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Sample records for generated hidden charm

  1. Dynamically generated N* and {Lambda}* resonances in the hidden charm sector around 4.3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-07-15

    The interactions of D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. A series of meson-baryon dynamically generated relatively narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are predicted around 4.3 GeV in the hidden charm sector. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for the experiment of antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) at the forthcoming GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) facility.

  2. Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nyiri, J.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Semenova, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm are considered as diquark-diquark-antiquark composite systems. Spin and isospin content of such exotic states is discussed and masses are evaluated.

  3. Identifying Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang; Li, Xue-Qian; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-09-25

    The LHCb Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN discovered two pentaquark states P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450). These two hidden-charm states are interpreted as the loosely bound Σ_{c}(2455)D^{*} and Σ_{c}^{*}(2520)D^{*} molecular states in the boson exchange interaction model, which provides an explanation for why the experimental width of P_{c}(4450) is much narrower than that of P_{c}(4380). The discovery of the new resonances P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450), indeed, opens a new page for hadron physics. The partners of P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450) should be pursued in future experiments. PMID:26451546

  4. Identifying Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang; Li, Xue-Qian; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-09-25

    The LHCb Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN discovered two pentaquark states P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450). These two hidden-charm states are interpreted as the loosely bound Σ_{c}(2455)D^{*} and Σ_{c}^{*}(2520)D^{*} molecular states in the boson exchange interaction model, which provides an explanation for why the experimental width of P_{c}(4450) is much narrower than that of P_{c}(4380). The discovery of the new resonances P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450), indeed, opens a new page for hadron physics. The partners of P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450) should be pursued in future experiments.

  5. Prediction of narrow N* and {Lambda}* with hidden charm

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-10-24

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons, such as D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Six narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are dynamically generated with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. These predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for PANDA at the forthcoming FAIR facility.

  6. Prediction of Narrow N* and {Lambda}* Resonances with Hidden Charm above 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2010-12-03

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons is studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Several meson-baryon dynamically generated narrow N{sup *} and {Lambda}{sup *} resonances with hidden charm are predicted with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. The predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks and can be looked for in the forthcoming PANDA/FAIR experiments.

  7. The hidden-charm pentaquark and tetraquark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade many charmonium-like states were observed experimentally. Especially those charged charmonium-like Zc states and bottomonium-like Zb states cannot be accommodated within the naive quark model. These charged Zc states are good candidates of either the hidden-charm tetraquark states or molecules composed of a pair of charmed mesons. Recently, the LHCb Collaboration discovered two hidden-charm pentaquark states, which are also beyond the quark model. In this work, we review the current experimental progress and investigate various theoretical interpretations of these candidates of the multiquark states. We list the puzzles and theoretical challenges of these models when confronted with the experimental data. We also discuss possible future measurements which may distinguish the theoretical schemes on the underlying structures of the hidden-charm multiquark states.

  8. Towards Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks in QCD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Steele, T G; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-10-23

    Inspired by P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) recently observed by LHCb, a QCD sum rule investigation is performed, by which they can be identified as exotic hidden-charm pentaquarks composed of an anticharmed meson and a charmed baryon. Our results suggest that P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) have quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and 5/2(+), respectively. Furthermore, two extra hidden-charm pentaqurks with configurations D̅Σ(c)(*) and D̅(*)Σ(c)(*) are predicted, which have spin-parity quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and J(P)=5/2(+), respectively. As an important extension, the mass predictions of hidden-bottom pentaquarks are also given. Searches for these partners of P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) are especially accessible at future experiments like LHCb and BelleII. PMID:26551105

  9. Penta-Quark States with Strangeness, Hidden Charm and Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Zou, Bing-Song

    The classical quenched quark models with three constituent quarks provide a good description for the baryon spatial ground states, but fail to reproduce the spectrum of baryon excited states. More and more evidences suggest that unquenched effects with multi-quark dynamics are necessary ingredients to solve the problem. Several new hyperon resonances reported recently could fit in the picture of penta-quark states. Based on this picture, some new hyperon excited states were predicted to exist; meanwhile with extension from strangeness to charm and beauty, super-heavy narrow N* and Λ* resonances with hidden charm or beauty were predicted to be around 4.3 and 11 GeV, respectively. Recently, two of such N* with hidden charm might have been observed by the LHCb experiment. More of those states are expected to be observed in near future. This opens a new window in order to study hadronic dynamics for the multi-quark states.

  10. Hidden-charm molecular pentaquarks and their charm-strange partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of one-pion-exchange (OPE) model, we study the hidden-charm and charm-strange molecular pentaquark systems composed of a heavy baryon (Σc , Σc*) and a vector meson (Kbar* ,Dbar*), where the S-D mixing effect is considered in our calculation. Our result shows that the ΣcDbar* molecular state with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 3 /2-) and the Σc* Dbar* molecular state with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 5 /2-) exist in the mass range of the observed Pc (4380) and Pc (4450), respectively. Moreover, we predict two other hidden-charm molecular pentaquarks with configurations ΣcDbar* (I = 3 / 2 ,JP = 1 /2-) and Σc* Dbar* (I = 3 / 2 ,JP = 1 /2-) and two charm-strange molecular pentaquarks Pcs (3340) and Pcs (3400) corresponding to the ΣcKbar* configuration with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 3 /2-) and the Σc* Kbar* configuration with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 5 /2-), respectively. Additionally, we also predict some hidden-bottom Σb(*)B* and Bc-like Σc(*)B* /Σb(*)Dbar* pentaquarks.

  11. Diffusion of hidden charm mesons in hadronic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sukanya; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Das, Santosh K.; Sarkar, Sourav; Alam, Jan-e.

    2016-07-01

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of a hot hadronic medium have been evaluated by using hidden charm mesons as probes. The scattering amplitudes required for the evaluation of these coefficients are calculated using an effective theory and scattering lengths obtained from lattice QCD calculations. It is found that although the magnitude of the transport coefficients are small their temperature variation is strong. The insignificant momentum diffusion of J / ψ in the hadronic medium keeps their momentum distribution largely unaltered. Therefore, the task of characterization of quark gluon plasma by using the observed suppression of J / ψ at high momentum will be comparatively easier.

  12. Study of reactions disclosing hidden charm pentaquarks with or without strangeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oset, Eulogio; Chen, Hua-Xing; Feijoo, Albert; Geng, Li-Sheng; Liang, Wei-Hong; Li, De-Min; Lu, Jun-Xu; Magas, Vladymir K.; Nieves, Juan; Ramos, Angels; Roca, Luis; Wang, En; Xie, Ju-Jun

    2016-10-01

    We present results for five reactions, Λb → J / ψK- p, Λb → J / ψηΛ, Λb → J / ψπ- p, Λb → J / ψK0 Λ and Ξb- → J / ψK- Λ, where combining information from the meson baryon interaction, using the chiral unitary approach, and predictions made for molecular states of hidden charm, with or without strangeness, we can evaluate invariant mass distributions for the light meson baryon states, and for those of J / ψp or J / ψΛ. We show that with the present available information, in all of these reactions one finds peaks where the pentaquark states show up. In the Λb → J / ψK- p and Λb → J / ψπ- p reactions we show that the results obtained from our study are compatible with present experimental observations.

  13. Formation of hidden-charm pentaquarks in photon-nucleon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarovsky, Valery P.; Voloshin, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    The cross section for formation in γ + ρ collisions of the recently found hidden-charm pentaquark states Ρc(4380) and Ρc(4450) is discussed and estimated. The studies of these resonances in photon beam experiments can be complementary to those in the LHCb experiment setting, and may be more advantageous for measurement of their additional decay channels. It is pointed out that both the relative importance of such decays and the yield of the resonances in the γ + ρ collisions are sensitive to the internal dynamics of the pentaquarks and can resolve between theoretical models. Specific numerical estimates are discussed within a simple ‘baryocharmonium’ model, where the the observed Ρc resonances are composites of J/ψ and excited nucleon states with the quantum numbers of Ν(1440) and Ν(1520).

  14. Formation of hidden-charm pentaquarks in photon-nucleon collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kubarovsky, Valery P.; Voloshin, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    The cross section for formation in γ + ρ collisions of the recently found hidden-charm pentaquark states Ρc(4380) and Ρc(4450) is discussed and estimated. The studies of these resonances in photon beam experiments can be complementary to those in the LHCb experiment setting, and may be more advantageous for measurement of their additional decay channels. It is pointed out that both the relative importance of such decays and the yield of the resonances in the γ + ρ collisions are sensitive to the internal dynamics of the pentaquarks and can resolve between theoretical models. Specific numerical estimates are discussed withinmore » a simple ‘baryocharmonium’ model, where the the observed Ρc resonances are composites of J/ψ and excited nucleon states with the quantum numbers of Ν(1440) and Ν(1520).« less

  15. Baryon states with hidden charm in the extended local hidden gauge approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, T.; Liang, Wei-Hong; Oset, E.

    2016-03-01

    The s -wave interaction of bar{D}Λ_c , bar{D} Σ_c , bar{D}^{ast}Λ_c , bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c and bar{D}Σ_c^{ast} , bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c^{ast} , is studied within a unitary coupled channels scheme with the extended local hidden gauge approach. In addition to the Weinberg-Tomozawa term, several additional diagrams via the pion exchange are also taken into account as box potentials. Furthermore, in order to implement the full coupled channels calculation, some of the box potentials which mix the vector-baryon and pseudoscalar-baryon sectors are extended to construct the effective transition potentials. As a result, we have observed six possible states in several angular momenta. Four of them correspond to two pairs of admixture states, two of bar{D}Σ_c-bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c with J = 1/2 , and two of bar{D}Σ_c^{ast} - bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c^{ast} with J = 3/2 . Moreover, we find a bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c resonance which couples to the bar{D}Λ_c channel and one spin degenerated bound state of bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c^{ast} with J = 1/2,5/2.

  16. Baryons States with Hidden Charm in the Extended Local Hidden Gauge Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Toshitaka; Liang, Wei-Hong; Oset, Eulogio

    The s-wave interaction of bar{D}Λ c, bar{D}Σ c, {bar{D}}nolimits*Λ c, {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c and bar{D}Σ c*, {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c*, is studied within a unitary coupled channels scheme with the extended local hidden gauge approach. In addition to the Weinberg-Tomozawa term, several additional diagrams via the pion-exchange are also taken into account as box potentials. Furthermore, in order to implement the full coupled channels calculation, some of the box potentials which mix the vector-baryon and pseudoscalar-baryon sectors are extended to construct the effective transition potentials. As a result, we have observed six possible states in several angular momenta. Four of them correspond to two pairs of admixture states, two of bar{D}Σ c - {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c with J = 1/2, and two of bar{D}Σ c* - {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c* with J = 3/2. Moreover, we find a {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c resonance which couples to the bar{D}Λ c channel and one spin degenerated bound state of {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c* with J = 1/2,5/2.

  17. B Decays to Open And Hidden Charm at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2005-10-12

    A wealth of new measurements of hadronic B decays to open charm and charmonium have been performed on the data sample collected by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} B-factory. We report the first measurement of the rates for inclusive charm production separately for charged and neutral B mesons. Combining measurements of the decay rate of B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +}D*{sup -} obtained with a partial reconstruction technique and the complete reconstruction of B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +}D*{sup -} with D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +}, we obtain the most precise measurement of {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +}). We present an update of the measurements of the branching fractions of exclusive B decays to J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), {chi}{sub c1}, {chi}{sub c2} and a kaon or a K*. In addition, we show preliminary results on exclusive decay rates to final states with baryons, or newly-discovered particles, such as D*{sub sJ}(2317), D{sub sJ}(2460){sup +}, and the X(3872).

  18. Prediction of isoscalar charmoniumlike structures in the hidden-charm di-eta decays of higher charmonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Considering the situation that a single chiral particle, η is initially emitted, we study the hidden-charm di-eta decays of the charmoniumlike state Y(4660) and the predicted charmonium \\psi (4790), i.e., Y(4660)/\\psi (4790)\\to J/\\psi η η through the inetermediates η [{{D}(*)}{{\\bar{D}}(*)}] and/or η [Ds+(*)Ds-(*)], and answer the important question of whether there exist isoscalar charmoniumlike structures in the {{D}(*)}{{\\bar{D}}(*)} and/or Ds+(*)Ds-(*) channels. Our results predict that there will be enhancement structures near D{{\\bar{D}}*}, {{D}*}{{\\bar{D}}*} and {{D}s}\\bar{D}s* thresholds for Y(4660) and near {{D}*}{{\\bar{D}}*}, {{D}s}\\bar{D}s* and Ds*\\bar{D}s* thresholds for \\psi (4790) in the {{M}max }(J/\\psi η ) distributions of Y(4660)/\\psi (4790)\\to η η J/\\psi , respectively. These peaks are accessible in future experiments, especially BESIII, Belle, BaBar, and the forthcoming BelleII.

  19. Thermoelectric generator hidden in a shirt with a fabric radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Vladimir; Vullers, Ruud J. M.; Hoof, Chris Van

    2012-06-01

    Integration of thermopiles in garments has been performed in this work in different ways. It is shown that textile has a minor effect on power generation, which enables completely hidden and unobtrusive energy harvester. A one-milliwatt thermoelectric generator is then integrated between two layers of a shirt and its characteristics are reported.

  20. A hidden-charm \\varvec{S=-1} pentaquark from the decay of \\varvec{Λ_b} into \\varvec{J/ψ η Λ} states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijoo, A.; Magas, V. K.; Ramos, A.; Oset, E.

    2016-08-01

    The hidden-charm pentaquark P_c(4450) observed recently by the LHCb collaboration may be of molecular nature, as advocated by some unitary approaches that also predict pentaquark partners in the strangeness S=-1 sector. In this work we argue that a hidden-charm strange pentaquark could be seen from the decay of the Λ_b, just as in the case of the non-strange P_c(4450), but looking into the J/ψ η Λ decay mode and forming the invariant mass spectrum of J/ψ Λ pairs. In the model presented here, which assumes a standard weak decay topology and incorporates the hadronization process and final-state interaction effects, we find the J/ψ η Λ final states to be populated with similar strength as the J/ψ K^- p states employed for the observation of the non-strange pentaquark. This makes the Λ_ b → J/ψ η Λ decay to be an interesting process to observe a possible strange partner of the P_c(4450). We study the dependence of the J/ψ Λ mass spectra on various model ingredients and on the unknown properties of the strange pentaquark.

  1. LHCb pentaquarks as a baryon-ψ (2 S ) bound state: Prediction of isospin-3/2 pentaquarks with hidden charm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevalova, Irina A.; Polyakov, Maxim V.; Schweitzer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The pentaquark Pc+(4450 ) recently discovered by the LHCb has been interpreted as a bound state of Ψ (2 S ) and a nucleon. The charmonium-nucleon interaction which provides the binding mechanism is given, in the heavy-quark limit, in terms of charmonium chromoelectric polarizabilities and densities of the nucleon energy-momentum tensor. In this work, we show in a model-independent way, by exploring general properties of the effective interaction, that Ψ (2 S ) can form bound states with a nucleon and Δ . Using the Skyrme model to evaluate the effective interaction in the large-Nc limit and estimate 1 /Nc corrections, we confirm the results from prior work which were based on a different effective model (chiral quark soliton model). This shows that the interpretation of Pc+(4450 ) is remarkably robust and weakly dependent on the details of the effective theories for the nucleon energy-momentum tensor. We explore the formalism further and present robust predictions of isospin-3/2 bound states of Ψ (2 S ) and Δ with masses around 4.5 GeV and widths around 70 MeV. The approach also predicts broader resonances in the Ψ (2 S )-Δ channel at 4.9 GeV with widths of the order of 150 MeV. We discuss in which reactions these new isospin-3/2 pentaquarks with hidden charm can be observed.

  2. Charm Factories: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweber, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The next generation tau-charm factory, the third Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BESIII) at the new Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII), has begun data collection. I discuss the flavor physics reach of the BESIII charm program and conclude with a discussion on future proposed tau-charm facilities.

  3. Studying the Fourth Generation Quark Contributions to the Double Charm Decays B_{(s)} to D_{(s)}^{(*)} Ds^{(*)}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan-Guo; Wang, Ru-Min

    2016-09-01

    Almost all branching ratios and longitudinal polarization fractions of the double charm decays B_{(s)} to D_{(s)}^{(*)} Ds^{(*)} have been measured, and the experimental central value of fL({B0s}to D^{*+}sD^{*-}s) is quite small comparing to its Standard Model prediction. We study the fourth generation quark contributions to the double charm decays B_{(s)} to D_{(s)}^{(*)} Ds^{(*)}. We find that the loop diagrams involving the fourth generation quark t' have great effects on all branching ratios and CP asymmetries, which are very sensitive to the fourth generation parameter λ s_{t^' }} and φ _{t^' }}. Nevertheless, the experimental measurements of all branching ratios can not give effective constraints on relevant new physics parameters. In addition, they have no obvious effect on the relevant polarization fractions. These results could be used to search for the fourth heavy quark t' via its indirect manifestations in loop diagrams.

  4. Next Generation Sequencing Reveals the Hidden Diversity of Zooplankton Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Rachel A.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Atkinson, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Background Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. Methodology/Principle Findings Plankton net hauls (200 µm) were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. Conclusions Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may become increasingly

  5. Charm and Charm Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Valentina; /Ferrara U.

    2011-11-23

    Recent developements in D mixing physics and charm spectroscopy will be discussed. Focus will be on the BaBar experimental results for the D mixing: first evidence of the D{sup 0}-mixing (hadronic D{sup 0} decays), lifetime difference and time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}. Then, recent results on charm spectroscopy will be presented with particular focus on the new Ds states that have been discovered in the last few years. Some of these states were not expected theoretically: their masses, widths, quantum numbers, and decay modes do not fit the existing spectroscopic classication, which is based mostly on potential model calculations.

  6. The new hidden charm states

    SciTech Connect

    Navarra, Fernando S.; Nielsen, Marina

    2010-08-04

    Many new states in the charmonium mass region were recently discovered by the BaBar, Belle and CDF Collaborations. We use the QCD Sum Rule approach to study the possible structure of some of these states.

  7. Phenomenology of nonperturbative charm in the nucleon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2014-04-02

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of the role of nonperturbative (or intrinsic) charm in the nucleon, generated through Fock state expansions of the nucleon wave function involving five-quark virtual states represented by charmed mesons and baryons. We consider contributions from a variety of charmed meson-baryon states and find surprisingly dominant effects from the D¯*0 Λc+ configuration. We pay particular attention to the existence and persistence of high-x structure for intrinsic charm, and the x dependence of the c-c¯ asymmetry predicted in meson-baryon models. We discuss how studies of charmed baryons and mesons in hadronic reactions can be used to constrainmore » models, and outline future measurements that could further illuminate the intrinsic charm component of the nucleon.« less

  8. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Solovieva, E. I.

    2015-12-15

    Apresent-day classification of charmed baryons is presented, a quark model for ground states is briefly described, and the energy levels of excited states are analyzed. In addition, a survey of experimentally observed states of charmed baryons is given.

  9. Charmed Baryonium

    SciTech Connect

    Cotugno, G.; Faccini, R.; Sabelli, C.; Polosa, A. D.

    2010-04-02

    We reanalyze the published data on the Y(4630){yields}{Lambda}{sub c{Lambda}c} and the Y(4660){yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{pi} with a consistent ansatz and we find that the two observations are likely to be due to the same state Y{sub B}, produced via initial state radiation (ISR), with M{sub Y{sub B}}=4660.7{+-}8.7 MeV and {Gamma}{sub Y{sub B}}=61{+-}23 MeV. Under this hypothesis and reanalyzing the e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}{pi}{pi}{gamma}{sub ISR} spectrum we find B(Y{sub B{yields}{Lambda}c{Lambda}c})/B(Y{sub B{yields}{psi}}(2S){pi}{pi})=117{+-}44, B(Y{sub B{yields}}J/{psi}{pi}{pi})/B(Y{sub B{yields}{psi}}(2S){pi}{pi})<0.46-90% C.L., B(Y(4350){yields}J/ {psi}{pi}{pi})/B(Y(4350){yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{pi})<3.4x10{sup -3}-90% C.L., and B(Y{sub B{yields}{psi}}(2S){sigma})/B(Y{sub B{yields}{psi}}(2S)f{sub 0})=2.0{+-}0.3. These conclusions strongly support the hypothesis of Y{sub B} being the first observation of a charmed baryonium constituted by four quarks. Analyzing the mass spectrum we show that Y(4350) and Y{sub B} are, respectively, consistent with the ground state and first radial excitation of the l=1 state.

  10. Discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species using nuclear emulsion techniques innovated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    NIU, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    This is a historical review of the discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species. These discoveries in the field of cosmic-ray physics were made by the innovation of nuclear emulsion techniques in Japan. A pair of naked charm particles was discovered in 1971 in a cosmic-ray interaction, three years prior to the discovery of the hidden charm particle, J/Ψ, in western countries. Lifetime differences between charged and neutral charm particles were pointed out in 1975, which were later re-confirmed by the collaborative Experiment E531 at Fermilab. Japanese physicists led by K.Niu made essential contributions to it with improved emulsion techniques, complemented by electronic detectors. This review also discusses the discovery of artificially produced naked charm particles by us in an accelerator experiment at Fermilab in 1975 and of multiple-pair productions of charm particles in a single interaction in 1987 by the collaborative Experiment WA75 at CERN. PMID:18941283

  11. Baryons with open beauty dynamically generated from meson-baryon interaction in the extended local hidden gauge approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei-Hong; Xiao, C. W.; Oset, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this talk we review the results about the interaction of B ¯N , B ¯Δ, B ¯*N and B ¯*Δ states with beauty B = 1, together with their coupled channels, using the extended local hidden gauge approach. The Λb(5912) and Λb(5920) observed in the experiment are dynamically generated from the meson-baryon interaction, and they couple mostly to B ¯*N , which are degenerate with the Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction. In addition, three more states with I = 0 and eight more states with I = 1 are predicted.

  12. Discovery of Charm

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Goldhaber, G.

    1984-11-01

    In my talk I will cover the period 1973 to 1976 which saw the discoveries of the J/psi and psi' resonances and most of the Psion spectroscopy, the tau lepton and the D0030099,D0015599 charmed meson doublet. Occasionally I will refer briefly to more recent results. Since this conference is on the history of the weak-interactions I will deal primarily with the properties of naked charm and in particular the weakly decaying doublet of charmed mesons. Most of the discoveries I will mention were made with the SLAC-LBL Magnetic Detector or MARK I which we operated at SPEAR from 1973 to 1976.

  13. Charmed Hadron Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liuming

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the scattering lengths of the scattering processes where one or both hadrons contain charm quarks in full lattice QCD. We use relativistic Fermilab formulation for the charm quark. For the light quark, we use domain-wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut- Susskind sea quarks. In J = Psi - N and D - K channels, we observe attractive interactions. In D - D* channel, the sign of the scattering length changes, which suggests a bound state.

  14. The Renaissance of Charm Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Briere, Roy A.

    2006-11-17

    A review of charm physics is presented, with an emphasis on decays of open-charm particles. An ongoing renaissance is in progress, with charm playing an important role in weak flavor physics. It is the unique venue among up-like quarks to perform precision tests to complement K and B physics. Charm also proves to be a useful test-bed for verifying theoretical methods, such as Lattice QCD, which are required to interpret precision B physics data.

  15. Charm production in DPMJET

    SciTech Connect

    Berghaus, P; Montaruli, T; Ranft, J E-mail: montaruli@ba.infn.it

    2008-06-15

    In this work, charm production in the DPMJET hadronic jet simulation is compared to experimental data. Since the major application of DPMJET is the simulation of cosmic-ray-induced air showers, the version of the code integrated in the CORSIKA simulation package has been used for the comparison. Wherever necessary, adjustments have been made to improve agreement between simulation and data. With the availability of new muon/neutrino detectors that combine a large fiducial volume with large amounts of shielding, investigation of prompt muons and neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions will be feasible for the first time. Furthermore, above {approx}>100 TeV charmed particle decay becomes the dominant background for diffuse extraterrestrial neutrino flux searches. A reliable method to simulate charm production in high-energy proton-nucleon interactions is therefore required.

  16. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  17. Hidden colostomy.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Gordon, P H

    1993-08-01

    For the patient with an unresectable carcinoma of the rectum, establishment of a "hidden" colostomy rather than formal colostomy, provides a better interim quality of life. When necessary, the "hidden" colostomy can readily be converted to a formal colostomy without the need for a laparotomy or general anesthetic. We conclude that surgeons should remember this technique when the appropriate situation occurs. PMID:7688147

  18. Study of charm photoproduction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. P.; Barate, R.; Bloch, D.; Bonamy, P.; Borgeaud, P.; Burchell, M.; Burmeister, H.; Brunet, J. M.; Calvino, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Crespo, J. M.; D'Almagne, B.; David, M.; di Ciaccio, L.; Druet, P.; Duane, A.; Engel, J. P.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Fokitis, E.; Forty, R. W.; Foucault, P.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J. P.; Giomataris, Y.; Hall, G.; Hofmokl, T.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Koratzinos, M.; Krafft, C.; Lefievre, B.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lopez, A.; Lui, W. K.; Magneville, C.; Maltezos, A.; McEwen, J. G.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pattison, B.; Poutot, D.; Primout, M.; Rahmani, H.; Roudeau, P.; Seez, C.; Six, J.; Strub, R.; Treille, D.; Triscos, P.; Tristram, G.; Villet, G.; Volte, A.; Wayne, M.; Websdale, D. M.; Wormser, G.; Zolnierowski, Y.

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents results on charm photoproduction in the energy interval 40 to 160 GeV, obtained from the high-statistics charm samples of the NA 14/2 experiment at CERN. We measure the charm cross-section, the distributions in x F and p {2/ T } and various production ratios and charge asymmetries. The total non-diffractive open-charm cross-section per nucleon is measured to beσ _{(γ N to cbar cX)} at < E γ> =100 GeV. We discuss the photoproduction of charm in terms of theoretical and phenomenological models. We compare the measured p {2/ T } and x F distributions with first-order QCD calculations of photon-gluon fusion and obtain a value for the charm-quark mass of m c =1.5{+0.2/-0.1}GeV/c2.

  19. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-09-01

    The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

  20. Susuks: charm needles in facial soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Shanmuhasuntharam, P; Ghani, S H

    1991-04-20

    Susuks or charm needles are a form of talisman inserted and worn subcutaneously, in the face and other parts of the body, in the belief that they will enhance or preserve the wearer's beauty, youth, charisma, strength or health, or bring success in business. This mystic practice is found among some south-east Asian people, especially Malayan and Muslim females. Most susuk wearers are secretive about their hidden talismans, but these gold or silver needles are being discovered with increasing frequency now that radiographs are used more widely. An understanding of this practice and an awareness of its existence is important to avoid misdiagnosis and mismanagement of these patients. The practice of susuk wearing and its relevance to dentistry is discussed. Nine cases of facial susuk wearers are presented and previous reports are reviewed.

  1. Exotic Effects at the Charm Threshold and Other Novel Physics Topics at JLab-12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-05-03

    I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics topics which can be investigated with the 12 GeV upgrade at J-Lab. The topics include new the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances accessible above the charm threshold, intrinsic charm and strangeness phenomena, the exclusive Sivers effect, hidden-color Fock states of nuclei, local two-photon interactions in deeply virtual Compton scattering, and non-universal antishadowing.

  2. Charm lifetime measurements from TASSO

    SciTech Connect

    Forden, G.E.

    1987-10-09

    Recent measurements by TASSO of the lifetimes of charmed mesons is reviewed. The lifetime reported for the D/sub s/ meson utilizes the entire data sample collected. The lifetime of the neutral charmed meson, D/sup o/, is from a subsample of the total data set. Special emphases is given to the experimental procedures used.

  3. Charmed baryon spectroscopy from CLEO at CESR

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Sajjad

    1999-02-17

    Charmed baryon spectroscopy has been unfolding since the discovery of the first charmed baryon in 1975. The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has now established itself as a charmed particle factory. In this report, we present results on charmed baryon production at CESR using the CLEO detector.

  4. Nuclear dependence of charm production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A. G.; Ayan, A. S.; Balatz, M. Y.; Bondar, N. F.; Cooper, P. S.; Dauwe, L. J.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dersch, U.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Dzyubenko, G. B.; Edelstein, R.; Emediato, L.; Endler, A. M. F.; Eschrich, I.; Escobar, C. O.; Estrada, N.; Evdokimov, A. V.; Filimonov, I. S.; Flores-Castillo, A.; Garcia, F. G.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gouffon, P.; Gülmez, E.; Iori, M.; Jun, S. Y.; Kaya, M.; Kilmer, J.; Kim, V. T.; Kochenda, L. M.; Konorov, I.; Kozhevnikov, A. P.; Krivshich, A. G.; Krüger, H.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Kubarovsky, V. P.; Kulyavtsev, A. I.; Kuropatkin, N. P.; Kurshetsov, V. F.; Kushnirenko, A.; Lach, J.; Landsberg, L. G.; Larin, I.; Leikin, E. M.; López-Hinojosa, G.; Lungov, T.; Maleev, V. P.; Mao, D.; Mathew, P.; Mattson, M.; Matveev, V.; McCliment, E.; Moinester, M. A.; Molchanov, V. V.; Morelos, A.; Nemitkin, A. V.; Neoustroev, P. V.; Newsom, C.; Nilov, A. P.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ocherashvili, A.; Onel, Y.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Penzo, A.; Petrenko, S. V.; Procario, M.; Prutskoi, V. A.; Razmyslovich, B. V.; Rud, V. I.; Russ, J.; Sánchez-López, J. L.; Simon, J.; Sitnikov, A. I.; Smith, V. J.; Srivastava, M.; Steiner, V.; Stepanov, V.; Stutte, L.; Svoiski, M.; Terentyev, N. K.; Torres, I.; Uvarov, L. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vavilov, D. V.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Verebryusov, V. S.; Victorov, V. A.; Vishnyakov, V. E.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorwalter, K.; You, J.; Zukanovich-Funchal, R.

    2009-12-01

    Using data taken by SELEX during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, we study the production of charmed hadrons on copper and carbon targets with Σ -, p, π -, and π + beams. Parametrizing the dependence of the inclusive production cross section on the atomic number A as A α , we determine α for D +, D 0, D {/s +}, D +(2010), Λ {/c +}, and their respective anti-particles, as a function of their transverse momentum p t and scaled longitudinal momentum x F . Within our statistics there is no dependence of α on x F for any charm species for the interval 0.1< x F <1.0. The average value of α for charm production by pion beams is α meson=0.850±0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average α baryon=0.755±0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ( Σ -, p).

  5. Charms of radiation research.

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    Most of my professional efforts over nearly five decades have been devoted to radiation research, that is, studies of the physical, chemical, and biological actions of high-energy radiation on matter. (By the term 'high-energy radiation' I mean here x rays, .GAMMA. rays, neutrons, and charged particles of high enough energies to produce ionization in matter. I exclude visible light, infrared waves, microwaves, and sound waves.) Charms of radiation research lie in its interdisciplinary character; although my training was in basic physics, the scope of my interest has gradually increased to cover many other areas, to my deep satisfaction. High-energy radiation is an important component of the universe, and of our environment. It often provides an effective avenue for characterizing matter and understanding its behavior. Near Earth's surface this radiation is normally present in exceptionally low quantity, and yet it plays a significant role in some atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, and also in the evolution of life. The recent advent of various devices for producing high-energy radiation has opened up the possibility of many applications, including medical and industrial uses. I have worked on some aspects of those uses. At every opportunity to address a broad audience I try to convey a sense of intellectual fun, together with some of the elements of the basic science involved. A goal of radiation education might be to make the word 'radiation' as common and familiar as words such as 'fire' and 'electricity' through increased usage.

  6. A critical assessment of hidden markov model sub-optimal sampling strategies applied to the generation of peptide 3D models.

    PubMed

    Lamiable, A; Thevenet, P; Tufféry, P

    2016-08-01

    Hidden Markov Model derived structural alphabets are a probabilistic framework in which the complete conformational space of a peptidic chain is described in terms of probability distributions that can be sampled to identify conformations of largest probabilities. Here, we assess how three strategies to sample sub-optimal conformations-Viterbi k-best, forward backtrack and a taboo sampling approach-can lead to the efficient generation of peptide conformations. We show that the diversity of sampling is essential to compensate biases introduced in the estimates of the probabilities, and we find that only the forward backtrack and a taboo sampling strategies can efficiently generate native or near-native models. Finally, we also find such approaches are as efficient as former protocols, while being one order of magnitude faster, opening the door to the large scale de novo modeling of peptides and mini-proteins. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317417

  7. Hidden earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.S.; Yeats, R.S.

    1989-06-01

    Seismologists generally look for earthquakes to happen along visible fault lines, e.g., the San Andreas fault. The authors maintain that another source of dangerous quakes has been overlooked: the release of stress along a fault that is hidden under a fold in the earth's crust. The paper describes the differences between an earthquake which occurs on a visible fault and one which occurs under an anticline and warns that Los Angeles greatest earthquake threat may come from a small quake originating under downtown Los Angeles, rather than a larger earthquake which occurs 50 miles away at the San Andreas fault.

  8. Hidden Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.-R.

    2014-10-01

    With the acceptance of QCD as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, one of the basic problems in the analysis of nuclear phenomena became how to consistently account for the effects of the underlying quark/gluon structure of nucleons and nuclei. Besides providing more detailed understanding of conventional nuclear physics, QCD may also point to novel phenomena accessible by new or upgraded nuclear experimental facilities. We discuss a few interesting applications of QCD to nuclear physics with an emphasis on the hidden color degrees of freedom.

  9. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  10. Nuclear Filtering of Intrinsic Charm

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2010-11-12

    Nuclei are transparent for a heavy intrinsic charm (IC) component of the beam hadrons, what leads to an enhanced nuclear dependence of open charm production at large Feynman x{sub F}. Indeed, such an effect is supported by data from the SELEX experiment published recently [1]. Our calculations reproduce well the data, providing strong support for the presence of IC in hadrons in amount less than 1%. Moreover, we performed an analysis of nuclear effects in J/{Psi} production and found at large x{sub F} a similar, albeit weaker effect, which does not contradict data.

  11. New states above charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia J.; Lane, Kenneth; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We revise and extend expectations for the properties of charmonium states that lie above charm threshold, in light of new experimental information. We refine the Cornell coupled-channel model for the coupling of c{bar c} levels to two-meson states, defining resonance masses and widths by pole positions in the complex energy plane, and suggest new targets for experiment.

  12. Nuclear Dependence of Charm Production

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, A.S.; Balatz, M.Y.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, Loretta J.; /Michigan U., Flint /Moscow, ITEP

    2009-02-01

    With data taken by SELEX, which accumulated data during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, we study the production of charmed hadrons on copper and carbon targets with {Sigma}{sup -}, p, {pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +} beams. Parameterizing the production cross section {infinity} A{sup {alpha}}, A being the atomic number, we determine {alpha} for D{sup +}, D{sup 0}, D{sub s}{sup +}, D{sup +}(2010), {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}, and their respective anti-particles, as a function of their transverse momentum p{sub t} and scaled longitudinal momentum x{sub F}. Within our statistics there is no dependence of {alpha} on x{sub F} for any charm species for the interval 0.1 < x{sub F} < 1.0. The average value of {alpha} for charm production by pion beams is {alpha}{sub meson} = 0.850 {+-} 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average {alpha}{sub baryon} = 0.755 {+-} 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ({Sigma}{sup -}, p).

  13. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  14. On quantum algorithms for noncommutative hidden subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, M.; Hoeyer, P.

    1998-12-01

    Quantum algorithms for factoring and discrete logarithm have previously been generalized to finding hidden subgroups of finite Abelian groups. This paper explores the possibility of extending this general viewpoint to finding hidden subgroups of noncommutative groups. The authors present a quantum algorithm for the special case of dihedral groups which determines the hidden subgroup in a linear number of calls to the input function. They also explore the difficulties of developing an algorithm to process the data to explicitly calculate a generating set for the subgroup. A general framework for the noncommutative hidden subgroup problem is discussed and they indicate future research directions.

  15. Hadron Physics at the Charm and Bottom Thresholds and Other Novel QCD Physics Topics at the NICA Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-20

    The NICA collider project at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna will have the capability of colliding protons, polarized deuterons, and nuclei at an effective nucleon-nucleon center-of mass energy in the range {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 to 11 GeV. I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics processes which can be investigated at the NICA collider. The topics include the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances near the charm and bottom thresholds, intrinsic strangeness, charm, and bottom phenomena, hidden-color degrees of freedom in nuclei, color transparency, single-spin asymmetries, the RHIC baryon anomaly, and non-universal antishadowing.

  16. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  17. Anomalies in cosmic rays: New particles versus charm?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balayan, G. L.; Khodjamirian, A. Y.; Oganessian, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    For a long time two anomalies are observed in cosmic rays at energies E approx. = 100 TeV: (1) the generation of long-flying cascades in the hadron calorimeter (the so-called Tien-Shan effect) and; (2) the enhancement of direct muon yield as compared with the accelerator energy region. The aim is to discuss the possibility that both anomalies have common origins arising from production and decays of the same particles. the main conclusions are the following: (1) direct muons cannot be generated by any new particles with mass exceeding 10+20 GeV; and (2) if both effects are originated from the charmed hadrons, then the needed charm hadroproduction cross section is unexpectedly large as compared with the quark-gluon model predictions.

  18. The hidden effects of child maltreatment in a war region: correlates of psychopathology in two generations living in Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Olema, David Kani; Catani, Claudia; Ertl, Verena; Saile, Regina; Neuner, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Adverse life experiences are a major risk factor for psychopathology. Studies from industrialized countries have consistently shown the detrimental effects of child maltreatment on the mental health of the victims. Research in war-affected populations, however, has mostly been restricted to the psychological damage caused by the war. Both war trauma and child maltreatment have rarely been studied simultaneously. In a comparative study of 2 generations living in severely war-affected regions in Northern Uganda, we determined the relationship between both trauma types and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, and suicide ideation. A total of 100 adolescents, 50 with and 50 without a history of abduction by the rebel army with both their parents (100 mothers and 100 fathers) living in camps in northern Uganda were interviewed. The study showed that both generations were severely affected by war and child maltreatment. Both trauma types were independently correlated with psychological disorders in the adolescent group. Only child maltreatment, however, not war violence, accounted for PTSD symptoms in the parent group (β = .253, p = .002). We conclude that, even in the context of severe war, the impact of child maltreatment on psychological disorders surpasses the damage of war trauma.

  19. Challenges in detecting genomic copy number aberrations using next-generation sequencing data and the eXome Hidden Markov Model: a clinical exome-first diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Ondo, Yumiko; Imai, Katsumi; Chong, Pin Fee; Kira, Ryutaro; Amemiya, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Akira; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is widely used for the detection of disease-causing nucleotide variants. The challenges associated with detecting copy number variants (CNVs) using NGS analysis have been reported previously. Disease-related exome panels such as Illumina TruSight One are more cost-effective than whole-exome sequencing (WES) because of their selective target regions (~21% of the WES). In this study, CNVs were analyzed using data extracted through a disease-related exome panel analysis and the eXome Hidden Markov Model (XHMM). Samples from 61 patients with undiagnosed developmental delays and 52 healthy parents were included in this study. In the preliminary study to validate the constructed XHMM system (microarray-first approach), 34 patients who had previously been analyzed by chromosomal microarray testing were used. Among the five CNVs larger than 200 kb that were considered as non-pathogenic CNVs and were used as positive controls, four CNVs was successfully detected. The system was subsequently used to analyze different samples from 27 patients (NGS-first approach); 2 of these patients were successfully diagnosed as having pathogenic CNVs (an unbalanced translocation der(5)t(5;14) and a 16p11.2 duplication). These diagnoses were re-confirmed by chromosomal microarray testing and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization. The NGS-first approach generated no false-negative or false-positive results for pathogenic CNVs, indicating its high sensitivity and specificity in detecting pathogenic CNVs. The results of this study show the possible clinical utility of pathogenic CNV screening using disease-related exome panel analysis and XHMM. PMID:27579173

  20. Challenges in detecting genomic copy number aberrations using next-generation sequencing data and the eXome Hidden Markov Model: a clinical exome-first diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Ondo, Yumiko; Imai, Katsumi; Chong, Pin Fee; Kira, Ryutaro; Amemiya, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Akira; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is widely used for the detection of disease-causing nucleotide variants. The challenges associated with detecting copy number variants (CNVs) using NGS analysis have been reported previously. Disease-related exome panels such as Illumina TruSight One are more cost-effective than whole-exome sequencing (WES) because of their selective target regions (~21% of the WES). In this study, CNVs were analyzed using data extracted through a disease-related exome panel analysis and the eXome Hidden Markov Model (XHMM). Samples from 61 patients with undiagnosed developmental delays and 52 healthy parents were included in this study. In the preliminary study to validate the constructed XHMM system (microarray-first approach), 34 patients who had previously been analyzed by chromosomal microarray testing were used. Among the five CNVs larger than 200 kb that were considered as non-pathogenic CNVs and were used as positive controls, four CNVs was successfully detected. The system was subsequently used to analyze different samples from 27 patients (NGS-first approach); 2 of these patients were successfully diagnosed as having pathogenic CNVs (an unbalanced translocation der(5)t(5;14) and a 16p11.2 duplication). These diagnoses were re-confirmed by chromosomal microarray testing and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization. The NGS-first approach generated no false-negative or false-positive results for pathogenic CNVs, indicating its high sensitivity and specificity in detecting pathogenic CNVs. The results of this study show the possible clinical utility of pathogenic CNV screening using disease-related exome panel analysis and XHMM. PMID:27579173

  1. Charmed hadron photoproduction at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yun; Guskov, Alexey

    2016-06-01

    Photoproduction of the charmonium-like state Zc(4200) and the charmed baryon Λ_c^* (2940) is investigated with an effective Lagrangian approach and the Regge trajectories applying to the COMPASS experiment. Combining the experimental data from COMPASS and our theoretical model we estimate the upper limit of ΓZc(4200)→J/ψπ to be of about 37 MeV. Moreover, the possibility to produce Λ_c^* (2940) at COMPASS is discussed. It seems one can try to search for this hadron in the missing mass spectrum since the t-channel is dominating for the Λ_c^* (2940) photoproduction.

  2. Fragmentation fractions of and quarks into charmed hadrons at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladilin, L.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation fractions of and quarks into the weakly decaying charmed hadrons , , and , and into the charmed vector meson have been derived from the LEP measurements and averaged. The quark fragmentation fractions represent probabilities to hadronise as a given charmed hadron, while the quark fragmentation fractions are defined as sums of probabilities to produce a particular charmed hadron or its antiparticle.

  3. Charm production in Pb + Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taesoo; Berrehrah, Hamza; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2016-03-01

    We study charm production in Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV in the parton-hadron-string-dynamics (PHSD) transport approach and the charm dynamics in the partonic and hadronic medium. The charm quarks are produced through initial binary nucleon-nucleon collisions by using the pythia event generator, taking into account the (anti-)shadowing incorporated in the eps09 package. The produced charm quarks interact with off-shell massive partons in the quark-gluon plasma and are hadronized into D mesons through coalescence or fragmentation close to the critical energy density, and then interact with hadrons in the final hadronic stage with scattering cross sections calculated in an effective Lagrangian approach with heavy-quark spin symmetry. The PHSD results show a reasonable RAA and elliptic flow of D mesons in comparison to the experimental data for Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV from the ALICE Collaboration. We also study the effect of temperature-dependent off-shell charm quarks in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that the scattering cross sections are only moderately affected by off-shell charm degrees of freedom. However, the position of the peak of RAA for D mesons depends on the strength of the scalar partonic forces which also have an impact on the D meson elliptic flow. The comparison with experimental data on the RAA suggests that the repulsive force is weaker for off-shell charm quarks as compared to that for light quarks. Furthermore, the effects from radiative charm energy loss appear to be low compared to the collisional energy loss up to transverse momenta of ˜15 GeV/c .

  4. CHARM 2010: Experiment summary and future charm facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The CHARM 2010 meeting had over 30 presentations of experimental results, plus additional future facilities talks just before this summary talk. Since there is not enough time to even summarize all that has been shown from experiments and to recognize all the memorable plots and results - tempting as it is to reproduce the many clean signals and data vs theory figures, the quantum correlations plots, and the D-mixing plots before and after the latest CLEO-c data is added. So, this review will give only my personal observations, exposing my prejudices and my areas of ignorance, no doubt. This overview will be at a fairly high level of abstraction - no re-showing individual plots or results. I ask the forgiveness of those who will have been slighted in this way - meaning all the presents.

  5. From the {psi} to charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G. |

    1994-11-01

    This talk deals with the author`s recollections about the discoveries of the J/{psi} the {psi}{prime} as well as psion spectroscopy and charmed mesons. He gives a chronology for the {psi} and {psi}{prime} discoveries. He also discusses the events which led to the charmed meson discovery as well as detailed discussions on the proof that the resonance observed in the K{sup {minus}} {pi}{sup +} system, at 1,865 MeV, was indeed the predicted charmed meson.

  6. Unique surgical tool as an iatromagic charm.

    PubMed

    Somma, Alfredo Musajo; Somma, Laura Musajo

    2010-12-01

    Papyri are writings made on special sheets made out of reeds grown on the banks of the river Nile. The Authors comment on the relationship between a ritual text and surgical therapy with an exploration of an ancient charm as recorded in a Greek written papyrus stored in the Medicea Laurenziana Library papyri collection. This charm was presumably intended to act apotropaically, rendering harmless the aggressive surgical tool by means of still keeping its therapeutic value and thereby affording healing protection. This ritual charm acts as a "therapeutic medium" to help the surgical procedure useful to cut or to excise the uvula. The surgical power of stafillotomos is linked to the protective power of the iatromagic charm, giving the chance to analyze ancient data and to suggest a possible shape of the original scalpel. PMID:21657101

  7. Charm, beauty and top at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, O.; Geiser, A.; Lisovyi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Results on open charm and beauty production and on the search for top production in high-energy electron-proton collisions at HERA are reviewed. This includes a discussion of relevant theoretical aspects, a summary of the available measurements and measurement techniques, and their impact on improved understanding of QCD and its parameters, such as parton density functions and charm- and beauty-quark masses. The impact of these results on measurements at the LHC and elsewhere is also addressed.

  8. Multiple charm production at the LHC energy

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V.; Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Novoselov, A. A.

    2013-01-15

    Cross sections for J/{psi} mesons produced in association with open charm and two charmed hadrons from different cc-bar pairs under LHC conditions are predicted theoretically. The respective processes are considered both in single and in double parton interactions. Particular attention is given to kinematical limits of the LHCb detector, and a comparison with the most recent experimental data is performed for them.

  9. Intrinsic charm in a matched general-mass scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Groth Merrild, Patrick; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca

    2016-03-01

    The FONLL general-mass variable-flavour number scheme provides a framework for the matching of a calculation in which a heavy quark is treated as a massless parton to one in which the mass dependence is retained throughout. We describe how the usual formulation of FONLL can be extended in such a way that the heavy quark parton distribution functions are freely parameterized at some initial scale, rather than being generated entirely perturbatively. We specifically consider the case of deep-inelastic scattering, in view of applications to PDF determination, and the possible impact of a fitted charm quark distribution on F2c is assessed.

  10. Probing the Charm Quark Yukawa Coupling in Higgs+Charm Production.

    PubMed

    Brivio, Ilaria; Goertz, Florian; Isidori, Gino

    2015-11-20

    We propose a new method for determining the coupling of the Higgs boson to charm quarks, via Higgs production in association with a charm-tagged jet: pp→hc. As a first estimate, we find that at the LHC with 3000 fb^{-1}, it should be possible to derive a constraint of order one, relative to the standard model (SM) value of the charm Yukawa coupling. As a by-product of this analysis, we present an estimate of the exclusive pp→hD^{(*)} electroweak cross section. Within the SM, the latter turns out to be not accessible at the LHC even in the high-luminosity phase.

  11. Probing the Charm Quark Yukawa Coupling in Higgs+Charm Production.

    PubMed

    Brivio, Ilaria; Goertz, Florian; Isidori, Gino

    2015-11-20

    We propose a new method for determining the coupling of the Higgs boson to charm quarks, via Higgs production in association with a charm-tagged jet: pp→hc. As a first estimate, we find that at the LHC with 3000 fb^{-1}, it should be possible to derive a constraint of order one, relative to the standard model (SM) value of the charm Yukawa coupling. As a by-product of this analysis, we present an estimate of the exclusive pp→hD^{(*)} electroweak cross section. Within the SM, the latter turns out to be not accessible at the LHC even in the high-luminosity phase. PMID:26636844

  12. Charm (and Beauty) Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacker, Jonas; /Bristol U.

    2007-11-01

    The authors present recent results on heavy flavor production at Tevatron Run II for typically {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of analyzed p{bar p} data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This includes results on single and correlated open charm and bottom cross sections, charm pair production kinematics, J/{psi}, {psi}(2S) and {chi}{sub cJ} cross sections and polarization measurements in J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), {Upsilon}(1S), and {Upsilon}(2S).

  13. Charm and Beauty in Photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobre, Monica

    2014-04-01

    The photoproduction of beauty and charm quarks at the ep collider HERA are presented. The b-quarks production was investigated in the bb → eeX' channel and the differential production cross section was measured as a function of the average transverse momentum of the beauty quarks down to the threshold. The cross section of D* meson decaying in the golden channel was determined both inclusively and in D*-tagged dijet events. Exploiting the characteristics of the heavy-flavoured hadron decays, beauty and charm quark cross sections were also measured in dijet events using secondary vertices or semi-muonic decays.

  14. Charm and beauty production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bishai, M.; /Brookhaven

    2005-01-01

    Using the data samples collected with the CDF Run II detector during 2002 and early 2003, new measurements of the production cross sections of charm and beauty hadrons at {radical}s = 1960 GeV are presented. New measurements of the cross sections of centrally produced b-hadrons and J/{psi} mesons down to zero transverse momenta have been carried out. The large charm signals made available by the silicon vertex track trigger have enabled the measurement of the cross sections of D{sup 0}, D*, D{sup {+-}}, and D{sub s} mesons.

  15. Thermal charm and charmonium production in quark gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai; Chen, Zhengyu; Greiner, Carsten; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of thermal charm production on charmonium regeneration in high energy nuclear collisions. By solving the kinetic equations for charm quark and charmonium distributions in Pb+Pb collisions, we calculate the global and differential nuclear modification factors RAA (Npart) and RAA (pt) for J / ψ s. Due to the thermal charm production in hot medium, the charmonium production source changes from the initially created charm quarks at SPS, RHIC and LHC to the thermally produced charm quarks at Future Circular Collider (FCC), and the J / ψ suppression (RAA < 1) observed so far will be replaced by a strong enhancement (RAA > 1) at FCC at low transverse momentum.

  16. Photoproduction of charm particles at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cumalat, John P.

    1997-03-15

    A brief description of the Fermilab Photoproduction Experiment E831 or FOCUS is presented. The experiment concentrates on the reconstruction of charm particles. The FOCUS collaboration has participants from several Central American and Latin American institutions; CINVESTAV and Universidad Autonoma de Puebla from Mexico, University of Puerto Rico from the United States, and Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro from Brasil.

  17. Charm and beauty at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    J. Cranshaw

    2003-10-13

    The large heavy quark production cross section in p{bar p} collisions makes the Tevatron an excellent place to study charm and bottom physics. This allows for a rich program of spectroscopy, CP parameter measurements, and searches for new physics.

  18. Charm contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan

    2016-07-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of K+Λ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward D¯0Λc pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate the much-studied central component and represent a significant contribution to the TeV atmospheric neutrino flux. Importantly, it cannot accommodate the PeV flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, or the excess of events observed by IceCube in the 30-200 TeV energy range indicating either structure in the flux of cosmic accelerators, or a presence of more than one component in the cosmic flux observed.

  19. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  20. Hidden circuits and argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, Risto; Kesonen, Mikko H. P.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the relevance of DC circuits in everyday life and schools, they have been shown to cause numerous learning difficulties at various school levels. In the course of this article, we present a flexible method for teaching DC circuits at lower secondary level. The method is labelled as hidden circuits, and the essential idea underlying hidden circuits is in hiding the actual wiring of DC circuits, but to make their behaviour evident for pupils. Pupils are expected to find out the wiring of the circuit which should enhance their learning of DC circuits. We present two possible ways to utilise hidden circuits in a classroom. First, they can be used to test and enhance pupils’ conceptual understanding when pupils are expected to find out which one of the offered circuit diagram options corresponds to the actual circuit shown. This method aims to get pupils to evaluate the circuits holistically rather than locally, and as a part of that aim this method highlights any learning difficulties of pupils. Second, hidden circuits can be used to enhance pupils’ argumentation skills with the aid of argumentation sheet that illustrates the main elements of an argument. Based on the findings from our co-operating teachers and our own experiences, hidden circuits offer a flexible and motivating way to supplement teaching of DC circuits.

  1. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-05-06

    This study presents the ground and excited state spectra of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD with dynamical quark fields. Calculations are performed on anisotropic lattices of size 16³ × 128, with inverse spacing in temporal direction at⁻¹=5.67(4) GeV and with a pion mass of about 390 MeV. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice yet which retain a memory of their continuum analogues are used. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavor, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) for spatial symmetry. The distillation method is utilized to generate baryon correlation functions which are analyzed using the variational fitting method to extract excited states. The lattice spectra obtained have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the pattern of low-lying states does not support the diquark picture for doubly charmed baryons. On the contrary the calculated spectra are remarkably similar to the expectations from models with an SU(6)×O(3) symmetry. Various spin-dependent energy splittings between the extracted states are also evaluated.

  2. Detecting targets hidden in random forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouritzin, Michael A.; Luo, Dandan; Newton, Fraser; Wu, Biao

    2009-05-01

    Military tanks, cargo or troop carriers, missile carriers or rocket launchers often hide themselves from detection in the forests. This plagues the detection problem of locating these hidden targets. An electro-optic camera mounted on a surveillance aircraft or unmanned aerial vehicle is used to capture the images of the forests with possible hidden targets, e.g., rocket launchers. We consider random forests of longitudinal and latitudinal correlations. Specifically, foliage coverage is encoded with a binary representation (i.e., foliage or no foliage), and is correlated in adjacent regions. We address the detection problem of camouflaged targets hidden in random forests by building memory into the observations. In particular, we propose an efficient algorithm to generate random forests, ground, and camouflage of hidden targets with two dimensional correlations. The observations are a sequence of snapshots consisting of foliage-obscured ground or target. Theoretically, detection is possible because there are subtle differences in the correlations of the ground and camouflage of the rocket launcher. However, these differences are well beyond human perception. To detect the presence of hidden targets automatically, we develop a Markov representation for these sequences and modify the classical filtering equations to allow the Markov chain observation. Particle filters are used to estimate the position of the targets in combination with a novel random weighting technique. Furthermore, we give positive proof-of-concept simulations.

  3. Show Me the Invisible: Visualizing Hidden Content.

    PubMed

    Geymayer, Thomas; Steinberger, Markus; Lex, Alexander; Streit, Marc; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Content on computer screens is often inaccessible to users because it is hidden, e.g., occluded by other windows, outside the viewport, or overlooked. In search tasks, the efficient retrieval of sought content is important. Current software, however, only provides limited support to visualize hidden occurrences and rarely supports search synchronization crossing application boundaries. To remedy this situation, we introduce two novel visualization methods to guide users to hidden content. Our first method generates awareness for occluded or out-of-viewport content using see-through visualization. For content that is either outside the screen's viewport or for data sources not opened at all, our second method shows off-screen indicators and an on-demand smart preview. To reduce the chances of overlooking content, we use visual links, i.e., visible edges, to connect the visible content or the visible representations of the hidden content. We show the validity of our methods in a user study, which demonstrates that our technique enables a faster localization of hidden content compared to traditional search functionality and thereby assists users in information retrieval tasks. PMID:25325078

  4. Charmed spectroscopy from a nonperturbatively determined relativistic heavy quark action in full QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2006-07-28

    We present a preliminary calculation of the charmed meson spectrum using the 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion lattice configurations currently being generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. The calculation is performed using the 3-parameter, relativistic heavy quark action with nonperturbatively determined coefficients. We will also demonstrate a step-scaling procedure for determining these coefficients nonperturbatively using a series of quenched, gauge field ensembles generated for three different lattice spacings.

  5. Hidden gauge structure of supersymmetric free differential algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianopoli, Laura; D'Auria, Riccardo; Ravera, Lucrezia

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the role of the nilpotent fermionic generator Q ' introduced in [6] and appearing in the hidden supergroup underlying the free differential algebra (FDA) of D=11 supergravity.

  6. Charmed-strange mesons revisited: Mass spectra and strong decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qin-Tao; Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by the present experimental status of charmed-strange mesons, we perform a systematic study of the charmed-strange meson family in which we calculate the mass spectra of the charmed-strange meson family by taking a screening effect into account in the Godfrey-Isgur model and investigate the corresponding strong decays via the quark pair creation model. These phenomenological analyses of charmed-strange mesons not only shed light on the features of the observed charmed-strange states, but also provide important information on future experimental search for the missing higher radial and orbital excitations in the charmed-strange meson family, which will be a valuable task in LHCb, the forthcoming Belle II, and PANDA.

  7. Charm degrees of freedom in the quark gluon plasma

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukherjee, Swagato; Petreczky, Peter; Sharma, Sayantan

    2016-01-11

    The lattice QCD studies on fluctuations and correlations of charm quantum number have established that deconfinement of charm degrees of freedom sets in around the chiral crossover temperature, Tc; i.e., charm degrees of freedom carrying fractional baryonic charge start to appear. When we reexamine those same lattice QCD data we show that, in addition to the contributions from quarklike excitations, the partial pressure of charm degrees of freedom may still contain significant contributions from open-charm-meson- and baryonlike excitations associated with integral baryonic charges for temperatures up to 1.2Tc. Finally, charm-quark quasiparticles become the dominant degrees of freedom for temperatures T>1.2Tc.

  8. Charm Spectroscopy at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Poireau, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-12-21

    We present a mini-review on charm spectroscopy at the BABAR experiment. We first report on the c{bar s} meson spectrum, and present precise measurements of the D{sub s1}(2536) meson as well as the properties of the many new states discovered since 2003 (D*{sub s0}(2317), D{sub s1}(2460), D*{sub sJ}(2860), and D{sub sJ}(2700) mesons). We then discuss about charmed baryons observed recently in the BABAR experiment: {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} and {Omega}*{sub c}{sup 0} css baryons, {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} udc baryon and the {Xi}{sub c} usc/dsc baryons.

  9. Production and decay of charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Hiyama, Emiko; Kim, SangHo; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Nagahiro, Hideko; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Oka, Makoto; Shirotori, Kotaro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss reactions involving charmed baryons to explore their unique features. A well known phenomenon, the separation of the two internal motions of the ρ and λ types of a three-quark system is revisited. First we discuss the mass spectrum of low lying excitations as function of the heavy quark mass, smoothly connecting the SU (3) and heavy quark limits. The properties of these modes can be tested in the production and decay reactions of the baryons. For production, we consider a one step process which excites dominantly λ modes. We find abundant production rates for some of the excited states. For decay, we study a pion emission process which provides a clean tool to test the structure of heavy quark systems due to the well controlled low energy dynamics of pions and quarks. Both production and decay of charmed baryons are issues for future experiments at J-PARC.

  10. Observation of semileptonic decays of charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, E.; Trilling, G.H.; Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Blondel, A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Himel, T.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Lueth, V.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1982-05-31

    Direct electrons are observed in baryon events produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at center-of-mass energies above the ..lambda../sub c/Lambda-bar/sub c/ threshold. These events are attributed to charmed baryon pair production and subsequent ..lambda../sub c/ semileptonic decay. Various semileptonic branching ratios of the ..lambda../sub c/ are determined, including BR(..lambda../sub c/..-->..e/sup +/X) = (4.5 +- 1.7)%.

  11. Babar: Sin(2beta) With Charm

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Clermont-Ferrand U.

    2006-04-12

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries of neutral B decays to several charm and charmonium final states. Data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In the absence of penguin contribution, the Standard Model predicts the time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters S and C are to be {eta}{sub CP} sin(2{beta}) and 0, respectively.

  12. Unsolved problems in hadronic charm decay

    SciTech Connect

    Browder, T.E.

    1989-08-01

    This paper describes several outstanding problems in the study of hadronic decays of charmed mesons where further experimental work and theoretical understanding is needed. Four topics are stressed: double Cabibbo suppressed decays (DCSD) of D/sup +/ mesons, hadronic D/sub s/ decays, weak hadronic quasi-two-body decays to pairs of vector mesons, and penguin decays of D mesons. 24 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Charming penguin contributions to B{r_arrow}K{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Isola, C.; Ladisa, M.; Nardulli, G.; Pham, T. N.; Santorelli, P.

    2001-07-01

    We present calculations of the charming-penguin long-distance contributions to B{r_arrow}K{pi} decays due to intermediate charmed meson states. Our calculation is based on the chiral effective Lagrangian for light and heavy mesons, corrected for the hard pion and kaon momenta. We find that the charming-penguin contributions increase significantly the B{r_arrow}K{pi} decay rates in comparison with the short-distance contributions, giving results in better agreement with experimental data.

  14. Abelian Hidden Sectors at a GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, David E.; Poland, David; Zurek, Kathryn; /Fermilab /Michigan U.

    2009-04-16

    We discuss mechanisms for naturally generating GeV-scale hidden sectors in the context of weak-scale supersymmetry. Such low mass scales can arise when hidden sectors are more weakly coupled to supersymmetry breaking than the visible sector, as happens when supersymmetry breaking is communicated to the visible sector by gauge interactions under which the hidden sector is uncharged, or if the hidden sector is sequestered from gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking. We study these mechanisms in detail in the context of gauge and gaugino mediation, and present specific models of Abelian GeV-scale hidden sectors. In particular, we discuss kinetic mixing of a U(1){sub x} gauge force with hypercharge, singlets or bi-fundamentals which couple to both sectors, and additional loop effects. Finally, we investigate the possible relevance of such sectors for dark matter phenomenology, as well as for low- and high-energy collider searches.

  15. Study of correlations between photoproduced pairs of charmed particles at Experiment E831/FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Castromonte Flores, Cesar Manuel

    2008-08-01

    The authors present the study of the charm-pair correlations produced in photon-nucleon interactions at $\\langle$Eγ$\\rangle$ = 175 GeV/c, by the Fermilab fixed target experiment E831/FOCUS. The E831/FOCUS experiment produced and reconstructed over one million charm particles. This high statistics allows the reconstruction of more than 7000 charm-pair mesons D$\\bar{D}$, 10 times the statistic of former experiments, and also allows to get, for the first time, about 600 totally reconstructed charm-pairs in the DDs and DΛc channels. They were able to study, with some detail, the kinematical correlations between the charm and anticharm particle forming a pair, in the square transverse momentum (pT2), azimuthal angle difference (ΔΦ), rapidity difference (Δy) and the charm-pair mass variables. They observe some correlation for the longitudinal momenta, and a significant correlation for the transverse momenta of the charm and anticharm particles. They compare the experimental distributions with theoretical predictions based on the photon-gluon fusion model (PGF), for the production of c$\\bar{c}$ quarks, and the standard Lund hadronization model. These models are implemented by the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA program allows the inclusion, in the simulation, of non-perturbative effects that have been shown to be important for charm production. In order to compare data and simulation, they have generated two Monte Carlo samples, the first one set to favor the production of D$\\bar{D}$ pairs (MCDD2), and the second one set to favor the production of DDsand DΛc pairs, where each one uses different functions and parameters values for the theoretical models in the simulation. They observe, for the correlation distributions, that the set of parameters used by the MCDD2 model together with the intrinsic transverse momentum (k$\\perp$) of the partons inside the

  16. Direct probe of the intrinsic charm content of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Tom; Ilten, Philip; Williams, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of Z bosons produced in association with charm jets (Z c ) in proton-proton collisions in the forward region provides a direct probe of a potential nonperturbative (intrinsic) charm component in the proton wave function. We provide a detailed study of the potential to measure Z c production at the LHCb experiment in Runs 2 and 3 of the LHC. The sensitivity to valence-like (sea-like) intrinsic charm is predicted to be ⟨x ⟩IC≳0.3 %(1 %). The impact of intrinsic charm on Higgs production at the LHC, including H c , is also discussed in detail.

  17. SELEX: Recent Progress in the Analysis of Charm-Strange and Double-Charm Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Engelfried, Jurgen

    2007-02-01

    SELEX (Fermilab Experiment 781) [1] employs beams of {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}, and protons at around 600 GeV/c to study production and decay properties of charmed baryons. It took data in the 1996/7 fixed target run and is currently analyzing those data. Here they focus on recently obtained results concerning the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime and the doubly-charmed baryons {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++}.

  18. Fragment-based docking: development of the CHARMMing Web user interface as a platform for computer-aided drug design.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, Yuri; Frugier, Emilie; Schalk, Vinushka; Caflisch, Amedeo; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-09-22

    Web-based user interfaces to scientific applications are important tools that allow researchers to utilize a broad range of software packages with just an Internet connection and a browser. One such interface, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics), facilitates access to the powerful and widely used molecular software package CHARMM. CHARMMing incorporates tasks such as molecular structure analysis, dynamics, multiscale modeling, and other techniques commonly used by computational life scientists. We have extended CHARMMing's capabilities to include a fragment-based docking protocol that allows users to perform molecular docking and virtual screening calculations either directly via the CHARMMing Web server or on computing resources using the self-contained job scripts generated via the Web interface. The docking protocol was evaluated by performing a series of "re-dockings" with direct comparison to top commercial docking software. Results of this evaluation showed that CHARMMing's docking implementation is comparable to many widely used software packages and validates the use of the new CHARMM generalized force field for docking and virtual screening.

  19. Measurements of CP violation and mixing in charm decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contu, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons. This sample is used to search for direct and indirect CP violation in charm, and to measure D0 mixing parameters. New and updated measurements are presented, with complementary time-dependent and time-integrated analyses of D0 meson decays.

  20. Charmed-Particle Lifetimes from Neutrino Interactions Experiment #531

    SciTech Connect

    Reay, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Detection of charm in several Fermilab experiments, among them E-531, was discussed by L. Hand, L. Voyvodic, and the author in Fermilab Report in March 1979. Since that time, there have been significant new results from E-531 on charmed particles and their lifetimes and a discussion of these results is useful at this time.

  1. Charm quark system at the physical point of 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Namekawa, Y.; Ukita, N.; Aoki, S.; Ishizuka, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Okawa, M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kanaya, K.; Kuramashi, Y.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the charm quark system using the relativistic heavy quark action on 2+1 flavor PACS-CS configurations previously generated on 32{sup 3}x64 lattice. The dynamical up, down, and strange quark masses are set to the physical values by using the technique of reweighting to shift the quark-hopping parameters from the values employed in the configuration generation. At the physical point, the lattice spacing equals a{sup -1}=2.194(10) GeV and the spatial extent L=2.88(1) fm. The charm quark mass is determined by the spin-averaged mass of the 1S charmonium state, from which we obtain m{sub charm}{sup MS}({mu}=m{sub charm}{sup MS})=1.260(1)(6)(35) GeV, where the errors are due to our statistics, scale determination and renormalization factor. An additional systematic error from the heavy quark is of order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}), f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}){sup 2}, which are estimated to be a percent level if the factor f(m{sub Q}a) analytic in m{sub Q}a is of order unity. Our results for the charmed and charmed-strange meson decay constants are f{sub D}=226(6)(1)(5) MeV, f{sub D{sub s}}=257(2)(1)(5) MeV, again up to the heavy quark errors of order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}), f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}){sup 2}. Combined with the CLEO values for the leptonic decay widths, these values yield |V{sub cd}|=0.205(6)(1)(5)(9), |V{sub cs}|=1.00(1)(1)(3)(3), where the last error is because of the experimental uncertainty of the decay widths.

  2. Charm quark system at the physical point of 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Izubuchi T.; Namekawa, Y.; Aoki, S.; Ishikawa, K.; Ishizuka, N.; Kanaya, K.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Ukita, N.: Yoshie, T.

    2011-04-24

    We investigate the charm quark system using the relativistic heavy quark action on 2+1 flavor PACS-CS configurations previously generated on 32{sup 3} x 64 lattice. The dynamical up, down, and strange quark masses are set to the physical values by using the technique of reweighting to shift the quark-hopping parameters from the values employed in the configuration generation. At the physical point, the lattice spacing equals a{sup -1} = 2.194(10) GeV and the spatial extent L = 2.88(1) fm. The charm quark mass is determined by the spin-averaged mass of the 1S charmonium state, from which we obtain m{sub charm}{sup M{bar S}} ({mu} = m{sub charm}{sup M{bar S}}) = 1.260(1)(6)(35) GeV, where the errors are due to our statistics, scale determination and renormalization factor. An additional systematic error from the heavy quark is of order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}), f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}){sup 2}, which are estimated to be a percent level if the factor f(m{sub Q}a) analytic in m{sub Q}a is of order unity. Our results for the charmed and charmed-strange meson decay constants are f{sub D} = 226(6)(1)(5) MeV, f{sub D}{sub s} = 257(2)(1)(5) MeV, again up to the heavy quark errors of order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}), f(m{sub Q}a)(a{Lambda}{sub QCD}){sup 2}. Combined with the CLEO values for the leptonic decay widths, these values yield |V{sub cd}| = 0.205(6)(1)(5)(9), |V{sub cs}| = 1.00(1)(1)(3)(3), where the last error is because of the experimental uncertainty of the decay widths.

  3. Charge asymmetry in charmed-meson photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V. Likhoded, A. K.

    2006-01-15

    Within the perturbative-recombination model, the charge asymmetries in the D*{sup +}-D*{sup -}, D*{sup 0}-D*{sup 0}, and D{sup +}{sub s}-D{sup -}{sub s} yields are estimated under the kinematical conditions of the COMPASS experiment. Corrections that arise owing to the mass of a light quark in a charmed meson are taken into account. The yield of D{sup +}{sub s} mesons is predicted to be large in relation to the yield of D{sup -}{sub s} mesons.

  4. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing web-user interface.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T; Filippov, Igor V; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a web-based tool for structure activity relationship and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms-Random Forest, Support Vector Machine, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting, so forth. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity.

  5. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing web-user interface.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T; Filippov, Igor V; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a web-based tool for structure activity relationship and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms-Random Forest, Support Vector Machine, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting, so forth. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. PMID:25362883

  6. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing Web-user interface

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Iwona E.; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T.; Filippov, Igor V.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a Web-based tool for SAR and QSAR modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms – Random Forest, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting etc. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. PMID:25362883

  7. Charm hadroproduction results from Fermilab E-400

    SciTech Connect

    Coteus, P.; Binkley, M.; Bossi, F.; Butler, J.; Cumalat, J.P.; DiCorato, M.; Diesburg, M.; Enagonio, J.; Filaseta, J.; Frabetti, P.L.

    1987-09-01

    Results are presented from Fermilab E-400 on the production of charmed baryons and mesons at a mean energy of 640 GeV. We show evidence for the charm-strange baryon, ..xi../sub c//sup +/, and present our measurements of its mass, width, lifetime, cross section and relative branching fractions, and the A, x/sub f/, p/sub t/, and particle/antiparticle dependence of the state. We show evidence for both the ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ and ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, and present measurements of three mass differences, ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/, and ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/. Measurements of the A dependence and particle/antiparticle ratios for ..sigma../sub c/ production are also presented. We show preliminary results on the ratio of two decay modes of the D/sup 0/, D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/ and D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sub 0/anti K/sub 0/. The latter mode has not been previously observed. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Lattice calculation of nonleptonic charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, J.N.

    1991-11-01

    The decays of charmed mesons into two body nonleptonic final states are investigated. Weak interaction amplitudes of interest in these decays are extracted from lattice four-point correlation functions using a effective weak Hamiltonian including effects to order G{sub f} in the weak interactions yet containing effects to all orders in the strong interactions. The lattice calculation allows a quantitative examination of non-spectator processes in charm decays helping to elucidate the role of effects such as color coherence, final state interactions and the importance of the so called weak annihilation process. For D {yields} K{pi}, we find that the non-spectator weak annihilation diagram is not small, and we interpret this as evidence for large final state interactions. Moreover, there is indications of a resonance in the isospin {1/2} channel to which the weak annihilation process contributes exclusively. Findings from the lattice calculation are compared to results from the continuum vacuum saturation approximation and amplitudes are examined within the framework of the 1/N expansion. Factorization and the vacuum saturation approximation are tested for lattice amplitudes by comparing amplitudes extracted from lattice four-point functions with the same amplitude extracted from products of two-point and three-point lattice correlation functions arising out of factorization and vacuum saturation.

  9. The Italian Tau/charm project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrica Biagini, Maria

    2014-06-01

    A τ/charm Factory, an e + e- collider with very high luminosity at the 2-4.6 GeV center of mass energy, to be built on the Rome University at Tor Vergata campus, was studied by the Consortium Nicola Cabibbo Laboratory and the INFN Frascati Laboratories. This project is the natural evolution of the flagship Italian project SuperB Factory, funded by the Italian Government in 2010 with a budget that turned out to be insufficient to cover the total costs of the project. The study of rare events at the τ/charm energy was already planned as a Phase-II of SuperB [1]. This design keeps all the unique features of SuperB, including the polarization of the electron beam, with the possibility to take data in a larger energy range, with reduced accelerator dimensions and construction and operation costs. A Report on the accelerator design has been published in September 2013 [2].

  10. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  11. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  12. Lepton mixing from the hidden sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludl, P. O.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental results indicate a possible relation between the lepton and quark mixing matrices of the form UPMNS≈VCKM†UX , where UX is a matrix with special structure related to the mechanism of neutrino mass generation. We propose a framework which can realize such a relation. The main ingredients of the framework are the double seesaw mechanism, SO(10) grand unification and a hidden sector of theory. The latter is composed of singlets (fermions and bosons) of the grand unified theory (GUT) symmetry with masses between the GUT and Planck scale. The interactions in this sector obey certain symmetries Ghidden. We explore the conditions under which symmetries Ghidden can produce flavor structures in the visible sector. Here the key elements are the basis-fixing symmetry and mediators which communicate information about properties of the hidden sector to the visible one. The interplay of SO(10) symmetry, basis-fixing symmetry identified as Z2×Z2 and Ghidden can lead to the required form of UX. A different kind of new physics is responsible for generation of the CKM mixing. We present the simplest realizations of the framework which differ by nature of the mediators and by symmetries of the hidden sector.

  13. How Charm can still be charming: some recent results from FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Malvezzi, Sandra

    2006-01-12

    Charm physics is a paradigm of the way in which precise measurements have led to a revival of the sector, allowing for New Physics searches through mixing, CP violation, and measurements of rare and forbidden decays. New vigorous spectroscopy studies of high-mass states (the so-called 'Renaissance of spectroscopy') complement the scenario. These promising investigations, which are typical of a mature field under study for several decades, require knowledge and control of QCD effects. Recent studies of charm weak decays in hadronic and semileptonic processes through Dalitz-plot analyses and form-factor measurements respectively, have revealed limits in the generally adopted approaches for treating strong dynamics effects. FOCUS has performed pioneering analyses, suggesting new directions for strong decay dynamics investigation; a few examples will be discussed in this paper.

  14. Estimating Neuronal Ageing with Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Pham, Tuan D.

    2011-06-01

    Neuronal degeneration is widely observed in normal ageing, meanwhile the neurode-generative disease like Alzheimer's disease effects neuronal degeneration in a faster way which is considered as faster ageing. Early intervention of such disease could benefit subjects with potentials of positive clinical outcome, therefore, early detection of disease related brain structural alteration is required. In this paper, we propose a computational approach for modelling the MRI-based structure alteration with ageing using hidden Markov model. The proposed hidden Markov model based brain structural model encodes intracortical tissue/fluid distribution using discrete wavelet transformation and vector quantization. Further, it captures gray matter volume loss, which is capable of reflecting subtle intracortical changes with ageing. Experiments were carried out on healthy subjects to validate its accuracy and robustness. Results have shown its ability of predicting the brain age with prediction error of 1.98 years without training data, which shows better result than other age predition methods.

  15. Opportunities for high-sensitivity charm physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.; Burnstein, R.A.; Lederman, L.M.; Rubin, H.A.; Brown, C.N.; Christian, D.C.; Gelfand, N.M.; Kwan, S.W.; Chen, T.Y.; He, M.; Koetke, D.D.; Napier, A.; Papavassiliou, V.; Yu, X.Q.

    1996-07-01

    The CO initiative under consideration at Fermilab makes feasible a charm experiment reconstructing >10{sup 9} charm decays, four orders - of magnitude beyond the largest extant sample. The experiment might commence data-taking as early as 1999. In addition to programmatic charm physics such as spectroscopy, lifetimes, and QCD tests, it will have significant new-physics reach in the areas of CP violation, flavor-changing neutral-current and lepton-number-violating decays, and D{sup o} {bar D} {bar {sup o}} mixing, and should observe direct CP violation in Cabibbo-suppressed D decays if it occurs at the level predicted by the Standard Model.

  16. DO -- antiMixing and Rare Charm Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Jeanne M; Burdman, Gustavo

    2003-10-06

    We review the current status of flavor-changing neutral currents in the charm sector. We focus on the standard-model predictions and identify the main sources of theoretical uncertainties in both charm mixing and rare charm decays. The potential of these observables for constraining short-distance physics in the standard model and its extensions is compromised by the presence of large nonperturbative effects. We examine the possible discovery windows in which short-distance physics can be tested and study the effects of various extensions of the standard model. The current experimental situation and future prospects are reviewed.

  17. Rare charm and B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2003-12-15

    We present results on rare charm and B decays using 65pb{sup -1} of data taken with the CDF detector in Run II. Three results are discussed, a measurement of the relative branching ratios {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}) and {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}) and the direct CP-violating decay rate asymmetry, and a limit on the branching ratio of the FCNC decay D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. We also discuss the prospects for the search for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays.

  18. Photoproduction of the Λ c charmed baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. P.; Barate, R.; Bloch, D.; Bonamy, P.; Borgeaud, P.; Burchell, M.; Burmeister, H.; Brunet, J. M.; Calvino, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Crespo, J. M.; d'Almagne, B.; David, M.; DiCiaccio, L.; Dixon, J.; Druet, P.; Duane, A.; Engel, J. P.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Fokitis, E.; Forty, R. W.; Foucault, P.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J. P.; Giomataris, Y.; Hofmokl, T.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Koratzinos, M.; Krafft, C.; Lefievre, B.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lopez, A.; Lui, W. K.; Magneville, C.; Maltezos, A.; McEwen, J. G.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pattison, B.; Poutot, D.; Primout, M.; Rahmani, H.; Roudeau, P.; Seez, C.; Six, J.; Strub, R.; Treille, D.; Triscos, P.; Tristram, G.; Villet, G.; Volte, A.; Wayne, M.; Websdale, D. M.; Wormser, G.; Zolnierowski, Y.; NA14/2 Collaboration

    1990-08-01

    In a photoproduction experiment using a mean photon energy of 100 GeV we have observed 29±8 Λ c( overlineΛ c) charmed-baryon and antibaryon decays in the pK-π + ( overlinepK +π -) final state. Quasi two-body final states do not contribite significantly to this channel. The mass of the Λ c was measured to be 2281.7±2.7±2.6 MeV/ c2 and its lifetime 0.18±0.03±0.03 ps. The ratio of {Λ c}/{D} production, measured in this experiment, is significantly greater than that predicted by photon-gluon fusion and using a Lund model to describe the hadronization. This excess cannot be completely accounted for in this model, even using a Λ c branching fraction in pK π as high as 5%.

  19. Search for the doubly charmed baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorbounov, P.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-12-01

    A search for the doubly charmed baryon in the decay mode is performed with a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.65 fb-1, of pp collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. No significant signal is found in the mass range 3300-3800 MeV /c 2. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the production cross-section times branching fraction to that of the , R, are given as a function of the mass and lifetime. The largest upper limits range from R < 1.5 × 10-2 for a lifetime of 100 fs to R < 3 .9 × 10-4 for a lifetime of 400 fs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Charm form factors in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, M. E.; Navarra, F. S.; Nielsen, M.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-12-28

    We calculate the form factors and the coupling constants in vertices with charm mesons, such as {rho}D*D*, in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the applications of these form factors in heavy ion collisions and in B decays. We then present an introduction to the method of QCD sum rules and describe how to work with the three-point function. We give special attention to the procedure employed to extrapolate results obtained in the deep euclidean region to the poles of the particles, located in the time-like region. Finally we present a table of ready-to-use parametrizations of all the form factors, which are relevant for the processes mentioned in the introduction. We also give the coupling constants.

  1. Hidden attractors in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Jafari, Sajad; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuznetsov, Nikolay V.; Leonov, Gennady A.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2016-06-01

    Complex dynamical systems, ranging from the climate, ecosystems to financial markets and engineering applications typically have many coexisting attractors. This property of the system is called multistability. The final state, i.e., the attractor on which the multistable system evolves strongly depends on the initial conditions. Additionally, such systems are very sensitive towards noise and system parameters so a sudden shift to a contrasting regime may occur. To understand the dynamics of these systems one has to identify all possible attractors and their basins of attraction. Recently, it has been shown that multistability is connected with the occurrence of unpredictable attractors which have been called hidden attractors. The basins of attraction of the hidden attractors do not touch unstable fixed points (if exists) and are located far away from such points. Numerical localization of the hidden attractors is not straightforward since there are no transient processes leading to them from the neighborhoods of unstable fixed points and one has to use the special analytical-numerical procedures. From the viewpoint of applications, the identification of hidden attractors is the major issue. The knowledge about the emergence and properties of hidden attractors can increase the likelihood that the system will remain on the most desirable attractor and reduce the risk of the sudden jump to undesired behavior. We review the most representative examples of hidden attractors, discuss their theoretical properties and experimental observations. We also describe numerical methods which allow identification of the hidden attractors.

  2. Mesonic Decay of Charm Hypernuclei Λc+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Fontoura, Carlos E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-03-01

    Λc+ hypernuclei are expected to have binding energies and other properties similar to those of strange hypernuclei in view of the similarity between the quark structures of the strange and charmed hyperons, namely Λ(uds) and Λc+(udc). One striking difference however occurs in their mesonic decays, as there is almost no Pauli blocking in the nucleonic decay of a charm hypernucleus because the final-state nucleons leave the nucleus at high energies. The nuclear medium nevertheless affects the mesonic decays of charm hypernucleus because the nuclear mean fields modify the masses of the charm hyperon. In the present communication we present results of a first investigation of the effects of finite baryon density on different weak mesonic decay channels of the Λc+ baryon. We found a non-negligible reduction of the decay widths as compared to their vacuum values.

  3. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  4. Charm and bottom hadronic form factors with QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, M. E.; Rodrigues, B. O.; Cerqueira, A. Jr.

    2013-03-25

    We present a brief review of some calculations of form factors and coupling constants in vertices with charm and bottom mesons in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the motivation for this work, describing possible applications of these form factors to charm and bottom decays processes. We first make a summarize of the QCD sum rules method. We give special attention to the uncertainties of the method introducing by the intrinsic variation of the parameters. Finally we conclude.

  5. CHARMMing: a new, flexible web portal for CHARMM.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin T; Singh, Rishi P; Klauda, Jeffery B; Hodoscek, Milan; Brooks, Bernard R; Woodcock, H Lee

    2008-09-01

    A new web portal for the CHARMM macromolecular modeling package, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics, http://www.charmming.org), is presented. This tool provides a user-friendly interface for the preparation, submission, monitoring, and visualization of molecular simulations (i.e., energy minimization, solvation, and dynamics). The infrastructure used to implement the web application is described. Two additional programs have been developed and integrated with CHARMMing: GENRTF, which is employed to define structural features not supported by the standard CHARMM force field, and a job broker, which is used to provide a portable method for using grid and cluster computing with CHARMMing. The use of the program is described with three proteins: 1YJP , 1O1O , and 1UFY . Source code is provided allowing CHARMMing to be downloaded, installed, and used by supercomputing centers and research groups that have a CHARMM license. Although no software can replace a scientist's own judgment and experience, CHARMMing eases the introduction of newcomers to the molecular modeling discipline by providing a graphical method for running simulations.

  6. Child Abuse: The Hidden Bruises

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACAP Facts for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Child Abuse - The Hidden Bruises Quick Links Facts For Families ... 5; Updated November 2014 The statistics on physical child abuse are alarming. It is estimated hundreds of thousands ...

  7. Hidden Magnetic Portals Around Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA-sponsored researcher at the University of Iowa has developed a way for spacecraft to hunt down hidden magnetic portals in the vicinity of Earth. These gateways link the magnetic field of our...

  8. Simple estimates of the masses of pentaquarks with hidden beauty or strangeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir; Potashnikova, Irina

    2016-04-01

    The masses of cryptoexotic pentaquarks with hidden beauty are estimated phenomenologically using the results by the LHCb Collaboration which discovered recently the cryptoexotic pentaquarks with hidden charm. The expected masses of the hidden beauty pentaquarks are about 10.8 GeV and 10.7 GeV in the limit of some kind of heavy quark symmetry. The states with hidden strangeness considered in a similar way have masses of about 2.37 GeV and 2.30 GeV, several hundred MeV higher than states discussed previously in connection with the relatively light positive strangeness pentaquark θ+. Empirical data on the spectra of pentaquarks can be used to get information about quarkonia interaction with nucleons. The results obtained for the case of heavy flavors are in fair agreement with the model of isospin (pion) exchange between flavored baryons and antiflavored vector mesons proposed by Karliner and Rosner, and in qualitative agreement with the bound-state version of the chiral soliton model.

  9. Hidden Statistics of Schroedinger Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    Work was carried out in determination of the mathematical origin of randomness in quantum mechanics and creating a hidden statistics of Schr dinger equation; i.e., to expose the transitional stochastic process as a "bridge" to the quantum world. The governing equations of hidden statistics would preserve such properties of quantum physics as superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods.

  10. Scale Invariant Extension of the Standard Model with a Strongly Interacting Hidden Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Taeil; Ko, P.

    2011-04-08

    We present a scale invariant extension of the standard model with a new QCD-like strong interaction in the hidden sector. A scale {Lambda}{sub H} is dynamically generated in the hidden sector by dimensional transmutation, and chiral symmetry breaking occurs in the hidden sector. This scale is transmitted to the SM sector by a real singlet scalar messenger S and can trigger electroweak symmetry breaking. Thus all the mass scales in this model arise from the hidden sector scale {Lambda}{sub H}, which has quantum mechanical origin. Furthermore, the lightest hadrons in the hidden sector are stable by the flavor conservation of the hidden sector strong interaction, and could be the cold dark matter (CDM). We study collider phenomenology, relic density, and direct detection rates of the CDM of this model.

  11. Improving data discovery and usability through commentary and user feedback: the CHARMe project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegre, R.; Blower, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science datasets are highly diverse. Users of these datasets are similarly varied, ranging from research scientists through industrial users to government decision- and policy-makers. It is very important for these users to understand the applicability of any dataset to their particular problem so that they can select the most appropriate data sources for their needs. Although data providers often provide rich supporting information in the form of metadata, typically this information does not include community usage information that can help other users judge fitness-for-purpose.The CHARMe project (http://www.charme.org.uk) is filling this gap by developing a system for sharing "commentary metadata". These are annotations that are generated and shared by the user community and include: Links between publications and datasets. The CHARMe system can record information about why a particular dataset was used (e.g. the paper may describe the dataset, it may use the dataset as a source, or it may be publishing results of a dataset assessment). These publications may appear in the peer-reviewed literature, or may be technical reports, websites or blog posts. Free-text comments supplied by the user. Provenance information, including links between datasets and descriptions of processing algorithms and sensors. External events that may affect data quality (e.g. large volcanic eruptions or El Niño events); we call these "significant events". Data quality information, e.g. system maturity indices. Commentary information can be linked to anything that can be uniquely identified (e.g. a dataset with a DOI or a persistent web address). It is also possible to associate commentary with particular subsets of datasets, for example to highlight an issue that is confined to a particular geographic region. We will demonstrate tools that show these capabilities in action, showing how users can apply commentary information during data discovery, visualization and analysis. The

  12. Dark photons from charm mesons at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, Philip; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike; Xue, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We propose a search for dark photons A' at the LHCb experiment using the charm meson decay D*(2007 )0→D0A'. At nominal luminosity, D*0→D0γ decays will be produced at about 700 kHz within the LHCb acceptance, yielding over 5 trillion such decays during Run 3 of the LHC. Replacing the photon with a kinetically mixed dark photon, LHCb is then sensitive to dark photons that decay as A'→e+e-. We pursue two search strategies in this paper. The displaced strategy takes advantage of the large Lorentz boost of the dark photon and the excellent vertex resolution of LHCb, yielding a nearly background-free search when the A' decay vertex is significantly displaced from the proton-proton primary vertex. The resonant strategy takes advantage of the large event rate for D*0→D0A' and the excellent invariant-mass resolution of LHCb, yielding a background-limited search that nevertheless covers a significant portion of the A' parameter space. Both search strategies rely on the planned upgrade to a triggerless-readout system at LHCb in Run 3, which will permit the identification of low-momentum electron-positron pairs online during data taking. For dark photon masses below about 100 MeV, LHCb can explore nearly all of the dark photon parameter space between existing prompt-A' and beam-dump limits.

  13. Hidden photons in connection to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, Sarah; Ringwald, Andreas; Goodsell, Mark D.

    2013-11-07

    Light extra U(1) gauge bosons, so called hidden photons, which reside in a hidden sector have attracted much attention since they are a well motivated feature of many scenarios beyond the Standard Model and furthermore could mediate the interaction with hidden sector dark matter. We review limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dump experiments including two new limits from such experiments at KEK and Orsay. In addition, we study the possibility of having dark matter in the hidden sector. A simple toy model and different supersymmetric realisations are shown to provide viable dark matter candidates in the hidden sector that are in agreement with recent direct detection limits.

  14. E789 and P865: High-rate fixed-target studies of charm and beauty

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    Experiment 789 at Fermilab used the high-rate E605/E772 spectrometer to study low-multiplicity charm and beauty decays. Preliminary results on charm and beauty production are presented based on analysis of [approx] 100% of the charm data and [approx] 50% of the beauty data. A new experiment is proposed to improve charm and beauty sensitivity by several orders of magnitude.

  15. Charm Meson Spectroscopy at BaBar and CLEO-C

    SciTech Connect

    Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-10-16

    In this mini-review we report on the most recent progress in charm meson spectroscopy. We discuss the precision measurements performed by the BABAR and CLEO-c experiments in the non strange charm meson part and we present the newly discovered strange charmed meson excited states.

  16. Incremental discovery of hidden structure: Applications in theory of elementary particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zytkow, J.M. |; Fischer, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Discovering hidden structure is a challenging, universal research task in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and other disciplines. Not only must the elements of hidden structure be postulated by the discoverer, but they can only be verified by indirect evidence, at the level of observable objects. In this paper we describe a framework for hidden structure discovery, built on a constructive definition of hidden structure. This definition leads to operators that build models of hidden structure step by step, postulating hidden objects, their combinations and properties, reactions described in terms of hidden objects, and mapping between the hidden and the observed structure. We introduce the operator dependency diagram, which shows the order of operator application and model evaluation. Different observational knowledge supports different evaluation criteria, which lead to different search systems with verifiable sequences of operator applications. Isomorph-free structure generation is another issue critical for efficiency of search. We apply our framework in the system GELL-MANN, that hypothesizes hidden structure for elementary particles and we present the results of a large scale search for quark models.

  17. Monitoring volcano activity through Hidden Markov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, C.; Montalto, P.; Prestifilippo, M.; Aliotta, M.; Cannata, A.; Patanè, D.

    2013-12-01

    During 2011-2013, Mt. Etna was mainly characterized by cyclic occurrences of lava fountains, totaling to 38 episodes. During this time interval Etna volcano's states (QUIET, PRE-FOUNTAIN, FOUNTAIN, POST-FOUNTAIN), whose automatic recognition is very useful for monitoring purposes, turned out to be strongly related to the trend of RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded by stations close to the summit area. Since RMS time series behavior is considered to be stochastic, we can try to model the system generating its values, assuming to be a Markov process, by using Hidden Markov models (HMMs). HMMs are a powerful tool in modeling any time-varying series. HMMs analysis seeks to recover the sequence of hidden states from the observed emissions. In our framework, observed emissions are characters generated by the SAX (Symbolic Aggregate approXimation) technique, which maps RMS time series values with discrete literal emissions. The experiments show how it is possible to guess volcano states by means of HMMs and SAX.

  18. Hidden symmetries in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Peter K.; Corwin, Eric I.

    2016-07-01

    There are deep, but hidden, geometric structures within jammed systems, associated with hidden symmetries. These can be revealed by repeated transformations under which these structures lead to fixed points. These geometric structures can be found in the Voronoi tesselation of space defined by the packing. In this paper we examine two iterative processes: maximum inscribed sphere (MIS) inversion and a real-space coarsening scheme. Under repeated iterations of the MIS inversion process we find invariant systems in which every particle is equal to the maximum inscribed sphere within its Voronoi cell. Using a real-space coarsening scheme we reveal behavior in geometric order parameters which is length-scale invariant.

  19. Penguins with charm and quark-hadron duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Buchalla, G.; Neubert, M.; Sachrajda, C. T.

    2009-06-01

    The integrated branching fraction of the process B→ X s l + l - is dominated by resonance background from narrow charmonium states, such as B→ X s ψ→ X s l + l -, which exceeds the non-resonant charm-loop contribution by two orders of magnitude. The origin of this fact is discussed in view of the general expectation of quark-hadron duality. The situation in B→ X s l + l - is contrasted with charm-penguin amplitudes in two-body hadronic B decays of the type B→ π π, for which it is demonstrated that resonance effects and the potentially non-perturbative cbar{c} threshold region do not invalidate the standard picture of QCD factorization. This holds irrespective of whether the charm quark is treated as a light or a heavy quark.

  20. Beauty and charm physics at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    M. Bishai

    2003-10-16

    Using the data samples collected with the CDF Run II detector during the year 2002 and early 2003, new measurements of the production cross-sections and the masses, lifetimes and branching fractions of beauty and charm hadrons are presented. New measurements of the {Lambda}{sub b} mass, lifetime, and branching fractions have greatly improved the current knowledge of bottom baryon properties and decay dynamics. the large charm signals made available by the silicon vertex track trigger have enabled the establishment of key measurements using rare charm decays that are sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model. The decay signals B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{pi} and the two body charmless decays of B{sup 0} and B{sub s} have been established. These decay channels are important milestones towards the measurement of B{sub s} mixing and direct CP violation in the B system.

  1. Multivariate longitudinal data analysis with mixed effects hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Jesse D; Dubin, Joel A

    2015-09-01

    Multiple longitudinal responses are often collected as a means to capture relevant features of the true outcome of interest, which is often hidden and not directly measurable. We outline an approach which models these multivariate longitudinal responses as generated from a hidden disease process. We propose a class of models which uses a hidden Markov model with separate but correlated random effects between multiple longitudinal responses. This approach was motivated by a smoking cessation clinical trial, where a bivariate longitudinal response involving both a continuous and a binomial response was collected for each participant to monitor smoking behavior. A Bayesian method using Markov chain Monte Carlo is used. Comparison of separate univariate response models to the bivariate response models was undertaken. Our methods are demonstrated on the smoking cessation clinical trial dataset, and properties of our approach are examined through extensive simulation studies. PMID:25761965

  2. Open charm measurements in p + p collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlustý, David; Star Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    In this article, we will present the STAR results of open charm hadron and non-photonic productions at mid-rapidity in p+p collisions at = 200 and 500 GeV. Open charm mesons are reconstructed directly via hadronic decay channels with daughter particles identified by STAR Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and Time Of Flight (TOF) detectors. Non-photonic electron yields are calculated by subtracting photonic electrons from inclusive electrons identified using TPC and Electromagnetic Calorimeter. These measurements are compared to theoretical model calculations and physics implications will be discussed.

  3. D0-D bar 0 mixing and rare charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Burdman, Gustavo; Shipsey, Ian

    2003-10-08

    We review the current status of flavor-changing neutral currents in the charm sector. We focus on the standard-model predictions and identify the main sources of theoretical uncertainties in both D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing and rare charm decays. The potential of these observables for constraining short-distance physics in the standard model and its extensions is compromised by the presence of large nonperturbative effects. We examine the possible discovery windows in which short-distance physics can be tested and study the effects of various extensions of the standard model. The current experimental situation and future prospects are reviewed.

  4. Charm and Charmonium Spectroscopy at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Palano, Antimo; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari

    2011-11-22

    In the last few years many new unexpected new particles have been discovered in the analysis of B-factories data. In the charm sector, the newly discovered D{sub s} mesons are difficult to explain within potential models. In the charmonium sector, the large variety of new states are difficult to accommodate in the quark model and some of them are candidates for being hybrids or 4-quark states. Results will be presented on charm and charmonium spectroscopy from BaBar experiment using inclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} interactions, B decays and exclusive ISR reactions.

  5. CP violation in charm and beauty decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe Altarelli, M.

    2013-08-01

    LHCb is a dedicated heavy flavour physics precision experiment at the LHC searching for New Physics (NP) beyond the Standard Model (SM) through the study of very rare decays of beauty and charm-flavoured hadrons and precision measurements of CP-violating observables. In this review I will present a selection of recent precision measurements of CP-violating observables in the decays of beauty and charm-flavoured hadrons. These measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of up to 1.0 fb collected by LHCb in 2011.

  6. Beauty and charm production in fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Vogt, Ramona

    2004-05-01

    We present calculations of NNLO threshold corrections for beauty and charm production in {pi}{sup -} p and pp interactions at fixed-target experiments. Recent calculations for heavy quark hadroproduction have included next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) soft-gluon corrections [1] to the double differential cross section from threshold resummation techniques [2]. These corrections are important for near-threshold beauty and charm production at fixed-target experiments, including HERA-B and some of the current and future heavy ion experiments.

  7. Charmonium physics at a tau-charm factory

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. |

    1993-11-01

    Since its discovery in 1974 the charmonium system has served hadron physics as an important arena for the investigation of many aspects of QCD and hadron spectroscopy. In this summary the author briefly reviews some of these and discusses several of the important outstanding issues in hadron spectroscopy and their relation to the spectrum and couplings of resonances in the charmonium system. The topics discussed are charmonium spectroscopy, electromagnetic couplings ({gamma}, {gamma}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}), strong decays and unusual states (charm molecules and charmonium hybrids), and in each case the author notes areas in which experiments at a tau-charm factory could make valuable contributions.

  8. Towards an understanding of the new charm and charm-strange mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the DsJ*(2317), DsJ(2460), and SELEX DsJ*(2632) states with properties differing considerably from what was expected has led to a renewed interest in hadron spectroscopy. In addition to these states, non-strange partners of the DsJ states have also been observed. Understanding the D0* and D1' states can provide important insights into the DsJ states. In this contribution I examine quark model predictions for the D0* and D1' states and discuss experimental measurements that can shed light on them. I find that these states are well described as the broad, j = 1/2 non-strange charmed P-wave mesons. In the latter part of this writeup I discuss the cbar s possibilities for the SELEX DsJ*(2632) and measurements that can shed light on it.

  9. Preschoolers Search for Hidden Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Yuping; Keen, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The issue of whether young children use spatio-temporal information (e.g., movement of objects through time and space) and/or contact-mechanical information (e.g., interaction between objects) to search for a hidden object was investigated. To determine whether one cue can have priority over the other, a dynamic event that put these cues into…

  10. Search for Popcorn Mesons in Events with Two Charmed Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartfiel, Brandon; /SLAC

    2006-07-07

    The physics of this note is divided into two parts. The first part measures the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {pi}kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c. The data sample consists of 15,400 {Lambda}{sub c} baryons from 9.46 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} K{sup 0}p mode, and look for events with a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} in order to look for ''popcorn'' mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb{sup -1}. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06 {+-} .09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to {Lambda}{sub c} + {eta}{pi}, we are left with 2.63 {+-} .21 additional charged pions in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per baryon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  11. Search for popcorn mesons in events with two charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartfiel, Brandon

    The physics of this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part measures the Λc → pi kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c, which is just below the Υ(4s) resonance. The data sample consists of 15,400 Λc baryons from 9.46 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the Λc → K0p mode, and look for events with a Λc+ and a Λ c- in order to look for "popcorn" mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb-1. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06+/-.09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to Λc + npi, we are left with 2.63+/-.21 additional charged pious in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per bayon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  12. Grand unified hidden-sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Stephen J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2014-10-01

    We explore G×G unified theories with the visible and the hidden or dark sectors paired under a Z2 symmetry. Developing a system of "asymmetric symmetry breaking" we motivate such models on the basis of their ability to generate dark baryons that are confined with a mass scale just above that of the proton, as motivated by asymmetric dark matter. This difference is achieved from the distinct but related confinement scales that develop in unified theories that have the two factors of G spontaneously breaking in an asymmetric manner. We show how Higgs potentials that admit different gauge group breaking chains in each sector can be constructed, and demonstrate the capacity for generating different fermion mass scales. Lastly we discuss supersymmetric extensions of such schemes.

  13. Two-body hadronic charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chiang, Cheng-Wei

    2010-04-01

    In this work we study the two-body hadronic charmed meson decays, including both the PP and VP modes. The latest experimental data are first analyzed in the diagrammatic approach. The magnitudes and strong phases of the flavor amplitudes are extracted from the Cabibbo-favored decay modes using χ2 minimization. The best-fitted values are then used to predict the branching fractions of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes in the flavor SU(3) symmetry limit. We observe significant SU(3) breaking effects in some of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed channels. In the case of VP modes, we point out that the AP and AV amplitudes cannot be completely determined based on currently available data. We conjecture that the quoted experimental results for both Ds+→K¯0K*+ and Ds+→ρ+η' are overestimated. We compare the sizes of color-allowed and color-suppressed tree amplitudes extracted from the diagrammatical approach with the effective parameters a1 and a2 defined in the factorization approach. The ratio |a2/a1| is more or less universal among the D→K¯π, K¯*π, and K¯ρ modes. This feature allows us to discriminate between different solutions of topological amplitudes. For the long-standing puzzle about the ratio Γ(D0→K+K-)/Γ(D0→π+π-), we argue that, in addition to the SU(3) breaking effect in the spectator amplitudes, the long-distance resonant contribution through the nearby resonance f0(1710) can naturally explain why D0 decays more copiously to K+K- than π+π- through the W-exchange topology. This has to do with the dominance of the scalar glueball content of f0(1710) and the chiral-suppression effect in the decay of a scalar glueball into two pseudoscalar mesons. The same final-state interaction also explains the occurrence of D0→K0K¯0 and its vanishing amplitude when SU(3) flavor symmetry is exact. Owing to the G-parity selection rule, Ds+→π+ω does not receive contributions from the short-distance W

  14. Search for a strongly decaying neutral charmed pentaquark

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-06-01

    We present a search for a charmed pentaquark decaying strongly to D{sup (*)}-p. Finding no evidence for such a state, we set limits on the cross section times branching ratio relative to D*{sup -} and D{sup -} under particular assumptions about the production mechanism.

  15. Decay properties of charm and beauty open flavour mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Rai, Ajay; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2007-10-03

    The masses of S and P states, pseudoscalar and vector decay constants, leptonic, semileptonic decay widths of charm (D) and beauty (B) open flavour mesons have been computed in the framework of Coulomb and power potential of the form V(r) = -({alpha}{sub c}/r)+Ar{sup v}. The results are compared with other theoretical as well as experimental results.

  16. Role of 'intrinsic charm' in semileptonic B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Breidenbach, C.; Feldmann, T.; Turczyk, S.; Mannel, T.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the role of so-called 'intrinsic-charm' operators in semileptonic B-meson decays, which appear first at order 1/m{sub b}{sup 3} in the heavy quark expansion. We show by explicit calculation that - at scales {mu}{<=}m{sub c} - the contributions from 'intrinsic-charm' effects can be absorbed into short-distance coefficient functions multiplying, for instance, the Darwin term. Then, the only remnant of 'intrinsic charm' are logarithms of the form ln(m{sub c}{sup 2}/m{sub b}{sup 2}), which can be resummed by using renormalization-group techniques. As long as the dynamics at the charm-quark scale is perturbative, {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub c})<<1, this implies that no additional nonperturbative matrix elements aside from the Darwin and the spin-orbit term have to be introduced at order 1/m{sub b}{sup 3}. Hence, no sources for additional hadronic uncertainties have to be taken into account. Similar arguments may be made for higher orders in the 1/m{sub b} expansion.

  17. Enhancement of new physics signal sensitivity with mistagged charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the potential for enhancing search sensitivity for signals having charm quarks in the final state, using the sizable bottom-mistagging rate for charm quarks at the LHC. Provided that the relevant background processes contain light quarks instead of charm quarks, the application of b-tagging on charm quark-initiated jets enables us to reject more background events than signal ones due to the relatively small mistagging rate for light quarks. The basic idea is tested with two rare top decay processes: i) t → ch → cb b bar and ii) t → bH+ → b b bar c where h and H+ denote the Standard Model-like higgs boson and a charged higgs boson, respectively. The major background source is a hadronic top quark decay such as t → bW+ → b s bar c. We test our method with Monte Carlo simulation at the LHC 14 TeV, and find that the signal-over-background ratio can be increased by a factor of O (6- 7) with a suitably designed (heavy) flavor tagging algorithm and scheme.

  18. Inclusive /b decays to wrong sign charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Schwanda, C.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2003-05-01

    The production of wrong sign charmed mesons b-->D(s)X, D(s)=(D0,D+,Ds), is studied using the data collected by the DELPHI experiment in the years 1994 and 1995. Charmed mesons in /Z-->bb¯ events are exclusively reconstructed by searching for the decays D0-->K-π+, D+-->K-π+π+ and Ds+-->φπ+-->K+K-π+. The wrong sign contribution is extracted by using two discriminant variables: the charge of the /b-quark at decay time, estimated from the charges of identified particles, and the momentum of the charmed meson in the rest frame of the /b-hadron. The inclusive branching fractions of /b-hadrons into wrong sign charm mesons are measured to be: B(b-->D0X)+B(b-->D-X)=(9.3+/-1.7(stat)+/-1.3(syst)+/-0.4(B))%, B(b-->Ds-X)=(10.1+/-1.0(stat)+/-0.6(syst)+/-2.8(B))% where the first error is statistical, the second and third errors are systematic.

  19. Inclusive b decays to wrong sign charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Schwanda, C.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    The production of wrong sign charmed mesons b→overlineD(s)X, D(s)=(D0,D+,Ds), is studied using the data collected by the DELPHI experiment in the years 1994 and 1995. Charmed mesons in Z→bb¯ events are exclusively reconstructed by searching for the decays D0→K-π+, D+→K-π+π+ and Ds+→φπ+→K+K-π+. The wrong sign contribution is extracted by using two discriminant variables: the charge of the b-quark at decay time, estimated from the charges of identified particles, and the momentum of the charmed meson in the rest frame of the b-hadron. The inclusive branching fractions of b-hadrons into wrong sign charm mesons are measured to be: B(b→overlineD0X)+B(b→D-X)=(9.3±1.7(stat)±1.3(syst)±0.4(B))%, B(b→Ds-X)=(10.1±1.0(stat)±0.6(syst)±2.8(B))% where the first error is statistical, the second and third errors are systematic.

  20. Charm and beauty production and polarization at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vaia Papadimitriou

    2000-10-10

    In this paper the authors present results on Charm and Beauty production as well as on production and polarization of Quarkonia at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. These results were obtained from data taken with the CDF detector at Fermilab. They cover recently completed analyses of the 1992--96 collider run.

  1. Charm and beauty measurements at Fermilab fixed target

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1993-10-01

    Eighteen months after a successful run of the Fermilab fixed target program, interesting results from several experiments are available. This is the first time that more than one Fermilab fixed target experiment has reported the observation of beauty mesons. In this paper we review recent results from charm and beauty fixed target experiments at Fermilab.

  2. Charm and Charmonium Spectroscopy in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, M.; /Ferrara U.

    2008-02-06

    The BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B-factory offers excellent opportunities in charm and charmonium spectroscopy. The recent observation of new states in the D{sub s} and in the charmonium mass regions revived the interest in this field. Recent BABAR results are presented.

  3. Compositeness of the strange, charm, and beauty odd parity Λ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Recio, C.; Hidalgo-Duque, C.; Nieves, J.; Salcedo, L. L.; Tolos, L.

    2015-08-01

    We study the dependence on the quark mass of the compositeness of the lowest-lying odd parity hyperon states. Thus, we pay attention to Λ -like states in the strange, charm, and beauty sectors which are dynamically generated using a unitarized meson-baryon model. In the strange sector we use a SU(6) extension of the Weinberg-Tomozawa meson-baryon interaction, and we further implement the heavy-quark spin symmetry to construct the meson-baryon interaction when charmed or beauty hadrons are involved. In the three examined flavor sectors, we obtain two JP=1 /2- and one JP=3 /2- Λ states. We find that the Λ states which are bound states (the three Λb) or narrow resonances [one Λ (1405 ) and one Λc(2595 )] are well described as molecular states composed of s -wave meson-baryon pairs. The 1/2- wide Λ (1405 ) and Λc(2595 ) as well as the 3/2- Λ (1520 ) and Λc(2625 ) states display smaller compositeness so they would require new mechanisms, such as d -wave interactions.

  4. Spectroscopy of doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2013-11-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using lattice QCD with dynamical clover fermions. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) Ⓧ O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses. Using those splittings for doubly-charmed baryons, and taking input of experimental Bc meson mass, we predict the mass splittings of B*c-Bc to be about 80 ± 8 MeV and mΩccb=8050±10 MeV.

  5. Fragment-Based Docking: Development of the CHARMMing Web User Interface as a Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Web-based user interfaces to scientific applications are important tools that allow researchers to utilize a broad range of software packages with just an Internet connection and a browser.1 One such interface, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics), facilitates access to the powerful and widely used molecular software package CHARMM. CHARMMing incorporates tasks such as molecular structure analysis, dynamics, multiscale modeling, and other techniques commonly used by computational life scientists. We have extended CHARMMing’s capabilities to include a fragment-based docking protocol that allows users to perform molecular docking and virtual screening calculations either directly via the CHARMMing Web server or on computing resources using the self-contained job scripts generated via the Web interface. The docking protocol was evaluated by performing a series of “re-dockings” with direct comparison to top commercial docking software. Results of this evaluation showed that CHARMMing’s docking implementation is comparable to many widely used software packages and validates the use of the new CHARMM generalized force field for docking and virtual screening. PMID:25151852

  6. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-30

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

  7. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

  8. Search for charmed hadrons in the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, A.

    2015-05-01

    The OPERA experiment was designed to study muon neutrino to tau neutrino oscillations in appearance mode, using the CERN to Gran Sasso (CNGS) high energy neutrino beam 730 km far from the source. From 2008 to 2012, CNGS neutrinos interactions were recorded in the OPERA detector, which includes target units made of lead plates alternated with emulsion films and electronic tracker planes. The on-going analysis is aimed at the detection of short-lived particle decays occurring over distances of the order of 1 mm from the neutrino interaction point. It has allowed identifying charmed hadrons together with the tau lepton decay candidates that have established vμ → vτ oscillations with a significance of 4.2 σ. The procedure applied in OPERA to detect short-lived particle decays and its application to the search for charmed hadrons will be discussed here in detail.

  9. CHARMS: The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The success of numerous upcoming NASA infrared (IR) missions will rely critically on accurate knowledge of the IR refractive indices of their constituent optical components at design operating temperatures. To satisfy the demand for such data, we have built a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS), which, for typical 1R materials. can measure the index of refraction accurate to (+ or -) 5 x 10sup -3 . This versatile, one-of-a-kind facility can also measure refractive index over a wide range of wavelengths, from 0.105 um in the far-ultraviolet to 6 um in the IR, and over a wide range of temperatures, from 10 K to 100 degrees C, all with comparable accuracies. We first summarize the technical challenges we faced and engineering solutions we developed during the construction of CHARMS. Next we present our "first light," index of refraction data for fused silica and compare our data to previously published results.

  10. Semileptonic B and Bs decays into orbitally excited charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, J.; Albertus, C.; Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.; Hernández, E.; Pérez-García, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    The BABAR Collaboration has recently reported products of branching fractions that include B meson semileptonic decays into final states with charged and neutral D1(2420) and D2*(2460), two narrow orbitally excited charmed mesons. We evaluate these branching fractions, together with those concerning D0*(2400) and D1'(2430) mesons, within the framework of a constituent quark model. The calculation is performed in two steps, one of which involves a semileptonic decay and the other is mediated by a strong process. Our results are in agreement with the experimental data. We also extend the study to semileptonic decays of Bs into orbitally excited charmed-strange mesons, providing predictions to the possible measurements to be carried out at LHC.

  11. Fragmentation production of charmed hadrons in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Novoselov, A. A.

    2010-10-15

    Processes involving the production of D* mesons and {Lambda}{sub c} baryons in electron-positron annihilation at the energies of 10.58 and 91.18 GeV are considered. At the energy of 10.58 GeV, the production of pairs of B mesons that is followed by their decay to charmed particles is analyzed along with direct charm production. The violation of scaling in the respective fragmentation functions is taken into account in the next-to-leading-logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD. The required nonperturbative fragmentation functions are extracted numerically from experimental data obtained at B factories and are approximated by simple analytic expressions. It is shown that the difference in the nonperturbative fragmentation functions for transitions to mesons and baryons can readily be explained on the basis of the quark-counting rules.

  12. Quantum computation and hidden variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V. V.; Nikulov, A. V.

    2008-03-01

    Many physicists limit oneself to an instrumentalist description of quantum phenomena and ignore the problems of foundation and interpretation of quantum mechanics. This instrumentalist approach results to "specialization barbarism" and mass delusion concerning the problem, how a quantum computer can be made. The idea of quantum computation can be described within the limits of quantum formalism. But in order to understand how this idea can be put into practice one should realize the question: "What could the quantum formalism describe?", in spite of the absence of an universally recognized answer. Only a realization of this question and the undecided problem of quantum foundations allows to see in which quantum systems the superposition and EPR correlation could be expected. Because of the "specialization barbarism" many authors are sure that Bell proved full impossibility of any hidden-variables interpretation. Therefore it is important to emphasize that in reality Bell has restricted to validity limits of the no-hidden-variables proof and has shown that two-state quantum system can be described by hidden variables. The later means that no experimental result obtained on two-state quantum system can prove the existence of superposition and violation of the realism. One should not assume before unambiguous experimental evidence that any two-state quantum system is quantum bit. No experimental evidence of superposition of macroscopically distinct quantum states and of a quantum bit on base of superconductor structure was obtained for the present. Moreover same experimental results can not be described in the limits of the quantum formalism.

  13. Study of Charm Baryons with the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Brian Aa.

    2006-10-24

    The authors report on several studies of charm baryon production and decays by the BABAR collaboration. They confirm previous observations of the {Xi}'{sub c}{sup 0/+}, {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup +} baryons, measure branching ratios for Cabibbo-suppressed {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} decays and use baryon decays to study the properties of the light-quark baryons, {Omega}{sup -} and {Xi}(1690){sup 0}.

  14. Charmed Meson Production in 800 GEV Proton-Proton Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Mark Frederick

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x_ {F} >=q 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies sqrt{s} <=q 27 GeV and sqrt {s} >=q 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of sqrt{s} . The result of our experiment, sigma (D/| D) = 42.7 +/- 7.8 mub at sqrt{s} = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d^2sigma/dx_{F}dp _sp{|}{2} ~ (1 - | x_{F }|)^{n}e^{-bp _sp{|}{2}} gives the results n = 8.4_sp {-1.9}{+2.2}, b = 0.78_sp{-0.16}{+0.19} (GeV/c)^{-2}, and < pbot > = 1.1_sp{-0.1}{+0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and < pbot > being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions. Lastly, analysis has shown that sigma(D ^*^+/-)/sigma(D^0) is governed primarily by spin statistics, displaying no energy dependence. The resulting cross section for D^*^+/- production is sigma(D^*^+/-) = 13.31 +/- 5.74 mub.

  15. Recent results from Fermilab E687 on charm spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, P.

    1997-07-01

    Recent analyses of charm spectroscopy from Fermilab fixed target experiment 687 are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenology of Cabibbo suppression in the meson sector. Such transitions have been observed in the semileptonic modes and hadronic modes. While the former transitions give us an opportunity to observe the weak current and the CKM matrix, a systematic comparison of the latter transitions allow us to study strong interaction effects, and possibly, light quark spectroscopy.

  16. Light Higgs boson decaying to four charm quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bellazzini, Brando; Csaki, Csaba; Falkowski, Adam; Weiler, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    We present a simple supersymmetric model where the dominant decay mode of the lightest Higgs boson is h{yields}2{eta}{yields}4c, where {eta} is a light pseudoscalar and c is the charm quark. For such decays the Higgs mass can be smaller than 100 GeV without conflict with experiment. Together with the fact that both the Higgs and the pseudoscalar {eta} are pseudo-Goldstone bosons, this resolves the little hierarchy problem.

  17. Recent charm mixing results from BABAR, Belle, and CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.J.; /Iowa U. /SLAC

    2009-02-02

    A summary of the results of several recent studies of charm mixing is presented. A number of different methods were used, including the measurement of lifetime ratios for final states of different CP, time dependence of wrong-sign hadronic decays, fits to time-dependent Dalitz plots, and searches for wrong-sign semi-leptonic decays. Taken together, they suggest mixing is of order 1%. The status of searches for indirect CP violation is also reported.

  18. On charm and beauty decays: A theorist's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1987-10-01

    The present understanding of charm and bottom decays is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on discussing the theoretical uncertainties in view of the particularly rich harvest of new data from the last year. A semi-quantitative description of D decays has emerged enabling us to address rather detailed and relatively subtle questions there, like on once and twice Cabibbo suppressed decays. Beauty physics having left its infancy is now in its adolescence; its future development towards maturity is analyzed.

  19. Solving the "Hidden Line" Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    David Hedgley Jr., a mathematician at Dryden Flight Research Center, has developed an accurate computer program that considers whether a line in a graphic model of a three dimensional object should or should not be visible. The Hidden Line Computer Code, program automatically removes superfluous lines and permits the computer to display an object from specific viewpoints, just as the human eye would see it. Users include Rowland Institute for Science in Cambridge, MA, several departments of Lockheed Georgia Co., and Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD).

  20. Penguin diagrams, charmless B decays, and the ``missing charm puzzle''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Alexander; Nierste, Ulrich; Ostermaier, Gaby

    1997-12-01

    We calculate the contributions of penguin diagrams with internal u or c quarks to various inclusive charmless B-decay rates. Further we analyze the influence of the chromomagnetic dipole operator Q8 on these rates. We find that the rates corresponding to B¯-->Xuūs, B¯-->Xdd¯s, B¯-->Xss¯s, B¯-->Xss¯d, and B¯-->Xdd¯d are dominated by the new penguin contributions. The contributions of Q8 sizably diminish these rates. Despite an increase of the total charmless decay rate by 36%, the new contributions are not large enough to explain the charm deficit observed by ARGUS and CLEO. We predict nc=1.33+/-0.06 for the average number of charmed particles per B decay in the standard model. Then the hypothesis of an enhancement of the chromomagnetic dipole coefficient C8 by new physics contributions is analyzed. We perform a model-independent fit of C8 to the experimental data. If the CKM structure of the new physics contribution is the same as in the standard model, \\|C8(MW)\\| must be enhanced by a factor of 9 to 16 in order to explain the observed charm deficit.

  1. Hadronic decays of beauty and charm from CLEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge L.

    1999-02-01

    A selection of recent results on hadronic charm and beauty decays from the CLEO experiment are presented. We report preliminary evidence for the existence of final state interactions in B decays and the first observation of the decay B0→D*+D*- with a branching fraction of (7.8-3.8+5.4±1.5)×10-4. We also present preliminary results on the first observation of the broad, JP=1+, charmed meson resonance with a mass of mD1(j=1/2)0=2.461-0.34+0.41±0.010±0.032 GeV and a width of Γ=290-79+101±26±36 MeV and branching fraction measurements of the B-→DJ0π-1 decay. Finally, we report on our search for the radial excitation of a spin 1 charmed meson, the D*'1, and on an improved measurement of the ratio of decay rates Γ(D0→K+π-)/Γ(D0→K-π+).

  2. B, Lambda{sub b} and charm results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    F. Azfar

    2003-09-18

    Recent results on B{sub d}, B{sub u}{sup {+-}}, B{sub s}, {Lambda}{sub b} and Charm hadrons are reported from {approx} 75 pb{sup -1} and {approx} 40 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated at the upgraded CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}-p collider, during Run-II. These include lifetime and mass measurements of B and Charm hadrons, searches for rare decays in charm and B hadrons and CP-violation in Charm decays. Results relevant to CP-violation in B-decays are also reported.

  3. Generalized single-hidden layer feedforward networks for regression problems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Er, Meng Joo; Han, Min

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, traditional single-hidden layer feedforward network (SLFN) is extended to novel generalized SLFN (GSLFN) by employing polynomial functions of inputs as output weights connecting randomly generated hidden units with corresponding output nodes. The significant contributions of this paper are as follows: 1) a primal GSLFN (P-GSLFN) is implemented using randomly generated hidden nodes and polynomial output weights whereby the regression matrix is augmented by full or partial input variables and only polynomial coefficients are to be estimated; 2) a simplified GSLFN (S-GSLFN) is realized by decomposing the polynomial output weights of the P-GSLFN into randomly generated polynomial nodes and tunable output weights; 3) both P- and S-GSLFN are able to achieve universal approximation if the output weights are tuned by ridge regression estimators; and 4) by virtue of the developed batch and online sequential ridge ELM (BR-ELM and OSR-ELM) learning algorithms, high performance of the proposed GSLFNs in terms of generalization and learning speed is guaranteed. Comprehensive simulation studies and comparisons with standard SLFNs are carried out on real-world regression benchmark data sets. Simulation results demonstrate that the innovative GSLFNs using BR-ELM and OSR-ELM are superior to standard SLFNs in terms of accuracy, training speed, and structure compactness.

  4. Universal approximation of extreme learning machine with adaptive growth of hidden nodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Lan, Yuan; Huang, Guang-Bin; Xu, Zong-Ben

    2012-02-01

    Extreme learning machines (ELMs) have been proposed for generalized single-hidden-layer feedforward networks which need not be neuron-like and perform well in both regression and classification applications. In this brief, we propose an ELM with adaptive growth of hidden nodes (AG-ELM), which provides a new approach for the automated design of networks. Different from other incremental ELMs (I-ELMs) whose existing hidden nodes are frozen when the new hidden nodes are added one by one, in AG-ELM the number of hidden nodes is determined in an adaptive way in the sense that the existing networks may be replaced by newly generated networks which have fewer hidden nodes and better generalization performance. We then prove that such an AG-ELM using Lebesgue p-integrable hidden activation functions can approximate any Lebesgue p-integrable function on a compact input set. Simulation results demonstrate and verify that this new approach can achieve a more compact network architecture than the I-ELM.

  5. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavour, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) symmetry for orbital angular momenta. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6)ⓍO(3) symmetry.

  6. Hidden scale invariance of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Felix; Kresse, Georg; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Pedersen, Ulf R.

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 58 liquid elements at their triple point show that most metals exhibit near proportionality between the thermal fluctuations of the virial and the potential energy in the isochoric ensemble. This demonstrates a general "hidden" scale invariance of metals making the condensed part of the thermodynamic phase diagram effectively one dimensional with respect to structure and dynamics. DFT computed density scaling exponents, related to the Grüneisen parameter, are in good agreement with experimental values for the 16 elements where reliable data were available. Hidden scale invariance is demonstrated in detail for magnesium by showing invariance of structure and dynamics. Computed melting curves of period three metals follow curves with invariance (isomorphs). The experimental structure factor of magnesium is predicted by assuming scale invariant inverse power-law (IPL) pair interactions. However, crystal packings of several transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, and Hg), most post-transition metals (Ga, In, Sn, and Tl), and the metalloids Si and Ge cannot be explained by the IPL assumption. The virial-energy correlation coefficients of iron and phosphorous are shown to increase at elevated pressures. Finally, we discuss how scale invariance explains the Grüneisen equation of state and a number of well-known empirical melting and freezing rules.

  7. Dissolved gas - the hidden saboteur

    SciTech Connect

    Magorien, V.G.

    1993-12-31

    Almost all hydraulic power components, to properly perform their tasks, rely on one basic, physical property, i.e., the incompressibility of the working fluid. Unfortunately, a frequently overlooked fluid property which frustrates this requirement is its ability to absorb, i.e., dissolve, store and give off gas. The gas is, most often but not always, air. This property is a complex one because it is a function not only of the fluid`s chemical make-up but temperature, pressure, exposed area, depth and time. In its relationshiop to aircraft landing-gear, where energy is absorbed hydraulically, this multi-faceted fluid property can be detrimental in two ways: dynamically, i.e., loss of energy absorption ability and statically, i.e., improper aircraft attitude on the ground. The pupose of this paper is to bring an awareness to this property by presenting: (1) examples of these manifestations with some empirical and practical solutions to them, (2) illustrations of this normally `hidden saboteur` at work, (3) Henry`s Dissolved Gas Law, (4) room-temperature, saturated values of dissolved gas for a number of different working fluids, (5) a description of the instrument used to obtain them, (6) some `missing elements` of the Dissolved Gas Law pertaining to absoption, (7) how static and dynamic conditions effect gas absorption and (8) some recommended solutions to prevent becoming a victim of this `hidden saboteur`

  8. Hidden Variable Theories and Quantum Nonlocality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We clarify the meaning of Bell's theorem and its implications for the construction of hidden variable theories by considering an example system consisting of two entangled spin-1/2 particles. Using this example, we present a simplified version of Bell's theorem and describe several hidden variable theories that agree with the predictions of…

  9. Building Simple Hidden Markov Models. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Wai-Ki; Ng, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are widely used in bioinformatics, speech recognition and many other areas. This note presents HMMs via the framework of classical Markov chain models. A simple example is given to illustrate the model. An estimation method for the transition probabilities of the hidden states is also discussed.

  10. Heating up the Galaxy with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Hernández-Chifflet, Guzmán

    2015-12-29

    We elaborate on the dynamics of ionized interstellar medium in the presence of hidden photon dark matter. Our main focus is the ultra-light regime, where the hidden photon mass is smaller than the plasma frequency in the Milky Way. We point out that as a result of the Galactic plasma shielding direct detection of ultra-light photons in this mass range is especially challenging. However, we demonstrate that ultra-light hidden photon dark matter provides a powerful heating source for the ionized interstellar medium. This results in a strong bound on the kinetic mixing between hidden and regular photons all the way down to the hidden photon masses of order 10{sup −20} eV.

  11. Heating up the Galaxy with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Hernández-Chifflet, Guzmán E-mail: ghc236@nyu.edu

    2015-12-01

    We elaborate on the dynamics of ionized interstellar medium in the presence of hidden photon dark matter. Our main focus is the ultra-light regime, where the hidden photon mass is smaller than the plasma frequency in the Milky Way. We point out that as a result of the Galactic plasma shielding direct detection of ultra-light photons in this mass range is especially challenging. However, we demonstrate that ultra-light hidden photon dark matter provides a powerful heating source for the ionized interstellar medium. This results in a strong bound on the kinetic mixing between hidden and regular photons all the way down to the hidden photon masses of order 10{sup −20} eV.

  12. Stochastic thermodynamics of hidden pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Parrondo, Juan M. R.

    2015-05-01

    We show that a reversible pumping mechanism operating between two states of a kinetic network can give rise to Poisson transitions between these two states. An external observer, for whom the pumping mechanism is not accessible, will observe a Markov chain satisfying local detailed balance with an emerging effective force induced by the hidden pump. Due to the reversibility of the pump, the actual entropy production turns out to be lower than the coarse-grained entropy production estimated from the flows and affinities of the resulting Markov chain. Moreover, in presence of a large time scale separation between the fast-pumping dynamics and the slow-network dynamics, a finite current with zero dissipation may be produced. We make use of these general results to build a synthetase-like kinetic scheme able to reversibly produce high free-energy molecules at a finite rate and a rotatory motor achieving 100% efficiency at finite speed.

  13. Stochastic thermodynamics of hidden pumps.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Parrondo, Juan M R

    2015-05-01

    We show that a reversible pumping mechanism operating between two states of a kinetic network can give rise to Poisson transitions between these two states. An external observer, for whom the pumping mechanism is not accessible, will observe a Markov chain satisfying local detailed balance with an emerging effective force induced by the hidden pump. Due to the reversibility of the pump, the actual entropy production turns out to be lower than the coarse-grained entropy production estimated from the flows and affinities of the resulting Markov chain. Moreover, in presence of a large time scale separation between the fast-pumping dynamics and the slow-network dynamics, a finite current with zero dissipation may be produced. We make use of these general results to build a synthetase-like kinetic scheme able to reversibly produce high free-energy molecules at a finite rate and a rotatory motor achieving 100% efficiency at finite speed. PMID:26066126

  14. A tau -- charm -- factory at Argonne. Preliminary assessment of the physics case and the Argonne Site

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Fields, T.; Grosnick, D.; Norem, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P.

    1994-02-02

    Depending on the beam energy setting, the {tau} -- charm -- factory will be optimized to study physics with {tau} leptons, with charmed mesons, or with charmonium states. This report gives a short overview of the physics of these topics. Also discussed are the detectors and the costs associated with this project.

  15. FAIR: a Horizon for Future Charming Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ritman, James

    2007-11-07

    The science goals underlying the future international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research--FAIR--[1] that is being realized in Darmstadt span a broad range of research activities on the structure of matter. One component of this facility is directed towards studies of hadronic matter at the sub-nuclear level with beams of antiprotons. These studies focus on two key aspects: confinement of quarks and the generation of the hadron masses. These goals will be pursued by performing precision measurements of charged and neutral decay products from antiproton-proton annihilation in the charmonium mass region. In this talk I present some of the issues connected to FAIR in which the groups in Cracow and Juelich are extending and intensifying our cooperation.

  16. Variational Infinite Hidden Conditional Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Bousmalis, Konstantinos; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Pantic, Maja; Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-09-01

    Hidden conditional random fields (HCRFs) are discriminative latent variable models which have been shown to successfully learn the hidden structure of a given classification problem. An Infinite hidden conditional random field is a hidden conditional random field with a countably infinite number of hidden states, which rids us not only of the necessity to specify a priori a fixed number of hidden states available but also of the problem of overfitting. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling algorithms are often employed for inference in such models. However, convergence of such algorithms is rather difficult to verify, and as the complexity of the task at hand increases the computational cost of such algorithms often becomes prohibitive. These limitations can be overcome by variational techniques. In this paper, we present a generalized framework for infinite HCRF models, and a novel variational inference approach on a model based on coupled Dirichlet Process Mixtures, the HCRF-DPM. We show that the variational HCRF-DPM is able to converge to a correct number of represented hidden states, and performs as well as the best parametric HCRFs-chosen via cross-validation-for the difficult tasks of recognizing instances of agreement, disagreement, and pain in audiovisual sequences. PMID:26353136

  17. Feminine charm: an experimental analysis of its costs and benefits in negotiations.

    PubMed

    Kray, Laura J; Locke, Connson C; Van Zant, Alex B

    2012-10-01

    The authors examined feminine charm, an impression management technique available to women that combines friendliness with flirtation. They asked whether feminine charm resolves the impression management dilemma facing women who simultaneously pursue task (i.e., economic) and social goals in negotiations. They compared women's social and economic consequences after using feminine charm versus a neutral interaction style. They hypothesized that feminine charm would create positive impressions of its users, thus partially mitigating the social penalties women negotiators often incur. They also expected that the degree to which females were perceived as flirtatious (signaling a concern for self), rather than merely friendly (signaling a concern for other), would predict better economic deals for females. Hypotheses were supported across a correlational study and three experiments. Feminine charm has costs and benefits spanning economic and social measures. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:22821088

  18. Nonleptonic two-body decays of charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2011-10-01

    Nonleptonic decays of charmed mesons into two pseudoscalar mesons or one pseudoscalar meson and one vector meson are studied on the basis of a generalized factorization method considering the resonance effects in the pole model for the annihilation contributions. Large strong phases between different topological diagrams are considered in this work, simply taking the phase in the coefficients ai. We find that the annihilation-type contributions calculated in the pole model are large in both of the PP and PV modes, which make our numerical results agree with the experimental data better than those previous calculations.

  19. Open charm and beauty at ultrarelativistic heavy ion colliders.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Magdalena; Gyulassy, Miklos; Wicks, Simon

    2005-03-25

    Important goals of BNL RHIC and CERN LHC experiments with ion beams include the creation and study of new forms of matter, such as the quark gluon plasma. Heavy quark production and attenuation provide unique tomographic probes of that matter. We predict the suppression pattern of open charm and beauty in Au+Au collisions at RHIC and LHC energies based on the DGLV formalism of radiative energy loss. A cancellation between effects due to the sqrt[s] energy dependence of the high p(T) slope and heavy quark energy loss is predicted to lead to surprising similarity of heavy quark suppression at RHIC and LHC. PMID:15903848

  20. Spectroscopy of triply charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-10-14

    The spectrum of excitations of triply-charmed baryons is computed using lattice QCD including dynamical light quark fields. The spectrum obtained has baryonic states with well-defined total spin up to 7/2 and the low-lying states closely resemble the expectation from models with an SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. As a result, energy splittings between extracted states, including those due to spin-orbit coupling in the heavy quark limit are computed and compared against data at other quark masses.

  1. A classification of hidden-variable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburger, Adam; Yanofsky, Noson

    2008-10-01

    Hidden variables are extra components added to try to banish counterintuitive features of quantum mechanics. We start with a quantum-mechanical model and describe various properties that can be asked of a hidden-variable model. We present six such properties and a Venn diagram of how they are related. With two existence theorems and three no-go theorems (EPR, Bell and Kochen-Specker), we show which properties of empirically equivalent hidden-variable models are possible and which are not. Formally, our treatment relies only on classical probability models, and physical phenomena are used only to motivate which models to choose.

  2. Spatiotemporal pattern recognition using hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Kenneth H.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Welsh, Byron M.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1993-10-01

    A spatio-temporal method for identifying objects contained in an image sequence is presented. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM) technique is used as the classification algorithm, making classification decisions based on a spatio-temporal sequence of observed object features. A five class problem is considered. Classification accuracies of 100% and 99.7% are obtained for sequences of images generated over two separate regions of viewing positions. HMMs trained on image sequences of the objects moving in opposite directions showed a 98.1% successful classification rate by class and direction of movement. The HMM technique proved robust to image corruption with additive correlated noise and had a higher accuracy than a single look nearest neighbor method. A real image sequence of one of the objects used was successfully recognized with the HMMs trained on synthetic data. This study shows the temporal changes that observed feature vectors undergo due to object motion hold information that can yield superior classification accuracy when compared to single frame techniques.

  3. Hidden Staphylococcus aureus Carriage: Overrated or Underappreciated?

    PubMed

    van Belkum, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent companion bacterial species in one-third of humankind. Reservoirs include the nasal and nasopharyngeal cavities, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Despite earlier claims that colonization of individuals is caused by clonal organisms, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revealed that resident type heterogeneity is not exceptional. Carriage, whether overt or hidden, is correlated with a risk of autoinfection. In a recent article in mBio, it was shown that, based on staphylococcal genome sequencing, low-level GI persistence may cause long-term nosocomial outbreaks [L. Senn et al., 7(1):e02039-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.02039-15]. Institutional endemicity with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) sequence type 228 (ST228) is shown to originate not from high-level nasal carriage or poor compliance with infection control practice but from low-grade asymptomatic GI colonization. This shows the power of NGS in elucidating staphylococcal epidemiology and, even more important, demonstrates that (drug-resistant) microorganisms may possess stealthy means of persistence. Identifying these persistence mechanisms is key to successful infection control. PMID:26884429

  4. Stochastic motif extraction using hidden Markov model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yukiko; Asogawa, Minoru; Konagaya, Akihiko

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we study the application of an HMM (hidden Markov model) to the problem of representing protein sequences by a stochastic motif. A stochastic protein motif represents the small segments of protein sequences that have a certain function or structure. The stochastic motif, represented by an HMM, has conditional probabilities to deal with the stochastic nature of the motif. This HMM directive reflects the characteristics of the motif, such as a protein periodical structure or grouping. In order to obtain the optimal HMM, we developed the {open_quotes}iterative duplication method{close_quotes} for HMM topology learning. It starts from a small fully-connected network and iterates the network generation and parameter optimization until it achieves sufficient discrimination accuracy. Using this method, we obtained an HMM for a leucine zipper motif. Compared to the accuracy of a symbolic pattern representation with accuracy of 14.8 percent, an HMM achieved 79.3 percent in prediction. Additionally, the method can obtain an HMM for various types of zinc finger motifs, and it might separate the mixed data. We demonstrated that this approach is applicable to the validation of the protein databases; a constructed HMM b as indicated that one protein sequence annotated as {open_quotes}lencine-zipper like sequence{close_quotes} in the database is quite different from other leucine-zipper sequences in terms of likelihood, and we found this discrimination is plausible.

  5. A Statistical Analysis of Langmuir Wave-Electron Correlations Observed by the CHARM II Auroral Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Kaeppler, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Langmuir-mode electron plasma waves are frequently observed by spacecraft in active plasma environments such as the ionosphere. Ionospheric Langmuir waves may be excited by the bump-on-tail instability generated by impinging beams of electrons traveling parallel to the background magnetic field (B). The Correlation of High-frequencies and Auroral Roar Measurement (CHARM II) sounding rocket was launched into a substorm at 9:49 UT on 17 February 2010, from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. The primary instruments included the University of Iowa Wave-Particle Correlator (WPC), the Dartmouth High-Frequency Experiment (HFE), several charged particle detectors, low-frequency wave instruments, and a magnetometer. The HFE is a receiver system which effectively yields continuous (100% duty cycle) electric-field waveform measurements from 100 kHz to 5 MHz, and which had its detection axis aligned nominally parallel to B. The HFE output was fed on-payload to the WPC, which uses a phase-locked loop to track the incoming wave frequency with the most power, then sorting incoming electrons at eight energy levels into sixteen wave-phase bins. CHARM II encountered several regions of strong Langmuir wave activity throughout its 15-minute flight, and the WPC showed wave-lock and statistically significant particle correlation distributions during several time periods. We show results of an in-depth analysis of the CHARM II WPC data for the entire flight, including statistical analysis of correlations which show evidence of direct interaction with the Langmuir waves, indicating (at various times) trapping of particles and both driving and damping of Langmuir waves by particles. In particular, the sign of the gradient in particle flux appears to correlate with the phase relation between the electrons and the wave field, with possible implications for the wave physics.

  6. Searches for Rare or Forbidden Semileptonic Charm Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2011-08-15

    We present searches for rare or forbidden charm decays of the form X{sub c}{sup +} {yields} h{sup {+-}}{ell}{sup {-+}}{ell}{sup ({prime})+}, where X{sub c}{sup +} is a charm hardron (D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, or {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}), h{sup {+-}} is a pion, kaon, or proton, and {ell}{sup ({prime}){+-}} is an electron or muon. The analysis is based on 384 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected at or close to the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. No significant signal is observed for any of the 35 decay modes that are investigated. We establish 90% confidence-level upper limits on the branching fractions between 1 x 10{sup -6} and 44 x 10{sup -6} depending on the channel. In most cases, these results represent either the first limits or significant improvements on existing limits for the decay modes studied.

  7. Charmed tetraquarks Tcc and Tcs from dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi; Charron, Bruno; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Charmed tetraquarks Tcc=(ccubardbar) and Tcs=(csubardbar) are studied through the S-wave meson-meson interactions, D-D, Kbar-D, D-D* and Kbar-D*, on the basis of the (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD simulations with the pion mass mπ≃410, 570 and 700 MeV. For the charm quark, the relativistic heavy quark action is employed to treat its dynamics on the lattice. Using the HAL QCD method, we extract the S-wave potentials in lattice QCD simulations, from which the meson-meson scattering phase shifts are calculated. The phase shifts in the isospin triplet (I=1) channels indicate repulsive interactions, while those in the I=0 channels suggest attraction, growing as mπ decreases. This is particularly prominent in the Tcc (JP=1+,I=0) channel, though neither bound state nor resonance are found in the range mπ=410-700 MeV. We make a qualitative comparison of our results with the phenomenological diquark picture.

  8. The Experimental Discovery of Double-Charm Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelfried, Jürgen; Selex Collaboration

    2005-04-01

    In 2002, the SELEX [The SELEX (Fermilab E781) Collaboration: Ball State University, Bogazici University, Carnegie-Mellon University, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Fermilab, Institute For High Energy Physics (Protvino), Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing), Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow), Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Tel Aviv University, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, University of Iowa, University of Michigan-Flint, University of Rochester, University of Rome La Sapienza and INFN, University of São Paulo, University of Trieste and INFN. http://www-selex.fnal.gov] Experiment (Fermilab E781) reported the first observation of a member of the family of doubly charmed baryons [SELEX Collaboration, M. Mattson et al.: First observation of the doubly charmed baryonΞcc+. Phys. Rev. Letters 89 (2002) 112001, [ arXiv:hep-ex/0208014

  9. Hints for Enhanced b -> sg From Charm and Kaon Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Rathsman, Johan

    2003-05-09

    Previously, motivation for enhanced b {yields} sg from new flavor physics has centered on discrepancies between theory and experiment. Here two experimental hints are considered: (1) updated measurements of the charm multiplicity and {Beta}({bar B} {yields} X{sub c{bar c}s}) at the {Upsilon}(4S) imply {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub no charm}) {approx} 12.4 {+-} 5.6%, (2) the {bar B} {yields} K{sup -}X and {bar B} {yields} K{sup +}/K{sup -}X branching fractions are in excess of conventional {bar B} {yields} X{sub c} {yields} KX yields by about 16.9 {+-} 5.6% and 18 {+-} 5.3%, respectively. JETSET 7.4 was used to estimate kaon yields from s{bar s} popping in {bar B} {yields} X{sub c{bar u}d} decays. JETSET 7.4 Monte Carlos for {Beta}({bar B} {yields} X{sub sg}) {approx} 15% imply that the additional kaon production would lead to 1{sigma} agreement with observed charged and neutral kaon yields. The K{sub s} momentum spectrum would be consistent with recent CLEO bounds in the end point region. Search strategies for enhanced b {yields} sg are discussed in light of large theoretical uncertainty in the standard model fast kaon background from b {yields} s penguin operators.

  10. Fibroid Tumors in Women: A Hidden Epidemic?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Fibroid Tumors in Women: A Hidden Epidemic? Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... turn Javascript on. Dr. Cynthia Morton is seeking women who have fibroid tumors for a "sister study" ...

  11. A Chaotic System with Different Families of Hidden Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Thanh; Volos, Christos; Jafari, Sajad; Vaidyanathan, Sundarapandian; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Wang, Xiong

    The presence of hidden attractors in dynamical systems has received considerable attention recently both in theory and applications. A novel three-dimensional autonomous chaotic system with hidden attractors is introduced in this paper. It is exciting that this chaotic system can exhibit two different families of hidden attractors: hidden attractors with an infinite number of equilibrium points and hidden attractors without equilibrium. Dynamical behaviors of such system are discovered through mathematical analysis, numerical simulations and circuit implementation.

  12. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  13. AIRWAY LABELING USING A HIDDEN MARKOV TREE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Ross, James C.; Díaz, Alejandro A.; Okajima, Yuka; Wassermann, Demian; Washko, George R.; Dy, Jennifer; San José Estépar, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel airway labeling algorithm based on a Hidden Markov Tree Model (HMTM). We obtain a collection of discrete points along the segmented airway tree using particles sampling [1] and establish topology using Kruskal’s minimum spanning tree algorithm. Following this, our HMTM algorithm probabilistically assigns labels to each point. While alternative methods label airway branches out to the segmental level, we describe a general method and demonstrate its performance out to the subsubsegmental level (two generations further than previously published approaches). We present results on a collection of 25 computed tomography (CT) datasets taken from a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) study. PMID:25436039

  14. New hidden beauty molecules predicted by the local hidden gauge approach and heavy quark spin symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C. W.; Ozpineci, A.; Oset, E.

    2015-10-01

    Using a coupled channel unitary approach, combining the heavy quark spin symmetry and the dynamics of the local hidden gauge, we investigate the meson-meson interaction with hidden beauty. We obtain several new states of isospin I = 0: six bound states, and weakly bound six more possible states which depend on the influence of the coupled channel effects.

  15. Detection and characterization of regulatory elements using probabilistic conditional random field and hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-04-01

    By altering the electrostatic charge of histones or providing binding sites to protein recognition molecules, Chromatin marks have been proposed to regulate gene expression, a property that has motivated researchers to link these marks to cis-regulatory elements. With the help of next generation sequencing technologies, we can now correlate one specific chromatin mark with regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers or promoters) and also build tools, such as hidden Markov models, to gain insight into mark combinations. However, hidden Markov models have limitation for their character of generative models and assume that a current observation depends only on a current hidden state in the chain. Here, we employed two graphical probabilistic models, namely the linear conditional random field model and multivariate hidden Markov model, to mark gene regions with different states based on recurrent and spatially coherent character of these eight marks. Both models revealed chromatin states that may correspond to enhancers and promoters, transcribed regions, transcriptional elongation, and low-signal regions. We also found that the linear conditional random field model was more effective than the hidden Markov model in recognizing regulatory elements, such as promoter-, enhancer-, and transcriptional elongation-associated regions, which gives us a better choice.

  16. Detection and characterization of regulatory elements using probabilistic conditional random field and hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-04-01

    By altering the electrostatic charge of histones or providing binding sites to protein recognition molecules, Chromatin marks have been proposed to regulate gene expression, a property that has motivated researchers to link these marks to cis-regulatory elements. With the help of next generation sequencing technologies, we can now correlate one specific chromatin mark with regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers or promoters) and also build tools, such as hidden Markov models, to gain insight into mark combinations. However, hidden Markov models have limitation for their character of generative models and assume that a current observation depends only on a current hidden state in the chain. Here, we employed two graphical probabilistic models, namely the linear conditional random field model and multivariate hidden Markov model, to mark gene regions with different states based on recurrent and spatially coherent character of these eight marks. Both models revealed chromatin states that may correspond to enhancers and promoters, transcribed regions, transcriptional elongation, and low-signal regions. We also found that the linear conditional random field model was more effective than the hidden Markov model in recognizing regulatory elements, such as promoter-, enhancer-, and transcriptional elongation-associated regions, which gives us a better choice. PMID:23237214

  17. Complex Sequencing Rules of Birdsong Can be Explained by Simple Hidden Markov Processes

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, Kentaro; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Complex sequencing rules observed in birdsongs provide an opportunity to investigate the neural mechanism for generating complex sequential behaviors. To relate the findings from studying birdsongs to other sequential behaviors such as human speech and musical performance, it is crucial to characterize the statistical properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs. However, the properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs have not yet been fully addressed. In this study, we investigate the statistical properties of the complex birdsong of the Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Based on manual-annotated syllable labeles, we first show that there are significant higher-order context dependencies in Bengalese finch songs, that is, which syllable appears next depends on more than one previous syllable. We then analyze acoustic features of the song and show that higher-order context dependencies can be explained using first-order hidden state transition dynamics with redundant hidden states. This model corresponds to hidden Markov models (HMMs), well known statistical models with a large range of application for time series modeling. The song annotation with these models with first-order hidden state dynamics agreed well with manual annotation, the score was comparable to that of a second-order HMM, and surpassed the zeroth-order model (the Gaussian mixture model; GMM), which does not use context information. Our results imply that the hierarchical representation with hidden state dynamics may underlie the neural implementation for generating complex behavioral sequences with higher-order dependencies. PMID:21915345

  18. Complex sequencing rules of birdsong can be explained by simple hidden Markov processes.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Kentaro; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Complex sequencing rules observed in birdsongs provide an opportunity to investigate the neural mechanism for generating complex sequential behaviors. To relate the findings from studying birdsongs to other sequential behaviors such as human speech and musical performance, it is crucial to characterize the statistical properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs. However, the properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs have not yet been fully addressed. In this study, we investigate the statistical properties of the complex birdsong of the Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Based on manual-annotated syllable labeles, we first show that there are significant higher-order context dependencies in Bengalese finch songs, that is, which syllable appears next depends on more than one previous syllable. We then analyze acoustic features of the song and show that higher-order context dependencies can be explained using first-order hidden state transition dynamics with redundant hidden states. This model corresponds to hidden Markov models (HMMs), well known statistical models with a large range of application for time series modeling. The song annotation with these models with first-order hidden state dynamics agreed well with manual annotation, the score was comparable to that of a second-order HMM, and surpassed the zeroth-order model (the Gaussian mixture model; GMM), which does not use context information. Our results imply that the hierarchical representation with hidden state dynamics may underlie the neural implementation for generating complex behavioral sequences with higher-order dependencies.

  19. Complex sequencing rules of birdsong can be explained by simple hidden Markov processes.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Kentaro; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Complex sequencing rules observed in birdsongs provide an opportunity to investigate the neural mechanism for generating complex sequential behaviors. To relate the findings from studying birdsongs to other sequential behaviors such as human speech and musical performance, it is crucial to characterize the statistical properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs. However, the properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs have not yet been fully addressed. In this study, we investigate the statistical properties of the complex birdsong of the Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Based on manual-annotated syllable labeles, we first show that there are significant higher-order context dependencies in Bengalese finch songs, that is, which syllable appears next depends on more than one previous syllable. We then analyze acoustic features of the song and show that higher-order context dependencies can be explained using first-order hidden state transition dynamics with redundant hidden states. This model corresponds to hidden Markov models (HMMs), well known statistical models with a large range of application for time series modeling. The song annotation with these models with first-order hidden state dynamics agreed well with manual annotation, the score was comparable to that of a second-order HMM, and surpassed the zeroth-order model (the Gaussian mixture model; GMM), which does not use context information. Our results imply that the hierarchical representation with hidden state dynamics may underlie the neural implementation for generating complex behavioral sequences with higher-order dependencies. PMID:21915345

  20. Probing hidden sector photons through the Higgs window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Markus; Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the possibility that a (light) hidden sector extra photon receives its mass via spontaneous symmetry breaking of a hidden sector Higgs boson, the so-called hidden-Higgs. The hidden-photon can mix with the ordinary photon via a gauge kinetic mixing term. The hidden-Higgs can couple to the standard model Higgs via a renormalizable quartic term—sometimes called the Higgs portal. We discuss the implications of this light hidden-Higgs in the context of laser polarization and light-shining-through-the-wall experiments as well as cosmological, astrophysical, and non-Newtonian force measurements. For hidden-photons receiving their mass from a hidden-Higgs, we find in the small mass regime significantly stronger bounds than the bounds on massive hidden sector photons alone.

  1. Identification of beauty and charm quark jets at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Identification of jets originating from beauty and charm quarks is important for measuring Standard Model processes and for searching for new physics. The performance of algorithms developed to select b- and c-quark jets is measured using data recorded by LHCb from proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV in 2011 and at √s = 8 TeV in 2012. The efficiency for identifying a b(c) jet is about 65%(25%) with a probability for misidentifying a light-parton jet of 0.3% for jets with transverse momentum pT > 20GeV and pseudorapidity 2.2 < η < 4.2. The dependence of the performance on the pT and η of the jet is also measured.

  2. Identifying hidden voice and video streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jieyan; Wu, Dapeng; Nucci, Antonio; Keralapura, Ram; Gao, Lixin

    2009-04-01

    Given the rising popularity of voice and video services over the Internet, accurately identifying voice and video traffic that traverse their networks has become a critical task for Internet service providers (ISPs). As the number of proprietary applications that deliver voice and video services to end users increases over time, the search for the one methodology that can accurately detect such services while being application independent still remains open. This problem becomes even more complicated when voice and video service providers like Skype, Microsoft, and Google bundle their voice and video services with other services like file transfer and chat. For example, a bundled Skype session can contain both voice stream and file transfer stream in the same layer-3/layer-4 flow. In this context, traditional techniques to identify voice and video streams do not work. In this paper, we propose a novel self-learning classifier, called VVS-I , that detects the presence of voice and video streams in flows with minimum manual intervention. Our classifier works in two phases: training phase and detection phase. In the training phase, VVS-I first extracts the relevant features, and subsequently constructs a fingerprint of a flow using the power spectral density (PSD) analysis. In the detection phase, it compares the fingerprint of a flow to the existing fingerprints learned during the training phase, and subsequently classifies the flow. Our classifier is not only capable of detecting voice and video streams that are hidden in different flows, but is also capable of detecting different applications (like Skype, MSN, etc.) that generate these voice/video streams. We show that our classifier can achieve close to 100% detection rate while keeping the false positive rate to less that 1%.

  3. Status of the Tau-Charm Factory Project and aspects of the detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Tau-Charm Factory Project being proposed for construction in Spain. The paper also reviews characteristics of the detector design, and the issues surrounding the present choices of technologies.

  4. Measurement of the Gluon Polarization {delta}g/g from Open Charm at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunne, Fabienne

    2009-08-04

    We have measured the gluon polarization in the nucleon by detecting charm production via D{sup 0} meson decay to charged K and {pi} in polarized muon scattering off a longitudinally polarized deuteron target. The dominant process for charm production is the photon gluon fusion into a charm anti-charm quark pair. By using all deuteron statistics from COMPASS accumulated between 2002 and 2006, we extract double spin asymmetries in bins of the transverse momentum and the energy of the D{sup 0} meson and we perform a leading order analysis of the data to extract the gluon polarization <{delta}g/g> = -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst) at a Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) scale {mu}{sup 2} = 13 GeV{sup 2} and at a gluon momentum fraction = 0.11.

  5. CHARM: A CubeSat Water Vapor Radiometer for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Boon; Mauro, David; DeRosee, Rodolphe; Sorgenfrei, Matthew; Vance, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Ames Research Center (ARC) are partnering in the CubeSat Hydrometric Atmospheric Radiometer Mission (CHARM), a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform, selected for implementation under NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE-3). CHARM will measure 4 channels at 183 GHz water vapor line, subsets of measurements currently performed by larger and more costly spacecraft (e.g. ATMS, AMSU-B and SSMI/S). While flying a payload that supports SMD science objectives, CHARM provides a hands-on opportunity to develop technical, leadership, and project skills. CHARM will furthermore advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and the CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7.

  6. Conference summary: 6th International conference on hyperons, charm, and beauty hadrons (BEACH04)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Joel N.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm, and Beauty Hadrons (BEACH04) treated us to a wonderful array of new results. Here the author attempts to summarize the talks and discuss the conference highlights.

  7. Regarding the Charmed-Strange Member of the 23S1 Meson State

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xue-Chao; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    By employing the mass relations derived from the mass matrix and Regge trajectory, we investigate the masses of charmed and charmed-strange members of the 23S1 meson. The masses are compared with the values predicted by other theoretical approaches and experimental data. The results may be useful for the discovery of the unobserved meson and the determination of the quantum number of the newly discovered states. PMID:24250272

  8. Mixing and CP violation in the beauty and charm sectors at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López March, Neus

    2014-04-01

    The LHCb detector is a dedicated heavy flavour experiment operating at the Large Hadron Collider designed to pursue an extensive study of CP violation in the beauty and charm sectors. In the first part of this contribution, important milestones towards the measurement of CP violation in the beauty sector using B± and Bs0 decays are presented. In the second part, highlights of the searches of CP violation in the charm sector are reported.

  9. Black hole portal into hidden valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Gorbenko, Victor

    2011-05-15

    Superradiant instability turns rotating astrophysical black holes into unique probes of light axions. We consider what happens when a light axion is coupled to a strongly coupled hidden gauge sector. In this case superradiance results in an adiabatic increase of a hidden sector CP-violating {theta} parameter in a near horizon region. This may trigger a first order phase transition in the gauge sector. As a result a significant fraction of a black hole mass is released as a cloud of hidden mesons and can be later converted into electromagnetic radiation. This results in a violent electromagnetic burst. The characteristic frequency of such bursts may range from {approx}100 eV to {approx}100 MeV.

  10. Hidden Variables Theorems with Fewer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Jay

    A Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) contradiction may be thought of as a sequence of measurements on a system of N particles, for which each may be duplicated by local hidden variables up to, but not including the last of an irreducible set. Each measurement consists of N spatially separated local measurements on individual particles. Existing contradictions require more such measurements than there are particles, the minimum number being N + 1 . By allowing successive measurements to impose incremental local constraints on the hidden variables (as opposed to global constraints associated with products of hidden variables), we derive contradictions that require fewer measurements. We have found protocols for which the number of measurements, Nm, grows more slowly than linearly with the number of particles: Asymptotically, Nm √{ 2 N } for large N if the particles are qubits, and a similar relation holds for particles of higher spins.

  11. Hidden conformal symmetry and quasinormal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang

    2010-12-01

    We provide an algebraic way to calculate the quasinormal modes of a black hole, which possesses a hidden conformal symmetry. We construct an infinite tower of quasinormal modes from the highest-weight mode, in a simple and elegant way. For the scalar, the hidden conformal symmetry manifests itself in the fact that the scalar Laplacian could be rewritten in terms of the SL(2,R) quadratic Casimir. For the vector and the tensor, the hidden conformal symmetry acts on them through Lie derivatives. We show that for three-dimensional black holes, with an appropriate combination of the components, the radial equations of the vector and the tensor could be written in terms of the Lie-induced quadratic Casimir. This makes the algebraic construction of the quasinormal modes feasible. Our results are in good agreement with the previous study.

  12. Hidden treasures - 50 km points of interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lommi, Matias; Kortelainen, Jaana

    2015-04-01

    Tampere is third largest city in Finland and a regional centre. During 70's there occurred several communal mergers. Nowadays this local area has both strong and diversed identity - from wilderness and agricultural fields to high density city living. Outside the city center there are interesting geological points unknown for modern city settlers. There is even a local proverb, "Go abroad to Teisko!". That is the area the Hidden Treasures -student project is focused on. Our school Tammerkoski Upper Secondary School (or Gymnasium) has emphasis on visual arts. We are going to offer our art students scientific and artistic experiences and knowledge about the hidden treasures of Teisko area and involve the Teisko inhabitants into this project. Hidden treasures - Precambrian subduction zone and a volcanism belt with dense bed of gold (Au) and arsenic (As), operating goldmines and quarries of minerals and metamorphic slates. - North of subduction zone a homogenic precambrian magmastone area with quarries, products known as Kuru Grey. - Former ashores of post-glasial Lake Näsijärvi and it's sediments enabled the developing agriculture and sustained settlement. Nowadays these ashores have both scenery and biodiversity values. - Old cattle sheds and dairy buildings made of local granite stones related to cultural stonebuilding inheritance. - Local active community of Kapee, about 100 inhabitants. Students will discover information of these "hidden" phenomena, and rendering this information trough Enviromental Art Method. Final form of this project will be published in several artistic and informative geocaches. These caches are achieved by a GPS-based special Hidden Treasures Cycling Route and by a website guiding people to find these hidden points of interests.

  13. Results from the Solar Hidden Photon Search (SHIPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Matthias; Knabbe, Ernst-Axel; Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas; Schneide, Magnus; Susol, Jaroslaw; Wiedemann, Günter

    2015-08-07

    We present the results of a search for transversely polarised hidden photons (HPs) with ∼3 eV energies emitted from the Sun. These hypothetical particles, known also as paraphotons or dark sector photons, are theoretically well motivated for example by string theory inspired extensions of the Standard Model. Solar HPs of sub-eV mass can convert into photons of the same energy (photon ↔ HP oscillations are similar to neutrino flavour oscillations). At SHIPS this would take place inside a long light-tight high-vacuum tube, which tracks the Sun. The generated photons would then be focused into a low-noise photomultiplier at the far end of the tube. Our analysis of 330 h of data (and 330 h of background characterisation) reveals no signal of photons from solar hidden photon conversion. We estimate the rate of newly generated photons due to this conversion to be smaller than 25 mHz/m{sup 2} at the 95% C.L. Using this and a recent model of solar HP emission, we set stringent constraints on χ, the coupling constant between HPs and photons, as a function of the HP mass.

  14. Signatures of a hidden cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-09-26

    If there is a light Abelian gauge boson gamma' in the hidden sector its kinetic mixing with the photon can produce a hidden cosmic microwave background (HCMB). For meV masses, resonant oscillations gamma<-->gamma' happen after big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) but before CMB decoupling, increasing the effective number of neutrinos Nnu(eff) and the baryon to photon ratio, and distorting the CMB blackbody spectrum. The agreement between BBN and CMB data provides new constraints. However, including Lyman-alpha data, Nnu(eff) > 3 is preferred. It is tempting to attribute this effect to the HCMB. The interesting parameter range will be tested in upcoming laboratory experiments. PMID:18851438

  15. A fast hidden line algorithm with contour option. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thue, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The JonesD algorithm was modified to allow the processing of N-sided elements and implemented in conjunction with a 3-D contour generation algorithm. The total hidden line and contour subsystem is implemented in the MOVIE.BYU Display package, and is compared to the subsystems already existing in the MOVIE.BYU package. The comparison reveals that the modified JonesD hidden line and contour subsystem yields substantial processing time savings, when processing moderate sized models comprised of 1000 elements or less. There are, however, some limitations to the modified JonesD subsystem.

  16. Charmed meson physics accessible to an L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider operating near charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1989-06-01

    In this report, the potential for dedicated charmed D/sup 0/, D/sup +/ and D/sub s/ meson physics in a high-luminosity e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider operated near charm threshold is explored. The construction of such a high-luminosity collider or Tau-Charm Factory in conjunction with a new detector whose design draws heavily on the extensive operational experience of previous detectors at SPEAR, could achieve three orders-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity in most areas of charmed meson studies. 27 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Hidden solution to the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem in gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Tuhin S.; Schmaltz, Martin

    2008-05-01

    We propose a solution to the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem in gauge mediation. The novel feature of our solution is that it uses dynamics of the hidden sector, which is often present in models with dynamical supersymmetry breaking. We give an explicit example model of gauge mediation where a very simple messenger sector generates both {mu} and B{sub {mu}} at one loop. The usual problem, that B{sub {mu}} is then too large, is solved by strong renormalization effects from the hidden sector which suppress B{sub {mu}} relative to {mu}. Our mechanism relies on an assumption about the signs of certain incalculable anomalous dimensions in the hidden sector. Making these assumptions not only allows us to solve the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem but also leads to a characteristic superpartner spectrum which would be a smoking gun signal for our mechanism.

  18. The Corporate Illiterates: The Hidden Illiterates of Silicon Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    Describes the writing and business communication problems of college-educated workers in Silicon Valley. Discusses hidden illiterates in the universities and in the workplace. Offers solutions for professors and managers faced with the problem of hidden illiterates. (PRA)

  19. The Hidden Injuries of Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennett, Richard; Cobb, Jonathan

    The book examines the effect of class barriers on blue collar workers by mirroring occupational/ethnic backgrounds of the white manual-laboring population in the Boston area through urban anthropological observations as well as 150 in-depth interviews conducted in 1969-70. It mainly reflects the experience of middle-aged, third generation American…

  20. The Hidden Curriculum of Doctoral Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding-DeKam, Jenni L.; Hamilton, Boni; Loyd, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    We examined the hidden curriculum of doctoral advising by conceptualizing the advisor as a teacher. Using autoethnographic methods in this case study, we simultaneously explored both sides of the advisor-student relationship. The constructivist paradigm permeated all aspects of the research: data collection, analysis, and interpretation. The…

  1. Hidden Messages: Instructional Materials for Investigating Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Barbara, Ed.; Eder, Elizabeth K., Ed.

    This book, intended to be used in the middle and high school classroom, provides teachers with unique ideas and lesson plans for exploring culture and adding a multicultural perspective to diverse subjects. "Hidden messages" are the messages of culture that are entwined in everyday lives, but which are seldom recognized or appreciated for the…

  2. The Hidden Labour Market of the Academic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouhelo, Anne

    Finding employment as an academic is becoming increasingly challenging for several reasons, including the tightening employment market and increases in the qualifications demanded of jobseekers and the pool of academically trained job seekers. A two-round Delphi study was therefore conducted to identify recruitment channels in the hidden labor…

  3. Discovering Hidden Treasures with GPS Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Paul; Palmer, Roger

    2014-01-01

    "I found it!" Addison proudly proclaimed, as she used an iPhone and Global Positioning System (GPS) software to find the hidden geocache along the riverbank. Others in Lisa Bostick's fourth grade class were jealous, but there would be other geocaches to find. With the excitement of movies like "Pirates of the Caribbean"…

  4. Registration of 'Hidden Valley' meadow fescue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Hidden Valley' (Reg. No. CV-xxxx, PI xxxxxx) meadow fescue [Schedonorus pratensis (Huds.) P. Beauv.; syn. Festuca pratensis Huds.; syn. Lolium pratense (Huds.) Darbysh.] is a synthetic population originating from 561 parental genotypes. The original germplasm is of unknown central or northern Europ...

  5. Hidden Transcripts of Flight Attendant Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Alexandra G.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes (using flight attendants) hidden transcripts--interactions, stories, myths, and rituals in which employees participate beyond direct observation--to provide an avenue to identify resistance and change in the organizing process. Challenges the outdated ideal of transmissional meaning, questions organizational power by including the…

  6. A Hidden Minority Amidst White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    2008-01-01

    It seems rather amusing to say that the author belongs to a minority, no less a hidden minority. After all, at first glance, she appears to be just another white girl (or woman). She grew up in the mid-west in a predominantly white community, middle class, and well educated. The paradox comes in their definition of minority. Today, as they seek to…

  7. Taking Impressions of Hidden Cavity Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, D.; Mayer, W.

    1987-01-01

    Lightweight, portable internal-molding device makes it possible to measure radii of, or examine contours of, passageways in hidden or complicated cavities. With device, measurements made in field, without returning assemblies to shop or laboratory for inspection. Molding head expands when compressed air applied. Inflatable tubes around head perform dual sealing and aligning function.

  8. Subtleties of Hidden Quantifiers in Implication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical conjectures and theorems are most often of the form P(x) ? Q(x), meaning ?x,P(x) ? Q(x). The hidden quantifier ?x is crucial in understanding the implication as a statement with a truth value. Here P(x) and Q(x) alone are only predicates, without truth values, since they contain unquantified variables. But standard textbook…

  9. Hidden supersymmetry in quantum bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Francisco Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2007-10-15

    We show that some simple well-studied quantum mechanical systems without fermion (spin) degrees of freedom display, surprisingly, a hidden supersymmetry. The list includes the bound state Aharonov-Bohm, the Dirac delta and the Poeschl-Teller potential problems, in which the unbroken and broken N = 2 supersymmetry of linear and nonlinear (polynomial) forms is revealed.

  10. New Experimental Limit on Photon Hidden-Sector Paraphoton Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andrei; Afanasev, Andrei; Baker, O.; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James; Minarni, Minarni; Ramdon, Roopchan; Michelle D. Shinn; Slocum, P.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the first results of a search for optical-wavelength photons mixing with hypothetical hidden-sector paraphotons in the mass range between 10^-5 and 10^-2 electron volts for a mixing parameter greater than 10^-7. This was a generation-regeneration experiment using the "light shining through a wall" technique in which regenerated photons are searched for downstream of an optical barrier that separates it from an upstream generation region. The new limits presented here are approximately three times more sensitive to this mixing than the best previous measurement. The present results indicate no evidence for photon-paraphoton mixing for the range of parameters investigated.

  11. Exodus: Hidden origin of dark matter and baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, James

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new framework for explaining the proximity of the baryon and dark matter relic densities ΩDM ≈ 5Ω B . The scenario assumes that the number density of the observed dark matter states is generated due to decays from a second hidden sector which simultaneously generates the baryon asymmetry. In contrast to asymmetric dark matter models, the dark matter can be a real scalar or Majorana fermion and thus presents distinct phenomenology. We discuss aspects of model building and general constraints in this framework. Moreover, we argue that this scenario circumvents several of the experimental bounds which significantly constrain typical models of asymmetric dark matter. We present a simple supersymmetric implementation of this mechanism and show that it can be used to obtain the correct dark matter relic density for a bino LSP.

  12. Inter-Comparison of CHARM Data and WSR-88D Storm Integrated Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Meyer, Paul J.; Guillory, Anthony R.; Stellman, Keith; Limaye, Ashutosh; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A localized precipitation network has been established over a 4000 sq km region of northern Alabama in support of local weather and climate research at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC) in Huntsville. This Cooperative Huntsville-Area Rainfall Measurement (CHARM) network is comprised of over 80 volunteers who manually take daily rainfall measurements from 85 sites. The network also incorporates 20 automated gauges that report data at 1-5 minute intervals on a 24 h a day basis. The average spacing of the gauges in the network is about 6 kin, however coverage in some regions benefit from gauges every 1-2 km. The 24 h rainfall totals from the CHARM network have been used to validate Stage III rainfall estimates of daily and storm totals derived from the WSR-88D radars that cover northern Alabama. The Stage III rainfall product is produced by the Lower Mississippi River Forecast Center (LMRFC) in support of their daily forecast operations. The intercomparisons between the local rain gauge and the radar estimates have been useful to understand the accuracy and utility of the Stage III data. Recently, the Stage III and CHARM rainfall measurements have been combined to produce an hourly rainfall dataset at each CHARM observation site. The procedure matches each CHARM site with a time sequence of Stage III radar estimates of precipitation. Hourly stage III rainfall estimates were used to partition the rain gauge values to the time interval over which they occurred. The new hourly rain gauge dataset is validated at selected points where 1-5 minute rainfall measurements have been made. This procedure greatly enhances the utility of the CHARM data for local weather and hydrologic modeling studies. The conference paper will present highlights of the Stage III intercomparison and some examples of the combined radar / rain gauge product demonstrating its accuracy and utility in deriving an hourly rainfall product from the 24 h CHARM totals.

  13. Hidden Statistics Approach to Quantum Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information theory have inspired an explosion of interest in new quantum algorithms for solving hard computational (quantum and non-quantum) problems. The basic principle of quantum computation is that the quantum properties can be used to represent structure data, and that quantum mechanisms can be devised and built to perform operations with this data. Three basic non-classical properties of quantum mechanics superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability were main reasons for optimism about capabilities of quantum computers that promised simultaneous processing of large massifs of highly correlated data. Unfortunately, these advantages of quantum mechanics came with a high price. One major problem is keeping the components of the computer in a coherent state, as the slightest interaction with the external world would cause the system to decohere. That is why the hardware implementation of a quantum computer is still unsolved. The basic idea of this work is to create a new kind of dynamical system that would preserve the main three properties of quantum physics superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. In other words, such a system would reinforce the advantages and minimize limitations of both quantum and classical aspects. Based upon a concept of hidden statistics, a new kind of dynamical system for simulation of Schroedinger equation is proposed. The system represents a modified Madelung version of Schroedinger equation. It preserves superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. Such an optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for simulating quantum systems. The model includes a transitional component of quantum potential (that has been overlooked in previous treatment of the Madelung equation). The role of the

  14. CONSTRAINED-TRANSPORT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT IN CHARM

    SciTech Connect

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F. E-mail: DFMartin@lbl.gov

    2011-07-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  15. Rare beauty and charm decays with the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai-Feng

    2013-05-01

    Rare beauty meson decays Bs0 → µ+µ-, B0 → μ+μ-, and charm meson decays D0 → μ+μ- are searched in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment is used for the B → μ+μ- study, while the data sample used for D0 → μ+μ- search is 90 pb-1. The number of events observed after applying the full selection criteria is consistent with the expectations from the sum of background and standard model signal. The resulting upper limits on the branching fractions are ℬ(Bs0 → µ+µ-) < 7.7 × 10-9, ℬ(B0 µ+ µ-) < 1.8 × 10-9 at 95% confidence level, and ℬ(D0 → μ+μ-) < 5.4 × 10-7 at 90% confidence level.

  16. Search for T violation in charm meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-06-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment, they have searched for T violation in charm meson decays using the four-body decay channels D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The T violation asymmetry is obtained using triple-product correlations and assuming the validity of the CPT theorem. They find the asymmetry values to be A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup 0}) = 0.010 {+-} 0.057(stat.) {+-} 0.037(syst.), A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup +}) = 0.023 {+-} 0.062(stat.) {+-} 0.022(syst.), and A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sub s}{sup +}) = -0.036 {+-} 0.067(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.). Each measurement is consistent with no T violation. New measurements of the CP asymmetries for some of these decay modes are also presented.

  17. Invisible waves and hidden realms: augmented reality and experimental art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzanka, Silvia

    2012-03-01

    Augmented reality is way of both altering the visible and revealing the invisible. It offers new opportunities for artistic exploration through virtual interventions in real space. In this paper, the author describes the implementation of two art installations using different AR technologies, one using optical marker tracking on mobile devices and one integrating stereoscopic projections into the physical environment. The first artwork, De Ondas y Abejas (The Waves and the Bees), is based on the widely publicized (but unproven) hypothesis of a link between cellphone radiation and the phenomenon of bee colony collapse disorder. Using an Android tablet, viewers search out small fiducial markers in the shape of electromagnetic waves hidden throughout the gallery, which reveal swarms of bees scattered on the floor. The piece also creates a generative soundscape based on electromagnetic fields. The second artwork, Urban Fauna, is a series of animations in which features of the urban landscape become plants and animals. Surveillance cameras become flocks of birds while miniature cellphone towers, lampposts, and telephone poles grow like small seedlings in time-lapse animation. The animations are presented as small stereoscopic projections, integrated into the physical space of the gallery. These two pieces explore the relationship between nature and technology through the visualization of invisible forces and hidden alternate realities.

  18. Hadronic Matrix Elements with Heavy Quarks: The Charm-Loop Effect in B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Khodjamirian, Alexander

    2010-12-22

    I present the summary of our recent work on the long-distance effect in B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, generated by the four-quark operators with charmed quarks. In addition to the factorized c-barc loop, the soft-gluon emission from the loop is calculated in the framework of light-cone OPE, applying light-cone QCD sum rules. The resulting contribution of this effect to the B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, decay amplitude is cast in a form of the correction to the leading Wilson coefficient C{sub 9}.

  19. Hidden ghost in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2013-03-01

    The Hessian's determinant for a version of massive gravity given by an infinite expansion of a square root function of the induced metric, vanishes. We show that it allows us to eliminate one of four scalar fields used to generate the graviton mass. This, however, gives rise to the appearance of extra terms in the action with the squared time derivative of the metric, thus signaling that a nonlinear ghost survives. We demonstrate this phenomenon considering a simple system with constraint, which is supposed to reduce the number of physical degrees of freedom, however, we explicitly show how the constraint forces the metric to propagate an extra tachyonic state.

  20. First Airborne Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the MERLIN Demonstrator CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, Axel; Büdenbender, Christian; Ehret, Gerhard; Fix, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Kiemle, Chritstoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    2016-04-01

    CHARM-F is the new airborne four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Due to its high technological conformity it is also a demonstrator for MERLIN, the French-German satellite mission providing a methane lidar. MERLIN's Preliminary Design Review was successfully passed recently. The launch is planned for 2020. First CHARM-F measurements were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The aircraft's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, result in data similar to those obtained by a spaceborne system. The CHARM-F and MERLIN lidars are designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between the system and ground. The successfully completed CHARM-F flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. Furthermore, the dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on system design questions. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard the aircraft during the flight campaign: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the aircraft lidar. For the near future, detailed characterizations of CHARM-F are planned, further support of the MERLIN design, as well as the scientific aircraft campaign CoMet.

  1. Constraining charming penguins in charmless B → ππ, πK and KK decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhou, Yu-Feng; Zhuang, Ci

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the correlations induced by the charming penguin contributions to B → ππ, πK and KK modes in the flavor SU(3) diagrammatic approach. Strong constraints are found from the measurements of the direct CP asymmetries, especially that of πK modes. We make global fits to the latest data, and show that only a relatively small charming penguin is allowed. In the presence of the charming penguin, the size of color-suppressed tree amplitude (C) relative to that of tree amplitude (T) still remains large C/T ~= 0.6, which disfavors the possibility of a large charming penguin alone as an explanation for the ππ puzzle. We find that this conclusion remains unchanged for various SU(3) breaking schemes. Nevertheless, together with an enhanced annihilation-type W-exchange diagram (E) which is allowed by the current data, the ratio C/T can be reduced to ~0.4. We show that a small charming penguin amplitude can still have significant contribution to the time-dependent CP asymmetry in the KSKS mode.

  2. A precision measurement of charm dimuon production in neutrino interactions from the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoylov, O.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; De Santo, A.; Del Prete, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Duyang, H.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kim, J. J.; Kirsanov, M.; Kulagin, S.; Kullenberg, C. T.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Libo, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Scott, A. M.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tian, X. C.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present our new measurement of the cross-section for charm dimuon production in neutrino-iron interactions based upon the full statistics collected by the NOMAD experiment. After background subtraction we observe 15 344 charm dimuon events, providing the largest sample currently available. The analysis exploits the large inclusive charged current sample - about 9×106 events after all analysis cuts - and the high resolution NOMAD detector to constrain the total systematic uncertainty on the ratio of charm dimuon to inclusive Charged Current (CC) cross-sections to ˜2%. We also perform a fit to the NOMAD data to extract the charm production parameters and the strange quark sea content of the nucleon within the NLO QCD approximation. We obtain a value of mc(mc)=1.159±0.075 GeV/c2 for the running mass of the charm quark in the MS¯ scheme and a strange quark sea suppression factor of κs=0.591±0.019 at Q2=20 GeV/c2.

  3. Estimation of the occurrence rate of strong earthquakes based on hidden semi-Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votsi, I.; Limnios, N.; Tsaklidis, G.; Papadimitriou, E.

    2012-04-01

    The present paper aims at the application of hidden semi-Markov models (HSMMs) in an attempt to reveal key features for the earthquake generation, associated with the actual stress field, which is not accessible to direct observation. The models generalize the hidden Markov models by considering the hidden process to form actually a semi-Markov chain. Considering that the states of the models correspond to levels of actual stress fields, the stress field level at the occurrence time of each strong event is revealed. The dataset concerns a well catalogued seismically active region incorporating a variety of tectonic styles. More specifically, the models are applied in Greece and its surrounding lands, concerning a complete data sample with strong (M≥ 6.5) earthquakes that occurred in the study area since 1845 up to present. The earthquakes that occurred are grouped according to their magnitudes and the cases of two and three magnitude ranges for a corresponding number of states are examined. The parameters of the HSMMs are estimated and their confidence intervals are calculated based on their asymptotic behavior. The rate of the earthquake occurrence is introduced through the proposed HSMMs and its maximum likelihood estimator is calculated. The asymptotic properties of the estimator are studied, including the uniformly strongly consistency and the asymptotical normality. The confidence interval for the proposed estimator is given. We assume the state space of both the observable and the hidden process to be finite, the hidden Markov chain to be homogeneous and stationary and the observations to be conditionally independent. The hidden states at the occurrence time of each strong event are revealed and the rate of occurrence of an anticipated earthquake is estimated on the basis of the proposed HSMMs. Moreover, the mean time for the first occurrence of a strong anticipated earthquake is estimated and its confidence interval is calculated.

  4. Laser experiments explore the hidden sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, M.; Gies, H.; Jaeckel, J.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axionlike particles. In this paper we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of 2. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses ≲0.05eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)×10-7 times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  5. Hidden SU (N ) glueball dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Amarjit; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the possibility that the dark matter candidate is from a pure non-Abelian gauge theory of the hidden sector, motivated in large part by its elegance and simplicity. The dark matter is the lightest bound state made of the confined gauge fields, the hidden glueball. We point out that this simple setup is capable of providing rich and novel phenomena in the dark sector, especially in the parameter space of large N . They include self-interacting and warm dark matter scenarios, Bose-Einstein condensation leading to massive dark stars possibly millions of times heavier than our sun giving rise to gravitational lensing effects, and indirect detections through higher dimensional operators as well as interesting collider signatures.

  6. Hidden penis release: adjunctive suprapubic lipectomy.

    PubMed

    Horton, C E; Vorstman, B; Teasley, D; Winslow, B

    1987-08-01

    We believe the hidden penis may be caused and concealed by a prominent suprapubic fat pad in addition to the restrictive fibrous bands of the dartos fascia fixing the shaft of the penis proximally while loose skin folds prolapse distally over the phallus. A penis of inadequate length or appearance may affect body image. Patients with this problem often require psychological support. Hidden penis may be distinguished from micropenis by palpating adequate corpora and showing a stretched penile length within 2 SD of normal. Excision of suprapubic fat with sectioning of the tethering dartos bands will release and increase the length of the penis. Suprapubic fat pad resection may also be helpful to elongate a short penis in cases of adult microphallus, or after partial penectomy because of trauma or cancer. Circumcision is contraindicated.

  7. Biofortification for combating 'hidden hunger' for iron.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Irene; Arosio, Paolo; Tarantino, Delia; Soave, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are responsible for so-called 'hidden undernutrition'. In particular, iron (Fe) deficiency adversely affects growth, immune function and can cause anaemia. However, supplementation of iron can exacerbate infectious diseases and current policies of iron therapy carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of these interventions. Here we review the approaches of biofortification of valuable crops for reducing 'hidden undernutrition' of iron in the light of the latest nutritional and medical advances. The increase of iron and prebiotics in edible parts of plants is expected to improve health, whereas the reduction of phytic acid concentration, in crops valuable for human diet, might be less beneficial for the developed countries, or for the developing countries exposed to endemic infections. PMID:22093370

  8. Hidden variables and nonlocality in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmick, Douglas Lloyd

    1997-05-01

    Most physicists hold a skeptical attitude toward a 'hidden variables' interpretation of quantum theory, despite David Bohm's successful construction of such a theory and John S. Bell's strong arguments in favor of the idea. The first reason for doubt concerns certain mathematical theorems (von Neumann's, Gleason's, Kochen and Specker's, and Bell's) which can be applied to the hidden variables issue. These theorems are often credited with proving that hidden variables are indeed 'impossible', in the sense that they cannot replicate the predictions of quantum mechanics. Many who do not draw such a strong conclusion nevertheless accept that hidden variables have been shown to exhibit prohibitively complicated features. The second concern is that the most sophisticated example of a hidden variables theory-that of David Bohm-exhibits non-locality, i.e., consequences of events at one place can propagate to other places instantaneously. However, neither the mathematical theorems in question nor the attribute of nonlocality detract from the importance of a hidden variables interpretation of quantum theory. Nonlocality is present in quantum mechanics itself, and is a required characteristic of any theory that agrees with the quantum mechanical predictions. We first discuss the earliest analysis of hidden variables-that of von Neumann's theorem-and review John S. Bell's refutation of von Neumann's 'impossibility proof'. We recall and elaborate on Bell's arguments regarding the theorems of Gleason, and Kochen and Specker. According to Bell, these latter theorems do not imply that hidden variables interpretations are untenable, but instead that such theories must exhibit contextuality, i.e., they must allow for the dependence of measurement results on the characteristics of both measured system and measuring apparatus. We demonstrate a new way to understand the implications of both Gleason's theorem and Kochen and Specker's theorem by noting that they prove a result we call

  9. Multiple alignment using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    A simulated annealing method is described for training hidden Markov models and producing multiple sequence alignments from initially unaligned protein or DNA sequences. Simulated annealing in turn uses a dynamic programming algorithm for correctly sampling suboptimal multiple alignments according to their probability and a Boltzmann temperature factor. The quality of simulated annealing alignments is evaluated on structural alignments of ten different protein families, and compared to the performance of other HMM training methods and the ClustalW program. Simulated annealing is better able to find near-global optima in the multiple alignment probability landscape than the other tested HMM training methods. Neither ClustalW nor simulated annealing produce consistently better alignments compared to each other. Examination of the specific cases in which ClustalW outperforms simulated annealing, and vice versa, provides insight into the strengths and weaknesses of current hidden Maxkov model approaches.

  10. Hydraulic-Leak Detector for Hidden Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Loo, S.

    1986-01-01

    Slow leakage of fluid made obvious. Indicator consists of wick wrapped at one end around joint to be monitored. Wick absorbs hydraulic fluid leaking from joint and transmits to opposite end, located outside cover plate and visible to inspector. Leakage manifested as discoloration of outside end of wick. Indicator reveals leaks in hidden fittings on hydraulic lines. Fast inspection of joints without disassembly. Used in aerospace, petroleum, chemical, nuclear, and other industries where removing covers for inspection impossible, difficult, or time-consuming.

  11. The Hidden Gifts of Quiet Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trierweiler, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    The author relates that she was an introvert child. It has always taken her time and energy to find her place in a group. As a grown-up, she still needed quiet time to regroup during a busy day. In this article, the author presents an interview with Marti Olsen Laney, author of "The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child." During the interview,…

  12. Hidden structures of knot invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleptsov, Alexey

    2014-11-01

    We discuss a connection of HOMFLY polynomials with Hurwitz covers and represent a generating function for the HOMFLY polynomial of a given knot in all representations as Hurwitz partition function, i.e. the dependence of the HOMFLY polynomials on representation R is naturally captured by symmetric group characters (cut-and-join eigenvalues). The genus expansion and the loop expansion through Vassiliev invariants explicitly demonstrate this phenomenon. We study the genus expansion and discuss its properties. We also consider the loop expansion in details. In particular, we give an algorithm to calculate Vassiliev invariants, give some examples and discuss relations among Vassiliev invariants. Then we consider superpolynomials for torus knots defined via double affine Hecke algebra. We claim that the superpolynomials are not functions of Hurwitz type: symmetric group characters do not provide an adequate linear basis for their expansions. Deformation to superpolynomials is, however, straightforward in the multiplicative basis: the Casimir operators are beta-deformed to Hamiltonians of the Calogero-Moser-Sutherland system. Applying this trick to the genus and Vassiliev expansions, we observe that the deformation is fully straightforward only for the thin knots. Beyond the family of thin knots additional algebraically independent terms appear in the Vassiliev expansions. This can suggest that the superpolynomials do in fact contain more information about knots than the colored HOMFLY and Kauffman polynomials.

  13. Extracting hidden messages in steganographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Quach, Tu-Thach

    2014-07-17

    The eventual goal of steganalytic forensic is to extract the hidden messages embedded in steganographic images. A promising technique that addresses this problem partially is steganographic payload location, an approach to reveal the message bits, but not their logical order. It works by finding modified pixels, or residuals, as an artifact of the embedding process. This technique is successful against simple least-significant bit steganography and group-parity steganography. The actual messages, however, remain hidden as no logical order can be inferred from the located payload. This paper establishes an important result addressing this shortcoming: we show that the expected mean residuals contain enough information to logically order the located payload provided that the size of the payload in each stego image is not fixed. The located payload can be ordered as prescribed by the mean residuals to obtain the hidden messages without knowledge of the embedding key, exposing the vulnerability of these embedding algorithms. We provide experimental results to support our analysis.

  14. Hidden Markov Model Analysis of Multichromophore Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Troy C.; Kim, Hiyun; Giurleo, Jason T.; Talaga, David S.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of single-molecule measurements is greatly complicated by the presence of multiple fluorescent labels. However, many molecular systems of interest consist of multiple interacting components. We investigate this issue using multiply labeled dextran polymers that we intentionally photobleach to the background on a single-molecule basis. Hidden Markov models allow for unsupervised analysis of the data to determine the number of fluorescent subunits involved in the fluorescence intermittency of the 6-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine labels by counting the discrete steps in fluorescence intensity. The Bayes information criterion allows us to distinguish between hidden Markov models that differ by the number of states, that is, the number of fluorescent molecules. We determine information-theoretical limits and show via Monte Carlo simulations that the hidden Markov model analysis approaches these theoretical limits. This technique has resolving power of one fluorescing unit up to as many as 30 fluorescent dyes with the appropriate choice of dye and adequate detection capability. We discuss the general utility of this method for determining aggregation-state distributions as could appear in many biologically important systems and its adaptability to general photometric experiments. PMID:16913765

  15. Extracting hidden messages in steganographic images

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quach, Tu-Thach

    2014-07-17

    The eventual goal of steganalytic forensic is to extract the hidden messages embedded in steganographic images. A promising technique that addresses this problem partially is steganographic payload location, an approach to reveal the message bits, but not their logical order. It works by finding modified pixels, or residuals, as an artifact of the embedding process. This technique is successful against simple least-significant bit steganography and group-parity steganography. The actual messages, however, remain hidden as no logical order can be inferred from the located payload. This paper establishes an important result addressing this shortcoming: we show that the expected mean residualsmore » contain enough information to logically order the located payload provided that the size of the payload in each stego image is not fixed. The located payload can be ordered as prescribed by the mean residuals to obtain the hidden messages without knowledge of the embedding key, exposing the vulnerability of these embedding algorithms. We provide experimental results to support our analysis.« less

  16. A pseudoscalar glueball and charmed mesons in the extended linear sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraim, Walaa I.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the so-called extended linear sigma model (eLSM), we include a pseudoscalar glueball with a mass of 2.6 GeV (as predicted by Lattice-QCD simulations) and we compute the two- and three-body decays into scalar and pseudoscalar mesons. This study is relevant for the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. As a second step, we extend the eLSM by including the charm quark according to the global U(4)R × U(4)L chiral symmetry. We compute the masses, weak decay constants and strong decay widths of open charmed mesons. The precise description of the decays of open charmed states is important for the CBM experiment at FAIR.

  17. Recent Results on Charm and Tau Physics from BaBar And Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatore, Fabrizio F.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2007-10-15

    Recent results on charm and tau physics obtained at the BABAR and Belle experiments are presented in this article. The charm section will be focused on the most recent results on D{sup 0}{bar D}{sup 0} mixing at Belle and on the measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant f{sub Ds} using charm tagged e+e- events at BABAR. In the tau section the recent results on Lepton Flavor Violation from tau decays will be discussed, as well as the recent result on the rare decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3{pi}{sup -}2{pi}{sup +}2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} at BABAR and the measurement of the {tau} lepton mass at Belle.

  18. Object-Oriented Implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks using Charm++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Sanjeev; Bhandarkar, Milind; Kale, Laxmikant V.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes experiences with implementing the NAS Computational Fluid Dynamics benchmarks using a parallel object-oriented language, Charm++. Our main objective in implementing the NAS CFD kernel benchmarks was to develop a code that could be used to easily experiment with different domain decomposition strategies and dynamic load balancing. We also wished to leverage the object-orientation provided by the Charm++ parallel object-oriented language, to develop reusable abstractions that would simplify the process of developing parallel applications. We first describe the Charm++ parallel programming model and the parallel object array abstraction, then go into detail about each of the Scalar Pentadiagonal (SP) and Lower/Upper Triangular (LU) benchmarks, along with performance results. Finally we conclude with an evaluation of the methodology used.

  19. New results on CLEO`s heavy quarks - bottom and charm

    SciTech Connect

    Menary, S.

    1997-01-01

    While the top quark is confined to virtual reality for CLEO, the increased luminosity of the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) and the improved photon detection capabilities of the CLEO`s {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} quarks - bottom and charm. I will describe new results in the B meson sector including the first observation of exclusive b {yields} ulv decays, upper limits on gluonic penguin decay rates, and precise measurements of semileptonic and hadronic b {yields} c branching fractions. The charmed hadron results that are discussed include the observation of isospin violation in D{sub s}*{sup +} decays, an update on measurements of the D{sub s}{sup +} decay constant, and the observation of a new excited {Xi}{sub c} charmed baryon. These measurements have had a large impact on our understanding of heavy quark physics.

  20. Combined study of 2 S and 1 D open-charm mesons with natural spin-parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Ailin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we perform a combined study of 2 S and 1 D open-charm mesons with natural spin-parity. Our results indicate that D1*(2600 )/Ds1 *(2700 ) and D1*(2760 )/Ds1 *(2860 ) are predominantly the 2 3S1 3 and 1 3D1 charmed/charmed-strange mesons, respectively, while D3*(2760 )/Ds3 *(2860 ) can be regarded as the 1 3<.SUP>D3 3 charmed/charmed-strange mesons. In addition, some typical ratios of partial widths of the discussed natural states are predicted, by which future experiments can test these assignments, especially for the 2 S -1 D mixing scheme existing in D1*(2600 )/D1*(2760 ) and Ds1 *(2700 )/Ds1 *(2860 ).

  1. The Hidden Complexity of Mendelian Traits across Natural Yeast Populations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Sigwalt, Anastasie; Fournier, Téo; Pflieger, David; Peter, Jackson; de Montigny, Jacky; Dunham, Maitreya J; Schacherer, Joseph

    2016-07-26

    Mendelian traits are considered to be at the lower end of the complexity spectrum of heritable phenotypes. However, more than a century after the rediscovery of Mendel's law, the global landscape of monogenic variants, as well as their effects and inheritance patterns within natural populations, is still not well understood. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed a species-wide survey of Mendelian traits across a large population of isolates. We generated offspring from 41 unique parental pairs and analyzed 1,105 cross/trait combinations. We found that 8.9% of the cases were Mendelian. Further tracing of causal variants revealed background-specific expressivity and modified inheritances, gradually transitioning from Mendelian to complex traits in 30% of the cases. In fact, when taking into account the natural population diversity, the hidden complexity of traits could be substantial, confounding phenotypic predictability even for simple Mendelian traits. PMID:27396326

  2. Lifetime measurements of the D +, D 0, D {/s +}, and Λ {/c +} charmed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. P.; Barate, R.; Bloch, D.; Bonamy, P.; Borgeaud, P.; Burchell, M.; Burmeister, H.; Brunet, J. M.; Calvino, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Crespo, J. M.; D'Almagne, B.; David, M.; Diciaccio, L.; Dixon, J.; Druet, P.; Duane, A.; Engel, J. P.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Fokitis, E.; Forty, R. W.; Foucault, P.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J. P.; Giomataris, Y.; Hofmokl, T.; Katsoutis, E. C.; Koratzinos, M.; Krafft, C.; Lefievre, B.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lopez, A.; Lui, W. K.; Magneville, C.; Maltezos, A.; McEwen, J. G.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pattison, B.; Poutot, D.; Primout, M.; Rahmani, H.; Roudeau, P.; Seez, C.; Six, J.; Strub, R.; Treille, D.; Triscos, P.; Tristram, G.; Villet, G.; Volte, A.; Wayne, M.; Websdale, D. M.; Wormser, G.; Zolnierowski, Y.

    1990-12-01

    Using a high-statistics sample of more than 1000 reconstructed charmed-particle decays, the lifetimes of the weakly decaying charmed mesons and of the Λ {/c +} baryon have been measured: 10052_2005_Article_BF01552318_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} tau _{D^ + } = 1.03 ± 0.08 + 0.06 ps,tau _{D^0 } = 0.417 ± 0.018 ± 0.015 ps \\ tau _{D_s^ + } = 0.33_{ - 0.08}^{ + 0.12} ± 0.03 ps,tau _{Λ _c^ + } = 0.18 ± 0.03 ± 0.03 ps. \\

  3. Diffractively Produced Charm Final States in 800-GeV / c pp Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. H. L. S.; Berisso, M. C.; Christian, D. C.; Felix, J.; Gara, A.; Gottschalk, E.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knapp, B. C.; Kreisler, M. N.

    2001-08-20

    We report the first observation of diffractively produced open charm in 800-GeV/c pp collisions of the type pp{yields}pD{sup *}X. We measure cross sections of {sigma}{sub diff}(D{sup *+})= (0.185{+-}0.044{+-}0.054) {mu}b and {sigma}{sub diff}(D{sup *-})= (0.174{+-}0.034{+-}0.029) {mu}b. Our measurements are based on 4.3 x 10{sup 9} events recorded by FNAL E690 in the fixed-target run of 1991. We compare our results with previous fixed-target charm experiments.

  4. Model-independent analysis of CP violation in charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of CP violation, inspired by recent experimental observations, in charmed meson decays. The topological diagram approach is used to study direct CP asymmetries for singly Cabibbo-suppressed two-body hadronic decays of charmed mesons. We extract the magnitudes and relative phases of the corresponding topological amplitudes from available experimental information. In order to get more precise and reliable estimates of direct CP asymmetries, we take into account contributions from all possible strong penguin amplitudes, including the internal b-quark penguin contributions. We also study flavor SU(3) symmetry breaking effects in these decay modes and consequently predict direct CP asymmetries of unmeasured modes.

  5. Charm mixing and CPV at B{sub A}B{sub AR} experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Milanes, Diego A.

    2008-11-23

    Searches of D{sup 0}-D-bar{sup 0} mixing and CP violation in the charm sector are strongly motivated by the possibility of observing a signal from new physics leading to bigger effects than those expected in Standard Model. Recent experimental results have shown strong evidence of D{sup 0}-D-bar{sup 0} mixing and many efforts are made within the BABAR collaboration to confirm and improve these results. We will discuss the main results in charm mixing and CP violation analyses with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B-factory.

  6. Measurement of Beauty and Charm Photoproduction at H1 using inclusive lifetime tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, L.

    2005-10-06

    A measurement of the charm and beauty photoproduction cross sections at the ep collider HERA is presented. The lifetime signature of c and b-flavoured hadrons is exploited to determine the fractions of events in the sample containing charm or beauty. Differential cross sections as a function of the jet transverse momentum, the rapidity and x{sub {gamma}}{sup obs} are measured in the photoproduction region Q2 < 1 GeV2, with inelasticity 0.15 < y < 0.8. The results are compared with calculations in next-to-leading order perturbative QCD and Monte Carlo models as implemented in PYTHIA and CASCADE.

  7. Charm structure functions and gluon shadowing effects with the AdS/CFT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Min; Hou, Zhao-Yu; Liu, Jia-Fu; Sun, Xian-Jing

    2012-08-01

    By means of the UGD function extracted from an AdS/CFT inspired saturation model, the charm and bottom structure functions are studied in fixed-order perturbation theory. It is shown that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the recent HERA data. Then, this UGD function is also used to investigate net-kaon rapidity distribution in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies and the theoretical results fit well to the BRAHMS data. In the end of this paper, we give the predicted results for nuclear charm structure function at very small x where the popular shadowing parameterizations are invalid.

  8. Charm and strange quark masses and fD s from overlap fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Chen, Ying; Alexandru, Andrei; Dong, Shao-Jing; Draper, Terrence; Gong, Ming; Lee, Frank X.; Li, Anyi; Liu, Keh-Fei; Liu, Zhaofeng; Lujan, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We use overlap fermions as valence quarks to calculate meson masses in a wide quark mass range on the 2 +1 -flavor domain-wall fermion gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations. The well-defined quark masses in the overlap fermion formalism and the clear valence quark mass dependence of meson masses observed from the calculation facilitate a direct derivation of physical current quark masses through a global fit to the lattice data, which incorporates O (a2) and O (mc4a4) corrections, chiral extrapolation, and quark mass interpolation. Using the physical masses of Ds, Ds* and J /ψ as inputs, Sommer's scale parameter r0 and the masses of charm quark and strange quark in the MS ¯ scheme are determined to be r0=0.465 (4 )(9 ) fm , mcMS ¯(2 GeV )=1.118 (6 )(24 ) GeV (or mcMS ¯(mc)=1.304 (5 )(20 ) GeV ), and msMS ¯(2 GeV )=0.101 (3 )(6 ) GeV , respectively. Furthermore, we observe that the mass difference of the vector meson and the pseudoscalar meson with the same valence quark content is proportional to the reciprocal of the square root of the valence quark masses. The hyperfine splitting of charmonium, MJ /ψ-Mηc , is determined to be 119(2)(7) MeV, which is in good agreement with the experimental value. We also predict the decay constant of Ds to be fDs=254 (2 )(4 ) MeV . The masses of charmonium P -wave states χc 0 , χc 1 and hc are also in good agreement with experiments.

  9. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  10. Production of charm mesons by high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons ED{sup *{plus minus}}, D{sup 0}, and D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 {plus minus} 19 events was investigated in the decay mode D{sup *{plus minus}} {yields} D{sup 0} {pi}{sup {plus minus}} with the subsequent decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}. The cross section per nucleon for D{sup *}{plus minus}, at most probable energy {radical}s = 35 GeV, was measured to be: d{sigma}(xf)/dxf {center dot} BR = 2.11 {plus minus} .43({plus minus}63){mu}b/nucleon for 0.0 < x{sub f} < 0.14 (x{sub f} = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR {identical to} BR(D{sup *} {yields} D{sub {pi}}) {times} BR(D {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in the target was fit to a form A{sup {alpha}} and it was found that {alpha} = .96 {plus minus} .17. A sample of 64 {plus minus} 16 D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} events was investigated for the decay D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup {plus minus}}. The differential cross section for D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR {center dot} {1/2} d{sigma}D{sub s}{sup +}/dxf + d{sigma}(D{sub s}{sup {minus}}/dxf) = 2.8 {plus minus} 0.80 {plus minus} .86 {mu}b/nucleon at x{sub f} = 0.175 where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR {identical to} BR(D{sub s} {yields} {phi}{pi}), and a linear A dependence was assumed.

  11. Production of charm mesons by high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons D/sup /plus minus//, D/sup 0/, and D/sub s//sup /plus minus//, have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 /plus minus/ 19 events as investigated in the decay D/sup /plus minus// /yields/ D/sup 0//pi//sup /plus minus// with the subsequent decay mode D/sup 0/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//. The cross section per nucleon for D/sup /plus minus//, at most probable energy /radical/s = 35 GeV, was measured to be 2.11 /plus minus/ .43 (plusreverse arrowminus/.63)/mu/b/nucleon for 0.0 < x/sub f/ < 0.14 (/bar x//sub f/ = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR /identicalreverse arrowto/ Br(D /yields/ D/pi/) /times/ BR(D /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in target was fit to a form A /sup /alpha// and it was found that /alpha/ = .96 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .17. A sample of 64 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 16 D/sub s//sup /plus minus// events was investigates for the decay D/sub s//sup /plus minus// /yields/ /phi//pi//sup /plus minus//. The differential cross section for D/sub s//sup /plus minus// production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR.(1/2)(d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup +/)/dx/sub f/ + d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup /minus//) = 2.85 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.80 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .86 /mu/b/nucleon at x/sub f/ = 0.175 where the first errors is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR /equivalentreverse arrowto/ BR(D/sub s/ /yields/ /phi//pi/), and a linear A dependence was assumed. An estimate of relative cross section is: 0.19 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.09 at x/sub f/ = 0. 36 refs., 43 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Zipf exponent of trajectory distribution in the hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, V. V.; Lerner, E. Yu

    2014-03-01

    This paper is the first step of generalization of the previously obtained full classification of the asymptotic behavior of the probability for Markov chain trajectories for the case of hidden Markov models. The main goal is to study the power (Zipf) and nonpower asymptotics of the frequency list of trajectories of hidden Markov frequencys and to obtain explicit formulae for the exponent of the power asymptotics. We consider several simple classes of hidden Markov models. We prove that the asymptotics for a hidden Markov model and for the corresponding Markov chain can be essentially different.

  13. Extended supersymmetry and hidden symmetries in one-dimensional matrix quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. A.; Sokolov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    We study properties of nonlinear supersymmetry algebras realized in the one-dimensional quantum mechanics of matrix systems. Supercharges of these algebras are differential operators of a finite order in derivatives. In special cases, there exist independent supercharges realizing an (extended) supersymmetry of the same super-Hamiltonian. The extended supersymmetry generates hidden symmetries of the super-Hamiltonian. Such symmetries have been found in models with (2×2)-matrix potentials.

  14. Hidden Markov models for stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John

    2015-07-01

    The formalism of state estimation and hidden Markov models can simplify and clarify the discussion of stochastic thermodynamics in the presence of feedback and measurement errors. After reviewing the basic formalism, we use it to shed light on a recent discussion of phase transitions in the optimized response of an information engine, for which measurement noise serves as a control parameter. The HMM formalism also shows that the value of additional information displays a maximum at intermediate signal-to-noise ratios. Finally, we discuss how systems open to information flow can apparently violate causality; the HMM formalism can quantify the performance gains due to such violations.

  15. Diphoton signals from colorless hidden quarkonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Sho; Lee, Gabriel; Shadmi, Yael; Ziegler, Robert

    2016-07-01

    We show that quarkonialike states of a hidden SU (N ) gauge group can account for the 750 GeV diphoton excess observed by ATLAS and CMS, even with constituents carrying standard model hypercharge only. The required hypercharge is modest, varying between about 1.3-1.6 for strong SU (N ) coupling to 2-3 for weak SU (N ) coupling, for N =3 , 4. This scenario predicts a variety of diphoton and multiphoton resonances, as well as photons from continuum pair production, and possibly exotic decays into standard model fermions, with no significant multijet resonances.

  16. Diphoton excess as a hidden monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masaki; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yonekura, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    We provide a theory with a monopole of a strongly-interacting hidden U(1) gauge symmetry that can explain the 750-GeV diphoton excess reported by ATLAS and CMS. The excess results from the resonance of monopole, which is produced via gluon fusion and decays into two photons. In the low energy, there are only mesons and a monopole in our model because any baryons cannot be gauge invariant in terms of strongly interacting Abelian symmetry. This is advantageous of our model because there is no unwanted relics around the BBN epoch.

  17. Dual technicolor with hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    We consider a dual description of the technicolor-like gauge theory within the D4/D8-brane configuration with varying confinement and electroweak symmetry breaking scales. Constructing an effective truncated model valid below a certain cutoff, we identify the particle spectrum with Kaluza-Klein modes of the model in a manner consistent with the hidden local symmetry. Integrating out heavy states, we find that the low-energy action receives nontrivial corrections stemming from the mixing between standard model and heavy gauge bosons, which results in reduction of oblique parameters.

  18. Learning Heterogeneous Hidden Markov Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Chunming; Burnside, Elizabeth; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    Hidden Markov random fields (HMRFs) are conventionally assumed to be homogeneous in the sense that the potential functions are invariant across different sites. However in some biological applications, it is desirable to make HMRFs heterogeneous, especially when there exists some background knowledge about how the potential functions vary. We formally define heterogeneous HMRFs and propose an EM algorithm whose M-step combines a contrastive divergence learner with a kernel smoothing step to incorporate the background knowledge. Simulations show that our algorithm is effective for learning heterogeneous HMRFs and outperforms alternative binning methods. We learn a heterogeneous HMRF in a real-world study. PMID:25404989

  19. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing I: Lessons and tutorial.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin T; Singh, Rishi P; Schalk, Vinushka; Pevzner, Yuri; Sun, Jingjun; Miller, Carrie S; Boresch, Stefan; Ichiye, Toshiko; Brooks, Bernard R; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and use of web-based "lessons" to introduce students and other newcomers to computer simulations of biological macromolecules. These lessons, i.e., interactive step-by-step instructions for performing common molecular simulation tasks, are integrated into the collaboratively developed CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web user interface (http://www.charmming.org). Several lessons have already been developed with new ones easily added via a provided Python script. In addition to CHARMMing's new lessons functionality, web-based graphical capabilities have been overhauled and are fully compatible with modern mobile web browsers (e.g., phones and tablets), allowing easy integration of these advanced simulation techniques into coursework. Finally, one of the primary objections to web-based systems like CHARMMing has been that "point and click" simulation set-up does little to teach the user about the underlying physics, biology, and computational methods being applied. In response to this criticism, we have developed a freely available tutorial to bridge the gap between graphical simulation setup and the technical knowledge necessary to perform simulations without user interface assistance. PMID:25057988

  20. A Photographic Essay of Apache Clothing, War Charms, and Weapons, Volume 2-Part D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on Apache clothing, war charms, and weaponry. A brief historical introduction is followed by 21 question suggestions for classroom use. Each of the 12 photographic topics is accompanied by a descriptive…

  1. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing I: Lessons and Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Benjamin T.; Singh, Rishi P.; Schalk, Vinushka; Pevzner, Yuri; Sun, Jingjun; Miller, Carrie S.; Boresch, Stefan; Ichiye, Toshiko; Brooks, Bernard R.; Woodcock, H. Lee

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and use of web-based “lessons” to introduce students and other newcomers to computer simulations of biological macromolecules. These lessons, i.e., interactive step-by-step instructions for performing common molecular simulation tasks, are integrated into the collaboratively developed CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web user interface (http://www.charmming.org). Several lessons have already been developed with new ones easily added via a provided Python script. In addition to CHARMMing's new lessons functionality, web-based graphical capabilities have been overhauled and are fully compatible with modern mobile web browsers (e.g., phones and tablets), allowing easy integration of these advanced simulation techniques into coursework. Finally, one of the primary objections to web-based systems like CHARMMing has been that “point and click” simulation set-up does little to teach the user about the underlying physics, biology, and computational methods being applied. In response to this criticism, we have developed a freely available tutorial to bridge the gap between graphical simulation setup and the technical knowledge necessary to perform simulations without user interface assistance. PMID:25057988

  2. Charm production by muons and its role in scale-noninvariance

    SciTech Connect

    Gollin, G D

    1981-01-01

    Interactions of 209 GeV muons in the Multimuon Spectrometer at Fermilab have yielded more than 8 x 10/sup 4/ events with two muons in the final state. After reconstruction and cuts, the data contain 20,072 events with (81 +- 10)% attributed to the diffractive production of charmed states decaying to muons. The cross section for diffractive charm muoproduction is 6.9(+1.9,-1.4) nb where the error includes systematic uncertainties. Extrapolated to Q/sup 2/ = 0 with sigma(Q/sup 2/) = sigma(0)(1 + Q/sup 2//..lambda../sup 2/)/sup -2/, the effective cross section for 178 (100) GeV photons is 750(+180,-130) (560(+200,-120)) nb and the parameter ..lambda.. is 3.3 +- 0.2 (2.9 +- 0.2) GeV/c. The ..nu.. dependence of the cross section is similar to that of the photon-gluon-fusion model. A first determination of the structure function for diffractive charm production indicates that charm accounts for approximately 1/3 of the scale-noninvariance observed in inclusive muon-nucleon scattering at low Bjorken x. Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka selection rules and unitarity allow the muon data to set a 90%-confidence lower limit on the psi N total cross section of 0.9 mb.

  3. Production of doubly charmed baryons at energy {radical}s=10.58 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.V.; Likhoded, A.K.; Shevlyagin, M.V.

    1995-06-01

    The cross section for the production of doubly charmed baryons at a B-factory is estimated on the basis of perturbative QCD calculations of the cross sections for cc-diquark production and of the quark-hadron duality. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  4. CP Violation in B0 decays to Charmonium and Charm Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunhui

    2008-09-24

    We report on measurements of time-dependent CP-violation asymmetries in neutral B meson decays to charmonium and charm final states. The results are obtained from a data sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory.

  5. The future of tau physics and tau-charm detector and factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1991-02-01

    Future research on the tau lepton requires large statistics, thorough investigation of systematic errors, and direct experimental knowledge of backgrounds. Only a tau-charm factory with a specially designed detector can provide all the experimental conditions to meet these requirements. This paper is a summary of three lectures delivered at the 1991 Lake Louise Winter Institute.

  6. Status of the Tau-Charm Facility and highlights of its physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1990-02-01

    In this paper I will first discuss the history and current status of the Tau-Charm Facility. I will then focus on the unique aspects of the heavy meson and tau physics program of such a facility, which motivates its construction and operation in the mid-1090's.

  7. Measurement of the cross section of charmed hadrons and the nuclear dependence alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Covarrubias, Ernesto Alejandro

    2009-12-03

    With data from the SELEX experiment we study charm hadro-production. We report the differential production cross sections as function of the longitudinal and transverse momentum, as well as for two different target materials, of 14 charmed hadron and/or their decay modes. This is the most extensive study to date. SELEX is a fixed target experiment at Fermilab with high forward acceptance; it took data during 1996-1997 with 600 GeV/c Σ- and π-, and 540 GeV/c proton and π+ beams. It used 5 target foils (two copper and three diamond). We use the results to determine α, used in parametrizing the production cross section as ∞ Aα, where A is the mass number of the target nuclei. We found within our statistics that α is independent of the longitudinal momentum fraction xF in the interval 0.1 < xF < 1.0, with α = 0.778 ± 0.014. The average value of α} for charm production by pion beams is α meson = 0.850 ± 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average αbaryon = 0.755 ± 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams (Σ- and protons).

  8. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing I: Lessons and tutorial.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin T; Singh, Rishi P; Schalk, Vinushka; Pevzner, Yuri; Sun, Jingjun; Miller, Carrie S; Boresch, Stefan; Ichiye, Toshiko; Brooks, Bernard R; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and use of web-based "lessons" to introduce students and other newcomers to computer simulations of biological macromolecules. These lessons, i.e., interactive step-by-step instructions for performing common molecular simulation tasks, are integrated into the collaboratively developed CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web user interface (http://www.charmming.org). Several lessons have already been developed with new ones easily added via a provided Python script. In addition to CHARMMing's new lessons functionality, web-based graphical capabilities have been overhauled and are fully compatible with modern mobile web browsers (e.g., phones and tablets), allowing easy integration of these advanced simulation techniques into coursework. Finally, one of the primary objections to web-based systems like CHARMMing has been that "point and click" simulation set-up does little to teach the user about the underlying physics, biology, and computational methods being applied. In response to this criticism, we have developed a freely available tutorial to bridge the gap between graphical simulation setup and the technical knowledge necessary to perform simulations without user interface assistance.

  9. Where is hidden the ghost in phantom sensations?

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, Michelangelo

    2015-01-01

    The term phantom sensations (PS) refers to sensations in a missing body part. They are almost universal in amputees and can be both painful and not painful. Although PS have been frequently described in limb amputees, they can also occur in other clinical conditions and several pathophysiological interpretations have been proposed, with a predominance of theories based on a central origin. Actually, different mechanisms are able to create a phantom sensation. After an amputation, PS are frequently generated by the genesis of ectopic action potentials in the interrupted nerve fibers but the PS generator can also be more proximal. Sometimes PS are not created by the stimulation of somatosensory fibers with a missing territory, but they can be the result of central sensitization or neuroplastic changes that allow for the convergence of impulses coming from different body parts (referred sensations), one of which is missing. In conclusion, PS can be generated by both neuropathic and non-neuropathic mechanisms developed in the amputated body part or in other parts of the nervous system. Since these mechanisms are not pathognomonic of amputation there are no hidden ghosts to look for in phantom sensations. The only interpretative rule is just to follow the pathophysiological principles. PMID:26244147

  10. Hidden Costs of Energy: Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use

    SciTech Connect

    National Academies,; Lee, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Despite the many benefits of energy, most of which are reflected in energy market prices, the production, distribution, and use of energy causes negative effects. Many of these negative effects are not reflected in energy market prices. When market failures like this occur, there may be a case for government interventions in the form of regulations, taxes, fees, tradable permits, or other instruments that will motivate recognition of these external or hidden costs. The Hidden Costs of Energy defines and evaluates key external costs and benefits that are associated with the production, distribution, and use of energy, but are not reflected in market prices. The damage estimates presented are substantial and reflect damages from air pollution associated with electricity generation, motor vehicle transportation, and heat generation. The book also considers other effects not quantified in dollar amounts, such as damages from climate change, effects of some air pollutants such as mercury, and risks to national security. While not a comprehensive guide to policy, this analysis indicates that major initiatives to further reduce other emissions, improve energy efficiency, or shift to a cleaner electricity generating mix could substantially reduce the damages of external effects. A first step in minimizing the adverse consequences of new energy technologies is to better understand these external effects and damages. The Hidden Costs of Energy will therefore be a vital informational tool for government policy makers, scientists, and economists in even the earliest stages of research and development on energy technologies.

  11. Charmed baryon decays observed in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, E.N.

    1981-12-01

    Various weak decays of the charmed baryon ..lambda../sub c/ are observed in the Mark II detector at the SLAC e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring SPEAR. Hadronic decays ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pK/sup -/..pi../sup +/ and ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pK/sub s//sup 0/ and their conjugates are observed as peaks in invariant mass spectra at m(..lambda../sub c/) = (2286 +- 6) MeV/c/sup 2/. An estimate of the charmed baryon production cross section, sigma(..lambda../sub c/) + sigma (anti ..lambda../sub c/) = (1.7 +- 0.4) nb, derived from Mark II measurements of the inclusive baryon cross sections R/sub p/ and R/sub ..lambda../ as functions of center-of-mass energy, is used to calculate branching ratios for these hadronic decays: BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. p K/sup -/ ..pi../sup +/) = (2.0 +- 0.8)%; BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. p k/sub s//sup 0/)/BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. p K/sup -/ ..pi../sup +/) = (36 +- 16)%. An attempt is also made to observe higher mass charmed baryons by reconstructing cascade decays ..sigma../sub c/ ..-->.. ..lambda../sub c/..pi... Evidence for the observation of semileptonic decays of the charmed baryon is presented. Direct electrons are observed in events containing antiprotons, lambdas and antilambdas. The number of electrons per baryon event, after background subtraction and efficiency correction, is used, together with an estimate of the charmed baryon content of proton and lambda events, to calculate inclusive and semi-inclusive semileptonic branching ratios of the ..lambda../sub c/.

  12. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0-1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  13. ESO's Hidden Treasures Brought to Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition attracted nearly 100 entries, and ESO is delighted to announce the winners. Hidden Treasures gave amateur astronomers the opportunity to search ESO's vast archives of astronomical data for a well-hidden cosmic gem. Astronomy enthusiast Igor Chekalin from Russia won the first prize in this difficult but rewarding challenge - the trip of a lifetime to ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. The pictures of the Universe that can be seen in ESO's releases are impressive. However, many hours of skilful work are required to assemble the raw greyscale data captured by the telescopes into these colourful images, correcting them for distortions and unwanted signatures of the instrument, and enhancing them so as to bring out the details contained in the astronomical data. ESO has a team of professional image processors, but for the ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 competition, the experts decided to give astronomy and photography enthusiasts the opportunity to show the world what they could do with the mammoth amount of data contained in ESO's archives. The enthusiasts who responded to the call submitted nearly 100 entries in total - far exceeding initial expectations, given the difficult nature of the challenge. "We were completely taken aback both by the quantity and the quality of the images that were submitted. This was not a challenge for the faint-hearted, requiring both an advanced knowledge of data processing and an artistic eye. We are thrilled to have discovered so many talented people," said Lars Lindberg Christensen, Head of ESO's education and Public Outreach Department. Digging through many terabytes of professional astronomical data, the entrants had to identify a series of greyscale images of a celestial object that would reveal the hidden beauty of our Universe. The chance of a great reward for the lucky winner was enough to spur on the competitors; the first prize being a trip to ESO's Very Large

  14. Hidden superconformal symmetry of the cosmological evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2014-01-01

    In the superconformal formulation of supergravity, the standard supergravity action appears as a result of spontaneous symmetry breaking when the conformal compensator scalar field, the conformon, acquires a nonzero value, giving rise to the Planck mass. After that, many symmetries of the original theory become well hidden, and therefore they are often ignored. However, recent developments demonstrated that superconformal invariance is more than just a tool: it plays an important role in generalizing previously existing formulations of supergravity and developing new classes of inflationary models. In this paper we describe hidden superconformal symmetry of the cosmological evolution. In this formulation, inflation can be equivalently described as the conformon instability, and creation of the universe 'from nothing' can be interpreted as spontaneous symmetry breaking due to emergence of a classical conformon field. We develop a general formalism that allows to describe the cosmological evolution simultaneously with the evolution of the conformon. We find a set of gauge invariant physical observables, including the superconformally invariant generalizations of the square of the Weyl tensor, which are necessary for invariant description of the cosmological singularities.

  15. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-20

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  16. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  17. Secret Codes: The Hidden Curriculum of Semantic Web Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard; Carmichael, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    There is a long tradition in education of examination of the hidden curriculum, those elements which are implicit or tacit to the formal goals of education. This article draws upon that tradition to open up for investigation the hidden curriculum and assumptions about students and knowledge that are embedded in the coding undertaken to facilitate…

  18. The Hidden Curriculum of Youth Policy: A Dutch Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopman, Marit; de Winter, Micha; Koops, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Youth policy is more than a mere response to the actual behavior of children, but it is equally influenced by values and beliefs of policy makers. These values are however rarely made explicit and, therefore, the authors refer to them as "the hidden curriculum" of youth policy. The study investigation explicates this hidden curriculum by…

  19. Hidden attractor in the Rabinovich system, Chua circuits and PLL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, N. V.; Leonov, G. A.; Mokaev, T. N.; Seledzhi, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this report the existence of hidden attractors in Rabinovich system, phase-locked loop and coupled Chua circuits is considered. It is shown that the existence of hidden attractors may complicate the analysis of the systems and significantly affect the synchronization.

  20. Seuss's Butter Battle Book: Is There Hidden Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Cleaf, David W.; Martin, Rita J.

    1986-01-01

    Examines whether elementary school children relate to the "harmful hidden message" about nuclear war in Dr. Seuss's THE BUTTER BATTLE BOOK. After ascertaining the children's cognitive level, they participated in activities to find hidden meanings in stories, including Seuss's book. Students failed to identify the nuclear war message in Seuss's…

  1. Hidden Curriculum as One of Current Issue of Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2015-01-01

    There are several issues in the education system, especially in the curriculum field that affect education. Hidden curriculum is one of current controversial curriculum issues. Many hidden curricular issues are the result of assumptions and expectations that are not formally communicated, established, or conveyed within the learning environment.…

  2. Identifying hidden sexual bridging communities in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Youm, Yoosik; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen; Williams, Chyvette T; Ouellet, Lawrence J

    2009-07-01

    Bridge populations can play a central role in the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by providing transmission links between higher and lower prevalence populations. While social network methods are well suited to the study of bridge populations, analyses tend to focus on dyads (i.e., risk between drug and/or sex partners) and ignore bridges between distinct subpopulations. This study takes initial steps toward moving the analysis of sexual network linkages beyond individual and risk group levels to a community level in which Chicago's 77 community areas are examined as subpopulations for the purpose of identifying potential bridging communities. Of particular interest are "hidden" bridging communities; that is, areas with above-average levels of sexual ties with other areas but whose below-average AIDS prevalence may hide their potential importance for HIV prevention. Data for this analysis came from the first wave of recruiting at the Chicago Sexual Acquisition and Transmission of HIV Cooperative Agreement Program site. Between August 2005 through October 2006, respondent-driven sampling was used to recruit users of heroin, cocaine, or methamphetamine, men who have sex with men regardless of drug use, the sex partners of these two groups, and sex partners of the sex partners. In this cross-sectional study of the sexual transmission of HIV, participants completed a network-focused computer-assisted self-administered interview, which included questions about the geographic locations of sexual contacts with up to six recent partners. Bridging scores for each area were determined using a matrix representing Chicago's 77 community areas and were assessed using two measures: non-redundant ties and flow betweenness. Bridging measures and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) case prevalence rates were plotted for each community area on charts representing four conditions: below-average bridging and AIDS prevalence, below-average bridging and above

  3. Charm mixing in a model-independent analysis of correlated D{sup 0}D{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, Alex; Vorobiev, Vitaly; Poluektov, Anton

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the impact of charm mixing on a model-independent {gamma} measurement using the Dalitz plot analysis of the three-body D decay from the B{sup +}{yields}DK{sup +} process, and show that ignoring the mixing at all stages of the analysis is safe up to a sub-degree level of precision. We also find that in the coherent production of the D{sup 0}D{sup *0} system in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions, the effect of charm mixing is enhanced, and propose a model-independent method to measure charm mixing parameters in time-integrated Dalitz plot analysis at charm factories.

  4. Charming the Next Generation: A Strategy for Turning Toddlers into Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Renea

    2005-01-01

    Typically, when a parent and a toddler share a picture book, the adult reads and the child listens. But practitioners of a special, research-based technique called dialogic reading are turning that age-old model upside down. Dialogic reading transforms youngsters into storytellers and adults into active listeners, increasing the likelihood that…

  5. Defect Detection Using Hidden Markov Random Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dogandzic, Aleksandar; Eua-anant, Nawanat; Zhang Benhong

    2005-04-09

    We derive an approximate maximum a posteriori (MAP) method for detecting NDE defect signals using hidden Markov random fields (HMRFs). In the proposed HMRF framework, a set of spatially distributed NDE measurements is assumed to form a noisy realization of an underlying random field that has a simple structure with Markovian dependence. Here, the random field describes the defect signals to be estimated or detected. The HMRF models incorporate measurement locations into the statistical analysis, which is important in scenarios where the same defect affects measurements at multiple locations. We also discuss initialization of the proposed HMRF detector and apply to simulated eddy-current data and experimental ultrasonic C-scan data from an inspection of a cylindrical Ti 6-4 billet.

  6. Magneto-Radar Hidden Metal Detector

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    2005-07-05

    A varying magnetic field excites slight vibrations in an object and a radar sensor detects the vibrations at a harmonic of the excitation frequency. The synergy of the magnetic excitation and radar detection provides increased detection range compared to conventional magnetic metal detectors. The radar rejects background clutter by responding only to reflecting objects that are vibrating at a harmonic excitation field, thereby significantly improving detection reliability. As an exemplary arrangement, an ultra-wideband micropower impulse radar (MIR) is capable of being employed to provide superior materials penetration while providing range information. The magneto-radar may be applied to pre-screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients, landmine detection and finding hidden treasures.

  7. Hidden baryons: The physics of Compton composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Frederick J.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of the mass-energy of the Universe appears to be composed of Compton composites. How is it then that these composites are not frequently observed in experiments? This paper addresses this question, and others, by reviewing recent publications that: 1) introduced Compton composites, 2) showed how and where they are formed and 3) explained how they interact with other systems. Though ubiquitous in many physical situations, Compton composites are almost completely hidden in experiments due to their unique interaction characteristics. Still, their presence has been indirectly observed, though not interpreted as such until recently. Looking to the future, direct-detection experiments are proposed that could verify the composites' components. It is with deep sadness that I dedicate this paper to my mentor, collaborator, and friend, Dr. John R. Reitz, who passed away within days of the publication of our paper “Compton Composites Late in the Early Universe”.

  8. The hidden biology of sponges and ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Casey W; Leys, Sally P; Haddock, Steven H D

    2015-05-01

    Animal evolution is often presented as a march toward complexity, with different living animal groups each representing grades of organization that arose through the progressive acquisition of complex traits. There are now many reasons to reject this classical hypothesis. Not only is it incompatible with recent phylogenetic analyses, but it is also an artifact of 'hidden biology', that is, blind spots to complex traits in non-model species. A new hypothesis of animal evolution, where many complex traits have been repeatedly gained and lost, is emerging. As we discuss here, key details of this new model hinge on a better understanding of the Porifera and Ctenophora, which have each been hypothesized to be sister to all other animals, but are poorly studied and often misrepresented. PMID:25840473

  9. Mixture Hidden Markov Models in Finance Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, José G.; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Ramos, Sofia

    Finite mixture models have proven to be a powerful framework whenever unobserved heterogeneity cannot be ignored. We introduce in finance research the Mixture Hidden Markov Model (MHMM) that takes into account time and space heterogeneity simultaneously. This approach is flexible in the sense that it can deal with the specific features of financial time series data, such as asymmetry, kurtosis, and unobserved heterogeneity. This methodology is applied to model simultaneously 12 time series of Asian stock markets indexes. Because we selected a heterogeneous sample of countries including both developed and emerging countries, we expect that heterogeneity in market returns due to country idiosyncrasies will show up in the results. The best fitting model was the one with two clusters at country level with different dynamics between the two regimes.

  10. Plume mapping via hidden Markov methods.

    PubMed

    Farrell, J A; Pang, Shuo; Li, Wei

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of mapping likely locations of a chemical source using an autonomous vehicle operating in a fluid flow. The paper reviews biological plume-tracing concepts, reviews previous strategies for vehicle-based plume tracing, and presents a new plume mapping approach based on hidden Markov methods (HMM). HMM provide efficient algorithms for predicting the likelihood of odor detection versus position, the likelihood of source location versus position, the most likely path taken by the odor to a given location, and the path between two points most likely to result in odor detection. All four are useful for solving the odor source localization problem using an autonomous vehicle. The vehicle is assumed to be capable of detecting above threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. The fluid flow is assumed to vary with space and time, and to have a high Reynolds number (Re>10). PMID:18238238

  11. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs. PMID:27271936

  12. SU(3) breaking and hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.; OConnell, H.B.

    1998-10-01

    We study the various existing implementations of SU(3) breaking in the hidden local symmetry model for the low energy hadronic sector following a mechanism originally proposed by Bando, Kugo and Yamawaki (BKY). We pay particular attention to Hermiticity and current conservation. Following this, we present a new method for including symmetry breaking effects which preserves the BKY mass relation among vector mesons. Symmetry breaking (SB) necessarily requires a transformation of the pseudoscalar fields, which, following BKY, we refer to as field renormalization. We examine the consequences of propagating this through all Lagrangian terms including the anomalous ones. We thus explore the consequences of these various SB schemes for both charged and neutral pseudoscalar decay constants as measured in weak and anomalous decays respectively. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. The hidden biology of sponges and ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Casey W; Leys, Sally P; Haddock, Steven H D

    2015-05-01

    Animal evolution is often presented as a march toward complexity, with different living animal groups each representing grades of organization that arose through the progressive acquisition of complex traits. There are now many reasons to reject this classical hypothesis. Not only is it incompatible with recent phylogenetic analyses, but it is also an artifact of 'hidden biology', that is, blind spots to complex traits in non-model species. A new hypothesis of animal evolution, where many complex traits have been repeatedly gained and lost, is emerging. As we discuss here, key details of this new model hinge on a better understanding of the Porifera and Ctenophora, which have each been hypothesized to be sister to all other animals, but are poorly studied and often misrepresented.

  14. Natural inflation with hidden scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, Neil D.; Kobakhidze, Archil; Liang, Shelley

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new class of natural inflation models based on a hidden scale invariance. In a very generic Wilsonian effective field theory with an arbitrary number of scalar fields, which exhibits scale invariance via the dilaton, the potential necessarily contains a flat direction in the classical limit. This flat direction is lifted by small quantum corrections and inflation is realised without need for an unnatural fine-tuning. In the conformal limit, the effective potential becomes linear in the inflaton field, yielding to specific predictions for the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio, being respectively: ns - 1 ≈ - 0.025 (N⋆/60)-1 and r ≈ 0.0667 (N⋆/60)-1, where N⋆ ≈ 30- 65 is a number of efolds during observable inflation. This predictions are in reasonable agreement with cosmological measurements. Further improvement of the accuracy of these measurements may turn out to be critical in falsifying our scenario.

  15. Reply to comment on ''New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distribution''

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Hobbs, Timothy J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2016-01-05

    We reply to the Comment of Brodsky and Gardner on our paper "New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions" [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 082002 (2015)]. We address a number of incorrect claims made about our fitting methodology, and elaborate how global QCD analysis of all available high-energy data provides no evidence for a large intrinsic charm component of the nucleon.

  16. Facies Reconstruction by hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeri, M.; Della Rossa, E.; Dovera, L.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2012-04-01

    The inherent heterogeneity of natural aquifer complex systems can be properly described by a doubly stochastic composite medium approach, where distributions of geomaterials (facies) and attributes, e.g., hydraulic conductivity and porosity, can be uncertain. We focus on the reconstruction of the spatial distribution of facies within a porous medium. The key contribution of our work is to provide a methodology for evaluating the unknown facies distribution while maintaining the spatial correlation between the geological bodies. The latter is considered to be known a priori. The geostatistical model for the spatial distribution of facies is defined in the framework of multiple-point geostatistics, relying on transition probabilities (Stien and Kolbjornsen, 2011). Specifically, we model the facies distribution over the domain by employing the notion of Hidden Markov Model. The hidden states of the system are provided by the value of the indicator function at each cell of the grid, while the the petrophysical properties of the soil (e.g., the permeability) are considered as known. In this context, the key issue is the assessment of the spatial architecture of the geological bodies within the domain of interest upon maximizing the probability associated with a given permeability distribution. This objective is achieved through the Viterbi algorithm. This algorithm was initially introduced for signal denoising problems (e.g., Rabiner, 1989) and has been extended here to a two-dimensional system, following the approach proposed by Li et al. (2000) according to the following steps: (1) the parameters of the transitional probabilities of the facies distribution are estimated from a given training image; (2) the facies distribution maximizing the probability of occurrence considering the probability of (i) facies distribution, (ii) conductivity distribution and (iii) their joint conditional probability is then reconstructed. We demonstrate the reliability and advantage of

  17. How hidden are hidden processes? A primer on crypticity and entropy convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John R.; Ellison, Christopher J.; James, Ryan G.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate a stationary process's crypticity—a measure of the difference between its hidden state information and its observed information—using the causal states of computational mechanics. Here, we motivate crypticity and cryptic order as physically meaningful quantities that monitor how hidden a hidden process is. This is done by recasting previous results on the convergence of block entropy and block-state entropy in a geometric setting, one that is more intuitive and that leads to a number of new results. For example, we connect crypticity to how an observer synchronizes to a process. We show that the block-causal-state entropy is a convex function of block length. We give a complete analysis of spin chains. We present a classification scheme that surveys stationary processes in terms of their possible cryptic and Markov orders. We illustrate related entropy convergence behaviors using a new form of foliated information diagram. Finally, along the way, we provide a variety of interpretations of crypticity and cryptic order to establish their naturalness and pervasiveness. This is also a first step in developing applications in spatially extended and network dynamical systems.

  18. How hidden are hidden processes? A primer on crypticity and entropy convergence.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, John R; Ellison, Christopher J; James, Ryan G; Crutchfield, James P

    2011-09-01

    We investigate a stationary process's crypticity--a measure of the difference between its hidden state information and its observed information--using the causal states of computational mechanics. Here, we motivate crypticity and cryptic order as physically meaningful quantities that monitor how hidden a hidden process is. This is done by recasting previous results on the convergence of block entropy and block-state entropy in a geometric setting, one that is more intuitive and that leads to a number of new results. For example, we connect crypticity to how an observer synchronizes to a process. We show that the block-causal-state entropy is a convex function of block length. We give a complete analysis of spin chains. We present a classification scheme that surveys stationary processes in terms of their possible cryptic and Markov orders. We illustrate related entropy convergence behaviors using a new form of foliated information diagram. Finally, along the way, we provide a variety of interpretations of crypticity and cryptic order to establish their naturalness and pervasiveness. This is also a first step in developing applications in spatially extended and network dynamical systems. PMID:21974675

  19. Radio for hidden-photon dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Graham, Peter W.; Irwin, Kent; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2015-10-08

    We propose a resonant electromagnetic detector to search for hidden-photon dark matter over an extensive range of masses. Hidden-photon dark matter can be described as a weakly coupled “hidden electric field,” oscillating at a frequency fixed by the mass, and able to penetrate any shielding. At low frequencies (compared to the inverse size of the shielding), we find that the observable effect of the hidden photon inside any shielding is a real, oscillating magnetic field. We outline experimental setups designed to search for hidden-photon dark matter, using a tunable, resonant LC circuit designed to couple to this magnetic field. Our “straw man” setups take into consideration resonator design, readout architecture and noise estimates. At high frequencies, there is an upper limit to the useful size of a single resonator set by 1/ν. However, many resonators may be multiplexed within a hidden-photon coherence length to increase the sensitivity in this regime. Hidden-photon dark matter has an enormous range of possible frequencies, but current experiments search only over a few narrow pieces of that range. As a result, we find the potential sensitivity of our proposal is many orders of magnitude beyond current limits over an extensive range of frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 700 GHz and potentially higher.

  20. Hidden anti-double stranded DNA antibodies in autoimmune mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, F; Ziff, M

    1982-01-01

    When MRL/l mouse spleen cell culture supernatants were incubated with normal mouse spleen cells, a two-50-fold increase in anti-dsDNA activity was noted. A smaller increase in anti-ssDNA and no change in anti-TNP antibody activity were observed. This 'hidden' antibody in the MRL/l supernatants could not be revealed by DNAse digestion and could not be absorbed by a DNA cellulose column. Hidden antibody was removed from supernatants by sepharose-anti Ig. After DNAase digestion of the MRL/l supernatants, hidden anti-dsDNA could not be revealed by incubation with spleen cells. All the hidden activity was excluded by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300 (mol. wt greater than 300,000) but was banded in the low density protein area of caesium chloride equilibrium density gradients. It was also noted that MRL/l mouse sera had hidden anti-dsDNA antibodies. Hidden antibodies were present in both the IgG and IgM classes. The revealed antibodies demonstrated impaired ability to bind Fc specific anti-Ig reagents suggesting that they were partially degraded during the incubation with mouse spleen cells. The hidden anti-dsDNA thus appears to represent a DNA-anti-dsDNA complex, perhaps of very high affinity. It may explain why anti-dsDNA but not anti-ssDNA antibodies are of pathological importance in SLE. PMID:6756722

  1. Radio for hidden-photon dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Graham, Peter W.; Irwin, Kent; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2015-10-01

    We propose a resonant electromagnetic detector to search for hidden-photon dark matter over an extensive range of masses. Hidden-photon dark matter can be described as a weakly coupled "hidden electric field," oscillating at a frequency fixed by the mass, and able to penetrate any shielding. At low frequencies (compared to the inverse size of the shielding), we find that the observable effect of the hidden photon inside any shielding is a real, oscillating magnetic field. We outline experimental setups designed to search for hidden-photon dark matter, using a tunable, resonant LC circuit designed to couple to this magnetic field. Our "straw man" setups take into consideration resonator design, readout architecture and noise estimates. At high frequencies, there is an upper limit to the useful size of a single resonator set by 1 /ν . However, many resonators may be multiplexed within a hidden-photon coherence length to increase the sensitivity in this regime. Hidden-photon dark matter has an enormous range of possible frequencies, but current experiments search only over a few narrow pieces of that range. We find the potential sensitivity of our proposal is many orders of magnitude beyond current limits over an extensive range of frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 700 GHz and potentially higher.

  2. Radio for hidden-photon dark matter detection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Graham, Peter W.; Irwin, Kent; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2015-10-08

    We propose a resonant electromagnetic detector to search for hidden-photon dark matter over an extensive range of masses. Hidden-photon dark matter can be described as a weakly coupled “hidden electric field,” oscillating at a frequency fixed by the mass, and able to penetrate any shielding. At low frequencies (compared to the inverse size of the shielding), we find that the observable effect of the hidden photon inside any shielding is a real, oscillating magnetic field. We outline experimental setups designed to search for hidden-photon dark matter, using a tunable, resonant LC circuit designed to couple to this magnetic field. Ourmore » “straw man” setups take into consideration resonator design, readout architecture and noise estimates. At high frequencies, there is an upper limit to the useful size of a single resonator set by 1/ν. However, many resonators may be multiplexed within a hidden-photon coherence length to increase the sensitivity in this regime. Hidden-photon dark matter has an enormous range of possible frequencies, but current experiments search only over a few narrow pieces of that range. As a result, we find the potential sensitivity of our proposal is many orders of magnitude beyond current limits over an extensive range of frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 700 GHz and potentially higher.« less

  3. Charm production in association with an electroweak gauge boson at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Stirling, W J; Vryonidou, E

    2012-08-24

    The production of charm quark jets in association with electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC can be used as a tool to constrain quark parton distribution functions (PDFs). Motivated by recent measurements at the Tevatron and LHC, we calculate cross sections for W/Z+c, comparing these to W/Z+jet, for various PDF sets. The cross-section differences can be understood in terms of the different underlying PDFs, with the strange quark distribution being particularly important for W+c production. We suggest measurements of appropriately defined ratios and comment on how these measurements at the LHC can be used to extract information on the strange and charm content of the proton at high Q(2) scales.

  4. Modifications and adaptations of the Charm II rapid antibody assay for chloramphenicol in honey.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sarah E; Lansden, John A; Schenck, Frank J

    2004-07-01

    The Charm II screening method for the presence of chloramphenicol in honey has a sensitivity of 0.3 ppb. This screening method is a simple, rapid antibody assay using [3H]chloramphenicol and a binding reagent. Analysis of different types of honey revealed considerable differences in results. Honey can be liquid, crystallized (creamed), or partially crystallized and is classified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture into seven color categories: water white, extra white, white, extra light amber, light amber, amber, and dark amber. Fortified and nonfortified liquid amber honey tested appropriately with the Charm II unit and the negative control provided with the unit after slight modifications were made. However, approximately 70% of creamed honey samples fortified at 0.6 ppb did not test positive for the presence of chloramphenicol using the provided negative control. Matrix quenching effects were evaluated, and these effects were accounted for by establishing different assay conditions for different honey types.

  5. Beauty-quark and charm-quark pair production asymmetries at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Haisch, Ulrich; Pecjak, Ben D.; Re, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The LHCb Collaboration has recently performed a first measurement of the angular production asymmetry in the distribution of beauty quarks and antiquarks at a hadron collider. We calculate the corresponding standard model prediction for this asymmetry at fixed order in perturbation theory. Our results show good agreement with the data, which are provided differentially for three bins in the invariant mass of the b b ¯ system. We also present similar predictions for both beauty-quark and charm-quark final states within the LHCb acceptance for a collision energy of √{s }=13 TeV . We finally point out that a measurement of the ratio of the b b ¯ and c c ¯ cross sections may be useful for experimentally validating charm-tagging efficiencies.

  6. Semileptonic B and B{sub s} decays into orbitally excited charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Segovia, J.; Albertus, C.; Entem, D. R.; Fernandez, F.; Hernandez, E.; Perez-Garcia, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    The BABAR Collaboration has recently reported products of branching fractions that include B meson semileptonic decays into final states with charged and neutral D{sub 1}(2420) and D{sub 2}*(2460), two narrow orbitally excited charmed mesons. We evaluate these branching fractions, together with those concerning D{sub 0}*(2400) and D{sub 1}{sup '}(2430) mesons, within the framework of a constituent quark model. The calculation is performed in two steps, one of which involves a semileptonic decay and the other is mediated by a strong process. Our results are in agreement with the experimental data. We also extend the study to semileptonic decays of B{sub s} into orbitally excited charmed-strange mesons, providing predictions to the possible measurements to be carried out at LHC.

  7. Investigation of semileptonic B meson decays to P-wave charm mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellerive, Alain

    This thesis presents an investigation of semileptonic B meson decays with a narrow P-wave charm meson in the final state. The data sample consists of 3.29 × 106 BB¯ events collected with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring. The P-wave charm mesons are reconstructed in the chain of decays: D0J-->D*+p- ,D*+-->D0p+,D 0-->K-p+ or D0-->K- p+p 0 . Study of the decay B- -->D*+p0l -nl reveals useful information about the deficit observed in inclusive charm semileptonic B decays and the effective couplings of the W boson to heavy quark mesons. The results obtained for the exclusive semileptonic product branching fractions are B(B- --> D01l-nl ) B(D01-->D*+p -) = (0.373 +/- 0.085 +/- 0.052 +/- 0.024)% and B(B- -->D*0 2l- nl )B(D*0 2-->D*+p-) < 0.16% (90% C.L.). The assumption B(D01-->D* +p-) = 67% and B(D*02-->D *+p-) = 20% implies B(B- -->D01 l- nl) (0.56 0.13 +/- 0.08 +/- 0.04)% and B(B---> D*0 2lnl) < 0.8% (90% C.L.). These results indicate that at least 18% of the total B semileptonic rate is still unaccounted for by the observed exclusive decays, B-->D0l- nl, B-->D*ln l,B -->D1ln l, and B-->D*2 lnl . Furthermore, the first measurement of the q 2 spectrum for B- -->D01ln l is presented. The present analysis also suggests that the Λ QCD/mQ corrections beyond the HQS prescriptions might be significant in the theoretical treatment of the dynamics of B semileptonic decays to excited charm mesons.

  8. Charmed-meson production in 800-GeV P-P interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Senko, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x{sub F} {ge} 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies {radical}s {le} 27 GeV and {radical}s {ge} 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of {radical}s. The result of the experiment, {sigma}(D/{bar D}) = 42.7 {plus minus} 7.8 {mu}b at {radical}s = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d{sup 2}{sigma}/dx{sub F}dp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2} {approximately} (1 {minus} {vert bar}x{sub F}{vert bar}){sup n}e{sup {minus}bp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2}} gives the results n = 8.4{sub {minus}1.9}{sup +2.2}, b= 0.78{sub {minus}0.16}{sup +0.19} (GeV/c){sup {minus}2}, and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} = 1.1{sub {minus} 0.1}{sup +0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions.

  9. Resonant scattering and charm showers in ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos with energy of about 7 x 10 to the 6th GeV have much-enhanced cross sections due to W-boson production off electrons. Possible signals due to cosmic-ray sources are estimated. Higher-energy antineutrinos can efficiently produce a W accompanied by radiation. Another possibility, which could lead to shadowing at modest depths, is resonant production of a charged Higgs particle. The importance of muon production by charm showers in rock is pointed out.

  10. Neutrino Production of a Charmed Meson and the Transverse Spin Structure of the Nucleon.

    PubMed

    Pire, B; Szymanowski, L

    2015-08-28

    We calculate the amplitude for exclusive neutrino production of a charmed meson on an unpolarized target in the collinear QCD approach, where generalized parton distributions (GPDs) factorize from perturbatively calculable coefficient functions. We demonstrate that the transversity chiral odd GPDs contribute to the transverse cross section if the hard amplitude is calculated up to order m_{c}/Q. We show how to access these GPDs through the azimuthal dependence of the νN→μ^{-}D^{+}N differential cross section. PMID:26371643

  11. Line shapes of the exotic charm-anticharm mesons X(3872) and Z(4430)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meng

    The B-factory experiments have recently discovered a series of new cc mesons, including the X(3872) and the first manifestly exotic meson Z +/-(4430). The proximity of the mass of the X to the D*0D 0 threshold has motivated its identification as a loosely-bound hadronic molecule whose constituents are a superposition of the charm mesons pairs D*0D 0 and D0D* 0. Factorization formulas for its line shapes are derived by taking advantage of the universality of S-wave resonances near a 2-particle threshold and by including the effects from the nonzero width of D* meson and the inelastic scattering channels of the charm mesons. The best fit to the line shapes of X in the J/psipi +pi- and D0 D0pi0 channels measured by the Belle Collaboration corresponds to the X being a bound state whose mass is just below the D*0 D0 threshold. The differences between the line shapes of X produced in B+ decays and B0 decays as well as in decay channels J/psipi+pi-, J /psipi+pi-pi0 , and D0D 0pi0 are further derived by taking into account the effects from the closeby channel composed of charged charm mesons. A more speculative application of the universality of S-wave resonances near a 2-particle threshold is to the Z+/-(4430), which is interpreted as a charm meson molecule composed of a superposition of D+1D*0 and D*+D01 . The small ratio of the binding energy of the Z + to the width of its constituent D1 is exploited to obtained simple predictions for its line shapes in the channels psi(2S)pi + and D*D*pi.

  12. Studies of charmed hadronic B decays with the early LHCb data and prospects for {gamma} measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nardulli, J.

    2010-12-22

    We present the first studies of decays of the type B{yields}DX, where D represents a charmed meson (D{sup 0}, D{sup (*)+}, or D{sub s}) from the LHCb experiment at CERN. Our studies use data accumulated during the 2010 run of the LHC. This work represents the first steps on a programme towards a precision measurement of the angle {gamma} of the CKM Unitarity Triangle. The prospects for this {gamma} measurement will be reviewed.

  13. Rates for inclusive deep-inelastic electroproduction of charm quarks at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemersma, S.; Smith, J.; van Neerven, W. L.

    1995-02-01

    The coefficient functions for heavy flavour production in deeply inelastic electron hadron scattering have been calculated previously. These functions are so long that no analytic expressions could be published. Therefore we have tabulated them as two-dimensional arrays as is often done for the scale dependent parton densities. Using this computer program we present event rates for charm production at HERA in bins of x and Q2. These rates are insensitive to variations in the factorization and renormalization scale μ.

  14. Hidden order to antiferromagnetic transition in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jesse; Movassagh, Mahsa Rahimi; Wilson, Murray; Luke, Graeme; Kanchanavatee, Noravee; Huang, Kevin; Janoschek, Marc; Maple, M. Brian; Timusk, Tom

    The second-order phase transition in the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 continues to confound efforts to reveal its true nature, and bears the moniker ''hidden order'' with good reason. While the order parameter remains mysterious, antiferromagnetism is easily induced with modest chemical substitution. The proximity of these two phases offers tantalizing clues about the nature of the hidden order phase. We present data on the antiferromagnetic phase, revealing the similarities and the differences between the two phases, including evidence for effects above the transition temperature. The implications of these findings for the hidden order parameter will be discussed. Alternate affiliation: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  15. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles.

  16. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles. PMID:26894730

  17. Observation of the production of a W boson in association with a single charm quark.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chou, J P; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-02-15

    The first observation of the production of a W boson with a single charm quark (c) jet in pp[over ¯] collisions at √s=1.96  TeV is reported. The analysis uses data corresponding to 4.3  fb(-1), recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Charm quark candidates are selected through the identification of an electron or muon from charm-hadron semileptonic decay within a hadronic jet, and a Wc signal is observed with a significance of 5.7 standard deviations. The production cross section σ(Wc)(p(Tc)>20  GeV/c,|η(c)|<1.5)×B(W→ℓν) is measured to be 13.6(-3.1)(+3.4)  pb and is in agreement with theoretical expectations. From this result the magnitude of the quark-mixing matrix element V(cs) is derived, |V(cs)|=1.08±0.16 along with a lower limit of |V(cs)|>0.71 at the 95% confidence level, assuming that the Wc production through c to s quark coupling is dominant.

  18. Formation spectra of charmed meson-nucleus systems using an antiproton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Nieves, J.; Salcedo, L. L.; Tolos, L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the structure and formation of charmed meson-nucleus systems, with the aim of understanding the charmed meson-nucleon interactions and the properties of the charmed mesons in the nuclear medium. The D bar mesic nuclei are of special interest, since they have tiny decay widths due to the absence of strong decays for the D bar N pair. Employing an effective model for the D bar N and DN interactions and solving the Klein-Gordon equation for D bar and D in finite nuclei, we find that the D--11B system has 1s and 2p mesic nuclear states and that the D0-11B system binds in a 1s state. In view of the forthcoming experiments by the PANDA and CBM Collaborations at the future FAIR facility and the J-PARC upgrade, we calculate the formation spectra of the [D--11B] and [D0-11B] mesic nuclei for an antiproton beam on a 12C target. Our results suggest that it is possible to observe the 2pD- mesic nuclear state with an appropriate experimental setup.

  19. Exclusive charm production in pp collisions at {radical}(s) < or approx. 15 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, A. I.; Kaempfer, B.

    2008-08-15

    We discuss the open charm production in the peripheral reactions pp{yields}Y{sub c}Y{sub c} and pp{yields}M{sub c}M{sub c}, where Y{sub c} and M{sub c} stand for {lambda}{sub c}{sup +},{sigma}{sub c}{sup +} and D,D*, respectively, at {radical}(s) < or approx. 15 GeV, which corresponds to the energy range of FAIR. Our consideration is based on the topological decomposition of the planar quark and diquark diagrams, which allows us to estimate consistently meson and baryon exchange trajectories and energy scale parameters as well. The spin dependance is determined by the effective interaction of the lowest exchanged resonance. Unknown parameters are fixed by an independent analysis of open strangeness production in pp{yields}YY and pp{yields}KK reactions and of SU(4) symmetry. We present the corresponding cross sections and longitudinal double-spin asymmetries for exclusive binary reactions with open charm mesons and baryons in the final state. The polarization observables have a nontrivial t and s dependence that is sensitive to details of the open charm production mechanism.

  20. Exploring the role of the charm quark in the Δ I =1 /2 rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endress, E.; Pena, C.

    2014-11-01

    We study the dependence on the charm quark mass of the leading-order low-energy constants of the Δ S =1 effective Hamiltonian, with the aim of elucidating the role of the charm mass scale in the Δ I =1 /2 rule for K →π π decay. To that purpose, finite-volume chiral perturbation theory predictions are matched to QCD simulations, performed in the quenched approximation with overlap fermions and mu=md=ms . Light quark masses range between a few MeV up to around one third of the physical strange mass, while charm masses range between mu and a few hundred MeV. Novel variance reduction techniques are used to obtain a signal for penguin contractions in correlation functions involving four-fermion operators. The important role played by the subtractions required to construct renormalized amplitudes for mc≠mu is discussed in detail. We find evidence that the moderate enhancement of the Δ I =1 /2 amplitude previously found in the GIM limit mc=mu increases only slightly as mc abandons the light quark regime. Hints of a stronger enhancement for even higher values of mc are also found, but their confirmation requires a better understanding of the subtraction terms.

  1. Observation of the Production of a W Boson in Association with a Single Charm Quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chou, J. P.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-02-01

    The first observation of the production of a W boson with a single charm quark (c) jet in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV is reported. The analysis uses data corresponding to 4.3fb-1, recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Charm quark candidates are selected through the identification of an electron or muon from charm-hadron semileptonic decay within a hadronic jet, and a Wc signal is observed with a significance of 5.7 standard deviations. The production cross section σWc(pTc>20GeV/c,|ηc|<1.5)×B(W→ℓν) is measured to be 13.6-3.1+3.4pb and is in agreement with theoretical expectations. From this result the magnitude of the quark-mixing matrix element Vcs is derived, |Vcs|=1.08±0.16 along with a lower limit of |Vcs|>0.71 at the 95% confidence level, assuming that the Wc production through c to s quark coupling is dominant.

  2. Identification and classification of conopeptides using profile Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Laht, Silja; Koua, Dominique; Kaplinski, Lauris; Lisacek, Frédérique; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-03-01

    Conopeptides are small toxins produced by predatory marine snails of the genus Conus. They are studied with increasing intensity due to their potential in neurosciences and pharmacology. The number of existing conopeptides is estimated to be 1 million, but only about 1000 have been described to date. Thanks to new high-throughput sequencing technologies the number of known conopeptides is likely to increase exponentially in the near future. There is therefore a need for a fast and accurate computational method for identification and classification of the novel conopeptides in large data sets. 62 profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs) were built for prediction and classification of all described conopeptide superfamilies and families, based on the different parts of the corresponding protein sequences. These models showed very high specificity in detection of new peptides. 56 out of 62 models do not give a single false positive in a test with the entire UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot protein sequence database. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of mature peptide models for automatic classification with accuracy of 96% for the mature peptide models and 100% for the pro- and signal peptide models. Our conopeptide profile HMMs can be used for finding and annotation of new conopeptides from large datasets generated by transcriptome or genome sequencing. To our knowledge this is the first time this kind of computational method has been applied to predict all known conopeptide superfamilies and some conopeptide families. PMID:22244925

  3. Identification and classification of conopeptides using profile Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Laht, Silja; Koua, Dominique; Kaplinski, Lauris; Lisacek, Frédérique; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-03-01

    Conopeptides are small toxins produced by predatory marine snails of the genus Conus. They are studied with increasing intensity due to their potential in neurosciences and pharmacology. The number of existing conopeptides is estimated to be 1 million, but only about 1000 have been described to date. Thanks to new high-throughput sequencing technologies the number of known conopeptides is likely to increase exponentially in the near future. There is therefore a need for a fast and accurate computational method for identification and classification of the novel conopeptides in large data sets. 62 profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs) were built for prediction and classification of all described conopeptide superfamilies and families, based on the different parts of the corresponding protein sequences. These models showed very high specificity in detection of new peptides. 56 out of 62 models do not give a single false positive in a test with the entire UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot protein sequence database. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of mature peptide models for automatic classification with accuracy of 96% for the mature peptide models and 100% for the pro- and signal peptide models. Our conopeptide profile HMMs can be used for finding and annotation of new conopeptides from large datasets generated by transcriptome or genome sequencing. To our knowledge this is the first time this kind of computational method has been applied to predict all known conopeptide superfamilies and some conopeptide families.

  4. Characterization of Caenorhabditis elegans behavior in response to chemical stress by using hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeontaek; Sim, Seungwoo; Lee, Sang-Hee

    2014-06-01

    The locomotion behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans has been extensively studied to understand the relationship between the changes in the organism's neural activity and the biomechanics. However, so far, we have not yet achieved the understanding. This is because the worm complicatedly responds to the environmental factors, especially chemical stress. Constructing a mathematical model is helpful for the understanding the locomotion behavior in various surrounding conditions. In the present study, we built three hidden Markov models for the crawling behavior of C. elegans in a controlled environment with no chemical treatment and in a polluted environment by formaldehyde, toluene, and benzene (0.1 ppm and 0.5 ppm for each case). The organism's crawling activity was recorded using a digital camcorder for 20 min at a rate of 24 frames per second. All shape patterns were quantified by branch length similarity entropy and classified into five groups by using the self-organizing map. To evaluate and establish the hidden Markov models, we compared correlation coefficients between the simulated behavior (i.e. temporal pattern sequence) generated by the models and the actual crawling behavior. The comparison showed that the hidden Markov models are successful to characterize the crawling behavior. In addition, we briefly discussed the possibility of using the models together with the entropy to develop bio-monitoring systems for determining water quality.

  5. Hidden Tree Structure is a Key to the Emergence of Scaling in the World Wide Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo-Jin; Wang, Jian-Min; Chen, Gui-Sheng; Jiang, Jian; Shen, Xian-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Preferential attachment is the most popular explanation for the emergence of scaling behavior in the World Wide Web, but this explanation has been challenged by the global information hypothesis, the existence of linear preference and the emergence of new big internet companies in the real world. We notice that most websites have an obvious feature that their pages are organized as a tree (namely hidden tree) and hence propose a new model that introduces a hidden tree structure into the Erdös—Rényi model by adding a new rule: when one node connects to another, it should also connect to all nodes in the path between these two nodes in the hidden tree. The experimental results show that the degree distribution of the generated graphs would obey power law distributions and have variable high clustering coefficients and variable small average lengths of shortest paths. The proposed model provides an alternative explanation to the emergence of scaling in the World Wide Web without the above-mentioned difficulties, and also explains the “preferential attachment" phenomenon.

  6. Hidden Markov Models for Detecting Aseismic Events in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granat, R.

    2004-12-01

    We employ a hidden Markov model (HMM) to segment surface displacement time series collection by the Southern California Integrated Geodetic Network (SCIGN). These segmented time series are then used to detect regional events by observing the number of simultaneous mode changes across the network; if a large number of stations change at the same time, that indicates an event. The hidden Markov model (HMM) approach assumes that the observed data has been generated by an unobservable dynamical statistical process. The process is of a particular form such that each observation is coincident with the system being in a particular discrete state, which is interpreted as a behavioral mode. The dynamics are the model are constructed so that the next state is directly dependent only on the current state -- it is a first order Markov process. The model is completely described by a set of parameters: the initial state probabilities, the first order Markov chain state-to-state transition probabilities, and the probability distribution of observable outputs associated with each state. The result of this approach is that our segmentation decisions are based entirely on statistical changes in the behavior of the observed daily displacements. In general, finding the optimal model parameters to fit the data is a difficult problem. We present an innovative model fitting method that is unsupervised (i.e., it requires no labeled training data) and uses a regularized version of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to ensure that model solutions are both robust with respect to initial conditions and of high quality. We demonstrate the reliability of the method as compared to standard model fitting methods and show that it results in lower noise in the mode change correlation signal used to detect regional events. We compare candidate events detected by this method to the seismic record and observe that most are not correlated with a significant seismic event. Our analysis

  7. Measurement of associated production of z bosons with charm quark jets in pp collisions at √s=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2014-01-31

    We present the first measurements of the ratios of cross sections σ(pp → Z+c jet)/σ(pp → Z+jet) and σ(pp → Z+c jet)/σ(pp → Z+b jet) for the associated production of a Z boson with at least one charm or bottom quark jet. Jets have transverse momentum ​pT(jet)​>20  GeV and pseudorapidity |​η(jet)​|<2.5. These cross section ratios are measured differentially as a function of jet and Z boson transverse momenta, based on 9.7  fb(-1) of pp collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s=1.96  TeV. The measurements show significant deviations from perturbative QCD calculations and predictions from various event generators.

  8. Searching for a hidden sector in multiparticle production at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Moreno-Picot, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    A hidden sector beyond the Standard Model can show up in multiparticle production altering inclusive correlations and factorial cumulants of multiplicity distributions. In this report such a study is advocated with a special emphasis on the searches at LHC.

  9. Feedback stabilization using two-hidden-layer nets.

    PubMed

    Sontag, E D

    1992-01-01

    The representational capabilities of one-hidden-layer and two-hidden-layer nets consisting of feedforward interconnections of linear threshold units are compared. It is remarked that for certain problems two hidden layers are required, contrary to what might be in principle expected from the known approximation theorems. The differences are not based on numerical accuracy or number of units needed, nor on capabilities for feature extraction, but rather on a much more basic classification into direct and inverse problems. The former correspond to the approximation of continuous functions, while the latter are concerned with approximating one-sided inverses of continuous functions, and are often encountered in the context of inverse kinematics determination or in control questions. A general result is given showing that nonlinear control systems can be stabilized using two hidden layers, but not, in general, using just one.

  10. Hidden pion varieties in composite models for diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-10-01

    The diphoton excesses at 750 GeV seen in the LHC data may be the first hint of new physics at the TeV scale. We discuss variations of the model considered earlier, in which one or more diphoton excesses arise from composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (hidden pions) associated with new strong dynamics at the TeV scale. We study the case in which the 750 GeV excess arises from a unique hidden pion leading to a diphoton final state as well as the case in which it arises from one of the hidden pions decaying into diphotons. We consider S U (N ), S O (N ), and S p (N ) gauge groups for the strong dynamics and find that S O (N ) and S p (N ) models give extra hidden pions beyond those in the S U (N ) models, which can be used to discriminate among models.

  11. Isovector and hidden-beauty partners of the X(3872)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høgaasen, Hallstein; Kou, Emi; Richard, Jean-Marc; Sorba, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The isovector partners of the X(3872), recently found at BES III, Belle and CLEO-c were predicted in a simple model based on the chromomagnetic interaction among quarks. The extension to the hidden-beauty sector is discussed.

  12. Diagnostic Sampling to Reveal Hidden Lead and Copper Health Risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead, copper and other metallic contamination sources in premise drinking water plumbing systems, are unevenly distributed and are usually hidden from thought, view, or both. Many sampling protocols exist, each with some set of implicit assumptions governing its applicability to...

  13. SECTION L FROM FLAGPOLE TOWARD SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT (HIDDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECTION L FROM FLAGPOLE TOWARD SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT (HIDDEN BY TREES). VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bath National Cemetery, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Juan Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  14. Modelling proteins' hidden conformations to predict antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Kathryn M.; Ho, Chris M. W.; Dutta, Supratik; Gross, Michael L.; Bowman, Gregory R.

    2016-10-01

    TEM β-lactamase confers bacteria with resistance to many antibiotics and rapidly evolves activity against new drugs. However, functional changes are not easily explained by differences in crystal structures. We employ Markov state models to identify hidden conformations and explore their role in determining TEM's specificity. We integrate these models with existing drug-design tools to create a new technique, called Boltzmann docking, which better predicts TEM specificity by accounting for conformational heterogeneity. Using our MSMs, we identify hidden states whose populations correlate with activity against cefotaxime. To experimentally detect our predicted hidden states, we use rapid mass spectrometric footprinting and confirm our models' prediction that increased cefotaxime activity correlates with reduced Ω-loop flexibility. Finally, we design novel variants to stabilize the hidden cefotaximase states, and find their populations predict activity against cefotaxime in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we expect this framework to have numerous applications in drug and protein design.

  15. West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, and the deep shadow of the 1962 annex. View to northeast. - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Even 'Good' Insurance Comes with Hidden Hospital Bills

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159575.html Even 'Good' Insurance Comes With Hidden Hospital Bills Average out-of- ... June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Quality private health insurance is no protection against large out-of-pocket ...

  17. Charmed baryon decays observed in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Various weak decays of the charmed baryon ..lambda../sub c/ are observed in the Mark II detector at the SLAC e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring SPEAR. Hadronic decays ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pK/sup -/..pi../sup +/ and ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pK/sub s//sup 0/ and their charge conjugates are observed as peaks in invariant mass spectra at m(..lambda../sub c/) = (2286 +/- 6) MeV/c/sup 2/. An estimate of the charmed baryon production cross section, sigma(..lambda../sub c/) + sigma(..lambda..'/sub c/ = (1.7 +/- 0.4)nb, derived from Mark II measurements of the inclusive baryon cross sections R/sub p/ and R/sub ..lambda../ as functions of center-of-mass energy, is used to calculate branching ratios for these hadronic decays: BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pK/sup -/..pi../sup +/) = (2.0 +/- 0.8)%; BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pK/sub s//sup 0/)/BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pK/sup -/..pi../sup +/) = (36 +/- 16)%. An attempt is also made to observe higher mass charmed baryons by reconstructing cascade decays ..sigma../sub c/ ..-->.. ..lambda../sub c/..pi... Evidence for the observation of semileptonic decays of the charmed baryon is presented. Direct electrons are observed in events containing antiprotons, lambdas and antilambdas. The number of electrons per baryon event, after background subtraction and efficiency correction, is used, together with an estimate of the charmed baryon content of proton and lambda events, to calculate inclusive and semi-inclusive semileptonic branching ratios of the ..lambda../sub c/: BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. e/sup +/X) = (4.5 +/- 1.8)%; BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. pe/sup +/X) = (1.9 +/- 0.8)%; BR (..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. ..lambda../sup 0/e/sup +/X) = (1.2 +/- 0.6)%. The inclusive semileptonic branching ratio, combined with a theoretical calculation of the total semileptonic width, implies a lifetime tau(..lambda../sub c/) = (2.4 +/- 1.1) 10/sup -13/ sec, in good agreement with

  18. Phase transitions in Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John; Lathouwers, Emma

    In Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), a Markov process is not directly accessible. In the simplest case, a two-state Markov model ``emits'' one of two ``symbols'' at each time step. We can think of these symbols as noisy measurements of the underlying state. With some probability, the symbol implies that the system is in one state when it is actually in the other. The ability to judge which state the system is in sets the efficiency of a Maxwell demon that observes state fluctuations in order to extract heat from a coupled reservoir. The state-inference problem is to infer the underlying state from such noisy measurements at each time step. We show that there can be a phase transition in such measurements: for measurement error rates below a certain threshold, the inferred state always matches the observation. For higher error rates, there can be continuous or discontinuous transitions to situations where keeping a memory of past observations improves the state estimate. We can partly understand this behavior by mapping the HMM onto a 1d random-field Ising model at zero temperature. We also present more recent work that explores a larger parameter space and more states. Research funded by NSERC, Canada.

  19. The infinite hidden Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Chatzis, Sotirios P; Tsechpenakis, Gabriel

    2010-06-01

    Hidden Markov random field (HMRF) models are widely used for image segmentation, as they appear naturally in problems where a spatially constrained clustering scheme is asked for. A major limitation of HMRF models concerns the automatic selection of the proper number of their states, i.e., the number of region clusters derived by the image segmentation procedure. Existing methods, including likelihood- or entropy-based criteria, and reversible Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, usually tend to yield noisy model size estimates while imposing heavy computational requirements. Recently, Dirichlet process (DP, infinite) mixture models have emerged in the cornerstone of nonparametric Bayesian statistics as promising candidates for clustering applications where the number of clusters is unknown a priori; infinite mixture models based on the original DP or spatially constrained variants of it have been applied in unsupervised image segmentation applications showing promising results. Under this motivation, to resolve the aforementioned issues of HMRF models, in this paper, we introduce a nonparametric Bayesian formulation for the HMRF model, the infinite HMRF model, formulated on the basis of a joint Dirichlet process mixture (DPM) and Markov random field (MRF) construction. We derive an efficient variational Bayesian inference algorithm for the proposed model, and we experimentally demonstrate its advantages over competing methodologies.

  20. Hidden Markov models in automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrzoskowicz, Adam

    1993-11-01

    This article describes a method for constructing an automatic speech recognition system based on hidden Markov models (HMMs). The author discusses the basic concepts of HMM theory and the application of these models to the analysis and recognition of speech signals. The author provides algorithms which make it possible to train the ASR system and recognize signals on the basis of distinct stochastic models of selected speech sound classes. The author describes the specific components of the system and the procedures used to model and recognize speech. The author discusses problems associated with the choice of optimal signal detection and parameterization characteristics and their effect on the performance of the system. The author presents different options for the choice of speech signal segments and their consequences for the ASR process. The author gives special attention to the use of lexical, syntactic, and semantic information for the purpose of improving the quality and efficiency of the system. The author also describes an ASR system developed by the Speech Acoustics Laboratory of the IBPT PAS. The author discusses the results of experiments on the effect of noise on the performance of the ASR system and describes methods of constructing HMM's designed to operate in a noisy environment. The author also describes a language for human-robot communications which was defined as a complex multilevel network from an HMM model of speech sounds geared towards Polish inflections. The author also added mandatory lexical and syntactic rules to the system for its communications vocabulary.

  1. Systolic Architectures For Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. N.; Vlontzos, J. A.; Kung, S. Y.

    1988-10-01

    This paper proposes an unidirectional ring systolic architecture for implementing the hidden Markov models (HMMs). This array architecture maximizes the strength of VLSI in terms of intensive and pipelined computing and yet circumvents the limitation on communication. Both the scoring and learning phases of an HMM are formulated as a consecutive matrix-vector multiplication problem, which can be executed in a fully pipelined fashion (100% utilization effi-ciency) by using an unidirectional ring systolic architecture. By appropriately scheduling the algorithm, which combines both the operations of the backward evaluation procedure and reestimation algorithm at the same time, we can use this systolic HMM in a most efficient manner. The systolic HMM can also be easily adapted to the left-to-right HMM by using bidirectional semi-global links with significant time saving. This architecture can also incorporate the scaling scheme with little extra effort in the computations of forward and backward evaluation variables to prevent the frequently encountered mathematical undertow problems. We also discuss a possible implementation of this proposed architecture using Inmos transputer (T-800) as the building block.

  2. A Hidden Portrait by Edgar Degas.

    PubMed

    Thurrowgood, David; Paterson, David; de Jonge, Martin D; Kirkham, Robin; Thurrowgood, Saul; Howard, Daryl L

    2016-01-01

    The preservation and understanding of cultural heritage depends increasingly on in-depth chemical studies. Rapid technological advances are forging connections between scientists and arts communities, enabling revolutionary new techniques for non-invasive technical study of culturally significant, highly prized artworks. We have applied a non-invasive, rapid, high definition X-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental mapping technique to a French Impressionist painting using a synchrotron radiation source, and show how this technology can advance scholarly art interpretation and preservation. We have obtained detailed technical understanding of a painting which could not be resolved by conventional techniques. Here we show 31.6 megapixel scanning XRF derived elemental maps and report a novel image processing methodology utilising these maps to produce a false colour representation of a "hidden" portrait by Edgar Degas. This work provides a cohesive methodology for both imaging and understanding the chemical composition of artworks, and enables scholarly understandings of cultural heritage, many of which have eluded conventional technologies. We anticipate that the outcome from this work will encourage the reassessment of some of the world's great art treasures. PMID:27490856

  3. Academic mobbing: hidden health hazard at workplace.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Sb

    2010-01-01

    Academic mobbing is a non-violent, sophisticated, 'ganging up' behaviour adopted by academicians to "wear and tear" a colleague down emotionally through unjustified accusation, humiliation, general harassment and emotional abuse. These are directed at the target under a veil of lies and justifications so that they are "hidden" to others and difficult to prove. Bullies use mobbing activities to hide their own weaknesses and incompetence. Targets selected are often intelligent, innovative high achievers, with good integrity and principles. Mobbing activities appear trivial and innocuous on its own but the frequency and pattern of their occurrence over long period of time indicates an aggressive manipulation to "eliminate" the target. Mobbing activities typically progress through five stereotypical phases that begins with an unsolved minor conflict between two workers and ultimately escalates into a senseless mobbing whereby the target is stigmatized and victimized to justify the behaviours of the bullies. The result is always physical, mental, social distress or illness and, most often, expulsion of target from the workplace. Organizations are subjected to great financial loss, loss of key workers and a tarnished public image and reputation. Public awareness, education, effective counselling, establishment of anti-bullying policies and legislations at all levels are necessary to curb academic mobbing. General practitioners (GPs) play an important role in supporting patients subjected to mental and physical health injury caused by workplace bullying and mobbing.

  4. Dietary phytate, zinc and hidden zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandstead, Harold H; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological data suggest at least one in five humans are at risk of zinc deficiency. This is in large part because the phytate in cereals and legumes has not been removed during food preparation. Phytate, a potent indigestible ligand for zinc prevents it's absorption. Without knowledge of the frequency of consumption of foods rich in phytate, and foods rich in bioavailable zinc, the recognition of zinc deficiency early in the illness may be difficult. Plasma zinc is insensitive to early zinc deficiency. Serum ferritin concentration≤20μg/L is a potential indirect biomarker. Early effects of zinc deficiency are chemical, functional and may be "hidden". The clinical problem is illustrated by 2 studies that involved US Mexican-American children, and US premenopausal women. The children were consuming home diets that included traditional foods high in phytate. The premenopausal women were not eating red meat on a regular basis, and their consumption of phytate was mainly from bran breakfast cereals. In both studies the presence of zinc deficiency was proven by functional responses to controlled zinc treatment. In the children lean-mass, reasoning, and immunity were significantly affected. In the women memory, reasoning, and eye-hand coordination were significantly affected. A screening self-administered food frequency questionnaire for office might help caregiver's identify patients at risk of zinc deficiency.

  5. Hidden Topological Angles in Path Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behtash, Alireza; Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Schäfer, Thomas; Ünsal, Mithat

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the existence of hidden topological angles (HTAs) in a large class of quantum field theories and quantum mechanical systems. HTAs are distinct from theta parameters in the Lagrangian. They arise as invariant angles associated with saddle points of the complexified path integral and their descent manifolds (Lefschetz thimbles). Physical effects of HTAs become most transparent upon analytic continuation in nf to a noninteger number of flavors, reducing in the integer nf limit to a Z2 valued phase difference between dominant saddles. In N =1 super Yang-Mills theory we demonstrate the microscopic mechanism for the vanishing of the gluon condensate. The same effect leads to an anomalously small condensate in a QCD-like S U (N ) gauge theory with fermions in the two-index representation. The basic phenomenon is that, contrary to folklore, the gluon condensate can receive both positive and negative contributions in a semiclassical expansion. In quantum mechanics, a HTA leads to a difference in semiclassical expansion of integer and half-integer spin particles.

  6. Toward a Differential Diagnosis of Hidden Hearing Loss in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, M. Charles; Epstein, Michael J.; Cleveland, Sandra S.; Wang, Haobing

    2016-01-01

    Recent work suggests that hair cells are not the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear; rather, it is the synapses between hair cells and cochlear nerve terminals that degenerate first in the aging or noise-exposed ear. This primary neural degeneration does not affect hearing thresholds, but likely contributes to problems understanding speech in difficult listening environments, and may be important in the generation of tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. To look for signs of cochlear synaptopathy in humans, we recruited college students and divided them into low-risk and high-risk groups based on self-report of noise exposure and use of hearing protection. Cochlear function was assessed by otoacoustic emissions and click-evoked electrocochleography; hearing was assessed by behavioral audiometry and word recognition with or without noise or time compression and reverberation. Both groups had normal thresholds at standard audiometric frequencies, however, the high-risk group showed significant threshold elevation at high frequencies (10–16 kHz), consistent with early stages of noise damage. Electrocochleography showed a significant difference in the ratio between the waveform peaks generated by hair cells (Summating Potential; SP) vs. cochlear neurons (Action Potential; AP), i.e. the SP/AP ratio, consistent with selective neural loss. The high-risk group also showed significantly poorer performance on word recognition in noise or with time compression and reverberation, and reported heightened reactions to sound consistent with hyperacusis. These results suggest that the SP/AP ratio may be useful in the diagnosis of “hidden hearing loss” and that, as suggested by animal models, the noise-induced loss of cochlear nerve synapses leads to deficits in hearing abilities in difficult listening situations, despite the presence of normal thresholds at standard audiometric frequencies. PMID:27618300

  7. Toward a Differential Diagnosis of Hidden Hearing Loss in Humans.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M Charles; Epstein, Michael J; Cleveland, Sandra S; Wang, Haobing; Maison, Stéphane F

    2016-01-01

    Recent work suggests that hair cells are not the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear; rather, it is the synapses between hair cells and cochlear nerve terminals that degenerate first in the aging or noise-exposed ear. This primary neural degeneration does not affect hearing thresholds, but likely contributes to problems understanding speech in difficult listening environments, and may be important in the generation of tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. To look for signs of cochlear synaptopathy in humans, we recruited college students and divided them into low-risk and high-risk groups based on self-report of noise exposure and use of hearing protection. Cochlear function was assessed by otoacoustic emissions and click-evoked electrocochleography; hearing was assessed by behavioral audiometry and word recognition with or without noise or time compression and reverberation. Both groups had normal thresholds at standard audiometric frequencies, however, the high-risk group showed significant threshold elevation at high frequencies (10-16 kHz), consistent with early stages of noise damage. Electrocochleography showed a significant difference in the ratio between the waveform peaks generated by hair cells (Summating Potential; SP) vs. cochlear neurons (Action Potential; AP), i.e. the SP/AP ratio, consistent with selective neural loss. The high-risk group also showed significantly poorer performance on word recognition in noise or with time compression and reverberation, and reported heightened reactions to sound consistent with hyperacusis. These results suggest that the SP/AP ratio may be useful in the diagnosis of "hidden hearing loss" and that, as suggested by animal models, the noise-induced loss of cochlear nerve synapses leads to deficits in hearing abilities in difficult listening situations, despite the presence of normal thresholds at standard audiometric frequencies. PMID:27618300

  8. Finding the charm in 800 GeV/c p-Cu and p-Be single muon spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Klinksiek, Stephen A.; /New Mexico U.

    2005-01-01

    Fermilab Experiment 866 took single muon data from 800 GeV/c ({radical}s = 38.8 GeV) p-Cu and p-Be interactions in an attempt to extract the inclusive nuclear open charm/anti-charm (D/{bar D}) differential cross sections as a function of p{sub T}. The muons were decay products from semi-leptonic decays of open charm mesons as well as decays from lighter non-charmed mesons ({pi}'s and K's). Data were taken simultaneously from two interaction regions; one of two thin nuclear targets and a copper beam dump 92 inches downstream. The open decay length for hadrons produced in the targets increased the contribution to the muon spectrum from light hadron decays, relative to those from the dump. Production cross sections for light hadrons from previous experiments were used in conjunction with parameterized open charm cross sections to produce total Monte Carlo single muon spectra that were subsequently fit to the data. The sensitivity of this measurement covered an open charm hadron p{sub T} range of approximately 2 to 7 GeV/c, center-of-mass rapidity, y{sub cm}, between 0 and 2, and x{sub F} between 0.2 and 0.8. Previous experimental results for p-p or p-A open charm production at comparable energy was limited to {radical}5 GeV/ Three functions describing the shape of the open charm/anti-charm cross sections were fit to the data; an exponential, A{sub 1} exp (-B p{sub T}), and two polynomials, A{sub 2}/p{sub T}{sup 2} + {alpha}m{sub c}{sup 2}{sup n} and A{sub 2} (1-p{sub T}/p{sub beam}){sup m}/(p{sub T}{sup 2} + {alpha}m{sub c}{sup 2}){sup n}. The first polynomial was fit with the parameter n as a free parameter, and constant with three integer values, 4, 5 and 6. The second was fit with n held fixed at the constant integer values only. The best results were with the first polynomial with n around 6. All three parameterizations resulted in good fits. Extrapolation of the cross sections to small p{sub T} shows good agreement with previous experiments. The power {alpha} of

  9. Measuring the Hidden Aspects of Solar Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2008 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of astrophysical magnetic fields, when George Ellery Hale recorded the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in sunspots. With the introduction of Babcock's photoelectric magnetograph, it soon became clear that the Sun's magnetic field outside sunspots is extremely structured. The field strengths that were measured were found to get larger when the spatial resolutionwas improved. It was therefore necessary to come up with methods to go beyond the spatial resolution limit and diagnose the intrinsic magnetic-field properties without dependence on the quality of the telescope used. The line-ratio technique that was developed in the early 1970s revealed a picture where most flux that we see in magnetograms originates in highly bundled, kG fields with a tiny volume filling factor. This led to interpretations in terms of discrete, strong-field magnetic flux tubes embedded in a rather field-free medium, and a whole industry of flux tube models at increasing levels of sophistication. This magnetic-field paradigm has now been shattered with the advent of high-precision imaging polarimeters that allow us to apply the so-called "Second Solar Spectrum" to diagnose aspects of solar magnetism that have been hidden to Zeeman diagnostics. It is found that the bulk of the photospheric volume is seething with intermediately strong, tangled fields. In the new paradigm, the field behaves like a fractal with a high degree of self-similarity, spanning about 8 orders of magnitude in scale size, down to scales of order 10m.

  10. Foundational Forces & Hidden Variables in Technology Commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Brandon

    2011-03-01

    The science of physics seems vastly different from the process of technology commercialization. Physics strives to understand our world through the experimental deduction of immutable laws and dependent variables and the resulting macro-scale phenomenon. In comparison, the~goal of business is to make a profit by addressing the needs, preferences, and whims of individuals in a market. It may seem that this environment is too dynamic to identify all the hidden variables and deduct the foundational forces that impact a business's ability to commercialize innovative technologies. One example of a business ``force'' is found in the semiconductor industry. In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months. Known as Moore's Law, this prediction has become the guiding principle for the semiconductor industry for the last 40 years. Of course, Moore's Law is not really a law of nature; rather it is the result of efforts by Intel and the entire semiconductor industry. A closer examination suggests that there are foundational principles of business that underlie the macro-scale phenomenon of Moore's Law. Principles of profitability, incentive, and strategic alignment have resulted in a coordinated influx of resources that has driven technologies to market, increasing the profitability of the semiconductor industry and optimizing the fitness of its participants. New innovations in technology are subject to these same principles. So, in addition to traditional market forces, these often unrecognized forces and variables create challenges for new technology commercialization. In this talk, I will draw from ethnographic research, complex adaptive theory, and industry data to suggest a framework with which to think about new technology commercialization. Intel's bio-silicon initiative provides a case study.

  11. Jewish children hidden in france (1940-1944): what outcomes for feelings of shame?

    PubMed

    Feldman, Marion; Mouchenik, Yoram; Moro, Marie Rose

    2012-12-01

    This article explores how shame affects individuals over time, from childhood to late adulthood. A series of semi-structured interviews was conducted with 35 aging hidden Jewish children (21 women, 14 men; mean age of 74.9 years, range: 65-82 years), living in France 65 years after the Holocaust. For most of them, shame repeatedly acts as an "alarm signal." For many, the transformation has been possible: creation, recognition by the social group. We also discuss the fact that shame can lead to psychic exhaustion as well as handing down to the next generation. This outcome can prove fatal. PMID:23253059

  12. Memetic Approaches for Optimizing Hidden Markov Models: A Case Study in Time Series Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Lam Thu; Barlow, Michael

    We propose a methodology for employing memetics (local search) within the framework of evolutionary algorithms to optimize parameters of hidden markov models. With this proposal, the rate and frequency of using local search are automatically changed over time either at a population or individual level. At the population level, we allow the rate of using local search to decay over time to zero (at the final generation). At the individual level, each individual is equipped with information of when it will do local search and for how long. This information evolves over time alongside the main elements of the chromosome representing the individual.

  13. Search for Hidden Sector and Dark Matter Particles Produced at Fermilab's NuMI Target

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzikoutelis, Athanasios; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Bambah, Bindu A.; Kasetti, Siva P.

    2014-01-01

    In the long tradition of exotic searches at fixed-target experiments, we plan to use the NuMI beam-target and the NOvA Near Detector to observe potential signatures of Hidden Sector or Dark Matter particles, either directly produced within the target or through theoretically postulated mediators. Expecting mostly scattering events on electrons or nucleons as their signatures, an example of a mediator generated scalar dark matter particles is used to discuss the target production profile of a dark matter beam. This channel explores the capabilities of the detector to observe neutral-current events from electron-neutrino scattering interactions.

  14. Jewish children hidden in france (1940-1944): what outcomes for feelings of shame?

    PubMed

    Feldman, Marion; Mouchenik, Yoram; Moro, Marie Rose

    2012-12-01

    This article explores how shame affects individuals over time, from childhood to late adulthood. A series of semi-structured interviews was conducted with 35 aging hidden Jewish children (21 women, 14 men; mean age of 74.9 years, range: 65-82 years), living in France 65 years after the Holocaust. For most of them, shame repeatedly acts as an "alarm signal." For many, the transformation has been possible: creation, recognition by the social group. We also discuss the fact that shame can lead to psychic exhaustion as well as handing down to the next generation. This outcome can prove fatal.

  15. VISTA Captures Celestial Cat's Hidden Secrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    The Cat's Paw Nebula, NGC 6334, is a huge stellar nursery, the birthplace of hundreds of massive stars. In a magnificent new ESO image taken with the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile, the glowing gas and dust clouds obscuring the view are penetrated by infrared light and some of the Cat's hidden young stars are revealed. Towards the heart of the Milky Way, 5500 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Scorpius (the Scorpion), the Cat's Paw Nebula stretches across 50 light-years. In visible light, gas and dust are illuminated by hot young stars, creating strange reddish shapes that give the object its nickname. A recent image by ESO's Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the La Silla Observatory (eso1003) captured this visible light view in great detail. NGC 6334 is one of the most active nurseries of massive stars in our galaxy. VISTA, the latest addition to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Chilean Atacama Desert, is the world's largest survey telescope (eso0949). It works at infrared wavelengths, seeing right through much of the dust that is such a beautiful but distracting aspect of the nebula, and revealing objects hidden from the sight of visible light telescopes. Visible light tends to be scattered and absorbed by interstellar dust, but the dust is nearly transparent to infrared light. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 metres across and it is equipped with the largest infrared camera on any telescope. It shares the spectacular viewing conditions with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), which is located on the nearby summit. With this powerful instrument at their command, astronomers were keen to see the birth pains of the big young stars in the Cat's Paw Nebula, some nearly ten times the mass of the Sun. The view in the infrared is strikingly different from that in visible light. With the dust obscuring the view far less, they can learn much more about how these stars form and develop in their first

  16. VISTA Captures Celestial Cat's Hidden Secrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    The Cat's Paw Nebula, NGC 6334, is a huge stellar nursery, the birthplace of hundreds of massive stars. In a magnificent new ESO image taken with the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile, the glowing gas and dust clouds obscuring the view are penetrated by infrared light and some of the Cat's hidden young stars are revealed. Towards the heart of the Milky Way, 5500 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Scorpius (the Scorpion), the Cat's Paw Nebula stretches across 50 light-years. In visible light, gas and dust are illuminated by hot young stars, creating strange reddish shapes that give the object its nickname. A recent image by ESO's Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the La Silla Observatory (eso1003) captured this visible light view in great detail. NGC 6334 is one of the most active nurseries of massive stars in our galaxy. VISTA, the latest addition to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Chilean Atacama Desert, is the world's largest survey telescope (eso0949). It works at infrared wavelengths, seeing right through much of the dust that is such a beautiful but distracting aspect of the nebula, and revealing objects hidden from the sight of visible light telescopes. Visible light tends to be scattered and absorbed by interstellar dust, but the dust is nearly transparent to infrared light. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 metres across and it is equipped with the largest infrared camera on any telescope. It shares the spectacular viewing conditions with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), which is located on the nearby summit. With this powerful instrument at their command, astronomers were keen to see the birth pains of the big young stars in the Cat's Paw Nebula, some nearly ten times the mass of the Sun. The view in the infrared is strikingly different from that in visible light. With the dust obscuring the view far less, they can learn much more about how these stars form and develop in their first

  17. Probabilistic Reasoning Over Seismic Time Series: Volcano Monitoring by Hidden Markov Models at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Carmelo; Prestifilippo, Michele; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido; Patanè, Domenico; Privitera, Eugenio

    2016-07-01

    From January 2011 to December 2015, Mt. Etna was mainly characterized by a cyclic eruptive behavior with more than 40 lava fountains from New South-East Crater. Using the RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded by stations close to the summit area, an automatic recognition of the different states of volcanic activity (QUIET, PRE-FOUNTAIN, FOUNTAIN, POST-FOUNTAIN) has been applied for monitoring purposes. Since values of the RMS time series calculated on the seismic signal are generated from a stochastic process, we can try to model the system generating its sampled values, assumed to be a Markov process, using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). HMMs analysis seeks to recover the sequence of hidden states from the observations. In our framework, observations are characters generated by the Symbolic Aggregate approXimation (SAX) technique, which maps RMS time series values with symbols of a pre-defined alphabet. The main advantages of the proposed framework, based on HMMs and SAX, with respect to other automatic systems applied on seismic signals at Mt. Etna, are the use of multiple stations and static thresholds to well characterize the volcano states. Its application on a wide seismic dataset of Etna volcano shows the possibility to guess the volcano states. The experimental results show that, in most of the cases, we detected lava fountains in advance.

  18. Single electrons from semi-leptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au+Au collisions at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiya, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Heavy quarks are clean probes to explore the nature of strongly coupled quark gluon plasma created in high energy heavy ion collisions. The strong suppression of single electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons was observed. To further understand the heavy quark suppressions, PHENIX installed the silicon vertex detector (VTX) which allows us to measure the bottom and charm productions separately from measurement of displaced tracks. For the first time, we observed the electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charms for 3 < pT < 4 GeV/c and are similarly strongly suppressed for higher pT in minimum bias Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. We present the results of separated bottom and charm productions using the 2011 dataset with the VTX.

  19. {upsilon} decay to two charm-quark jets as a probe of the color-octet mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujie; Chao Kuangta

    2008-11-01

    We calculate the decay rate of bottomonium to two charm-quark jets {upsilon}{yields}cc at the tree level and one-loop level including color-singlet and color-octet bb annihilations. We find that the short-distance coefficient of the color-octet piece is much larger than the color-singlet piece, and that the QCD correction will change the end point behavior of the charm quark jet. The color-singlet piece is strongly affected by the one-loop QCD correction. In contrast, the QCD correction to the color-octet piece is weak. Once the experiment can measure the branching ratio and energy distribution of the two charm-quark jets in the {upsilon} decay, the result can be used to test the color-octet mechanism or give a strong constraint on the color-octet matrix elements.

  20. Gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson and instantons

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.V. |; Zhitnitsky, A.R. |

    1998-02-01

    Motivated by recent CLEO measurements of the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay, we evaluate the gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson using the interacting instanton liquid model of the QCD vacuum. Our main result is {l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 3}f{sup abc}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {nu}{alpha}}{sup b}G{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup c}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}={minus}(2.3{endash}3.3) GeV{sup 2}{times}{l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 2}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}. It is very large due to the strong field of small-size instantons. We show that it provides quantitative explanations of the CLEO data on the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay rate (as well as the inclusive process B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}+X), via a virtual Cabibbo-unsuppressed decay into a {bar c}c pair which then becomes {eta}{sup {prime}}. If so, a significant charm component may be present in other hadrons also: We briefly discuss the contribution of the charmed quark to the {ital polarized} deep-inelastic scattering on a proton. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Applicability of the Charm II system for monitoring antibiotic residues in manure-based composts.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S I; Owens, G; Ok, Y S; Lee, D B; Jeon, W-T; Kim, J G; Kim, K-R

    2011-01-01

    The effluence of veterinary antibiotics (VAs) to aquatic and terrestrial environments is of concern due to the potential adverse effects on human health, such as the production of antibiotic resistant bacteria. One of the main pathways for antibiotics to enter the environment is via the application of manure and/or manure-based composts as an alternative organic fertilizer to agricultural lands. While a wide diversity of manure-based composts are produced in Korea, there is currently no regulatory guideline for VA residues. Hence, monitoring and limiting the concentration of VA residues in manure and/or manure-based composts prior to application to the lands is important to mitigate any environmental burden. The current study was conducted to examine the applicability of the Charm II antibiotic test system for monitoring tetracyclines, sulfonamides and macrolides in manure-based composts. The Charm II system was a highly reproducible method for determining whether VA residue concentrations in manure-based compost exceeded specific guideline values. A wide range of manure-based composts and liquid fertilizers commercially available in Korea were examined using the Charm II system to monitor the residues of the target VAs. For this, the guideline concentrations of VA residues (0.8 mg kg(-1) for tetracyclines, 0.2 mg kg(-1) for sulfonamides, and 0.1 mg kg(-1) for macrolides) stated in 'Official Standard of Feeds' under the 'Control of Livestock and Fish Feed Act' in Korea were adopted to establish control points. Of the 70 compost samples examined 12 exceeded 0.8 mg kg(-1) for tetracyclines and 21 exceeded 0.2 mg kg(-1) for sulfonamides. Of the 25 liquid fertilizer samples examined most samples exceeded these prospective guidelines.

  2. ProBiS-CHARMMing: Web Interface for Prediction and Optimization of Ligands in Protein Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Konc, Janez; Miller, Benjamin T; Štular, Tanja; Lešnik, Samo; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Janežič, Dušanka

    2015-11-23

    Proteins often exist only as apo structures (unligated) in the Protein Data Bank, with their corresponding holo structures (with ligands) unavailable. However, apoproteins may not represent the amino-acid residue arrangement upon ligand binding well, which is especially problematic for molecular docking. We developed the ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface by connecting the ProBiS ( http://probis.cmm.ki.si ) and CHARMMing ( http://www.charmming.org ) web servers into one functional unit that enables prediction of protein-ligand complexes and allows for their geometry optimization and interaction energy calculation. The ProBiS web server predicts ligands (small compounds, proteins, nucleic acids, and single-atom ligands) that may bind to a query protein. This is achieved by comparing its surface structure against a nonredundant database of protein structures and finding those that have binding sites similar to that of the query protein. Existing ligands found in the similar binding sites are then transposed to the query according to predictions from ProBiS. The CHARMMing web server enables, among other things, minimization and potential energy calculation for a wide variety of biomolecular systems, and it is used here to optimize the geometry of the predicted protein-ligand complex structures using the CHARMM force field and to calculate their interaction energies with the corresponding query proteins. We show how ProBiS-CHARMMing can be used to predict ligands and their poses for a particular binding site, and minimize the predicted protein-ligand complexes to obtain representations of holoproteins. The ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface is freely available for academic users at http://probis.nih.gov.

  3. Search for rare and forbidden Charm Meson decays D0 --> Vl+l- and hhll.

    PubMed

    Aitala, E M; Amato, S; Anjos, J C; Appel, J A; Ashery, D; Banerjee, S; Bediaga, I; Blaylock, G; Bracker, S B; Burchat, P R; Burnstein, R A; Carter, T; Carvalho, H S; Copty, N K; Cremaldi, L M; Darling, C; Denisenko, K; Devmal, S; Fernandez, A; Fox, G F; Gagnon, P; Gobel, C; Gounder, K; Halling, A M; Herrera, G; Hurvits, G; James, C; Kasper, P A; Kwan, S; Langs, D C; Leslie, J; Lundberg, B; Magnin, J; MayTal-Beck, S; Meadows, B; de Mello Neto, J R; Mihalcea, D; Milburn, R H; de Miranda, J M; Napier, A; Nguyen, A; d'Oliveira, A B; O'Shaughnessy, K; Peng, K C; Perera, L P; Purohit, M V; Quinn, B; Radeztsky, S; Rafatian, A; Reay, N W; Reidy, J J; dos Reis, A C; Rubin, H A; Sanders, D A; Santha, A K; Santoro, A F; Schwartz, A J; Sheaff, M; Sidwell, R A; Slaughter, A J; Sokoloff, M D; Solano, J; Stanton, N R; Stefanski, R J; Stenson, K; Summers, D J; Takach, S; Thorne, K; Tripathi, A K; Watanabe, S; Weiss-Babai, R; Wiener, J; Witchey, N; Wolin, E; Yang, S M; Yi, D; Yoshida, S; Zaliznyak, R; Zhang, C

    2001-04-30

    We report results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC), lepton flavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the D0 (and its antiparticle) into three and four bodies. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, we examine modes with two leptons (muons or electrons) and a rho(0), K( *0), or straight phi vector meson or a nonresonant pi(pi), Kpi, or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, we present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined (18 new). PMID:11328072

  4. Production of the charmed strange baryon. xi. /sub c//sup +/ by neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    We report on the observation of a narrow resonance at a mass of 2450 MeV/c/sup 2/ in the final states ..lambda..K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/ and ..sigma../sup 0/K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/. The mass, width, lifetime, and decay modes support the interpretation of a hadronically produced charm-strange baryon, the ..xi../sub c//sup +/. We present our preliminary measurements of the lifetime, and the ..lambda.., x/sub feynman,/ and p/sub t/ dependence of the state.

  5. Searches for Rare Leptonic and Semileptonic Charm Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Paul D.; /Ohio State U.

    2007-01-17

    Recent results from leptonic and semi-leptonic charm decays at the BABAR B-factory are presented. The measurement of f{sub D{sub s}} from the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} channel is presented. Form-factor studies from the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e} channel are described along with a search for flavor-changing neutral-current X{sub c}{sup +} {yields} h{sup +}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} decays.

  6. Search for Rare and Forbidden Charm Meson Decays D0 --> Vl+l- and hhll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-04-01

    We report results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC), lepton flavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the D0 (and its antiparticle) into three and four bodies. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, we examine modes with two leptons (muons or electrons) and a ρ0, K¯ *0, or φ vector meson or a nonresonant ππ, Kπ, or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, we present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined (18 new).

  7. Trigluon correlations and single transverse spin asymmetry in open charm production

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Zhongbo; Qiu Jianwei

    2009-08-04

    We study the single transverse-spin asymmetry for open charm production in the semiinclusive lepton-hadron deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and pp collision. Within collinear factorization approach, we find that the asymmetry is sensitive to the twist-3 trigluon correlation functions in the proton. With a simple model for the trigluon correlation functions, we estimate the asymmetry in SIDIS for both COMPASS and eRHIC kinematics, as well as in pp collision at RHIC energy. We discuss the possibilities of extracting the trigluon correlation functions in these experiments.

  8. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  9. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Duoglas

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  10. Observation of Hadronic Charm Production in a High Resolution Streamer Chamber Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sandweiss, J.; et al.

    1980-01-01

    Short-lived particles produced in association with muons have been observed in the interactions of 350-GeV/c protons with neon in a high-resolution streamer chamber. The characteristics of these events are consistent with the expected properties of charmed particles if the average lifetime lies between 10/sup -13/ and 2 x 10/sup -12/ sec. With the assumption that the observed events are mainly D/sup + -/ mesons with lieftimes of approximately 10/sup -12/ sec, the production cross section is estimated to lie between 20 and 50 ..mu..b per nucleon.

  11. Search for rare and forbidden Charm Meson decays D0 --> Vl+l- and hhll.

    PubMed

    Aitala, E M; Amato, S; Anjos, J C; Appel, J A; Ashery, D; Banerjee, S; Bediaga, I; Blaylock, G; Bracker, S B; Burchat, P R; Burnstein, R A; Carter, T; Carvalho, H S; Copty, N K; Cremaldi, L M; Darling, C; Denisenko, K; Devmal, S; Fernandez, A; Fox, G F; Gagnon, P; Gobel, C; Gounder, K; Halling, A M; Herrera, G; Hurvits, G; James, C; Kasper, P A; Kwan, S; Langs, D C; Leslie, J; Lundberg, B; Magnin, J; MayTal-Beck, S; Meadows, B; de Mello Neto, J R; Mihalcea, D; Milburn, R H; de Miranda, J M; Napier, A; Nguyen, A; d'Oliveira, A B; O'Shaughnessy, K; Peng, K C; Perera, L P; Purohit, M V; Quinn, B; Radeztsky, S; Rafatian, A; Reay, N W; Reidy, J J; dos Reis, A C; Rubin, H A; Sanders, D A; Santha, A K; Santoro, A F; Schwartz, A J; Sheaff, M; Sidwell, R A; Slaughter, A J; Sokoloff, M D; Solano, J; Stanton, N R; Stefanski, R J; Stenson, K; Summers, D J; Takach, S; Thorne, K; Tripathi, A K; Watanabe, S; Weiss-Babai, R; Wiener, J; Witchey, N; Wolin, E; Yang, S M; Yi, D; Yoshida, S; Zaliznyak, R; Zhang, C

    2001-04-30

    We report results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC), lepton flavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the D0 (and its antiparticle) into three and four bodies. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, we examine modes with two leptons (muons or electrons) and a rho(0), K( *0), or straight phi vector meson or a nonresonant pi(pi), Kpi, or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, we present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined (18 new).

  12. Even- and Odd-Parity Charmed Meson Masses in Heavy Hadron Chiral Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen; Roxanne Springer

    2005-03-01

    We derive mass formulae for the ground state, J{sup P} = 0{sup -} and 1{sup -}, and first excited even-parity, J{sup P} = 0{sup +} and 1{sup +}, charmed mesons including one loop chiral corrections and {Omicron}(1/m{sub c}) counterterms in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory. We show a variety of fits to the current data. We find that certain parameter relations in the parity doubling model are not renormalized at one loop, providing a natural explanation for the equality of the hyperfine splittings of ground state and excited doublets.

  13. Infinite hidden conditional random fields for human behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Bousmalis, Konstantinos; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Hidden conditional random fields (HCRFs) are discriminative latent variable models that have been shown to successfully learn the hidden structure of a given classification problem (provided an appropriate validation of the number of hidden states). In this brief, we present the infinite HCRF (iHCRF), which is a nonparametric model based on hierarchical Dirichlet processes and is capable of automatically learning the optimal number of hidden states for a classification task. We show how we learn the model hyperparameters with an effective Markov-chain Monte Carlo sampling technique, and we explain the process that underlines our iHCRF model with the Restaurant Franchise Rating Agencies analogy. We show that the iHCRF is able to converge to a correct number of represented hidden states, and outperforms the best finite HCRFs--chosen via cross-validation--for the difficult tasks of recognizing instances of agreement, disagreement, and pain. Moreover, the iHCRF manages to achieve this performance in significantly less total training, validation, and testing time. PMID:24808217

  14. Reputation and Competition in a Hidden Action Model

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The economics models of reputation and quality in markets can be classified in three categories. (i) Pure hidden action, where only one type of seller is present who can provide goods of different quality. (ii) Pure hidden information, where sellers of different types have no control over product quality. (iii) Mixed frameworks, which include both hidden action and hidden information. In this paper we develop a pure hidden action model of reputation and Bertrand competition, where consumers and firms interact repeatedly in a market with free entry. The price of the good produced by the firms is contractible, whilst the quality is noncontractible, hence it is promised by the firms when a contract is signed. Consumers infer future quality from all available information, i.e., both from what they know about past quality and from current prices. According to early contributions, competition should make reputation unable to induce the production of high-quality goods. We provide a simple solution to this problem by showing that high quality levels are sustained as an outcome of a stationary symmetric equilibrium. PMID:25329387

  15. Unveiling the Hidden Heart of the Great Attractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, Thomas; Erdogdu, Pirin; Fairall, Tony; Huchra, John; Jones, Heath; Koribalski, Baerbel; Kraan-Korteweg, Renee; Lahav, Ofer; Lucey, John; Macri, Lucas; Masters, Karen; Meade, Marilyn; Nagayama, Takahiro; Rassat, Anais; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Wakamatsu, Ken; Whitney, Barbara; Woudt, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    The southern Milky Way shrouds one of the most important dynamical structures in the local universe, the Great Attractor, whose discovery some two decades ago has sparked intensive research into the large scale mass distribution of galaxies over the entire sky. And yet the Great Attractor itself -- its size, density and total mass -- remains largely a mystery as it is cut in half by the gas and dust mask of the foreground Galactic Plane. Without a complete picture of the local galaxy distribution, the reconstructed density field and cosmological density and biasing parameters will like-wise remain uncertain. Here we propose to use IRAC & MIPS to map the most heavily extinguished region of the Great Attractor, the 'heart' of the Norma Wall of galaxies that stretches across the plane of the Milky Way. Our preliminary investigation of this region using the shallow GLIMPSE survey resulted in detecting luminous galaxies that trace a more massive underlying population. We will identify and extract galaxies, follow them up with spectroscopic measurements to create a 3-D catalog of infrared galaxies in the region. Such a catalog will reveal the hidden large scale structure, completing the remaining gap that divides the southern and northern extragalactic sky after dedicated efforts in the optical, near-IR, X-ray and radio in mapping the galaxy distribution in the Great Attractor region. A complete view of the galaxy density field will enable comparison of the Great Attractor with the more distant Shapley Concentration to resolve the ongoing debate on their relative importance in generating the peculiar velocity field of the local universe. Spitzer is ideally suited to addressing the most difficult challenge associated with understanding the Great Attractor -- Spitzer is capable of simultaneously detecting all types of galaxies and penetrating the thick dust lanes of the Milky Way.

  16. Redefining CpG islands using hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Caffo, Brian; Jaffee, Harris A; Irizarry, Rafael A; Feinberg, Andrew P

    2010-07-01

    The DNA of most vertebrates is depleted in CpG dinucleotide: a C followed by a G in the 5' to 3' direction. CpGs are the target for DNA methylation, a chemical modification of cytosine (C) heritable during cell division and the most well-characterized epigenetic mechanism. The remaining CpGs tend to cluster in regions referred to as CpG islands (CGI). Knowing CGI locations is important because they mark functionally relevant epigenetic loci in development and disease. For various mammals, including human, a readily available and widely used list of CGI is available from the UCSC Genome Browser. This list was derived using algorithms that search for regions satisfying a definition of CGI proposed by Gardiner-Garden and Frommer more than 20 years ago. Recent findings, enabled by advances in technology that permit direct measurement of epigenetic endpoints at a whole-genome scale, motivate the need to adapt the current CGI definition. In this paper, we propose a procedure, guided by hidden Markov models, that permits an extensible approach to detecting CGI. The main advantage of our approach over others is that it summarizes the evidence for CGI status as probability scores. This provides flexibility in the definition of a CGI and facilitates the creation of CGI lists for other species. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by generating the first CGI lists for invertebrates, and the fact that we can create CGI lists that substantially increases overlap with recently discovered epigenetic marks. A CGI list and the probability scores, as a function of genome location, for each species are available at http://www.rafalab.org. PMID:20212320

  17. Ensemble hidden Markov models with application to landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Anis; Frigui, Hichem

    2015-12-01

    We introduce an ensemble learning method for temporal data that uses a mixture of hidden Markov models (HMM). We hypothesize that the data are generated by K models, each of which reflects a particular trend in the data. The proposed approach, called ensemble HMM (eHMM), is based on clustering within the log-likelihood space and has two main steps. First, one HMM is fit to each of the N individual training sequences. For each fitted model, we evaluate the log-likelihood of each sequence. This results in an N-by-N log-likelihood distance matrix that will be partitioned into K groups using a relational clustering algorithm. In the second step, we learn the parameters of one HMM per cluster. We propose using and optimizing various training approaches for the different K groups depending on their size and homogeneity. In particular, we investigate the maximum likelihood (ML), the minimum classification error (MCE), and the variational Bayesian (VB) training approaches. Finally, to test a new sequence, its likelihood is computed in all the models and a final confidence value is assigned by combining the models' outputs using an artificial neural network. We propose both discrete and continuous versions of the eHMM. Our approach was evaluated on a real-world application for landmine detection using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Results show that both the continuous and discrete eHMM can identify meaningful and coherent HMM mixture components that describe different properties of the data. Each HMM mixture component models a group of data that share common attributes. These attributes are reflected in the mixture model's parameters. The results indicate that the proposed method outperforms the baseline HMM that uses one model for each class in the data.

  18. A hidden efficacy of seemingly unproductive production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Manu

    Contrary to the fairly established notion in the learning sciences that un-scaffolded, ill-structured problem-solving processes rarely lead to meaningful learning, this study reports a hidden efficacy of such processes in a synchronous, computer-supported, collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. A contrasting-case, double-transfer design investigated the effect of problem type (well- vs. ill-structured problems in Newtonian Kinematics) on collaborative processes and outcomes as well as the transfer of problem-solving skills to the individual. N = 104 triads of 11th-grade science students were randomly assigned to solve either well- or ill-structured problems. Thereafter, all participants individually solved well-structured problems followed by ill-structured problems. Findings suggested that compared to well-structured problem-solving groups, ill-structured problem-solving groups struggled with defining the problem and spent much of their sustained interactional effort around problem critiquing and solution evaluation within a discussion that was highly complex, chaotic, and divergent. As such, they found it difficult to converge on the causes of the problem, set appropriate criteria for a solution, and develop a solution, which, in turn, decreased their group performance. Thus, on many counts, production in ill-structured problem-solving groups seemed unproductive when compared to production in well-structured problem-solving groups. Notwithstanding, the contrasting-case, double-transfer design of this study provided participants in the ill-structured condition with an opportunity to spontaneously contrast the ill-structured problems that they had solved in groups with the well-structured problems they solved on an individual basis afterwards. This contrast helped them separate the relevant from the irrelevant components of ill-structured problems, thereby facilitating a spontaneous transfer of problem-solving skills, which, in the absence of the contrast

  19. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  20. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon. PMID:27284650

  1. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  2. Gauge mediation scenario with hidden sector renormalization in MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika

    2010-02-01

    We study the hidden sector effects on the mass renormalization of a simplest gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario. We point out that possible hidden sector contributions render the soft scalar masses smaller, resulting in drastically different sparticle mass spectrum at low energy. In particular, in the 5+5 minimal gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with high messenger scale (that is favored by the gravitino cold dark matter scenario), we show that a stau can be the next lightest superparticle for moderate values of hidden sector self-coupling. This provides a very simple theoretical model of long-lived charged next lightest superparticles, which imply distinctive signals in ongoing and upcoming collider experiments.

  3. Detection and tracking of moving objects hidden from view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Tonolini, Francesco; Henderson, Robert; Leach, Jonathan; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect motion and track a moving object hidden around a corner or behind a wall provides a crucial advantage when physically going around the obstacle is impossible or dangerous. Previous methods have demonstrated that it is possible to reconstruct the shape of an object hidden from view. However, these methods do not enable the tracking of movement in real time. We demonstrate a compact non-line-of-sight laser ranging technology that relies on the ability to send light around an obstacle using a scattering floor and then detect the return signal from a hidden object within only a few seconds of acquisition time. By detecting this signal with a single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) camera, we follow the movement of an object located a metre away from the camera with centimetre precision. We discuss the possibility of applying this technology to a variety of real-life situations in the near future.

  4. Hidden dark matter sector, dark radiation, and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider theories where dark matter is composed of a thermal relic of weak scale mass, whose couplings to the standard model (SM) are however too small to give rise to the observed abundance. Instead, the abundance is set by annihilation to light hidden sector states that carry no charges under the SM gauge interactions. In such a scenario the constraints from direct and indirect detection, and from collider searches for dark matter, can easily be satisfied. The masses of such light hidden states can be protected by symmetry if they are Nambu-Goldstone bosons, fermions, or gauge bosons. These states can then contribute to the cosmic energy density as dark radiation, leading to observable signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Furthermore, depending on whether or not the light hidden sector states self-interact, the fraction of the total energy density that free-streams is either decreased or increased, leading to characteristic effects on both the scalar and tensor components of the CMB anisotropy that allows these two cases to be distinguished. The magnitude of these signals depends on the number of light degrees of freedom in the hidden sector, and on the temperature at which it kinetically decouples from the SM. We consider a simple model that realizes this scenario, based on a framework in which the SM and hidden sector are initially in thermal equilibrium through the Higgs portal, and show that the resulting signals are compatible with recent Planck results, while large enough to be detected in upcoming experiments such as CMBPol and CMB Stage-IV. Invisible decays of the Higgs into hidden sector states at colliders can offer a complementary probe of this model.

  5. Analysing the hidden curriculum: use of a cultural web

    PubMed Central

    Mossop, Liz; Dennick, Reg; Hammond, Richard; Robbé, Iain

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Major influences on learning about medical professionalism come from the hidden curriculum. These influences can contribute positively or negatively towards the professional enculturation of clinical students. The fact that there is no validated method for identifying the components of the hidden curriculum poses problems for educators considering professionalism. The aim of this study was to analyse whether a cultural web, adapted from a business context, might assist in the identification of elements of the hidden curriculum at a UK veterinary school. METHODS A qualitative approach was used. Seven focus groups consisting of three staff groups and four student groups were organised. Questioning was framed using the cultural web, which is a model used by business owners to assess their environment and consider how it affects their employees and customers. The focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically using a combination of a priori and emergent themes. RESULTS The cultural web identified elements of the hidden curriculum for both students and staff. These included: core assumptions; routines; rituals; control systems; organisational factors; power structures, and symbols. Discussions occurred about how and where these issues may affect students’ professional identity development. CONCLUSIONS The cultural web framework functioned well to help participants identify elements of the hidden curriculum. These aspects aligned broadly with previously described factors such as role models and institutional slang. The influence of these issues on a student’s development of a professional identity requires discussion amongst faculty staff, and could be used to develop learning opportunities for students. The framework is promising for the analysis of the hidden curriculum and could be developed as an instrument for implementation in other clinical teaching environments. PMID:23323652

  6. 3.55 keV line from exciting dark matter without a hidden sector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berlin, Asher; DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-04-24

    In this study, models in which dark matter particles can scatter into a slightly heavier state which promptly decays to the lighter state and a photon (known as eXciting Dark Matter, or XDM) have been shown to be capable of generating the 3.55 keV line observed from galaxy clusters, while suppressing the flux of such a line from smaller halos, including dwarf galaxies. In most of the XDM models discussed in the literature, this up-scattering is mediated by a new light particle, and dark matter annihilations proceed into pairs of this same light state. In these models, the dark matter andmore » the mediator effectively reside within a hidden sector, without sizable couplings to the Standard Model. In this paper, we explore a model of XDM that does not include a hidden sector. Instead, the dark matter both up-scatters and annihilates through the near resonant exchange of an O(102) GeV pseudoscalar with large Yukawa couplings to the dark matter and smaller, but non-neglibile, couplings to Standard Model fermions. The dark matter and the mediator are each mixtures of Standard Model singlets and SU(2)W doublets. We identify parameter space in which this model can simultaneously generate the 3.55 keV line and the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic center, without conflicting with constraints from colliders, direct detection experiments, or observations of dwarf galaxies.« less

  7. 3.55 keV line from exciting dark matter without a hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Asher; DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-04-24

    In this study, models in which dark matter particles can scatter into a slightly heavier state which promptly decays to the lighter state and a photon (known as eXciting Dark Matter, or XDM) have been shown to be capable of generating the 3.55 keV line observed from galaxy clusters, while suppressing the flux of such a line from smaller halos, including dwarf galaxies. In most of the XDM models discussed in the literature, this up-scattering is mediated by a new light particle, and dark matter annihilations proceed into pairs of this same light state. In these models, the dark matter and the mediator effectively reside within a hidden sector, without sizable couplings to the Standard Model. In this paper, we explore a model of XDM that does not include a hidden sector. Instead, the dark matter both up-scatters and annihilates through the near resonant exchange of an O(102) GeV pseudoscalar with large Yukawa couplings to the dark matter and smaller, but non-neglibile, couplings to Standard Model fermions. The dark matter and the mediator are each mixtures of Standard Model singlets and SU(2)W doublets. We identify parameter space in which this model can simultaneously generate the 3.55 keV line and the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic center, without conflicting with constraints from colliders, direct detection experiments, or observations of dwarf galaxies.

  8. The hidden opportunity cost of time effect on intertemporal choice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cui-Xia; Jiang, Cheng-Ming; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shu; Rao, Li-Lin; Zheng, Rui

    2015-01-01

    An interesting phenomenon called “hidden opportunity cost of time effect” was detected in intertemporal choices. The majority of our participants preferred the smaller but sooner (SS) option to the larger but later (LL) option if opportunity cost was explicit. However, a higher proportion of participants preferred the LL to SS option if opportunity cost was hidden. This shift violates the invariance principle and opens a new way to encourage future-oriented behavior. By simply mentioning the “obvious” opportunity cost of alternatives, decision makers can be more informed in prioritizing their long-term goals rather than short-term goals. PMID:25870570

  9. Singly and Doubly Charmed $J=1/2$ Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming Liu; Lin, Huey-Wen; Orginos, Kostas; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-05-01

    We compute the masses of the singly and doubly charmed baryons in full QCD using the relativistic Fermilab action for the charm quark. For the light quarks we use domain-wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks. We use the low-lying charmonium spectrum to tune our heavy-quark action and as a guide to understanding the discretization errors associated with the heavy quark. Our results are in good agreement with experiment within our systematicss, except for the spin-1/2 $\\Xi_{cc}$, for which we predict the isospin averaged mass to be $M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 3665 \\pm17 \\pm14\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV} (here the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the third an estimate of lattice discretization errors). In addition, we predict the splitting of the (isospin averaged) spin-1/2 $\\O_{cc}$ with the $\\Xi_{cc}$ to be $M_{\\O_{cc}} - M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 98 \\pm9 \\pm22$~{MeV} (in this mass splitting, the leading discretization errors cancel). This corresponds to a prediction of $M_{\\O_{cc}} = 3763\\pm9\\pm44\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV}.

  10. Direct CP violation in two-body hadronic charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chiang, Cheng-Wei

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the recent observation of CP violation in the charm sector by LHCb, we study direct CP asymmetries in the standard model (SM) for the singly Cabibbo-suppressed two-body hadronic decays of charmed mesons using the topological-diagram approach. In this approach, the magnitude and the phase of topological weak annihilation amplitudes, which arise mainly from final-state rescattering, can be extracted from the data. Consequently, direct CP asymmetry adir(tree) at tree level can be reliably estimated. In general, it lies in the range 10-4

  11. Semileptonic decays of charmed and beauty baryons with heavy sterile neutrinos in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, Sabir

    2009-04-01

    We obtain tree-level estimates of various differential branching ratios of heavy baryon decays with massive sterile neutrinos {nu}{sub x} in the final state. Generally, charmed baryons are found to be less promising than charmed mesons, in contrast to b hadrons. In the latter case, branching ratios of beauty mesons and baryons into sterile neutrinos are of the same order. As a consequence, at high energies beauty baryons give contribution to sterile neutrino production comparable to the contribution of beauty mesons (up to about 15%). Experimental limits on active-to-sterile mixing are quite strong for neutrinos lighter than D mesons but for heavier neutrinos they are weaker. As an example, for neutrino masses in the range 2 GeV < or approx. m{sub {nu}{sub x}} < or approx. 2.5 GeV, current data imply that the bounds on {lambda}{sub b}-hyperon branching ratios into sterile neutrinos are Br({lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}+e{sup -}+{nu}{sub x}) < or approx. 1.3x10{sup -5}-1.7x10{sup -6} and Br({lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}+{mu}{sup -}+{nu}{sub x}) < or approx. 3.9x10{sup -7}-1.4x10{sup -7}.

  12. Study of the Asymmetric Photoproduction of Charmed Mesons using Data from the FOCUS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; /CINVESTAV, IPN

    2005-05-01

    Using data from the fixed target charm-photoproduction experiment, Fermilab FOCUS/E831, they studied the asymmetric production of the mesons: D{sup 0}, D{sup +} y D{sub s}{sup +}. Even when the asymmetry in the production of charm particles, defined as the ratio between particles and antiparticles, at next leading order in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is almost zero, in data we observe asymmetries probably associate dto the fragmentation processes. Since these are the less understood phenomena in QCD, the results in the present work could be of great importance to understand them. We found asymmetries in the production of the mesons D{sup +} and D{sup 0} (statistic significant), for the D{sub s}{sup +} we only observed an asymmetry not conclusive. We also report a study of the production asymmetries vs. the kinematic variables: p{sub T}{sup 2} (square transversal momentum of the particles), p{sub L} or p{sub Z} (longitudinal momentum), x{sub F} (Feynman x) and E{sub {gamma}} (photon beam energy).

  13. 78 FR 17744 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Maya: Hidden Worlds...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed,'' imported...

  14. Detection of Objects Hidden in Highly Scattering Media Using Time-Gated Imaging Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galland, Pierre A.; Wang, L.; Liang, X.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.

    2000-01-01

    Non-intrusive and non-invasive optical imaging techniques has generated great interest among researchers for their potential applications to biological study, device characterization, surface defect detection, and jet fuel dynamics. Non-linear optical parametric amplification gate (NLOPG) has been used to detect back-scattered images of objects hidden in diluted Intralipid solutions. To directly detect objects hidden in highly scattering media, the diffusive component of light needs to be sorted out from early arrived ballistic and snake photons. In an optical imaging system, images are collected in transmission or back-scattered geometry. The early arrival photons in the transmission approach, always carry the direct information of the hidden object embedded in the turbid medium. In the back-scattered approach, the result is not so forth coming. In the presence of a scattering host, the first arrival photons in back-scattered approach will be directly photons from the host material. In the presentation, NLOPG was applied to acquire time resolved back-scattered images under the phase matching condition. A time-gated amplified signal was obtained through this NLOPG process. The system's gain was approximately 100 times. The time-gate was achieved through phase matching condition where only coherent photons retain their phase. As a result, the diffusive photons, which were the primary contributor to the background, were removed. With a large dynamic range and high resolution, time-gated early light imaging has the potential for improving rocket/aircraft design by determining jets shape and particle sizes. Refinements to these techniques may enable drop size measurements in the highly scattering, optically dense region of multi-element rocket injectors. These types of measurements should greatly enhance the design of stable, and higher performing rocket engines.

  15. Evidence of an odd-parity hidden order in a spin-orbit coupled correlated iridate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Torchinsky, D. H.; Chu, H.; Ivanov, V.; Lifshitz, R.; Flint, R.; Qi, T.; Cao, G.; Hsieh, D.

    2016-01-01

    A rare combination of strong spin-orbit coupling and electron-electron correlations makes the iridate Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 a promising host for novel electronic phases of matter. The resemblance of its crystallographic, magnetic and electronic structures to La2CuO4, as well as the emergence on doping of a pseudogap region and a low-temperature d-wave gap, has particularly strengthened analogies to cuprate high-Tc superconductors. However, unlike the cuprate phase diagram, which features a plethora of broken symmetry phases in a pseudogap region that includes charge density wave, stripe, nematic and possibly intra-unit-cell loop-current orders, no broken symmetry phases proximate to the parent antiferromagnetic Mott insulating phase in Sr2IrO4 have been observed so far, making the comparison of iridate to cuprate phenomenology incomplete. Using optical second-harmonic generation, we report evidence of a hidden non-dipolar magnetic order in Sr2IrO4 that breaks both the spatial inversion and rotational symmetries of the underlying tetragonal lattice. Four distinct domain types corresponding to discrete 90°-rotated orientations of a pseudovector order parameter are identified using nonlinear optical microscopy, which is expected from an electronic phase that possesses the symmetries of a magneto-electric loop-current order. The onset temperature of this phase is monotonically suppressed with bulk hole doping, albeit much more weakly than the Néel temperature, revealing an extended region of the phase diagram with purely hidden order. Driving this hidden phase to its quantum critical point may be a path to realizing superconductivity in Sr2IrO4.

  16. Project of a Super Charm-Tau factory at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A. E.

    2013-09-15

    A project of a Super Charm-Tau factory is being developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences) in Novosibirsk. The electron-positron collider to be employed will operate at c.m. energies in the range between 2 and 5 GeV at an unprecedentedly high luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a longitudinal electron polarization at the beam-interaction point. The main objective of experiments at the Super Charm-Tau factory is to study processes involving the production and properties of charmed quarks and tau leptons. A high luminosity of this setup will make it possible to obtain a statistical data sample that will be three to four orders of magnitude vaster than that from any other experiment performed thus far. Experiments at this setup are assumed to be sensitive to effects of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Investigations to be carried out at the Super-Charm-Tau factory will supplement future experiments at Super-B factories under construction in Italy and in Japan.

  17. Voodoo Dolls, Charms, and Spells in the Classroom: Teaching, Screening, and Deconstructing the Misrepresentation of the African Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuber, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    "New Orleans voodoo," also called "créole voodoo," is an amalgamation of an honoring of the spirits of the dead, a respect for the elderly and the spiritual life, African knowledge of herbs and charms, and European elements of Catholicism. It is a religion of ancestor worship that is unknown to us, and that we are not…

  18. Charm and beauty searches using electron -D{sup 0} azimuthal correlations and microvertexing techniques in STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Geromitsos, Artemios

    2010-12-22

    The energy loss of heavy quarks in the hot and dense matter created at RHIC, can be used to probe the properties of the medium. Both charm and beauty quarks contribute to the non-photonic electrons through their semi-leptonic decays. It is essential to determine experimentally the relative contribution of charm and beauty quarks to understand the suppression of heavy flavors at high p{sub T} in central Au+Au collisions. The azimuthal angular correlations of non-photonic electrons with the reconstructed D{sup 0} allow to disentangle the contribution of charm and beauty and to reduce the background below the D{sup 0} invariant mass as well. We discuss the STAR measurement of non-photonic electron and D{sup 0{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+} azimuthal correlations in p+p collisions at 200 GeV. Furthermore, we show results from the application of microvertexing techniques for charm and beauty searches in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV using the information of the Silicon tracker of STAR.

  19. A simple model of two-body decays of charmed mesons into pseudoscalar mesons using the {1}/{N} expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dean

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to understand charmed meson decays in a simple yet quantitative language. The {1}/{N} expansion of QCD is chosen for the analysis of these decays. With the {1}/{N} expansion, significant SU(3)-flavor breaking effects are isolated and evaluated.

  20. Study of open charm production in proton+proton collisions at center of mass energies = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsyk, Sergey

    2005-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with its unique electron identification system enables us to perform high precision measurements of electron yields. By measuring electron production at high transverse momentum, we can disentangle the contribution of electrons originating from semi-leptonic decays of heavy quarks (charm or bottom) from the less interesting "photonic" decay modes of light mesons. D/B mesons carry single heavy valence quarks and are usually referred to as "Open Charm" and "Open Bottom" particles, differentiating them from Closed Flavor particles such as J/psi, and Y mesons. Due to the large mass of the heavy quarks, their production mechanisms can be adequately explained by perturbative QCD (pQCD) theory. This dissertation presents the measurement of electrons from heavy flavor decays in proton + proton collisions at RHIC at collision energy s = 200 GeV over a wide range of transverse moment (0.4 < pT < 5 GeV/c). Two independent analysis techniques of signal extraction were performed. The "Cocktail" subtraction is based on the calculation and subtraction of the expected "photon-related" electron background based upon measured yields of light mesons. The "Converter" subtraction is based upon a direct measurement of photon yields achieved introducing additional material in the PHENIX acceptance and deducing the photon abundance by measuring the increase in electron yield. This is the first measurement of the Open Charm crossection at this collision energy and it is an important baseline measurement for comparison with nucleus + nucleus collisions. The modification of Open Charm production in heavy ion collisions compared to the presented p + p result can be used to study the final state interaction of the heavy quarks with hot dense matter inside the collisions. The results of the Open Charm measurements are compared to current pQCD predictions both in Leading Order (LO) O a2s and Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) O a3s

  1. Peculiarities of induction and persistence of hidden chromosome instability in peripheral blood lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Pilinska, M A; Dybsky, S S; Dybska, O B; Shvayko, L I; Sushko, V O

    2014-09-01

    Objective - to investigate the induction of hidden chromosome instability in persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and its persistence in vitro in successive mitoses. Materials and methods. Using two tests ("G2-bleomycin sensitivity assay" and two-term cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes) voluntary cytogenetic examination of 15 individuals participated in the conversion of the "Shelter" ("Chornobyl NPP") into ecologically safe system had been carried out. Total 24 034 metaphase had been analyzed, of which 12 243 - without additional mutagenic exposure, 11 791 - exposed to bleomycin in vitro at concentration of 0.05 μg/ml. Results. The magnitude and dynamics of background as well as bleomycin-induced cytogenetic effects in both terms of lymphocytes' cultivation in occupational group differed significantly from the group of comparison towards increasing of chromosome instability indices with significant interindividual fluctuations. Conclusion. Interindividual differences in persistence of radiation-induced hidden chromosome instability in successive generations of human somatic cells had been found.

  2. Hidden, Unacknowledged, Acquaintance, and Date Rape: Looking Back, Looking Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Mary P.

    2011-01-01

    In this commentary, the author reflects on two articles that have been among the most highly cited publications in "Psychology of Women Quarterly" ("PWQ") over its first 35 years, "The Hidden Rape Victim: Personality, Attitudinal, and Situational Characteristics" (Koss, 1985) and "Stranger and Acquaintance Rape: Are There Differences in the…

  3. Is There a Hidden Agenda? The English Language Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Herman H.

    A discussion of the movement to make English the official language of the United States, by constitutional amendment, looks for a hidden agenda among its advocates. The history of and debate over the amendment in Congress and around the country are reviewed, drawing from legislative texts, speeches, essays, media commentary, and related research.…

  4. Resources of learning through hidden curriculum: Iranian nursing students’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Zohreh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Abedi, Heidarali; Zarea, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Students tend to internalize and perpetuate the patterns of behavior and the values surrounding them. Review of literature showed that there are several student learning sources through the hidden curriculum, but they have not been identified in nursing yet. Hence, the purpose of this study is explanation of learning resources in the hidden curriculum in the view of baccalaureate nursing students. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was carried out in 2012 with the participation of 32 baccalaureate nursing students in Nursing and Midwifery College of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran by purposeful sampling strategies. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews and continued to the level of data saturation and themes’ emergence. Data analysis was performed through inductive content analysis method. Result: “Instructor as the unique learning element,” “various learning resources in the clinical setting,” and “instructive nature of the education environment” were extracted as the main themes, each of which incorporated some categories. Conclusion: Baccalaureate undergraduate nursing students learnt the hidden curriculum by the resources such as instructors, resources existing in the clinical setting, and the university campus. Therefore, more research is recommended for the identification of other resources. In order to promote positive messages and reduce the negative messages of the hidden curricula running at academic and clinical settings, nursing educators and nurses need to learn more about this issue in the nursing profession. PMID:26430684

  5. Discovering the Hidden Treasures of Physical Best and Fitnessgram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patti

    2011-01-01

    Physical Best and Fitnessgram have a 25-year history, yet many physical educators have yet to be exposed to their full potential. Exploring the Physical Best Activity Guide worksheets and the "Reports" section of Fitnessgram is like finding buried treasure in one's own back yard. These hidden treasures can help physical educators incorporate the…

  6. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-08-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites. PMID:24223436

  7. Using hidden cameras to monitor suspected parental abuse.

    PubMed

    Arterburn, T

    2001-01-01

    In using hidden cameras to monitor suspected parental abuse a security requirement or an invasion of privacy? Covert surveillance of patients suspected of having Munchausen syndrome by proxy at an Atlanta children's hospital resulted in considerable media scrutiny when researchers published their findings. This article presents details of the research, the involvement of security officers, and the reactions of local authorities and health officials.

  8. Simple yet Hidden Counterexamples in Undergraduate Real Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.; Shipman, Patrick D.

    2013-01-01

    We study situations in introductory analysis in which students affirmed false statements as true, despite simple counterexamples that they easily recognized afterwards. The study draws attention to how simple counterexamples can become hidden in plain sight, even in an active learning atmosphere where students proposed simple (as well as more…

  9. Doing School Time: The Hidden Curriculum Goes to Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, José; De Lissovoy, Noah

    2013-01-01

    The hidden curriculum is generally understood as the process by which daily exposure to school expectations and routines transmits norms and values of the dominant society to students. In the present, through the regimentation of thought, control of bodies and movement, and proliferation of punishment, contemporary accountability and testing…

  10. Progressing to University: Hidden Messages at Two State Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers some of the ways that schools play a role in shaping higher education (HE) decision-making. Through their everyday practices and processes, schools can carry hidden messages about progression to HE, including choice of university. The sorts of routine aspects of school life dealt with here include events and activities,…

  11. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-08-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites.

  12. Hidden algebra method (quasi-exact-solvability in quantum mechanics)

    SciTech Connect

    Turbiner, Alexander

    1996-02-20

    A general introduction to quasi-exactly-solvable problems of quantum mechanics is presented. Main attention is given to multidimensional quasi-exactly-solvable and exactly-solvable Schroedinger operators. Exact-solvability of the Calogero and Sutherland N-body problems ass ociated with an existence of the hidden algebra slN is discussed extensively.

  13. Commitment-Based Learning of Hidden Linguistic Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akers, Crystal Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Learners must simultaneously learn a grammar and a lexicon from observed forms, yet some structures that the grammar and lexicon reference are unobservable in the acoustic signal. Moreover, these "hidden" structures interact: the grammar maps an underlying form to a particular interpretation. Learning one structure depends on learning…

  14. Was 49: Mirror for a hidden Seyfert 1 galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules; Moran, E.; Kay, L.; Antonucci, R.

    1993-01-01

    Was 49 is an interacting pair of Seyfert galaxies at z = 0.063, one of which contains a hidden Seyfert 1 nucleus as evidenced by the highly polarized broad wings on its Balmer lines. The disk of the main galaxy, Was 49a, appears to be globally photoionized by a powerful continuum source, undoubtedly the hidden Seyfert 1 companion, Was 49b. The intrinsic luminosity of Was 49b is at least 100 times larger than the observed (scattered) luminosity. A single SWP spectrum of the pair, which can be spatially resolved in the large aperture was obtained. A narrow Ly-alpha line was detected from Was 49b, the hidden Seyfert 1, at a flux level consistent with that of an unreddened Seyfert 2 galaxy. The lack of detection of a continuum is consistent with a power-law of v(sup -1) or steeper extrapolated from the optical, again consistent with the spectrum of other Seyfert 2 and hidden Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  15. Unpacking the Hidden Efficacies of Learning in Productive Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, David; Chen, Victor; Lim, Seo Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for learning where learners undergo experimentations with the phenomena at hand according to progressive and staged goals. Bowling is used as a case study in this paper. The premise for experimentations is that learners can experience hidden efficacies, including the formation of "bad habits." A distinction is made…

  16. Hidden Covariation Detection Produces Faster, Not Slower, Social Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Lynne A.; Andrade, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    In P. Lewicki's (1986b) demonstration of hidden covariation detection (HCD), responses of participants were slower to faces that corresponded with a covariation encountered previously than to faces with novel covariations. This slowing contrasts with the typical finding that priming leads to faster responding and suggests that HCD is a unique type…

  17. Generalized hidden Z{sub 2} symmetry of neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, Duane A.; Ge Shaofeng; Repko, Wayne W.

    2011-05-01

    We explore the consequences of the neutrino mass matrix having a hidden Z{sub 2} symmetry and one zero eigenvalue. When implemented, these two conditions give relations among the mixing angles. In addition, fitting these relations to the existing oscillation data allows limits to be placed on the parameter of the symmetry.

  18. Hidden Assumptions, Attitudes, and Procedures in Failing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzelmann, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    Many hidden assumptions, attitudes, and procedures are practiced routinely in schools without much thought or analysis. One possible explanation for their occurrence is that educators become comfortable with familiar routines and believe they must be doing OK because that's the way schools have always operated. Another likely possibility involves…

  19. Masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Paripovic, Dusan; Kostic, Mirjana; Spasojevic, Brankica; Kruscic, Divna; Peco-Antic, Amira

    2010-09-01

    Arterial hypertension is a risk factor affecting graft function in pediatric kidney transplants. Recent pediatric studies reported a high prevalence of hypertension, especially nocturnal hypertension in this population. Data regarding the prevalence of masked hypertension in pediatric patients with kidney transplants are still scarce. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation. A total of 41 patients (25 males) with stable functioning renal graft were included in the study. Their median age was 14.5 years with the median interval since transplantation of 2.5 years (range 0.3 to 20.6). Spacelabs 90207 was used to measure ambulatory blood pressure (BP) during a 24-h period. Ambulatory hypertension was defined as mean systolic and/or diastolic BP index at day-time or nighttime >or=1. Masked hypertension was defined as normal office BP but daytime ambulatory hypertension in patients without antihypertensive medications. Hidden uncontrolled hypertension was defined as daytime ambulatory hypertension undetected by office BP measurements in treated patients. Antihypertensive medications were prescribed to 58%. Prevalence of nocturnal hypertension was 68%. On the basis of combination of office and ABPM masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension was detected in 24% and 21% of the study population, respectively. Regular use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in transplanted patients enables detection of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension. PMID:20467790

  20. Is There Hidden Potential for Rural Population Growth in Sweden?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedomysl, Thomas; Amcoff, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Rural depopulation is a concern in many countries, and various policy initiatives have been taken to combat such trends. This article examines whether hidden potential for rural population growth can be found in Sweden. If such potential exists, it implies that the development prospects for many rural areas are not as unpromising as they may seem…

  1. Hidden Milky Way star clusters hosting Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtev, R.; Borissova, J.; Ivanov, V. D.; Georgiev, L.

    2009-05-01

    A noticeable fraction of the hidden young star clusters contain WR and O stars providing us with unique laboratories to study the evolution of these rare objects and their maternity places. We are reporting the reddening, the distance and age of two new members of the family of massive young Galactic clusters, hosting WR stars - Glimpse 23 and Glimpse 30.

  2. On local-hidden-variable no-go theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methot, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    The strongest attack against quantum mechanics came in 1935 in the form of a paper by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. It was argued that the theory of quantum mechanics could not be called a complete theory of Nature, for every element of reality is not represented in the formalism as such. The authors then put forth a proposition: we must search for a theory where, upon knowing everything about the system, including possible hidden variables, one could make precise predictions concerning elements of reality. This project was ultimately doomed in 1964 with the work of Bell, who showed that the most general local hidden variable theory could not reproduce correlations that arise in quantum mechanics. There exist mainly three forms of no-go theorems for local hidden variable theories. Although almost every physicist knows the consequences of these no-go theorems, not every physicist is aware of the distinctions between the three or even their exact definitions. Thus, we will discuss here the three principal forms of no-go theorems for local hidden variable theories of Nature. We will define Bell theorems, Bell theorems without inequalities, and pseudo-telepathy. A discussion of the similarities and differences will follow.

  3. 29. WORTHINGTON FIRE PUMP WITH TURBINE HIDDEN BEHIND. PUMP HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. WORTHINGTON FIRE PUMP WITH TURBINE HIDDEN BEHIND. PUMP HOUSE IS LOCATED AT HEAD OF OLD TRASH GATES. PUMP ENTERS WATER ON EXTERIOR OF WALL IN FAR SIDE OF PHOTO. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  4. The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisson, Christian

    Academic training programs in the field of outdoor education and recreation have increased considerably in the past few decades, but their true costs are often hidden. A survey of 15 outdoor college programs in the United States and Canada examined special fees associated with outdoor courses. The cost of necessary personal equipment and clothing…

  5. Primordial black holes and a large hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Calmet, Xavier

    2010-10-15

    In this note we point out that primordial black holes could be much shorter lived than usually assumed if there is a large hidden sector of particles that only interacts gravitationally with the particles of the standard model. The observation of the explosion of one of these black holes would severely constrain the energy scale at which gravity becomes strong.

  6. Integrating hidden Markov model and PRAAT: a toolbox for robust automatic speech transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, A.; Barker, J.; Giurgiu, M.

    2010-09-01

    An automatic time-aligned phone transcription toolbox of English speech corpora has been developed. Especially the toolbox would be very useful to generate robust automatic transcription and able to produce phone level transcription using speaker independent models as well as speaker dependent models without manual intervention. The system is based on standard Hidden Markov Models (HMM) approach and it was successfully experimented over a large audiovisual speech corpus namely GRID corpus. One of the most powerful features of the toolbox is the increased flexibility in speech processing where the speech community would be able to import the automatic transcription generated by HMM Toolkit (HTK) into a popular transcription software, PRAAT, and vice-versa. The toolbox has been evaluated through statistical analysis on GRID data which shows that automatic transcription deviates by an average of 20 ms with respect to manual transcription.

  7. Hidden Owners, Hidden Profits, and Poor Nursing Home Care: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Charlene; Ross, Leslie; Kang, Taewoon

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the ownership transparency, financial accountability, and quality indicators of a regional for-profit nursing home chain in California, using a case study methodology to analyze data on the chain's ownership and management structure, financial data, staffing levels, deficiencies and complaints, and litigation. Secondary data were obtained from regulatory and cost reports and litigation cases. Qualitative descriptions of ownership and management were presented and quantitative analyses were conducted by comparing financial and quality indicators with other California for-profit chains, for-profit non-chains, and nonprofit nursing home groups in 2011. The chain's complex, interlocking individual and corporate owners and property companies obscured its ownership structure and financial arrangements. Nursing and support services expenditures were lower than nonprofits and administrative costs were higher than for-profit non-chains. The chain's nurse staffing was lower than expected staffing levels; its deficiencies and citations were higher than in nonprofits; and a number of lawsuits resulted in bankruptcy. Profits were hidden in the chain's management fees, lease agreements, interest payments to owners, and purchases from related-party companies. Greater ownership transparency and financial accountability requirements are needed to ensure regulatory oversight and quality of care. PMID:26159173

  8. 'Charm' Strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Charm’ is a new June-bearing (short-day) strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier) cultivar from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station and the Wa...

  9. Amine control for DUV lithography: identifying hidden sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishkovich, Oleg P.; Larson, Carl E.

    2000-06-01

    The impact of airborne basic molecular contamination (MB) on the performance of chemically amplified (CA) resist systems has been a long standing problem. Low ppb levels of MB may be sufficient for robust 0.25 micrometer lithography with today's advanced CA resist systems combined with adequate chemical air filtration. However, with minimum CD targets heading below 150 nm, the introduction of new resist chemistries for Next Generation Lithography, and the trend towards thinner resists, the impact of MB at low and sub-ppb levels again becomes a critical manufacturing issue. Maximizing process control at aggressive feature sizes requires that the level of MB be maintained below a certain limit, which depends on such parameters as the sensitivity of the CA resist, the type of production tools, product mix, and process characteristics. Three approaches have been identified to reduce the susceptibility of CA resists to MB: effective chemical air filtration, modifications to resist chemistry/processing and cleanroom protocols involving MB monitoring and removal of MB sources from the fab. The final MB concentration depends on the effectiveness of filtration resources and on the total pollution originating from different sources in and out of the cleanroom. There are many well-documented sources of MB. Among these are: ambient air; polluted exhaust from other manufacturing areas re-entering the cleanroom through make-up air handlers; manufacturing process chemicals containing volatile molecular bases; certain cleanroom construction materials, such as paint and ceiling tiles; and volatile, humidifier system boiler additives (corrosion inhibitors), such as morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and dimethylaminoethanol. However, there is also an indeterminate number of other 'hidden' pollution sources, which are neither obvious nor well-documented. None of these sources are new, but they had little impact on earlier semiconductor manufacturing processes because the contamination

  10. HMM-Fisher: identifying differential methylation using a hidden Markov model and Fisher's exact test.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuying; Yu, Xiaoqing

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic event that plays an important role in regulating gene expression. It is important to study DNA methylation, especially differential methylation patterns between two groups of samples (e.g. patients vs. normal individuals). With next generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to identify differential methylation patterns by considering methylation at the single CG site level in an entire genome. However, it is challenging to analyze large and complex NGS data. In order to address this difficult question, we have developed a new statistical method using a hidden Markov model and Fisher's exact test (HMM-Fisher) to identify differentially methylated cytosines and regions. We first use a hidden Markov chain to model the methylation signals to infer the methylation state as Not methylated (N), Partly methylated (P), and Fully methylated (F) for each individual sample. We then use Fisher's exact test to identify differentially methylated CG sites. We show the HMM-Fisher method and compare it with commonly cited methods using both simulated data and real sequencing data. The results show that HMM-Fisher outperforms the current available methods to which we have compared. HMM-Fisher is efficient and robust in identifying heterogeneous DM regions. PMID:26854292

  11. Ciliate communities and hidden biodiversity in freshwater biotopes of the Pistoia province (Tuscany, Italy).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessia; Boscaro, Vittorio; Carducci, Daniela; Serra, Valentina; Modeo, Letizia; Verni, Franco; Fokin, Sergei I; Petroni, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Ciliates are essential components of aquatic environments, playing a pivotal role in microbial loops. Thus, the composition and dynamics of ciliate communities have been subjected to intense studying. Morphological methods have been traditionally employed, until the development of next-generation sequencing recently allowed to explore the topic with exclusively molecular techniques. However, the results of the two approaches are hardly comparable, and the pictures they offer can be quite different. This may be due, among other reasons, to two factors: (1) morphological descriptions may miss a large portion of "hidden biodiversity" (including rare species and resistance forms) that is detected instead by molecular methods; (2) identification errors may arise due to difficulties in recognizing microbial taxa without in-depth analyses. In this survey of freshwater systems of the Pistoia province (Tuscany, Italy) we address both issues, trying to quantify the hidden diversity through prolonged observations of differentially treated sample aliquots, combining morphological identification with Sanger sequencing. We provide the first insights into the ciliate fauna of this area presenting results that are suitable for future comparisons thanks to their multidisciplinary origin, and supply the first molecular data on well-known taxa such as Linostomella and Disematostoma. PMID:26773904

  12. High-frequency guided ultrasonic waves for hidden defect detection in multi-layered aircraft structures.

    PubMed

    Masserey, Bernard; Raemy, Christian; Fromme, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Aerospace structures often contain multi-layered metallic components where hidden defects such as fatigue cracks and localized disbonds can develop, necessitating non-destructive testing. Employing standard wedge transducers, high frequency guided ultrasonic waves that penetrate through the complete thickness were generated in a model structure consisting of two adhesively bonded aluminium plates. Interference occurs between the wave modes during propagation along the structure, resulting in a frequency dependent variation of the energy through the thickness with distance. The wave propagation along the specimen was measured experimentally using a laser interferometer. Good agreement with theoretical predictions and two-dimensional finite element simulations was found. Significant propagation distance with a strong, non-dispersive main wave pulse was achieved. The interaction of the high frequency guided ultrasonic waves with small notches in the aluminium layer facing the sealant and on the bottom surface of the multilayer structure was investigated. Standard pulse-echo measurements were conducted to verify the detection sensitivity and the influence of the stand-off distance predicted from the finite element simulations. The results demonstrated the potential of high frequency guided waves for hidden defect detection at critical and difficult to access locations in aerospace structures from a stand-off distance. PMID:24856653

  13. Hidden disorder in the α'→δ transformation of Pu-1.9 at.% Ga

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeffries, J. R.; Manley, M. E.; Wall, M. A.; Blobaum, K. J. M.; Schwartz, A. J.

    2012-06-06

    Enthalpy and entropy are thermodynamic quantities critical to determining how and at what temperature a phase transition occurs. At a phase transition, the enthalpy and temperature-weighted entropy differences between two phases are equal (ΔH=TΔS), but there are materials where this balance has not been experimentally or theoretically realized, leading to the idea of hidden order and disorder. In a Pu-1.9 at. % Ga alloy, the δ phase is retained as a metastable state at room temperature, but at low temperatures, the δ phase yields to a mixed-phase microstructure of δ- and α'-Pu. The previously measured sources of entropy associated withmore » the α'→δ transformation fail to sum to the entropy predicted theoretically. We report an experimental measurement of the entropy of the α'→δ transformation that corroborates the theoretical prediction, and implies that only about 65% of the entropy stabilizing the δ phase is accounted for, leaving a missing entropy of about 0.5 kB/atom. Some previously proposed mechanisms for generating entropy are discussed, but none seem capable of providing the necessary disorder to stabilize the δ phase. This hidden disorder represents multiple accessible states per atom within the δ phase of Pu that may not be included in our current understanding of the properties and phase stability of δ-Pu.« less

  14. Ciliate communities and hidden biodiversity in freshwater biotopes of the Pistoia province (Tuscany, Italy).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessia; Boscaro, Vittorio; Carducci, Daniela; Serra, Valentina; Modeo, Letizia; Verni, Franco; Fokin, Sergei I; Petroni, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Ciliates are essential components of aquatic environments, playing a pivotal role in microbial loops. Thus, the composition and dynamics of ciliate communities have been subjected to intense studying. Morphological methods have been traditionally employed, until the development of next-generation sequencing recently allowed to explore the topic with exclusively molecular techniques. However, the results of the two approaches are hardly comparable, and the pictures they offer can be quite different. This may be due, among other reasons, to two factors: (1) morphological descriptions may miss a large portion of "hidden biodiversity" (including rare species and resistance forms) that is detected instead by molecular methods; (2) identification errors may arise due to difficulties in recognizing microbial taxa without in-depth analyses. In this survey of freshwater systems of the Pistoia province (Tuscany, Italy) we address both issues, trying to quantify the hidden diversity through prolonged observations of differentially treated sample aliquots, combining morphological identification with Sanger sequencing. We provide the first insights into the ciliate fauna of this area presenting results that are suitable for future comparisons thanks to their multidisciplinary origin, and supply the first molecular data on well-known taxa such as Linostomella and Disematostoma.

  15. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Delgado, P; Hobbs, T J; Londergan, J T; Melnitchouk, W

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q^{2}≳1  GeV^{2} and W^{2}≳3.5  GeV^{2}, including fixed-target proton and deuteron cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previous global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with ⟨x⟩_{IC} at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ∼1%) at the 4σ level for Δχ^{2}=1. We also critically assess the impact of older EMC measurements of F_{2}^{c} at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large χ^{2} values. PMID:25768757

  16. Observation of charmed-baryon production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Himel, T.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Longo, M.J.; Lueth, V.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Russell, J.J.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Trilling, G.H.; Vella, E.N.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1980-01-07

    A peak in the pK/sup -/..pi../sup +/ and p-barK/sup +/..pi../sup -/ invariant-mass spectra at 2.285 +- 0.006 GeV/c/sup 2/ is observed, which is associated with the lowest-lying charmed baryon (..lambda../sub c/). A cross section times branching ratio of 0.037 +- 0.012 nb at E/sub c.m./=5.2 GeV is measured with a substantial fraction of the events produced with an equal recoiling mass. New measurements of inclusive p and ..lambda.. cross sections are also presented, allowing an estimate of the branching ratio B (..lambda../sub c/ ..-->.. pK/sup -/..pi../sup +/) =0.022 +- 0.010.

  17. Search for rare and forbidden charm meson decays at Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Donald J. Summers et al.

    2000-09-29

    The authors report the results of a blind search for flavor-changing neutral current, lepton-flavor violating, and lepton-number violating decays of D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, and D{sup 0} mesons (and their antiparticles) into modes containing muons and electrons. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, they examine the {pi}{ell}{ell} and K{ell}{ell} decay modes of D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} and the {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}} decay modes of D{sup 0}. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, they present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 24 decay modes examined. Eight of these modes have no previously reported limits, and fourteen are reported with significant improvements over previously published results.

  18. Bottom and charm masses and lifetimes at the Tevatron; and a pentaquark search

    SciTech Connect

    B. Todd Huffman

    2003-06-09

    The Fermilab Tevatron, operating at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, provides a rich environment for the study of the bottom and charmed hadrons and for searches of other bound states. Presented here are recent measurements of the masses of the following states using fully reconstructed events: B{sup +}, B{sup 0}, B{sub s}, {Lambda}{sub b}, and the neutral B**. Lifetimes from both CDF and D0 in exclusive decays for all of these modes are also presented (sans the B**). A search was conducted at CDF for the {Xi}{sup 2} and {Xi}{sup 0} pentaquark states in the decay {Xi}(1860) {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup {+-}} setting a limit on their production in p-{bar p} collisions relative to the number of {Xi}(1530) baryons seen.

  19. Charmed partner of the exotic X (5568 ) state and its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaev, S. S.; Azizi, K.; Sundu, H.

    2016-05-01

    The mass, decay constant, and width of a hypothetical charmed partner Xc of the newly observed exotic Xb(5568 ) state are calculated using the technique of the QCD sum rule method. The Xc=[s u ][c ¯ d ¯ ] state with JP=0+ is described, employing two types of the diquark-antidiquark interpolating currents. The evaluation of the mass mXc and decay constant fXc is carried out utilizing the two-point sum rule method by including vacuum condensates up to eight dimensions. The widths of the decay channels Xc→Ds-π+ and Xc→D0K0 are also found. To this end, the strong couplings gXcDsπ and gXcDK are computed by means of QCD sum rules on the light-cone and soft-meson approximation.

  20. New Limits on Intrinsic Charm in the Nucleon from Global Analysis of Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2≳1 GeV2 and W2≳3.5 GeV2 , including fixed-target proton and deuteron cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previous global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with ⟨x ⟩IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ˜1 % ) at the 4 σ level for Δ χ2=1 . We also critically assess the impact of older EMC measurements of F2c at large x , which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large χ2 values.

  1. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1.more » We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.« less

  2. Axial charges of hyperons and charmed baryons using Nf=2 +1 +1 twisted mass fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Hadjiyiannakou, K.; Kallidonis, C.

    2016-08-01

    The axial couplings of the low lying baryons are evaluated using a total of five ensembles of dynamical twisted mass fermion gauge configurations. The simulations are performed using the Iwasaki gauge action and two degenerate flavors of light quarks, and a strange and a charm quark fixed to approximately their physical values at two values of the coupling constant. The lattice spacings, determined using the nucleon mass, are a =0.082 fm and a =0.065 fm , and the simulations cover a pion mass in the range of about 210 MeV to 430 MeV. We study the dependence of the axial couplings on the pion mass in the range of about 210 MeV to 430 MeV as well as the SU(3) breaking effects as we decrease the light quark mass toward its physical value.

  3. Evidence for B Semileptonic Decays into the Lambda_c Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-11-05

    We present the first evidence for B semileptonic decays into the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} based on 420 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. Events are tagged by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. We measure the relative branching fraction {Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}/{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}X) = (3.2 {+-} 0.9{sub stat.} {+-} 0.9{sub syst.})%. The significance of the signal including the systematic uncertainty is 4.9 standard deviations.

  4. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  5. Charm and beauty quark masses in the MMHT2014 global PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Martin, A. D.; Motylinski, P.; Thorne, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the variation in the MMHT2014 PDFs when we allow the heavy-quark masses m_c and m_b to vary away from their default values. We make PDF sets available in steps of Δ m_c =0.05 GeV and Δ m_b =0.25 GeV, and present the variation in the PDFs and in the predictions. We examine the comparison to the HERA data on charm and beauty structure functions and note that in each case the heavy-quark data, and the inclusive data, have a slight preference for lower masses than our default values. We provide PDF sets with three and four active quark flavours, as well as the standard value of five flavours. We use the pole mass definition of the quark masses, as in the default MMHT2014 analysis, but briefly comment on the overline{MS} definition.

  6. Nonperturbative charming penguin contributions to isospin asymmetries in radiative B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chul; Mehen, Thomas; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2008-09-01

    Recent experimental data on the radiative decays B{yields}V{gamma}, where V is a light vector meson, find small isospin violation in B{yields}K*{gamma} while isospin asymmetries in B{yields}{rho}{gamma} are of order 20%, with large uncertainties. Using soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate isospin asymmetries in these radiative B decays up to O(1/m{sub b}), also including O(v{alpha}{sub s}) contributions from nonperturbative charming penguins (NPCP). In the absence of NPCP contributions, the theoretical predictions for the asymmetries are a few percent or less. Including the NPCP can significantly increase the isospin asymmetries for both B{yields}V{gamma} modes. We also consider the effect of the NPCP on the branching ratio and CP asymmetries in B{sup {+-}}{yields}V{sup {+-}}{gamma}.

  7. Production of doubly charmed tetraquarks with exotic color configurations in electron-positron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Tetsuo; Liu, Yan-Rui; Oka, Makoto; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2013-04-01

    Structure and production of doubly charmed tetraquarks Tcc (cc ubardbar) are studied from the viewpoint of color configurations. Based on the diquark correlation, the tetraquark Tcc with I (JP) = 0 (1+) is considered to be stable against strong decay. We discuss that the mixing probability of color antitriplet and sextet cc components in Tcc is suppressed by 1 / mc2, so the two configurations are separately realized in the heavy quark limit. Utilizing the nonrelativistic QCD framework, we evaluate the production cross sections of Tcc in electron-positron collisions. The momentum dependence of the cross section of color antitriplet is found to be different from that of sextet, which can be used to discriminate the color structure of the Tcc states in experimental measurements.

  8. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Ωc* Decaying to Ωc0γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Hart, A. J.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Bard, D. J.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Ωc* (css) in the radiative decay Ωc0γ, where the Ωc0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Ω-π+, Ω-π+π0, Ω-π+π-π+, and Ξ-K-π+π+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Ωc* and the Ωc0 baryons is measured to be 70.8±1.0(stat)±1.1(syst)MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Ωc* and Ωc0 in e+e- annihilation.

  9. Observation of an excited charm baryon Omega c* decaying to Omega c0gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Omega c* (css) in the radiative decay Omega c0gamma, where the Omega c0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega(-)pi+, Omega(-)pi+pi0, Omega(-)pi+pi(-)pi+, and Xi(-)K(-)pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Omega c* and the Omega c0 baryons is measured to be 70.8+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.1(syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Omega c* and Omega c0 in e+e(-) annihilation. PMID:17280195

  10. Monte Carlo study of CP asymmetry measurement of a Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Karshon, U.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that, for D/sup 0//bar D//sup 0/ mixing of order /approximately/ 1%, it may be possible to observe in a Tau-Charm Factory a CP violation effect in the D/sup 0//bar D//sup 0/ system via a CP asymmetry. The method used is to tag one D by its semi-leptonic decay and to look for decays of the other D into CP eigenstates. It is estimated that within 1 year of running at the designed luminosity of L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/, /approximately/ 6600 such events can be collected. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The three-dimensional photochemical model CHARM. Incorporation of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.; V'yushkova, T. Yu.; Cherepanova, L. A.; Kukoleva, A. A.; Repnev, A. I.; Banin, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the numerical global photochemical model CHARM (CHemical Atmospheric Research Model) and the results of a numerical simulation of climatological distributions of ozone and other atmospheric trace gases in a height range of up to 90 km. We also present the results of numerical scenarios of an impact induced by a change in UV radiation fluxes in the solar activity cycle and conditioned by ozone depletion in polar regions by high-energy particles of cosmic origin. The spatial transport of chemically active species is described in the model (the Prather scheme) on the basis of global fields of wind components and temperature calculated by the ARM (Atmospheric Research Model) general circulation model.

  12. Wilson Prize Lecture: The Novosibirsk Tau/Charm Factory Project: prospect/status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, Alexander

    2002-04-01

    For a long time at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, we develop step-by-step our electron-electron and electron-positron colliders. Now, the VEPP-4M collider (total energy up to 11 GeV), with a special emphasis on Two-Photon hadron physics, is in operation. The new VEPP-2000 collider, as direct extension of our VEPP-2M collider (which finished its very productive life in 2000) to the energy up to 2 GeV total, should start its commissioning phase in 2002. But our main goal in the field (for quite a few years already) is development and construction of Tau/Charm Factory (VEPP-5 collider). There are 3 main modes of operation foreseen: Maximal luminosity - up to 1 \\cdot 10^34 cm-2 sec-1. For reaching of this ambitious goal we intend to use ``round beam'' approach. The approach will be used and studied at VEPP-2000. Longitudinally polarized collisions (proposed and proved theoretically in Novosibirsk still in 1969) with luminosity 1 \\cdot 10^33 cm-2 sec-1. High monochromaticity option (down to few 10 of keV). Now the new injector complex, which would produce intense low emittance bunches of positrons and electrons (for VEPP-5, VEPP-4M and VEPP-2000 efficient operation) is nearing completion. Fraction of the VEPP-5 tunnel is constructed. We hope, when the VEPP-5 collider would become closer to completion, to attract international collaborators to use unique features of our Tau/Charm Factory.

  13. An impossibility theorem for parameter independent hidden variable theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leegwater, Gijs

    2016-05-01

    Recently, Roger Colbeck and Renato Renner (C&R) have claimed that '[n]o extension of quantum theory can have improved predictive power' (Colbeck & Renner, 2011, 2012b). If correct, this is a spectacular impossibility theorem for hidden variable theories, which is more general than the theorems of Bell (1964) and Leggett (2003). Also, C&R have used their claim in attempt to prove that a system's quantum-mechanical wave function is in a one-to-one correspondence with its 'ontic' state (Colbeck & Renner, 2012a). C&R's claim essentially means that in any hidden variable theory that is compatible with quantum-mechanical predictions, probabilities of measurement outcomes are independent of these hidden variables. This makes such variables otiose. On closer inspection, however, the generality and validity of the claim can be contested. First, it is based on an assumption called 'Freedom of Choice'. As the name suggests, this assumption involves the independence of an experimenter's choice of measurement settings. But in the way C&R define this assumption, a no-signalling condition is surreptitiously presupposed, making the assumption less innocent than it sounds. When using this definition, any hidden variable theory violating parameter independence, such as Bohmian Mechanics, is immediately shown to be incompatible with quantum-mechanical predictions. Also, the argument of C&R is hard to follow and their mathematical derivation contains several gaps, some of which cannot be closed in the way they suggest. We shall show that these gaps can be filled. The issue with the 'Freedom of Choice' assumption can be circumvented by explicitly assuming parameter independence. This makes the result less general, but better founded. We then obtain an impossibility theorem for hidden variable theories satisfying parameter independence only. As stated above, such hidden variable theories are impossible in the sense that any supplemental variables have no bearing on outcome probabilities

  14. Measurement of Charm and Bottom Production in p+p Collisions at sqrtS = 200 GeV at RHIC-PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Morino, Yuhei; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri V; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    RHIC-PHENIX has observed a large suppression pattern and azimuthal anisotropy of non-photonic electron at mid-rapidity (|{eta}|< 0.35) in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. To understand these results and the interaction of heavy quarks in the hot and dense medium, experimental determination of production ratio of charm over bottom is one of the most important topics, since the behavior of bottom may differ from charm in the medium. We measured the ratio of charm over bottom and total cross section of bottom via partial reconstruction of D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +} K{sup -} {nu}{sub e} decay in p+p collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV. Total cross sections of charm and bottom were also measured via di-electron continuum in p+p collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV.

  15. Spin transistor action from hidden Onsager reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Adagideli, İ; Lutsker, V; Scheid, M; Jacquod, Ph; Richter, K

    2012-06-01

    We investigate generic Hamiltonians for confined electrons with weak inhomogeneous spin-orbit coupling. Using a local gauge transformation we show how the SU(2) Hamiltonian structure reduces to a U(1)×U(1) structure for spinless fermions in a fictitious orbital magnetic field, to leading order in the spin-orbit strength. Using an Onsager relation, we further show how the resulting spin conductance vanishes in a two-terminal setup, and how it is turned on by either weakly breaking time-reversal symmetry or opening additional transport terminals, thus allowing one to switch the generated spin current on or off. We numerically check our theory for mesoscopic cavities as well as Aharonov-Bohm rings.

  16. Hidden sources of mercury in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Chavez, C R; Federico-Perez, R A; Gomez-Alvarez, A; Velazquez-Contreras, L E; Perez-Rios, R

    2014-09-01

    The healthcare sector is an important contributor to mercury (Hg) pollution because of the potential presence of mercury in thermometers, blood pressure cuffs, amalgams, etc. There are also other potential sources of mercury in this sector which are used frequently and in high volumes where the presence of the metal is not obvious and which might be collectively contributing to pollution. For instance, some chemicals used for the clinical diagnosis of illness may contain mercury. The goal of this study was to investigate potential sources of mercury pollution, which originate from clinical laboratory discharges, using an exploratory approach. The focus was on the residue generated during automatic analysis of patients' bodily fluids at a medical center in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. This study shows an overview of what might be happening in the region or the country related to non-obvious sources of mercury in the healthcare sector. The results showed measurable levels of mercury in the residues coming from urine sediment analysis. These amounts do not exceed the maximum allowed by Mexican environmental regulations; nevertheless, the frequency and cumulative volume of residues generated, combined with the potential for persistence and the bioaccumulation of mercury in the environment, warrant attention. The work carried out in this study is being taken as a model for future studies for pollution prevention in the healthcare sector with the goal of measuring mercury emissions to the environment from clinical laboratory wastewater, including identifying sources which--while not obvious--could be important given the frequency and volume of their use in the clinical diagnosis.

  17. Apparent Ultra-High b-Value Diffusion-Weighted Image Reconstruction via Hidden Conditional Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Haider, Shahid A; Wong, Alexander; Lui, Dorothy; Cameron, Andrew; Modhafar, Ameen; Fieguth, Paul; Haider, Masoom A

    2015-05-01

    A promising, recently explored, alternative to ultra-high b-value diffusion weighted imaging (UHB-DWI) is apparent ultra-high b-value diffusion-weighted image reconstruction (AUHB-DWR), where a computational model is used to assist in the reconstruction of apparent DW images at ultra-high b -values. Firstly, we present a novel approach to AUHB-DWR that aims to improve image quality. We formulate the reconstruction of an apparent DW image as a hidden conditional random field (HCRF) in which tissue model diffusion parameters act as hidden states in this random field. The second contribution of this paper is a new generation of fully connected conditional random fields, called the hidden stochastically fully connected conditional random fields (HSFCRF) that allows for efficient inference with significantly reduced computational complexity via stochastic clique structures. The proposed AUHB-DWR algorithms, HCRF and HSFCRF, are evaluated quantitatively in nine different patient cases using Fisher's criteria, probability of error, and coefficient of variation metrics to validate its effectiveness for the purpose of improving intensity delineation between expert identified suspected cancerous and healthy tissue within the prostate gland. The proposed methods are also examined using a prostate phantom, where the apparent ultra-high b-value DW images reconstructed using the tested AUHB-DWR methods are compared with real captured UHB-DWI. The results illustrate that the proposed AUHB-DWR methods has improved reconstruction quality and improved intensity delineation compared with existing AUHB-DWR approaches.

  18. A DEAD box protein is required for formation of a hidden break in Arabidopsis chloroplast 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kenji; Ashida, Hiroki; Ogawa, Taro; Yokota, Akiho

    2010-09-01

    In plant chloroplasts, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the large subunit of the ribosome undergoes post-maturation fragmentation processing. This processing consists of site-specific cleavage that generates gapped, discontinuous rRNA molecules. However, the molecular mechanism underlying introduction of the gap structure (the 'hidden break') is poorly understood. Here, we found that the DEAD box protein RH39 plays a key role in introduction of the hidden break into the 23S rRNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Genetic screening for an Arabidopsis plant with a drastically reduced level of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase identified an RH39 mutant. The levels of other chloroplast-encoded photosynthetic proteins were also severely reduced. The reductions were not due to a failure of transcription, but rather inefficiency in translation. RNA gel blotting revealed incomplete fragmentation of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts during maturation. In vitro analysis with recombinant RH39 suggested that the protein binds to the adjacent sequence upstream of the hidden break site to exert its function. We propose a molecular mechanism for the RH39-mediated fragmentation processing of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts.

  19. Active Inference for Binary Symmetric Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2015-10-01

    We consider active maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference problem for hidden Markov models (HMM), where, given an initial MAP estimate of the hidden sequence, we select to label certain states in the sequence to improve the estimation accuracy of the remaining states. We focus on the binary symmetric HMM, and employ its known mapping to 1d Ising model in random fields. From the statistical physics viewpoint, the active MAP inference problem reduces to analyzing the ground state of the 1d Ising model under modified external fields. We develop an analytical approach and obtain a closed form solution that relates the expected error reduction to model parameters under the specified active inference scheme. We then use this solution to determine most optimal active inference scheme in terms of error reduction, and examine the relation of those schemes to heuristic principles of uncertainty reduction and solution unicity.

  20. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.