-01

    The Trps1 transcription factor is highly expressed in dental mesenchyme and preodontoblasts, while in mature, secretory odontoblasts, it is expressed at low levels. Previously, we have shown that high Trps1 levels in mature odontoblasts impair their function in vitro and in vivo. Col1a1-Trps1 transgenic (Trps1-Tg) mice demonstrate defective dentin secretion and mineralization, which are associated with significantly decreased Dspp expression due to direct repression of the Dspp gene by Trps1. Here, by crossing Trps1-Tg and Col1a1-Dspp transgenic (Dspp-Tg) mice, we generated Col1a1-Trps1;Col1a1-Dspp double transgenic (double-Tg) mice in which Dspp was restored in odontoblasts overexpressing Trps1. Comparative micro-computed tomography analyses revealed partial correction of the dentin volume and no improvement of dentin mineralization in double transgenic mice in comparison with Trps1-Tg and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, dentin of double-Tg mice has an irregular mineralization pattern characteristic for dentin in hypophosphatemic rickets. Consistent with this phenotype, decreased levels of Phex, Vdr, and Fam20c proteins are detected in both Trps1-Tg and double-Tg odontoblasts in comparison with WT and Dspp-Tg odontoblasts. This suggests that the Dspp-independent dentin mineralization defects in Trps1-Tg mice are a result of downregulation of a group of proteins critical for mineral deposition within the dentin matrix. In summary, by demonstrating that Trps1 functions as a repressor of later stages of dentinogenesis, we provide functional significance of the dynamic Trps1 expression pattern during dentinogenesis. PMID:25999324

  15. Identification of the microbiota in carious dentin lesions using 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Junko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Yamanaka, Wataru; Unemori, Masako; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    While mutans streptococci have long been assumed to be the specific pathogen responsible for human dental caries, the concept of a complex dental caries-associated microbiota has received significant attention in recent years. Molecular analyses revealed the complexity of the microbiota with the predominance of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in carious dentine lesions. However, characterization of the dentin caries-associated microbiota has not been extensively explored in different ethnicities and races. In the present study, the bacterial communities in the carious dentin of Japanese subjects were analyzed comprehensively with molecular approaches using the16S rRNA gene. Carious dentin lesion samples were collected from 32 subjects aged 4-76 years, and the 16S rRNA genes, amplified from the extracted DNA with universal primers, were sequenced with a pyrosequencer. The bacterial composition was classified into clusters I, II, and III according to the relative abundance (high, middle, low) of Lactobacillus. The bacterial composition in cluster II was composed of relatively high proportions of Olsenella and Propionibacterium or subdominated by heterogeneous genera. The bacterial communities in cluster III were characterized by the predominance of Atopobium, Prevotella, or Propionibacterium with Streptococcus or Actinomyces. Some samples in clusters II and III, mainly related to Atopobium and Propionibacterium, were novel combinations of microbiota in carious dentin lesions and may be characteristic of the Japanese population. Clone library analysis revealed that Atopobium sp. HOT-416 and P. acidifaciens were specific species associated with dentinal caries among these genera in a Japanese population. We summarized the bacterial composition of dentinal carious lesions in a Japanese population using next-generation sequencing and found typical Japanese types with Atopobium or Propionibacterium predominating. PMID:25083880

  16. Power toothbrushes, gender, and dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hefti, A F; Stone, C

    2000-06-01

    Power toothbrushes require less force for plaque removal than manual brushes. In addition, in vitro studies have indicated that brushing with low force could occlude patent dentin tubules by formation of a smear layer. Hence, lessening the force necessary to remove plaque may reduce dentin hypersensitivity. However, it was recently suggested that the use of an oscillating/rotating power toothbrush could decrease tooth sensitivity as compared to a sonic power toothbrush. Therefore, the objective of the present research was to compare the effect on dentin hypersensitivity of two different types of power brushes, the Optiva Sonicare and the Braun Oral B Ultra Plaque Remover. The null hypothesis was tested in an 8-week, randomized, parallel group, examiner-blind clinical trial. Fifty-nine subjects with a history of dentin hypersensitivity participated. Dentin hypersensitivity-associated pain was elicited using tactile and evaporative stimuli and assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) instrument. Clinical examinations were carried out at screening and baseline and repeated after 8 weeks of twice daily use of the power brushes. Data analysis was performed on VAS scores obtained at the final visit following adjustment for group differences at baseline. A 35% to 40% reduction in pain as compared to baseline was observed in both treatment groups. Treatment-related differences were not statistically significant. A gender-related effect on dentin hypersensitivity was observed using the tactile stimulus and may merit further investigation. PMID:11218507

  17. 9 CFR 202.103 - Rule 3: Beginning a reparation proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rule 3: Beginning a reparation proceeding. 202.103 Section 202.103 Animals and Animal Products GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS...) Quantity and quality of the livestock involved; (3) Whether a sale is involved and, if so, the date,...

  18. 9 CFR 202.103 - Rule 3: Beginning a reparation proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rule 3: Beginning a reparation proceeding. 202.103 Section 202.103 Animals and Animal Products GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS...) Quantity and quality of the livestock involved; (3) Whether a sale is involved and, if so, the date,...

  19. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modern self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability. PMID:20690420

  20. Odontoblasts: Specialized hard-tissue-forming cells in the dentin-pulp complex.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Odontoblasts are specialized cells that produce dentin and exhibit unique morphological characteristics; i.e., they extend cytoplasmic processes into dentinal tubules. While osteoblasts, which are typical hard-tissue-forming cells, are generated from mesenchymal stem cells during normal and pathological bone metabolism, the induction of odontoblasts only occurs once during tooth development, and odontoblasts survive throughout the lives of healthy teeth. During the differentiation of odontoblasts, signaling molecules from the inner enamel epithelium are considered necessary for the differentiation of odontoblast precursors, i.e., peripheral dental papilla cells. If odontoblasts are destroyed by severe external stimuli, such as deep caries, the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into odontoblast-like cells is induced. Various bioactive molecules, such as non-collagenous proteins, might be involved in this process, although the precise mechanisms responsible for odontoblast differentiation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, our knowledge about the other functional activities of odontoblasts (apart from dentin formation) has increased. For example, it has been suggested that odontoblasts might act as nociceptive receptors, and surveillance cells that detect the invasion of exogenous pathogens. The regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex has recently gained much attention as a promising future treatment modality that could increase the longevity of pulpless teeth. Finally, congenital dentin anomalies, which are concerned with the disturbance of odontoblast functions, are summarized. PMID:27131345

  1. Femtosecond laser surface structuring technique for making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    It is known that good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is a key factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. Here, we report on a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this new approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of femtosecond laser-produced parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  2. Adhesion to chondroitinase ABC treated dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Annalisa; Pashley, David H.; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Vita, Francesca; Falconi, Mirella; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Dentin bonding relies on complete resin impregnation throughout the demineralised hydrophilic collagen mesh. Chondroitin sulphate-glycosaminoglycans are claimed to regulate the three-dimensional arrangement of the dentin organic matrix and its hydrophilicity. The aim of this study was to investigate bond strength of two etch-and-rinse adhesives to chondroitinase ABC treated dentin. Human extracted molars were treated with chondroitinase ABC and a double labelling immunohistochemical technique was applied to reveal type I collagen and chondroitin 4/6 sulphate distribution under field emission in-lens scanning electron microscope. The immunohistochemical technique confirmed the effective removal of chondroitin 4/6 sulphate after the enzymatic treatment. Dentin surfaces exposed to chondroitinase ABC and untreated specimens prepared on untreated acid-etched dentin were bonded with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose or Prime & Bond NT. Bonded specimens were submitted to microtensile testing and nanoleakage interfacial analysis under transmission electron microscope. Increased mean values of microtensile bond strength and reduced nanoleakage expression were found for both adhesives after chondroitinase ABC treatment of the dentin surface. Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose increased its bond strength about 28%, while bonding made with Prime & Bond NT almost doubled (92% increase) compared to untreated specimens. This study supports the hypothesis that adhesion can be enhanced by removal of chondroitin 4/6 sulphate and dermatan sulphate, probably due to a reduced amount of water content and enlarged interfibrillar spaces. Further studies should validate this hypothesis investigating the stability of chondroitin 4/6 and dermatan sulphate-depleted dentin bonded interface over time. PMID:18161809

  3. Clinical status of ten dentin adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Verschueren, M; Gladys, S; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1994-11-01

    Laboratory testing of dentin adhesive systems still requires corroboration by long-term clinical trials for their ultimate clinical effectiveness to be validated. The objective of this clinical investigation was to evaluate, retrospectively, the clinical effectiveness of earlier-investigated dentin adhesive systems (Scotchbond, Gluma, Clearfil New Bond, Scotchbond 2, Tenure, and Tripton), and to compare their clinical results with those obtained with four modern total-etch adhesive systems (Bayer exp. 1 and 2, Clearfil Liner Bond System, and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose). In total, 1177 Class V cervical lesions in the teeth of 346 patients were restored following two cavity designs: In Group A, enamel was neither beveled nor intentionally etched, as per ADA guidelines; in Group B, adjacent enamel was beveled and conditioned. Clinical retention rates definitely indicated the improved clinical efficacy of the newest dentin adhesives over the earlier systems. With regard to adhesion strategy, adhesive systems that removed the smear layer and concurrently demineralized the dentin surface layer performed clinically better than systems that modified the disorderly layer of smear debris without complete removal. Hybridization by resin interdiffusion into the exposed dentinal collagen layer, combined with attachment of resin tags into the opened dentin tubules, appeared to be essential for reliable dentin bonding but might be insufficient by itself. The additional formation of an elastic bonding area as a polymerization shrinkage absorber and the use of a microfine restorative composite apparently guaranteed an efficient clinical result. The perfect one-year retention recorded for Clearfil Liner Bond System and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose must be confirmed at later recalls. PMID:7983255

  4. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  5. Long-term effect of carbodiimide on dentin matrix and resin-dentin bonds

    PubMed Central

    Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B.; Vidal, Cristina M.P.; Dos Santos, Paulo H.; Castellan, Carina S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the interaction of 1-Ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide Hydrochloride (EDC) with dentin matrix and its effect on the resin-dentin bond. Methods Changes to the stiffness of demineralized dentin fragments treated with EDC/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in different solutions were evaluated at different time points. The resistance against enzymatic degradation was indirectly evaluated by ultimate tensile strength (UTS) test of demineralized dentin treated or not with EDC/NHS and subjected to collagenase digestion. Short- and long-term evaluations of the strength of resin-dentin interfaces treated with EDC/NHS for 1 hour were performed using microtensile bond strength (µTBS) test. All data (MPa) were individually analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α=0.05). Results The different exposure times significantly increased the stiffness of dentin (p<0.0001, control - 5.15 and EDC/NHS - 29.50), while no differences were observed among the different solutions of EDC/NHS (p=0.063). Collagenase challenge did not affect the UTS values of EDC/NHS group (6.08) (p>0.05), while complete degradation was observed for the control group (p=0.0008, control - 20.84 and EDC/NHS - 43.15). EDC/NHS treatment did not significantly increase resin-dentin µTBS, but the values remained stable after 12 months water storage (p<0.05). Conclusions Biomimetic use of EDC/NHS to induce exogenous collagen cross-links resulted in increased mechanical properties and stability of dentin matrix and dentin-resin interfaces. PMID:20524201

  6. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  7. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    PubMed Central

    MOLLICA, Fernanda Brandão; TORRES, Carlos Rocha Gomes; GONÇALVES, Sergio Eduardo de Paiva; MANCINI, †Maria Nadir Gasparoto

    2012-01-01

    There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. Objectives The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. Material and methods The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10), according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. Results ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a), Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab), Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc). Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc), Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc), Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d). Conclusions DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values. PMID:23032207

  8. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering. PMID:26545748

  9. Clinical management of infected root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-08-01

    Several hundred different species of bacteria are present in the human intraoral environment. Bacterial penetration of root canal dentin occurs when bacteria invade the root canal system. These bacteria may constitute a reservoir from which root canal reinfection may occur during or after endodontic treatment. The learning objective of this article is to review endodontic microbiology, update readers on the role of bacteria in pulp and periapical disease, and discuss the principles of management of infected root canal dentin. Complete debridement, removal of microorganisms and affected dentin, and chemomechanical cleansing of the root canal are suggested as being the cornerstones of successful endodontic therapy, followed by intracanal medication to remove residual bacteria, when required. PMID:9242125

  10. Microscopic imaging of resin-bonded dentin using Cryo-FIB/TEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Turki A.

    2015-03-01

    Background and Objective: Introduction of focused ion beam (FIB) for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) preparation had enhanced the understanding of materials' interaction at nanoscale. However, this technique generates localized heat that may possibly have some effect on organic/vital structures during preparation of biological tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of milling with Cryogenic-FIB on imaging the ultra-morphological features of dentin-resin interface bonded in a tooth and compare the findings to a room-temperature FIB prepared specimens. Methods: After cylindrical dentin cavities (3 mm diameter × 1.5 mm depth) were prepared on the occlusal surfaces of extracted, non-carious human premolar teeth, they were restored with Filtek P90 (Silorane) restorative system (3M ESPE, USA). To investigate the ultra-morphological features of resin-dentin interface, the bonded specimens were divided into 2 groups based on the preparation technique; (1) FIB preparation at room-temperature (RT), and (2) FIB preparation with cryogenic cooling (Cy). Later, each group was examined under TEM. Results: The obtained sections in RT group showed blurred scattered needle-like crystals above the resin-impregnated dentin. However, the orientation of these crisscross needle-like crystals and the ultramorphological features of the underlying dentin were more vivid and distinct in Cy group. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this in-vitro study, it could be concluded that combining FIB with cryogenic cooling had preserved the biological organic features of dentin due to minimized beam damage. The presented cryogenic technique should be considered in future FIB/TEM studies involving biological substrates. This research was supported by King Abdulaziz University.

  11. A multi-item maintenance center inventory model for low-demand reparable items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    In many military and commercial contexts, complex equipment undergoes scheduled maintenance overhauls at regular intervals during which all failed components are replaced. Failure to have replacements on hand for all failed parts requires emergency measures at premium cost. When reparable parts are highly reliable and expensive, both holding and shortage costs are high. This model determines the reparable parts inventory for a maintenance center under three alternative criteria: (1) maximizing job-completion rate subject to constraint on total holding costs, (2) minimizing total holding costs plus expected job noncompletion costs, and (3) minimizing total holding costs subject to a required minimum job-completion rate. Exact solutions may be obtained using dynamic programming. Approximate solutions, found easily by marginal analysis, have readily computed bounds on possible error. The solution methods for the three formulations are illustrated in a simple example.

  12. Pulp-dentin Regeneration: Current State and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Song, M; Kim, E; Shon, W; Chugal, N; Bogen, G; Lin, L; Kim, R H; Park, N-H; Kang, M K

    2015-11-01

    The goal of regenerative endodontics is to reinstate normal pulp function in necrotic and infected teeth that would result in reestablishment of protective functions, including innate pulp immunity, pulp repair through mineralization, and pulp sensibility. In the unique microenvironment of the dental pulp, the triad of tissue engineering would require infection control, biomaterials, and stem cells. Although revascularization is successful in resolving apical periodontitis, multiple studies suggest that it alone does not support pulp-dentin regeneration. More recently, cell-based approaches in endodontic regeneration based on pulpal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated promising results in terms of pulp-dentin regeneration in vivo through autologous transplantation. Although pulpal regeneration requires the cell-based approach, several challenges in clinical translation must be overcome-including aging-associated phenotypic changes in pulpal MSCs, availability of tissue sources, and safety and regulation involved with expansion of MSCs in laboratories. Allotransplantation of MSCs may alleviate some of these obstacles, although the long-term stability of MSCs and efficacy in pulp-dentin regeneration demand further investigation. For an alternative source of MSCs, our laboratory developed induced MSCs (iMSCs) from primary human keratinocytes through epithelial-mesenchymal transition by modulating the epithelial plasticity genes. Initially, we showed that overexpression of ΔNp63α, a major isoform of the p63 gene, led to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and acquisition of stem characteristics. More recently, iMSCs were generated by transient knockdown of all p63 isoforms through siRNA, further simplifying the protocol and resolving the potential safety issues of viral vectors. These cells may be useful for patients who lack tissue sources for endogenous MSCs. Further research will elucidate the level of potency of these iMSCs and assess their

  13. 75 FR 3371 - Commission Guidance Concerning the Rules of Practice Relating to Reparations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ...The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``Commission'' or ``CFTC'') is issuing this policy statement to clarify and provide guidance to Commission staff and affected parties that Commission Rule 12.1(a), 17 CFR 12.1(a), requires that all rules of practice relating to reparation proceedings under 17 CFR part 12 ``shall be construed liberally so as to secure the just, speedy and inexpensive......

  14. Dentine in a capsule: clinical case reports.

    PubMed

    Kenchappa, Mallikarjuna; Gupta, Shilpi; Gupta, Puneet; Sharma, Priyamvada

    2015-01-01

    Biodentine TM , a calcium silicate based material has been popular now and can be used as an alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) due to superior physical and biologic properties. It has been known by several terms as Biodentine, dentin substitute, and RD 94. It has varied clinical applications such as apexification, apexogenesis, pulpotomy, internal resorption, root perforation repair, retrograde filling, pulp capping procedure, and dentin replacement. This article describes the clinical case reports using Biodentine in apexification, apexogenesis, pulpotomy, and root perforation repair. PMID:26156282

  15. Immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials.

    PubMed

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Sakai, Vivien T; Abdo, Ruy Cesar C; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M; Santos, Carlos F; Oliveira, Thais M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials. Twenty-five primary molars were divided into the following groups: formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide (CH), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), corticosteroid/antibiotic solution + CH (O + CH), and Portland cement (PC), and all received conventional pulpotomy treatment. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ(2) test (p < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the comparison among the groups through the use of a score system regarding the presence of hard tissue barrier, odontoblastic layer, and internal resorption, but not regarding pulp calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis showed immunostaining for DMP-1 in groups CH, MTA, O + CH, and PC. Internal resorption was observed in the groups FC and CH. MTA and PC showed pulp repair without inflammation and with the presence of hard tissue barrier. DMP-1 immunostaining was higher for MTA and PC, confirming the reparative and bioinductive capacity of these materials. PMID:25678029

  16. Mechanical characterization of proanthocyanidin-dentin matrix interaction

    PubMed Central

    Castellan, Carina Strano; Pereira, Patricia Nobrega; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the properties of dentin matrix treated with two proanthocyanidin rich cross-linking agents and their effect on dentin bonded interfaces. Methods Sound human molars were cut into 0.5 mm thick dentin slabs, demineralized and either treated with one of two cross-linking agents (grape seed - GSE and cocoa seed - COE extracts) or left untreated. The modulus of elasticity of demineralized dentin was assessed after 10 or 60 min and the swelling ratio after 60 min treatment. Bacterial collagenase was also used to assess resistance to enzymatic degradation of samples subjected to ultimate tensile strength. The effect of GSE or COE on the resin-dentin bond strength was evaluated after 10 or 60 min of exposure time. Data were statistically analyzed at a 95% confidence interval. Results Both cross-linkers increased the elastic modulus of demineralized dentin as exposure time increased. Swelling ratio was lower for treated samples when compared to control groups. No statistically significant changes to the UTS indicate that collagenase had no effect on dentin matrix treated with either GSE or COE. Dentin-resin bonds significantly increased following treatment with GSE regardless of the application time or adhesive system used. Significance Increased mechanical properties and stability of dentin matrix can be achieved by the use of PA-rich collagen cross-linkers most likely due to the formation of a PA-collagen complex. The short term dentin-resin bonds can be improved after 10 minutes dentin treatment. PMID:20650510

  17. Distribution of interglobular dentine in human tooth roots.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kagayama, M; Sasano, Y; Mayanagi, H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the distribution of interglobular dentine in human tooth roots. The material comprised 17 teeth, of which 3 were premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons from children 10-12 years of age and the other teeth (4 incisors, 3 canines and 7 molars) were extracted for periodontitis from individuals aged 32-63 years. All teeth were free of caries and cervical dentine defects. Ground sections of the teeth cut longitudinally were stained with basic fuchsin and observed by fluorescence and confocal microscopy as well as transmitted light microscopy. Basic fuchsin stained the dentinal tubules, interglobular dentine and the granular layer of Tomes. These structures appeared intense blue to faint violet with transmitted light microscopy, whereas their staining displayed intense fluorescence with fluorescence microscopy. Therefore, the interglobular dentine could be detected more sensitively with fluorescence and confocal microscopy than with transmitted light microscopy. Typical interglobular dentine was present in coronal dentine in most of the teeth. In the radicular dentin, position and size of the interglobular dentine was different among the teeth examined. Most of the teeth had the interglobular dentine in the cervical part of the roots (type A). Two premolars displayed the interglobular dentine in the coronal half of the root (type B). The types A and B contained large interglobular areas. A small amount of interglobular dentine was restricted to the apical half of the roots of two canines and one molar (type C). In contrast to types A and B which were seen at both labial or buccal and lingual sides of roots, the interglobular dentine of type C was seen only at one side, labial or lingual. Some of the tooth roots did not show any interglobular dentine (type D). Most of the incisors, canines and premolar were types A, B, and C, respectively, and the molars were mixed types A, C, and D. These results suggest that the factors

  18. Ultimate tensile strength of dentin: Evidence for a damage mechanics approach to dentin failure.

    PubMed

    Staninec, Michal; Marshall, Grayson W; Hilton, Joan F; Pashley, David H; Gansky, Stuart A; Marshall, Sally J; Kinney, John H

    2002-01-01

    Dentin structure and properties are known to vary with orientation and location. The present study explored the variation in the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of dentin with location in the tooth. Hourglass specimens were prepared from dentin located in the center, under cusps, and in the cervical regions of human molar teeth. These were tested in tension at various distances from the pulp. Median tensile strengths ranged from 44.4 MPa in the inner dentin near the pulp, to 97.8 MPa near the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ). This increase in the median UTS with distance from the pulp to the DEJ was statistically significant (P <.001). Of particular importance was the observation that the UTS measurements followed a Weibull probability distribution, with a Weibull modulus of about 4.5. The Weibull behavior of the UTS data strongly suggests that the large variances in fracture strength data result from a distribution of preexisting defects in the dentin. These findings justify a damage-mechanics approach to studies of dentin failure. PMID:12115767

  19. Tooth Bleaching Increases Dentinal Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sato, C.; Rodrigues, F.A.; Garcia, D.M.; Vidal, C.M.P.; Pashley, D.H.; Tjäderhane, L.; Carrilho, M.R.; Nascimento, F.D.; Tersariol, I.L.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative agent commonly used for dental bleaching procedures. The structural and biochemical responses of enamel, dentin, and pulp tissues to the in vivo bleaching of human (n = 20) premolars were investigated in this study. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe enamel nanostructure. The chemical composition of enamel and dentin was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The enzymatic activities of dental cathepsin B and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were monitored with fluorogenic substrates. The amount of collagen in dentin was measured by emission of collagen autofluorescence with confocal fluorescence microscopy. The presence of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the pulp was evaluated with a fluorogenic 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) probe. Vital bleaching of teeth significantly altered all tested parameters: AFM images revealed a corrosion of surface enamel nanostructure; FTIR analysis showed a loss of carbonate and proteins from enamel and dentin, along with an increase in the proteolytic activity of cathepsin-B and MMPs; and there was a reduction in the autofluorescence of collagen and an increase in both cathepsin-B activity and ROS in pulp tissues. Together, these results indicate that 35% hydrogen peroxide used in clinical bleaching protocols dramatically alters the structural and biochemical properties of dental hard and soft pulp tissue. PMID:23242228

  20. Bonding amalgam to dentin by different methods.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Strasdin, R B; McMeekin, G P

    1994-09-01

    The shear bond strengths of amalgam to dentin by use of (1) All-Bond-2 adhesive, (2) Amalgambond Plus adhesive and (3) TMS Minim pins were compared in this study. Forty-five sound human molars were mounted in acrylic resin and randomly assigned to one of the three groups. The occlusal surfaces were ground to expose the dentin, which was then wet-polished with 600-grit sand paper. All materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions. A split die with a 5 mm opening was placed and amalgam was condensed, which created an amalgam cylinder bonded/retained to the dentin surface. A shear bond force was applied to the base of the amalgam cylinder. The data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Scheffé's test at the 95% level. All systems were found to promote adhesion/retention of amalgam to dentin. The All-Bond 2 group showed significantly higher bond strength (11.106 +/- 3.585 MPa) than Amalgambond Plus (6.343 +/- 3.564 MPa) and TMS pin (6.868 +/- 0.794 MPa) (p < 0.05). PMID:7965897

  1. Dentin Dysplasia in Notum Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Read, R W; Hansen, G M; Powell, D R; Kantaputra, P N; Zambrowicz, B; Brommage, R

    2016-07-01

    Secreted WNT proteins control cell differentiation and proliferation in many tissues, and NOTUM is a secreted enzyme that modulates WNT morphogens by removing a palmitoleoylate moiety that is essential for their activity. To better understand the role this enzyme in development, the authors produced NOTUM-deficient mice by targeted insertional disruption of the Notum gene. The authors discovered a critical role for NOTUM in dentin morphogenesis suggesting that increased WNT activity can disrupt odontoblast differentiation and orientation in both incisor and molar teeth. Although molars in Notum(-/-) mice had normal-shaped crowns and normal mantle dentin, the defective crown dentin resulted in enamel prone to fracture during mastication and made teeth more susceptible to endodontal inflammation and necrosis. The dentin dysplasia and short roots contributed to tooth hypermobility and to the spread of periodontal inflammation, which often progressed to periapical abscess formation. The additional incidental finding of renal agenesis in some Notum (-/-) mice indicated that NOTUM also has a role in kidney development, with undiagnosed bilateral renal agenesis most likely responsible for the observed decreased perinatal viability of Notum(-/-) mice. The findings support a significant role for NOTUM in modulating WNT signaling pathways that have pleiotropic effects on tooth and kidney development. PMID:26926082

  2. Dentin Biomodification Potential Depends on Polyphenol Source

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, T.R.; Vidal, C.M.P.; Phansalkar, R.S.; Todorova, I.; Napolitano, J.G.; McAlpine, J.B.; Chen, S.N.; Pauli, G.F.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Although proanthocyanidins (PACs) modify dentin, the effectiveness of different PAC sources and the correlation with their specific chemical composition are still unknown. This study describes the chemical profiling of natural PAC-rich extracts from 7 plants using ultra high pressure/performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) to determine the overall composition of these extracts and, in parallel, comprehensively evaluate their effect on dentin properties. The total polyphenol content of the extracts was determined (as gallic acid equivalents) using Folin-Ciocalteau assays. Dentin biomodification was assessed by the modulus of elasticity, mass change, and resistance to enzymatic biodegradation. Extracts with a high polyphenol and PAC content from Vitis vinifera, Theobroma cacao, Camellia sinensis, and Pinus massoniana induced a significant increase in modulus of elasticity and mass. The UHPLC analysis showed the presence of multiple types of polyphenols, ranging from simple phenolic acids to oligomeric PACs and highly condensed tannins. Protective effect against enzymatic degradation was observed for all experimental groups; however, statistically significant differences were observed between plant extracts. The findings provide clear evidence that the dentin bioactivities of PACs are source dependent, resulting from a combination of concentration and specific chemical constitution of the complex PAC mixtures. PMID:24574140

  3. Dentin biomodification potential depends on polyphenol source.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, T R; Vidal, C M P; Phansalkar, R S; Todorova, I; Napolitano, J G; McAlpine, J B; Chen, S N; Pauli, G F; Bedran-Russo, A K

    2014-04-01

    Although proanthocyanidins (PACs) modify dentin, the effectiveness of different PAC sources and the correlation with their specific chemical composition are still unknown. This study describes the chemical profiling of natural PAC-rich extracts from 7 plants using ultra high pressure/performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) to determine the overall composition of these extracts and, in parallel, comprehensively evaluate their effect on dentin properties. The total polyphenol content of the extracts was determined (as gallic acid equivalents) using Folin-Ciocalteau assays. Dentin biomodification was assessed by the modulus of elasticity, mass change, and resistance to enzymatic biodegradation. Extracts with a high polyphenol and PAC content from Vitis vinifera, Theobroma cacao, Camellia sinensis, and Pinus massoniana induced a significant increase in modulus of elasticity and mass. The UHPLC analysis showed the presence of multiple types of polyphenols, ranging from simple phenolic acids to oligomeric PACs and highly condensed tannins. Protective effect against enzymatic degradation was observed for all experimental groups; however, statistically significant differences were observed between plant extracts. The findings provide clear evidence that the dentin bioactivities of PACs are source dependent, resulting from a combination of concentration and specific chemical constitution of the complex PAC mixtures. PMID:24574140

  4. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 5.85 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-06-01

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, the wavelength of 5.85 μm could realize the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but it was necessary to evaluate the stage of caries progression in order to control the ablation property.

  5. Bovine and equine peritubular and intertubular dentin.

    PubMed

    Stock, S R; Deymier-Black, A C; Veis, A; Telser, A; Lux, E; Cai, Z

    2014-09-01

    Dentin contains 1-2μm diameter tubules extending from the pulp cavity to near the junction with enamel. Peritubular dentin (PTD) borders the tubule lumens and is surrounded by intertubular dentin (ITD). Differences in PTD and ITD composition and microstructure remain poorly understood. Here, a (∼200nm)(2), 10.1keV synchrotron X-ray beam maps X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction simultaneously around tubules in 15-30μm thick bovine and equine specimens. Increased Ca fluorescence surrounding tubule lumens confirms that PTD is present, and the relative intensities in PTD and ITD correspond to carbonated apatite (cAp) volume fraction of ∼0.8 in PTD vs. 0.65 assumed for ITD. In the PTD near the lumen edges, Zn intensity is strongly peaked, corresponding to a Zn content of ∼0.9mgg(-1) for an assumed concentration of ∼0.4mgg(-1) for ITD. In the equine specimen, the Zn K-edge position indicates that Zn(2+) is present, similar to bovine dentin (Deymier-Black et al., 2013), and the above edge structure is consistent with spectra from macromolecules related to biomineralization. Transmission X-ray diffraction shows only cAp, and the 00.2 diffraction peak (Miller-Bravais indices) width is constant from ITD to the lumen edge. The cAp 00.2 average preferred orientation is axisymmetric (about the tubule axis) in both bovine and equine dentin, and the axisymmetric preferred orientation continues from ITD through the PTD to the tubule lumen. These data indicate that cAp structure does not vary from PTD to ITD. PMID:24911530

  6. Surface microanalysis and chemical imaging of early dentin remineralization.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Cabello, Inmaculada; Vílchez, Miguel Angel Cabrerizo; Fernández, Miguel Angel; Osorio, Raquel

    2014-02-01

    This study reports physical and chemical changes that occur at early dentin remineralization stages. Extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain dentin discs. After polishing the dentin surfaces, three groups were established: (1) untreated dentin (UD), (2) 37% phosphoric acid application for 15 s (partially demineralized dentin-PDD), and (3) 10% phosphoric acid for 12 h at 25° C (totally demineralized dentin-TDD). Five different remineralizing solutions were used: chlorhexidine (CHX), artificial saliva (AS), phosphate solution (PS), ZnCl2, and ZnO. Wettability (contact angle), ζ potential and Raman spectroscopy analysis were determined on dentin surfaces. Demineralization of dentin resulted in a higher contact angle. Wettability decreased after immersion in all solutions. ζ potential analysis showed dissimilar performance ranging from -6.21 mV (TDD + AS) up to 3.02 mV (PDD + PS). Raman analysis showed an increase in mineral components after immersing the dentin specimens, in terms of crystallinity, mineral content, and concentration. This confirmed the optimal incorporation and deposition of mineral on dentin collagen. Organic content reflected scarce changes, except in TDD that appeared partially denatured. Pyridinium, as an expression of cross-linking, appeared in all spectra except in specimens immersed in PS. PMID:24160361

  7. Effective dentin restorative material based on phosphate-terminated dendrimer as artificial protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Jiaojiao; Liang, Kunneng; Li, Jiyao; He, Libang; Yang, Xiao; Peng, Shuangjuan; Chen, Xingyu; Ding, Chunmei; Li, Jianshu

    2015-04-01

    In clinic, it calls for effective and simple materials to repair etched dentin. Bioinspired by the natural mineralization process guided by noncollagenous proteins (NCPs), in this work, we synthesized the fourth generation phosphate-terminated polyamidoamine dendrimer (G4-PO3H2) by one-step modification. We used FT-IR and 1H NMR to characterize the structure of G4-PO3H2, and MTT assay to prove its biocompatibility. It was applied as the analog of dentin phosphophoryn (DPP: a type of NCPs) to repair dentin, due to its similar dimensional scale, topological architecture and peripheral functionalities to that of DPP. By the characterization of SEM and XRD, the effective regeneration of human dentin induced by G4-PO3H2 is characterized and illustrated both in vitro (artificial saliva) and in vivo (oral cavity of rats). It is noted that the thickness of the regenerated mineral layers are more than 10 μm both in vitro and in vivo. The design strategy of G4-PO3H2 may be valuable for researchers in the fields of material science, stomatology and medicine to prepare various promising restorative nano-materials for biomineralized hard tissues such as bone and teeth. PMID:25703791

  8. Ultrastructural examination of dentin using focused ion-beam cross-sectioning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nalla, R K; Porter, A E; Daraio, C; Minor, A M; Radmilovic, V; Stach, E A; Tomsia, A P; Ritchie, R O

    2005-01-01

    Focused ion-beam (FIB) milling is a commonly used technique for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation of inorganic materials. In this study, we seek to evaluate the FIB as a TEM preparation tool for human dentin. Two particular problems involving dentin, a structural analog of bone that makes up the bulk of the human tooth, are examined. Firstly, the process of aging is studied through an investigation of the mineralization in 'transparent' dentin, which is formed naturally due to the filling up of dentinal tubules with large mineral crystals. Next, the process of fracture is examined to evaluate incipient events that occur at the collagen fiber level. For both these cases, FIB-milling was able to generate high-quality specimens that could be used for subsequent TEM examination. The changes in the mineralization suggested a simple mechanism of mineral 'dissolution and reprecipitation', while examination of the collagen revealed incipient damage in the form of voids within the collagen fibers. These studies help shed light on the process of aging and fracture of mineralized tissues and are useful steps in developing a framework for understanding such processes. PMID:16182542

  9. Dentin hypersensitivity treatment by CO2 laser: the influence of the density of dentin tubules and laser-beam incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; Gabay, Shimon; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Miron, Mariana I.; Mavrantoni, Androniki

    1997-12-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is considered to be a consequence of the presence of open dentin tubules on the exposed dentin surface. Various methods and materials used in the treatment of this disease are directed to achieve a tubule's occlusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate under scanning electron microscopy and clinical method the sealing effects of CO2 laser on dentin tubules of human teeth without any damages of the surrounding tissues. Samples of freshly extracted noncarious 3rd molars were used. The teeth were randomly divided in to two groups A and B. The samples of group A were exposed to laser beam in cervical area, directed parallel to their dentin tubules. The teeth of group B were sectioned through a hypothetical carious lesion and lased perpendicularly or obliquely of the dentin tubules. The CO2 laser, at 10.6 micrometers wavelength, was operated only in pulse mode and provided 6.25 - 350 mJ in a burst of 25 pulses each of 250 microsecond(s) time duration with a 2 ms time interval between successive pulses (repetition rate up to 500 mH). Melting of dentin surface and partial closure of exposed dentin tubules were found for all specimens at 6.25 to 31.25 mJ energy. Our results indicated that using CO2 laser in a parallel orientation of laser beam with dentin tubules, the dentin sensitivity can be reduced without any damages of pulp vitality.

  10. Effect of dentin location and long-term water storage on bonding effectiveness of dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Vivan Cardoso, Marcio; De Almeida Neves, Aline; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Dentin is a variable substrate with properties that change considerable in a single surface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding effectiveness to these different dentin locations and evaluate these differences over time. After bonding procedures with five different adhesives, small micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) beams were prepared and dichotomously divided in 'center' and 'periphery' dentin specimens. After 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months of water storage the µTBS of specimens of each group was determined, enabling a paired study design. The bond strengths of both etch&rinse adhesives were insensitive to regional variability. For the two-step self-etch adhesives, a marked increase in bond strengths was observed with increasing amount of intertubular dentin. Regional variability did not affect the long-term bonding effectiveness for any of the adhesives tested. In conclusion, only for the mild self-etch adhesives, µTBS to 'periphery' dentin was higher than for the 'center' specimens. PMID:21282894

  11. [Effects of opioid peptide dalargin on reparative processes in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Shekhter, A B; Solov'eva, A I; Spevak, S E; Titov, M I

    1988-10-01

    At intraperitoneal injection and local application of opioid peptide dalargin induces fibroblast proliferation (3-fold increase in the mitotic index) and growth of capillaries, accelerates the maturation of granulation tissue and of scar, epitheliazation of the defect, and considerably reduces the period of healing of skin wound in rats. The stimulating action of dalargin is associated with its effect on the microcirculation system and activation of the macrophage-fibroblast interaction. Possessing the triggering mechanism, the drug induces a cascade of inflammatory-reparative reactions, which reduce the duration of all healing stages. PMID:3191245

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Results on Sikorsky Aircraft Survivable Affordable Reparable Airframe Program (SARAP) Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The Survivable, Affordable, Reparable Airframe Program (SARAP) will develop/produce new structural design concepts with lower structural weight, reduced manufacturing complexity and development time, increased readiness, and improved threat protection. These new structural concepts will require advanced field capable inspection technologies to help meet the SARAP structural objectives. In the area of repair, damage assessment using nondestructive inspection (NDI) is critical to identify repair location and size. The purpose of this work is to conduct an assessment of new and emerging NDI methods that can potentially satisfy the SARAP program goals.

  13. Some reflections on Ian McEwan's atonement: enactment, guilt, and reparation.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ilany

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing that enactments have been discussed in psychoanalysis primarily as occurrences in the treatment setting, the author proposes a new application of the term enactments: that it may pertain to the actions of some individuals in their efforts to cope with bad things that they have done to others. That is, enactment can be a substitute-for-atonement mechanism. The author illustrates this view of enactment through a discussion of Ian McEwan's novel Atonement (2001), and in particular by examining the behavior and motivations of one of its central characters, Briony Tallis. Included are explorations of the relationships between enactment and guilt and between enactment and reparation. PMID:24470364

  14. Grape seed extracts inhibit dentin matrix degradation by MMP-3

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Le Denmat, Dominique; Tjaderhane, Leo; Menashi, Suzanne; Chaussain, Catherine; Rochefort, Gaël Y.; Boukpessi, Tchilalo

    2014-01-01

    Since Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been suggested to contribute to dentin caries progression, the hypothesis that MMP inhibition would affect the progression of dentin caries is clinically relevant. Grape seed extracts (GSE) have been previously reported to be natural inhibitors of MMPs. Objective: To evaluate the capacity of a GSE mouthrinse to prevent the degradation of demineralized dentin matrix by MMP-3 (stromelysin-1). Materials and Methods: Standardized blocks of dentin obtained from sound permanent teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were demineralized with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and pretreated either with (A) GSE (0.2% w/v), (B) amine fluoride (AmF) (20% w/v), (C) a mouthrinse which contains both, (D) placebo, (E) sodium fluoride (0.15 mg.ml−1), (F) PBS, (G) Chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), or (H) zinc chloride (ZnCl2). The dentin blocks were then incubated with activated recombinant MMP-3. The supernatants were analyzed by Western Blot for several dentin matrix proteins known to be MMP-3 substrate. In parallel, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on resin replica of the dentin blocks. Results: Western blot analysis of the supernatants revealed that MMP-3 released from the dentin matrix small proteoglycans (decorin and biglycan) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP) in the AmF, sodium fluoride, PBS and placebo pretreated groups, but not in the GSE and mouthrinse pretreated groups. SEM examination of resin replica showed that the mouthrinse and its active components not only had an anti-MMP action but also modified the dentin surface accessibility. Conclusion: This study shows that GSE either alone or combined with AmF as in the evaluated mouthrinse limits dentin matrix degradation. This association may be promising to prevent the progression of caries within dentin. However, the procedure should be adapted to clinically relevant durations. PMID:25400590

  15. The effect of rotary instrumentation on the permeability of dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.B.; Svare, C.W.

    1981-06-01

    The filtration and diffusion of tritiated water through dentin disks were measured ina split-chamber diffusion cell. The dentin had been cut with a diamond disk and the surfaces modified with a carbide fissure bur or diamond bur. Disks were given a secondary burnishing treatment with a blank bur or a modified blank bur. Burnishing reduced the permeability of dentin cut with a fissure bur.

  16. SEM evaluation of nanoparticulate silver penetration into dentine collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Bilenko, David I.; Venig, Sergey B.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study a novel approach to caries management based on the application of nanoparticles of different nature to increase the mineral phase of demineralized dentin has been developed. Silver nanoparticles have been tested as a material for dentine matrix infiltration. Research findings clearly show that collagen fibers of demineralized dentine could be considered as a scaffold for mineral component delivery and the place where mineral growth can occur.

  17. Detection of organochlorine compounds formed during the contact of sodium hypochlorite with dentin and dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Varise, Tiago Gilioli; Estrela, Carlos; Guedes, Débora Fernandes Costa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2014-01-01

    This study used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect the products formed during the contact of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with bovine pulp and dentin. For analysis of the products formed in the volatile phase, 11 mg of bovine pulp tissue were placed in contact with 0.5%, 2.5% and 5.25% NaOCl until complete tissue dissolution occurred. The solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was exposed inside the container through the cover membrane and immediately injected into the GC-MS system. 30 mg of the of dentin were kept in contact with NaOCl, and then the SPME fiber was exposed inside the container through the cover membrane for adsorption of the products and injected into the GC-MS system. The same protocol was used for the aqueous phase. For analysis of the volatile compounds, the final solution was extracted using pure ethyl ether. The suspended particulate phase of the mixture was aspirated, and ether was separated from the aqueous phase of the solution. The ether containing the products that resulted from the chemical interaction of dentin and pulp with the NaOCl was filtered and then injected into the GC-MS system for analysis of the aqueous phase. The aqueous and volatile phases of both dentin and pulp showed the formation of chloroform, hexachloroethane, dichloromethylbenzene and benzaldehyde. In conclusion, organochlorine compounds are generated during the contact of dentin and pulp with NaOCl at concentrations of 0.5%, 2.5% and 5.25%. PMID:25140714

  18. Hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of remineralized dentin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Jianming; Sun, Jian; Mao, Caiyun; Wang, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang; Gu, Xinhua

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the mechanical properties of dentin are significantly determined by its hierarchical structure. The current correlation between the mechanical properties and the hierarchical structure was mainly established by studying altered forms of dentin, which limits the potential outcome of the research. In this study, dentins with three different hierarchical structures were obtained via two different remineralization procedures and at different remineralization stages: (1) a dentin structure with amorphous minerals incorporated into the collagen fibrils, (2) a dentin with crystallized nanominerals incorporated into the collagen fibrils, and (3) a dentin with an out-of-order mineral layer filling the collagen fibrils matrix. Nanoindentation tests were performed to investigate the mechanical behavior of the remineralized dentin slides. The results showed that the incorporation of the crystallized nanominerals into the acid-etched demineralized organic fibrils resulted in a remarkable improvement of the mechanical properties of the dentin. In contrast, for the other two structures, i.e. the amorphous minerals inside the collagen fibrils and the out-of-order mineral layer within the collagen fibrils matrix, the excellent mechanical properties of dentin could not be restored. PMID:25259668

  19. Photosensitizer and light diffusion through dentin in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Ana C.; Graciano, Ariane X.; Nagata, Juliana Y.; Fujimaki, Mitsue; Terada, Raquel S. S.; Bento, Antonio C.; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been considered a potential antimicrobial modality against oral infections, including dental caries. A model to estimate the penetration of both photosensitizers and light through human dentin, a factor of interest in photodynamic therapy, is proposed. The photoacoustic spectroscopy technique was used to evaluate in vitro dentin permeability of three different photosensitizers. Using the dentin optical absorption and scattering coefficients, it was possible to propose a semi-quantitative model predicting both photosensitizer and light doses within dentin. The graphic illustrations obtained provided guidelines that may be useful in photodynamic therapy protocols used as antimicrobial tools in caries lesions.

  20. Adaptation of threaded dowels to dentin.

    PubMed

    Zmener, O

    1980-05-01

    Adaptation of threaded dowels to the walls of the canals is minimal in the cervical third and maximal in the apical third. Each of the three types of dowels may cause lateral stresses and possibly fracture. Matched reamers and dowels reduce the danger of fracture. Smaller-diameter dowels maintain less contact with the dentin and avoid weakening the root. The Kurer Anchor system provided a satisfactory combination of nonlateral residual stresses which protected the root from complications. PMID:6988582

  1. A Mechanistic study of Plasma Treatment Effects on Demineralized Dentin Surfaces for Improved Adhesive/Dentin Interface Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that non-thermal plasma treatment of demineralized dentin significantly (p<0.05) improved adhesive/dentin bonding strength for dental composite restoration as compared with the untreated controls. This study is to achieve mechanistic understanding of the plasma treatment effects on dentin surface through investigating the plasma treated dentin surfaces and their interaction with adhesive monomer, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The plasma treated dentin surfaces from human third molars were evaluated by water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that plasma-treated dentin surface with subsequent HEMA immersion (Plasma/HEMA Treated) had much lower water contact angle compared with only plasma-treated (Plasma Treated) or only HEMA immersed (HEMA Treated) dentin surfaces. With prolong water droplet deposition time, water droplets spread out completely on the Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces. SEM images of Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces verified that dentin tubules were opened-up and filled with HEMA monomers. Extracted type I collagen fibrils, which was used as simulation of the exposed dentinal collagen fibrils after acid etching step, were plasma treated and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. FT-IR spectra of the Plasma/HEMA Treated collage fibrils showed broadened amide I peak at 1660 cm−1 and amide II at 1550 cm−1, which indicate secondary structure changes of the collagen fibrils. CD spectra indicated that 67.4% collagen helix structures were denatured after plasma treatment. These experimental results demonstrate that non-thermal argon plasma treatment was very effective in loosing collagen structure and enhancing adhesive monomer penetration, which are beneficial to thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tag formation, and consequently enhance adhesive/dentin interface bonding. PMID:25267936

  2. Caries-resistant bonding layer in dentin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-na; Hu, Lin; Jiao, Kai; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-juan; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the mechanism for caries resistance and the pulp responses in vital teeth following the use of the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique. Dentin adhesives were applied to the surface of sound dentin disks in 4 experimental groups: non-antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (N-G), non-antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (N-H), antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (A-G), antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (A-H). The depth of demineralization induced by biological or chemical demineralization models was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Pulp responses of vital dog’s teeth to the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique were evaluated using light microscopy. Depth of demineralization was significantly affected by “adhesive type” and “intensity of adhesive displacement” for biological demineralization. For chemical demineralization, only “intensity of adhesive displacement” showed significant influence on lesion depth. Pulp response of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa groups showed only moderate disorganization of the odontoblast layer at 24 hours that completely re-organized after 3 weeks. Augmented-pressure adhesive displacement improves the caries resistance property of bonded dentin and does not cause irreversible pulpal damage to vital teeth when the air pressure employed is equal or smaller than 0.3 MPa. PMID:27599621

  3. Clinical effectiveness of contemporary dentin bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the clinical effectiveness of contemporary resin-based dentin bonding agents primarily focussing on the longevity of restoration. Materials and Methods: The literature published from June 2004 up to September 2010 was reviewed for clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of dentin bonding agents in the longevity of noncarious class V restoration. Results of each study reported using the USPHS criteria for clinical assessment of restoration were included and tabulated. The American Dental Association guidelines for dentin and enamel adhesives were used as a reference to compare the performance of individual bonding agents. Kruskal–Wallis followed by Mann–Whitney U was done to compare the mean Alfa score percentage for the three categories of bonding systems [etch-and-rinse (ER), self-etch primer (SEP), and self-etch-adhesive (SEA)]. Results: A comparison of the mean Alfa score percentages revealed no difference between the ER, SEP, and SEA categories of bonding systems except for marginal adaptation where ER was found to be superior to SEA. Conclusion: The clinical effectiveness of resin-based bonding agents is comparable among the three categories. PMID:21217944

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel C C M; Andrade, Ana K M; Montes, Marcos A J R

    2009-09-01

    This bibliographic review provides a general view of the etiology, characteristics and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity, so that professionals can use this information in the therapeutic management of this clinical condition. For this purpose, the authors have analyzed whole texts of relevant articles on the subject. This study showed that the predisposing factors associated with the causes of dentinal hypersensitivity must be controlled or eliminated, by educating the patient regarding the excessive intake of acidic food, as well as providing guidance on the proper tooth brushing technique and analysis of occlusion. Effective treatment must be preceded by a proper diagnosis, established after the exclusion of any other possible causes of the pain. These cases must be managed efficiently, quickly and permanently. The availability of a wide variety of treatment could be an indicator that there is still no effective desensitizing agent to completely resolve the patient's discomfort, or that it is difficult to treat, irrespective of the available treatment options. Even with the large number of published studies, it has not been possible to reach a consensus about the product that represents the gold standard in the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. PMID:19776498

  5. Dentin hypersensitivity: Recent trends in management

    PubMed Central

    Miglani, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Vivek; Ahuja, Bhoomika

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity (DH) is a common clinical condition usually associated with exposed dentinal surfaces. It can affect patients of any age group and most commonly affects the canines and premolars of both the arches. This article concisely reviews the patho-physiology, mechanism and clinical management of the DH. Treatment of DH should start with an accurate diagnosis. Differential diagnosis should be made and all other probable causes should be excluded. An often neglected phase of clinical management of DH is the identification and treatment of the causative factors of DH. By removing the etiological factors, the condition can be even prevented from occurring or recurring. There are various treatment modalities available which can be used at home or may be professionally applied. The “at home” desensitizing agents include toothpastes, mouthwashes or chewing gums and they act by either occluding the dentinal tubules or blocking the neural transmission. This article also discusses the recent treatment options like bioglass, Portland cement, lasers and casein phosphopeptide. PMID:21217949

  6. Caries-resistant bonding layer in dentin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-Na; Hu, Lin; Jiao, Kai; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-Juan; Tay, Franklin R; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the mechanism for caries resistance and the pulp responses in vital teeth following the use of the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique. Dentin adhesives were applied to the surface of sound dentin disks in 4 experimental groups: non-antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (N-G), non-antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (N-H), antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (A-G), antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (A-H). The depth of demineralization induced by biological or chemical demineralization models was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Pulp responses of vital dog's teeth to the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique were evaluated using light microscopy. Depth of demineralization was significantly affected by "adhesive type" and "intensity of adhesive displacement" for biological demineralization. For chemical demineralization, only "intensity of adhesive displacement" showed significant influence on lesion depth. Pulp response of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa groups showed only moderate disorganization of the odontoblast layer at 24 hours that completely re-organized after 3 weeks. Augmented-pressure adhesive displacement improves the caries resistance property of bonded dentin and does not cause irreversible pulpal damage to vital teeth when the air pressure employed is equal or smaller than 0.3 MPa. PMID:27599621

  7. Phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in dentin.

    PubMed

    Rupf, S; Hannig, M; Breitung, K; Schellenberger, W; Eschrich, K; Remmerbach, T; Kneist, S

    2008-12-01

    Information concerning phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in carious dentin is sparse. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) facilitates the phenotypic differentiation of bacteria to the subspecies level. To verify a supposed influence of restorative treatment on the phenotypic heterogeneity of S. mutans, we isolated and compared a total of 222 S. mutans strains from dentin samples of 21 human deciduous molars during caries excavation (T(1)) and 8 wks (T(2)) after removal of the temporary restoration. Phenotypic heterogeneity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS and hierarchical clustering. Thirty-six distinct S. mutans phenotypes could be identified. Although indistinguishable phenotypes were found in the same teeth at T(1) and T(2), as well as in different teeth of individual participants, the phenotypic heterogeneity increased significantly, from 1.4 phenotypes per S. mutans-positive dentin sample at T(1) to 2.2 phenotypes at T(2). We attribute this to an adaptation of S. mutans to the modified environment under the restoration following caries excavation. PMID:19029088

  8. Tensile strength and durability of bovine dentin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshiko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumio

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of thermal cycling on the tensile strength of dentin. Bovine dentin were divided into 10 groups, which were then subjected to various conditions: intact after preparation, thereby serving as a control; heating in boiling water for 45 minutes; 10,000 thermal cycles in water; 10,000 thermal cycles in PBS; storage in water at 5, 23, or 55 degrees C for two weeks; and storage in PBS at 5, 23, or 55 degrees C for two weeks. Subsequently, bovine dentin were trimmed into dumbbell-shaped specimens and the tensile test performed in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Mean tensile strengths were compared statistically by one-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLTD test (p<0.05). Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and reliability of the results was analyzed with Weibull distribution. Tensile strength did not significantly change after thermal cycling or storage in water and PBS at all temperatures tested (71.2-77.0 MPa) but decreased after treatment with boiling water (65.5 MPa). PMID:17694743

  9. In vitro imaging of remaining dentin and pulp chamber by optical coherence tomography: comparison between 850 and 1280 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonsêca, Déborah D. D.; Kyotoku, Bernardo B. C.; Maia, Ana M. A.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2009-03-01

    We report the application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to generate images of the remaining dentin and pulp chamber of in vitro human teeth. Bidimensional images of remaining dentin and of the pulp chamber were obtained parallel to the long axis of the teeth, by two OCT systems operating around 1280 and 850 nm, and compared to tomography images using the i-CAT® Cone Beam Volumetric Tomography system as the gold standard. The results demonstrated the efficacy of the OCT technique; furthermore, the wavelength close to 1280 nm presented greater penetration depth in the dentine than 850 nm, as expected from scattering and absorption coefficients. The OCT technique has great potential to be used on clinical practice, preventing accidental exposure of the pulp and promoting preventive restoration treatment.

  10. The effect of dentine location and tubule orientation on the bond strengths between resin and dentine.

    PubMed

    Phrukkanon, S; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    1999-05-01

    This study determined the influence of dentine structure on the micro-tensile bond strengths between resin and dentine of two different dentine adhesive systems (Single Bond, 3M Dental Products, St Paul, MN; MF-102 (experimental self-etching primer), GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). The study was separated into two main parts: bond strength measurement and investigation of the bonding interface. Twenty-two human premolars were used for the bond strength measurement. Each tooth was cut vertically, separating the tooth into mesio-distal halves. One half of the tooth was used to bond to a surface perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and other half to bond to a surface parallel to the tubules. For each half, six locations of dentine were bonded. Each material was used in accordance to the manufacturer's directions. Cylindrical hourglass-shaped specimens of 1.2 mm diameter at the bonded interface were manufactured. The bonds were stressed in tension at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean bond strengths were compared using LSD, one-way ANOVA, and Student's t-test. The fractured surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope, and the frequency of fracture modes was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. For the investigation of the bonded interface, four teeth were prepared by the same procedure used for the bond test specimens. The bonded interfaces were observed after an acid-base treatment or fracturing across the bonded interface, prior to investigation with a field-emission scanning electron microscope. For Single Bond, the bond strengths for mid-root dentine were significantly lower than for other locations (p < 0.05). For MF-102, there was no significant difference for all locations (p > 0.05). MF-102 bonded well to all locations of dentine while Single Bond showed a porous zone at the base of the hybrid layer. The bonds were not influenced by tubule orientation. The results indicate that the bond for Single Bond may be affected by

  11. Regenerative and reparative effects of human chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium on photo-aged epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Chen, Yan; Ma, Kui; Zhao, Along; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-04-17

    Epidermal cells are an important regenerative source for skin wound healing. Aged epidermal cells have a low ability to renew themselves and repair skin injury. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly UVB, can cause photo-aging of the skin by suppressing the viability of human epidermal cells. A chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium (CDSC-CNM) is thought to have regenerative properties. This study aimed to determine the regenerative effects of CDSC-CNM on UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells. Epidermal cells were passaged four times and irradiated with quantitative UVB, and non-irradiated cells served as a control group. Cells were then treated with different concentrations of CDSC-CNM. Compared to the non-irradiated group, the proliferation rates and migration rates of UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with increasing intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage. After treatment with CDSC-CNM, photo-aged epidermal cells significantly improved their viability, and their ROS generation and DNA damage decreased. The secretory factors in CDSC-CNM, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and the related signaling pathway protein levels, increased compared to the control medium (CM). The potential regenerative and reparative effects of CDSC-CNM indicate that it may be a candidate material for the treatment of prematurely aged skin. The functions of the secretory factors and the mechanisms of CDSC-CNM therapy deserve further attention. PMID:27097375

  12. The Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma, Part II: Reparative Adaptational Impacts.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Yael; Norris, Fran H; Lindert, Jutta; Paisner, Vera; Kronenberg, Sefi; Engdahl, Brian; Richter, Julia

    2015-05-01

    The impacts of the Holocaust on children of survivors have been widely investigated. However, consensus is limited, and no validated measures have been tailored with or to them. We aimed to develop and validate a scale that measures these specific impacts (Part II of the Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma). We studied 484 adult children of survivors who participated in a cross-sectional web-based survey in English or Hebrew; of these, 191 participated in a clinical interview. Exploratory factor analyses of 58 items to reduce and refine the measure yielded a 36-item scale, Reparative Adaptational Impacts, that had excellent internal consistency (α = .91) and congruence between English and Hebrew versions (φ ≥ .95). Associations between impacts and SCID-based diagnoses of major depressive episode, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder were moderate to strong (ds = 0.48-0.89). Strong associations also emerged between severity of offspring's reparative adaptational impacts and intensity of their parents' posttrauma adaptational styles (Multiple R = .72), with intensity of victim style, especially the mother's, having the strongest effect (β = .31-.33). Having both research and clinical relevance for assessing Holocaust survivors' offspring, future studies might investigate the scale's generalizability to other populations affected by mass trauma. PMID:25985110

  13. Micromorphological Evaluation of Dentin Treated with Different Desensitizing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Osmari, Deise; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana Carolina; de Carlo Bello, Mariana; Henrique Susin, Alexandre; Cecília Correa Aranha, Ana; Marquezan, Marcela; Lopes da Silveira, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of a desensitizing agent is a permanent coating or filling of dentin surface. Morphological analysis in vitro of this treated surface is essential to understand the interaction between desensitizing agent and hypersensitive dentin. The aim was to evaluate the morphology of four dentin surface treated with desensitizing agents. Methods: This was an in vitro laboratory study, where fifteen specimens from extracted human premolars were obtained. The enamel was removed to expose the dentin surface, polished with silicon carbide abrasive papers and etched with 6% citric acid for 2 min.The specimens were randomly divided into 5 groups: G1 - without treatment (control) (C), G2 - fluoride varnish (FV), G3 - potassium oxalate (PO), G4 - 2-step self-etching adhesive system (AS), G5 - diode laser (DL). The specimens were cleaved in the lingual buccaldirection, prepared for analysis by Scanning Electron Microscope and the surface and interior of the dentinal tubules were observed at 1500× magnification. Results: In the control group, the dentin etching promoted smear layer removal and exposure of dentinal tubules. In the group of fluoride varnish, a film was observed on the surface, with plugs of varnish into tubules. In the group of oxalate, partial obliteration of the tubular entrances was observed. In the group of the adhesive system, the tubules were obstructed through the formation of hybrid layer and a physical barrier on the surface. In the group of the diode laser, dentin melting and solidification with partial occlusion of dentinal tubules were observed. Conclusions: All desensitizing agents evaluated demonstrated ability to modify the surface of dentin, with partial or total occlusion of dentinal tubules. Thus, it is suggested to do more clinical studies to verify the effectiveness of the findings. PMID:25606322

  14. Zinc induces apatite and scholzite formation during dentin remineralization.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Cabello, I; Toledano, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain whether zinc may improve the repair ability of demineralized dentin. Dentin disks were demineralized by phosphoric acid during 15 s and immersed in artificial saliva, remineralizing solution, a zinc chloride solution and a zinc oxide solution. Dentin specimens were analyzed after 24 h and 1 month of storage. Surface morphology was assessed by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy, mechanical properties were analyzed by nanohardness testing in a TriboIndenter, and chemical changes at the surfaces were determined by X-ray diffraction, Raman and energy-dispersive elemental analyses. After phosphoric acid application, dentin was only partially demineralized. Demineralized dentin was remineralized after 24 h of storage in any of the tested solutions (nanohardness increased and hydroxylapatite formation was detected by Raman). Remineralization was maintained up to 1 month in dentin stored in remineralizing solution, zinc chloride and zinc oxide. Zinc and phosphate were important for hydroxylapatite homeostasis. Scholzite formation was encountered in dentin stored in zinc-containing solutions. Zinc might allow to reach the balance between dentin demineralization and remineralization processes. PMID:24513585

  15. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  16. Ablation of human carious dentin with a nanosecond pulsed laser at a wavelength of 5.85 μm: relationship between hardness and ablation depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-02-01

    Less invasive treatment and preservation of teeth, referred to as minimal intervention, are strong requirements in dentistry. In our previous study, the fundamental ablation properties of human dentin at wavelengths around 5.8 μm were investigated, and the results indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm was optimal for selective removal of carious dentin with less damage to normal dentin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the ablation depth and hardness of human dentin including carious lesion. A nanosecond pulsed laser produced by difference-frequency generation was used for irradiations to human carious dentin. It was observed that correlation between ablation depth and Vickers hardness after 2 s laser irradiation at the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2. On the other hand, ablations did not depend on Vickers hardness at the wavelength of 6.00 μm. A nanosecond pulsed laser with the wavelength at 5.85 μm is useful for selective ablation of human carious dentin in accordance with the hardness.

  17. Bonding BisGMA to dentin--a proof of concept for hydrophobic dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Kapur, R R; Carrilho, M R O; Hur, Y B; Garrett, L V; Tay, K C Y

    2007-11-01

    The use of TEGDMA as a diluent comonomer in the formulation of hydrophobic adhesives for ethanol wet-bonding is a concern, due to its leaching potential, higher water sorption, and bio-incompatibility. This study tested the hypothesis that hydrophobic bonding to acid-etched dentin may be accomplished with the use of ethanol-solvated BisGMA only. Phosphoric-acid-etched, oxalate-occluded, deep coronal dentin bonded under 20 cm water pressure with experimental BisGMA adhesives by ethanol wet-bonding exhibited tensile strengths that were not significantly different from that achieved with OptiBond FL bonded according to the manufacturer-recommended protocol, with similar acid-/base-resistant hybrid layers, resin tags, and nanoleakage distribution. Ethanol replacement of water-saturated dentin produced wider interfibrillar spaces, more extensive shrinkage of the collagen fibrils, and narrower hybrid layers. Experimental BisGMA adhesives provide the proof of concept that relatively hydrophobic resins may be coupled to acid-etched dentin by increasing its hydrophobic characteristics via ethanol replacement. They should be further optimized before clinical application. PMID:17959892

  18. Solvent Retention of Contemporary Commercial Dentin Bonding Agents in a Demineralized Dentin Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Georges; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel; D’Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; da Rocha Svizero, Nádia; Wang, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Solvents are ingredients in dentin-bonding agents (DBAs) that are essential to obtain efficient adhesion to dentin under wet-technique bonding protocol. However, an excess of solvents can compromise bonding durability. This study aimed to assess the retention of solvents present in different DBAs after their application to a demineralized dentin matrix. Methods: Thirty-six specimens of bovine dentin were demineralized for 7 days in 0.5M EDTA and divided into six groups n=6 (Scotchbond primer, Adper Single Bond 2, Excite, AdheSE primer, Prime & Bond NT and Xeno III). These specimens were individually saturated by the systems for 5 min and then kept in vials protected against light exposure. Each specimen was measured using a digital balance and then measured at the following intervals 10, 20, 30 sec, 1, 2 and 5 min thereafter. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (alfa=.05). Results: There were significant differences evident in Excite, Prime & Bond NT at 2 and 5 min, respectively. There was no significant interaction between materials and time in all experimented time evaluated. The amount of solvent spontaneously evaporated was limited even in acetone-based specimens. Conclusions: After DBAs are applied, professionals may facilitate their evaporation, since spontaneous evaporation is limited. PMID:20613918

  19. The physiologic sclerotic dentin: A literature-based hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kabartai, F; Hoffmann, T; Hannig, C

    2015-12-01

    Despite the many hypotheses trying to explain how the physiologic sclerotic dentin is formed, there has been so far no convincing explanation for all of its observations. In this review, we tried to make a hypothesis based on the facts published to date. We found that the apoptosis of odontoblasts, which takes place after the formation of the apical constriction, may be the key-factor for the development of physiologic sclerotic dentin, because the resulting apoptotic bodies cannot be eliminated through phagocytosis and become trapped within the dentinal tubules due to the continuous formation of secondary dentin. The apoptotic bodies suffer later from a secondary or apoptotic necrosis leading to the release of the internal contents of pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. Pyrophosphate can dehydrate the dentin and hydrogen phosphate can demineralize it, leading to the release of Ca(2+) ions which then contribute to the intratubular mineralization. PMID:26404871

  20. A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry: Individual Development, Psychology, and Social Reparation. Psychoanalysis, Education and Social Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry develops a poetry pedagogy that offers significant benefits to students by helping them to achieve a sense of renewal (a deeper awareness of self and potentials) and reparation (a realistic, but positive and proactive worldview). Todd O. Williams offers a thorough examination of the therapeutic potential…

  1. Mother-infant dyadic reparation and individual differences in vagal tone affect 4-month-old infants' social stress regulation.

    PubMed

    Provenzi, Livio; Casini, Erica; de Simone, Paola; Reni, Gianluigi; Borgatti, Renato; Montirosso, Rosario

    2015-12-01

    Infants' social stress regulation (i.e., reactivity and recovery) might be affected by mother-infant dyadic functioning and infants' vagal tone (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA). This study investigated the role of a specific dyadic functioning feature (i.e., dyadic reparation) and individual differences in vagal tone regulation (i.e., RSA suppression vs. non-suppression) in relation to social stress regulation in 4-month-old infants. A total of 65 mother-infant dyads participated in the face-to-face still-face paradigm. Social stress reactivity and recovery were measured as negative emotionality during Still-Face and Reunion episodes, respectively. RSA was measured during Play, Still-Face, and Reunion episodes. Suppressors had higher dyadic reparation during Play and higher recovery from social stress compared with non-suppressors. Higher reparation during Play was associated with lower reactivity and higher recovery only for suppressors. Findings suggest a joint role of infants' RSA individual differences and dyadic reparation in affecting infants' social stress regulation at 4 months of age. PMID:26247809

  2. Site specific properties of carious dentin matrices biomodified with collagen cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Karol, Sachin; Pashley, David H.; Viana, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess in non-cavitated carious teeth the mechanical properties of dentin matrix by measuring its reduced modulus of elasticity and the effect of dentin biomodification strategies on three dentin matrix zones: caries-affected, apparently normal dentin below caries-affected zone and sound dentin far from carious site. Methods Nano-indentations were performed on dentin matrices of carious molars before and after surface modification using known cross-linking agents (glutaraldehyde, proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract and carbodiimide). Results Statistically significant differences were observed between dentin zones of demineralized dentin prior to surface biomodification (P< 0.05). Following surface modification, there were no statistically significant differences between dentin zones (P< 0.05). An average increase of 30-fold, 2-fold and 2.2-fold of the reduced modulus of elasticity was observed following treatments of the three dentin zones with proanthocyanidin, carbodiimide and glutaraldehyde, respectively. PMID:24479274

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Neurotrauma: Evolving Roles in Injury and Reparative Processes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoqian; Adwanikar, Hita; Werb, Zena; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in a wide range of proteolytic events in fetal development and normal tissue remodeling as well as wound healing and inflammation. In the CNS, they have been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis to Alzheimer disease and are integral to stroke-related cell damage. Although studies implicate increased activity of MMPs in pathogenesis in the CNS, there is also a growing literature to support their participation in events that support recovery processes. Here the authors provide a brief overview of MMPs and their regulation, address their complex roles following traumatic injuries to the adult and developing CNS, and consider their time- and context-dependent signatures that influence both injury and reparative processes. PMID:20400713

  4. Micromechanical testing of the dentin hybrid zone formed by all-in-one adhesive system in sound human dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koytchev, E.; Datcheva, M.; Iankov, R.

    2015-10-01

    This study explored the spatial variations in mechanical behavior of the dentin hybrid layer formed by a single step (one bottle) dentin adhesive system. Objective. The objectives were to: (1) evaluate the mechanical behavior of the hybrid zone formed by a single sep dentin adhesive system using nanoindentation technique, (2) compare the indentation moduli (EIT) and indentation hardness (HIT) of human dentin and the hybrid zone, and (3) assess the importance of specimen hydration on the nanoindentation response. Methods. Specimens of human dentin, treated with commercial single step resin adhesive and restored with composite material were evaluated using a nanoindenter in a load-displacement control mode. The load and displacement responses were used to perform nanoindentation characterization of dentin and the hybrid layer and estimate EIT and HIT, using Oliver & Pharr approximation method. Results. In hydrated state, EIT for dentin and hybrid layer were 18.214 ± 1.30 GPa and 12.535 ± 0.19 GPa respectively. For HIT, also in hydrated state, the values in dentin and hybrid layer were 0.56 ± 0.06 GPa and 0.36 ± 0.005 GPa respectively. Viscoelastic deformation of the dentin hybrid zone exceeded that occuring in regions of uniform dentin tissue. The load displacement curves of the two zones were also estimated and analyzed. They generally follow the same pattern without any noticeable pop-ins or irregularities. Significance. The microstructure and hydration play critical roles on the mechanical behavior of the hybrid layer and nanoindentation provides a potent measurment tool for identifying the spatial variations.

  5. The extracellular matrix as a modulator of the inflammatory and reparative response following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dobaczewski, Marcin; Gonzalez-Quesada, Carlos; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic alterations in the cardiac extracellular matrix following myocardial infarction not only determine the mechanical properties of the infarcted heart, but also directly modulate the inflammatory and reparative response. During the inflammatory phase of healing, rapid activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) causes degradation of the cardiac extracellular matrix. Matrix fragments exert potent pro-inflammatory actions, while MMPs process cytokines and chemokines altering their biological activity. In addition, vascular hyperpermeability results in extravasation of fibronectin and fibrinogen leading to formation of a plasma-derived provisional matrix that serves as a scaffold for leukocyte infiltration. Clearance of the infarct from dead cells and matrix debris is essential for resolution of inflammation and marks the transition to the proliferative phase. The fibrin-based provisional matrix is lysed and cellular fibronectin is secreted. ED-A fibronectin, mechanical tension and Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β are essential for modulation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, the main collagen-secreting cells in the wound. The matricellular proteins thrombospondin-1 and -2, osteopontin, tenascin-C, periostin, and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) are induced in the infarct regulating cellular interactions and promoting matrix organization. As the infarct matures, matrix cross-linking results in formation of a dense collagen-based scar. At this stage, shielding of fibroblasts from external mechanical tension by the mature matrix network may promote deactivation and cellular quiescence. The components of the extracellular matrix do not passively follow the pathologic alterations of the infarcted heart but critically modulate inflammatory and reparative pathways by transducing signals that affect cell survival, phenotype and gene expression. PMID:19631653

  6. Carbodiimide Inactivation of MMPs and Effect on Dentin Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, A.; Apolonio, F.M.; Saboia, V.P.A.; Santi, S.; Angeloni, V.; Checchi, V.; Curci, R.; Di Lenarda, R.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Breschi, L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of protein cross-linking agents during bonding procedures has been recently proposed to improve bond durability. This study aimed to use zymography and in situ zymography techniques to evaluate the ability of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) cross-linker to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The hypotheses tested were that: (1) bonding procedures increase dentin gelatinolytic activity and (2) EDC pre-treatment prevents this enzymatic activity. The zymographic assay was performed on protein extracts obtained from dentin powder treated with Optibond FL or Scotchbond 1XT with or without 0.3M EDC pre-treatment. For in situ zymography, adhesive/dentin interfaces were created with the same adhesives applied to acid-etched dentin slabs pre-treated or not with EDC conditioner. Zymograms revealed increased expression of dentin endogenous MMP-2 and -9 after adhesive application, while the use of EDC as a primer inactivated dentin gelatinases. Results of in situ zymograpy showed that hybrid layers of tested adhesives exhibited intense collagenolytic activity, while almost no fluorescence signal was detected when specimens were pre-treated with EDC. The correlative analysis used in this study demonstrated that EDC could contribute to inactivate endogenous dentin MMPs within the hybrid layer created by etch-and-rinse adhesives. PMID:24334409

  7. Carbodiimide inactivation of MMPs and effect on dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, A; Apolonio, F M; Saboia, V P A; Santi, S; Angeloni, V; Checchi, V; Curci, R; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Breschi, L

    2014-03-01

    The use of protein cross-linking agents during bonding procedures has been recently proposed to improve bond durability. This study aimed to use zymography and in situ zymography techniques to evaluate the ability of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) cross-linker to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The hypotheses tested were that: (1) bonding procedures increase dentin gelatinolytic activity and (2) EDC pre-treatment prevents this enzymatic activity. The zymographic assay was performed on protein extracts obtained from dentin powder treated with Optibond FL or Scotchbond 1XT with or without 0.3M EDC pre-treatment. For in situ zymography, adhesive/dentin interfaces were created with the same adhesives applied to acid-etched dentin slabs pre-treated or not with EDC conditioner. Zymograms revealed increased expression of dentin endogenous MMP-2 and -9 after adhesive application, while the use of EDC as a primer inactivated dentin gelatinases. Results of in situ zymograpy showed that hybrid layers of tested adhesives exhibited intense collagenolytic activity, while almost no fluorescence signal was detected when specimens were pre-treated with EDC. The correlative analysis used in this study demonstrated that EDC could contribute to inactivate endogenous dentin MMPs within the hybrid layer created by etch-and-rinse adhesives. PMID:24334409

  8. Abrasion of eroded root dentine brushed with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    De Menezes, Márcio; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness change and wear provided by different dentifrices on root dentine previously exposed to erosive challenges. According to a randomized complete block design, 150 slabs of bovine root dentine (6 x 3 x 2 mm) were ground flat and polished. In an area of 4 x 3 mm on the dentine surface, specimens were submitted to five erosive/abrasive events, each one composed by: exposure to Sprite Diet or distilled water for 5 min, then to a remineralizing solution for 1 min, and simulation of 5,000 brushing strokes. Four dentifrices--regular (RE), baking soda (BS), whitening (WT) and tartar control (TC)--and distilled water (CO), used as control, were compared. Final texture and the wear depth were evaluated using a profilometer. ANOVA did not show significant interaction, indicating that the effect of dentifrices on both surface roughness change and wear did not depend on whether or not the dentine was eroded ( p>0.05). There was no difference between abrasion of eroded and sound dentine. The Tukey's test revealed that WT, BS and TC provided the highest increase in surface roughness differing from RE and CO. TC yielded the deepest wear of root dentine, whereas RE and CO, the shallowest. No significant difference in wear among BS, TC and WT were observed. Within the limitations of this study, the data showed that abrasion of both eroded and sound root dentine was dependent on the dentifrice used. PMID:15146320

  9. Spectroscopic and morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemor, R. M.; Kruger, Michael B.; Wieliczka, David M.; Swafford, Jim R.; Spencer, Paulette

    1999-01-01

    The potential environmental risks associated with mercury release have forced many European countries to ban the use of dental amalgam. Alternative materials such as composite resins do not provide the clinical function for the length of time characteristically associated with dental amalgam. The weak link in the composite restoration is the dentin/adhesive bond. The purpose of this study was to correlate morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive bond with chemical analyses using micro- Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A commercial dental adhesive was placed on dentin substrates cut from extracted, unerupted human third molars. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface were investigated using infrared radiation produced at the Aladdin synchrotron source; visible radiation from a Kr+ laser was used for the micro-Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface, differentially stained to identify protein, mineral, and adhesive, were examined using light microscopy. Due to its limited spatial resolution and the unknown sample thickness the infrared results cannot be used quantitatively in determining the extent of diffusion. The results from the micro-Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy indicate exposed protein at the dentin/adhesive interface. Using a laser that reduces background fluorescence, the micro-Raman spectroscopy provides quantitative chemical and morphologic information on the dentin/adhesive interface. The staining procedure is sensitive to sites of pure protein and thus, complements the Raman results.

  10. Mutations in COL1A1 Gene Change Dentin Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhenxia; Gan, Yunna; Xia, Dan; Li, Qiang; Li, Yanling; Yang, Jiaji; Gao, Shan; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have attempted to associate specific gene mutations with dentin phenotypic severity, it remains unknown how the mutations in COL1A1 gene influence the mechanical behavior of dentin collagen and matrix. Here, we reported one osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) pedigree caused by two new inserting mutations in exon 5 of COL1A1 (NM_000088.3:c.440_441insT;c.441_442insA), which resulted in the unstable expression of COL1A1 mRNA and half quantity of procollagen production. We investigated the morphological and mechanical features of proband's dentin using atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Increased D-periodic spacing, variably enlarged collagen fibrils coating with fewer minerals were found in the mutated collagen. AFM analysis demonstrated rougher dentin surface and sparsely decreased Young's modulus in proband's dentin. We believe that our findings provide new insights into the genetic-/nano- mechanisms of dentin diseases, and may well explain OI dentin features with reduced mechanical strength and a lower crosslinked density. Anat Rec, 299:511-519, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694865

  11. Dentin Biomodification: Strategies, Renewable Resources and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Pauli, Guido F.; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James; Castellan, Carina S.; Phansalkar, Rasika S; Aguiar, Thaiane R.; Vidal, Cristina M.P.; Napotilano, José; Nam, Joo-Won; Leme, Ariene A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The biomodification of dentin is a biomimetic approach, mediated by bioactive agents, to enhance and reinforce the dentin by locally altering the biochemistry and biomechanical properties. This review provides an overview of key dentin matrix components, targeting effects of biomodification strategies, the chemistry of renewable natural sources, and current research on their potential clinical applications. Methods The PubMed database and collected literature were used as a resource for peer-reviewed articles to highlight the topics of dentin hierarchical structure, biomodification agents, and laboratorial investigations of their clinical applications. In addition, new data is presented on laboratorial methods for the standardization of proanthocyanidin-rich preparations as a renewable source of plant-derived biomodification agents. Results Biomodification agents can be categorized as physical methods and chemical agents. Synthetic and naturally occurring chemical strategies present distinctive mechanism of interaction with the tissue. Initially thought to be driven only by inter- or intra-molecular collagen induced non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking, multiple interactions with other dentin components are fundamental for the long-term biomechanics and biostability of the tissue. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins show promising bioactivity, and their chemical complexity requires systematic evaluation of the active compounds to produce a fully standardized intervention material from renewable resource, prior to their detailed clinical evaluation. Significance Understanding the hierarchical structure of dentin and the targeting effect of the bioactive compounds will establish their use in both dentin-biomaterials interface and caries management. PMID:24309436

  12. Effect of ascorbic acid deficiency on primary and reparative dentinogenesis in non-ascorbate-synthesizing ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, M; Aoki, K; Okiji, T; Suda, H

    1997-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is essential to the biosynthesis of collagen, the major organic matrix component of dentine. The ODS rat is a mutant strain of Wistar rat characterized by hereditary lack of L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase and thus is unable to synthesize ascorbic acid. ODS rats were given an ascorbic acid-free diet to investigate how ascorbic acid deficiency affects dentine formation in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis on their growing molars and incisors showed a significant reduction in both size and mineral apposition rate of dentine, as revealed by contact microradiography and fluorescent time-marking, respectively. A similar reduction in bone formation was simultaneously demonstrated in the mandible, confirming the previously reported osteopathic effects of ascorbic acid deficiency. When pulp inflammation was induced in lower first molars by making unsealed pulp exposures, specimens from control animals showed continuous deposition of an osteodentine-like tissue in the radicular pulp chamber; this type of mineralized tissue formation was greatly reduced in ascorbic acid-deprived animals. These results indicate that ascorbic acid deficiency hampers dentine formation under both physiological and pathological conditions of the dentine/pulp complex. ODS rats could be useful in investigating in vivo effects of ascorbic acid deficiency on the formation of dentine and other dental mineralized tissues. PMID:9447259

  13. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  14. Role of Dentin MMPs in Caries Progression and Bond Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, A.; Tjäderhane, L.; Checchi, V.; Di Lenarda, R.; Salo, T.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin can be described as a biological composite with collagen matrix embedded with nanosized hydroxyapatite mineral crystallites. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins are families of endopeptidases. Enzymes of both families are present in dentin and collectively capable of degrading virtually all extracellular matrix components. This review describes these enzymes and their presence in dentin, mainly focusing on their role in dentin caries pathogenesis and loss of collagen in the adhesive hybrid layer under composite restorations. MMPs and cysteine cathepsins present in saliva, mineralized dentin, and/or dentinal fluid may affect the dentin caries process at the early phases of demineralization. Changes in collagen and noncollagenous protein structure may participate in observed decreases in mechanical properties of caries-affected dentin and reduce the ability of caries-affected dentin to remineralize. These endogenous enzymes also remain entrapped within the hybrid layer during the resin infiltration process, and the acidic bonding agents themselves (irrespective of whether they are etch-and-rinse or self-etch) can activate these endogenous protease proforms. Since resin impregnation is frequently incomplete, denuded collagen matrices associated with free water (which serves as a collagen cleavage reagent for these endogenous hydrolase enzymes) can be enzymatically disrupted, finally contributing to the degradation of the hybrid layer. There are multiple in vitro and in vivo reports showing that the longevity of the adhesive interface is increased when nonspecific enzyme-inhibiting strategies are used. Different chemicals (i.e., chlorhexidine, galardin, and benzalkonium chloride) or collagen cross-linker agents have been successfully employed as therapeutic primers in the bonding procedure. In addition, the incorporation of enzyme inhibitors (i.e., quaternary ammonium methacrylates) into the resin blends has been recently promoted. This

  15. Role of dentin MMPs in caries progression and bond stability.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, A; Tjäderhane, L; Checchi, V; Di Lenarda, R; Salo, T; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Breschi, L

    2015-02-01

    Dentin can be described as a biological composite with collagen matrix embedded with nanosized hydroxyapatite mineral crystallites. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins are families of endopeptidases. Enzymes of both families are present in dentin and collectively capable of degrading virtually all extracellular matrix components. This review describes these enzymes and their presence in dentin, mainly focusing on their role in dentin caries pathogenesis and loss of collagen in the adhesive hybrid layer under composite restorations. MMPs and cysteine cathepsins present in saliva, mineralized dentin, and/or dentinal fluid may affect the dentin caries process at the early phases of demineralization. Changes in collagen and noncollagenous protein structure may participate in observed decreases in mechanical properties of caries-affected dentin and reduce the ability of caries-affected dentin to remineralize. These endogenous enzymes also remain entrapped within the hybrid layer during the resin infiltration process, and the acidic bonding agents themselves (irrespective of whether they are etch-and-rinse or self-etch) can activate these endogenous protease proforms. Since resin impregnation is frequently incomplete, denuded collagen matrices associated with free water (which serves as a collagen cleavage reagent for these endogenous hydrolase enzymes) can be enzymatically disrupted, finally contributing to the degradation of the hybrid layer. There are multiple in vitro and in vivo reports showing that the longevity of the adhesive interface is increased when nonspecific enzyme-inhibiting strategies are used. Different chemicals (i.e., chlorhexidine, galardin, and benzalkonium chloride) or collagen cross-linker agents have been successfully employed as therapeutic primers in the bonding procedure. In addition, the incorporation of enzyme inhibitors (i.e., quaternary ammonium methacrylates) into the resin blends has been recently promoted. This

  16. Dentinal tubules revealed with X-ray tensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Jud, Christoph; Schaff, Florian; Zanette, Irene; Wolf, Johannes; Fehringer, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Dentin is a mineralized material making up most of the tooth bulk. A system of microtubules, so called dentinal tubules, transverses it radially from the pulp chamber to the outside. This highly oriented structure leads to anisotropic mechanical properties directly connected to the tubules orientation and density: the ultimate tensile strength as well as the fracture toughness and the shear strength are largest perpendicular to dentinal tubules. Consequently, the fatigue strength depends on the direction of dentinal tubules, too. However, none of the existing techniques used to investigate teeth provide access to orientation and density of dentinal tubules for an entire specimen in a non-destructive way. In this paper, we measure a third molar human tooth both with conventional micro-CT and X-ray tensor tomography (XTT). While the achievable resolution in micro-CT is too low to directly resolve the dentinal tubules, we provide strong evidence that the direction and density of dentinal tubules can be indirectly measured by XTT, which exploits small-angle X-ray scattering to retrieve a 3D map of scattering tensors. We show that the mean directions of scattering structures correlate to the orientation of dentinal tubules and that the mean effective scattering strength provides an estimation of the relative density of dentinal tubules. Thus, this method could be applied to investigate the connection between tubule orientation and fatigue or tensile properties of teeth for a full sample without cutting one, non-representative peace of tooth out of the full sample. PMID:27424269

  17. Limitations in Bonding to Dentin and Experimental Strategies to Prevent Bond Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Tjäderhane, L.; Breschi, L.; Mazzoni, A.; Li, N.; Mao, J.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    The limited durability of resin-dentin bonds severely compromises the lifetime of tooth-colored restorations. Bond degradation occurs via hydrolysis of suboptimally polymerized hydrophilic resin components and degradation of water-rich, resin-sparse collagen matrices by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. This review examined data generated over the past three years on five experimental strategies developed by different research groups for extending the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. They include: (1) increasing the degree of conversion and esterase resistance of hydrophilic adhesives; (2) the use of broad-spectrum inhibitors of collagenolytic enzymes, including novel inhibitor functional groups grafted to methacrylate resins monomers to produce anti-MMP adhesives; (3) the use of cross-linking agents for silencing the activities of MMP and cathepsins that irreversibly alter the 3-D structures of their catalytic/allosteric domains; (4) ethanol wet-bonding with hydrophobic resins to completely replace water from the extrafibrillar and intrafibrillar collagen compartments and immobilize the collagenolytic enzymes; and (5) biomimetic remineralization of the water-filled collagen matrix using analogs of matrix proteins to progressively replace water with intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar apatites to exclude exogenous collagenolytic enzymes and fossilize endogenous collagenolytic enzymes. A combination of several of these strategies should result in overcoming the critical barriers to progress currently encountered in dentin bonding. PMID:21220360

  18. Structure and chemical composition of the dentin-enamel junction analyzed by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desoutter, A.; Salehi, H.; Slimani, A.; Marquet, P.; Jacquot, B.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the human dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) was studied using confocal Raman microscopy - a chemical imaging technique. Slices of non-fixed, sound teeth were prepared with an Isomet diamond saw and scanned with Witec Alpha300R system. The combination of different characteristics peaks of phosphate, carbonate and organic matrix (respectively 960, 1072 and 1545 cm-1), generates images representing the chemical composition of the DEJ area. Images are also calculated using peak ratios enabling precise determination of the chemical composition across the DEJ. Then, with two characterized peaks, different pictures are calculated to show the ratio of two components. The images of the spatial distribution of mineral phosphate (960cm-1) to organic matrix (1545 cm-1) ratios, mineral carbonates (1072cm-1) to mineral phosphate ratios; and mineral carbonates to organic matrix ratios were reconstructed. Cross sectional and calculated graphic profile show the variations of the different chemical component ratios through the enamel and the dentin. Phosphate to organic ratio shows an accumulation of organic material under the enamel surface. The cross sectional profile of these pictures shows a high phosphate content compared to enamel in the vicinity of the DEJ. The Confocal Raman imaging technique can be used to further provide full chemical imaging of tooth, particularly of the whole DEJ and to study enamel and dentin decay.

  19. Dentin hypersensitivity: etiology, diagnosis and treatment; a literature review.

    PubMed

    Davari, Ar; Ataei, E; Assarzadeh, H

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this review is to inform practitioners about dentin hypersensitivity (DH); to provide a brief overview of the diagnosis, etiology and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity and to discuss technical approaches to relieve sensitivity. This clinical information is described in the context of the underlying biology. The author used PUBMED to find relevant English-language literature published in the period 1999 to 2010. The author used combinations of the search terms "dentin*", "tooth", "teeth", "hypersensit*", "desensitiz*". Abstracts and also full text articles to identify studies describing etiology, prevalence, clinical features, controlled clinical trials of treatments and relevant laboratory research on mechanisms of action were used. PMID:24724135

  20. Dentin dysplasia type I – A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sangeeta; Gupta, Swati; Wadhwan, Vijay; Suhasini, GP

    2015-01-01

    Dentin dysplasia is a rare disturbance of dentin formation characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation with abnormal pupal morphology. The teeth appear clinically normal in morphologic appearance and color. The teeth characteristically exhibit extreme mobility and are commonly exfoliated prematurely. Radiograph shows obliteration of all pulp chambers, short, blunted and malformed or absent roots with periapical radiolucencies involving apparently intact tooth. This case is reported here because of its rarity along with the description of various clinical, radiological and histological features. PMID:26097326

  1. Dentine hypersensitivity. The effects in vitro of acids and dietary substances on root-planed and burred dentine.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Absi, E G; Adams, D

    1987-05-01

    Evidence indicates that teeth exhibiting cervical dentine hypersensitivity have open dentinal tubules at the dentine surface. The identification of factors which render dentine exposed and tubules open is important both to the prevention and management of dentine hypersensitivity. In this study, recently extracted teeth were root planed or burred to expose the root dentine. Specimens were horizontally sectioned and then using the apical portion as control, the coronal portions placed in a variety of strong and weak acids and dietary fluids. Examination under the scanning electron microscope revealed a smear layer covering completely underlying tubules on the control root planed or burred portions. Test portions exposed to strong and weak acids showed loss of the smear layer and exposure of large numbers of tubules. Formic and tannic acids produced no changes. Some dietary fluids, in particular red and white wine, citrus fruit juices, apple juice and yogurt produced similar etching effects to the acids. The low pH carbonated drink, coca-cola, and a blackcurrent cordial produced no effects. The results of this study in vitro cannot necessarily be extrapolated to the clinical situation, but suggest that certain dietary factors could play a rôle in the aetiology of dentine hypersensitivity. Dietary advice to patients may prove important in the management of this often recurrent condition. PMID:3301914

  2. Fatigue of the Resin-Dentin Interface: A New Approach for Evaluating the Durability of Dentin Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Yahyazadefar, Mobin; Ryou, Heonjune; Majd, Hessam; Do, Dominic; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-01-01

    There are concerns regarding the longevity of resin composite restorations and the clinical relevance of in vitro bond strength testing to the durability of dentin bonds in vivo. Objective The objectives of this investigation were to: 1) develop a new method of experimental evaluation for quantifying the durability of dentin bonds, 2) apply this method to characterize the interfacial strength of a selected commercial system under both monotonic and cyclic loading, and 3) distinguish mechanisms contributing to the interface degradation and failure. Methods A new method for fatigue testing the resin-dentin interface was developed based on a four-point flexure arrangement that includes two identical bonded interfaces. Cyclic loading of specimens comprised of coronal dentin bonded to a commercial resin composite and controls of resin composite was performed to failure within a hydrated environment. Scanning electron microscopy and nanoscopic dynamic mechanical analysis were used to evaluate failure mechanisms. Results The fatigue strength of the resin-dentin interface was significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than that of the resin composite and reported for dentin over the entire finite life regime. Defined at 1×107 cycles, the apparent endurance limit of the resin-dentin interface was 13 MPa, in comparison to 48 MPa and 44 MPa for the resin composite and dentin, respectively. The ratio of fully reversed endurance limit to ultimate strength of the interface (0.26) was the lowest of the three materials. Significance The proposed approach for characterizing the fatigue strength of resin-dentin bonds may offer new insights concerning durability of the bonded interface. PMID:23434232

  3. Computer simulated screening of dentin bonding primer monomers through analysis of their chemical functions and their spatial 3D alignment.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, J; Vaidyanathan, T K; Ravichandran, S

    2009-02-01

    Binding interactions between dentin bonding primer monomers and dentinal collagen were studied by an analysis of their chemical functions and their spatial 3D alignment. A trial set of 12 monomers used as primers in dentin adhesives was characterized to assess them for binding to a complementary target. HipHop utility in the Catalyst software from Accelrys was used for the study. Ten hypotheses were generated by HipHop procedures involving (a) conformational generation using a poling technique to promote conformational variation, (b) extraction of functions to remodel ligands as function-based structures, and (c) identification of common patterns of functional alignment displayed by low energy conformations. The hypotheses, designated as pharmacaphores, were also scored and ranked. Analysis of pharmacaphore models through mapping of ligands revealed important differences between ligands. Top-ranked poses from direct docking simulations using type 1 collagen target were mapped in a rigid manner to the highest ranked pharmacophore model. The visual match observed in mapping and associated fit values suggest a strong correspondence between direct and indirect docking simulations. The results elegantly demonstrate that an indirect approach used to identify pharmacaphore models from adhesive ligands without a target may be a simple and viable approach to assess their intermolecular interactions with an intended target. Inexpensive indirect/direct virtual screening of hydrophilic monomer candidates may be a practical way to assess their initial promise for dentin primer use well before additional experimental evaluation of their priming/bonding efficacy. This is also of value in the search/design of new compounds for priming dentin. PMID:18546179

  4. Selective treatment of carious dentin using a mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser at 6 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiki, Masayuki; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-03-01

    Optical technologies have good potential for caries detection, prevention, excavation, and the realization of minimal intervention dentistry. This study aimed to develop a selective excavation technique of carious tissue using the specific absorption in 6 μm wavelength range. Bovine dentin demineralized with lactic acid solution was used as a carious dentin model. A mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The wavelength was tuned to 6.02 and 6.42 μm which correspond to absorption bands called amide I and amide II, respectively. The laser delivers 5 ns pulse width at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The morphological change after irradiation was observed with a scanning electron microscope, and the measurement of ablation depth was performed with a confocal laser microscope. At λ = 6.02 μm and the average power density of 15 W/cm2, demineralized dentin was removed selectively with less-invasive effect on sound dentin. The wavelength of 6.42 μm also showed the possibility of selective removal. High ablation efficiency and low thermal side effect were observed using the nanosecond pulsed laser with λ = 6.02 μm. In the near future, development of compact laser device will open the minimal invasive laser treatment to the dental clinic.

  5. Morphology of the dentin structure of sloths Bradypus tridactylus: a light and scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Santana, L N S; Barbosa, L V M; Teixeira, F B; Costa, A M P; Fernandes, L M P; Lima, R R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dentine morphology of sloths (Bradypus tridactylus). The sloth teeth were removed and prepared for light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy analyses (SEM). LM revealed two patterns of tubular dentins: an outer with dentinary tubules over the all tooth length and one in the inner part with larger diameter and more spaced tubules, when compared to those present in the outer dentine. These findings were confirmed by SEM, which revealed a tubular pattern in the outer dentine like in humans. The inner dentine displayed pared grouped tubules that were characterized as vascular channels. It can be concluded that this sloth species present two types of dentins: an inner dentin (ortodentin) and an outer dentin characterized as a vascular dentin. This suggests a partial evolutive/adaptive process of this dental tissue, as compared to other mammalian species. PMID:23410180

  6. Role of Dentin Compositional Changes and Structural Loss on Fracture Predilection in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossareh, Arezou

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of chemical compositional changes and iatrogenic dentin structural loss on the mechanical response of teeth to force and resistance to fracture. The experiments were divided into three phases. In phase 1, experimental studies were performed to evaluate the effect of chemicals used during treatment on ultrastructure, composition and resistance to fracture of dentin. In phase 2, experimental studies were used to evaluate the influence of dentin removal and remaining dentin volume on the resistance to fracture and microcrack formation in root dentin. In phase 3 finite element analysis was carried out to examine the influence of dentin loss on the stress distribution in root dentin. The combination of experimental and numerical analysis highlighted the role of remaining dentin volume and moment of inertia on root dentin biomechanics.

  7. Kinetics of reparative DNA replication induced in CBA and C57BL/6 mouse spleen cells by urethane and influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A.F.; Antonenko, S.V.; Chekova, V.V.; Shcherbinskaya, A.M.; Nadgornaya, N.I.; Zasukhina, G.D.

    1986-09-01

    The authors investigated the reparative replication of DNA, induced by urethane and influenza virus in C57BL/6 and CBA mice which have marked differences in tumor formation. Reparative DNA replication, induced by urethane and influenza virus was investigated by a liquid scintillation method based on measuring incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into the total mass of mouse spleen cells, when replicative DNA synthesis was inhibited by hydroxyurea. The intensity of reparative DNA replication was judged from the value of the stimulation index which is the ratio of the radioactivity in the spleen cells of the experimental animals to the corresponding parameters in cells of intact animals. The phenomenon of the stimulating and inhibitory effects of influenza virus on reparative DNA replication in cells depending on their genotype and sensitivity to virus is established.

  8. Dentine hypersensitivity: analysis of self-care products.

    PubMed

    Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Fiorini, Tiago; Liberman, Diego Nique; Cavagni, Juliano

    2009-01-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity is a condition that is often present in individuals, leading them to seek dental treatment. It has been described as an acute, provoked pain that is not attributable to other dental problems. Its actual prevalence is unknown, but it is interpreted as very unpleasant by individuals. Several therapeutic alternatives are available to manage dentine hypersensitivity, involving both in-office treatment and home-use products. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate self-care products for managing dentine hypersensitivity. Among the products available, dentifrices and fluorides are the most studied self-care products, with positive effects. However, a high percentage of individuals is affected by the placebo effect. Among dentifrices, those containing potassium salts seem to be the most promising. Dental professionals need to understand the advantages and limitations of these therapies and use this knowledge in a positive approach that might help in decreasing dentine hypersensitivity among patients. PMID:19838559

  9. Innovations for combating dentin hypersensitivity: current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming

    2012-06-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common dental complaint, and in severe cases it can impair eating, drinking, and even speaking, thus interfering with the normal daily life of an individual. Throughout years of research, there has been significant advancement in understanding dentin hypersensitivity, and various treatment regimens have been developed for combating the problem. The continued efforts have recently resulted in a novel technology that uses 8% arginine and calcium carbonate for treating dentin hypersensitivity. Formulations of oral care products using this technology--including toothpaste and prophylactic pastes--have demonstrated not only their effectiveness but also their ability to provide instant relief. This paper provides an overview of the etiology of dentin hypersensitivity, the discovery and development of measures for combating the problem, and the available data on the clinical efficacy of products based on 8% arginine and calcium carbonate. PMID:22774324

  10. Role of Alcohol on the Fracture Resistance of Dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie,Robert O.

    2006-05-01

    Healthy dentin, the mineralized tissue that makes up the bulk of the tooth, is naturally hydrated in vivo; however, it is known that various chemical reagents including acetone and ethanol can induce dehydration and thereby affect its properties. Here, we seek to investigate this in light of the effect alcohol can have on the mechanical properties of dentin, specifically by measuring the stiffness, strength and toughness of dentin in simulated body fluid and scotch whisky. Results indicate that chemical dehydration induced by the whisky has a significant beneficial effect on the elastic modulus, strength and fracture toughness of dentin. Although this makes teeth more resistant to fracture, the change in properties is fully reversible upon rehydration. This effect is considered to be associated with increased cross-linking of the collagen molecules from intermolecular hydrogen-bonding where water is replaced with weaker hydrogen-bond forming solvents such as alcohol.

  11. Penetration of varnishes into demineralized root dentine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arends, J; Duschner, H; Ruben, J L

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the penetration of three different varnishes employed in caries prevention (Duraphat, Fluor Protector and Cervitec) into demineralized dentine is quantified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results show that the varnish penetration into lesions about 85 microns in depth if for Cervitec about 35 microns and considerably less for Duraphat and Fluor Protector. The penetration is into the dentinal tubules and is influenced by dentinal tubule direction. The drying procedure--pretreatment of the dentine--influences the penetration, though sizeably only for Cervitec applications. This paper shows that varnish penetration into the tissue and presumably 'sealing' tubules completely or partly is valuable with respect to root caries prevention and hypersensitivity. PMID:9165191

  12. Morphological effects of MMPs inhibitors on the dentin bonding

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Li, Tianbo; Li, Xiuying; Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Penglian; Li, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been studied extensively, and MMP inhibitors have been used as dental pretreatment agents prior to dentin bonding because they reduce collagen fiber degradation and improve bonding strength. However, morphologic characteristics of the collagen network after etching and of the post-adhesive dentin hybrid layers (DHL) after MMP inhibitors pretreatment have not been evaluated. Thus, we investigated demineralized dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine (CHX) and minocycline (MI) in an etch- and -rinse adhesive system with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and immuno-gold labeling markers to observe the collagen network and DHL. FESEM revealed after CHX and MI, a demineralized dentin surface and improved collagen network formation, reduced collagen degradation, and distinct gold-labeling signals. Applying adhesive after either MMP inhibitor created a better dentin interface as evidenced by immuno-gold staining, better adhesive penetration, and higher DHL quality. With microtensile bond strength tests (µTBS) we estimated bonding strength using µTBS data. Immediate µTBS was enhanced with MMP inhibitor application to the bonding surface, and the CHX group was significantly different than non-treated etched surfaces, but no significant change was detected in the MI group. Surface micromorphology of the fractured dentin resin restoration showed that the CHX group had a better resin and dentin tube combination. Both MMP inhibitors created uniform resin coverage. Thus, morphologic results and µTBS data suggest that CHX and MI can inhibit MMP activity, improve immediate bonding strength, and enhance dentin bonding stability with an etch- and -rinse adhesive system. PMID:26379873

  13. Mesenchymal Dental Pulp Cells Attenuate Dentin Resorption in Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.; Chen, M.; He, L.; Marão, H.F.; Sun, D.M.; Zhou, J.; Kim, S.G.; Song, S.; Wang, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin in permanent teeth rarely undergoes resorption in development, homeostasis, or aging, in contrast to bone that undergoes periodic resorption/remodeling. The authors hypothesized that cells in the mesenchymal compartment of dental pulp attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Mononucleated and adherent cells from donor-matched rat dental pulp (dental pulp cells [DPCs]) and alveolar bone (alveolar bone cells [ABCs]) were isolated and separately cocultured with primary rat splenocytes. Primary splenocytes readily aggregated and formed osteoclast-like cells in chemically defined osteoclastogenesis medium with 20 ng/mL of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and 50 ng/mL of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Strikingly, DPCs attenuated osteoclastogenesis when cocultured with primary splenocytes, whereas ABCs slightly but significantly promoted osteoclastogenesis. DPCs yielded ~20-fold lower RANKL expression but >2-fold higher osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression than donor-matched ABCs, yielding a RANKL/OPG ratio of 41:1 (ABCs:DPCs). Vitamin D3 significantly promoted RANKL expression in ABCs and OPG in DPCs. In vivo, rat maxillary incisors were atraumatically extracted (without any tooth fractures), followed by retrograde pulpectomy to remove DPCs and immediate replantation into the extraction sockets to allow repopulation of the surgically treated root canal with periodontal and alveolar bone–derived cells. After 8 wk, multiple dentin/root resorption lacunae were present in root dentin with robust RANKL and OPG expression. There were areas of dentin resoprtion alternating with areas of osteodentin formation in root dentin surface in the observed 8 wk. These findings suggest that DPCs of the mesenchymal compartment have an innate ability to attenuate osteoclastogenesis and that this innate ability may be responsible for the absence of dentin resorption in homeostasis. Mesenchymal attenuation of dentin resorption may have implications in internal

  14. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C–O–C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P–O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  15. Methods for biomimetic remineralization of human dentine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chris Ying; Mei, May Lei; Li, Quan-Li; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Chu, Chun Hung

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the laboratory methods on biomimetic remineralization of demineralized human dentine. A systematic search of the publications in the PubMed, TRIP, and Web of Science databases was performed. Titles and abstracts of initially identified publications were screened. Clinical trials, reviews, non-English articles, resin-dentine interface studies, hybrid layer studies, hybrid scaffolds studies, and irrelevant studies were excluded. The remaining papers were retrieved with full texts. Manual screening was conducted on the bibliographies of remaining papers to identify relevant articles. A total of 716 studies were found, and 690 were excluded after initial screening. Two articles were identified from the bibliographies of the remaining papers. After retrieving the full text, 23 were included in this systematic review. Sixteen studies used analogues to mimic the functions of non-collagenous proteins in biomineralization of dentine, and four studies used bioactive materials to induce apatite formation on demineralized dentine surface. One study used zinc as a bioactive element, one study used polydopamine, and another study constructed an agarose hydrogel system for biomimetic mineralization of dentine. Many studies reported success in biomimetic mineralization of dentine, including the use of non-collagenous protein analogues, bioactive materials, or elements and agarose hydrogel system. PMID:25739078

  16. Dentin barrier test with transfected bovine pulp-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, G; Schuster, U; Thonemann, B; Barth, M; Esterbauer, S

    2001-02-01

    Growth kinetics of SV40 large T-antigen-transfected bovine pulp-derived cells on dentin were investigated. These cells were used in a dentin barrier test device, and the system was evaluated by testing a set of dental filling materials. Cells (120 cells/mm2) were seeded on dentin slices and incubated for up to 21 days. Cell proliferation was recorded using MTT assay. For cytotoxicity tests 3500 cells/mm2 were seeded on dentin discs, which were then incorporated into the dentin barrier test device. After 72 h preincubation test materials were applied. After a 24 h exposure with or without perfusion of the pulpal part of the test device, cell survival was evaluated using MTT assay. The cells revealed similar growth kinetics on dentin slices and on tissue culture plates. In cytotoxicity tests the cells were more sensitive toward the test materials than previously used three-dimensional cultures of human foreskin fibroblasts and as anticipated from clinical experience. Further improvement is expected by using three-dimensional cultures of pulp-derived cells. PMID:11491647

  17. Methods for Biomimetic Remineralization of Human Dentine: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chris Ying; Mei, May Lei; Li, Quan-Li; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Chu, Chun Hung

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the laboratory methods on biomimetic remineralization of demineralized human dentine. A systematic search of the publications in the PubMed, TRIP, and Web of Science databases was performed. Titles and abstracts of initially identified publications were screened. Clinical trials, reviews, non-English articles, resin-dentine interface studies, hybrid layer studies, hybrid scaffolds studies, and irrelevant studies were excluded. The remaining papers were retrieved with full texts. Manual screening was conducted on the bibliographies of remaining papers to identify relevant articles. A total of 716 studies were found, and 690 were excluded after initial screening. Two articles were identified from the bibliographies of the remaining papers. After retrieving the full text, 23 were included in this systematic review. Sixteen studies used analogues to mimic the functions of non-collagenous proteins in biomineralization of dentine, and four studies used bioactive materials to induce apatite formation on demineralized dentine surface. One study used zinc as a bioactive element, one study used polydopamine, and another study constructed an agarose hydrogel system for biomimetic mineralization of dentine. Many studies reported success in biomimetic mineralization of dentine, including the use of non-collagenous protein analogues, bioactive materials, or elements and agarose hydrogel system. PMID:25739078

  18. Multiscale characterization of partially demineralized superficial and deep dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Irina M; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, Ana-Maria; Farge, Pierre; Piednoir, Agnes; Pirat, Christophe; Ramos, Stella M M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to address the following question: 'Which properties are modified in partially demineralized surfaces, compared with non-demineralized dentin surfaces, following orthophosphoric acid-etching as performed in clinical procedures?'. For this purpose, the complementary techniques atomic force microscopy/spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements were used to provide a multiscale characterization of the dentin substrate undergoing the acidic preconditioning designed to enhance wetting. Special attention was given to the influence of the etching pretreatment on the nanomechanical properties at different levels of dentin surfaces, in both dry and hydrated conditions. The four-sided pyramid model (extended Hertz contact model) proved to be accurate for calculating the apparent Young's modulus, offering new information on the elasticity of dentin. The modulus value notably decreased following etching and surface hydration. This study underlines that after the acid etching pretreatment the contribution of the nanomechanical, morphological, and physicochemical modifications has a strong influence on the dentin adhesion properties and thus plays a significant role in the coupling of the adhesive-resin composite build-up material at the dentin surface. PMID:23841786

  19. In vitro remineralization of severely compromised bonded dentin.

    PubMed

    Mai, S; Kim, Y K; Kim, J; Yiu, C K Y; Ling, J; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2010-04-01

    Biomimetic remineralization is potentially useful for the remineralization of incompletely resin-infiltrated collagen matrices created by etch-and-rinse adhesives. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that structurally altered dentin collagen cannot be remineralized to the same hierarchical order and dimension seen in structurally intact dentin collagen. The remineralization medium consisted of a set Portland cement/simulated body fluid system containing polycarboxylic acid and polyvinylphosphonic acid as biomimetic analogs. Remineralization of air-dried, collapsed hybrid layers was apparent after one month, with hybrid layers remineralized to 80-90% of their thickness after 2-4 months. A hypermineralized layer was seen on the hybrid layer surface, and tubular orifices were occluded with apatite deposits that resembled those present in non-carious cervical dentin. Structurally altered collagen is unlikely to be remineralized to the same hierarchical order and dimension as seen in intact dentin. The aggressively air-dried acid-etched dentin remineralization model also sheds light on the mechanism of sclerotic dentin formation. PMID:20173183

  20. [The stimulation of reparative regeneration in the treatment of fractures of the extremities with the use of new biotechnologies].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, G V; Borovkov, V N; Eremin, A V; Orlov, A A; Saburina, I N

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of Russian and foreign authors on modern methods of stimulation of reparative regeneration of bone tissue. Highlight general principles for the construction and use of bioplastic materials. An attempt to classify the most famous of biomaterials based on their physico-chemical and biological properties, as well as identified trends in the further development of tissue engineering and its importance in traumatology and orthopedics. PMID:24340626

  1. The effects of host derived metalloproteinases on dentin bond and the role of MMPs inhibitors on dentin matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    LONGHI, M.; CERRONI, L.; CONDÒ, S.G.; ARIANO, V.; PASQUANTONIO, G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. The work has the objective to analyze the literature on the degradation of the adhesive interface. In particular the study is focused on the role of the metalloproteinase in the hydrolytic degradation of collagen matrix in the bonded interface. The survey will concern also the latest innovations to improve and increase the link between dentin and the restorative materials through the MMPs inhibitors. Methods. The research has been carried out in the MEDLINE database by choosing keywords as “metalloproteinases” and “dentin bond” and “degradation”. In vitro studies were included in the research, excluding studies with no human and deciduous teeth. Language was limited to English. Results. The collagenolytic enzymes in mineralized dentin have been demonstrated to have an important role in dental hard tissue pathologies, including the degradation of the hybrid layer. Conclusion. The preservation of the collagen matrix integrity is a key issue in the attempts to improve the dentin bonding durability. PMID:25992261

  2. BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT TO PRIMARY DENTIN AFTER CUTTING WITH DIFFERENT BUR TYPES AND DENTIN CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Nicoló, Rebeca Di; Shintome, Luciana Keiko; Myaki, Silvio Issáo; Nagayassu, Marcos Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12). In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer – 3M/ESPE) prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5%) and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence. PMID:19089179

  3. Adhesive bond strengths to enamel and dentin using recommended and extended treatment times.

    PubMed

    Kimmes, Nicole S; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of different enamel and dentin conditioning times on the shear bond strength of a resin composite using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were determined following treatment of flat ground human enamel and dentin surfaces (4000 grit) with 11 adhesive systems: 1) AdheSE One Viva Pen-(ASE), 2) Adper Prompt L-Pop-(PLP), 3) Adper Single Bond Plus-(SBP), 4) Clearfil SE Bond-(CSE), 5) Clearfil S3 Bond-(CS3), 6) OptiBond All-In-One-(OBA), 7) OptiBond Solo Plus-(OBS), 8) Peak SE-(PSE), 9) Xeno IV-(X4), 10) Xeno V-(X5) and 11) XP Bond-(XPB) using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Composite (Z100) to enamel and dentin bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with a three-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's LSD post hoc test. The highest shear bond strengths (MPa) to enamel were achieved by the three etch-and-rinse systems at both the recommended treatment time (SBP-40.5 +/- 6.1; XPB-38.7 +/- 3.7; OBS- 35.2 +/- 6.2) and the extended treatment time (SBP-44.5 +/- 8.1; XPB-40.9 +/- 5.7; OBS-35.0 +/- 4.5). Extending the enamel treatment time did not produce a significant change (p > 0.05) in bond strength for the 11 adhesive systems tested. OBS generated the highest (46.2 +/- 7.9) bond strengths to dentin at the recommended treatment time. At the extended treatment time X4 (42.2 +/- 11.7), PSE (42.1 +/- 9.7) and OBS (41.4 +/- 8.0) produced the highest bond strengths to dentin. The bond strength change between recommend and extended treatment times was significant (p < 0.05) for PSE, but the other 10 systems did not exhibit any significant change. PMID:20166418

  4. Fibronectin is Essential for Reparative Cardiac Progenitor Cell Response Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Konstandin, Mathias H.; Toko, Haruhiro; Gastelum, Grady M.; Quijada, Pearl; De La Torre, Andrea; Quintana, Mercedes; Collins, Brett; Din, Shabana; Avitabile, Daniele; Völkers, Mirko; Gude, Natalie; Fässler, Reinhard; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Adoptive transfer of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) has entered clinical application despite limited mechanistic understanding of the endogenous response following myocardial infarction (MI). Extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes after MI and therefore might be linked to CPC-mediated repair. Objective Demonstrate the significance of Fibronectin (Fn), a component of the ECM, for induction of the endogenous CPC response to MI. Methods and Results This report shows that presence of CPCs correlates with expression of Fn during cardiac development and after MI. In vivo, genetic conditional ablation of Fn blunts CPC response measured 7 days after MI through reduced proliferation and diminished survival. Attenuated vasculogenesis and cardiogenesis during recovery was evident at the end of a 12 week follow-up period. Impaired CPC-dependent reparative remodeling ultimately leads to continuous decline of cardiac function in Fn knockout animals. In vitro, Fn protects and induces proliferation of CPCs via β1-Integrin-FAK-Stat3-Pim1 but Akt-independent mechanism. Conclusion Fn is essential for endogenous CPC expansion and repair needed for stabilization of cardiac function after MI. PMID:23652800

  5. Potential Reparative Role of Resident Adult Renal Stem/Progenitor Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sallustio, Fabio; Serino, Grazia; Schena, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human kidney is particularly susceptible to ischemia and toxins with consequential tubular necrosis and activation of inflammatory processes. This process can lead to the acute renal injury, and even if the kidney has a great capacity for regeneration after tubular damage, in several circumstances, the normal renal repair program may not be sufficient to achieve a successful regeneration. Resident adult renal stem/progenitor cells could participate in this repair process and have the potentiality to enhance the renal regenerative mechanism. This could be achieved both directly, by means of their capacity to differentiate and integrate into the renal tissues, and by means of paracrine factors able to induce or improve the renal repair or regeneration. Recent genetic fate-tracing studies indicated that tubular damage is instead repaired by proliferative duplication of epithelial cells, acquiring a transient progenitor phenotype and by fate-restricted clonal cell progeny emerging from different nephron segments. In this review, we discuss about the properties and the reparative characteristics of high regenerative CD133+/CD24+ cells, with a view to a future application of these cells for the treatment of acute renal injury. PMID:26309808

  6. Nanoleakage distribution at adhesive-dentin interfaces in 3D.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, E; Cardoso, M V; Fernandes, C P; Neves, A A; Gouvea, C V D; Van Landuyt, K L; De Munck, J; Van Meerbeek, B

    2011-08-01

    In spite of its role in the degradation of tooth-biomaterial interfaces, reports on nanoleakage are largely inconsistent. The aim of this work was to assess nanoleakage patterns qualitatively and quantitatively in 3D, to determine the influence of direction, position, and inclination of the field-of-view. Therefore, we applied a gold-standard 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive to bur-cut dentin surfaces, after which interface samples were sectioned, infiltrated with an ammoniacal silver-nitrate solution, and embedded by common TEM procedures. High-resolution 3D models of interfaces were then generated by FIB and electron tomography, following strict conditions determined by Monte Carlo simulations. Inverted images in FIB tomography disclosed morphological characteristics analogous to those revealed by TEM. Quantitative analysis revealed large variations in silver-nitrate uptake between 2D image projections in different directions. Furthermore, silver-nitrate fractions in individual 2D image projections were seldom related to the total 3D volumetric fraction. Electron tomography showed that inclination also affected the morphology of silver-nitrate patterns. In conclusion, conventional nanoleakage evaluation is heavily influenced by direction, position, and inclination of the field-of-view, and thus may contain artifacts. PMID:21586664

  7. Selective excavation of decalcified dentin using a mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser: wavelength dependency in the 6 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-07-01

    Selective caries treatment has been anticipated as an essential application of dentistry. In clinic, some lasers have already realized the optical drilling of dental hard tissue. However, conventional lasers lack the selectivity, and still depend on the dentist's ability. Based on the absorption property of carious dentin, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for excavation. The objective of this study is to develop a selective excavation of carious dentin by using the laser ablation with 6 μm wavelength range. A mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The wavelength was tuned around the absorption bands called amide 1 and amide 2. In the wavelength range from 5.75 to 6.60 μm, the difference of ablation depth between demineralized and normal dentin was observed. The wavelength at 6.02 μm and the average power density of 15 W/cm2, demineralized dentin was removed selectively with less-invasive effect on normal dentin. The wavelength at 6.42 μm required the increase of average power density, but also showed the possibility of selective ablation. This study provided a valuable insight into a wavelength choice for a novel dental laser device under development for minimal intervention dentistry.

  8. Mineralization of dentin induced by treatment with bioactive glass S53P4 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Forsback, Ari-Pekka; Areva, Sami; Salonen, Jukka I

    2004-02-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity can be managed to occlude dentin tubules, but none of the agents used are components of natural dentin. Using a calcium phosphate precipitation (CPP) method, dentin tubules can be occluded with a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer similar to the major inorganic component of dentin. The CPP method utilizes acidic pH conditions, such as etching of dentin, over the course of several dental treatments. A gentler method can be used to produce a CaP layer on the surface of dentin. By treating with bioactive glass S53P4 (BAG), or regular commercial glass (CG), mineralization occurs in physiologically neutral solutions such as simulated body fluid (SBF) and remineralization solution (RMS). After a short period of immersion, silica is dissolved from both types of glass, but the amount of silica released is much greater from BAG than from CG. The dissolved silica is adsorbed on the surface of dentin during the pretreatment procedure and enhances the mineralization of dentin in SBF. After 14 days' mineralization the dentin is fully covered by the CaP layer, but after 14 days' immersion in RMS decalcification of the dentin occurs. Pretreatment with BAG decreases the degree of decalcification of dentin during the mineralization process. These findings suggest that bioactive glass S53P4 can be used as a therapeutic material for mineralization of dentin and its tubules in a physiological environment. PMID:15124778

  9. The effect of IDS (immediate dentin sealing) on dentin bond strength under various thermocycling periods

    PubMed Central

    Leesungbok, Richard; Lee, Sang-Min; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Suk-Won; Lee, Do Yun; Im, Byung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) on bond strength of ceramic restoration under various thermocycling periods with DBA (dentin bonding agent system). MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty freshly extracted human mandibular third molars were divided into 5 groups (1 control and 4 experimental groups) of 10 teeth. We removed enamel layer of sound teeth and embedded them which will proceed to be IDS, using All Bond II. A thermocycling was applied to experimental groups for 1, 2, 7, 14 days respectively and was not applied to control group. IPS Empress II for ceramic was acid-etched with ceramic etchant (9.5% HF) and silane was applied. Each ceramic disc was bonded to specimens with Duo-link, dual curable resin cement by means of light curing for 100 seconds. After the cementation procedures, shear bond strength measurement and SEM analysis of the fractured surface were done. The data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences between 4 experimental groups and control group, however the mean value started to decrease in group 7d, and group 14d showed the lowest mean bond strength in all groups. Also, group 7d and 14d showed distinct exposed dentin and collapsed hybrid layer was observed in SEM analysis. CONCLUSION In the present study, it can be concluded that ceramic restorations like a laminate veneer restoration should be bonded using resin cement within one week after IDS procedure. PMID:26140174

  10. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Fons-Font, Antonio; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesive requiring acid etching, and Clearfil SE Bond® (Kuraray), two-bottle self-etching adhesive. The vestibular, lingual, distal and mesial surfaces of ten molars (n=10) were ground to remove all enamel and 40 ceramic samples were cemented with Variolink II® (Ivoclar Vivadent). Half the molar surfaces were treated to create round microretention (pits) to determine whether these could influence bond strength to dentin. The 40 molar surfaces were divided into four groups (n=10): Optibond FL (O); Clearfil SE (C); Optibond FL + microretention (OM); Clearfil SE + micro retention (CM). A shear bond test was performed and the bond failures provoked examined under an optical microscope. Results O=35.27±8.02 MPa; C=36.23±11.23 MPa; OM=28.61±6.27 MPa; CM=27.01±7.57 MPa. No statistically significant differences were found between the adhesives. Optibond FL showed less statistical dispersion than Clearfil SE. The presence of microretentions reduced bond strength values regardless of the adhesive used. Conclusions 1. Clearfil SE self-etching adhesive and Optibond FL acid-etch showed adequate bond strengths and can be recommended for bonding ceramic restorations to dentin. 2. The creation of round microretention pits compromises these adhesives’ bond strength to dentin. Key words:Adhesion to dentin, bonding agent, Optibond FL, Clearfil SE, microretention, shear bond test. PMID:26330937

  11. Influence of handpiece maintenance sprays on resin bonding to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Toyotarou; Kameyama, Atsushi; Haruyama, Akiko; Oishi, Takumi; Kukidome, Nobuyuki; Takase, Yasuaki; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of maintenance spray on resin bonding to dentin. Materials and methods The crown of extracted, caries-free human molars was transversally sectioned with a model trimmer to prepare the dentin surfaces from mid-coronal sound dentin, and then uniformly abraded with #600 silicon carbide paper. The dentin surfaces were randomly divided into three groups: oil-free spray group where maintenance cleaner for air bearing handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; oil-containing spray group where maintenance cleaner for micro motor handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; and control group where the surface was rinsed with water spray for 30 s and then air-dried. These surfaces were then bonded with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical), and resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray Medical) build-up crowns were incrementally constructed on the bonded surfaces. After storage for 24 h in 37°C water, the bonded teeth were sectioned into hour-glass shaped slices (0.7-mm thick) perpendicular to the bonded surfaces. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test. Results Maintenance spray-contaminated specimens (oil-free and oil-containing spray groups) showed significantly lower μTBS than control specimens (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the spray-contaminated groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion Maintenance spray significantly reduces the bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond to dentin. PMID:23662078

  12. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  13. Temperature change, dentinal fluid flow and cuspal displacement during resin composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Ratih, D N; Palamara, J E A; Messer, H H

    2007-09-01

    Dentin-bonding agents and resin composite materials typically require light activation for polymerization. Light curing generates heat, which may influence dentinal fluid flow (DFF) and cuspal displacement. This study investigated the relationship among temperature increase, DFF and cuspal displacement in extracted human maxillary premolars with a mesial occlusal distal (MOD) cavity preparation. Two types of curing light were compared. Temperature changes were measured using thermocouples located on the occlusal cavity floor and at the pulp-dentine junction, during polymerization of bonding agent and resin composite material. DFF and cuspal displacement were measured simultaneously using automated flow measurement apparatus and direct current differential transformers respectively. Temperature increases of up to 15 degrees C were recorded during the restoration procedures. A quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) unit produced a significantly greater temperature increase than a light-emitting diode unit and curing of the bonding agent generated less temperature increase than curing of the resin composite. Heating due to exothermic reaction during polymerization of bonding agent and resin was not significantly different between light sources or between bonding and curing (P > 0.05). The QTH unit produced both greater inward fluid flow and cuspal displacement during the irradiation of bonding agent and resin composite than the light-emitting diode unit. There was not a simple relationship between temperature increase, fluid movement and cuspal displacement. From a clinical point of view, the light-emitting diode unit can be considered preferable to the QTH light, because it caused significantly smaller temperature increase, fluid shift and cuspal displacement. PMID:17716269

  14. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin. PMID:24642975

  15. Untreated cavitated dentine lesions: impact on children's quality of life.

    PubMed

    Leal, S C; Bronkhorst, E M; Fan, M; Frencken, J E

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to assess the impact of dental caries prevalence and the consequences of untreated cavitated dentine lesions on quality of life of 6- and 7-year-old Brazilian children. A total of 826 schoolchildren were assessed using ICDAS and pufa (to score consequences of dental caries on soft tissues) indices. History of extraction and toothache was recorded. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed using the Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (B-ECOHIS). A multiple logistic regression model was used to analyze the relationship between the prevalence of dentine carious lesions, pufa, history of extraction and toothache with the B-ECOHIS scores. A total of 587 questionnaires were analyzed. The prevalence of cavitated dentine lesions and pufa was 74.8 and 26.2%, respectively. Some 21.8% of children reported toothache and 9.2% had had at least one tooth extraction. The chance (OR) for children with cavitated dentine lesions, pufa ≥1, history of extraction and toothache of having higher B-ECOHIS scores than those not affected was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.18-3.06), 6.26 (95% CI: 3.63-10.83), 6.87 (95% CI: 2.75-17.16) and 3.68 (95% CI: 2.12-6.39), respectively. Children's quality of life was negatively influenced by untreated cavitated dentine lesions and their consequences. PMID:22398411

  16. Impact of protease inhibitors on dentin matrix degradation by collagenase.

    PubMed

    Kato, M T; Leite, A L; Hannas, A R; Calabria, M P; Magalhães, A C; Pereira, J C; Buzalaf, M A R

    2012-12-01

    This proof-of-concept study assessed whether the reduction of the degradation of the demineralized organic matrix (DOM) by pre-treatment with protease inhibitors (PI) is effective against dentin matrix loss. Bovine dentin slices were demineralized with 0.87 M citric acid, pH 2.3, for 36 hrs. In sequence, specimens were treated or not (UT, untreated) for 1 min with gels containing epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG, 400 µM), chlorhexidine (CHX, 0.012%), FeSO(4) (1 mM), NaF (1.23%), or no active compound (P, placebo). Specimens were then stored in artificial saliva (5 days, 37°C) with the addition of collagenase (Clostridium histolyticum, 100 U/mL). We analyzed collagen degradation by assaying hydroxyproline (HYP) in the incubation solutions (n = 5) and evaluated the dentin matrix loss by profilometry (n = 12). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Treatment with gels containing EGCG, CHX, or FeSO(4) led to significantly lower HYP concentrations in solution and dentin matrix loss when compared with the other treatments. These results strongly suggest that the preventive effects of the PI tested against dentin erosion are due to their ability to reduce the degradation of the DOM. PMID:23023765

  17. Penetration of smeared or nonsmeared dentine by Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Chandler, N P; Jenkinson, H F

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the penetration of smeared and nonsmeared dentine by Streptococcus gordonii. Prepared human roots, grouped as either nonsmeared or smeared, were immersed in a suspension of S. gordonii cells for 3 weeks. The roots were then prepared for scanning electron microscopy and histological analysis. Dentine discs prepared from coronal dentine were grouped similarly. Using a fluid filtration apparatus, the hydraulic conductance (Lp) of each disc was determined before and after incubation with bacterial suspension. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the roots following infection with bacteria showed no change in the smear layer (P < 0.0001). Histological sections revealed that bacterial penetration of all the nonsmeared samples had occurred, while nine out of 10 smeared samples showed no bacterial penetration (P < 0.0001). The Lp of the nonsmeared discs was significantly reduced by 42% (P < 0.0001) after bacterial penetration. However, the smeared samples revealed a 1% reduction in Lp which was not significant (P > 0.05). The results suggest that dentinal smear layers are an effective barrier to dentinal tubule invasion by S. gordonii. PMID:9206406

  18. Assessment of dentin remineralization with PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manesh, Saman K.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image natural root caries lesions, measure non-destructively the severity of dentin demineralization and determine the efficacy of intervention with anti-caries agents including fluoride and lasers. The objective of this study was to determine if PS-OCT could be used to nondestructively measure the formation of a layer of remineralized dentin on the surface of dentin lesions after exposure to a remineralization solution. In this study images of artificial dentin lesions on extracted human teeth were acquired using PS-OCT after exposure to an artificial demineralizing solution at pH 4.9 for six days and after subsequent exposure to a remineralizing solution at pH 7.0 for 20 days. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography were used to examine histological thin sections from the samples for comparison. PS-OCT successfully measured the formation of a layer of increased mineral content near the lesion surface. PLM and TMR corroborated those results. This study demonstrates the potential use of PS-OCT for the nondestructive measurement of the remineralization of dentin surfaces.

  19. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration. PMID:18037654

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitors epigenetically promote reparative events in primary dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Henry F.; Smith, Anthony J.; Fleming, Garry J.P.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2013-06-10

    Application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) to cells epigenetically alters their chromatin structure and induces transcriptional and cellular reparative events. This study investigated the application of two HDACi, valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA) on the induction of repair-associated responses in primary dental pulp cell (DPC) cultures. Flow cytometry demonstrated that TSA (100 nM, 400 nM) significantly increased cell viability. Neither HDACi was cytotoxic, although cell growth analysis revealed significant anti-proliferative effects at higher concentrations for VPA (>0.5 mM) and TSA (>50 nM). While high-content-analysis demonstrated that HDACi did not significantly induce caspase-3 or p21 activity, p53-expression was increased by VPA (3 mM, 5 mM) at 48 h. HDACi-exposure induced mineralization per cell dose-dependently to a plateau level (VPA-0.125 mM and TSA-25 nM) with accompanying increases in mineralization/dentinogenic-associated gene expression at 5 days (DMP-1, BMP-2/-4, Nestin) and 10 days (DSPP, BMP-2/-4). Both HDACis, at a range of concentrations, significantly stimulated osteopontin and BMP-2 protein expression at 10 and 14 days further supporting the ability of HDACi to promote differentiation. HDACi exert different effects on primary compared with transformed DPCs and promote mineralization and differentiation events without cytotoxic effects. These novel data now highlight the potential in restorative dentistry for applying low concentrations of HDACi in vital pulp treatment. -- Highlights: • Valproic acid and trichostatin A promoted mineralization in primary pulp cells. • Cell viability, apoptosis, caspase-3, p21 unaltered; p53 increased by valproic acid. • Trichostatin A increased cell viability at 24 h at selected concentrations. • Altered cell toxicity and differentiation between primary and transformed cells. • HDACi-induced the differentiation marker proteins osteopontin and BMP-2.

  1. A New Method to Stabilize C-Kit Expression in Reparative Cardiac Mesenchymal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wysoczynski, Marcin; Dassanayaka, Sujith; Zafir, Ayesha; Ghafghazi, Shahab; Long, Bethany W.; Noble, Camille; DeMartino, Angelica M.; Brittian, Kenneth R.; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy improves cardiac function. Few cells have been investigated more extensively or consistently shown to be more effective than c-kit sorted cells; however, c-kit expression is easily lost during passage. Here, our primary goal was to develop an improved method to isolate c-kitpos cells and maintain c-kit expression after passaging. Cardiac mesenchymal cells (CMCs) from wild-type mice were selected by polystyrene adherence properties. CMCs adhering within the first hours are referred to as rapidly adherent (RA); CMCs adhering subsequently are dubbed slowly adherent (SA). Both RA and SA CMCs were c-kit sorted. SA CMCs maintained significantly higher c-kit expression than RA cells; SA CMCs also had higher expression endothelial markers. We subsequently tested the relative efficacy of SA vs. RA CMCs in the setting of post-infarct adoptive transfer. Two days after coronary occlusion, vehicle, RA CMCs, or SA CMCs were delivered percutaneously with echocardiographic guidance. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, significantly improved cardiac function compared to vehicle treatment. Although the mechanism remains to be elucidated, the more pronounced endothelial phenotype of the SA CMCs coupled with the finding of increased vascular density suggest a potential pro-vasculogenic action. This new method of isolating CMCs better preserves c-kit expression during passage. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, were effective in reducing cardiac dysfunction. Although c-kit expression was maintained, it is unclear whether maintenance of c-kit expression per se was responsible for improved function, or whether the differential adherence property itself confers a reparative phenotype independently of c-kit. PMID:27536657

  2. Possible involvement of inflammatory/reparative processes in the development of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Protic, Olga; Toti, Paolo; Islam, Md Soriful; Occhini, Rossella; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Catherino, William H; Cinti, Saverio; Petraglia, Felice; Ciavattini, Andrea; Castellucci, Mario; Hinz, Boris; Ciarmela, Pasquapina

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors in the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. The most common histological type is the "usual leiomyoma", characterized by overexpression of ECM proteins, whereas the "cellular type" has higher cellular content. Our objective is to investigate the involvement of inflammatory and reparative processes in leiomyoma pathobiology. Using a morphological approach, we investigate the presence of inflammatory cells. Next, we determine the localization of the ECM, the presence/absence of fibrotic cells via α-sma and desmin and the immunohistochemical profile of the mesenchymal cells with respect to CD34. Finally, we explore the effect of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, GM-CSF and IFN-γ) on pro-fibrotic factor activin A mRNA expression in vitro. Higher numbers of macrophages were found inside and close to leiomyomas as compared to the more distant myometrium. Cellular leiomyomas showed more macrophages and mast cells than the "usual type". Inside the fibroid tissue, we found cells positive for α-sma, but negative for desmin and a large amount of collagen surrounding the nodule, suggestive of myofibroblasts producing ECM. In the myometrium and leiomyomas of the "usual type", we identified numerous CD34+ fibroblasts, which are known to give rise to myofibroblasts upon loss of CD34 expression. In leiomyomas of the "cellular type", stromal fibroblasts were CD34-negative. Finally, we found that TNF-α increased activin A mRNA in myometrial and leiomyoma cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the presence of inflammatory cells in uterine leiomyomas, which may contribute to excessive ECM production, tissue remodeling and leiomyoma growth. PMID:26613601

  3. A New Method to Stabilize C-Kit Expression in Reparative Cardiac Mesenchymal Cells.

    PubMed

    Wysoczynski, Marcin; Dassanayaka, Sujith; Zafir, Ayesha; Ghafghazi, Shahab; Long, Bethany W; Noble, Camille; DeMartino, Angelica M; Brittian, Kenneth R; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy improves cardiac function. Few cells have been investigated more extensively or consistently shown to be more effective than c-kit sorted cells; however, c-kit expression is easily lost during passage. Here, our primary goal was to develop an improved method to isolate c-kit(pos) cells and maintain c-kit expression after passaging. Cardiac mesenchymal cells (CMCs) from wild-type mice were selected by polystyrene adherence properties. CMCs adhering within the first hours are referred to as rapidly adherent (RA); CMCs adhering subsequently are dubbed slowly adherent (SA). Both RA and SA CMCs were c-kit sorted. SA CMCs maintained significantly higher c-kit expression than RA cells; SA CMCs also had higher expression endothelial markers. We subsequently tested the relative efficacy of SA vs. RA CMCs in the setting of post-infarct adoptive transfer. Two days after coronary occlusion, vehicle, RA CMCs, or SA CMCs were delivered percutaneously with echocardiographic guidance. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, significantly improved cardiac function compared to vehicle treatment. Although the mechanism remains to be elucidated, the more pronounced endothelial phenotype of the SA CMCs coupled with the finding of increased vascular density suggest a potential pro-vasculogenic action. This new method of isolating CMCs better preserves c-kit expression during passage. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, were effective in reducing cardiac dysfunction. Although c-kit expression was maintained, it is unclear whether maintenance of c-kit expression per se was responsible for improved function, or whether the differential adherence property itself confers a reparative phenotype independently of c-kit. PMID:27536657

  4. Anti-proteolytic capacity and bonding durability of proanthocyanidin-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui-Rui; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Ling; Tang, Cheng-Fang; Dou, Qi; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that biomodification of demineralized dentin collagen with proanthocyanidin (PA) for a clinically practical duration improves the mechanical properties of the dentin matrix and the immediate resin–dentin bond strength. The present study sought to evaluate the ability of PA biomodification to reduce collagenase-induced biodegradation of demineralized dentin matrix and dentin/adhesive interfaces in a clinically relevant manner. The effects of collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on PA-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix were analysed by hydroxyproline assay and gelatin zymography. Then, resin-/dentin-bonded specimens were prepared and challenged with bacterial collagenases. Dentin treated with 2% chlorhexidine and untreated dentin were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. Collagen biodegradation, the microtensile bond strengths of bonded specimens and the micromorphologies of the fractured interfaces were assessed. The results revealed that both collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on demineralized dentin were notably inhibited in the PA-biomodified groups, irrespective of PA concentration and biomodification duration. When challenged with exogenous collagenases, PA-biomodified bonded specimens exhibited significantly less biodegradation and maintained higher bond strengths than the untreated control. These results suggest that PA biomodification was effective at inhibiting proteolytic activity on demineralized dentin matrix and at stabilizing the adhesive/dentin interface against enzymatic degradation, is a new concept that has the potential to improve bonding durability. PMID:24810807

  5. The Difference of Structural State and Deformation Behavior between Teenage and Mature Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Panfilov, Peter; Zaytsev, Dmitry; Antonova, Olga V.; Alpatova, Victoria; Kiselnikova, Larissa P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The cause of considerable elasticity and plasticity of human dentin is discussed in the relationship with its microstructure. Methods. Structural state of teenage and mature human dentin is examined by using XRD and TEM techniques, and their deformation behavior under compression is studied as well. Result. XRD study has shown that crystallographic type of calcium hydroxyapatite in human dentin (calcium hydrogen phosphate hydroxide Ca9HPO4(PO4)5OH; Space Group P63/m (176); a = 9,441 A; c = 6,881 A; c/a = 0,729; Crystallite (Scherrer) 200 A) is the same for these age groups. In both cases, dentin matrix is X-ray amorphous. According to TEM examination, there are amorphous and ultrafine grain phases in teenage and mature dentin. Mature dentin is stronger on about 20% than teenage dentin, while teenage dentin is more elastic on about 20% but is less plastic on about 15% than mature dentin. Conclusion. The amorphous phase is dominant in teenage dentin, whereas the ultrafine grain phase becomes dominant in mature dentin. Mechanical properties of human dentin under compression depend on its structural state, too. PMID:26989416

  6. The Difference of Structural State and Deformation Behavior between Teenage and Mature Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Panfilov, Peter; Zaytsev, Dmitry; Antonova, Olga V; Alpatova, Victoria; Kiselnikova, Larissa P

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The cause of considerable elasticity and plasticity of human dentin is discussed in the relationship with its microstructure. Methods. Structural state of teenage and mature human dentin is examined by using XRD and TEM techniques, and their deformation behavior under compression is studied as well. Result. XRD study has shown that crystallographic type of calcium hydroxyapatite in human dentin (calcium hydrogen phosphate hydroxide Ca9HPO4(PO4)5OH; Space Group P63/m (176); a = 9,441 A; c = 6,881 A; c/a = 0,729; Crystallite (Scherrer) 200 A) is the same for these age groups. In both cases, dentin matrix is X-ray amorphous. According to TEM examination, there are amorphous and ultrafine grain phases in teenage and mature dentin. Mature dentin is stronger on about 20% than teenage dentin, while teenage dentin is more elastic on about 20% but is less plastic on about 15% than mature dentin. Conclusion. The amorphous phase is dominant in teenage dentin, whereas the ultrafine grain phase becomes dominant in mature dentin. Mechanical properties of human dentin under compression depend on its structural state, too. PMID:26989416

  7. Resistance of dentin coating materials against abrasion by toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Gando, Iori; Ariyoshi, Meu; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Thin-film coating of root dentin surface by all-in-one adhesives has been shown to be an effective option to prevent root surface caries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear resistance against toothbrush abrasion of two all-in-one coating materials; Shield Force (SF) and Hybrid Coat (HC). Bovine dentin surfaces were covered with one of the coating materials; SF or HC. After storage in water for 24 h, the testing surface was subjected to the toothbrush abrasion test up to 50,000 cycles either in water or toothpaste slurry. The remaining thickness of the coating material was measured using SEM. Toothpaste slurry significantly increased rate of tooth brush abrasion of the coating materials. While SF and HC wore at a similar pace under toothbrush abrasion, SF had a thicker coat and could protect dentin longer, up to 50,000 cycles. PMID:23370872

  8. Pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George TJ

    2009-01-01

    Dental pulp tissue is vulnerable to infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection – commonly known as root-canal therapy. Regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. However, with the advent of the concept of modern tissue engineering and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the early attempts to regenerate pulp tissue and the current endeavor of pulp and dentin tissue engineering, and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:19761395

  9. Pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration: current progress.

    PubMed

    Huang, George T J

    2009-09-01

    Dental pulp tissue is vulnerable to infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection - commonly known as root-canal therapy. Regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. However, with the advent of the concept of modern tissue engineering and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the early attempts to regenerate pulp tissue and the current endeavor of pulp and dentin tissue engineering, and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:19761395

  10. Microleakage in MOD resin composite with three dentin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Nakamoto, D K

    1989-11-01

    The extent of microleakage under MOD composites was studied when an aluminum oxalate dentin bonding agent (Tenure), a phosphonated resin bonding agent (Bondlite), and a glass-ionomer cement (Ketac Silver) were used. Three groups of 10 extracted molars were prepared with MOD cavities; one box ended on enamel, the other on cementum. In Group 1, Bondlite was applied to dentin and etched enamel before the sample was restored with a light-cured hybrid composite. In Group 2, a 2-mm increment of Ketac Silver was placed in each box before Bondlite and composite. In Group 3, Tenure was applied to dentin before being restored. Teeth were thermal-cycled, stained in silver nitrate, sectioned, and scored for microleakage. Microleakage along the gingival floor was significantly less at enamel margins than at cementum margins in all three groups. All groups showed severe marginal microleakage on cementum. PMID:2700971

  11. Excimer laser interaction with dentin of the human tooth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Gilliam, Ruth L.; Baker, George R.

    1989-01-01

    The use an excimer laser produced many unusual conical structures within the dentin of the inner part of the human tooth. By varying the frequency of the laser one can disperse the energy and cause more bleeding in laser surgery, but not destroy the cells associated with the incision. Therefore, the healing process will virtually be without scarring. Whereas, using the infrared laser the blood loss would be less, but the healing process would tend to be longer because cells are being destroyed due to the cauterization effect of the laser. The question is, are these structures produced as an interaction with the laser or are they an intrinsic part of the structure. The effects of the laser interaction upon dentin was studied, and in using electron microscopy the interaction of the excimer laser upon the tooth dentin and other various biological tissue is more clearly understood.

  12. Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment; A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Davari, AR; Ataei, E; Assarzadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to inform practitioners about dentin hypersensitivity (DH); to provide a brief overview of the diagnosis, etiology and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity and to discuss technical approaches to relieve sensitivity. This clinical information is described in the context of the underlying biology. The author used PUBMED to find relevant English-language literature published in the period 1999 to 2010. The author used combinations of the search terms “dentin*”, “tooth”, “teeth”, “hypersensit*”, “desensitiz*”. Abstracts and also full text articles to identify studies describing etiology, prevalence, clinical features, controlled clinical trials of treatments and relevant laboratory research on mechanisms of action were used. PMID:24724135

  13. Temperature changes across CO2-lased dentin during multiple exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariasen, Kenneth L.; Barron, Joseph R.; Boran, Thomas L.

    1990-06-01

    The literature increasingly indicates that lasers will have a multitude of applications for dental hard tissue procedures, e.g. preventive therapy, caries removal, laser etching and endodontic therapy. However, it is critical that such laser therapies avoid the production of heat levels which will be damaging to the surrounding vital tissues, such as the dental pulp and periodontal tissues. Our preliminary research on temperature changes across C02 lased dentin indicated that for single preventive therapeutic exposures (1.2 W., 0. 1 sec., 1.0 mm focal spot) the mean temperature rise across 350 j.tm of dentin was 0.57 0C while across 1000 .tm of dentin the mean rise was only 0.18 °C. Further research utilizing multiple preventive therapeutic exposures (1.2 W., 0. 1 sec., 1.0 mm focal spot, 3 x 1.0 sec. intervals) showed mean temperature elevations of 1.56 0C across 350 m of dentin and 0.66 O across 1000 xm of dentin. While these temperature elevations, which would be associated with preventive therapy, are very low and would be biologically acceptable, it must be noted that exposures of higher intensities are required to fuse enamel and porcelain, or remove decay. This current research investigates temperature elevations which occuT during C02 lasing utilizing the following exposure parameters: 8.0 W., 1.0 mm focal spot, 0.1 sec. exposures, 2 or 4 exposures per site pulsed 1.0 sec. apart. Three dentin thicknesses were utilized, i.e. 1000 jim, 1500 p.tm and 2000 .tm. Four sections of each thickness were utilized with four exposure sites per specimen (2 with 2 exposures, 2 with 4 exposures). All dentin sections were prepared from non-carious third molars using a hard tissue microtome. A thermistor was placed on the dentin surface opposite each lased site and temperature changes were recorded for approximately 50 sec. following lasing. Mean temperature elevations ranged from a high of 3.07 C for the 1000 xm section utilizing four exposures to a low of 0.37 0C for the

  14. Removal of organic debris from bovine dentin shavings.

    PubMed

    Kamburis, J J; Barker, T H; Barfield, R D; Eleazer, P D

    2003-09-01

    A common problem with root canal failures is chronic inflammation at the apex caused by overfilling of root canal materials. Dentin filings have been suggested as an apical plug to create a biocompatible barrier between the filling material and the periapical tissue. Unfortunately residual organic material, such as pulp remnants or bacteria, still may be part of the filings. Dentin filings removed from the tooth, cleaned, and then used to form a barrier might serve as an effective barrier. The purpose of this study was to evaluate methods of cleaning dentin of organic debris. NaOCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and 1% Triton X-100 were used to treat dentin shavings and were evaluated by a micro bicinchoninic acid protein analysis assay. Two series of experiments were performed. One compared the effect of temperature while using phosphate-buffered saline as a control and the second compared exposure times. The percentage of protein extracted from dentin samples increased with temperature. Sodium hypochlorite at room temperature extracted 24.6%, NaOCl at 37 degrees C extracted 26.9%, and NaOCl at 70 degrees C extracted 33.9%. Only NaOCl at 37 degrees C and 70 degrees C showed statistically significant differences from phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature with p-values of 0.028 and 0.019, respectively. The exposure time series showed a difference between a phosphate-buffered saline solution and 6.25% NaOCl. NaOCl removed approximately 90% of protein compared with 60% for the phosphate-buffered saline. A 10-min exposure to 70 degrees C 6.25% NaOCl may be an efficient means of removing organic material from dentin shavings. PMID:14503826

  15. Anacardic acid from brazilian cashew nut trees reduces dentine erosion.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Cintia; Oliveira, Flávia; Dos Santos, Maria Lucilia; de Freitas, Thiago; Imparato, José Carlos; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of solutions containing saturated anacardic acid (AA) on dentine erosion in vitro. AA was chemically isolated from natural cashew nutshell liquid obtained by continuous extraction in a Soxhlet extractor and was fully saturated by catalytic hydrogenation. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity, when exposed to buffers containing 100 µmol/l AA, was analyzed using zymography. Bovine root samples were subjected to erosive demineralization (Sprite Zero™, 4 × 90 s/day) and remineralization with artificial saliva between the erosive cycles for 5 days. The samples were treated as follows, after the first and the last acid exposure (1 min; n = 12/group): (1) 100 µmol/l epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (positive control); (2) 0.05% NaF; (3) 100 µmol/l saturated AA; (4) saturated AA and EGCG; (5) saturated AA, EGCG and NaF; (6) untreated (negative control). Dentine erosion was measured using a contact profilometer. Two dentine samples from each group were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Saturated AA reduced the activity of MMP-2. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed that all treatments significantly reduced dentine loss compared to the negative control (6.03 ± 0.98 µm). Solutions containing saturated AA (1.97 ± 1.02 µm) showed the greatest reduction in dentine erosion compared to the NaF (3.93 ± 1.54 µm) and EGCG (3.79 ± 0.83 µm) solutions. Therefore, it may be concluded that AA significantly reduces dentine erosion in vitro, possibly by acting as an MMP-2 inhibitor. PMID:24993776

  16. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Suryakumari, Nujella B. P.; Reddy, P. Satyanarayana; Surender, L. R.; Kiran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems — (the V generation) at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system — (Adper Single Bond) was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated); Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE) was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III) and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V) if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III) the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength. PMID:22090757

  17. Evaluation Of The Shear Bond Strength Between Dentin And Dental Luting Cement Following Dentin Surface Treatment By 980 Nm Diode Laser And Desensitizing Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, T.; Gheith, M.

    2011-09-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is described clinically as an exaggerated response to non-noxious sensory stimuli. Current treatment is concentrating on two approaches; to occlude the dentinal tubules or to block neural transmission. This is achieved through using dentin desensitizers and low power lasers. Forty eight freshly extracted human molar teeth were used in this study and divided equally into three groups. Group 1) control group, group 2) laser treated dentin surface group, and group 3) desensitizing agent dentin surface group. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of laser treated group showed melted globules, no carbonization, recrystalization and crystal growth of the apatite in some areas. In diode laser dentin surface treated group showed the highest shear bond strength mean value.

  18. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 in Human Caries Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, C.; Galanti, C.; Musumeci, G.; Rusu, M.C.; Leonardi, R.

    2014-01-01

    The immunoexpression profile of matrix metalloproteinase-13 was investigated for the first time in dentin of human caries and healthy teeth. Twelve permanent premolars (10 caries and 2 sound) were decalcified in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and processed for embedding in paraffin wax. Sections 3-4 µm in thickness were cut and processed for immunohistochemistry. A mouse monoclonal anti-metalloproteinase-13 antibody was used for localisation using an immunoperoxidase technique. Dentinal immunoreactivity was detected in all teeth; it was weak in sound teeth and strong close to the caries area. These in vivo findings suggest a role for metalloproteinase-13 in the development and progression of adult human dental tissue disorders. PMID:24704999

  19. Rate of permeation of isotopes through human dentin, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H; Livingston, M J; Outhwaite, W C

    1977-01-01

    A simple in vitro method has been described for quantitatively measuring the rate at which isotopically labeled substances permeate through dentin in occlusal cavity preparations. The presence or absence of pulp tissue had only a minor effect on the kinetics of permeation. As the dentin was made thinner there was a resulting increase in the rate of iodide permeation. The relative rates of permeation were 3H2O greater than 131I greater than 99mTc greater than 14C-urea, a sequence that follows the molecular dimensions of these substances. PMID:264870

  20. Dentine lead and child intelligence in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, M B; Wang, J D; Soong, W T

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that lead is a developmental neurotoxin, but, because many factors influence a child's development, a safe level of lead for children is still not clear. In this study, personal lead exposure was assessed. A total of 940 deciduous teeth--mostly incisors--was collected from 764 children in grades 1-3 who attended 7 primary schools. Two of the primary schools were near smelters, 4 were in Taipei City, and 1 was located in a coastal village. Teachers were provided with a questionnaire about classroom performance, and 97% completed and returned the questionnaire to the laboratory. Parents were given a questionnaire about family background, pregnancy, and health history (92% returned). Dentine lead levels of shed incisors for children in Taipei City were higher than levels reported in Boston, i.e., mean (standard deviation) of 4.4 (3.5) versus 3.3 (2.5) micrograms/g, respectively (p less than .001). The lead values were significantly higher in children who attended school near a smelter than in children who attended school in Taipei City: 6.3 (3.3) (p less than .001). The mean lead levels in children who attended school in a coastal village was 5.1 (2.8). The ranges for all schools overlapped, which indicated that there were multiple lead sources. Intelligence scores from Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices Test were negatively correlated with lead levels, especially among girls and among children whose parents had less education. We adjusted for other risk factors--most notably parental education, which correlates inversely with lead levels--and found that the role of the lead term was lowered but not eliminated. PMID:1772260

  1. Optical properties of human radicular dentin: ATR-FTIR characterization and dentine tubule direction influence on radicular post adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Jose; Zamataro, Claudia B.; Benetti, Carolina; Dias, Derly A.; Blay, Alberto; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge of dental structures is essential for understanding of laser interaction and its consequences during adhesion processes. Tubule density in dentin ranges from 4.900 to 90.000 per mm2, for diameters from 1 to 3 μm. Light propagation inside the tubules is associated with tubules orientation. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous work in literature characterizing physical-chemical alterations in dentin. The dentin samples were irradiated with a Er,Cr:YSGG Laser at wavelength 2.78 μm, with an energy density of 9.46 J/cm2 , above the ablation threshold. ATRFTIR at wavenumbers 2000 to 700 cm-1 was used to evaluate the differences among third root region and tubules orientation.

  2. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P < 0.05) applied for multiple paired comparisons. Results. The shear bond strength results for group A to E ranged from 6.94 ± 1.53 to 10.03 ± 3.50 MPa. One-way ANOVA demonstrated a difference (P < 0.05) between the groups tested and the Tukey HSD demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) difference between the shear bond strength (SBS) of Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A–D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control. PMID:22287963

  3. Mechanisms Regulating the Degradation of Dentin Matrices by Endogenous Dentin Proteases and their Role in Dental Adhesion. A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Camila; Pashley, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This systematic review provides an overview of the different mechanisms proposed to regulate the degradation of dentin matrices bye host-derived dentin proteases, particularly as it relates to their role in dental adhesion. Methods Significant developments have taken place over the last few years that have contributed to a better understanding of all the factors affecting the durability of adhesive resin restorations. The complexity of dentin-resin interfaces mandates a thorough understanding of all the mechanical, physical and biochemical aspects that play a role in the formation of hybrid layers. The ionic and hydrophilic nature of current dental adhesives yields permeable, unstable hybrid layers susceptible to water sorption, hydrolytic degradation and resin leaching. The hydrolytic activity of host-derived proteases also contributes to the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds. Preservation of the collagen matrix is critical to the improvement of resin-dentin bond durability. Approaches to regulate collagenolytic activity of dentin proteases have been the subject of extensive research in the last few years. A shift has occurred from the use of proteases inhibitors to the use of collagen cross-linking agents. Data provided by fifty-one studies published in peer-reviewed journals between January 1999 and December 2013 was compiled in this systematic review. Results Appraisal of the data provided by the studies included in the present review yielded a summary of the mechanisms which have already proven to be clinically successful and those which need further investigation before new clinical protocols can be adopted. PMID:25831604

  4. Age-related ransparent root dentin: mineral concentration,crystallite size and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, John H.; Nalla, Ravi K.; Pople, John A.; Breunig, Tom M.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2004-12-29

    Many fractures occur in teeth that have been altered, forexample restored or endodontically repaired. It is therefore essential toevaluate the structure and mechanical properties of these altereddentins. One such altered form of dentin is transparent (sometimes calledsclerotic) dentin, which forms gradually with aging. The present studyfocuses on differences in the structure and mechanical properties ofnormal versus transparent dentin. The mineral concentration, as measuredby X-ray computed microtomography, was signifcantly higher in transparentdentin, the elevated concentration being consistent with the closure ofthe tubule lumens. Crystallite size, as measured by small angle X-rayscattering, was slightly smaller in transparent dentin, although theimportance of this ending requires further study. The elastic propertieswere unchanged by transparency; however, transparent dentin, unlikenormal dentin, exhibited almost no yielding before failure. In addition,the fracture toughness was lowered by roughly 20 percent while thefatigue lifetime was deleteriously affected at high stress levels. Theseresults are discussed in terms of the altered microstructure oftransparent dentin.

  5. Comparison of mechanical property and role between enamel and dentin in the human teeth

    PubMed Central

    Choi, HH; Lee, JY

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of enamel and dentin were studied using test specimens having the same shape and dimensions because these properties might vary with the experimental conditions and specimen shapes and dimensions. Healthy human teeth were used as specimens for mechanical tests. The stress (MPa), strain (%), and elastic modulus (E, MPa) of the specimens were obtained from compression tests. The maximum stresses of the enamel, dentin, and enamel–dentin specimens were 62.2 ± 23.8, 193.7 ± 30.6, and 126.1 ± 54.6 MPa, respectively. The maximum strains of the enamel, dentin, and enamel–dentin specimens were 4.5 ± 0.8%, 11.9 ± 0.1%, and 8.7 ± 2.7%, respectively. The elastic moduli of the enamel, dentin, and enamel–dentin specimens were 1338.2 ± 307.9, 1653.7 ± 277.9, and 1628.6 ± 482.7 MPa, respectively. The measured hardness value of enamel specimens (HV = 274.8 ± 18.1) was around 4.2 times higher than that of dentin specimens (HV = 65.6 ± 3.9). Judging from the measured values of the stress and strain of enamel specimens, enamel tended to fracture earlier than dentin; therefore, it was considered more brittle than dentin. However, judging from the measured hardness values, enamel was considered harder than dentin. Therefore, enamel has higher wear resistance, making it suitable for grinding and crushing foods, and dentin has higher force resistance, making it suitable for absorbing bite forces. The different mechanical roles of enamel and dentin may arise from their different compositions and internal structures, as revealed through scanning electron micrographs of enamel and dentin. PMID:24550998

  6. Reparative Dentinogenesis Induced by Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Review from the Biological and Physicochemical Points of View

    PubMed Central

    Okiji, Takashi; Yoshiba, Kunihiko

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to review the biological and physicochemical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with respect to its ability to induce reparative dentinogenesis, which involves complex cellular and molecular events leading to hard-tissue repair by newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells. Compared with that of calcium hydroxide-based materials, MTA is more efficient at inducing reparative dentinogenesis in vivo. The available literature suggests that the action of MTA is attributable to the natural wound healing process of exposed pulps, although MTA can stimulate hard-tissue-forming cells to induce matrix formation and mineralization in vitro. Physicochemical analyses have revealed that MTA not only acts as a “calcium hydroxide-releasing” material, but also interacts with phosphate-containing fluids to form apatite precipitates. MTA also shows better sealing ability and structural stability, but less potent antimicrobial activity compared with that of calcium hydroxide. The clinical outcome of direct pulp capping and pulpotomy with MTA appears quite favorable, although the number of controled prospective studies is still limited. Attempts are being conducted to improve the properties of MTA by the addition of setting accelerators and the development of new calcium silicate-based materials. PMID:20339574

  7. Characterization and Streptococcus mutans adhesion on air polishing dentin.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kazuhiro; Oda, Hirotake; Inatomi, Michitomo; Sato, Soh

    2014-07-01

    Air polishing is known as an effective and time saving tooth cleaning method. However, this method increased surface roughness and bacterial adhesion on dentin surface. The aim of this study was to characterize and examine Streptococcus mutans adhesion on dentin surface after air polishing as compared to the conventional method. The dentin blocks (4 × 4 × 1 mm) were polished by a rubber cup with polishing material (Polishing) and air-polished by 25 μm glycine (G25), 65 μm glycine (G65), and 65 μm sodium bicarbonate (NHC65) microparticles. Surface roughness (Ra) was measured by a laser electron microscope. The amount of adhered S. mutans was quantified using a resazurin reduction assay (alamarBlue(®)). The Ra of G25 and G65 was significantly (p < 0.01) smaller than that of NHC65 and greater than that of Polishing. However, there was no significant difference in S. mutans adhesion among Polishing, G25, and G65, while NHC65 showed significantly (p < 0.01) higher S. mutans adhesion. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, air polishing using glycine microparticles conditioned S. mutans adhesion on dentin surface in a similar fashion than the conventional method, and less than air polishing using sodium bicarbonate microparticles. PMID:23744363

  8. Ten-years degradation of resin-dentin bonds.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Fujita, Shinichi; Nagano, Futami; Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durability of resin-dentin bonds in 10-yr water-storage testing. Resin-dentin bonded bulk specimens were prepared using six commercially available resin adhesives. The resin-dentin bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 h (control group) or for 10 yr (experimental groups). After each storage period, the specimens were sectioned to make specimen beams and then subjected to a microtensile bond test. After the bond test, fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, interfacial observation of silver nanoleakage was performed using the backscatter electron mode of SEM. The bond strengths of four of the six adhesive systems tested decreased significantly after 10 yr. However, no significant bond-strength reduction was recorded for the other two systems. The interfacial observations showed water tree propagation in the bonding resin layer as a typical morphological change after aging for five of the six adhesives tested. Water tree propagation may be a symptom of degradation in the resin bonding layer of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:20662915

  9. Effects of chlorhexidine and fluoride on irradiated enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Neiva, N A; Soares, P B F; Dechichi, P; Novais, V R; Naves, L Z; Marques, M R

    2011-05-01

    The effectiveness of mouthwash protocols in preventing gamma irradiation therapy damage to the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of enamel and dentin is unknown. It was hypothesized that the use of chlorhexidine and fluoride mouthwash would maintain the UTS of dental structures. One hundred and twenty teeth were divided into 2 groups: irradiated (subjected to 60 Gy of gamma irradiation in daily increments of 2 Gy) and non-irradiated. They were then subdivided into 2 mouthwash protocols used 3 times per day: 0.12% chlorhexidine, 0.05% sodium fluoride, and control group (n = 10). The specimens were evaluated by microtensile testing. The results of the Tukey test (p < 0.05) indicated that the gamma irradiation therapy significantly reduced the UTS of the enamel, crown, and root dentin. Macromolecular alterations were suggested by optical retardation data in dentin. Structural alterations, in both substrates, were detected by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Mouthwash with 0.12% chlorhexidine partially prevented the damage to the mechanical properties of the irradiated crown dentin, whereas the 0.05% sodium-fluoride-irradiated enamel showed UTS similar to that of non-irradiated enamel. PMID:21335538

  10. Cryopreservation and image enhancement of juvenile and adult dentine mineral.

    PubMed

    Carter, D H; Scully, A J; Hatton, P V; Davies, R M; Aaron, J E

    2000-04-01

    The inorganic component of bone and related hard tissues is generally described as sheets of uniform needle- and plate-like crystals. However, cryofixation has become the method of choice for ultrastructural studies of bone mineral when ladder-like arrangements of filaments contained within deformable microspheres about 1 microm in diameter are apparently the prime structural feature and are consistent with the optical image. The same methodology has now been applied to mature human dentine in caries-free juvenile and adult teeth. These were fixed, sliced, stained for mineral and examined optically or were snap frozen, fragmented under liquid nitrogen, freeze-substituted with methanol or acetone and embedded without thawing in Lowicryl K4M for electron microscopy. Others were processed by traditional transmission electron microscopy methods. To obtain maximum resolution, the electron micrographs were photographically printed as negatives and image-enhanced by digitisation using a Polaroid Sprint Scan 45 and laser printer. In both optical and cryopreparations of juvenile and adult dentine, mineral microspheres up to 1 microm in diameter, were present in the dentinal tubules and peritubular dentine. Within these objects, the mineral was primarily in the form of sinuous electron dense filaments, 5 nm thick, which had a characteristic periodicity. In these preparations needle-like and plate-like structures were rare. In contrast, after traditional transmission electron microscopy preparation although similar filamentous structures remained, the mineral more generally had the familiar form of needles measuring approximately 50 nm in the long axis. The cryopreserved calcified filaments were apparently particularly densely distributed in the intertubular dentine where their parallel ladder-like arrays often formed highly orientated struts and stays. It was concluded that early dentine mineral has the form of filamentous microspheres and as in bone (and other calcifying

  11. Enhancement of nano-hydroxyapatite bonding to dentin through a collagen/calcium dual-affinitive peptide for dentinal tubule occlusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ronghan; Wang, Qiong; Wang, Xiumei; Tian, Lili; Liu, Huiying; Zhao, Miaomiao; Peng, Ce; Cai, Qiang; Shi, Yunming

    2014-02-01

    Calcium phosphate crystals, as the main component of dentin and enamel, have been widely used for the occlusion of dentinal tubules. However, the low bond strength and poor sealing effect limit their clinical practicality. In this study, a collagen/calcium dual-affinitive peptide E8DS (EEEEEEEEDSpESpSpEEDR) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) flocculi were developed to seal dentin tubules for reducing dentin hypersensitivity, whereas the E8DS peptides were pre-applied to improve the adhesion of occlusive hydroxyapatite coating on dentin collagen matrix for the long-lasting sealing effect and relief from hypersensitivity. Our study showed that E8DS peptides had a strong affinity with dentin collageneous matrix that almost 43.7% of initial E8DS peptides immobilized on exposed dentin samples remained detained after continuous washing by distilled water for four weeks at a rate of 1 mL/min. Nano-HAp flocculi were obtained by re-neutralization of HAp-HCl solution and then brushed onto the surfaces of pre-treated human dentin disks with E8DS peptides, which showed a perfect occlusion of exposed dentinal tubules, as compared with Nano-HAp only and a commercial desensitizer, Green Or. With only around 10-min E8DS peptide pre-treatment, the occlusive mineral layers remained intact against consecutively stirred washing in phosphate-buffered saline or coke for 15 min, and 6 min of tooth-brushing, which implied that our E8DS peptide could comparatively improve the durability of sealant-dentin interface bonds for long-lasting dentine desensitization. PMID:24505078

  12. Weakening of dentin from cracks resulting from laser irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Staninec, Michal; Meshkin, Neda; Manesh, Saman K.; Ritchie, R. O.; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cracking of tooth structure is a frequent mechanism of clinical failure necessitating treatment. Some laser conditions, particularly those without sufficient water cooling, may cause surface cracking of dentin. Surface cracks may serve as initiation sites for the onset of catastrophic fracture under mechanical stress, resulting in failure of the dentin. In this study, the hypothesis that laser initiated cracks result in lower bending strength of dentin was tested. Dentin beam specimens were prepared from human molar teeth, 1.1 × 1.1 × ~9 mm, and divided into groups C (control), W (wet), D (dry) of 12 beams each. In groups W, D, the middle of each beam on one surface (buccal) was irradiated with either a Er-YAG or Q-switched Er-YSGG laser and measured under a microscope, noting the dimensions in the irradiated area and immediately adjacent to irradiated area. Each beam was placed in a mechanical testing machine in a four-point bend jig and tested each with a monotonically increasing load at a displacement rate of 1 mm/min until failure. The bending strengths for groups C, W (Er-YAG laser) and D (Q-switched Er-YSGG laser) were, respectively, 141.6, 114.0, and 90.9 MPa. A one-way ANOVA determined a significant difference between groups C and D, p<0.001. Conclusion The Q-switched Er-YSGG laser without water caused cracks in the surface that significantly decreased the bending strength of dentin. PMID:19062088

  13. Viability of imaging structures inside human dentin using dental transillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandisoli, C. L.; Alves-de-Souza, F. D.; Costa, M. M.; Castro, L.; Ana, P. A.; Zezell, D. M.; Lins, E. C.

    2014-02-01

    Dental Transillumination (DT) is a technique for imaging internal structures of teeth by detecting infrared radiation transmitted throughout the specimens. It was successfully used to detect caries even considering dental enamel and dentin scatter infrared radiation strongly. Literature reports enamel's scattering coefficient is 10 to 30 times lower than dentin; this explain why DT is useful for imaging pathologies in dental enamel, but does not disable its using for imaging dental structures or pathologies inside the dentin. There was no conclusive data in the literature about the limitations of using DT to access biomedical information of dentin. The goal in this study was to present an application of DT to imaging internal structures of dentin. Slices of tooth were confectioned varying the thickness of groups from 0.5 mm up to 2,5 mm. For imaging a FPA InGaAs camera Xeva 1.7- 320 (900-1700 nm; Xenics, Inc., Belgium) and a 3W lamp-based broadband light source (Ocean Optics, Inc., USA) was used; bandpass optical filters at 1000+/-10 nm, 1100+/-10 nm, 1200+/-10 nm and 1300+/-50 nm spectral region were also applied to spectral selection. Images were captured for different camera exposure times and finally a computational processing was applied. The best results revealed the viability to imaging dent in tissue with thickness up to 2,5 mm without a filter (900-1700nm spectral range). After these results a pilot experiment of using DT to detect the pulp chamber of an incisive human tooth was made. New data showed the viability to imaging the pulp chamber of specimen.

  14. AGING AND THE REDUCTION IN FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, A.; Bajaj, D.; Zhang, D.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of the crack growth resistance of human coronal dentin was performed on tissue obtained from patients between ages 18 and 83. Stable crack extension was achieved over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤1 mm) under Mode I quasi-static loading and perpendicular to the nominal tubule direction. Results distinguished that human dentin exhibits an increase in crack growth resistance with extension (i.e. rising R-curve) and that there is a significant reduction in both the initiation (Ko) and plateau (Kp) components of toughness with patient age. In the young dentin (18≤age≤35) there was a 25 % increase in the crack growth resistance from the onset of extension (Ko =1.34 MPa·m0.5) to the maximum or “plateau” toughness (Kp = 1.65 MPa·m0.5). In comparison, the crack growth resistance of the old dentin (55≤age) increased with extension by less than 10 % from Ko = 1.08 MPa·m0.5 to Kp = 1.17 MPa·m0.5. In young dentin toughening was achieved by a combination of inelastic deformation of the mineralized collagen matrix and microcracking of the peritubular cuffs. These mechanisms facilitated further toughening via the development of unbroken ligaments of tissue and posterior crack-bridging. Microstructural changes with aging decreased the capacity for near-tip inelastic deformation and microcracking of the tubules, which in turn suppressed the formation of unbroken ligaments and the degree of extrinsic toughening. PMID:19627862

  15. Hyperlipidemia induced by high-fat diet enhances dentin formation and delays dentin mineralization in mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Pishan

    2016-10-01

    Dyslipidemia has become a serious health problem in children and adolescents worldwide for its high prevalence. Since hard tissues of permanent teeth form mainly during this period and lipids are actively involved in tooth development, the effects of hyperlipidemia on dental tissue formation and mineralization need to be illustrated. In this study, hyperlipidemia model was established in mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). Micro-CT and histomorphological analyses were performed on the mandibular bones to assess the morphological changes of the mandibular incisor and first molar. After 4 weeks of HFD feeding, mice had significantly elevated serum lipid levels compared with mice fed with control diet. After 8 weeks, the mandibular incisor presented significantly increased dentin thickness and decreased diameter of pulp cavity in HFD-fed mice compared with control diet-fed mice, while its gross morphology and enamel thickness were not altered. In the mandibular first molar, dentin thickness of root did not show difference between the two groups. Histological section showed that mandibular incisor of HFD-fed mice manifested a wider predentin region and a lower mineral apposition rate compared with that of the control mice. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia induced by HFD feeding enhances dentin formation and delays dentin mineralization in the developing mouse incisor. PMID:27558143

  16. Prevention of water-contamination of ethanol-saturated dentin and hydrophobic hybrid layers

    PubMed Central

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Mannocci, Francesco; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose This in vitro study evaluated the amount and the distribution of outward fluid flow that occurred when an experimental etch-and-rinse hydrophobic adhesive was applied to ethanol-saturated dentin before and after oxalate pretreatment. Materials and methods Measurements of dentin permeability were performed under a constant pulpal pressure of 20 cm H2O in deep and middle dentin. A lucifer yellow solution was placed in the pulp chamber to determine the distribution of the water contamination of the hybrid layers. Results The distribution of fluorescence in dentin specimens that were not pretreated with oxalate revealed that the dye permeated around the resin tags and filled the hybrid layer. Dentin specimens pretreated with oxalate prior to resin bonding, showed 80–83% less (p<0.05) water contamination compared to controls. The dentin permeability results obtained before and after oxalate pretreatment showed that oxalate decreased dentin permeability by 98% (p<0.05) compared to acid-etched controls. This prevented outward fluid movement during bonding resulting in better resin sealing of dentin due to the formation of a double seal of resin tags over calcium oxalate crystals in the tubules. Conclusion Outward dentinal fluid flow may contaminate hybrid layers during adhesive bonding procedures. Pretreatment of acid-etched dentin with 3% oxalic acid prior to bonding procedures can prevent outward fluid flow during bonding and water contamination of the hydrophobic hybrid layers. PMID:19701507

  17. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules

    PubMed Central

    BRITTAN, Jane L; SPRAGUE, Susan V; MACDONALD, Emma L; LOVE, Robert M; JENKINSON, Howard F; WEST, Nicola X

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF). DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0) to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine. PMID:27119760

  18. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules.

    PubMed

    Brittan, Jane L; Sprague, Susan V; Macdonald, Emma L; Love, Robert M; Jenkinson, Howard F; West, Nicola X

    2016-04-01

    Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF). DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0) to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine. PMID:27119760

  19. Dentin reactions to caries are misinterpreted by histological “gold standards”

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila Florentino; de Holanda Ferreira, Danilo Augusto; Meira, Kássia Regina Simões; Forte, Franklin Delano Soares; Chaves, Ana Maria Barros; de Sousa, Frederico Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Dentin reactions to caries, crucial for pathogenesis and for the determination of the severity of caries lesions, are believed to be reasonably detected by stereomicroscopy (SM) and polarized light microscopy in quinoline (PLMQ), but accuracies are not available. Here, stereomicroscopy of wet (SW) and dry (SD) ground sections of natural occlusal caries lesions resulted in moderate (0.7, for normal dentin) and low accuracies (< 0.6, for carious and sclerotic dentin) as validated by contrast-corrected microradiography. Accuracies of PLMQ were moderate for both normal (0.71) and carious dentin (0.71). The hypothesis that detection of dentin reactions by SM and PLMQ would be influenced by the contrast quality of micrographic images was rejected. Dentin reactions were scored by SW, SD, PLMQ, and three types of microradiographic images with varying contrast qualities and each technique was compared against the one that resulted in the highest number of scores for each dentin reaction. Large differences resulted, mainly related to the detection of sclerotic dentin by both SW and SD, and normal and carious dentin by PLMQ. It is concluded that contrast-corrected microradiography should be preferred as the gold standard and SM and PLMQ should be avoided, but the relationship of PLMQ with dentin mineralization deserves further investigation. PMID:25469227

  20. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  1. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Chiba, Ayaka; Scheffel, Debora L. S.; Hebling, Josimeri; Agee, Kelli; Niu, Li-na; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM) and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA) and VanishTM (VAN), after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001) and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001). VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents. PMID:27359118

  2. Adipose tissue-deprived stem cells acquire cementoblast features treated with dental follicle cell conditioned medium containing dentin non-collagenous proteins in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiujie; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Li; Liu, Luchuan; Deng, Manjing

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} In this study we examine the effects of dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs) on differentiation of ADSCs. {yields} We examined that ADSCs treated with dNCPs/DFCCM underwent morphological changes and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. {yields} dNCPs/DFCCM enhanced the mineralization behaviour and mineralization-related marker expression of ADSCs. {yields} ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are easily harvested and show excellent pluripotency potential, have generated considerable interest in regenerative medicine. In this study, the differentiation of ADSCs was assessed after treatment with dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs). ADSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and high proliferative capacity. However, after treatment with dNCPs/DFCCM, ADSCs changed from a fibroblast-like to cementoblast-like morphology and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. Alkaline phosphatase activity and in vitro mineralization behaviour of ADSCs were significantly enhanced. Mineralization-related markers including cementum attachment protein, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin and osteonectin were detected at mRNA or protein levels, whereas dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin sialoprotein were not detected, implying a cementoblast-like phenotype. These results demonstrate that ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment and could be a potential source of cementogenic cells for periodontal regeneration.

  3. Effects of Citric Acid and Desensitizing Agent Application on Nonfluorosed and Fluorosed Dentin: An In Vitro Sem Study

    PubMed Central

    Neha, Mahajan; Vandana, Laxman K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorosis is one of the factors which bring about mineralisation changes in a dentinal structure leading to dentin. The purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the dentinal tubular changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth subsequent to the application of citric acid,strontium acetate based sodium fluoride (SAF) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dentin specimens from healthy fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth were included in the study. Each of them was grouped into acid treated and SAF treatment groups. Using SEM, the photomicrographs (3500x) of dentin specimens were evaluated. Results showed while there was a significant difference in tubular width of partial occlusion ≤ 25%, being more in fluorosed group compared to nonfluorosed group after application SAF. Application of desensitising agents demonstrated higher number of dentinal tubular occlusion and diameter reduction in nonfluorosed dentin compared to fluorosed dentin. Summary: Root biomodification and desensitising agent procedure brings in definite difference between fluorosed and non-fluorosed dentin specimens. PMID:25870716

  4. Impact of adhesive application to wet and dry dentin on long-term resin-dentin bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Reis, Alessandra; Pellizzaro, Arlete; Dal-Bianco, Karen; Gones, Osnara Mongruel; Patzlaff, Rafael; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the effects of moisture and rubbing action on the immediate and one-year microtensile bond strength (BS) of an ethanol/water-based adhesive system (Single Bond [SB]) and an acetone-based system (One Step [OS]) to dentin. A flat superficial dentin surface on 60 human molars was exposed by wet abrasion. Two coats of the adhesives were applied on either a dry (D) or rewetted surface (W) with no (NRA), slight (SRA) or vigorous rubbing action (VRA). After light curing (600 mW/cm2/10 seconds), composite buildups were constructed incrementally and the specimens were stored in water (37 degrees C/24 hours). They were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/minute. The sticks from each tooth were then divided, stored in water at 37 degrees C and tested immediately and after 12 months (12 M) at 0.5 mm/minute. The bond strength values of sticks from the same hemitooth were averaged for statistical purposes. The prematurely debonded specimens were included in the hemi-tooth mean. The data from each adhesive was analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests (alpha = 0.05). In the dry groups, high bond strength values were obtained under VRA. When the dentin was kept moist, both SRA and VRA provided high resin-dentin bond strength values. Reductions in bond strength values after one year of water storage were not observed for the SB adhesive or were less pronounced for the OS adhesive when it was vigorously rubbed onto the dentin surface. PMID:17695611

  5. Dentin Hypersensitivity: Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 8/2016).

    PubMed

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-01

    Many adults suffer from dentin hypersensitivity during their lifetime, which causes intense and unpleasant pain. A facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment is presented by J.-S. Ahn, D. S. Wang, and team on page 919. The approach is based on complexes of gallic acid and metal ions, inspired by the tunicate-self healing process. PMID:27091778

  6. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age < 40). Aged dentin, in which the dentinal tubules were occluded with calcified material, recorded the highest mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen. PMID:26797297

  7. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  8. The effect of dentin primer on the shear bond strength between composite resin and enamel.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; Louie, P W; Shinkewski, D J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of accidental dentin primer contact with etched enamel on shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel. Four dentin bonding systems were included in this study: GLUMA Dentin Bond, Scotchbond, and Prisma Universal Bond 2 and 3. Eighty extracted human permanent anterior teeth were used and divided in eight test groups. The vestibular surfaces were ground and acid etched. For each dentin bonding system 10 samples were treated with dentin primer prior to placement of resin. Shear bond testing showed that enamel contact with dentin primer in the above two systems decreased the shear bond strength between composite and enamel by 31 to 44%. PMID:8337183

  9. [Effect of weightlessness on the course of the reparative process in the muscles of the biosatellite Kosmos-2044 rats].

    PubMed

    Il'ina-Kakueva, E I; Burkovskaia, T E

    1991-01-01

    The repair process in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of SPF Wistar rats flown for 14 days on the biosatellite Cosmos-2044 was investigated. The muscles were injured 2 days before launch by means of clamp forceps. The exposure inhibited the process but did not impair its phasic development. As a result, the reparative field diminished and took the size of an atrophic muscle; thinner myofibers appeared that originated from the ends of injured atrophic fibers and fibers that underwent splitting. It is postulated that repair inhibition is caused by the same mechanisms that produce muscle atrophy in microgravity. It is suggested that both repair inhibition and muscle atrophy are induced by disorders in the neurotrophic regulation of metabolism due to partial disuse. PMID:8577135

  10. [The research of biodegradation of a composite material used in reconstructive and reparative surgery of maxillofacial area].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V O; Astapenko, O O; Halatenko, N A; Rozhnova, R A

    2013-09-01

    Dates about the research of biodegradation of epoxy-polyurethane composite material used in reconstructive and reparative surgery of maxillofacial area are reflected in the article. Was founded: 1) notable biodegradation of species from epoxy-polyurethane composition in the term of observation up to 6 months was not founded. That testifies their preservation of physical and mechanical properties. 2) founded, that in species from epoxy-polyurethane composition, which contain levamisole, processes of biodegradation are faster then in species from pure epoxy-polyurethane composition and in species from epoxy-polyurethane composition with hydroxyapatite; 3) material from epoxy-polyurethane composition, which contains levamisole and hydroxyapatite, stays in biological environment in small quantity of petty fragments during the incubation in term of 2 years. So, it biodegrades practically totally. Authors suggest on the basis of achieved information, that the use of epoxy-polyurethane constructions that biodegrade, is pertinently in reconstructive maxillofacial surgery. PMID:25510095

  11. The Peruvian Truth Commission's mental health reparations: empowering survivors of political violence to impact public health policy.

    PubMed

    Laplante, Lisa J; Holguin, Miryam Rivera

    2006-01-01

    The Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), formed in 2001, turned national attention toward the serious mental health consequences of the country's 20-year internal armed conflict. The TRC prioritized reparations in mental health, using a legal justification that provided victims-survivors of the war with a rights-based framework for demanding that the public sector attend to their mental health needs. Since the majority of victims-survivors come from historically poor, rural, and marginalized populations and have tended to not exercise their right to health for a variety of social, economic, and cultural reasons, framing mental health in terms of rights helps to empower these people to impact the development of appropriate policies in mental health. The authors suggest that this process contributes directly to improving the mental health of this population. PMID:17265758

  12. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase activity in human dentin via novel antibacterial monomer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Majd, Hessam; Weir, Michael D.; Arola, Dwayne D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Dentin-composite bond failure is caused by factors including hybrid layer degradation, which in turn can be caused by hydrolysis and enzymatic degradation of the exposed collagen in the dentin. The objectives of this study were to investigate a new antibacterial monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) as an inhibitor for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and to determine the effects of DMADDM on both soluble recombinant human MMPs (rhMMPs) and dentin matrix-bound endogenous MMPs. Methods Inhibitory effects of DMADDM at six mass% (0.1% to 10%) on soluble rhMMP-8 and rhMMP-9 were measured using a colorimetic assay. Matrix-bound endogenous MMP activity was evaluated in demineralized human dentin. Dentin beams were divided into four groups (n = 10) and incubated in calcium- and zinc-containing media (control medium); or control medium + 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX); 5% 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB); or 5% DMADDM. Dissolution of dentin collagen peptides was evaluated by mechanical testing in three-point flexure, loss of dentin mass, and a hydroxyproline assay. Results Use of 0.1% to 10% DMADDM exhibited a strong concentration-dependent anti-MMP effect, reaching 90% of inhibition on rhMMP-8 and rhMMP-9 at 5% DMADDM concentration. Dentin beams in medium with 5% DMADDM showed 34% decrease in elastic modulus (vs. 73% decrease for control), 3% loss of dry dentin mass (vs. 28% loss for control), and significantly less solubilized hydroxyproline when compared with control (p < 0.05). Significance The new antibacterial monomer DMADDM was effective in inhibiting both soluble rhMMPs and matrix-bound human dentin MMPs. These results, together with previous studies showing that adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited biofilms without compromising dentin bond strength, suggest that DMADDM is promising for use in adhesives to prevent collagen degradation in hybrid layer and protect the resin-dentin bond. PMID:25595564

  13. Bonding to sound vs caries-affected dentin using photo- and dual-cure adhesives.

    PubMed

    Say, Esra Can; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Senawongse, Pisol; Soyman, Mübin; Ozer, Füsun; Tagami, Junji

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of photo- and dual-cure adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentin using total- and self-etch techniques. Human third molars with occlusal caries were prepared as previously described by Nakajima and others (1995). Dentin surfaces were bonded with Optibond Solo Plus (Kerr; photo-cure adhesive) or Optibond Solo Plus + Dual-cure activator (Kerr; dual-cure adhesive) with total- and self-etch technique. Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray) was used for composite buildups. Following storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slices to obtain sound and caries-affected dentin slabs, then trimmed to form hour glass shapes with a 1 mm2 cross-sectional area. The specimens were subjected to microtensile testing using EZ-test (Shimadzu) at 1 mm/minute. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-Test (p<0.05). Bond strengths to sound dentin with photo- and dual-cure adhesives using total- and self-etch techniques were significantly higher than those to caries-affected dentin. Dual-cure adhesive significantly decreased bond strengths both to sound and caries-affected dentin. The total-etch technique showed no beneficial effect on caries-affected dentin compared with the self-etch technique. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the resin-dentin interfaces revealed that hybrid layers in caries-affected dentin were thicker than those observed in sound dentin with photo- and dual-cure adhesives. Resin infiltration into dentinal tubules of caries-affected dentin was hampered by the presence of mineral deposits. PMID:15765963

  14. Imbalances in Mobilization and Activation of Pro-Inflammatory and Vascular Reparative Bone Marrow-Derived Cells in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Navitskaya, Svetlana; O’Reilly, Sandra; Wang, Qi; Kady, Nermin; Huang, Chao; Grant, Maria B.; Busik, Julia V.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes, affecting 65% of patients after 10 years of the disease. Diabetic metabolic insult leads to chronic low-grade inflammation, retinal endothelial cell loss and inadequate vascular repair. This is partly due to bone marrow (BM) pathology leading to increased activity of BM-derived pro-inflammatory monocytes and impaired function of BM-derived reparative circulating angiogenic cells (CACs). We propose that diabetes has a significant long-term effect on the nature and proportion of BM-derived cells that circulate in the blood, localize to the retina and home back to their BM niche. Using a streptozotocin mouse model of diabetic retinopathy with GFP BM-transplantation, we have demonstrated that BM-derived circulating pro-inflammatory monocytes are increased in diabetes while reparative CACs are trapped in the BM and spleen, with impaired release into circulation. Diabetes also alters activation of splenocytes and BM-derived dendritic cells in response to LPS stimulation. A majority of the BM-derived GFP cells that migrate to the retina express microglial markers, while others express endothelial, pericyte and Müller cell markers. Diabetes significantly increases infiltration of BM-derived microglia in an activated state, while reducing infiltration of BM-derived endothelial progenitor cells in the retina. Further, control CACs injected into the vitreous are very efficient at migrating back to their BM niche, whereas diabetic CACs have lost this ability, indicating that the in vivo homing efficiency of diabetic CACs is dramatically decreased. Moreover, diabetes causes a significant reduction in expression of specific integrins regulating CAC migration. Collectively, these findings indicate that BM pathology in diabetes could play a role in both increased pro-inflammatory state and inadequate vascular repair contributing to diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26760976

  15. Laser-assisted treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Roberto; Cossellu, Gianguido; Sarcina, Michele; Pizzamiglio, Ilaria Tina; Farronato, Giampietro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate the effectiveness of the laser-assisted treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. A review with inclusion and exclusion criteria was performed from January 2009 to December 2014 with electronic data-bases: MedLine via PubMed, Science Direct and Cochrane Library. Research of paper magazines by hand was not considered. Forty-three articles were selected between literature reviews, in vitro studies, clinical trials, pilot and preliminary studies. The items were divided into laser-used groups for an accurate description, and then the reading of results into various typologies. Laser-assisted treatment reduces dentinal hypersensitivity-related pain, but also a psychosomatic component must be considered, so further studies and more suitable follow-ups are necessary. PMID:26941892

  16. Bonding to dentine with a simplified Gluma system.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, P A; Asmussen, E

    1989-12-01

    In the present study, a number of modifications were introduced in the so-called Gluma resin--a new, simplified bonding system. The amount of acetone in its formulation was altered, or the acetone as well as part of the water were substituted by one of several volatile compounds with the purpose of obtaining a pretreatment of easier clinical application. Some modifications of the pH of the mixtures were also tried. Dentine specimens for shear bond testing were prepared and conditioned with an aluminium oxalate/glycine solution. The dentine surfaces were then treated with the modified Gluma resin mixtures before the placement of the composite resin. Gluma resin formulations containing tetrahydrofuran resulted in acceptable bond strengths, and with formulations of reduced pH, high bond strengths were obtained. PMID:2532625

  17. Effect of free electron laser (FEL) irradiation on tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Seiji; Awazu, Kunio; Tomimasu, Takio

    1996-12-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) gives high efficiency for the photo-induced effects when the laser is tuned to the absorption maximum of target materials. The effect on dentine was investigated using the FEL tuned to 9.4 micrometers , which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid in infrared region. As a result, irradiated dentine surface which was amorphous had changed to the recrystalized structure by the spectroscopic analysis of IR absorption and x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of P/Ca had reduced from 0.65 to 0.60. These results indicated that 9.4micrometers -FEL irradiation caused the selective ablation of phosphoric acid ion and the reconstruction of disordered atoms.

  18. Regional variation in root dentinal tubule infection by Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules at different regions in human roots. Specimens were obtained from single-rooted teeth that had their root canals prepared in a standard manner. Roots were then sectioned longitudinally through the canals and the resulting specimens chemically treated to remove the smear layers. Specimens were immersed in a suspension of Streptococcus gordonii for 3 weeks and then prepared for histological analysis. Sections from the cervical, midroot, and apical areas were examined. The pattern of bacterial infection of the cervical and midroot areas was similar, characterized as a heavy infection with bacteria penetrating as deep as 200 microns. Invasion of the apical dentin was significantly different, with a mild infection and maximum penetration of 60 microns. PMID:8934987

  19. Effect of Calcium Hydroxide on the Fracture Resistance of Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, Evan R.; Quinn, George D.; Quinn, Janet B.

    2011-01-01

    An increased incidence of fracture has been reported in teeth where root canals were treated with calcium hydroxide. Edge chipping is one test used to measure the resistance of brittle materials to fracture. Presently, no studies have reported on edge chipping in teeth. This study evaluated the fracture resistance of human dentin exposed to calcium hydroxide for up to 60 days using the edge chipping method. Twelve recently extracted teeth were divided into a control group and three experimental groups with varying calcium hydroxide exposures. All teeth underwent pulpectomy via standard protocol. It was expected that the edge chip resistance would decrease as a function of exposure, but the results showed the converse. Chip resistance may reflect both the fracture resistance and the hardness of dentin, a quasi brittle material. PMID:26989596

  20. Laser-assisted treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Biagi, Roberto; Cossellu, Gianguido; Sarcina, Michele; Pizzamiglio, Ilaria Tina; Farronato, Giampietro

    2015-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate the effectiveness of the laser-assisted treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. A review with inclusion and exclusion criteria was performed from January 2009 to December 2014 with electronic data-bases: MedLine via PubMed, Science Direct and Cochrane Library. Research of paper magazines by hand was not considered. Forty-three articles were selected between literature reviews, in vitro studies, clinical trials, pilot and preliminary studies. The items were divided into laser-used groups for an accurate description, and then the reading of results into various typologies. Laser-assisted treatment reduces dentinal hypersensitivity-related pain, but also a psychosomatic component must be considered, so further studies and more suitable follow-ups are necessary. PMID:26941892

  1. A forensic aspect of age characteristics of dentine using transversal microradiography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Translucency of dentine is the result of occlusion of the corresponding dentinal tubules by a mineral substance which has a refractive index similar to that of the rest of the dentine. Case presentation This case report describes the microradiographic features of an upper cadaveric canine. Transverse microradiograph is one of the methods assessing apical dentine translucency for various dental and medical reasons. Conclusion Estimation of age using teeth structures may be of primary value in forensic dentistry, especially when soft tissues are severely destructed. PMID:19121209

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases and other matrix proteinases in relation to cariology: the era of 'dentin degradomics'.

    PubMed

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Carrilho, Marcela; Chaussain, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Dentin organic matrix, with type I collagen as the main component, is exposed after demineralization in dentinal caries, erosion or acidic conditioning during adhesive composite restorative treatment. This exposed matrix is prone to slow hydrolytic degradation by host collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. Here we review the recent findings demonstrating that inhibition of salivary or dentin endogenous collagenolytic enzymes may provide preventive means against progression of caries or erosion, just as they have been shown to retain the integrity and improve the longevity of resin composite filling bonding to dentin. This paper also presents the case that the organic matrix in caries-affected dentin may not be preserved as intact as previously considered. In partially demineralized dentin, MMPs and cysteine cathepsins with the ability to cleave off the terminal non-helical ends of collagen molecules (telopeptides) may lead to the gradual loss of intramolecular gap areas. This would seriously compromise the matrix ability for intrafibrillar remineralization, which is considered essential in restoring the dentin's mechanical properties. More detailed data of the enzymes responsible and their detailed function in dentin-destructive conditions may not only help to find new and better preventive means, but better preservation of demineralized dentin collagenous matrix may also facilitate true biological remineralization for the better restoration of tooth structural and mechanical integrity and mechanical properties. PMID:25661522

  3. Clinical, histological and microbiological study of hand-excavated carious dentine in extracted permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Bönecker, M; Grossman, E; Cleaton-Jones, P E; Parak, R

    2003-08-01

    Changes in cultivable flora in dentine samples collected before and after hand excavation were examined in association with clinical status of the cavity surface, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thirty-five extracted permanent molar teeth with an occlusal caries lesion were excavated with hand instruments according to the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach. Excavation pressure, dentine colour and consistency were recorded at the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) prior to carious dentine removal and at the cavity floor after the final excavation; a microbiological sample of dentine was taken at both stages. Twelve restored teeth; six with positive and six with negative bacterial growth on the second sample, were selected for light microscopy and SEM. The hand-excavation removed tooth structure was soft, irreversibly damaged, dark and highly infected. Hand excavation reached dentine of increased hardness with a more normal colour to provide a sound structural base for restoration. Light and SEM examination of the cavity floor showed infected dentinal tubules in all 12 teeth examined. Linear logistic analysis showed a statistical association between light-yellow dentine on the cavity floor and an absence of bacterial growth (P = 0.006). This short-term in vitro study showed that caries-producing bacteria remained in dentine close to the cavity floor in 26/35 teeth despite clinical observations that indicated a suitably prepared cavity floor. PMID:14649040

  4. Effect of dentin etching and chlorhexidine application on metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Raquel, Osorio; Mónica, Yamauti; Estrella, Osorio; Estrella, Ruiz-Requena María; David, Pashley; Franklin, Tay; Manuel, Toledano

    2013-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in collagen degradation of resin-dentin interfaces. This study evaluated if collagen degradation can be prevented by chlorhexidine after different dentin demineralization procedures. Human dentin demineralization was performed with phosphoric acid (PA), EDTA, or acidic monomers (ClearfilSEBond and XENOV). Specimens were stored (24 h, 1 wk or 3 wk) in the presence or absence of chlorhexidine. In half of the groups, active MMP-2 was incorporated into the storing solution. C-terminal telopeptide determination (ICTP) was performed in the supernatants. Collagen degradation was higher in PA and EDTA-demineralized dentin. Chlorhexidine reduced collagen degradation in these groups only for 24 h. When dentin was demineralized with SEBond or Xeno, collagen degradation was reduced up to 30%, but addition of exogenous MMP-2 significantly increased collagen degradation. In self-etchant treated dentin the inhibitory effect of chlorhexidine on MMPs lasted up to 3 wk. Treating dentin with EDTA, PA or self-etching agents produces enough demineralization to permit cleavage of the exposed collagen. Monomers infiltration may exert protection on demineralized collagen, probably through immobilization of MMPs. The partial inhibitory action of CHX on MMP activity produced by self-etching adhesives was prolonged compared to the short-acting in PA or EDTA-treated dentin. PMID:21244516

  5. Evaluation of caries-affected dentin with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Cynthia Soares de; Trung, Luciana Cardoso Espejo; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti; Freitas, Anderson Zanardi de; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of demineralization of artificially induced caries-affected human dentin by an in vitro microbiological method. The occlusal surfaces of 6 human molar teeth were abraded until a flat surface was obtained, and the enamel was removed to expose the occlusal dentin surface. These teeth were sectioned in 12 halves in the vestibular-lingual direction and divided into 3 groups according to the period length of the microbiological essay (n = 4): G1, 7 days; G2, 14 days; and G3, 21 days. The surfaces of all specimens were protected by an acid-resistant nail varnish, except for a window where the caries lesion was induced by a Streptoccocus mutans biofilm in a batch-culture model supplemented with 5% sucrose. The specimens were then analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a super-luminescent light diode (Λ = 930 nm) with 6.0-µm lateral and longitudinal resolution (in the air). Qualitative and quantitative results (images and average dentin demineralization, respectively) were obtained. The mean demineralization depths were (µm) 235 ± 31.4, 279 ± 14, and 271 ± 8.3 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In addition, no significant change was observed in the lesion mean depth from 7 days of cariogenic challenge on. In conclusion, OCT was shown to be an efficient and non-invasive method to detect the depths of lesions caused by demineralization. Further, a seven-day demineralization time was considered sufficient for caries-affected dentin to be obtained. PMID:22031053

  6. Treatment of dentinal tubules by Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelíčkova, Hana; Zapletalova, Zdeňka; Peřina, Jan, Jr.; Novotný, Radko; Kubínek, Roman; Stranyánek, Martin

    2005-08-01

    Symptom of cervical dentine hypersensitivity attacks from 10% to 15% of population and causes an uncomfortable pain during contact with any matter. Sealing of open dentinal tubules is one of the methods to reach insensibility. Laser as a source of coherent radiation is used to melt dentine surface layers. Melted dentine turns to hard mass with a smooth, non-porous surface. Simulation of this therapy was made in vitro by means of LASAG Nd:YAG pulsed laser system KLS 246-102. Eighty human extracted teeth were cut horizontally to obtain samples from 2 mm to 3 mm thick. First experiments were done on cross section surfaces to find an optimal range of laser parameters. A wide range of energies from 30 mJ to 210 mJ embedded in 0,3 ms long pulse was tested. Motion in X and Y axes was ensured by a CNC driven table and the pulse frequency 15 Hz was chosen to have a suitable overlap of laser spots. Some color agents were examined with the aim to improve surface absorption. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to evaluate all samples and provided optimal values of energies around 50 J.cm-2. Next experiments were done with the beam oriented perpendicularly to a root surface, close to the real situation. Optical fibers with the diameter of 0,6 mm and 0,2 mm were used to guide a laser beam to teeth surfaces. Laser processing heads with lens F = 100 mm and F = 50 mm were used. The best samples were investigated by means of the Atomic Force Microscopy.

  7. Adhesive Bonding to Dentin Improved by Polymerizable Cyclodextrin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Rafael L.; Schumacher, Gary E.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Guttman, Charles M.; Carey, Clifton M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine bonding characteristics of a hydrophilic monomer formulation containing polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives. The hypothesis was that a formulation containing hydrophilic cross-linking diluent comonomers and cyclodextrins with functional groups attached by hydrolytically stable ether linkages could form strong adhesive bonds to dentin. The previously synthesized polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives were formulated with sorbitol dimethacrylate, methacrylic acid and phenylbis(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl) phosphine oxide photoinitiator. The same formulation without the polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives isolated the effects of the polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives. A commercial self-etching bonding system was tested as a comparative control. Ground mid-coronal dentin was etched with 37 % phosphoric acid (H3PO4) for 15 s and rinsed with distilled water for 10 s. Formulations were applied to the moist dentin and light-cured 10 s. A packable composite was then applied through irises and light-cured 60 s. Teeth were stored in water for 24 h before bonds were tested in a shearing orientation. One-way ANOVA was performed on the data. The average values of shear bond strengths were defined as loads at fracture divided by the 4 mm diameter iris areas. The average value of shear bond strength for the formulation containing the polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives was higher (p < 0.05), where p is a fraction of the probability distribution) than that of the same monomeric formulation except that the polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives were not included. This was supporting evidence that the polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives contributed to improved bonding. The average value of shear bond strength for the formulation containing the polymerizable cyclodextrin derivatives was also higher (p < 0.05) than that of the commercial self-etching bonding system. These preliminary results are in accordance with the hypothesis

  8. Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-05-07

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  9. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  10. Molecular evolution of dentin phosphoprotein among toothed and toothless animals

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is the largest member of the SIBLING family and is the most abundant noncollagenous protein in dentin. DSPP is also expressed in non-mineralized tissues including metabolically active ductal epithelia and some cancers. Its function, however, is poorly defined. The carboxy-terminal fragment, dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) is encoded predominantly by a large repetitive domain that requires separate cloning/sequencing reactions and is, therefore, often incomplete in genomic databases. Comparison of DPP sequences from at least one member of each major branch in the mammalian evolutionary tree (including some "toothless" mammals) as well as one reptile and bird may help delineate its possible functions in both dentin and ductal epithelia. Results The BMP1-cleavage and translation-termination domains were sufficiently conserved to permit amplification/cloning/sequencing of most species' DPP. While the integrin-binding domain, RGD, was present in about half of species, only vestigial remnants of this tripeptide were identified in the others. The number of tandem repeats of the nominal SerSerAsp phosphorylation motif in toothed mammals (including baleen whale and platypus which lack teeth as adults), ranged from ~75 (elephant) to >230 (human). These repeats were not perfect, however, and patterns of intervening sequences highlight the rapidity of changes among even closely related species. Two toothless anteater species have evolved different sets of nonsense mutations shortly after their BMP1 motifs suggesting that while cleavage may be important for DSPP processing in other tissues, the DPP domain itself may be required only in dentin. The lizard DSPP had an intact BMP1 site, a remnant RGD motif, as well as a distinctly different Ser/Asp-rich domain compared to mammals. Conclusions The DPP domain of DSPP was found to change dramatically within mammals and was lost in two truly toothless animals. The defining aspect of DPP, the

  11. Topical application of lithium chloride on the pulp induces dentin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Kazuya; Hayano, Satoru; Yanagita, Takeshi; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Itoh, Shinsuke; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kuboki, Takuo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe a novel procedure for dentin regeneration that mimics the biological processes of tooth development in nature. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is an important regulator of the Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) expression. Our approach mimics the biological processes underlying tooth development in nature and focuses on the activation of canonical Wnt signaling to trigger the natural process of dentinogenesis. The coronal portion of the dentin and the underlying pulp was removed from the first molars. We applied lithium chloride (LiCl), an activator of canonical Wnt signaling, on the amputated pulp surface to achieve transdifferentiation toward odontoblasts from the surrounding pulpal cells. MicroCT and microscopic analyses demonstrated that the topical application of LiCl induced dentin repair, including the formation of a complete dentin bridge. LiCl-induced dentin is a tubular dentin in which the pulp cells are not embedded within the matrix, as in primary dentin. In contrast, a dentin bridge was not induced in the control group treated with pulp capping with material carriers alone, although osteodentin without tubular formation was induced at a comparatively deeper position from the pulp exposure site. We also evaluated the influence of LiCl on differentiation toward odontoblasts in vitro. In the mDP odontoblast cell line, LiCl activated the mRNA expression of Dspp, Axin2 and Kallikrein 4 (Klk4) and downregulated the Osteopontin (Osp) expression. These results provide a scientific basis for the biomimetic regeneration of dentin using LiCl as a new capping material to activate dentine regeneration. PMID:25812134

  12. Topical Application of Lithium Chloride on the Pulp Induces Dentin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Kazuya; Hayano, Satoru; Yanagita, Takeshi; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Itoh, Shinsuke; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kuboki, Takuo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe a novel procedure for dentin regeneration that mimics the biological processes of tooth development in nature. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is an important regulator of the Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) expression. Our approach mimics the biological processes underlying tooth development in nature and focuses on the activation of canonical Wnt signaling to trigger the natural process of dentinogenesis. The coronal portion of the dentin and the underlying pulp was removed from the first molars. We applied lithium chloride (LiCl), an activator of canonical Wnt signaling, on the amputated pulp surface to achieve transdifferentiation toward odontoblasts from the surrounding pulpal cells. MicroCT and microscopic analyses demonstrated that the topical application of LiCl induced dentin repair, including the formation of a complete dentin bridge. LiCl-induced dentin is a tubular dentin in which the pulp cells are not embedded within the matrix, as in primary dentin. In contrast, a dentin bridge was not induced in the control group treated with pulp capping with material carriers alone, although osteodentin without tubular formation was induced at a comparatively deeper position from the pulp exposure site. We also evaluated the influence of LiCl on differentiation toward odontoblasts in vitro. In the mDP odontoblast cell line, LiCl activated the mRNA expression of Dspp, Axin2 and Kallikrein 4 (Klk4) and downregulated the Osteopontin (Osp) expression. These results provide a scientific basis for the biomimetic regeneration of dentin using LiCl as a new capping material to activate dentine regeneration. PMID:25812134

  13. Effect of propolis gel on the in vitro reduction of dentin permeability

    PubMed Central

    SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; de CARVALHO, Flávia Negreiros; MARSICANO, Juliane Avansini; MATTOS, Maria Cecília; PEREIRA, José Carlos; FORIM, Moacir Rossi; da SILVA, Maria Fatima das Graças Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of potassium oxalate, fluoride gel and two kinds of propolis gel to reduce the hydraulic conductance of dentin, in vitro. Material and Methods The methodology used for the measurement of hydraulic conductance of dentin in the present study was based on a model proposed in literature. Thirty-six 1-mm-thick dentin discs, obtained from extracted human third molars were divided into 4 groups (n=9). The groups corresponded to the following experimental materials: GI-10% propolis gel, pH 4.1; GII-30% propolis gel; GIII-3% potassium oxalate gel, pH 4,1; and GIV-1.23% fluoride gel, pH 4.1, applied to the dentin under the following surface conditions: after 37% phosphoric acid and before 6% citric acid application. The occluding capacity of the dentin tubules was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at ×500, ×1,000 and ×2,000 magnifications. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Results Groups I, II, III, IV did not differ significantly from the others in any conditions by reducing in hydraulic conductance. The active agents reduced dentin permeability; however they produced the smallest reduction in hydraulic conductance when compared to the presence of smear layer (P<0.05). The effectiveness in reducing dentin permeability did not differ significantly from 10% or 30% propolis gels. SEM micrographs revealed that dentin tubules were partially occluded after treatment with propolis. Conclusions Under the conditions of this study, the application of 10% and 30% propolis gels did not seem to reduce the hydraulic conductance of dentin in vitro, but it showed capacity of partially obliterating the dentin tubules. Propolis is used in the treatment of different oral problems without causing significant great collateral effects, and can be a good option in the treatment of patients with dentin sensitivity. PMID:21956588

  14. Composite resin bond strength to caries-affected dentin contaminated with 3 different hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Hosseini-Shirazi, Moeen; Farahbod, Foroozan; Keshani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of composite resins to sound and caries-affected dentin in cervical areas may necessitate the use of hemostatic agents to control sulcular fluid and hemorrhage. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive system to sound and caries-affected dentin after the use of 3 different hemostatic agents. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to 48 caries-affected and 48 sound dentin surfaces in 8 groups. Groups 1-4 utilized caries-affected dentin: group 1, uncontaminated control; 2, ViscoStat; 3, ViscoStat Clear; and 4, trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Groups 5-8 utilized sound dentin: group 5, uncontaminated control; 6, ViscoStat; 7, ViscoStat Clear; and 8, TCA. The hemostatic agents were applied for 2 minutes and rinsed. After 500 rounds of thermocycling, shear bond strength tests were carried out. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way analyses of variance, t test, and post hoc Tukey tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Bond strength was significantly influenced by dentin type (F = 38.23; P = 0.0001) and hemostatic agent (F = 6.32; P = 0.001). Furthermore, groups 2 and 6 (ViscoStat) showed significantly lower bond strength values than the control groups (groups 1 and 5) in both affected and sound dentin (P = 0.043 and P = 0.009, respectively). Within the limitations of this study, the bond strength of composite resin to caries-affected dentin was significantly reduced compared to that with sound dentin. Among the studied hemostatic agents, ViscoStat resulted in a greater decrease in dentin bond strength. Contamination of both sound and caries-affected dentin with hemostatic agents decreased composite resin bond strength. Of the 3 hemostatic agents used, ViscoStat Clear appeared to have the least detrimental effect on bond strength. PMID:27367640

  15. A Physiological Permeability Study of Third Molar Dentine with Odontoblasts Preserved and Odontoblasts Free Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Che

    2000-01-01

    Introduction Dentine a viable biological tissue forms an intimately related complex with the odontoblasts. Much has been question of the barrier properties of dentine within teeth and between teeth.. In human adults the odontoblasts are fully differentiated post-mitotic cells, which send its cytoplasmic processes into the dentinal tubules, yet various studies in the physic of fluid flow in dentine takes little recognition of its presence. The permeability of dentine has been implicated in a possible hydrodynamic mechanism by which rapid fluid movement in the tubules is thought to depolarise the nerve endings. Objective The innovative aim from this pilot investigation is to contribute to the understanding of the influence of odontoblasts on the permeability of human dentine. Methodology This study describes the permeability in odontoblast preserved and odontoblast free preparations in vitro i.e. comparing fluid flow across dentine in human third molars. The pulp tissues were removed from human third molars leaving the odontoblasts attached to the walls of the chamber. The specimens were then either fixed chemically (odontoblast-preserved specimens) or immersed in NaOH (odontoblast free specimens). Occlusal dentine was exposed by removing the enamel. The exposed dentine was placed in contact with water and the ingress of water into the pulp chamber was observed with a binocular microscope. A microlitre syringe was used to measure the volume of water accumulated at time intervals of several hours for up to 70 hours or more. Results The results showed that spontaneous flow continued in both preparations until equilibrium was reached. The relative final volumes were greater in the odontoblast free preparations than in the odontoblast preserved. Conclusion Water movement through odontoblast free dentine was believed to be driven by capillarity and through odontoblast preserved dentine by capillarity and osmotic pressure.

  16. Strain Distribution in Root Surface Dentin of Maxillary Central Incisors during Lateral Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Metzger, Zvi; Brosh, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Aim To precisely quantify the circumferential strains created along the radicular dentin of maxillary incisors during a simulated clinical procedure of lateral compaction. Methods Six miniature strain gauges were bonded on the roots of fourteen recently extracted maxillary central incisors that were subjected to root canal instrumentation. The strain gauges were bonded at three levels (apical, middle, and coronal) and four aspects (buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal) of the roots. Each tooth was embedded in a PVC cylinder containing polyvinyl-siloxane impression material. Root filling was then performed by simulating the clinical procedure of lateral compaction using nickel-titanium finger spreaders. The force applied to the spreader and the strains developing in the surface root dentin were continuously recorded at a frequency of 10 Hz. Results The highest strains that developed during lateral compaction were in the mesial and distal aspects at the apical level of the root. The magnitudes of the maximal mesial/distal strains at the apical as well as the mid-root levels were approximately 2.5–3 times higher than those at the buccal/lingual aspects (p = 0.041). The strains decreased significantly (p<0.04) from the apical through the mid-root levels to the coronal level, yielding gradients of 2.5- and 6-fold, respectively. The mesial and distal strains were consistently tensile and did not differ significantly; however, the buccal strains were generally 35–65% higher than the lingual strains (p = 0.078). Lateral compaction resulted in the gradual build-up of residual strains, resulting in generation of a 'stair-step' curve. These strains declined gradually and almost completely disappeared after 1000 sec. Conclusions With proper mounting of several miniature strain gauges at various levels and aspects of the root, significant circumferential strains can be monitored under clinically relevant compaction forces. The residual strains at the end of lateral

  17. Effect of dentinal water on bonding of self-etching adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Fujita, Shinichi; Endo, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hiroki

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the effect of dentinal water on bonding, comparing one-bottle and two-step self-etching adhesives using microtensile bond test and scanning electron microscope. The bond strength of resin to dentin was measured for wet dentin (control) and dry dentin substrates. Wet dentin is the normal substrate for bond testing, whereas dry dentin was dehydrated in a desiccator at different drying times (5 to 60 min) before bonding. After bond testing, the fractured surfaces were examined. Although no correlation was found for two-step self-etching adhesives, the bond strength of the dry-dentin was significantly increased with the increase in the drying-time for one-bottle adhesives. With increased drying-time, the amount of water-bubbles was decreased for one-bottle adhesives; however, no bubble formation was seen in two-step adhesives in any group. The hydrophilic resin adhesive may entrap the water from dentin by osmosis during and after bonding. This effect may depend on the "hydrophilicity" of adhesives. PMID:19822996

  18. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    PubMed

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime. PMID:27275662

  19. Glutaraldehyde-induced remineralization improves the mechanical properties and biostability of dentin collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoqun; Mao, Caiyun; Sun, Jian; Chen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang; Gu, Xinhua

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to induce a biomimetic remineralization process by using glutaraldehyde (GA) to reconstruct the mechanical properties and biostability of demineralized collagen. Demineralized dentin disks (35% phosphoric acid, 10s) were pretreated with a 5% GA solution for 3min and then cultivated in a calcium phosphate remineralization solution. The remineralization kinetics and superstructure of the remineralization layer were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation tests. The biostability was examined by enzymatic degradation experiments. A significant difference was found in dentin remineralization process between dentin with and without GA pretreating. GA showed a specific affinity to dentin collagen resulting in the formation of a cross-linking superstructure. GA pretreating could remarkably shorten remineralization time from 7days to 2days. The GA-induced remineralized collagen fibrils were well encapsulated by newly formed hydroxyapatite mineral nanocrystals. With the nano-hydroxyapatite coating, both the mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) and the biostability against enzymatic degradation of the collagen were significantly enhanced, matching those of natural dentin. The results indicated that GA cross-linking of dentin collagen could promote dentin biomimetic remineralization, resulting in an improved mechanical properties and biostability. It may provide a promising tissue-engineering technology for dentin repair. PMID:27287165

  20. Role of host-derived proteinases in dentine caries and erosion.

    PubMed

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Charone, Senda; Tjäderhane, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Demineralization in dentinal caries and erosion exposes dentine organic matrix. This exposed matrix, containing type I collagen and non-collagenous proteins, is then degraded by host collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. The knowledge of the identities and function of these enzymes in dentine has accumulated only within the last 15 years, but has already formed a field of research called 'dentine degradomics'. This research has demonstrated the role of endogenous collagenolytic enzymes in caries and erosion development. In demineralized dentine, the enzymes degrade triple-helical collagen molecules, leading to the gradual loss of collagen matrix. Even before that, they can cleave off the terminal non-helical ends of collagen molecules called telopeptides, leading to the structural changes at the intramolecular gap areas, which may affect or even prevent intrafibrillar remineralization, which is considered essential in restoring the dentine's mechanical properties. They may also cause the loss of non-collagenous proteins that could serve as nucleation sites for remineralization. Here we review the findings demonstrating that inhibition of salivary or dentine endogenous MMPs and cysteine cathepsins may provide preventive means against the progression of caries or erosion. Furthermore, we also suggest the future directions for the new experimental preventive research to gain more knowledge of the enzymes and their function during and after dentine demineralization, and the pathways to find the clinically acceptable means to prevent the functional activity of these enzymes. PMID:25871416

  1. Magnitude and distribution of stresses in composite resin and sound dentine interface with mechanical retentions

    PubMed Central

    Borie, Eduardo; Orsi, Iara-Augusta; Del Sol, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Background Adhesive systems are constantly subjected to mechanical and chemical stresses that negatively impact the integrity and durability of the dentine-adhesive interface. Despite the lack of evidence to support or reject the clinical indication for mechanical retention, the potential further contribution of these preparations to the behavior of the composite resin-sound dentine bond has been rarely addressed. The authors evaluated by finite element analysis the effect of mechanical retention on the magnitude and distribution of stresses in a composite resin-sound dentin bonding interface when subjected to tensile and shear forces. Material and Methods A three-dimensional model was created based on three cylindrical volumes representing the sound dentin, adhesive system, and composite resin. From this main model, two models were designed to simulate dentine bonding: 1) a model with no mechanical retention, which considered flat adhesion; and 2) a model with retention, which considered four hemispherical holes on the dentine surface. Both groups were subjected to linear static analysis under tensile and shear loading of 200N. Results At the model with retentions’ bonding interface under tensile and shear loading, a concentration of Von Mises equivalent stress was observed within the retentions, with a reduction of those stresses on the bonding boundary surface. Conclusions Additional mechanical retention increases the tensile strength of the sound dentin-composite resin bonding interface, promoting a decrease in the magnitude of the stresses and their redistribution under tensile and shear loading. Key words:Adhesion, composite resins, dentine, finite element analysis. PMID:26155338

  2. In Vitro Ability of a Novel Nanohydroxyapatite Oral Rinse to Occlude Dentine Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert G.; Chen, Xiaohui; Gillam, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of a novel nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) desensitizing oral rinse to occlude dentine tubules compared to selected commercially available desensitizing oral rinses. Methods. 25 caries-free extracted molars were sectioned into 1 mm thick dentine discs. The dentine discs (n = 25) were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed with distilled water, prior to a 30-second application of test and control oral rinses. Evaluation was by (1) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the dentine surface and (2) fluid flow measurements through a dentine disc. Results. Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse. However the hydroxyapatite, 1.4% potassium oxalate, and arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinses, appeared to be relatively more effective than the nHA test and negative control rinses (potassium nitrate) in relation to a reduction in fluid flow measurements. Conclusions. Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse. PMID:26161093

  3. Microbiome of Deep Dentinal Caries Lesions in Teeth with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Alves, Flávio R F; Rachid, Caio T C C; Lima, Kenio C; Assunção, Isauremi V; Gomes, Patrícia N; Siqueira, José F

    2016-01-01

    This study used a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the bacterial taxa occurring in the advanced front of caries biofilms associated with pulp exposure and irreversible pulpitis. Samples were taken from the deepest layer of dentinal caries lesions associated with pulp exposure in 10 teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. DNA was extracted and the microbiome was characterized on the basis of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene by using paired-end sequencing on Illumina MiSeq device. Bacterial taxa were mapped to 14 phyla and 101 genera composed by 706 different OTUs. Three phyla accounted for approximately 98% of the sequences: Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. These phyla were also the ones with most representatives at the species level. Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum in 9/10 samples. As for genera, Lactobacillus accounted for 42.3% of the sequences, followed by Olsenella (13.7%), Pseudoramibacter (10.7%) and Streptococcus (5.5%). Half of the samples were heavily dominated by Lactobacillus, while in the other half lactobacilli were in very low abundance and the most dominant genera were Pseudoramibacter, Olsenella, Streptococcus, and Stenotrophomonas. High bacterial diversity occurred in deep dentinal caries lesions associated with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The microbiome could be classified according to the relative abundance of Lactobacillus. Except for Lactobacillus species, most of the highly prevalent and abundant bacterial taxa identified in this study have been commonly detected in infected root canals. The detected taxa can be regarded as candidate pathogens for irreversible pulpitis and possibly the pioneers in pulp invasion to initiate endodontic infection. PMID:27135405

  4. Microbiome of Deep Dentinal Caries Lesions in Teeth with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.; Rachid, Caio T. C. C.; Lima, Kenio C.; Assunção, Isauremi V.; Gomes, Patrícia N.; Siqueira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the bacterial taxa occurring in the advanced front of caries biofilms associated with pulp exposure and irreversible pulpitis. Samples were taken from the deepest layer of dentinal caries lesions associated with pulp exposure in 10 teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. DNA was extracted and the microbiome was characterized on the basis of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene by using paired-end sequencing on Illumina MiSeq device. Bacterial taxa were mapped to 14 phyla and 101 genera composed by 706 different OTUs. Three phyla accounted for approximately 98% of the sequences: Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. These phyla were also the ones with most representatives at the species level. Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum in 9/10 samples. As for genera, Lactobacillus accounted for 42.3% of the sequences, followed by Olsenella (13.7%), Pseudoramibacter (10.7%) and Streptococcus (5.5%). Half of the samples were heavily dominated by Lactobacillus, while in the other half lactobacilli were in very low abundance and the most dominant genera were Pseudoramibacter, Olsenella, Streptococcus, and Stenotrophomonas. High bacterial diversity occurred in deep dentinal caries lesions associated with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The microbiome could be classified according to the relative abundance of Lactobacillus. Except for Lactobacillus species, most of the highly prevalent and abundant bacterial taxa identified in this study have been commonly detected in infected root canals. The detected taxa can be regarded as candidate pathogens for irreversible pulpitis and possibly the pioneers in pulp invasion to initiate endodontic infection. PMID:27135405

  5. Dentin matrix degradation by host matrix metalloproteinases: inhibition and clinical perspectives toward regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chaussain, Catherine; Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Khaddam, Mayssam; Tjaderhane, Leo; George, Anne; Menashi, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enzymes have long been considered solely accountable for the degradation of the dentin matrix during the carious process. However, the emerging literature suggests that host-derived enzymes, and in particular the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contained in dentin and saliva can play a major role in this process by their ability to degrade the dentin matrix from within. These findings are important since they open new therapeutic options for caries prevention and treatment. The possibility of using MMP inhibitors to interfere with dentin caries progression is discussed. Furthermore, the potential release of bioactive peptides by the enzymatic cleavage of dentin matrix proteins by MMPs during the carious process is discussed. These peptides, once identified, may constitute promising therapeutical tools for tooth and bone regeneration. PMID:24198787

  6. Clinical effect of photodynamic therapy on primary carious dentin after partial caries removal.

    PubMed

    Neves, Pierre Adriano Moreno; Lima, Leonardo Abrantes; Rodrigues, Fernanda Cristina Nogueira; Leitão, Tarcisio Jorge; Ribeiro, Cecília Cláudia Costa

    2016-05-20

    This study was conducted to assess the clinical effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the decontamination of the deep dentin of deciduous molars submitted to partial removal of carious tissue. After cavity preparation, dentin samples were taken from the pulp wall of nineteen deciduous molars before and after PDT application. Remaining dentin was treated with 0.01% methylene blue dye followed by irradiation with an InGaAlP diode laser (λ - 660 nm; 40 mW; 120 J/cm2; 120 s). Dentin samples were microbiologically assessed for the enumeration of total microorganisms, Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci. There was no significant difference in the number of colony-forming units (CFU) for any of the microorganisms assessed (p > 0.05). Photodynamic therapy, using 0.01% methylene blue dye at a dosimetry of 120 J/cm2 would not be a viable clinical alternative to reduce bacterial contamination in deep dentin. PMID:27223131

  7. In Vitro Study of Dentin Hypersensitivity Treated by 980-nm Diode Laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Gao, Jie; Gao, Yan; XU, Shuaimei; Zhan, Xueling; Wu, Buling

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To investigate the ultrastructural changes of dentin irradiated with 980-nm diode laser under different parameters and to observe the morphological alterations of odontoblasts and pulp tissue to determine the safety parameters of 980-nm diode laser in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity (DH). Methods: Twenty extracted human third molars were selected to prepare dentin discs. Each dentin disc was divided into four areas and was irradiated by 980-nm diode laser under different parameters: Group A: control group, 0 J/cm2; Group B: 2 W/CW (continuous mode), 166 J/cm2; Group C: 3W/CW, 250 J/cm2; and Group D: 4W/CW, 333 J/cm2. Ten additional extracted human third molars were selected to prepare dentin discs. Each dentin disc was divided into two areas and was irradiated by 980-nm diode laser: Group E: control group, 0 J/cm2; and Group F: 2.0 W/CW, 166 J/cm2. The morphological alterations of the dentin surfaces and odontoblasts were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the morphological alterations of the dental pulp tissue irradiated by laser were observed with an upright microscope. Results: The study demonstrated that dentinal tubules can be entirely blocked after irradiation by 980-nm diode laser, regardless of the parameter setting. Diode laser with settings of 2.0 W and 980-nm sealed exposed dentin tubules effectively, and no significant morphological alterations of the pulp and odontoblasts were observed after irradiation. Conclusions: Irradiation with 980-nm diode laser could be effective for routine clinical treatment of DH, and 2.0W/CW (166 J/cm2) was a suitable energy parameter due to its rapid sealing of the exposed dentin tubules and its safety to the odontoblasts and pulp tissue. PMID:25606318

  8. Evaluation of phase, microstructure and composition of human dentine after Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi; Pan, Danmei; Lin, Qi; Yin, Shungao; Chen, Dagui; Liu, Qinghua; Yu, Lili; Lin, Zhang

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the composition, micro-structure and inorganic phase alternations of human dentine irradiated by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with water cooling spray system. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the main inorganic phase of dentine before and after laser irradiation were all Hydroxyapatite (HA) structure, approximately 30 nm in size. No significant changes occurred in the average particle size after irradiation in four energy densities (6.18 J/cm2, 8.04 J/cm2, 9.89 J/cm2, 11.1 J/cm2). Atomic force microscope (AFM) phase image and the energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) analysis, however, demonstrated that the thermal effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with water-cooling spray system on the dentin surface was intense enough to induce notable decrease of the organic matter. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and AFM analysis showed that the irradiated dentine presented rough surface morphology. The surface is clean and dentinal tubules are completely open. The ablation rate of both peri- and intertubular dentine increased at higher energy densities but no significant changes of gross appearance took place. Chemical analysis reveals that laser photothermal effect would decrease significantly the organic content of superficial dentinal layer. We conclude that the Er,Cr:YSGG laser, as a new type clinic laser, would not significantly influence the inorganic phase structure of the surface dentine layer, however, thermal ablation was occurred in organic component. Moreover, the rough ablated surface as well as the opened dentinal tubules induced by irradiation, might be advantageous to the infiltration of the adhesive materials, thus the adhesion of dental restoration could be enhanced. Further studies should focus on the correlation between bond strength and Er,Cr:YSGG lased dentine. PMID:21449402

  9. The antimicrobial activity of a dentin conditioner combined with antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Dental hand instruments are not efficient in removing all infected dentin when performing carious removal for minimal intervention techniques. The use of an antibacterial dentin conditioner may therefore be useful when restoring cavities that have residual carious dentin. Antibacterial agents--chlorhexidine hydrochloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, cetrimide, benzaIkonium chloride and sodium hypochlorite, were added either to a dentin conditioner used for glass ionomer cements or distilled water at 1% concentration. Dentin conditioning solutions at pH 2.5, 4.9 and 7.7 were also prepared, along with 1% aqueous thymol. Using an agar diffusion test, 25 microl aliquots were examined for their inhibitory effects on three cariogenic bacteria. After 24 hours, an agar pellet was extracted adjacent to the agar well and placed on a second inoculated agar plate to observe sustained inhibitory effects, after which this procedure was repeated one more time. Antibacterial dentin conditioners showed significant inhibitory effect compared to the control over the three test periods (p<0.016). The combination of dentin conditioners with antibacterial agents significantly reduced the inhibitory effect compared to the antibacterial aqueous solutions (p<0.016). One-percent aqueous thymol showed no inhibitory effect against the test bacteria. The cetrimide-dentin conditioner showed the greatest inhibitory effect against all three test bacteria over the three experimental periods (p<0.016). The inhibitory effect of antibacterial agents was significantly reduced when combined with a dentin conditioner. Only the cetrimide-dentin conditioner combination produced significant inhibitory effects against all three test organisms. PMID:15765961

  10. Storage effect on dentine structure and on resultant composite bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Lin, C T

    1997-11-01

    This study evaluates the effects of a food simulating solution (75 vol% ethanol/water) and an artificial saliva (Moi-Stir) on dentine structure and chemistry, using scanning electron microscopic examination and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) microscopic characterization. The effect on the bonding of composites to the conditioned dentine were evaluated by shear bond strength (SBS) tests. Three adhesive/composite systems were examined: Tenure/Marathon One, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z100, and Optibond/Herculite XRV. Control specimens were stored in either distilled water or tested without storage. Dentine surface exposure to ethanol resulted in partial loss of the smear layer and of plugs, as well as possible perturbation of collagen. Dentine surfaces exposed to artificial saliva or to distilled water had no evidence of any change from normal appearance of the smear layer. The measured FTIR spectra for most specimens conditioned in these two liquids appeared to be similar to those obtained from fresh dentine. SBS data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. The SBS value for the non-preconditioned control (23.0 +/- 3.7 MPa) or for the dentine preconditioned in distilled water (22.9 +/- 4.2 MPa) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that for dentine pre-conditioned in ethanol (20.0 +/- 3.5 MPa). The SBS (13.3 +/- 3.4 MPa) of all bonding systems was reduced by 40-50% (P < 0.001) when artificial saliva pre-conditioned dentine was used. The failure mode at the dentine-bonding agent interface for the artificial saliva group was adhesive in nature. This is in contrast to the complex cohesive fracture mode found in the control groups and in most ethanol conditioned groups. Dentine structure and chemistry, shear bond strength, and the subsequent debonded mode can be significantly affected by exposure to oral environment prior to conditioning. PMID:9426164

  11. Dynamic mechanical behavior of human dentin and collagen: Methods and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, Heonjune

    Experimental evaluations of human coronal dentin and its collagen fibrils were performed by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) using nanoindentation and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The primary objectives were to quantify the changes in mechanical behavior of intertubular and peritubular dentin with age, and to evaluate the nanostructure and mechanical behavior of the collagen fibrils. Specimens of coronal dentin were evaluated by nanoDMA using single indents and in scanning mode via scanning probe microscopy. Collagen fibrils from coronal dentin were evaluated using Pulse-Force Mode (PFM) AFM (Peakforce QNM). Nanoindentation results showed that there were no significant differences in the storage modulus or complex modulus between the two age groups (18-25 versus 54-83 yrs) for either the intertubular or peritubular dentin. However, there were significant differences in the dampening behavior between the young and old tissues, as represented in the loss modulus and tanϕ responses. For both the intertubular and peritubular components, the capacity for dampening was significantly lower in the old group. Scanning based nanoDMA showed that the tubules of old dentin exhibit a gradient in elastic behavior, with decrease in elastic modulus from the cuff to the center of tubules filled with newly deposited mineral. AFM results showed that the stiffness of the old dentin fibrils in the peak and trough regions were greater than the young dentin fibrils. In addition, there were significant differences in the dampening behavior between the young and old dentin fibrils, as represented in the energy dissipation, phase angle and loss modulus responses. For both the peak and trough regions, the dissipative capacity was significantly lower in the old dentin fibrils.

  12. Milk as Desensitizing Agent for Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity Following Periodontal Treatment Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentinal hypersensitivity is a commonly observed problem after periodontal treatment procedures in periodontal patients. This further complicates preventive oral hygiene procedures by patients which jeopardize periodontal treatment, or even may aid in periodontal treatment failure. Aims and Objectives The aims and objectives of present study were to assess the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment and selection of cases for evaluation of commercially available milk at room temperature as mouth rinse for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity caused by periodontal treatment. Materials and Methods Patients were selected randomly for nonsurgical periodontal treatment and then were assessed for dentine hypersensitivity. Those having dentine hypersensitivity were assigned in two groups. Group one patients were advised to rinse with commercially available milk at room temperature, group two patients were advised to rinse with luke warm water as control. A four point Verbal Rating Score (VRS) was designed to record the numerical value of dentine hypersensitivity. Results The results show incidence of 42.5% and prevalence of 77.5% for dentine hypersensitivity after periodontal treatment procedures. After rinsing with milk following periodontal treatment procedures, there was found a significant reduction of dentine hypersensitivity with probability by unpaired t-test as 0.0007 and 0.0001 at tenth and fifteenth day post periodontal treatment procedures respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the milk rinse is a suitable, cheaper, fast acting, home-use and easily available solution to the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Milk can be used as desensitizing agent and rinsing with milk for few days is effective in quick reduction of dentine hypersensitivity due to periodontal treatment procedures. PMID:26674005

  13. Characterization of the elastic and viscoelastic properties of dentin by a nanoindentation creep test.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Fen; Lin, Shih-Yun; Wei, Pal-Jen; Han, Chang-Fu; Lin, Jen-Fin; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2015-07-16

    Dentin is the main supporting structure of teeth, but its mechanical properties may be adversely affected by pathological demineralization. The purposes of this study were to develop a quantitative approach to characterize the viscoelastic properties of dentin after de- and re-mineralization, and to examine the elastic properties using a nanoindentation creep test. Dentin specimens were prepared to receive both micro- and nano-indentation tests at wet and dry states. These tests were repeatedly performed after demineralization (1% citric acid for 3 days) and remineralization (artificial saliva immersion for 28 days). The nanoindentation test was executed in a creep mode, and the resulting displacement-time responses were disintegrated into primary (transient) and secondary (viscous) creep. The structural changes and mineral densities of dentin were also examined under SEM and microCT, respectively. The results showed that demineralization removed superficial minerals of dentin to the depth of 400 μm, and affected its micro- and nano-hardness, especially in the hydrate state. Remineralization only repaired the minerals at the surface layer, and partially recovered the nanohardness. Both the primary the secondary creep increased in the demineralized dentin, while the hydration further enhanced creep deformation of untreated and remineralized dentin. Remineralization reduced the primary creep of dentin, but did not effectively increase the viscosity. In conclusion, water plasticization increases the transient and viscous creep strains of demineralized dentin and reduces load sustainability. The nanoindentation creep test is capable of analyzing the elastic and viscoelastic properties of dentin, and reveals crucial information about creep responses. PMID:25911251

  14. Effects of cleaning agents on bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Celso; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Netto, Narciso Garone; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2005-01-01

    The cleaning of cavity walls aims to improve adhesive restorative procedures and longevity of restorations. This study has compared the effect of three cleaning agents--sodium bicarbonate jet (Profi II, Dabi Atlante, São Paulo, Brazil); pumice paste plus a biologic detergent (Tergestesim, Probem, São Paulo, Brazil); air water spray--on the bond strength between dentin and two different adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Kioto, Japan) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (3M-ESPE, São Paulo, Brazil). Six groups (n: 10) of dental fragments obtained from young adult extracted teeth were prepared, and each one received one of the listed surface cleaning techniques. After the adhesive application, a cone-shaped test body was built with AP-X (Kuraray, Kioto, Japan) or Z100 (3M-ESPE, São Paulo, Brazil) composite resins, using a Teflon matrix. The specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after one-week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Two pairs of fractured specimens of each group were randomly chosen and processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. ANOVA test of the bond strength values showed no statistical differences among the cleaning agents and neither between their interactions with the bonding systems. Upon SEM analysis, most surfaces showed mixed fractures of adhesive and cohesive failures in bonding resin to dentin. Based on statistical and SEM analysis, it was concluded that the cleaning agents studied did not interfere with the bond strength of the adhesive systems used to dentin. PMID:16292446

  15. Resin-modified glass ionomers: dentin bond strength versus time.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, M; Iwasaki, K; Soyamura, T; Onose, H; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    Most dentin bond strength tests of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements have been conducted after at least 24 hours' storage in water. In a clinical situation, debonding might occur soon after the restoration was placed if subjected to stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the rate of development of shear bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, two Type IIs of which, Fuji II LC and Vitremer, were used. A conventional glass-ionomer cement, Fuji II, and a resin composite, Herculite XRV/OptiBond system, were also employed as controls. Bovine incisors were mounted in self-curing resin, and the facial surfaces wet ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose dentin. Materials were condensed into a vinyl mold and bonded following the manufacturers' instructions. The shear bond strengths of 10 specimens per group were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute after 1, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes' and 2, 5, and 24 hours' storage in water at 37 degrees C. One-way ANOVAs followed by the Dunnet test (P < 0.05) were used to test for significant differences between the mean bond strength at 1 minute and each of the other test periods. The test period when there was a significant increase in bond strength was defined as the "initial increasing time." The dentin bond strengths of all the materials tested increased with prolonged storage time. The initial increasing times were 10 minutes for Fuji II LC and OptiBond, 20 minutes for Fuji II, and 60 minutes for Vitremer. The differences in the initial increasing time might have clinical implications if the restoration is subjected to significant stress immediately after placement. PMID:9656926

  16. Chelating and antibacterial properties of chitosan nanoparticles on dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de Moura, Marcia Regina; Aouada, Fauze Ahmad; Kishen, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The use of chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) in endodontics is of interest due to their antibiofilm properties. This study was to investigate the ability of bioactive CNPs to remove the smear layer and inhibit bacterial recolonization on dentin. Materials and Methods One hundred bovine dentin sections were divided into five groups (n = 20 per group) according to the treatment. The irrigating solutions used were 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 20 min, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 3 min and 1.29 mg/mL CNPs for 3 min. The samples were irrigated with either distilled water (control), NaOCl, NaOCl-EDTA, NaOCl-EDTA-CNPs or NaOCl-CNPs. After the treatment, half of the samples (n = 50) were used to assess the chelating effect of the solutions using portable scanning electronic microscopy, while the other half (n = 50) were infected intra-orally to examine the post-treatment bacterial biofilm forming capacity. The biovolume and cellular viability of the biofilms were analysed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The Kappa test was performed for examiner calibration, and the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05) were used for comparisons among the groups. Results The smear layer was significantly reduced in all of the groups except the control and NaOCl groups (p < 0.05). The CNPs-treated samples were able to resist biofilm formation significantly better than other treatment groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions CNPs could be used as a final irrigant during root canal treatment with the dual benefit of removing the smear layer and inhibiting bacterial recolonization on root dentin. PMID:26295022

  17. Molar enamel thickness and dentine horn height in Gigantopithecus blacki.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, A J; Smith, T M; Wang, W; Potts, R; Ciochon, R; Kullmer, O; Schrenk, F; Hublin, J-J

    2008-01-01

    Absolutely thick molar enamel is consistent with large body size estimates and dietary inferences about Gigantopithecus blacki, which focus on tough or fibrous vegetation. In this study, 10 G. blacki molars demonstrating various stages of attrition were imaged using high-resolution microtomography. Three-dimensional average enamel thickness and relative enamel thickness measurements were recorded on the least worn molars within the sample (n = 2). Seven molars were also virtually sectioned through the mesial cusps and two-dimensional enamel thickness and dentine horn height measurements were recorded. Gigantopithecus has the thickest enamel of any fossil or extant primate in terms of absolute thickness. Relative (size-scaled) measures of enamel thickness, however, support a thick characterization (i.e., not "hyper-thick"); G. blacki relative enamel thickness overlaps slightly with Pongo and completely with Homo. Gigantopithecus blacki dentine horns are relatively short, similar to (but shorter than) those of Pongo, which in turn are shorter than those of humans and African apes. Gigantopithecus blacki molar enamel (and to a lesser extent, that of Pongo pygmaeus) is distributed relatively evenly across the occlusal surface compared with the more complex distribution of enamel thickness in Homo sapiens. The combination of evenly distributed occlusal enamel and relatively short dentine horns in G. blacki results in a flat and low-cusped occlusal surface suitable to grinding tough or fibrous food objects. This suite of molar morphologies is also found to varying degrees in Pongo and Sivapithecus, but not in African apes and humans, and may be diagnostic of subfamily Ponginae. PMID:17941103

  18. Dentine chips produced by nickel-titanium rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Guppy, D R; Curtis, R V; Ford, T R

    2000-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the cross-sectional shape of two nickel-titanium rotary instruments, namely ProFile and Quantec files, both ISO 25, 0.06 taper, and sought to relate this to the chips produced by cutting dentine. A limited comparison was made with stainless steel engine reamers. First, five files of each type were sectioned transversely at 12 mm, 8 mm and 4 mm from the tip and examined by scanning electron microscopy. The cutting angles were assessed by a direct measurement technique which allowed for the inclination of a cutting edge to the root canal. Second, eight samples of cutting debris were collected from instrumentation by each type of nickel-titanium file and four samples from the engine reamers. The major and minor axis, area and roundness of the dentine chips in each sample were measured using computerized particle analysis. The results demonstrated that all files had a negative cutting angle which varied at the different levels (ProFiles range 69.4 degrees to 58.4 degrees and Quantec range 74.8 degrees to 56.8 degrees). The consistency within files of the same type was good as demonstrated by low standard deviations, except for Quantec files at the 4 mm level where higher standard deviations of 4.1 degrees and 5.5 degrees for the two blades were found. The chip analysis showed significant differences between chips produced by ProFile and Quantec files (P < 0.05). The latter were larger and rounder. The chips from the ProFile and the engine reamer chips were similar in dimension (P > 0.05). No simple relationship existed between file geometry and the dentine chips produced during instrumentation. PMID:11202891

  19. Evaluation of dentin permeability after light activated internal dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Zanello Guerisoli, Danilo M; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively the dentin permeability of human teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LEDs, halogen lamp or using the walking bleach technique. Forty human maxillary central incisors had standard access cavities performed and the cervical thirds of the canals were prepared with Gates-Glidden drills up to a size 130. Roots were resected between the coronal and middle thirds and the apical portions were discarded. A glass ionomer, 2 mm thick cervical plug was placed inside the canal, at the cement-enamel junction level. Group I received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by LEDs. Group II was submitted to 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by halogen lamp. Group III received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel and the walking bleach technique was followed. Group IV (control) received a dry cotton pellet inside the pulp chamber with temporary restoration. Dentinal permeability was quantified by copper ion penetration. Linear measurements were obtained by analysis of digital images under x 5 magnification. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I, 7.1% (+/-3.2%); II, 8.4% (+/-3.0%); III, 9.1% (+/-3.0%); IV, 1.3% (+/-2.8%). One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the results. Results showed an increase of permeability values for groups I, II and III when compared to group IV (control); however, no statistical differences were found between the three tested bleaching techniques. It can be concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED, halogen lamp or used following the walking bleach technique produced similar increase in dentinal permeability. PMID:17227378

  20. [The dentinal smear layer. Characteristics and interactions. 2].

    PubMed

    Negri, P L; Eramo, S; Lotito, M; De Pino, C

    1991-03-15

    The Authors, after the presentation (in the first part of the Dossier) of a large literature review about the physical, chemical and clinical characteristics of formation, interaction, remotion of "smear layer" during cavity preparation in hard tooth tissue, describe the results of a scanning microelectronic research about the action as cleanser (for the dentinal cavity wall) of the CK101 (Caridex) versus wather, Tubulicid and phosphoric acid. The experimental results obtained "in vitro" show that the substance has relative action, without removing the tubular portion of "smear layer". PMID:2070916

  1. Water distribution in dentin matrices: bound vs. unbound water

    PubMed Central

    Agee, Kelli A.; Prakki, Anuradha; Abu-Haimed, Tariq; Naguib, Ghada H.; Nawareg, Manar Abu; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Scheffel, Debora L.S.; Chen, Chen; Jang, Seung Soon; Hwang, Hyea; Brackett, Martha; Grégoire, Geneviéve; Tay, Franklin R.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This work measured the amount of bound versus unbound water in completely-demineralized dentin. Methods Dentin beams prepared from extracted human teeth were completely demineralized, rinsed and dried to constant mass. They were rehydrated in 41% relative humidity (RH), while gravimetrically measuring their mass increase until the first plateau was reached at 0.064 (vacuum) or 0.116 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite). The specimens were then exposed to 60% RH until attaining the second plateau at 0.220 (vacuum) or 0.191 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite), and subsequently exposed to 99% RH until attaining the third plateau at 0.493 (vacuum) or 0.401 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite). Results Exposure of the first layer of bound water to 0% RH for 5 min produced a −0.3% loss of bound water; in the second layer of bound water it caused a −3.3% loss of bound water; in the third layer it caused a −6% loss of bound water. Immersion in 100% ethanol or acetone for 5 min produced a 2.8 and 1.9% loss of bound water from the first layer, respectively; it caused a −4 and −7% loss of bound water in the second layer, respectively; and a −17 and −23% loss of bound water in the third layer.. Bound water represented 21–25% of total dentin water. Chemical dehydration of water-saturated dentin with ethanol/acetone for 1 min only removed between 25 to 35% of unbound water, respectively. Significance Attempts to remove bound water by evaporation were not very successful. Chemical dehydration with 100% acetone was more successful than 100% ethanol especially the third layer of bound water. Since unbound water represents between 75–79% of total matrix water, the more such water can be removed, the more resin can be infiltrated. PMID:25612786

  2. Third-harmonic generation microscopy reveals dental anatomy in ancient fossils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Szu-Yu; Wu, Yana; Brink, Kirstin; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Huang, Timothy D; Reisz, Robert R; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-04-01

    Fossil teeth are primary tools in the study of vertebrate evolution, but standard imaging modalities have not been capable of providing high-quality images in dentin, the main component of teeth, owing to small refractive index differences in the fossilized dentin. Our first attempt to use third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy in fossil teeth has yielded significant submicrometer level anatomy, with an unexpectedly strong signal contrasting fossilized tubules from the surrounding dentin. Comparison between fossilized and extant teeth of crocodilians reveals a consistent evolutionary signature through time, indicating the great significance of THG microscopy in the evolutionary studies of dental anatomy in fossil teeth. PMID:25831331

  3. Laser-based technique for controlled damage of mesenchymal cell spheroids: a first step in studying reparation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kosheleva, N V; Ilina, I V; Zurina, I M; Roskova, A E; Gorkun, A A; Ovchinnikov, A V; Agranat, M B; Saburina, I N

    2016-01-01

    Modern techniques of laser microsurgery of cell spheroids were used to develop a new simple reproducible model for studying repair and regeneration in vitro Nanosecond laser pulses (wavelength 355 nm, frequency 100 Hz, pulse duration 2 ns) were applied to perform a microdissection of the outer and the inner zones of human bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM MMSC) spheroids. To achieve effective dissection and preservation of spheroid viability, the energy of laser pulses was optimized and adjusted in the range 7-9 μJ. After microdissection, the edges of the wound surface opened and the angular opening reached a value of more than 180°. The destruction of the initial spheroid structure was observed in the wound area, with surviving cells changing their shape into a round one. Partial restoration of a spheroid form took place in the first six hours. The complete structure restoration accompanying the reparative processes occurred gradually over seven days due to remodelling of surviving cells. PMID:27334698

  4. Laser-based technique for controlled damage of mesenchymal cell spheroids: a first step in studying reparation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ilina, I. V.; Zurina, I. M.; Roskova, A. E.; Gorkun, A. A.; Ovchinnikov, A. V.; Agranat, M. B.; Saburina, I. N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Modern techniques of laser microsurgery of cell spheroids were used to develop a new simple reproducible model for studying repair and regeneration in vitro. Nanosecond laser pulses (wavelength 355 nm, frequency 100 Hz, pulse duration 2 ns) were applied to perform a microdissection of the outer and the inner zones of human bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM MMSC) spheroids. To achieve effective dissection and preservation of spheroid viability, the energy of laser pulses was optimized and adjusted in the range 7-9 μJ. After microdissection, the edges of the wound surface opened and the angular opening reached a value of more than 180°. The destruction of the initial spheroid structure was observed in the wound area, with surviving cells changing their shape into a round one. Partial restoration of a spheroid form took place in the first six hours. The complete structure restoration accompanying the reparative processes occurred gradually over seven days due to remodelling of surviving cells. PMID:27334698

  5. Digital moiré interferometric analysis on the effect of nanoparticle conditioning on the mechanical deformation in dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang Chi; Kishen, Anil

    2016-02-01

    Dentin is a biological composite that forms the major bulk of tooth structure. Understanding the biomechanical response of dentin structure to forces is essential to restore the loss of mechanical integrity associated with dentin loss during disease or treatment procedures. Moiré interferometry is an optical interferometry based method, which allows wholefield, real-time analysis of dental structures with high-sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the deformation gradients in dentin during function and subsequent to surface conditioning with bioactive biopolymeric nanoparticle. Slab shaped dentin specimens were prepared and a customized loading jig was used to compressively load the specimens from 10 N to 50 N. Specific regions of interest was chosen on the dentin specimens for strain analysis. The digital moiré interferometry experiments showed a distinct deformation pattern in dentin in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules, which increased with increase in dentin loss. The dentin conditioned with nanoparticles did not display marked increase in strain gradients with loads. The current photomechanical experiment highlighted the impact of nanoparticle treatment to improve the mechanical integrity of dentin.

  6. Influence of cariogenic challenge on bond strength stability of dentin.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Anelise Fernandes; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cariogenic challenge on the microtensile bond strength values (μTBS) of dentin pre-treated with chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Thirty-six sound molars were selected and randomly assigned to 3 dentin pre-treatments (distilled water - control, 2% CHX and 10% NaOCl) and 4 aging protocols (24h control, biofilm without cariogenic challenge, biofilm with cariogenic challenge, and 18-month water storage). The same etch-and-rinse adhesive system and composite resin were used for all groups (n=30 beams). For the biofilm groups, dental microcosm biofilms originated from saliva of a healthy donor were grown on the samples with a defined medium enriched with mucin, with or without 10% sucrose, according to the group. After the experimental period, the microtensile test was performed. Data were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). The pre-treatment did not influence μTBS for all aging conditions (p=0.188), but the type of aging affected the bond strength (p<0.001). Cariogenic challenge and water storage aging affected the bond stability resulting in a decrease of the μTBS, but the pre-treatments did not influence the μTBS. PMID:25831102

  7. Biomimetic Scaffold with Aligned Microporosity Designed for Dentin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Dozio, Samuele Maria; Savini, Elisa; Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common result of a variety of oral diseases due to physiological causes, trauma, genetic disorders, and aging and can lead to physical and mental suffering that markedly lowers the individual’s quality of life. Tooth is a complex organ that is composed of mineralized tissues and soft connective tissues. Dentin is the most voluminous tissue of the tooth and its formation (dentinogenesis) is a highly regulated process displaying several similarities with osteogenesis. In this study, gelatin, thermally denatured collagen, was used as a promising low-cost material to develop scaffolds for hard tissue engineering. We synthetized dentin-like scaffolds using gelatin biomineralized with magnesium-doped hydroxyapatite and blended it with alginate. With a controlled freeze-drying process and alginate cross-linking, it is possible to obtain scaffolds with microscopic aligned channels suitable for tissue engineering. 3D cell culture with mesenchymal stem cells showed the promising properties of the new scaffolds for tooth regeneration. In detail, the chemical–physical features of the scaffolds, mimicking those of natural tissue, facilitate the cell adhesion, and the porosity is suitable for long-term cell colonization and fine cell–material interactions. PMID:27376060

  8. Root dentine and endodontic instrumentation: cutting edge microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Atmeh, Amre R; Watson, Timothy F

    2016-06-01

    Cutting of the dental hard tissues is an integral part of restorative dentistry. Cutting of the root dentine is also needed in preparation prior to endodontic treatment, with significant commercial investment for the development of flexible cutting instruments based around nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys. This paper describes the evolution of endodontic cutting instruments, both in materials used, e.g. the transition from stainless steel to NiTi, and the design of the actual instruments themselves and their method of activation-by hand or motor driven. We have been examining tooth-cutting interactions microscopically for over 25 years using a variety of microscopic techniques; in particular, video-rate confocal microscopy. This has given a unique insight into how many of the procedures that we take for granted are achieved in clinical practice, by showing microscopic video images of the cutting as it occurs within the tooth. This technology has now been extended to allow imaging of the endodontic instrument and the root canal wall for the first time. We are able to image dentine distortion and crack propagation during endodontic filing of the root canal space. We are also able to visualize the often claimed, but seldom seen action of contemporary endodontic instruments. PMID:27274802

  9. Geochemical evolution of amino acids in dentine of Pleistocene bears.

    PubMed

    De Torres, T; Ortiz, J E; García, M J; Llamas, J F; Canoira, L; De La Morena, M A; Juliá, R

    2001-08-01

    A linear correlation was established between aspartic acid racemization ratio from cave bear dentine collagen and absolute dating. The high correlation coefficient obtained allowed age calculation through amino acid racemization. Aspartic acid and glutamic acid racemization kinetics have also been explored in dentine from a North American black bear (Ursus americanus Pallas). Three sample sets were prepared for kinetic heating experiments in nitrogen atmosphere: one water soaked, one with a water-saturated nitrogen atmosphere, and one without any moisture. It was possible to show that the presence of water is a factor controlling amino acid racemization rate. The aspartic acid in a heating experiment at 105 degrees C shows an "apparent kinetics reversal" which can be explained by a progressive hydrolysis of amino acid chains (proteins and polypeptides). Because of the low potential of collagen preservation over long periods of time, the apparent kinetics reversal phenomenon will not affect the dating of old material where no traces of collagen remain. An apparent kinetics reversal was not observed in glutamic acid, which racemizates more slowly. PMID:11466777

  10. Biodentine-a novel dentinal substitute for single visit apexification

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mohammad Faiz

    2014-01-01

    Use of an apical plug in management of cases with open apices has gained popularity in recent years. Biodentine, a new calcium silicate-based material has recently been introduced as a dentine substitute, whenever original dentine is damaged. This case report describes single visit apexification in a maxillary central incisor with necrotic pulp and open apex using Biodentine as an apical barrier, and a synthetic collagen material as an internal matrix. Following canal cleaning and shaping, calcium hydroxide was placed as an intracanal medicament for 1 mon. This was followed by placement of small piece of absorbable collagen membrane beyond the root apex to serve as matrix. An apical plug of Biodentine of 5 mm thickness was placed against the matrix using pre-fitted hand pluggers. The remainder of canal was back-filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha and access cavity was restored with composite resin followed by all-ceramic crown. One year follow-up revealed restored aesthetics and function, absence of clinical signs and symptoms, resolution of periapical rarefaction, and a thin layer of calcific tissue formed apical to the Biodentine barrier. The positive clinical outcome in this case is encouraging for the use of Biodentine as an apical plug in single visit apexification procedures. PMID:24790925

  11. SYNERGISTIC DEGRADATION OF DENTIN BY CYCLIC STRESS AND BUFFER AGITATION

    PubMed Central

    Orrego, Santiago; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Secondary caries and non-carious lesions develop in regions of stress concentrations and oral fluid movement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of cyclic stress and fluid movement on material loss and subsurface degradation of dentin within an acidic environment. Rectangular specimens of radicular dentin were prepared from caries-free unrestored 3rd molars. Two groups were subjected to cyclic cantilever loading within a lactic acid solution (pH=5) to achieve compressive stresses on the inner (pulpal) or outer sides of the specimens. Two additional groups were evaluated in the same solution, one subjected to movement only (no stress) and the second held stagnant (control: no stress or movement). Exterior material loss profiles and subsurface degradation were quantified on the two sides of the specimens. Results showed that under cyclic stress material loss was significantly greater (p≤0.0005) on the pulpal side than on the outer side and significantly greater (p≤0.05) under compression than tension. However, movement only caused significantly greater material loss (p≤0.0005) than cyclic stress. Subsurface degradation was greatest at the location of highest stress, but was not influenced by stress state or movement. PMID:25637823

  12. Biomimetic Scaffold with Aligned Microporosity Designed for Dentin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Dozio, Samuele Maria; Savini, Elisa; Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common result of a variety of oral diseases due to physiological causes, trauma, genetic disorders, and aging and can lead to physical and mental suffering that markedly lowers the individual's quality of life. Tooth is a complex organ that is composed of mineralized tissues and soft connective tissues. Dentin is the most voluminous tissue of the tooth and its formation (dentinogenesis) is a highly regulated process displaying several similarities with osteogenesis. In this study, gelatin, thermally denatured collagen, was used as a promising low-cost material to develop scaffolds for hard tissue engineering. We synthetized dentin-like scaffolds using gelatin biomineralized with magnesium-doped hydroxyapatite and blended it with alginate. With a controlled freeze-drying process and alginate cross-linking, it is possible to obtain scaffolds with microscopic aligned channels suitable for tissue engineering. 3D cell culture with mesenchymal stem cells showed the promising properties of the new scaffolds for tooth regeneration. In detail, the chemical-physical features of the scaffolds, mimicking those of natural tissue, facilitate the cell adhesion, and the porosity is suitable for long-term cell colonization and fine cell-material interactions. PMID:27376060

  13. Synergistic degradation of dentin by cyclic stress and buffer agitation.

    PubMed

    Orrego, Santiago; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    Secondary caries and non-carious lesions develop in regions of stress concentrations and oral fluid movement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of cyclic stress and fluid movement on material loss and subsurface degradation of dentin within an acidic environment. Rectangular specimens of radicular dentin were prepared from caries-free unrestored 3rd molars. Two groups were subjected to cyclic cantilever loading within a lactic acid solution (pH = 5) to achieve compressive stresses on the inner (pulpal) or outer sides of the specimens. Two additional groups were evaluated in the same solution, one subjected to movement only (no stress) and the second held stagnant (control: no stress or movement). Exterior material loss profiles and subsurface degradation were quantified on the two sides of the specimens. Results showed that under cyclic stress material loss was significantly greater (p ≤ 0.0005) on the pulpal side than on the outer side and significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) under compression than tension. However, movement only caused significantly greater material loss (p ≤ 0.0005) than cyclic stress. Subsurface degradation was greatest at the location of highest stress, but was not influenced by stress state or movement. PMID:25637823

  14. Wnt Acts as a Prosurvival Signal to Enhance Dentin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Daniel J; Bardet, Claire; Mouraret, Sylvain; Liu, Bo; Singh, Gurpreet; Sadoine, Jérémy; Dhamdhere, Girija; Smith, Andrew; Tran, Xuan Vinh; Joy, Adrienne; Rooker, Scott; Suzuki, Shigeki; Vuorinen, Annukka; Miettinen, Susanna; Chaussain, Catherine; Helms, Jill A

    2015-07-01

    Wnt proteins are lipid-modified, short-range signals that control stem cell self-renewal and tissue regeneration. We identified a population of Wnt responsive cells in the pulp cavity, characterized their function, and then created a pulp injury. The repair response was evaluated over time using molecular, cellular, and quantitative assays. We tested how healing was impacted by wound environments in which Wnt signaling was amplified. We found that a Wnt-amplified environment was associated with superior pulp healing. Although cell death was still rampant, the number of cells undergoing apoptosis was significantly reduced. This resulted in significantly better survival of injured pulp cells, and resulted in the formation of more tertiary dentin. We engineered a liposome-reconstituted form of WNT3A then tested whether this biomimetic compound could activate cells in the injured tooth pulp and stimulate dentin regeneration. Pulp cells responded to the elevated Wnt stimulus by differentiating into secretory odontoblasts. Thus, transiently amplifying the body's natural Wnt response resulted in improved pulp vitality. These data have direct clinical implications for treating dental caries, the most prevalent disease affecting mankind. PMID:25556760

  15. Porcine dentin matrix protein 1: gene structure, cDNA sequence, and expression in teeth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Iwata, Takanori; Hu, Yuan Yuan; Zhang, Hengmin; Hu, Jan C.-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic non-collagenous protein that is necessary for the proper biomineralization of bone, cartilage, cementum, dentin, and enamel. Dentin matrix protein 1 is highly phosphorylated and potentially glycosylated, but there is no experimental data identifying which specific amino acids are modified. For the purpose of facilitating the characterization of DMP1 from pig, which has the advantage of large developing teeth for obtaining protein in quantity and extensive structural information concerning other tooth matrix proteins, we characterized the porcine DMP1 cDNA and gene structure, raised anti-peptide immunoglobulins that are specific for porcine DMP1, and detected DMP1 protein in porcine tooth extracts and histological sections. Porcine DMP1 has 510 amino acids, including a 16-amino acid signal peptide. The deduced molecular weight of the secreted, unmodified protein is 53.5 kDa. The protein has 93 serines and 12 threonines in the appropriate context for phosphorylation, and four asparagines in a context suitable for glycosylation. Dentin matrix protein 1 protein bands with apparent molecular weights between 30 and 45 kDa were observed in partially purified dentin extracts. In developing teeth, immunohistochemistry localized DMP1 in odontoblasts and the dentinal tubules of mineralized dentin and in ameloblasts, but not in the enamel matrix. PMID:16460339

  16. Comparison of propagation-based phase-contrast tomography approaches for the evaluation of dentin microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Lang, Sabrina; Schulz, Georg; Rack, Alexander; Zanette, Irene; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The complex hierarchical structure of human tooth hard tissues, enamel and dentin, guarantees function for decades. On the micrometer level the dentin morphology is dominated by the tubules, micrometer-narrow channels extending from the dentin-enamel junction to the pulp chamber. Their structure has been extensively studied, mainly with two-dimensional approaches. Dentin tubules are formed during tooth growth and their orientation is linked to the morphology of the nanometer-sized components, which is of interest for example for the development of bio-inspired dental fillings. Therefore, a method has to be identified that can access the three-dimensional organization of the tubules, e.g. density and orientation. Tomographic setups with pixel sizes in the sub-micrometer range allow for the three-dimensional visualization of tooth dentin tubules both in phase and absorption contrast modes. We compare high-resolution tomographic scans reconstructed with propagation based phase retrieval algorithms as well as reconstructions without phase retrieval concerning spatial and density resolution as well as rendering of the dentin microstructure to determine the approach best suited for dentin tubule imaging. Reasonable results were obtained with a single-distance phase retrieval algorithm and a propagation distance of about 75% of the critical distance of d2/λ, where d is the size of the smallest objects identifiable in the specimen and λ is the X-ray wavelength.

  17. Desensitizing Agent Reduces Dentin Hypersensitivity During Ultrasonic Scaling: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Tomonari; Akiyama, Toshiharu; Takano, Takuya; Gokyu, Misa; Sudo, Takeaki; Khemwong, Thatawee; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin hypersensitivity can interfere with optimal periodontal care by dentists and patients. The pain associated with dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling is intolerable for patient and interferes with the procedure, particularly during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for patients with gingival recession. Aim This study proposed to evaluate the desensitizing effect of the oxalic acid agent on pain caused by dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling. Materials and Methods This study involved 12 patients who were incorporated in SPT program and complained of dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling. We examined the availability of the oxalic acid agent to compare the degree of pain during ultrasonic scaling with or without the application of the dentin hypersensitivity agent. Evaluation of effects on dentin hypersensitivity was determined by a questionnaire and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores after ultrasonic scaling. The statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results The desensitizing agent reduced the mean VAS pain score from 69.33 ± 16.02 at baseline to 26.08 ± 27.99 after application. The questionnaire revealed that >80% patients were satisfied and requested the application of the desensitizing agent for future ultrasonic scaling sessions. Conclusion This study shows that the application of the oxalic acid agent considerably reduces pain associated with dentin hypersensitivity experienced during ultrasonic scaling. This pain control treatment may improve patient participation and treatment efficiency. PMID:26501012

  18. The fibrillar structure of the cemento-dentinal junction in different kinds of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Domon, T; Takahashi, S; Islam, M N; Suzuki, R

    2001-10-01

    The cemento-dentinal junction was examined in human maxillary incisors, canines and premolars by scanning electron microscopy combined with NaOH maceration. The NaOH maceration was used to remove interfibrillar substances and to observe details of the fibrillar architecture. The teeth were half-sectioned longitudinally, demineralized and macerated for 3-4 days or for 10-14 days. In the 3-4 day-macerated specimens, longitudinal sections of the cemento-dentinal junction were examined. In the 10-14 day-macerated specimens, the cementum was detached and the inner cementum surface facing the cemento-dentinal junction was examined. Observations suggested that cemental fibrils intermingle with dentinal fibrils only in places at the cemento-dentinal junction in both acellular and cellular cementum. These structural features were consistent in all kinds of teeth investigated here. Using human molars, we have previously proposed that the adhesion of proteoglycans is a main factor for the cemento-dentinal attachment and that the fibril intermingling between dentin and cementum is an accessory or secondary factor. The present study suggests that this applies to other kinds of human teeth. PMID:11585119

  19. Optimizing dentin bond durability: control of collagen degradation by matrix metalloproteinases and cysteine cathepsins

    PubMed Central

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Nascimento, Fabio D.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Tersariol, Ivarne L.S.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carrilho, Marcela R.; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary adhesives lose their bond strength to dentin regardless of the bonding system used. This loss relates to the hydrolysis of collagen matrix of the hybrid layers. The preservation of the collagen matrix integrity is a key issue in the attempts to improve the dentin bonding durability. Methods Dentin contains collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins, which are responsible for the hydrolytic degradation of collagen matrix in the bonded interface. Results The identities, roles and function of collagenolytic enzymes in mineralized dentin has been gathered only within last 15 years, but they have already been demonstrated to have an important role in dental hard tissue pathologies, including the degradation of the hybrid layer. Identifying responsible enzymes facilitates the development of new, more efficient methods to improve the stability of dentin-adhesive bond and durability of bond strength. Significance Understanding the nature and role of proteolytic degradation of dentin-adhesive interfaces has improved immensely and has practically grown to a scientific field of its own within only 10 years, holding excellent promise that stable resin-dentin bonds will be routinely available in a daily clinical setting already in a near future. PMID:22901826

  20. Changes in elastic modulus of adhesive and adhesive-infiltrated dentin during storage in water.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Genta; Inage, Hirohiko; Kawamoto, Ryo; Shimamura, Yutaka; Takubo, Chikako; Tamura, Yukie; Koga, Kensaku; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elastic modulus of components at the resin-dentin interface with the use of an ultrasound device. Dentin slabs were obtained from freshly extracted bovine incisors shaped into a rectangular form. After demineralization, the dentin specimens were immersed in adhesives and polymerized. Adhesives were also polymerized and trimmed into the same shape as the dentin slabs. The specimens were then immersed in distilled water at 37 degrees C for up to one year. The ultrasound equipment employed in this study was a Pulser-Receiver, transducers and an oscilloscope. By measuring the longitudinal and shear wave sound velocities, the elastic modulus was determined. When the elastic modulus of adhesive resin-infiltrated demineralized dentin was compared with that of adhesives, slightly but significantly lower values were found for adhesives used in a self-etching primer system. On the other hand, a higher elastic modulus was observed for resin-infiltrated dentin than for an adhesive used in an etch and rinse system. The elastic modulus of the resin-infiltrated dentin prepared with the etch and rinse system was affected by long-term storage in distilled water. PMID:19106478

  1. Effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and chitosan solutions on microhardness of the human radicular dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jaiswal, Shikha; Bansal, Parul; Arora, Rohit; Raj, Shalya; Malhotra, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and chitosan solutions on the microhardness of human radicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty dentin specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each according to the irrigant used: G1 — 1% phytic acid, G2 — 17% EDTA, and G3 — 0.2% chitosan. A standardized volume of each chelating solution was used for 3 min. Dentin microhardness was measured before and after application at the cervical, middle, and apical levels with a Vickers indenter under a 200-g load and a 10-s dwell time. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test. Results: Microhardness of the radicular dentin varied at the cervical, middle, and apical levels. EDTA had the greatest overall effect, causing a sharp percentage reduction in dentin microhardness with a significant difference from phytic acid and chitosan (P = 0.002). However, phytic acid and chitosan differed insignificantly from each other (P = 0.887). Conclusion: All tested chelating solutions reduced microhardness of the radicular dentin layer at all the levels. However, reduction was least at the apical level. EDTA caused more reduction in dentin microhardness than chitosan while phytic acid reduced the least. PMID:27099428

  2. Dental Pulp and Dentin Tissue Engineering and Regeneration – Advancement and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George T.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Hard tissue is difficult to repair especially dental structures. Tooth enamel is incapable of self-repairing whereas dentin and cememtum can regenerate with limited capacity. Enamel and dentin are commonly under the attack by caries. Extensive forms of caries destroy enamel and dentin and can lead to dental pulp infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by the pulp space disinfection and filled with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection --commonly known as root canal or endodontic therapy. Regeneration of dentin relies on having vital pulps; however, regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. With the advent of modern tissue engineering concept and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the recent endeavor on pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement and challenge in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:21196351

  3. Visualization and quantification of healthy and carious dentin structure using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Matsumoto, Koukichi; Berns, Michael W.

    1996-04-01

    In this study, a fluorescence technique was developed for visualization of dentin using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Eighteen extracted human teeth were used: 13 showing no clinical signs of caries and 5 with visually apparent decay. Preliminary study: All teeth were horizontally sectioned to approx. 200 micrometers thickness and pre-treated as follows: no pretreatment; vacuum only; ultrasonication only; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) only; vacuum and NaOCl; ultrasonication and NaOCl; or vacuum, ultrasonication and NaOCl. Samples were stained with Rhodamine 123 fluorescent dye at a concentration of 10-5 M in phosphate buffer saline for 1 to 24 hours. Caries study: Dentin surfaces, some with pre-existing caries, were visualized using CLSM. Most dentin tubules in sound dentin appeared open using CLSM, but most dentin tubules in carious dentin appeared closed or narrowed. Surface images obtained using CLSM were similar to those seen by SEM, but additional subsurface imaging was possible using CLSM at depth intervals of 1 micrometers to a depth of 30 - 50 micrometers . This technique shows good potential for non-invasive surface and subsurface imaging of dentin structures.

  4. Remineralization of artificial dentinal caries lesions by biomimetically modified mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-pin; Li, Nan; Niu, Li-na; Primus, Carolyn M; Ling, Jun-Qi; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-02-01

    Fluoride-releasing restorative materials are available for remineralization of enamel and root caries. However, remineralization of dentin is more difficult than remineralization of enamel due to the paucity of apatite seed crystallites along the lesion surface for heterogeneous crystal growth. Extracellular matrix proteins play critical roles in controlling apatite nucleation/growth in collagenous tissues. This study examined the remineralization efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in phosphate-containing simulated body fluid (SBF) by incorporating polyacrylic acid and sodium tripolyphosphate as biomimetic analogs of matrix proteins for remineralizing caries-like dentin. Artificial caries-like dentin lesions incubated in SBF were remineralized over a 6 week period using MTA alone or MTA containing biomimetic analogs in the absence or presence of dentin adhesive application. Lesion depths and integrated mineral loss were monitored with microcomputed tomography. The ultrastructure of baseline and remineralized lesions was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dentin remineralization was best achieved using MTA containing biomimetic analogs regardless of whether an adhesive was applied; dentinal tubules within the remineralized dentin were occluded by apatite. It is concluded that the version of MTA employed in this study may be doped with biomimetic analogs for remineralization of unbonded and bonded artificial caries-like lesions in the presence of SBF. PMID:22085925

  5. Adhesion to Primary and Permanent Dentin and a Simple Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Can-Karabulut, Deniz C.; Oz, Firdevs Tulga; Karabulut, Baris; Batmaz, Inci; Ilk, Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    Objectives First to compare different dentin bonding agents’ shear bond strength to primary and permanent dentin. Secondly to compare the fracture failure modes and making an attempt to develop a statistical model that could be helpful in predicting them. Methods Extracted human primary and permanent molars were used as substrates (dentin). The shear bond strength of composite to substrate was measured and fracture surfaces were evaluated visually and with stereomicroscope. Using the data obtained, a statistical model was built in order to predict the failure modes. Results Higher bond strength values were obtained for permanent dentin. Total-etch adhesives displayed higher shear bond strength values than the self-etch adhesive. Adhesive failures were more frequently seen in primary dentin. Self-etch adhesive system displayed more adhesive failures. Prepared model confirmed the negative relationship between shear bond strength and the probability of observing adhesive failure. Conclusions There should be an application protocol for the usage of dentin bonding agents in primary dentin. Further development of statistical and fuzzy models for failure modes can be supportive alternatives for microscopic evaluations and also be helpful in understanding and eliminating the factors which are responsible for the formation of adhesive failures and for achieving clinically more successful adhesive restorations. PMID:19262729

  6. Effect of in vitro chewing and bruxism events on remineralization, at the resin-dentin interface.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Cabello, Inmaculada; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if different in vitro functional and parafunctional habits promote mineralization at the resin-dentin interface after bonding with three different adhesive approaches. Dentin surfaces were subjected to distinct treatments: demineralization by (1) 37% phosphoric acid (PA) followed by application of an etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive, Single Bond (SB) (PA+SB); (2) 0.5 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) followed by SB (EDTA+SB); (3) application of a self-etch dentin adhesive, Clearfil SE Bond (SEB). Different loading waveforms were applied: No cycling (I), cycled in sine (II) or square (III) waves, sustained loading hold for 24 h (IV) or sustained loading hold for 72 h (V). Remineralization at the bonded interfaces was assessed by AFM imaging/nano-indentation, Raman spectroscopy and Masson's trichrome staining. In general, in vitro chewing and parafunctional habits, promoted an increase of nano-mechanical properties at the resin-dentin interface. Raman spectroscopy through cluster analysis demonstrated an augmentation of the mineral-matrix ratio in loaded specimens. Trichrome staining reflected a narrow demineralized dentin matrix after loading in all groups except in PA+SB and EDTA+SB samples after sustained loading hold for 72 h, which exhibited a strong degree of mineralization. In vitro mechanical loading, produced during chewing and bruxism (square or hold 24 and 72 h waveforms), induced remineralization at the resin-dentin bonded interface. PMID:25443879

  7. Microorganism penetration in dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal walls. In vitro SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sulaiman, Alaa; Al-Rasheed, Fellwa; Alnajjar, Fatimah; Al-Abdulwahab, Bander; Al-Badah, Abdulhakeem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This in vitro study aimed to investigate the ability of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) to penetrate dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal surface of split human teeth. Materials and Methods Sixty intact extracted human single-rooted teeth were divided into 4 groups, negative control, positive control without canal instrumentation, instrumented, and retreated. Root canals in the instrumented group were enlarged with endodontic instruments, while root canals in the retreated group were enlarged, filled, and then removed the canal filling materials. The teeth were split longitudinally after canal preparation in 3 groups except the negative control group. The teeth were inoculated with both microorganisms separately and in combination. Teeth specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the depth of penetration into the dentinal tubules was assessed using the SMILE view software (JEOL Ltd). Results Penetration of C. albicans and E. faecalis into the dentinal tubules was observed in all 3 groups, although penetration was partially restricted by dentin debris of tubules in the instrumented group and remnants of canal filling materials in the retreated group. In all 3 groups, E. faecalis penetrated deeper into the dentinal tubules by way of cell division than C. albicans which built colonies and penetrated by means of hyphae. Conclusions Microorganisms can easily penetrate dentinal tubules of root canals with different appearance based on the microorganism size and status of dentinal tubules. PMID:25383343

  8. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  9. Repair of dentin defects from DSPP knockout mice by PILP mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Nurrohman, H.; Saeki, K.; Carneiro, K.; Chien, Y.C.; Djomehri, S.; Ho, S.P.; Qin, C.; Marshall, S.J.; Gower, L.B.; Marshall, G.W.; Habelitz, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) lacks intrafibrillar mineral with severe compromise of dentin mechanical properties. A Dspp knockout (Dspp−/−) mouse, with a phenotype similar to that of human DGI-II, was used to determine if poly-L-aspartic acid [poly(ASP)] in the “polymer-induced liquid-precursor” (PILP) system can restore its mechanical properties. Dentin from six-week old Dspp−/− and wild-type mice was treated with CaP solution containing poly(ASP) for up to 14 days. Elastic modulus and hardness before and after treatment were correlated with mineralization from Micro x-ray computed tomography (Micro-XCT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were used to compare matrix mineralization and crystallography. Mechanical properties of the Dspp−/− dentin were significantly less than wild-type dentin and recovered significantly (P < 0.05) after PILP-treatment, reaching values comparable to wild-type dentin. Micro-XCT showed mineral recovery similar to wild-type dentin after PILP-treatment. TEM/SAED showed repair of patchy mineralization and complete mineralization of defective dentin. This approach may lead to new strategies for hard tissue repair. PMID:27239097

  10. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin. PMID:21628640

  11. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Centofanti, Antonio; Artemisia, Alessandro; Bramanti, Ennio; Militi, Angela; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Irrera, Alessia; Lo Giudice, Roberto; Cicciù, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm) than the middle zone (3.74 μm) and the apical zone (1.73 μm). The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2) was similar in coronal zone (46,798 ± 10,644) and apical zone (45,192 ± 10,888), while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940 ± 7,651). However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system. PMID:26413504

  12. Residual Dentin Thickness of Bifurcated Maxillary Premolars Following Two Post Space Preparation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Bagherpour, Ali; Mahmudabadi, Fatemeh; Forghani, Maryam; Sarmad, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of Gates-Glidden and Peeso reamer drills on residual dentin thickness during post space preparation in order to discover which method has minimum root structure damage. Materials and Methods Thirty extracted human maxillary premolars with bifurcations at root middle were horizontally cut 15 mm coronal to the apical end after root canal treatment. The samples were scannedby Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) before and after preparing the post space. Residual dentin thicknesses were measured at 4-, 6-, and 8-mm levels from the apex. Data were analyzed using repeated measured ANOVA. Results Endodontic therapy and post space preparations removed more dentin within the bifurcation of both roots compared to outer dentin. The difference in residual dentin thickness was highly significant regarding stage (before and after post space preparation) in all levels and stage × device in coronal and middle levels (P<.05). This in vitro study emphasizes the minimal dentin width in the buccal root of maxillary premolars, especially near the bifurcation. Conclusion Lack of adequate residual dentin thickness after post space preparation implies that the use of posts in maxillary first premolars should be limited. When mandatory, it is recommended that post space be prepared with Gates-Glidden drill in the palatal root of maxillary first premolars and use of Peeso reamer be avoided. PMID:23922568

  13. Bonding efficacy of an acetone/based etch-and-rinse adhesive after dentin deproteinization

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Fátima S.; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Moura, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: to evaluate the effect of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) treatment on dentin bonding by means of shear bond strength (SBS) measurements when using Prime&Bond NT (PB NT) adhesive. Ultrastructure of the interfaces was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Study design: Extracted human third molars were sectioned and ground to expose flat surfaces of superficial or deep dentin. Specimens were randomly assigned to two equal groups, and bonded as follows: (1) according to the manufacturers’ directions, after 35% H3PO4 etching, (2) 5% NaOCl treated for 2 minutes, after 35% H3PO4 etching. Each sample was embedded in a Watanabe shear test assembly for a single plane lap shear. After PB NT bonding, specimens were stored in water for 24 h at 37ºC and thermocycled (500x). Samples were tested in shear to failure using a universal testing machine at 0.75 mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test procedures. Two samples of each group were randomly selected to investigate the morphologic aspect of the resin/dentin interface with SEM. Results: After etching and after aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOClaq) application, SBS values were similar on superficial than deep dentin (p>0.05). SEM findings shows for H3PO4 etching conditioned samples a detectable hybrid layer and long resin tags; for NaOCl treated specimens, it may be observed a non apparent hybrid layer, and the adhesive contact directly with the neck of the cylindrical resin tags. Conclusions: The use of 5% NaOCl for 2 min after dentin demineralization when PB NT was employed did not improve the bond strength to dentin, probably due to nanofiller content and/or oxidative changes on collagen-depleted dentin. Key words:Sodium hypochlorite, shear bond strength, SEM, Prime&Bond NT, superficial dentin, deep dentin. PMID:22322501

  14. Nanoscopic dynamic mechanical analysis of resin-infiltrated dentine, under in vitro chewing and bruxism events.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Aguilera, Fátima S; López-López, Modesto T; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the induced changes in mechanical behavior and bonding capability of resin-infiltrated dentine interfaces, after application of mechanical stimuli. Dentine surfaces were subjected to partial demineralization through 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by the application of an etch-and-rinse dentine adhesive, Single Bond (3M/ESPE). Bonded interfaces were stored in simulated body fluid during 24h, and then tested or submitted to the mechanical loading challenge. Different loading waveforms were applied: No cycling (I), 24h cycled in sine (II) or square (III) waves, sustained loading held for 24h (IV) or sustained loading held for 72h (V). Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) was assessed for the different groups. Debonded dentine surfaces were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). At the resin-dentine interface, both the hybrid layer (HL) and the bottom of the hybrid layer (BHL), and both peritubular and intertubular were evaluated using a nanoindenter in scanning mode. The load and displacement responses were used to perform the nano-Dynamic Mechanical analysis and to estimate the complex and storage modulus. Dye assisted Confocal Microscopy Evaluation was used to assess sealing ability. Load cycling increased the percentage of adhesive failures in all groups. Specimens load cycled in held 24h attained the highest complex and storage moduli at HL and BHL. The storage modulus was maximum in specimens load cycled in held 24h at peritubular dentine, and the lowest values were attained at intertubular dentine. The storage modulus increased in all mechanical tests, at peritubular dentine. An absence of micropermeability and nanoleakage after loading in sine and square waveforms were encountered. Porosity of the resin-dentine interface was observed when specimens were load cycled in held 72h. Areas of combined sealing and permeability were discovered at the interface of specimens load cycled in held 24h. Crack

  15. Differences in the Microstructure and Fatigue Properties of Dentin Between Residents of North and South America

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Naranjo, M.; Correa, S.; Ossa, A.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial variations in the microstructure of dentin contribute to its mechanical behavior. Objective The objective of this investigation was to compare the microstructure and fatigue behavior of dentin from donors of two different countries. Methods Caries-free third molars were obtained from dental practices in Colombia, South America and the US to assemble two age-matched samples. The microstructure of the coronal dentin was evaluated at three characteristic depths (i.e. deep, middle and superficial dentin) using scanning electron microscopy and image processing techniques. The mechanical behavior of dentin in these three regions was evaluated by the fatigue crack growth resistance. Cyclic crack growth was achieved in-plane with the dentin tubules and the fatigue crack growth behavior was characterized in terms of the stress intensity threshold and the Paris Law parameters. Results There was no difference in the tubule density between the dentin of patients from the two countries. However, there were significant differences (p≤0.05) in the tubule lumen diameters between the two groups in the deep and peripheral regions. In regards to the fatigue resistance, there was a significant increase (p≤0.05) in threshold stress intensity range, and a significant decrease in fatigue crack growth coefficient with increasing distance from the pulp in teeth from the US donors. In contrast, these properties were independent of location for the dentin of teeth from the Colombian donors. Conclusions The microstructure of dentin and its mechanical behavior appear to be a function of patient background, which may include environmental factors and/or ethnicity. PMID:24960115

  16. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  17. Effects of heating by steam autoclaving and Er:YAG laser etching on dentin components.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo S; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima A A; Santo, Ana Maria E; Martin, Airton A

    2011-09-01

    The simultaneous need for infection-control protocols in sample preparations and for safe laser irradiation parameters prompted this study about the effects of heat produced by both sample sterilization and laser etching on dentin components. The dentin was exposed on 30 bovine incisors, and then divided into two main groups: autoclaved (group A) or thymol treatment (group B). The surface of the dentin was schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control-CG) or irradiated with Er:YAG laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Elemental distribution maps were done by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (μ-EDXRF) on each treatment area. The dentin surface in depth was exposed and line-scan maps were performed. The B_CG treatment produced the best distribution of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content throughout the dentin surface. Er:YAG laser etching produced irregular patterns of elemental distribution in the dentin. Laser energies of 120 and 180 mJ produced the highest maximum calcium values. The Er:YAG laser energy of 180 mJ produced a localized increase in Ca and P content on the superficial layer of the dentin (∼ 0-0.10 mm). The autoclaving treatment of samples in experiments is not recommended since it produced damaging effects on dentin components. Er:YAG laser irradiation produced a heterogeneous Ca and P distribution throughout the dentin surface with areas of increased Ca concentration, and this may affect clinically the permeability, solubility, or adhesive characteristics of dental hard tissues with restorative procedures. PMID:20625787

  18. Effect of application mode on interfacial morphology and chemistry between dentin and self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of application mode on the interfacial morphology and chemistry between dentin and self-etch adhesives with different aggressiveness. Methods The occlusal one-third of the crown was removed from un-erupted human third molars, followed by abrading with 600 grit SiC under water. Rectangular dentin slabs were prepared by sectioning the tooth specimens perpendicular to the abraded surfaces. The obtained dentin slabs were treated with one of the two one-step self-etch adhesives: Adper Easy Bond (AEB, PH~2.5) and Adper Prompt L-Pop (APLP, PH~0.8) with (15s, active application) or without (15s, inactive application) agitation. The dentin slabs were fractured and the exposed adhesive/dentin (A/D) interfaces were examined with micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The interfacial morphology, degree of dentin demineralization (DD) and degree of conversion (DC) of the strong self-etch adhesive APLP showed more significant dependence on the application mode than the mild AEB. APLP exhibited inferior bonding at the A/D interface if applied without agitation, evidenced by debonding from the dentin substrate. The DDs and DCs of the APLP with agitation were higher than those of without agitation in the interface, in contrast to the comparable DD and DC values of two AEB specimen groups with different application modes. Raman spectral analysis revealed the important role of chemical interaction between acid monomers of self-etch adhesives and dentin in the above observations. Conclusion The chemical interaction with dentin is especially important for improving the DC of the strong self-etching adhesive at the A/D interface. Agitation could benefit polymerization efficacy of the strong self-etch adhesive through enhancing the chemical interaction with tooth substrate. PMID:23153573

  19. Distribution and relative activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in human coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Boushell, Lee W; Kaku, Masaru; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in dentin has been reported, but its distribution and activity level in mature human coronal dentin are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the MMP-2 distribution and relative activity in demineralized dentin. Crowns of twenty eight human molars were sectioned into inner (ID), middle (MD), and outer dentin (OD) regions and demineralized. MMP-2 was extracted with 0.33 mol·L−1 EDTA/2 mol·L−1 guanidine-HCl, pH 7.4, and MMP-2 concentration was estimated with enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA). Further characterization was accomplished by Western blotting analysis and gelatin zymography. The mean concentrations of MMP-2 per mg dentin protein in the dentin regions were significantly different (P=0.043): 0.9 ng (ID), 0.4 ng (MD), and 2.2 ng (OD), respectively. The pattern of MMP-2 concentration was OD>ID>MD. Western blotting analysis detected ∼66 and ∼72 kDa immunopositive proteins corresponding to pro- and mature MMP-2, respectively, in the ID and MD, and a ∼66 kDa protein in the OD. Gelatinolytic activity consistent with MMP-2 was detected in all regions. Interestingly, the pattern of levels of Western blot immunodetection and gelatinolytic activity was MD>ID>OD. The concentration of MMP-2 in human coronal dentin was highest in the region of dentin that contains the dentinoenamel junction and least in the middle region of dentin. However, levels of Western blot immunodetection and gelatinolytic activity did not correlate with the estimated regional concentrations of MMP-2, potentially indicating region specific protein interactions. PMID:22010577

  20. Effect of surface preparation on bond strength of resin luting cements to dentin.

    PubMed

    Peerzada, Farrahnaz; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; Hiraishi, Noriko; Tay, Franklin Russell; King, Nigel Martyn

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of using two different burs for dentin surface preparation on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of three resin luting cements. Flat, deep dentin surfaces from 45 extracted human third molars were divided into three groups (n = 15) according to bur type: (i) diamond bur and (ii) tungsten carbide bur. The controls were abraded with #600-grit SiC paper. Both burs operated in a high-speed handpiece under water-cooling. Composite blocks were luted onto the dentin using one of three cements: RelyX ARC (ARC, 3M ESPE), Panavia F2.0 (PF, Kuraray) and RelyX Unicem (UN, 3M ESPE) following the manufacturers' instructions. For ARC, the dentin surface was treated with 32% phosphoric acid. The bonded specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and sectioned into 0.9 x 0.9 mm beams for microTBS testing. The data were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Representative fractured beams from each group were prepared for fractographic analysis under SEM. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the effects of "dentin surface preparation" and "luting cement" were statistically significant (p < 0.001); however, the interaction of these two factors was not significant (p > 0.05). ARC showed no significant difference in microTBS among the three differently prepared dentin surfaces. The microTBS of PF and UN was significantly lower when bonding to dentin prepared with a diamond bur (p < 0.05), compared to the control. For Panavia F2.0, higher bond strengths were achieved on the dentin surface prepared with a tungsten carbide bur. Proper bur selection is essential to optimizing the dentin adhesion of self-etch resin luting cements. PMID:21180001

  1. Aspects of dentinal and pulpal pain. Pain of dentinal and pulpal origin--a review for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Figdor, D

    1994-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of pain arising from the dental pulp serve to benefit patients by improving the clinician's ability to diagnose and treat pain. There are two types of pain arising from the pulp which are mediated by entirely different nerve fibres, each with their own individual characteristics. One is a short, sharp fast pain which is induced by stimuli which cause a rapid fluid flow within the dentinal tubules. Such stimuli include cold, heat, air, drilling, and osmotic stimuli. Once the affected teeth are identified, they can often be treated by sealing the open, exposed dentine. The second type of pain is experienced as a slow, dull, aching, poorly localized pain which is mediated by pain fibres activated by stimuli which are noxious to the pulp, such as prolonged damaging heat and inflammatory mediators. Pain of this character can be difficult to diagnose and often indicates serious pulp damage necessitating removal of the offending pulp by endodontic therapy. PMID:7993042

  2. Autocrine effects of interleukin-6 mediate acute-phase proinflammatory and tissue-reparative transcriptional responses of canine bladder mucosa.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael W; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Gookin, Jody L

    2011-02-01

    During early urinary tract infection (UTI) the interplay between invading bacteria and the urothelium elicits a mucosal response aimed at clearing infection. Unfortunately, the resultant inflammation and associated local tissue injury are responsible for patient symptoms. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine released during acute UTI, has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on other body systems. Within the urothelium, the IL-6 native-tissue origin, the target cell type(s), and ultimate effect of the cytokine on target cells are largely unknown. In the present study we modeled the UTI IL-6 response ex vivo using canine bladder mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers to determine the inflammatory and reparative role of IL-6. We demonstrated that uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 by all urothelial cell layers, with the urothelial cells alone representing the only site of unequivocal IL-6 receptor expression. Autocrine effects of IL-6 were supported by the activation of urothelial STAT3 signaling and SOCS3 expression. Using exogenous IL-6, a microarray approach, and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (q-RT-PCR), 5 target genes (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, matrix metallopeptidase 2, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1, and hyaluronan synthase 2) that have direct or indirect roles in promoting a proinflammatory state were identified. Two of these genes, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1 and hyaluronan synthase 2, are also potentially important mediators of wound repair via the production of glycosaminoglycan components. These findings suggest that IL-6 secretion during acute UTI may serve a dual biological role by initiating the inflammatory response while also repairing urothelial defenses. PMID:21115724

  3. Autocrine Effects of Interleukin-6 Mediate Acute-Phase Proinflammatory and Tissue-Reparative Transcriptional Responses of Canine Bladder Mucosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michael W.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Gookin, Jody L.

    2011-01-01

    During early urinary tract infection (UTI) the interplay between invading bacteria and the urothelium elicits a mucosal response aimed at clearing infection. Unfortunately, the resultant inflammation and associated local tissue injury are responsible for patient symptoms. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine released during acute UTI, has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on other body systems. Within the urothelium, the IL-6 native-tissue origin, the target cell type(s), and ultimate effect of the cytokine on target cells are largely unknown. In the present study we modeled the UTI IL-6 response ex vivo using canine bladder mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers to determine the inflammatory and reparative role of IL-6. We demonstrated that uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 by all urothelial cell layers, with the urothelial cells alone representing the only site of unequivocal IL-6 receptor expression. Autocrine effects of IL-6 were supported by the activation of urothelial STAT3 signaling and SOCS3 expression. Using exogenous IL-6, a microarray approach, and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (q-RT-PCR), 5 target genes (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, matrix metallopeptidase 2, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1, and hyaluronan synthase 2) that have direct or indirect roles in promoting a proinflammatory state were identified. Two of these genes, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1 and hyaluronan synthase 2, are also potentially important mediators of wound repair via the production of glycosaminoglycan components. These findings suggest that IL-6 secretion during acute UTI may serve a dual biological role by initiating the inflammatory response while also repairing urothelial defenses. PMID:21115724

  4. The role of the fibrocyte, a bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor, in reactive and reparative fibroses.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Alberto; Mattoli, Sabrina

    2007-09-01

    Human fibrocytes are mesenchymal progenitors that exhibit mixed morphological and molecular characteristics of hematopoietic stem cells, monocytes and fibroblasts. They likely represent the obligate intermediate stage of differentiation into mature mesenchymal cells of a bone marrow-derived precursor of the monocyte lineage under permissive conditions. On in vitro stimulation with pro-fibrotic cytokines and growth factors, human fibrocytes produce large quantities of extracellular matrix components and further differentiate into cells identical to the contractile myofibroblasts that emerge at the tissue sites during repair processes and in some fibrotic lesions. Studies in various animal models of wound healing or fibrotic diseases have confirmed the ability of fibrocytes to differentiate into mature mesenchymal cells in vivo and have suggested a causal link between fibrocyte accumulation and ongoing tissue fibrogenesis or vascular remodeling in response to tissue damage or hypoxia. Fibrocytes synthesizing new collagen or acquiring myofibroblast markers have been detected in human hypertrophic scars, in the skin of patients affected by nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, in human atherosclerotic lesions, and in pulmonary diseases characterized by repeated cycles of inflammation and repair, like asthma. The presence of fibrocyte-like cells has been reported in human chronic pancreatitis and chronic cystitis. Similar cells also populate the stroma surrounding human benign tumors. The available data indicate that human fibrocytes serve as a source of mature mesenchymal cells during reparative processes and in fibrotic disorders or stromal reactions predominantly associated with a persistent inflammatory infiltrate or with the selective recruitment of monocytes induced by ischemic changes and tumor development. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in fibrocyte differentiation in these pathological conditions may lead to the development of novel therapies for

  5. Comparison of the Effect of Dentin Bonding, Dentin Sealing Agents on the Microleakage of Provisional Crowns Fabricated with Direct and Indirect Technique-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, B; Kumar, M Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative sensitivity after temporization is a common complaint in Fixed Partial Denture patients. It is caused by weak and ill fitting temporary restorations which results in microleakage. This can be controlled by providing good temporary restorations and by coating the exposed dentinal tubules of the prepared tooth with dentin bonding agent or dental varnish. Aim The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of dentin-bonding, dentin sealing agents on the microleakage of temporary crowns made by tooth colored auto polymerizing resin fabricated with direct and indirect technique. Materials and Methods Thirty premolar and molar human teeth were collected which were extracted recently was used for the study. The teeth were marked and divided into 3 groups each containing 10 nos. They were individually mounted with self-cure acrylic resin. It was then mounted on a milling machine and crown preparations done. Temporary crowns were fabricated by direct and indirect method with two types of materials. In group A (Control group), the temporary crowns fabricated with both direct and indirect method were cemented directly with temporary luting cement. In group B dentine-bonding agent (solobond M) was applied once to the prepared surface of each tooth specimen before the cementation of temporary crowns where as in case of group C a single layer of dental varnish is applied prior to crown cementation. The entire specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue and allowed to undergo thermal treatment. It was then sectioned in a hard tissue microtome. Each section was evaluated for dye penetration into the dentin tubules by comparing it with a visual scale. Statistical Analysis SPSS Version 13 software was used for non-parametric data analysis by a qualified statistician. P-values less than 0.05 (p-value<0.05) were considered to be statistically significant. Results Group B (Dentin Bonding Agent) specimens cemented with crowns fabricated in direct technique

  6. The initial attachment of cemental fibrils to the root dentin surface in acellular and cellular cementogenesis in rat molars.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Domon, T; Takahashi, S; Islam, M N; Suzuki, R

    2001-03-01

    To elucidate the initial attachment mechanism of cemental fibrils to the root dentin surface in acellular and cellular cementogenesis, developing rat molars were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with NaOH maceration. The NaOH maceration was used to observe details of the positional association of cemental and dentinal fibrils during cementogenesis. An initial hematoxylin stained, cementum layer began to form on the root dentin surface with the first dentin mineralization in both acellular and cellular cementogenesis. The initial attachment of cemental fibrils to the dentin surface also began at this point. At the initial attachment the intermingling of cemental and dentinal fibrils occurred only in places. With advanced cementogenesis the initial cementum layer became the fibril-poor cemento-dentinal junction. This suggests that cemental fibrils attach on the initial cementum layer, and not directly on dentinal fibrils, so that the layer results in the fibril-poor cemento-dentinal junction. The present study suggests that an intervening adhesive is necessary for the cemento-dentinal attachment at any stage of cementogenesis in rat molars. PMID:11325058

  7. The comparison between two irrigation regimens on the dentine wettability for an epoxy resin based sealer by measuring its contact angle formed to the irrigated dentine

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rayapudi Phani; Pai, Annappa Raghavendra Vivekananda

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess the influence of two irrigation regimens having ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid with cetrimide (EDTAC) as final irrigants, respectively, on the dentine wettability for AH Plus sealer by comparing its contact angle formed to the irrigated dentine. Materials and Methods: Study samples were divided into two groups (n = 10). The groups were irrigated with 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution followed by either 17% EDTA or 17% EDTAC solution. AH Plus was mixed, and controlled volume droplet (0.1 mL) of the sealer was placed on the dried samples. The contact angle was measured using a Dynamic Contact Angle Analyzer and results were analyzed using SPSS 21.0 and 2 sample t-test. Results: There was a significant difference in the contact angle of AH Plus formed to the dentine irrigated with the above two regimens. AH Plus showed significantly lower contact angle with the regimen having EDTAC as a final irrigant than the one with EDTA (P < 0.05). Conclusion: An irrigation regimen consisting of NaOCl with either EDTA or EDTAC solution as a final irrigant influences the dentine wettability and contact angle of a sealer. EDTAC as a final irrigant facilitates better dentin wettability than EDTA for AH Plus to promote its better flow and adhesion. PMID:26180409

  8. Magnesium-Containing Nanostructured Hybrid Scaffolds for Enhanced Dentin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Tiejun; Jing, Junjun; Jiang, Yong; Taylor, Robert J.; Feng, Jian Q.; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the United States, affecting 92% of adults aged 20–64 years. Scaffold-based tissue engineering represents a promising strategy to replace damaged dental structures and restore their biological functions. Current single-component scaffolding materials used for dental tissue regeneration, however, cannot provide the proper microenvironment for dental stem/progenitor cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation; new biomimetic hybrid scaffolds are needed to promote better dental tissue formation. In this work, we developed a biomimetic approach to prepare three-dimensional (3D) nanofibrous gelatin/magnesium phosphate (NF-gelatin/MgP) hybrid scaffolds. These scaffolds not only mimic the nanostructured architecture and the chemical composition of natural dentin matrices but also constantly present favorable chemical signals (Mg ions) to dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), thus providing a desirable microenvironment to facilitate DPSC proliferation, differentiation, and biomineralization. Synthesized hybrid NF-gelatin/MgP possesses natural extracellular matrix (ECM)-like architecture, high porosity, high pore interconnectivity, well-defined pore size, and controlled Mg ion release from the scaffold. Adding MgP into NF-gelatin also increased the mechanical strength of the hybrid scaffold. The sustained release of Mg ions from the NF-gelatin/MgP (MgP=10% wt/wt) scaffold significantly enhanced the proliferation, differentiation, and biomineralization of human DPSCs in vitro. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expressions for odontogenic differentiation (collagen I [Col I], ALP, osteocalcin [OCN], dentin sialophosphoprotein [DSPP], and dentin matrix protein 1 [DMP1]) were all significantly higher (p<0.05) in the NF-gelatin/MgP group than in the NF-gelatin group. Those results were further confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and von Kossa staining, as shown by greater ECM secretion and

  9. Reverse spot bonding: a novel technique for provisionalization with immediate dentin sealing.

    PubMed

    Schoenbaum, Todd R; Ercus, Sebastian; Snowden, John

    2012-05-01

    Described here is a clinical technique for the creation of predictable, stable, and efficient provisionals in combination with the use of immediate dentin sealing for partial-coverage posterior ceramic restorations. PMID:22616222

  10. Mechanical properties of methacrylate-based model dentin adhesives: effect of loading rate and moisture exposure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanical behavior of model methacrylate-based dentin adhesives under conditions that simulate the wet oral environment. A series of monotonic and creep experiments were performed on rectangular beam samples of dentin adhesive in three-point bending configuration under different moisture conditions. The monotonic test results show a significant effect of loading rate on the failure strength and the linear limit (yield point) of the stress-strain response. In addition, these tests show that the failure strength is low, and the failure occurs at a smaller deformation when the test is performed under continuously changing moisture conditions. The creep test results show that under constant moisture conditions, the model dentin adhesives can have a viscoelastic response under certain low loading levels. However, when the moisture conditions vary under the same low loading levels, the dentin adhesives have an anomalous creep response accompanied by large secondary creep and high strain accumulation. PMID:23744598

  11. Triclosan-loaded poly(amido amine) dendrimer for simultaneous treatment and remineralization of human dentine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Yang, Jiaojiao; Lin, Zaifu; Li, Jiyao; Liang, Kunneng; Yuan, He; Li, Sheyu; Li, Jianshu

    2014-03-01

    In order to treat dental caries of damaged dentine, triclosan-loaded carboxyl-terminated poly(amido amine) dendrimer (PAMAM-COOH) is prepared and characterized. While being incubated in artificial saliva, triclosan-loaded PAMAM-COOH formulation can induce in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA) on etched dentine, and the regenerated HA has a similar crystal structure with natural dentine. It can also release the encapsulated triclosan for a long period. The interesting drug release profiles are controlled by both dendrimer encapsulation capability and the mineralization degree, which are ideal to obtain multifunctional properties of long-term release of anti-bacterial drug for local treatment during the remineralization process. The triclosan-loaded G4-COOH provides a general strategy to cure dental caries and repair damaged dentine at the same time, which forms a potential restorative material for dental repair. PMID:24362062

  12. Dentin dysplasia type I: a challenge for treatment with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Depprich, Rita A; Ommerborn, Michelle A; Handschel, Jörg GK; Naujoks, Christian D; Meyer, Ulrich; Kübler, Norbert R

    2007-01-01

    Background Dentin dysplasia type I is characterized by a defect of dentin development with clinical normal appearance of the permanent teeth but no or only rudimentary root formation. Early loss of all teeth and concomitant underdevelopment of the jaws are challenging for successful treatment with dental implants. Methods A combination of sinus lifting and onlay bone augmentation based on treatment planning using stereolithographic templates was used in a patient with dentin dysplasia type I to rehabilitate the masticatory function. Results (i) a predisposition for an increased and accelerated bone resorption was observed in our patient, (ii) bone augmentation was successful using a mixture of allogenic graft material with autogenous bone preventing fast bone resorption, (iii) surgical planning, based on stereolithographic models and surgical templates, facilitated the accurate placement of dental implants. Conclusion Bony augmentation and elaborate treatment planning is helpful for oral rehabilitation of patients with dentin dysplasia type I. PMID:17714586

  13. The effects of spaceflight on the mineralization of rat incisor dentin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Rosenberg, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Specific effects of space flight on dentin formation on the lower incisors of male rats were determined. Data were Fourier analyzed to determine the spectra of chemical growth rhythms. It was found that Calcium and P were more concentrated in the newly forming dentin of the Flight rats than in comparable regions of control tissues. There was no significant difference in the mean S-concentration between the two groups, but the pattern of S-distribution in the recently formed dentin from the Flight rats was different from that in the control group. Sulfur fluctuations in flight animals periodically peak above the irregular background fluctuations, but there are no comparable sulfur peaks across the dentin in the control. It is indicated that spaceflight has measurable effects on dentinogenesis, and may also bear on the problem of the regulatory role of proteoglycans in mineralization and the maturation of mineral and matrix moieties in skeletal tissue.

  14. The effect of endodontic regeneration medicaments on mechanical properties of radicular dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassen, Ghaeth H.

    Endodontic regeneration treatment of necrotic immature teeth has gained popularity in recent years. The approach suggests a biological alternative to induce a continuous root development. In this project, three in vitro experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of three medicaments used in endodontic regeneration on mechanical properties and chemical structure of radicular dentin. In the first experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on the indentation properties of the root canal surface of immature teeth using a novel BioDent reference point indenter. A significant difference in the majority of indentation parameters between all groups was found after one-week and one-month application of medicaments (p double antibiotic paste (DAP) > control > calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2]. The four-week exposure of dentin to TAP and DAP caused 43% and 31% increase in total indentation distance outcome, respectively. In the second experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on the chemical structure of immature radicular dentin by measuring the phosphate/amide I ratios of dentin using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Phosphate/amide I ratios were significantly different between the four groups after one week, two weeks and four week application of medicaments (p untreated dentin > DAP-treated dentin > TAP-treated dentin. In the third experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on root fracture resistance and microhardness of radicular dentin. For the microhardness, the two-way interaction between group and time was significant (p<0.001). TAP and DAP caused a significant and continuous decrease in dentin microhardness after one and three month application, respectively. The three-month intracanal application of Ca(OH)2 significantly increased the microhardness of root dentin. The time factor had a significant effect on fracture resistance (p<0.001). All

  15. Adhesion forces between AFM tips and superficial dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, I M; Piednoir, A; Machon, D; Farge, P; Pirat, C; Ramos, S M M

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we study the adhesion forces between atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and superficial dentin etched with phosphoric acid. Initially, we quantitatively analyze the effect of acid etching on the surface heterogeneity and the surface roughness, two parameters that play a key role in the adhesion phenomenon. From a statistical study of the force-distance curves, we determine the average adhesion forces on the processed substrates. Our results show that the average adhesion forces, measured in water, increase linearly with the acid exposure time. The highest values of such forces are ascribed to the high density of collagen fibers on the etched surfaces. The individual contribution of exposed collagen fibrils to the adhesion force is highlighted. We also discuss in this paper the influence of the environmental medium (water/air) in the adhesion measurements. We show that the weak forces involved require working in the aqueous medium. PMID:22472512

  16. [Biological evaluation of means for chemomechanical removal of carious dentine].

    PubMed

    Chechina, G N; Vinnichenko, Iu A; Rudenko, O E

    2007-01-01

    Biological evaluation of the 1st domestically developed and produced preparation for chemomechanical removal of carious dentine Caricleans (firm "VladMiVa", Belgorod) was performed in the CRIS with the use of express techniques of the hemolytic activity (HA) and cytotoxic effect (CTE). It was established that according to HA data both gels of the Caricleans preparation were nontoxic. CTE of 2 gels was also determined on 2 cells lines - LECH (lung embryon cell human) and HeLa; higher sensitivity was received on HeLa cells, the toxic effect of gel #2 of the Caricleans preparation was higher. The received results allowed the authors come to the conclusion that taking into account high sensitivity, high specificity and high cost of the CTE-test not to recommend its use for evaluation of the preparations for short-term action in stomatology. PMID:17690636

  17. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A. Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin irradiation with Erbium: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Methods: Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces. PMID:23407579

  18. The prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity in general dental practices in the northwest United States

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Wataha, John C.; Heaton, Lisa J.; Rothen, Marilynn; Sobieraj, Martin; Scott, JoAnna; Berg, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity is uncertain, yet appropriate diagnosis and treatment of dentin hypersensitivity require accurate knowledge regarding its prevalence. The authors conducted a study to estimate the prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity in general dental practices and to investigate associated risk factors. Methods The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of 787 adult patients from 37 general dental practices within Northwest Practice-based Research Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT). Dentin hypersensitivity was diagnosed by means of participants’ responses to a question regarding pain in their teeth and gingivae, and practitioner-investigators conducted a clinical examination to rule out alternative causes of pain. Participants recorded their pain level on a visual analog scale and the Seattle Scales in response to a one-second air blast. The authors used generalized estimating equation log-linear models to estimate the prevalence and the prevalence ratios. Results The prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity was 12.3 percent; patients with hypersensitivity had, on average, 3.5 hypersensitive teeth. The prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity was higher among 18- to 44-year olds than among participants 65 years or older; it also was higher in women than in men, in participants with gingival recession than in those without gingival recession and in participants who underwent at-home tooth whitening than in those who did not. Hypersensitivity was not associated with obvious occlusal trauma, noncarious cervical lesions or aggressive toothbrushing habits. Conclusions One in eight participants from general practices had dentin hypersensitivity, which was a chronic condition causing intermittent, low-level pain. Patients with hypersensitivity were more likely to be younger, to be female and to have a high prevalence of gingival recession and at-home tooth whitening. Practical Implications Given dentin

  19. Morphological and Chemical Characterization of Bonding Hydrophobic Adhesive to Dentin Using Ethanol Wet Bonding Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shin, T. Phillip; Yao, Xiaomei; Huenergardt, Robin; Walker, Mary P; Wang, Yong

    2009-01-01

    Objective BisGMA, a widely used component in dentin adhesive has very good mechanical properties after curing, but is relatively hydrophobic and thus, does not adequately infiltrate the water wet demineralized dentin collagen. Developing techniques that would lead to optimum infiltration of the hydrophobic component into the demineralized dentin matrix is very important. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interfacial morphological and chemical characteristics of the resultant adhesive-dentin interface when the ethanol wet bonding technique is used with hydrophobic adhesives. Materials and methods The occlusal one-third of the crown was removed from six unerupted human third molars; a uniform smear layer was created with 600 grit SiC. The dentin surface was etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds before applying BisGMA/HEMA model adhesive using either water wet or ethanol wet bonding technique. Five-micro-thick sections of adhesive/dentin interface specimens were cut and stained with Goldner’s trichrome for light microscopy. Companion slabs were analyzed with SEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Results The presence of ethanol in the demineralized dentin increased adhesive collagen encapsulation as indicated by trichrome staining. The SEM results confirmed that the ethanol wet bonding improved the quality of the interface. Micro-Raman spectral analysis of the dentin/adhesive interface indicated there was a gradual decrease in penetration of BisGMA component for specimens using water wet bonding, while relatively homogeneous distribution of the hydrophobic BisGMA component was noted in the interface with ethanol wet bonding. Significance Wet bonding with ethanol instead of water permits better BisGMA infiltration improving the quality of interface. We speculate that the higher infiltration of hydrophobic BisGMA and better collagen encapsulation observed from the specimens using ethanol wet bonding would lead to more durable bonds because of improved

  20. Enamel and dentin mineralization in familial hypophosphatemic rickets: a micro-CT study

    PubMed Central

    Costa, F W G; Soares, E C S; Williams, J R; Fonteles, C S R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to analyse the mineralization pattern of enamel and dentin in patients affected by X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) using micro-CT (µCT), and to associate enamel and dentin mineralization in primary and permanent teeth with tooth position, gender and the presence/absence of this disease. Methods: 19 teeth were collected from 5 individuals from the same family, 1 non-affected by XLHR and 4 affected by XLHR. Gender, age, tooth position (anterior/posterior) and tooth type (deciduous/permanent) were recorded for each patient. Following collection, teeth were placed in 0.1% thymol solution until µCT scan. Projection images were reconstructed and analysed. A plot profile describing the greyscale distance relationship in µCT images was achieved through a line bisecting each tooth in a region with the presence of enamel and dentin. The enamel and dentin mineralization densities were measured and compared. Univariate ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used for all comparisons. Results: Teeth of all affected patients presented dentin with a different mineralization pattern compared with the teeth of healthy patients with dentin defects observed next to the pulp chambers. Highly significant differences were found for gray values between anterior and posterior teeth (p < 0.05), affected and non-affected (p < 0.05), as well as when position and disease status were considered (p < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, the mineralization patterns of dentin differed when comparing teeth from patients with and without FHR, mainly next to pulp chambers where areas with porosity and consequently lower mineral density and dentin defects were found. PMID:25651274

  1. Characterization of transparent dentin in attrited teeth using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Mandurah, Mona M; Sadr, Alireza; Bakhsh, Turki A; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2015-05-01

    Attrition and wear of tooth surface occur with aging and result in loss of enamel, with exposure and histological changes in dentin. Dealing with attrited teeth and restoration of the lost tissue are clinically challenging. The main objective of this study is to characterize the exposed transparent dentin in the occlusal surface of attrited teeth by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Naturally attrited, extracted human teeth with occlusal-transparent dentin were investigated in comparison to sound and carious teeth. The teeth were subjected to OCT imaging and then cross-sectioned and polished. OCT B-scans were compared to light microscopy images of the same cross section. In OCT images, some changes were evident at the transparent dentin in attrited teeth. An OCT attenuation coefficient parameter (μ t) was derived based on the Beer-Lambert law as a function of backscatter signal slope. The mean values of μ t were 1.05 ± 0.3, 2.23 ± 0.4, and 0.61 ± 0.27 mm(-1) for sound, carious, and transparent dentins, respectively. One-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc showed a significant difference between groups (p < 0.05). Physiological changes in transparent dentin that involve deposition of mineral casts in the dentinal tubules lead to lower attenuation of OCT signal. OCT has a potential role to detect transparent dentin on the surface of attrited teeth and can be used in the future as a clinical adjunct tool. PMID:24532117

  2. The effect of fluoride toothpaste on root dentine demineralization progression: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Juliana Nunes; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Silva, Wander Jose da; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andalo; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    The anticaries effect of fluoride (F) toothpaste containing 1100 µg F/g in reducing enamel demineralization is well established, but its effect on dentine has not been extensively studied. Furthermore, it has been shown that toothpaste containing a high F concentration is necessary to remineralize root dentine lesions, suggesting that a 1100 µg F/g concentration might not be high enough to reduce root dentine demineralization, particularly when dentine is subjected to a high cariogenic challenge. Thus, the aim of this pilot study was to evaluate in situ the effect of F toothpaste, at a concentration of 1100 µg F/g, on dentine demineralization. In a crossover and double-blind study, conducted in two phases of 14 days, six volunteers wore a palatal appliance containing four slabs of bovine root dentine whose surface hardness (SH) was previously determined and to which a 10% sucrose solution was applied extra-orally 8×/day. Volunteers used a non-F toothpaste (negative control) or F toothpaste (1100 µg F/g, NaF/SiO2) three times a day. On the 10th and 14th days of each phase, two slabs were collected and SH was determined again. Dentine demineralization was assessed as percentage of SH loss (%SHL). The effect of toothpaste was significant, showing lower %SHL for the F toothpaste group (42.0 ± 9.7) compared to the non-F group (62.0 ± 6.4; p < 0.0001), but the effect of time was not significant (p > 0.05). This pilot study suggests that F toothpaste at 1100 µg F/g is able to decrease dentine caries even under a high cariogenic challenge of biofilm accumulation and sugar exposure. PMID:24554099

  3. Does immediate dentin sealing influence the polymerization of impression materials?

    PubMed Central

    Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Steiger, Arno Kieling; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the following study is to evaluate the interaction between the resin materials used in immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques and impression materials with two different techniques to eliminate the oxygen-inhibition layer. Materials and Methods: The occlusal dentin surface of 35 human molars was exposed. The teeth were used in two Groups: Group 1 – Impression with Express XT; Group 2 – Impression with Impregum. Groups 1 and 2 were divided into 14 subgroups: Groups 1a and 2a – Control groups; 1b and 2b – IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); 1c and 2c – IDS with CSE + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; 1d and 2d – IDS with CSE + alcohol; 1e and 2e – IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F (PLF); 1f and 2f – IDS with CSE and PLF + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; and 1g and 2g – IDS with CSE and PLF + alcohol. Five teeth were used in each experimental group, and the tooth surface was photographed using a digital camera. Results: Small quantity of unpolymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF in Groups 1b and 1e. Groups 1c and 1d prevented the interaction. Small quantity of polymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF for Groups 2b and 2e. The same interaction was observed for Groups 2c and 2d. For Groups 2c and 2f, no interactions were observed. Conclusion: Resin materials interacted with impression materials. The application of glycerin jelly and alcohol prevented the interaction of CSE with Express XT and PLF with Impregum; however, these treatments were not completely effective in preventing the interaction of CSE with Impregum and PLF with Express XT. PMID:25202218

  4. Zoledronate and Ion-releasing Resins Impair Dentin Collagen Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R.; Feitosa, V.P.; Tay, F.R.; Watson, T.F.; Pashley, D.H.; Sauro, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  5. Zoledronate and ion-releasing resins impair dentin collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R; Feitosa, V P; Tay, F R; Watson, T F; Pashley, D H; Sauro, S

    2014-10-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  6. Surface roughness and wettability of dentin ablated with ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Lü, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and wettability of dentin following ultrashort pulsed laser ablation with different levels of fluence and pulse overlap (PO). Twenty-five extracted human teeth crowns were cut longitudinally into slices of approximately 1.5-mm thick and randomly divided into nine groups of five. Samples in groups 1 to 8 were ablated with an ultrashort pulsed laser through a galvanometric scanning system. Samples in group 9 were prepared using a mechanical rotary instrument. The surface roughness of samples from each group was then measured using a three-dimensional profile measurement laser microscope, and wettability was evaluated by measuring the contact angle of a drop of water on the prepared dentin surface using an optical contact angle measuring device. The results showed that both laser fluence and PO had an effect on dentin surface roughness. Specifically, a higher PO decreased dentin surface roughness and reduced the effect of high-laser fluence on decreasing the surface roughness in some groups. Furthermore, all ablated dentin showed a contact angle of approximately 0 deg, meaning that laser ablation significantly improved wettability. Adjustment of ultrashort pulsed laser parameters can, therefore, significantly alter dentin surface roughness and wettability.

  7. Er:YAG laser irradiation on dentin: FT-Raman and SEM studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Bitar, Renata Andrade; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Resende, Erick B. P. S.; Jara, Walter A. A.; Martin, Airton A.

    2007-02-01

    This study evaluated the molecular and morphological changes on dentin elements after the Er:YAG laser irradiation. Six human third molars were selected and the occlusal one-third of the crown was removed. The dentin surface was schematically divided into areas corresponding to four surface treatments groups: Control (Group C): 37% phosphoric acid etching; Group I: Er:YAG laser 80mJ; Group II: Er:YAG laser 120mJ; Group III: Er:YAG laser 180mJ. The characterization was performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-Transformed Raman Spectroscopy (FT-Raman) before and after the treatments. A reduction of the relative intensity for the spectra was observed in the Group II and III samples. The SEM photomicrographies revealed open dentin tubules in the control group specimens. The groups I, II and III presented partially open dentin tubules. SEM images showed that the laser-irradiated dentin surface was not favorable to the diffusion of monomers. The chemical information obtained by Raman spectroscopy showed that higher laser energies (180 mJ) affected more the phosphate, carbonate and the organic components of dentin.

  8. Morphological analysis of dentin tissue after Er, Cr: YSGG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lili; Lin, Qi; Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Lin, Shi; Xie, Shusen

    2009-08-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the morphological changes of dentin tissue after Er, Cr: YSGG laser Irradiation. The wavelength is 2.78 μm with pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz and pulse duration of 140 μs. The samples extracted from sound intact adult human premolars were cut into 1 mm thick dentin slices, and then polished by abrasive papers. After preparation, specimens were randomly divided into two groups: one group treated with conventional drills (a diamond drill and a fissure bur), and the other group treated with lasers at four different power settings (2W to 3.5W). The morphological alterations produced by the different treatments were observed and compared by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed that the dentin surfaces had distinct and characteristic morphological alteration with different power settings. Compared with the samples treated with conventional drills, the irradiated samples revealed an absent smear layer with open dentinal tubules. The ablation of intertubular dentin was more evident than that of peritubular dentin.

  9. Photomechanical investigations on the stress-strain relationship in dentine macrostructure.

    PubMed

    Kishen, A; Asundi, A

    2005-01-01

    In this study photomechanical experiments were carried out to examine the relationship between macroscopic mechanical stress and strain gradients within the root dentine structure. Three-dimensional digital photoelasticity was used to study the stress distribution patterns in tooth models, while digital moire interferometry was used to study the strain gradients within the natural teeth. The stress analysis showed a distinct bending stress distribution, along faciolingual plane in the coronal and cervical regions of the tooth. There was a reduction in bending towards the apical third of the tooth model. The strain analysis displayed strain gradients in the axial (along the long axis of the tooth) and lateral (perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth) directions in dentine. There was a conspicuous reduction in strains from the cervical to the apical third of the root dentine. The root dentine displayed uniform distribution of normal strains. Although there was a steep increase in stresses from the inner core region to the outer surface of an isotropic tooth model, there were more uniform strain gradients in the natural dentine structure. It is apparent from these observations that complex organization of material properties facilitated distinct strain gradients in dentine structure during mechanical functions. PMID:16229654

  10. Fluoride concentration in dentin of exfoliated primary teeth as a biomarker for cumulative fluoride exposure.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, G G; Rozier, R G; Bawden, J W

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R(2). A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure. PMID:18832828

  11. Fluoride Concentration in Dentin of Exfoliated Primary Teeth as a Biomarker for Cumulative Fluoride Exposure

    PubMed Central

    dela Cruz, G.G.; Rozier, R.G.; Bawden, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R2. A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure. PMID:18832828

  12. Effect of smear layer treatment on dentin bond of self-adhesive cements.

    PubMed

    Kambara, Keisuke; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Hosaka, Keiichi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Ichinose, Shizuko; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dentin bond strength of three self-adhesive cements with smear layer pretreatments using a calcium-chelating agent (EDTA) and deproteinizing solution (NaOCl) and to evaluate their interfacial characteristics. Smear layer-covered dentin surfaces were pretreated with EDTA for 60 s, NaOCl for 5 and 15 s, or none. Three self-adhesive cements; Clearfil SA luting (Kuraray Medical), Rely X Unicem clicker (3M ESPE) and Breeze (Pentron) were applied to the dentin surfaces. After 24-h water storage, shear bond strengths to dentin were determined. In addition, nanoleakage evaluation at the interface was performed using FE-SEM and EDS. EDTA-pretreatment significantly improved the bond strength of BR (p<0.05) and NaOCl-pretreatment for 15 s significantly improved the bond strength of RX (p<0.05). On the other hand, for SA, both pretreatments significantly decreased bond strength to dentin (p<0.05). Nanoleakage formation was observed in various amounts at the cement-dentin interfaces. PMID:23207204

  13. Effects of the Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on dentin bond strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccioni, M. A. R. V.; Neves, T. P. C.; Kubo, C. S.; Saad, J. R. C.; Campos, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and bur on the bond strength of different single step self-etch adhesive systems in normal and artificially hypermineralized dentin. In total, 112 human molars were selected. The specimens were randomly divided into two different groups according to the type of dentin. The teeth from each group were randomly divided into two subgroups according to the adhesive system used: Clearfil S3 Bond and Optibond All in One. Each subgroup received different treatments: (1) conditioning conventional; (2) conditioning of the dentin surface with Er,Cr:YSGG  +  application of the adhesive system; (3) ‘surface roughening’ dentin with 3098 diamond bur  +  application of the adhesive system. The matrices were positioned, filled with composite resin and photoactivated for 40 s. After a storage period of 24 h in a humid environment, the specimens were submitted to microshear bond strength testing. Subsequently, the fracture pattern of each sample was determined. One specimen per group was prepared in order to evaluate the interface and/or appearance of resin tags. The data of the microshear bond strength (μSBS) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s (p  <0.05). In the hypermineralized dentin, there was no significant statistical difference between all the treatments employed, enhancing the option of employing single step self-etch adhesives in dentin sclerotic.

  14. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems to Er:YAG-laser-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Brulat, Nathalie; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Leforestier, Eric; Fiorucci, Gilbert; Nammour, Samir; Bertrand, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin bonded to Er:YAG laser or bur-prepared dentin surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems. The occlusal surfaces of 120 human third molars were ground flat to expose dentin. The dentin was prepared using either a carbide bur or an Er:YAG laser at 350 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (fluence, 44.5 J/cm(2)). Three different self-etching adhesive systems were applied: iBond, Xeno III and Clearfil SE Bond. Rods of composite resin were bonded to dentin surfaces and shear bond tests were carried out. Both dentin surfaces after debonding and resin rods were observed using a scanning electron microscope. When the Xeno III was used, no difference was observed on shear bond strength values when bur and Er:YAG laser were compared. When using iBond and Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values measured on Er:YAG-laser-prepared surfaces were lower than those observed on bur-prepared surfaces. The absence of smear layer formation during the preparation of the dentin by the Er:YAG laser did not improve the adhesion values of self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:18034284

  15. Enamel and dentine demineralization by a combination of starch and sucrose in a biofilm - caries model.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Juliana Nunes; Villegas-Salinas, Mario; Troncoso-Gajardo, Pía; Giacaman, Rodrigo Andrés; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2016-05-20

    Sucrose is the most cariogenic dietary carbohydrate and starch is considered non-cariogenic for enamel and moderately cariogenic for dentine. However, the cariogenicity of the combination of starch and sucrose remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this combination on Streptococcus mutans biofilm composition and enamel and dentine demineralization. Biofilms of S. mutans UA159 were grown on saliva-coated enamel and dentine slabs in culture medium containing 10% saliva. They were exposed (8 times/day) to one of the following treatments: 0.9% NaCl (negative control), 1% starch, 10% sucrose, or 1% starch and 10% sucrose (starch + sucrose). To simulate the effect of human salivary amylase on the starch metabolization, the biofilms were pretreated with saliva before each treatment and saliva was also added to the culture medium. Acidogenicity of the biofilm was estimated by evaluating (2 times/day) the culture medium pH. After 4 (dentine) or 5 (enamel) days of growth, biofilms (n = 9) were individually collected, and the biomass, viable microorganism count, and polysaccharide content were quantified. Dentine and enamel demineralization was assessed by determining the percentage of surface hardness loss. Biofilms exposed to starch + sucrose were more acidogenic and caused higher demineralization (p < 0.0001) on either enamel or dentine than those exposed to each carbohydrate alone. The findings suggest that starch increases the cariogenic potential of sucrose. PMID:27223133

  16. The effects of oxalate-containing products on the exposed dentine surface: an SEM investigation.

    PubMed

    Gillam, D G; Mordan, N J; Sinodinou, A D; Tang, J Y; Knowles, J C; Gibson, I R

    2001-11-01

    In-office products containing oxalates have been claimed to be clinically effective in reducing dentine sensitivity, although there has been limited supporting clinical data. The rationale for their use appears to be based on their potential to act as occluding and/or nerve desensitizing agents. Four commercially available oxalate-containing products were applied to etched dentine discs and the extent of tubule occlusion was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Tenure Quick (aluminium oxalate), Sensodyne Sealant (ferric oxalate) and MS Coat (oxalic acid) covered the dentine surface and occluded the tubules. However, Butler Protect (potassium oxalate) did not cover the surface to any great extent but provided some occlusion. The presence of oxalates after application to glass slides and dentine discs was examined using thin film X-ray diffraction. From samples on glass, only potassium oxalate could be clearly identified (JCPDS 14-0845). No oxalate was detected on dentine discs in either thin film geometry or standard theta two theta mode. We have demonstrated that professionally applied in-office products containing oxalate are capable of covering the dentine surface and/or occluding the tubules to varying degrees. However, X-ray diffraction analysis was unable to confirm the oxalate profile for all products as described in the available commercial literature. PMID:11722720

  17. The use of collagen cross-linking agents to enhance dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ammar, Aiman; Drummond, James L; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B.

    2009-01-01

    Type I collagen is a major component of the hybrid layer, and improvement of its mechanical properties may be advantageous during bonding procedures. Objective To investigate the effect of three different cross-linking agents (Glutaraldehyde [GD], Grape seed extract [GSE], and Genipin [GE]) on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin-dentin bonds. Materials and Methods Sixty-four sound human molars were collected and their occlusal surfaces were ground flat to expose dentin. Dentin surfaces were etched using a phosphoric acid and then teeth were randomly divided according to the dentin treatment: Control group (no treatment), 5% GD, 6.5% GSE or 0.5% GE. Teeth were restored either with One Step Plus or Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive systems and resin composite. After 24 hours, teeth were sectioned to produce a cross-sectional surface area of 1.0 mm2 and tested for tensile bond strength. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (p< 0.05). There was a statistically significant interaction between factors (treatment and adhesive p<0.001). Treatment affected TBS (p< 0.0001), while no differences were observed between the adhesive systems (p = 0.6961). Conclusion Chemical modification to the dentin matrix promoted by GD and GSE, but not GE, resulted in increased bond strength. The application of selective collagen cross-linkers during adhesive restorative procedures may be a new approach to improve dentin bond strength properties. PMID:19507140

  18. Activation of intradental nerves in the dog to some stimuli applied to the dentine.

    PubMed

    Närhi, M V; Hirvonen, T J; Hakumäki, M O

    1982-01-01

    Both scraping of superficial dentine and air blasts induced bursts of action potentials in 19 out of 22 units immediately. In 5 out of 16 units 4.9 mol/l CaCl2-solution was also effective. Dry absorbent cotton activated 5 out of 16 units with a 10-20 s latency. All 18 units tested responded to mechanical irritation of the pulp. Acid etching of dentine made the units more sensitive. Resin impregnation abolished the responses. Drilling of dentine with a turbine bur induced responses of the same type as air blasts. Three units responded to heat and 2 also to cold. Hypertonic NaCl-solution was only effective when applied either to the pulp (in 9 out of 12 units) or to the inner dentine (in 5 out of 17 units). It is concluded that intradental nerve fibres sensitive to several different stimuli exist in the dog. Many of the stimuli used induce fluid flow in dentinal tubules in vitro. Nerve activation might have been due to the same mechanism with all stimuli used, possibly to mechanical distortion of the peripheral pulp tissue as a result of the fluid flow. The findings support the hydrodynamic hypothesis of dentine sensitivity. PMID:6963884

  19. New Advanced Materials for High Performance at the Resin-Dentine Interface.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a tool for the integration of new concepts and biomaterials related with the resin-dentine interface. The principles of dentine demineralisation and remineralisation that shape modern restorative dentistry practices, as well as considerations for the selection of new materials for different restorative approaches, are emphasised. Re-incorporation of mineral into the demineralised dentine matrix is important since the mineral precipitated may work as a constant site for further nucleation, and the remineralised subsurface of the tissue may be more resistant to subsequent acid attack. This deposition of minerals may be due to both spontaneous precipitation induced by local supersaturation of Ca and P in the presence of non-specific tissue alkaline phosphatase or through heterogeneous nucleation sites provided by phosphoproteins within the dentine collagen matrix. Nucleation is a multistep process involving both protein and mineral transition and suggests a temporally synchronised process. Dentine provides both structural and chemical frameworks, acting as a scaffold for mineral deposition at specific sites. The ultimate goal in the design and improvement of new materials for high performance at the resin-dentine interface is to render a stronger and durable adhesion to dental tissues despite the severe conditions in the oral environment. In the present chapter, glass ionomers, calcium-phosphate cements and doped dental adhesives have been selected to represent the cutting edge biomaterials at the interface. PMID:26201275

  20. Contributions of microstructure and chemical composition to the mechanical properties of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, H.; Amin, N.; Ross, A.; Eidelman, N.; Wang, D. H.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of microstructural variations and chemical composition to the mechanical properties and apparent flaw sensitivity of dentin were evaluated. Rect-angular beams (N = 80) of the deep and superficial coronal dentin were prepared from virgin 3rd molars; twenty beams of each region were nominally flaw free and the remainder possessed a single “surface flaw” via a Vickers indentation. Mechanical properties were estimated in four-point flexure and examined using Weibull statistics. Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy in Reflectance Mode (FTIR-RM) was used to quantify the relative mineral to collagen ratios. Results showed that the average flexural strength, and strain and energy to fracture of the deep dentin beams were significantly lower (P < 0.005) than for the superficial dentin. While the deep dentin exhibited the highest mineral/collagen ratio and lowest damage tolerance, there was no significant effect of the surface flaws. Weibull analyses suggest that deep dentin possesses a larger distribution of intrinsic flaw sizes that contributes to the location dependence in strength. PMID:21455677

  1. Host-derived Loss of Dentin Matrix Stiffness Associated with Solubilization of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, Marcela R.; Tay, Franklin R.; Donnelly, Adam M.; Agee, Kelli A.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Foulger, Stephen; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) bound to dentin matrices are activated during adhesive bonding procedures and are thought to contribute to the progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in mechanical, biochemical and structural properties of demineralized dentin treated with or without chlorhexidine (CHX), a known MMP-inhibitor. After demineralizing dentin beams in EDTA or phosphoric acid (PA), the baseline modulus of elasticity (E) of each beam was measured by 3-point flexure. Specimens were pretreated with water (control) or with 2% CHX (experimental) and then incubated in artificial saliva (AS) at 37°C for 4 weeks. The E of each specimen was remeasured weekly and, the media was analyzed for solubilized dentin collagen at first and fourth week of incubation. Some specimens were processed for electron microscopy (TEM) immediately after demineralization and after 4 weeks of incubation. In EDTA and PA-demineralized specimens, the E of the control specimens fell (p<0.05) after incubation in AS, while there were no changes in E in the CHX-pretreated specimens over time. More collagen was solubilized from PA-demineralized controls (p<0.05) than from EDTA-demineralized matrices after 1 or 4 weeks. Less collagen (p<0.05) was solubilized from CHX-pretreated specimens demineralized in EDTA compared to PA. TEM examination of control beams revealed that prolonged demineralization of dentin in 10% PA (12 h) did not denature the collagen fibrils. PMID:19090493

  2. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography for the nondestructive assessment of the remineralization of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manesh, Saman K.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image caries lesions in dentin, measure nondestructively the severity of dentin demineralization, and determine the efficacy of intervention with anticaries agents including fluoride and lasers. The objective of this study is to determine if PS-OCT can be used to nondestructively measure a reduction in the reflectivity of dentin lesions after exposure to a remineralization solution. Although studies have shown the ability of PS-OCT to image the remineralization of lesions in enamel, none have included dentin. PS-OCT images of dentin surfaces are acquired after exposure to an artificial demineralizing solution for six days and a remineralizing solution for 20 days. The integrated reflectivity, depth of demineralization, and thickness of the layer of remineralization are calculated for each of the two treatment groups on each sample. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography are used to measure lesion severity on histological thin sections for comparison. PS-OCT successfully measured the formation of a layer of increased mineral content near the lesion surface. Polorized light microscopy (PLM) and transverse microradiography (TMR) corroborated those results. PS-OCT can be used for the nondestructive measurement of the remineralization of dentin.

  3. Chondroitin sulfate is involved in the hypercalcification of the organic matrix of bovine peritubular dentin.

    PubMed

    Dorvee, Jason R; Gerkowicz, Lauren; Bahmanyar, Sara; Deymier-Black, Alix; Veis, Arthur

    2016-02-01

    Apatitic mineral of dentin forms within the collagenous matrix (intertubular dentin, ITD) secreted from the odontoblastic processes (OP). Highly calcified mineral (peritubular dentin, PTD) is deposited at the interface between the ITD and each process membrane, creating a tubular system penetrating the dentin that extends from the dentino-enamel junction to the predentin-dentin junction. We focus on determining the composition of the PTD both with regard to its organic matrix and the inorganic phase. A laser capture technique has been adapted for the isolation of the mineralized PTD free from the ITD, and for the analysis of the PTD by SEM, TEM, and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), these data were subsequently compared with similar analyses of intact dentin slices containing ITD bounded-PTD annuli. Elemental line scans reveal clearly marked boundaries between ITD, PTD, and OP components, and illustrate the differences in composition, and topographical surface roughness. The organic matrix of the PTD was shown to be sulfur rich, and further antibody labeling showed the sulfated organic component to be chondroitin sulfate B. In this PTD organic matrix the S/Ca and Ca/P ratios were distinctly higher than in the ITD, indicating that polysaccharide bound S supplies the anionic counterion facilitating the formation of the apatitic PTD mineral. PMID:26656507

  4. On the deformation behavior of human dentin under compression and bending.

    PubMed

    Zaytsev, Dmitry; Ivashov, Alexander S; Mandra, Julia V; Panfilov, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The cause of difference in deformation behavior of human dentin under compression and bending is discussed. Mechanical properties of dentin under these deformation schemes are compared. Microstructural study of fracture surfaces of samples and cracks in dentin is carried out, too. Dentin behaves like a brittle solid under bending, whereas it exhibits various types of response from brittle to highly deformable under compression that depended on the geometry of sample (d/h ratio of a cubic sample). It is shown that the quantity of cracks on the compressed sample increases when its elasticity and plasticity grow up, whereas under bending the failure of sample occurs due to the advancement of dominant crack. Deformation and crack growth are the channels for the accommodation of applied stress in dentin. Crack growth is the leading one when the level of tensile stress in sample is dominant, whereas deformation becomes the leading channel when compression stress is dominant. However, in both cases contribution of the concurrent channel cannot be ignored. This feature is caused by the ductile fracture mode of dentin on the mesoscopic level. PMID:24907741

  5. THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL VARIATIONS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Arola, D.

    2012-01-01

    The crack growth resistance of human dentin was characterized as a function of relative distance from the DEJ and the corresponding microstructure. Compact tension specimens were prepared from the coronal dentin of caries-free 3rd molars. The specimens were sectioned from either the outer, middle or inner dentin. Stable crack extension was achieved under Mode I quasi-static loading, with the crack oriented in-plane with the tubules, and the crack growth resistance was characterized in terms of the initiation (Ko), growth (Kg) and plateau (Kp) toughness. A hybrid approach was also used to quantify the contribution of dominant mechanisms to the overall toughness. Results showed that human dentin exhibits increasing crack growth resistance with crack extension in all regions, and that the fracture toughness of inner dentin (2.2±0.5 MPa•m0.5) was significantly lower than that of middle (2.7±0.2 MPa•m0.5) and outer regions (3.4±0.3 MPa•m0.5). Extrinsic toughening, composed mostly of crack bridging, was estimated to cause an average increase in the fracture energy of 26% in all three regions. Based on these findings, dental restorations extended into deep dentin are much more likely to cause tooth fracture due to the greater potential for introduction of flaws and decrease in fracture toughness with depth. PMID:23131531

  6. Er:YAG laser irradiation of human dentin: Raman study of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luis E. S.; Martin, Airton A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima; Arisawa, Emilia A.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.

    2004-05-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was used to examine the distribution of the organic components in the human dentin before and after the chemical and thermal etching process. Polished dentin disks (n = 6/group) with 4mm thickness from twelve third molars were irradiated with Er:YAG laser. The dentin disks were prepared by polishing through a series of SiO2 papers with water and cleaned by ultrasonic system. Four pretreatment were performed. The disks were etched with 37% phoshporic acid for 15 s (group 1), Er:YAG laser 80 mJ, 3Hz, 30s. (group II), Er:YAG laser 120 mJ, 3Hz, 30s. (group III) and Er:YAG laser 180mJ, 3Hz, 30s. (group IV). The Raman spectra obtained from normal and treated dentin were analyzed. Attention was paid to the organic component (1453cm-1). Raman spectroscopy showed that the organic dentin content were more affected in autoclaved teeth than in the specimens treated by Thymol. Peak area reduction in the specimens treated by Thymol in group I and II showed to be the most conservative procedures regarding to changes in organic dentin components. Pulse energies of 120 and 180 mJ showed to preduce more reduction in the organic content associated with more reduction in the peak areas at 1453 cm-1.

  7. Raman study of human dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S. Soares, Luis E.; Martin, Airton A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A.; Arisawa, Emilia A.; T. Pacheco, Marcos T.

    2004-09-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was used to examine the distribution of the mineral and organic components in the human dentin before and after the chemical and thermal etching process. Polished dentin disks (n = 6/group) with 4mm thickness from twelve third molars were irradiated with Er:YAG laser. The dentin disks were prepared by polishing through a series of SiO2 papers with water and cleaned by ultrasonic system. Four pretreatment were performed. The disks were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (group I), Er:YAG laser 80mJ, 3Hz, 30s. (group II), Er:YAG laser 120mJ, 3Hz, 30s. (group III) and Er:YAG laser 180mJ, 3Hz, 30s. (group IV). The Raman spectra obtained from normal and treated dentin were analyzed. Attention was paid to the mineral PO4 (962 cm-1), CO3 (1073 cm-1) and to the organic component (1453cm-1). Raman spectroscopy showed that the mineral and organic dentin content were more affected in autoclaved teeth than in the specimens treated by Thymol. Peak area reduction in the specimens treated by Thymol in group I and II showed to be the most conservative procedures regarding to changes in organic and inorganic dentin components. Pulse energies of 120 and 180mJ showed to produce more reduction in the organic and inorganic content associated with more reduction in the peak areas at 960 and 1453cm-1.

  8. Failure of a Glass Ionomer to Remineralize Apatite-depleted Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y.K.; Yiu, C.K.Y.; Kim, J.R.; Gu, L.; Kim, S.K.; Weller, R.N.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2010-01-01

    Remineralization of demineralized dentin lesions adjacent to glass-ionomer cements (GICs) has been reported in the literature. This study tested the hypothesis that a strontium-based GIC can remineralize completely demineralized dentin by nucleation of new apatite crystallites within an apatite-free dentin matrix. Human dentin specimens were acid-etched, bonded with Fuji IXGP, and immersed in a calcium-and-phosphate-containing 1.5X simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1-4 months. Polyacrylic acid and polyvinylphosphonic acid biomimetic analogs were added to the SBFs to create 2 additional remineralization media. Specimens were processed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). No apatite deposition could be identified in the completely demineralized dentin in any of the specimens immersed in the 3 remineralization media, despite TEM/EDX evidence of diffusion of ions specific to the strontium-based GIC into the demineralized dentin. The hypothesis was rejected; mineral concentration alone is not a sufficient endpoint for assessing the success of contemporary remineralization strategies. PMID:20110510

  9. A Case of Dentin Dysplasia with Full Mouth Rehabilitation: A 3-year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dheeraj; Likhyani, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dentin dysplasia, a rare hereditary disorder of dentin formation, is characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation along with abnormal pulpal morphology. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It has been divided into two clinical entities: type I (radicular) and type II (coronal). Early diagnosis and initiation of effective regular dental treatments may help the patients with this condition to delay or prevent the loss of the entire dentition and help them in cope up with edentulous state in early ages. The condition undoubtedly has a negative impact on the physical and psychological well-being of the affected individual. Numerous factors have to be considered during the prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with dentin dysplasia. Treatment protocol varies according to clinical case. Although literature reports suggest general guidelines for treatment planning, the present case report describes a full mouth rehabilitation of an 8-year-old female patient with dentin dysplasia. How to cite this article: Khandelwal S, Gupta D, Likhyani L. A Case of Dentin Dysplasia with Full Mouth Rehabilitation: A 3-year Longitudinal Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2): 119-124. PMID:25356011

  10. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Brajkovic, Denis; Ilic, Dragan; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Rakocevic, Zlatko; Djuric, Marija; Busse, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples' microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  11. Microleakage and Resin-to-Dentin Interface Morphology of Pre-Etching versus Self-Etching Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, G.L; Vaidyanathan, T.K; Vaidyanathan, J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microleakage and tissue-adhesive interface morphology from Class V restorations using different systems of dentin adhesives. Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 27 extracted caries-free molars and premolars. Teeth were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) Prime & Bond NT, a 5th generation system using an initial step of total etch followed by a second step of application of a self bonding primer (2) Clearfil SE Bond, a 5th generation adhesive system employing two separate steps of self-etch priming and subsequent bonding (3) One-up Bond F, a 6th generation one step self-etching, self-priming and self-bonding adhesive. Microleakage and interface morphology of teeth restored with these adhesives and a composite resin were evaluated. Kruskal-Wallis Test (p = 0.05) was used to analyze the results. SEM analysis was used to relate interface morphology to microleakage. The mean and (SD) values of microleakage were: Prime and Bond NT: 0.15 (0.33), Clearfil SE Bond: 0.06 (0.17) and One-up Bond F: 2.96 (0.63). The mean microleakage for One-up Bond was significantly higher than for the other groups (p<0.05). Protruding tags in dentin channels were observed in Prime and Bond and Clearfil systems, but not in One-up Bond. The single step adhesive system, although more convenient for the clinician, uses a low viscosity formulation difficult to keep in place on cavity walls. It also tends to be too aggressive and hydrophilic to create an impermeable hybridized tissue-adhesive interfacial layer resistant to microleakage. Two-step adhesive systems, on the other hand, were retained on all segments of the cavosurface during application, and formed a hybridized interfacial layer resistant to microleakage. PMID:19444319

  12. Bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive to dentin surfaces treated with saliva, blood, and different hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Nimet; Cebe, Fatma; Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Cetin, Ali Riza; Cobanoglu, Nevin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive to dentin surfaces after treatment with 4 different hemostatic agents in the presence of saliva and blood. After testing, no significant differences were found between the mean bond strength of Clearfil SE (CSE) Bond resin adhesive to normal dentin and those of CSE to dentin treated with the hemostatic agents ViscoStat Clear, Astringedent, or Astringedent X (P > 0.05). However, the mean bond strength of CSE Bond to dentin treated with Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) was significantly greater than those of the other groups (P < 0.05). Thus, while 3 of the tested hemostatic agents did not have significant effects on the bond strength of composite resin to dentin, ABS increased the bond strength of CSE Bond to dentin. PMID:26147164

  13. Chlorhexidine Nanocapsule Drug Delivery Approach to the Resin-Dentin Interface.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, B M; Selvan, S T; Lu, T B; Xie, H; Neo, J; Fawzy, A S

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we are introducing a new drug-delivery approach to demineralized dentin substrates through microsized dentinal tubules in the form of drug-loaded nanocapsules. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is widely used in adhesive dentistry due to its nonspecific matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory effect and antibacterial activities. Poly(ε-caprolactone) nanocapsules (nano-PCL) loaded with CHX were fabricated by interfacial polymer deposition at PCL/CHX ratios of 125:10, 125:25, and 125:50. Unloaded nanocapsules (blank) were fabricated as control. The fabricated nanocapsules were characterized in vitro in terms of particle size, surface charges, particle recovery, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading. Nanocapsule morphology, drug inclusion, structural properties, and crystallinity were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Initial screening of the antibacterial activities and the cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules were also conducted. Nanocapsules, as carried on ethanol/water solution, were delivered to demineralized dentin specimens connected to an ex vivo model setup simulating the pulpal pressure to study their infiltration, penetration depth, and retention inside the dentinal tubules by SEM/TEM. Nanocapsules were Ag labeled and delivered to demineralized dentin, followed by the application of a 2-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive. CHX-release profiles were characterized in vitro and ex vivo up to 25 d. Spherical nanocapsules were fabricated with a CHX core coated with a thin PCL shell. The blank nanocapsules exhibited the largest z-average diameter with negatively charged ζ-potential. With CHX incorporation, the nanocapsule size was decreased with a positive shift in ζ-potential. Nano-PCL/CHX at 125:50 showed the highest drug loading, antibacterial effect, and CHX release both in vitro and ex vivo. SEM and TEM revealed the deep

  14. Distribution of non-collagenous dentin matrix proteins and proteoglycans, and their relation to calcium accumulation in bisphosphonate-affected rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Ohma, N; Takagi, Y; Takano, Y

    2000-06-01

    It has been reported that multiple injections of 1-hydroxyethylidene- 1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP) to rats prevent mineralization of incisor dentin, thereby revealing high concentrations of calcium in the non-mineralized matrix of circumpulpal dentin. To identify the molecules responsible for calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin matrix, rats were injected daily with HEBP (8 mg P/kg) for 7 d, and the incisors processed for various histochemical and immunohistochemical staining of non-collagenous matrices of dentin. Cuprolinic blue reactions for proteoglycans (PGs) were equally distributed in non-mineralized matrix of mantle and circumpulpal dentin layers. Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and osteopontin (OPN) immunoreactions were found in non-mineralized circumpulpal dentin matrix, but not in mantle dentin. In normal incisors, however, predentin matrix showing significant DSP immunoreactivity was negative for Ca-GBHA reactions. HEBP-affected, non-mineralized OPN immunopositive bone matrix was also non-reactive for calcium. From these observations, neither PGs, OPN nor DSP appear to be responsible for calcium accumulation in HEBP-affected circumpulpal dentin. Stains-all reactive component, possibly dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), only showed the same distribution as that of Ca-GBHA in both HEBP-affected and normal dentin matrix, implicating a possible contribution of DPP to calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin and, hence, to appositional mineralization of dentin. PMID:10872993

  15. A novel dentin bond strength measurement technique using a composite disk in diametral compression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Lian-Shan; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Rob; Aparicio, Conrado; Lin, Chun-Pin; Fok, Alex

    2012-04-01

    New methods are needed that can predict the clinical failure of dental restorations that primarily rely on dentin bonding. Existing methods have shortcomings, e.g. severe deviation in the actual stress distribution from theory and a large standard deviation in the measured bond strength. We introduce here a novel test specimen by examining an endodontic model for dentin bonding. Specifically, we evaluated the feasibility of using the modified Brazilian disk test to measure the post-dentin interfacial bond strength. Four groups of resin composite disks which contained a slice of dentin with or without an intracanal post in the center were tested under diametral compression until fracture. Advanced nondestructive examination and imaging techniques in the form of acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used innovatively to capture the fracture process in real time. DIC showed strain concentration first appearing at one of the lateral sides of the post-dentin interface. The appearance of the interfacial strain concentration also coincided with the first AE signal detected. Utilizing both the experimental data and finite-element analysis, the bond/tensile strengths were calculated to be: 11.2 MPa (fiber posts), 12.9 MPa (metal posts), 8.9 MPa (direct resin fillings) and 82.6 MPa for dentin. We have thus established the feasibility of using the composite disk in diametral compression to measure the bond strength between intracanal posts and dentin. The new method has the advantages of simpler specimen preparation, no premature failure, more consistent failure mode and smaller variations in the calculated bond strength. PMID:22266033

  16. In vivo assessment of secondary caries and dentin characteristics after traditional amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    de Assunção Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; de Lima, Kenio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of secondary caries and dentin characteristics in permanent molars after traditional amalgam restorations, by means of clinical visual examination, radiographs and laser-induced fluorescence (LF) (DIAGNOdent). Methods: Thirty first permanent molars of 30 schoolchildren in the 7 to14 year-old age group were included. Caries was removed by hand. Thus, indirect pulp capping was performed with glass-ionomer cement (GIC), the cavity was varnished and amalgam filled. LF was measured before and after cavity preparation and after a 12-month observation period. Dentin color after cavity preparation and after the 12-month observation period was recorded. Recurrent caries was also investigated by visual clinical and radiographic examinations, in addition to dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping. Data was analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measurements, paired “t” test and descriptive statistic. Results: There were statistically significant differences (P<.05) among LF scores for dentin in all periods evaluated, with the lowest scores shown after 12 month of observation. There was no statistical difference between dentin color after cavity preparation and following 12 months of observation. Moreover, there was no recurrent caries attack at 12-month follow-up; dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping was similar between baseline and final observation periods. It was concluded that the clinical restorative procedure using hand caries removal, indirect pulp capping with GIC, varnishing and amalgam filling the cavity did not provide secondary caries and increased dentin mineral content after 12 months. PMID:22904654

  17. Challenges of stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, GEORGE T.-J.; AL-HABIB, MEY; GAUTHIER, PHILIPPE

    2013-01-01

    There are two types of approaches to regenerate tissues: cell-based and cell-free. The former approach is to introduce exogenous cells into the host to regenerate tissues, and the latter is to use materials other than cells in an attempt to regenerate tissues. There has been a significant advancement in stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration research in the past few years. Studies in small and large animals have demonstrated that pulp/dentin-like tissues can be regenerated partially or completely in the root canal space with apical openings of 0.7-3.0 mm using dental pulp stem cells, including stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) and subpopulations of pulp stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) have also been shown to regenerate pulp-like tissue. In contrast, the cell-free approach has not produced convincing evidence on pulp regeneration. However, one crucial concept has not been considered nor defined in the field of pulp/dentin regeneration and that is the critical size defect of dentin and pulp. Without such consideration and definition, it is difficult to predict or anticipate the extent of cell-free pulp regeneration that would occur. By reasoning, cell-free therapy is unlikely to regenerate an organ/tissue after total loss. Similarly, after a total loss of pulp, it is unlikely to regenerate without using exogenously introduced cells. A cell homing approach may provide a limited amount of tissue regeneration. Although stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration has shown great promise, clinical trials are difficult to launch at present. This article will address several issues that challenge and hinder the clinical applications of pulp/dentin regeneration which need to be overcome before stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration can occur in the clinic. PMID:23914150

  18. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions. PMID:27058377

  19. Transmission of Curing Light through Moist, Air-Dried, and EDTA Treated Dentine and Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo, E.; Varrela, J.; Lassila, L.; Vallittu, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study measured light transmission through enamel and dentin and the effect of exposed dentinal tubules to light propagation. Methods. Light attenuation through enamel and dentin layers of various thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm) was measured using specimens that were (1) moist and (2) air-dried (n = 5). Measurements were repeated after the specimens were treated with EDTA. Specimens were transilluminated with a light curing unit (maximum power output 1869 mW/cm2), and the mean irradiance power of transmitting light was measured. The transmission of light through teeth was studied using 10 extracted intact human incisors and premolars. Results. Transmitted light irradiance through 1 mm thick moist discs was 500 mW/cm2 for enamel and 398 mW/cm2 for dentin (p < 0.05). The increase of the specimen thickness decreased light transmission in all groups (p < 0.005), and moist specimens attenuated light less than air-dried specimens in all thicknesses (p < 0.05). EDTA treatment increased light transmission from 398 mW/cm2 to 439 mW/cm2 (1 mm dentin specimen thickness) (p < 0.05). Light transmission through intact premolar was 6.2 mW/cm2 (average thickness 8.2 mm) and through incisor was 37.6 mW/cm2 (average thickness 5.6 mm). Conclusion. Light transmission through enamel is greater than that through dentin, probably reflecting differences in refractive indices and extinction coefficients. Light transmission through enamel, dentin, and extracted teeth seemed to follow Beer-Lambert's law. PMID:27446954

  20. In vitro photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy in dentine contaminated by cariogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, M. A. S.; de-Paula, D. M.; Lima, J. P. M.; Borges, F. M. C.; Steiner-Oliveira, C.; Nobre-Dos-Santos, M.; Zanin, I. C. J.; Barros, E. B.; Rodrigues, L. K. A.

    2010-06-01

    The development of a method to ensure bacterial-free substrates without extensive cavity preparation would be highly useful to dentistry, since there is no currently available effective method for killing residual bacteria in dentinal tissue. This randomized in vitro study determined parameters for using toluidine blue O (TBO) with a light-emitting diode (LED) for dentine caries disinfection and monitored intrapulpal/periodontal temperatures during irradiation. Occlusal human dentine slabs were immersed in Streptococcus mutans culture for demineralization induction. Slabs were allocated to 10 groups ( n = 15), which were treated with 0.1 mg ml-1 TBO with 5 min of incubation time or 0.9% NaCl solution for 5, 10 or 15 min, and submitted or not to irradiation for 5, 10 or 15 min (47, 94, and 144 J/cm2). Before and after treatments, dentine samples were analyzed with regard to S. mutans counts. In whole teeth, temperature in pulp and periodontium was measured by thermocouples during irradiation. Kruskal-Wallis/Student-Newman-Keuls, and ANOVA/Tukey test were respectively utilized to compare log reductions and temperature rises between groups. Bacterial reduction was observed when dentine was exposed to both TBO and LED at all irradiation times, as well as to LED alone for 10 and 15 min. Temperature increases lower than 2°C were observed for either pulp or periodontium. Concluding, LED combined with TBO is a safe and effective approach for dentine caries disinfection. Nevertheless, additional studies should be conducted to determine the influence of the irradiation in S. mutans viability in dentinal surface/tubules.

  1. Evaluation of the Effect of Low Level Laser Therapy Toothbrush in Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Jaber; Mogharehabed, Ahmad; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mohamadi, Mehrnush; Ashtiju, Fahime

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dentin hypersensitivity is one of the most common complications that affect patients after periodontal therapy. Recently low level laser therapy has been introduced as a new treatment modality and has produced beneficial results. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy toothbrushes in reduction of dentin hypersensitivity. Methods: In this pilot interventional controlled clinical trial, 40 patients suffering from dentin hypersensitivity were selected using simple randomization. Half of the patients were given laser toothbrushes and the other half was given non-laser sensodyne toothbrushes. Primary dentin hypersensitivity was recorded by visual analogue scale (VAS) score and ice spray. Then dentin hypersensitivity was measured right after the treatment as well az in the intervals of 1 month and 2 months after initiation of the study. Data were compared using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software and Analysis of variance (ANOVA) paired T test. Results: The results of this study showed that there was a significant difference in each of the two kinds of tooth brushes separately for all time intervals (P < 0.001). Also the effect of the type of toothbrush was investigated using before treatment VAS with covariance analyses. P values for immediately, 1 month and 2 months after treatment were calculated to be 0.078, 0.02, 0.01 respectfully. Also the effect of the toothbrush type was significant in the manner that laser toothbrushes reduce dentin hypersensitivity more than ordinary toothbrushes (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Both sensodyne and laser tooth brushes improve dentin hypersensitivity, although the laser toothbrush led to better results in short. PMID:25987974

  2. Degradation in the dentin-composite interface subjected to multi-species biofilm challenges.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Carrera, C; Chen, R; Li, J; Lenton, P; Rudney, J D; Jones, R S; Aparicio, C; Fok, A

    2014-01-01

    Oral biofilms can degrade the components in dental resin-based composite restorations, thus compromising marginal integrity and leading to secondary caries. This study investigates the mechanical integrity of the dentin-composite interface challenged with multi-species oral biofilms. While most studies used single-species biofilms, the present study used a more realistic, diverse biofilm model produced directly from plaques collected from donors with a history of early childhood caries. Dentin-composite disks were made using bovine incisor roots filled with Z100(TM) or Filtek(TM) LS (3M ESPE). The disks were incubated for 72 h in paired CDC biofilm reactors, using a previously published protocol. One reactor was pulsed with sucrose, and the other was not. A sterile saliva-only control group was run with sucrose pulsing. The disks were fractured under diametral compression to evaluate their interfacial bond strength. The surface deformation of the disks was mapped using digital image correlation to ascertain the fracture origin. Fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to assess demineralization and interfacial degradation. Dentin demineralization was greater under sucrose-pulsed biofilms, as the pH dropped <5.5 during pulsing, with LS and Z100 specimens suffering similar degrees of surface mineral loss. Biofilm growth with sucrose pulsing also caused preferential degradation of the composite-dentin interface, depending on the composite/adhesive system used. Specifically, Z100 specimens showed greater bond strength reduction and more frequent cohesive failure in the adhesive layer. This was attributed to the inferior dentin coverage by Z100 adhesive, which possibly led to a higher level of chemical and enzymatic degradation. The results suggested that factors other than dentin demineralization were also responsible for interfacial degradation. A clinically relevant in vitro biofilm model was therefore

  3. Brushing abrasion of eroded dentin after application of sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Zirkel, C; Hellwig, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of sodium fluoride solutions on brushing abrasion of eroded dentin. Dentin specimens were prepared from 60 bovine incisors. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin, ground flat, polished and subsequently covered with tape exposing an area of 1.8 mm x 10.0 mm in the center of the exposed dentin. The samples were alternatingly stored in a demineralizing solution (5 min) and a remineralizing solution (1 min) for 5 times. The erosive soft drink Sprite light(R) served as a demineralizing solution and artificial saliva was used as a remineralizing solution. Prior to storage in artificial saliva 15 specimens were each treated for 1 min with 250 and 2,000 ppm fluoride solution, respectively. Fifteen specimens were treated with distilled water instead of the fluoride solution (= eroded controls). The remaining samples were neither eroded with the soft drink nor fluoridated (= uneroded controls). After each immersion in artificial saliva the specimens were submitted to abrasion in a toothbrushing machine. After 5 demineralization-remineralization brushing cycles the total amount of tooth wear due to erosion and subsequent abrasion was profilometrically evaluated. Statistical analysis revealed the significantly lowest wear in the uneroded controls and the highest amount of abrasion in the eroded controls. Application of the fluoride solutions increased the wear resistance of the eroded dentin specimens, showing significantly better protection by the high-concentration compared to the low-concentration solution. The susceptibility to abrasion of the eroded dentin specimens treated with the high-concentration fluoride solution did not differ significantly from the uneroded dentin samples. It is concluded that application of 2,000 ppm sodium fluoride solutions immediately before toothbrushing significantly reduces abrasion of eroded dentin in vitro. PMID:9701659

  4. Effect of storage solutions on microhardness of crown enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Berdan; Pamir, Tijen; Baltaci, Aysun; Orman, Mehmet N.; Turk, Tugba

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine alterations in microhardness of crown dentin and enamel, after 2 and 12-month storage in de-ionized water, 0.2% glutaraldehyde, Hanks’ Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS), 0.1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) or 0.1% thymol. Materials and Methods: Freshly extracted, nonsterile 60 intact human premolars were distributed to five groups. Six teeth from each group were evaluated after two, and other six teeth were evaluated after 12 months storage. After grinding and polishing of teeth, Vickers hardness was evaluated with making indentations on enamel and dentin, using a pyramid diamond indenter tip exerting 100 g load for 15 s. Results: After 2 months storage in solutions, range of the hardness values (HV) of enamel and dentin were in between 315–357 and 64–67, respectively. However, 12 months storage of the teeth resulted in a statistically significant decrease in microhardness when compared to microhardness of teeth stored for 2 months (P = 0.001). Although the differences were not significant regarding solutions, all solutions decreased the microhardness both in enamel and dentin (P > 0.05). However, decrease in microhardness was relatively less in de-ionized water and thymol solutions while glutaraldehyde decreased microhardness the most: 63% for enamel and 53% for dentin. Conclusions: Microhardness of enamel and dentin was in an acceptable range when teeth were stored for 2 months in de-ionized water, glutaraldehyde, HBSS, NaOCl or in thymol; thus, teeth kept up to 2 months in these solutions can be used for mechanical in vitro tests. However, 12 months storage significantly decreased the microhardness of enamel and dentin. PMID:26038661

  5. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Dusevich, Vladimir; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-um-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min) / input power (5–15 w). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen’s banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen. PMID:25458523

  6. Evaluation of the effect of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in dentin caries: a pilot in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, F. M. C.; de-Melo, M. A. S.; Lima, J. M. P.; Zanin, I. C. J.; Rodrigues, L. K. A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.

    2010-02-01

    In vitro and in situ studies have demonstrated that the photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PACT) is effective in reducing Streptococcus mutans population in artificially carious dentin. This pilot in vivo study evaluated the antimicrobial effect of PACT using toluidine blue O (TBO) and a light-emitting diode (LED) in carious dentin lesions. Five healthy adult volunteers (19-36 yr), with at least 4 active carious cavities each, participated in this study. Teeth of each volunteer were randomly divided into four groups: (1) without TBO and without light (Control); (2) with TBO alone (TBO); (3) with LED at 94/J cm2 alone (LED); and (4) with TBO plus LED at 94 J/cm2 (PACT). Each cavity was divided into two halves. The baseline carious dentin sample was collected from half of each cavity. Following, the treatments were performed using a random distribution of tooth into treatments. Then, the second collection of carious dentin samples was performed. Before and after treatments, dentin samples were analyzed with regard to the counts of total viable microorganisms, total streptococci, mutans streptococci, and lactobacilli. The data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α=5%). Log reductions ranged from -0.12 to 2.68 and significant reductions were observed for PACT (group 4) when compared to the other groups (1, 2, and 3) for total streptococci and mutans streptococci. Concluding, PACT was effective in killing oral microorganisms present in in vivo carious dentin lesions and may be a promising technique for eliminating bacteria from dentin before restoration.

  7. Dentine oxygen isotopes (δ (18)O) as a proxy for odontocete distributions and movements.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Cory J D; Longstaffe, Fred J; Ferguson, Steven H

    2016-07-01

    Spatial variation in marine oxygen isotope ratios (δ (18)O) resulting from differential evaporation rates and precipitation inputs is potentially useful for characterizing marine mammal distributions and tracking movements across δ (18)O gradients. Dentine hydroxyapatite contains carbonate and phosphate that precipitate in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with body water, which in odontocetes closely tracks the isotopic composition of ambient water. To test whether dentine oxygen isotope composition reliably records that of ambient water and can therefore serve as a proxy for odontocete distribution and movement patterns, we measured δ (18)O values of dentine structural carbonate (δ (18) OSC) and phosphate (δ (18) OP) of seven odontocete species (n = 55 individuals) from regional marine water bodies spanning a surface water δ (18)O range of several per mil. Mean dentine δ (18) OSC (range +21.2 to +25.5‰ VSMOW) and δ (18) OP (+16.7 to +20.3‰) values were strongly correlated with marine surface water δ (18)O values, with lower dentine δ (18) OSC and δ (18) OP values in high-latitude regions (Arctic and Eastern North Pacific) and higher values in the Gulf of California, Gulf of Mexico, and Mediterranean Sea. Correlations between dentine δ (18) OSC and δ (18) OP values with marine surface water δ (18)O values indicate that sequential δ (18)O measurements along dentine, which grows incrementally and archives intra- and interannual isotopic composition over the lifetime of the animal, would be useful for characterizing residency within and movements among water bodies with strong δ (18)O gradients, particularly between polar and lower latitudes, or between oceans and marginal basins. PMID:27547302

  8. Effect of eugenol-containing temporary cements on bond strength of composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Ganss, C; Jung, M

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temporary materials on shear bond strength of composite to dentin was investigated. Sixty previously impacted (caries-free) human third molars were embedded and sectioned horizontally at the pulp chamber and at the half of the crown. The samples were covered with ZOE, Temp Bond (eugenol-containing), Fermit, (temporary resin material, used without cementing) and Provicol, (eugenol-free, calcium hydroxide-containing). All specimens were stored in saline for 10 days. After mechanical cleaning the dentin was pretreated with a dentin bonding agent (Syntac), and the composite columns were applied. Debonding was performed using a Zwick Universal Testing Machine (cross-head speed 1.5 mm/min). The mode of failure was noted using a light microscope, and the thickness of the dentin at the composite/dentin interface was measured. The median shear bond strength values for the treated and control samples were: ZOE 7.46 MPa, Temp Bond 10.22 MPa, Fermit 6.49 MPa, Provicol 8.43 MPa, and control 10.06 MPa. No two groups were significantly different at the 0.05 level (one-way ANOVA and Scheffé test). In all groups the predominant mode of failure was adhesive and there was a slight tendency towards lower shear bond strength values at lower values for the thickness of the dentin. Under the conditions described the use of eugenol-containing temporary cements had no adverse effect on shear bond strength of a dual-curing composite luting cement to dentin. PMID:9573789

  9. Bonding of restorative materials to dentine: the present status in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, N

    1985-06-01

    Monomers which promote adhesion not only to enamel but also to dentine have been prepared. They have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. The monomers are 2-hydroxy-3-beta-naphthoxypropyl methacrylate, 2-methacryloxyethyl phenyl hydrogen phosphoric acid and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride. Chemical reaction between monomers and tooth substrates did not lead to adhesion. Cleaning of the ground tooth surface to remove the smeared layer with aqueous 10 per cent citric acid and 3 per cent ferric chloride solution prior to adhesion is recommended. Then, the lipophilic monomers will promote the inter-penetration of monomers into the hard tissues. The infiltrated methacrylates polymerize there and good adhesion takes place. The layer has good resistance against acid and is, in effect, a resin reinforced dentine and enamel as demonstrated by SEM and TEM. The tensile adhesive strength to the cleaned dentine was 18 MN/m2 and to the enamel 14 MN/m2. On the other hand, the value was reduced to 6 MN/m2 when the dentine had been etched by phosphoric acid or citric acid. The ferric chloride added to the citric acid protected dentinal collagen during demineralization. However, the ferric chloride provided ineffective protection against an acid as strong as phosphoric acid. The high bond strength was not dependent upon interlocking at the dentinal tubules as had been considered previously. The resin reinforced dentine and enamel is a hybrid of natural tissue and artificial material and is valuable in the prevention of secondary caries after restoration. PMID:3894241

  10. Polymerization Behavior of Hydrophilic-Rich Phase of Dentin Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, F.; Parthasarathy, R.; Misra, A.; Spencer, P.

    2015-01-01

    The 2-fold objectives of this study were 1) to understand whether model hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phase mimics of dentin adhesive polymerize similarly and 2) to determine which factor, the dimethacrylate component, bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) or photoinitiator concentration, has greater influence on the polymerization of the hydrophilic-rich phase mimic. Current dentin adhesives are sensitive to moisture, as evidenced by nanoleakage in the hybrid layer and phase separation into hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases. Phase separation leads to limited availability of the cross-linkable dimethacrylate monomer and hydrophobic photoinitiators within the hydrophilic-rich phase. Model hydrophobic-rich phase was prepared as a single-phase solution by adding maximum wt% deuterium oxide (D2O) to HEMA/BisGMA neat resins containing 45 wt% 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Mimics of the hydrophilic-rich phase were prepared similarly but using HEMA/BisGMA neat resins containing 95, 99, 99.5, and 100 wt% HEMA. The hydrophilic-rich mimics were prepared with standard or reduced photoinitiator content. The photoinitiator systems were camphorquinone (CQ)/ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDMAB) with or without [3-(3, 4-dimethyl-9-oxo-9H-thioxanthen-2-yloxy)-2-hydroxypropyl]trimethylammonium chloride (QTX). The polymerization kinetics was monitored using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer with a time-resolved collection mode. The hydrophobic-rich phase exhibited a significantly higher polymerization rate compared with the hydrophilic-rich phase. Postpolymerization resulting in the secondary rate maxima was observed for the hydrophilic-rich mimic. The hydrophilic-rich mimics with standard photoinitiator concentration but varying cross-linker (BisGMA) content showed postpolymerization and a substantial degree of conversion. In contrast, the corresponding formulations with reduced photoinitiator concentrations exhibited lower polymerization and

  11. Polymerization behavior of hydrophilic-rich phase of dentin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Abedin, F; Ye, Q; Parthasarathy, R; Misra, A; Spencer, P

    2015-03-01

    The 2-fold objectives of this study were 1) to understand whether model hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phase mimics of dentin adhesive polymerize similarly and 2) to determine which factor, the dimethacrylate component, bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) or photoinitiator concentration, has greater influence on the polymerization of the hydrophilic-rich phase mimic. Current dentin adhesives are sensitive to moisture, as evidenced by nanoleakage in the hybrid layer and phase separation into hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases. Phase separation leads to limited availability of the cross-linkable dimethacrylate monomer and hydrophobic photoinitiators within the hydrophilic-rich phase. Model hydrophobic-rich phase was prepared as a single-phase solution by adding maximum wt% deuterium oxide (D2O) to HEMA/BisGMA neat resins containing 45 wt% 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Mimics of the hydrophilic-rich phase were prepared similarly but using HEMA/BisGMA neat resins containing 95, 99, 99.5, and 100 wt% HEMA. The hydrophilic-rich mimics were prepared with standard or reduced photoinitiator content. The photoinitiator systems were camphorquinone (CQ)/ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDMAB) with or without [3-(3, 4-dimethyl-9-oxo-9H-thioxanthen-2-yloxy)-2-hydroxypropyl]trimethylammonium chloride (QTX). The polymerization kinetics was monitored using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer with a time-resolved collection mode. The hydrophobic-rich phase exhibited a significantly higher polymerization rate compared with the hydrophilic-rich phase. Postpolymerization resulting in the secondary rate maxima was observed for the hydrophilic-rich mimic. The hydrophilic-rich mimics with standard photoinitiator concentration but varying cross-linker (BisGMA) content showed postpolymerization and a substantial degree of conversion. In contrast, the corresponding formulations with reduced photoinitiator concentrations exhibited lower polymerization and

  12. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  13. Potential role of surface wettability on the long-term stability of dentin bonds after surface biomodification

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Ariene A.; Vidal, Cristina M. P.; Hassan, Lina Saleh; Bedran-Russo, Ana K.

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of the adhesive interface contributes to the failure of resin composite restorations. The hydrophilicity of the dentin matrix during and after bonding procedures may result in an adhesive interface that is more prone to degradation over time. This study assessed the effect of chemical modification of dentin matrix on the wettability and the long-term reduced modulus of elasticity (Er) of the adhesive interfaces. Human molars were divided into groups according to the priming solutions: distilled water (control), 6.5% Proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract (PACs), 5.75% 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/1.4% n-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) and 5% Glutaraldehyde (GA). The water-surface contact angle was verified before and after chemical modification of the dentin matrix. The demineralized dentin surface was treated with the priming solutions and restored with One Step Plus (OS) and Single Bond Plus (SB) and resin composite. The Er of the adhesive, hybrid layer and underlying dentin was evaluated after 24 h and 30 months in artificial saliva. The dentin hydrophilicity significantly decreased after application of the priming solutions. Aging significantly decreased the Er in the hybrid layer and underlying dentin of control groups. The Er of GA groups remained stable over time at the hybrid layer and underlying dentin. Significant higher Er was observed for PACs and EDC/NHS groups at the hybrid layer after 24 h. The decreased hydrophilicity of the modified dentin matrix likely influence the immediate mechanical properties of the hybrid layer. Dentin biomodification prevented substantial aging at the hybrid layer and underlying dentin after 30 months storage. PMID:25869721

  14. Effect of Lesion Baseline Severity and Mineral Distribution on Remineralization and Progression of Human and Bovine Dentin Caries Lesions.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Frank; Churchley, David; Lynch, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this laboratory study were to compare the effects of lesion baseline severity, mineral distribution and substrate on remineralization and progression of caries lesions created in root dentin. Lesions were formed in dentin specimens prepared from human and bovine dentin using three protocols, each utilizing three demineralization periods to create lesions of different mineral distributions (subsurface, moderate softening, extreme softening) and severity within each lesion type. Lesions were then either remineralized or demineralized further and analyzed using transverse microradiography. At lesion baseline, no differences were found between human and bovine dentin for integrated mineral loss (x0394;Z). Differences in mineral distribution between lesion types were apparent. Human dentin lesions were more prone to secondary demineralization (x0394;x0394;Z) than bovine dentin lesions, although there were no differences in x0394;L. Likewise, smaller lesions were more susceptible to secondary demineralization than larger ones. Subsurface lesions were more acid-resistant than moderately and extremely softened lesions. After remineralization, differences between human and bovine dentin lesions were not apparent for x0394;x0394;Z although bovine dentin lesions showed greater reduction in lesion depth L. For lesion types, responsiveness to remineralization (x0394;x0394;Z) was in the order extremely softened>moderately softened>subsurface. More demineralized lesions exhibited greater remineralization than shallower ones. In summary, some differences exist between human and bovine dentin and their relative responsiveness to de- and remineralization. These differences, however, were overshadowed by the effects of lesion baseline mineral distribution and severity. Thus, bovine dentin appears to be a suitable substitute for human dentin in mechanistic root caries studies. PMID:26228732

  15. Comparative evaluation of the effect of different bonding agents on the ultramorphology of primary tooth dentin and the resin dentin interface

    PubMed Central

    Vashisth, Pallavi; Goswami, Mousumi; Mittal, Mudit; Chaudhary, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To analyze and compare the changes in the ultramorphology of dentin in primary teeth using different bonding agents and to study the resin/dentin interface produced by them. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 50 extracted human deciduous teeth were grounded to expose the dentin. The teeth were divided into two groups (A) For viewing surface morphology- 18 teeth divided into four groups: (a) for viewing dentinal morphology (3 teeth), (b) Scotchbond multi-purpose (5 teeth), (c) Adhe SE (5 teeth), (d) Futurabond (5 teeth). (B) For viewing interfacial morphology- 32 teeth divided into four groups with 8 teeth each: (a) Scotch Bond Multipurpose (3M, ESPE),), (b) Adhe Se (Vivadent), (c) Optibond All-in-One (Kerr), (d) Futurabond NR (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany). The adhesives were applied to each group following the manufacturer's instruction. All the samples were then prepared for viewing under SEM. Results: The photographs were graded using a four-step (0-3) scale method proposed by Ferrari et al. For Scotchbond, 12 (75%) were graded as 2 Grade 3 was observed in only 1 observation in the entire lot of materials. The results obtained for Adhe SE and Optibond AIO were similar, i.e. in 5 (31.25%) observations each the scores were 0 and in 11 (68.75%) observations each the scores were 1. In case of Futurabond, 3 (18.75%) observations were graded as 0 and 13 (81.25%) were graded as 1, thus showing a mean score of 0.81±0.40. Conclusion: Three- step bonding agent results in the complete removal of smear layer. While the self- etch approach is not efficient in removing the smear layer and opening of the dentinal tubules. The longest resin tags with lateral branches were seen in two groups- Scotch bond multipurpose and Optibond FL. PMID:23112484

  16. The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55℃. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392

  17. The evaluation of dentinal tubule occlusion by desensitizing agents: a real-time measurement of dentinal fluid flow rate and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S Y; Kim, E J; Kim, D S; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine changes in dentinal fluid flow (DFF) during the application of a desensitizing agent and to compare the permeability reduction levels among different types of desensitizing agents. A cervical cavity was prepared for the exposure of cervical dentin on an extracted human premolar connected to a subnanoliter fluid flow measuring device under 20 cm of water pressure. The cavity was acid-etched with 32% phosphoric acid to make dentin highly permeable. The different types of desensitizing agents that were applied on the cavity were Seal&Protect as the light-curing adhesive type, SuperSeal and BisBlock as oxalate types, Gluma Desensitizer as the protein-precipitation type, and Bi-Fluoride 12 as the fluoride type. DFF was measured from the time before the application of the desensitizing agent throughout the application procedure to five minutes after the application. The characteristics of dentinal tubule occlusion of each desensitizing agent were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The DFF rate after each desensitizing agent application was significantly reduced when compared to the initial DFF rate before application for all of the desensitizing agents (p<0.05). Seal&Protect showed a greater reduction in the DFF rate when compared to Gluma Desensitizer and Bi-Fluoride 12 (p<0.05). SuperSeal and BisBlock exhibited a greater reduction in DFF rate when compared to Bi-Fluoride 12 (p<0.05). The dentin hypersensitivity treatment effects of the employed desensitizing agents in this study were confirmed through real-time measurements of DFF changes. The light-curing adhesive and oxalate types showed greater reduction in the DFF rate than did the protein-precipitation and fluoride types. PMID:23110582

  18. Paucity of Nanolayering in Resin-Dentin Interfaces of MDP-based Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Tian, F; Zhou, L; Zhang, Z; Niu, L; Zhang, L; Chen, C; Zhou, J; Yang, H; Wang, X; Fu, B; Huang, C; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2016-04-01

    Self-assembled nanolayering structures have been reported in resin-dentin interfaces created by adhesives that contain 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP). These structures have been hypothesized to contribute to bond durability. The objective of the present study was to determine the extent of nanolayering in resin-dentin interfaces after application of commercialized 10-MDP-containing self-etch and universal adhesives to human dentin. Seven commercialized adhesives were examined: Adhese Universal (Ivoclar-Vivadent), All-Bond Universal (Bisco, Inc.), Clearfil SE Bond 2, Clearfil S3 Bond Plus, Clearfil Universal Bond (all from Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc.), G-Premio Bond (GC Corp.), and Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE). Each adhesive was applied in the self-etch mode on midcoronal dentin according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Bonded specimens (n = 6) were covered with flowable resin composite, processed for transmission electron microscopy, and examined at 30 random sites without staining. Thin-film glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to detect the characteristic peaks exhibited by nanolayering (n = 4). The control consisted of 15%wt, 10%wt, and 5%wt 10-MDP (DM Healthcare Products, Inc.) dissolved in a mixed solvent (ethanol and water weight ratio 9:8, with photoinitiators). Experimental primers were applied to dentin for 20 s, covered with hydrophobic resin layer, and examined in the same manner. Profuse nanolayering with highly ordered periodicity (~3.7 nm wide) was observed adjacent to partially dissolved apatite crystallites in dentin treated with the 15% 10-MDP primer. Three peaks in the 2θ range of 2.40° (3.68 nm), 4.78° (1.85 nm), and 7.18° (1.23 nm) were identified from thin-film XRD. Reduction in the extent of nanolayering was observed in the 10% and 5% 10-MDP experimental primer-dentin interface along with lower intensity XRD peaks. Nanolayering and characteristic XRD peaks were rarely observed in

  19. Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity by Diode Laser: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25–60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5 W PW (T on 100 m and T off 100 ms), fluence 62.2 J/cm2 in defocused mode with a 320 μ fiber. Each tooth received three 1′ applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel. PMID:22792109

  20. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser89 is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S89 was substituted with G89 (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  1. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser(89) is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S(89) was substituted with G(89) (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  2. Exploring Some Aspects Associated with Dentine Hypersensitivity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shitsuka, Caleb; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Corrêa, Maria Salete Nahás Pires; Leite, Mariana Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background. The etiology of dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is still inconclusive and there are few studies concerning it in children. Aim. To evaluate clinical, dietary, and salivary variables in children with DH complaints. Design. Forty-eight children were asked about DH. Data regarding dietary habits were collected from the children's parents and an examination was performed to determine dental erosion. Dental biofilm was estimated by oral hygiene status, according to Greene and Vermillion's Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S). Whole saliva was collected under mechanical stimulation and evaluated salivary flow rate, initial pH, buffer capacity, and calcium and phosphate concentrations. The temperature of soft drinks, drinking method, sense of bitter taste, and other variables were also determined. Possible factors associated with DH were analyzed by univariate and multiple Poisson regression analyses. The prevalence ratio (PR) values and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results. DH was associated with the presence of dental erosion (PR; 95% CI = 2.23; 1.05 to 4.71) and salivary flow rate (2.49; 1.05 to 5.91). When the presence of erosion was not included, other variables were retained as follows: bitter taste (2.36; 1.38 to 4.03), OHI-S (0.47; 0.23 to 0.97). Conclusion. DH in children is associated with factors related to dental erosion. PMID:25879070

  3. Porphyrin involvement in redshift fluorescence in dentin decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slimani, A.; Panayotov, I.; Levallois, B.; Cloitre, T.; Gergely, C.; Bec, N.; Larroque, C.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the porphyrin involvement in the red fluorescence observed in dental caries with Soprolife® light-induced fluorescence camera in treatments mode (SOPRO, ACTEON Group, La Ciotat, France) and Vistacam® camera (DÜRR DENTAL AG, Bietigheim-Bissingen, Germany). The International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) was used to rand the samples. Human teeth cross-sections, ranked from ICDAS score 0 to 6, were examined by epi-fluorescence microscopy and Confocal Raman microscopy. Comparable studies were done with Protoporphyrin IX, Porphyrin I and Pentosidine solutions. An RGB analysis of Soprolife® images was performed using ImageJ Software (1.46r, National Institutes of Health, USA). Fluorescence spectroscopy and MicroRaman spectroscopy revealed the presence of Protoporphyrin IX, in carious enamel, dentin and dental plaque. However, the presence of porphyrin I and pentosidine cannot be excluded. The results indicated that not only porphyrin were implicated in the red fluorescence, Advanced Glygation Endproducts (AGEs) of the Maillard reaction also contributed to this phenomenon.

  4. Retrograde root filling with dentin-bonded modified resin composite.

    PubMed

    Rud, J; Rud, V; Munksgaard, E C

    1996-09-01

    A retrograde root-end cover with a special resin composite (Retroplast) combined with the dentin bonding agent Gluma (Bayer AG) has been used since 1984 by the authors. Its content of silver, added to promote radiopacity, has been found to lower the working time and storage stability of the composite and might cause discolorations. Since 1990, silver has therefore been replaced with ytterbium trifluoride, which eliminates these side effects. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results obtained with these two resin composites and to evaluate the healing results after several years in function. Apical fillings (351) with the modified Retroplast showed the following radiographic healing pattern 1 yr after surgery: 80% complete healing, 2% scar tissue, 12% uncertain healing, and 6% failure. No significant difference in this healing pattern was found, compared with that obtained with the silver-containing Retroplast. Cases with ytterbium trifluoride classified as scar tissue and uncertain healing at 1 yr when examined at 2 to 4 yr postoperatively showed 89% complete healing. 0% scar tissue, 1% uncertain healing, and 9% failure. This result is significantly different from that obtained 1 yr after surgery. Based on calculations, it was predicted that with time 90% will become complete healing, whereas 10% will become failure. PMID:9198430

  5. The Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP) Domain Regulates Dental Mesenchymal Cell Differentiation through a Novel Surface Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunyan; Yuan, Guohua; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Heng; Liu, Huan; Chen, Lei; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein that is processed into dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSP is mainly expressed in odontoblasts. We hypothesized that DSP interacts with cell surface receptors and subsequently activates intracellular signaling. Using DSP as bait for screening a protein library, we demonstrate that DSP acts as a ligand and binds to integrin β6. The 36 amino acid residues of DSP are sufficient to bind to integrin β6. This peptide promoted cell attachment, migration, differentiation and mineralization of dental mesenchymal cells. In addition, DSP aa183-219 stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38 kinases. This activation was inhibited by an anti-integrin β6 antibody and siRNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this DSP fragment induces SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation via ERK1/2 and P38 signaling. SMAD1/5/8 binds to SMAD binding elements (SBEs) in the DSPP gene promoter. SBE mutations result in a decrease in DSPP transcriptional activity. Endogenous DSPP expression was up-regulated by DSP aa183-219 in dental mesenchymal cells. The data in the current study demonstrate for the first time that this DSP domain acts as a ligand in a RGD-independent manner and is involved in intracellular signaling via interacting with integrin β6. The DSP domain regulates DSPP expression and odontoblast homeostasis via a positive feedback loop. PMID:27430624

  6. The Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP) Domain Regulates Dental Mesenchymal Cell Differentiation through a Novel Surface Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunyan; Yuan, Guohua; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Heng; Liu, Huan; Chen, Lei; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein that is processed into dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSP is mainly expressed in odontoblasts. We hypothesized that DSP interacts with cell surface receptors and subsequently activates intracellular signaling. Using DSP as bait for screening a protein library, we demonstrate that DSP acts as a ligand and binds to integrin β6. The 36 amino acid residues of DSP are sufficient to bind to integrin β6. This peptide promoted cell attachment, migration, differentiation and mineralization of dental mesenchymal cells. In addition, DSP (aa183-219) stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38 kinases. This activation was inhibited by an anti-integrin β6 antibody and siRNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this DSP fragment induces SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation via ERK1/2 and P38 signaling. SMAD1/5/8 binds to SMAD binding elements (SBEs) in the DSPP gene promoter. SBE mutations result in a decrease in DSPP transcriptional activity. Endogenous DSPP expression was up-regulated by DSP (aa183-219) in dental mesenchymal cells. The data in the current study demonstrate for the first time that this DSP domain acts as a ligand in a RGD-independent manner and is involved in intracellular signaling via interacting with integrin β6. The DSP domain regulates DSPP expression and odontoblast homeostasis via a positive feedback loop. PMID:27430624

  7. Influence of remaining dentin wall thickness on the fracture strength of endodontically treated tooth

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Al-Qahtani, Ali Saad; Al-Qarni, Marie Mohammed; Al-Homrany, Rami Mohammed; Aboalkhair, Ayyob Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Remaining dentin wall thickness may influence the fracture resistance of tooth. Aims: To investigate the effect of various coronal dentin wall widths on the fracture strength of root canal treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Fifty recently extracted single canal mandibular premolars were used for the study. Ten unrestored teeth were used as control (Group 1); remaining teeth were root canal treated and divided into four groups (n = 10). The Groups 2a, 2b and 3a, 3b were having 2.5 mm, 1.5 mm remaining dentin with and without post, respectively. The samples fracture resistance was tested under the universal testing machine. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test for comparative evaluation. Results: The mean fracture strength observed in Group 1 was (29.75 Mpa) followed by Group 2a (28.97 Mpa), Group 2b (27.70 Mpa), Group 3a (23.39 Mpa), and Group 3b (16.38 Mpa). There was no statistically significant difference between control and Groups 2a and 2b with P > 0.05. The post contributed significantly for fracture resistance in Group 3a. Conclusion: The endodontic post is not required in root canal treated teeth >2.5 mm coronal dentin wall width while the post is essential for a tooth with <1.5 mm dentin wall width to improve fracture resistance. PMID:26957796

  8. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fractureresistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information inarchival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. Infact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralizedtissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled,there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. Thepresent study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel setof in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving adouble-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whetherthe critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locallystress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used tocharacterize the notion of "plasticity" in dentin and the interaction ofcracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed thatfracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that thepresence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this processof crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to becritical steps in the development ofa micromechanical model for thefracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence ofboth the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  9. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fracture resistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled, there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. The present study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel set of in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving a double-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whether the critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locally stress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used to characterize the notion of ''plasticity'' in dentin and the interaction of cracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed that fracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that the presence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this process of crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to be critical steps in the development of a micromechanical model for the fracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence of both the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  10. Dentin and dental pulp regeneration by the patient’s endogenous cells

    PubMed Central

    KIM, SAHNG G.; ZHENG, YING; ZHOU, JIAN; CHEN, MO; EMBREE, MILDRED C.; SONG, KAREN; JIANG, NAN; MAO, JEREMY J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of regenerative endodontics is to restore the functions of the dental pulp–dentin complex. Two approaches are being applied toward dental pulp–dentin regeneration: cell transplantation and cell homing. The majority of previous approaches are based on cell transplantation by delivering ex vivo cultivated cells toward dental pulp or dentin regeneration. Many hurdles limit the clinical translation of cell transplantation such as the difficulty of acquiring and isolating viable cells, uncertainty of what cells or what fractions of cells to use, excessive cost of cell manipulation and transportation, and the risk of immune rejection, pathogen transmission, and tumorigenesis in associated with ex vivo cell manipulation. In contrast, cell homing relies on induced chemotaxis of endogenous cells and therefore circumvents many of the difficulties that are associated with cell transplantation. An array of proteins, peptides, and chemical compounds that are yet to be identified may orchestrate endogenous cells to regenerate dental pulp–dentin complex. Both cell transplantation and cell homing are scientifically valid approaches; however, cell homing offers a number of advantages that are compatible with the development of clinical therapies for dental pulp–dentin regeneration. PMID:24976816

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  12. Biological effects of a root conditioning agent for dentin surface modification in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seol, Yang-Jo; Park, Jang-Ryul; Park, Yoon-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Connective tissue reattachment to periodontally damaged root surfaces is one of the most important goals of periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to develop a root conditioning agent that can demineralize and detoxify the infected root surface. Methods Dentin slices obtained from human teeth were treated with a novel root planing agent for 2 minutes and then washed with phosphate-buffered saline. Smear layer removal and type I collagen exposure were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and type I collagen immunostaining, respectively. Cell attachment and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) removal demonstrated the efficiency of the root conditioning agent. Results SEM revealed that the smear layer was entirely removed and the dentinal tubules were opened by the experimental gel. Type I collagen was exposed on the surfaces of the dentin slices treated by the experimental gel, which were compared with dentin treated with other root planing agents. Dentin slices treated with the experimental gel showed the highest number of attached fibroblasts and flattened cell morphology. The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity. Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel. Conclusions These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads. PMID:21246015

  13. The role of toothpaste in the aetiology and treatment of dentine hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; West, N X

    2013-01-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is a common, painful dental condition with a multi-factorial aetiology. The hydrodynamic mechanism theory to explain dentine sensitivity also appears to fit DH: lesions exhibiting large numbers of open dentinal tubules at the surface and patent to the pulp. By definition, DH can only occur when dentine becomes exposed (lesion localisation) and tubules opened (lesion initiation), thus permitting increased fluid flow in tubules on stimulation. Erosion, particularly from dietary acids appears to play a dominant role in both processes. Toothbrushing with most toothpaste products alone cause clinically insignificant wear of enamel but are additive, even synergistic, to erosive enamel loss. Additionally, toothbrushing with toothpaste is implicated in 'healthy' gingival recession. Toothbrushing with most toothpastes removes the smear layer to expose tubules and again can exacerbate erosive loss of dentine. These findings thereby implicate toothbrushing with toothpaste in the aetiology of DH. Management of the condition should have secondary prevention at the core of treatment and therefore, must consider first and foremost the aetiology. Fluoride toothpaste at present appears to provide little primary or secondary preventive benefits to DH; additional ingredients can provide therapeutic benefits. Potassium-based products to block pulpal nerve response have caused much debate and are considered by many as unproven, which should not translate to ineffective. Several toothpaste technologies formulated to block tubules are from studies in vitro, in situ and controlled clinical trials considered proven for the treatment of DH. PMID:23817061

  14. Enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of dentin adhesives containing a new urethane-based trimethacrylate monomer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Gu; Ye, Qiang; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Spencer, Paulette

    2009-01-01

    A new trimethacrylate monomer with urethane-linked groups, 1,1,1-tri-[4-(methacryloxyethylamino-carbonyloxy)-phenyl]ethane (MPE), was synthesized, characterized, and used as a co-monomer in dentin adhesives. Dentin adhesives containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA, 45% w/w) and 2,2-bis[4(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy-propyloxy)-phenyl] propane (BisGMA, 30% w/w) in addition to MPE (25% w/w) were formulated with H2O at 0 (MPE0), 8 (MPE8) and 16 wt % water (MPE16) to simulate the wet demineralized dentin matrix and compared with controls [HEMA/BisGMA, 45/55 w/w, at 0 (C0), 8 (C8) and 16 wt% water (C16)]. The new adhesive showed a degree of double bond conversion and mechanical properties comparable with control, with good penetration into the dentin surface and a uniform adhesive/dentin interface. On exposure to porcine liver esterase, the net cumulative methacrylic acid (MAA) release from the new adhesives was dramatically (P < 0.05) decreased relative to the control, suggesting that the new monomer improves esterase resistance. PMID:19582843

  15. Temperature rise induced by various light curing units through human dentin.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Arife; Hubbezoglu, Ihsan; Dogan, Orhan Murat; Bolayir, Giray; Demir, Hakan

    2009-05-01

    This study investigated temperature rises caused by different light curing units (LCUs) in dentin of different thicknesses. The different LCUs tested in this study were namely: quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) (Heliolux DLX) LCU, plasma arc (PAC) (Apollo 95E Elite) LCU, and light emitting diode (LED) (Mini LED) in standard curing mode as well as pulse and soft-start modes. One hundred and forty dentin disks of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mm thickness were prepared from mandibular molars (n=7). Temperatures were recorded using a L-type thermocouple in direct contact with the light guide tip. For all curing units/modes, dentin thickness was inversely proportional to temperature rise and that QTH light gave significantly higher values compared to PAC and LED in all the test conditions. The highest temperature rise was observed under 0.5-mm-thick dentin disk with QTH, whereas the lowest temperature rise was registered with LED light in pulse mode under 2-mm-thick dentin. PMID:19662722

  16. Contributions of aging to the fatigue crack growth resistance of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-07-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2 ± 1.5 to 24.1 ± 5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in-plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4 ± 3.03 to 22.9 ± 5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy. PMID:22484693

  17. Photoactivated rose bengal functionalized chitosan nanoparticles produce antibacterial/biofilm activity and stabilize dentin-collagen

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Annie; Hamblin, Michael R.; Kishen, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of infected teeth presents two major challenges: persistence of the bacterial-biofilm within root canals after treatment and compromised structural integrity of the dentin hard-tissue. In this study bioactive polymeric chitosan nanoparticles functionalized with rose-bengal, CSRBnp was developed to produce antibiofilm effects as well as stabilize structural-integrity by photocrosslinking dentin-collagen. CSRBnp was less toxic to fibroblasts and had significant antibacterial activity even in the presence of bovine serum albumin. CSRBnp exerted antibacterial mechanism by adhering to bacterial cell surface, permeabilizing the membrane and lysing the cells subsequent to photodynamic treatment. Photoactivated CSRBnp resulted in reduced viability of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms and disruption of biofilm structure. Incorporation of CSRBnp and photocrosslinking significantly improved resistance to degradation and mechanical strength of dentin-collagen (p<0.05). The functionalized chitosan nanoparticles provided a single-step treatment of infected root dentin by combining the properties of chitosan and that of photosensitizer to eliminate bacterial-biofilms and stabilize dentin-matrix. PMID:24200522

  18. Effects of polar solvents and adhesive resin on the denaturation temperatures of demineralised dentine matrices

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Steven R.; Jessop, Julie L.P.; Winn, Erik; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives To measure the denaturation temperature (Td) of demineralised dentine matrix as a function of infiltration with water vs polar solvents vs adhesive resins. Methods Small disks of normal dentine were completely demineralised in 0.5 M EDTA. Dried demineralised specimens were placed in water, methanol, ethanol, acetone, η-butanol or HEMA. Additional specimens were infiltrated with Prime & Bond NT and polymerised. All specimens sealed in high pressure pans and scanned using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results Demineralised dentine saturated with water showed a Td of 65.6°C that increased with saturation by methanol, ethanol, acetone, η-butanol or HEMA to 148.5°C. These increases in Td were inversely related to the molar concentration of the solvents and to their Hoy’s solubility parameter for hydrogen bonding (δh, p<0.01), as well as directly related to the cube root of their molecular weights (p<0.001). The presence of adhesive resins also increased the Td of demineralised matrices to even higher values depending if the resin bonded dentine was measured after 24 h of water storage (166.8°C) or dry (172.7°C) storage. Conclusions Solvents and monomers with low δh values (i.e. 100% HEMA) increase the Td of demineralized dentin above that produced by solvents with higher δh values such as methanol and water. PMID:18022750

  19. Effects of bioactive glass with and without mesoporous structures on desensitization in dentinal tubule occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Kung, Jung-Chang; Chen, Cheng-Hwei; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Chi-Jen; Chien, Chi-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) is a potential material for treating dentin hypersensitivity due to its high ability of dissolution. In this study, conventional BG and BG with well-ordered mesopore structures (MBG) were applied for dentinal tubule occlusion. We used X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) to investigate the physiochemical properties and the dentinal tubule occlusion ability of BG and MBG groups. The results showed that the major crystallite phase of MBG and BG agents was monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. MBG pastes, mixed with 30 and 40 wt% phosphoric acid hardening solutions, had the ability to create a penetration depth greater than 50 μm. These results showed that BG with mesoporous structures turned the pastes mixed with suitable phosphoric acid solution into a material with great ability for occluding dentinal tubules; it has a short reaction time and good operability, and these agents have better potential for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity than BG without mesoporous structures.

  20. Bone Regeneration Using Dentin Matrix Depends on the Degree of Demineralization and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Takamitsu; Minamizato, Tokutaro; Kawai, Yosuke; Miura, Kei-ichiro; I, Takashi; Nakatani, Yuya; Sumita, Yoshinori; Asahina, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine the influence of particle size and extent of demineralization of dentin matrix