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Sample records for generates distinct nurf

  1. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  2. The ISWI-containing NURF complex regulates the output of the canonical Wingless pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiyun; Spichiger-Haeusermann, Chloe; Basler, Konrad

    2009-10-01

    Wingless (Wg) signalling regulates the expression of its target genes through Pangolin, Armadillo and their interacting co-factors. In a genetic screen for Wg signalling components, we found that imitation switch (ISWI), a chromatin-remodelling ATPase, had a positive role in transducing the canonical Wg signal, promoting the expression of the Wg target senseless. ISWI is found in several chromatin-remodelling complexes, including nucleosome remodelling factor (NURF). The effect of interfering with the function of other components of the NURF complex in vivo mimics that of ISWI. The NURF complex is also required for the efficient expression of other Wg target genes. Armadillo interacts directly with the NURF complex in vitro and recruits it to Wg targets in cultured cells. Together, our results suggest that the ISWI-containing NURF complex functions as a co-activator of Armadillo to promote Wg-mediated transcription.

  3. Familiarity, relative distinctiveness, and the generation effect.

    PubMed

    Peynircioğlu, Z F; Mungan, E

    1993-05-01

    In Experiment 1, psychology experts and novices showed generation effects with both psychology-related and other words. In Experiment 2, music experts who were sports novices and sports experts who were music novices showed a generation effect in a recognition test for all words regardless of domain (music or sports). Moreover, the effect was greater for words from the subjects' "nonexpertise" area. In Experiments 3A and 3B, music experts showed a greater generation effect for sports words than for music words in a free recall test but only when the sports and music words were studied together. These results are inconsistent with the semantic elaboration requirement for the generation effect that predicts less of an effect, if any, with less familiar materials. Rather, they provide evidence for the idea that the generation effect is influenced by relative distinctiveness of the to-be-remembered items.

  4. A Novel Algorithm for the Generation of Distinct Kinematic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medapati, Sreenivasa Reddy; Kuchibhotla, Mallikarjuna Rao; Annambhotla, Balaji Srinivasa Rao

    2016-07-01

    Generation of distinct kinematic chains is an important topic in the design of mechanisms for various industrial applications i.e., robotic manipulator, tractor, crane etc. Many researchers have intently focused on this area and explained various processes of generating distinct kinematic chains which are laborious and complex. It is desirable to enumerate the kinematic chains systematically to know the inherent characteristics of a chain related to its structure so that all the distinct chains can be analyzed in depth, prior to the selection of a chain for a purpose. This paper proposes a novel and simple method with set of rules defined to eliminate isomorphic kinematic chains generating distinct kinematic chains. Also, this method simplifies the process of generating distinct kinematic chains even at higher levels i.e., 10-link, 11-link with single and multiple degree of freedom.

  5. Setd1a and NURF mediate chromatin dynamics and gene regulation during erythroid lineage commitment and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Schulz, Vincent P.; Deng, Changwang; Li, Guangyao; Shen, Yong; Tusi, Betsabeh K.; Ma, Gina; Stees, Jared; Qiu, Yi; Steiner, Laurie A.; Zhou, Lei; Zhao, Keji; Bungert, Jörg; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of chromatin structure is a key step in transcription regulation in mammalian cells and eventually determines lineage commitment and differentiation. USF1/2, Setd1a and NURF complexes interact to regulate chromatin architecture in erythropoiesis, but the mechanistic basis for this regulation is hitherto unknown. Here we showed that Setd1a and NURF complexes bind to promoters to control chromatin structural alterations and gene activation in a cell context dependent manner. In human primary erythroid cells USF1/2, H3K4me3 and the NURF complex were significantly co-enriched at transcription start sites of erythroid genes, and their binding was associated with promoter/enhancer accessibility that resulted from nucleosome repositioning. Mice deficient for Setd1a, an H3K4 trimethylase, in the erythroid compartment exhibited reduced Ter119/CD71 positive erythroblasts, peripheral blood RBCs and hemoglobin levels. Loss of Setd1a led to a reduction of promoter-associated H3K4 methylation, inhibition of gene transcription and blockade of erythroid differentiation. This was associated with alterations in NURF complex occupancy at erythroid gene promoters and reduced chromatin accessibility. Setd1a deficiency caused decreased associations between enhancer and promoter looped interactions as well as reduced expression of erythroid genes such as the adult β-globin gene. These data indicate that Setd1a and NURF complexes are specifically targeted to and coordinately regulate erythroid promoter chromatin dynamics during erythroid lineage differentiation. PMID:27141965

  6. Selection on a Subunit of the NURF Chromatin Remodeler Modifies Life History Traits in a Domesticated Strain of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Large, Edward E.; Zhao, Yuehui; Long, Lijiang; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Andersen, Erik C.; McGrath, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary life history theory seeks to explain how reproductive and survival traits are shaped by selection through allocations of an individual’s resources to competing life functions. Although life-history traits evolve rapidly, little is known about the genetic and cellular mechanisms that control and couple these tradeoffs. Here, we find that two laboratory-adapted strains of C. elegans descended from a single common ancestor that lived in the 1950s have differences in a number of life-history traits, including reproductive timing, lifespan, dauer formation, growth rate, and offspring number. We identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect that controls 24%–75% of the total trait variance in reproductive timing at various timepoints. Using CRISPR/Cas9-induced genome editing, we show this QTL is due in part to a 60 bp deletion in the 3’ end of the nurf-1 gene, which is orthologous to the human gene encoding the BPTF component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex. Besides reproduction, nurf-1 also regulates growth rate, lifespan, and dauer formation. The fitness consequences of this deletion are environment specific—it increases fitness in the growth conditions where it was fixed but decreases fitness in alternative laboratory growth conditions. We propose that chromatin remodeling, acting through nurf-1, is a pleiotropic regulator of life history trade-offs underlying the evolution of multiple traits across different species. PMID:27467070

  7. Net Generation or Digital Natives: Is There a Distinct New Generation Entering University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Chris; Ramanau, Ruslan; Cross, Simon; Healing, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article reports key findings from the first phase of a research project investigating Net generation age students as they encounter e-learning at five universities in England. We take a critical view of the idea of a distinct generation which has been described using various terms including Net generation and Digital Natives and explore age…

  8. Epigenetic regulation of stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila testis via the nucleosome-remodeling factor NURF.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Christopher M; Matunis, Erika L

    2010-06-04

    Regulation of stem cells depends on both tissue-specific transcriptional regulators and changes in chromatin organization, yet the coordination of these events in endogenous niches is poorly understood. In the Drosophila testis, local JAK-STAT signaling maintains germline and somatic stem cells (GSCs and cyst progenitor cells, or CPCs) in a single niche. Here we show that epigenetic regulation via the nucleosome-remodeling factor (NURF) complex ensures GSC and CPC maintenance by positively regulating JAK-STAT signaling, thereby preventing premature differentiation. Conversely, NURF is not required in early differentiating daughter cells of either lineage. Because three additional ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ACF, CHRAC, and dMi-2/NuRD) are dispensable for stem cell maintenance in the testis, epigenetic regulation of stem cells within this niche may rely primarily on NURF. Thus, local signals cooperate with specific chromatin-remodeling complexes in intact niches to coordinately regulate a common set of target genes to prevent premature stem cell differentiation.

  9. Overland flow generation in two lithologically distinct rainforest catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsey, S.; Elsenbeer, H.; Stallard, R.

    2004-01-01

    Streams on uniformly rainforest-covered, but lithologically very diverse Barro Colorado Island in central Panama?? show remarkable differences in their runoff response to rainfall. This lithological diversity is reflected in equally diverse soilscapes, and our objective was to test the hypothesis that contrasting runoff responses derive from soilscape features that control the generation of overland flow. We determined the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of two neighboring, but hydrologically contrasting catchments (Lutz Creek with a flashy and Conrad Trail with a delayed response to rainfall), and quantified the spatial and temporal frequency of overland flow occurrence. The median Ks values at a depth of 12.5 cm are large enough to rule out Hortonian overland flow, but a marked decrease in K s in Lutz Creek catchment at 30 cm suggests the formation of a perched water table and the generation saturation overland flow; the decrease in Ks in the Conrad Trail catchment is more gradual, and a perched water table is expected to form only at depths below 50 cm. In Lutz Creek, overland flow was generated frequently in time and space and regardless of topographic position, including near the interfluve, with very low thresholds of storm magnitude, duration, intensity and antecedent wetness, whereas in Conrad Trail, overland flow was generated much less frequently and then only locally. We conclude that soilscape features and microtopography are important controls of overland flow generation in these catchments. Our results contribute to the growing evidence that overland flow and forests are not a priori a contradiction in terms. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Overland flow generation in two lithologically distinct rainforest catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S.; Elsenbeer, H.; Stallard, R.

    2004-08-01

    Streams on uniformly rainforest-covered, but lithologically very diverse Barro Colorado Island in central Panamá show remarkable differences in their runoff response to rainfall. This lithological diversity is reflected in equally diverse soilscapes, and our objective was to test the hypothesis that contrasting runoff responses derive from soilscape features that control the generation of overland flow. We determined the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity ( Ks) of two neighboring, but hydrologically contrasting catchments (Lutz Creek with a flashy and Conrad Trail with a delayed response to rainfall), and quantified the spatial and temporal frequency of overland flow occurrence. The median Ks values at a depth of 12.5 cm are large enough to rule out Hortonian overland flow, but a marked decrease in Ks in Lutz Creek catchment at 30 cm suggests the formation of a perched water table and the generation saturation overland flow; the decrease in Ks in the Conrad Trail catchment is more gradual, and a perched water table is expected to form only at depths below 50 cm. In Lutz Creek, overland flow was generated frequently in time and space and regardless of topographic position, including near the interfluve, with very low thresholds of storm magnitude, duration, intensity and antecedent wetness, whereas in Conrad Trail, overland flow was generated much less frequently and then only locally. We conclude that soilscape features and microtopography are important controls of overland flow generation in these catchments. Our results contribute to the growing evidence that overland flow and forests are not a priori a contradiction in terms.

  11. Exposure to bacterial endotoxin generates a distinct strain of α-synuclein fibril

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changyoun; Lv, Guohua; Lee, Jun Sung; Jung, Byung Chul; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hong, Chul-Suk; Valera, Elvira; Lee, He-Jin; Paik, Seung R.; Hasegawa, Masato; Masliah, Eliezer; Eliezer, David; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A single amyloidogenic protein is implicated in multiple neurological diseases and capable of generating a number of aggregate “strains” with distinct structures. Among the amyloidogenic proteins, α-synuclein generates multiple patterns of proteinopathies in a group of diseases, such as Parkinson disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, the link between specific conformations and distinct pathologies, the key concept of the strain hypothesis, remains elusive. Here we show that in the presence of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), α-synuclein generated a self-renewable, structurally distinct fibril strain that consistently induced specific patterns of synucleinopathies in mice. These results suggest that amyloid fibrils with self-renewable structures cause distinct types of proteinopathies despite the identical primary structure and that exposure to exogenous pathogens may contribute to the diversity of synucleinopathies. PMID:27488222

  12. Distinct molecular processes associated with isometric force generation and rapid tension recovery after quick release.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B; Chalovich, J M; Yu, L C

    1995-01-01

    It was proposed by Huxley and Simmons (Nature 1971, 233:533-538) that force-generating cross-bridges are attached to actin in several stable positions. In this concept, isometric force is generated by the same mechanism as the quick tension recovery after an abrupt release of length; i.e., when crossbridges proceed from the first postulated stable position to the second and/or subsequent positions, resulting in straining of the elastic elements within the cross-bridges. Therefore, isometric force is generated by cross-bridges in the second or even subsequent stable positions. However, through mechanical measurements of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers, we found that during isometric contraction only the first stable state is significantly occupied; i.e., isometric force is generated by cross-bridges in the first of the stable states. Thus, isometric force and the quick tension recovery appear to result from two distinctly different molecular processes. We propose that isometric force results from a structural change in the actomyosin complex associated with the transition from a weakly bound configuration to a strongly bound configuration before the reaction steps in the Huxley-Simmons model, whereas a major component of quick tension recovery originates from transitions among the subsequent strongly bound states. Mechanical, biochemical, and structural evidence for the two distinct processes is summarized and reviewed. PMID:7787051

  13. Distinct molecular processes associated with isometric force generation and rapid tension recovery after quick release.

    PubMed

    Brenner, B; Chalovich, J M; Yu, L C

    1995-04-01

    It was proposed by Huxley and Simmons (Nature 1971, 233:533-538) that force-generating cross-bridges are attached to actin in several stable positions. In this concept, isometric force is generated by the same mechanism as the quick tension recovery after an abrupt release of length; i.e., when crossbridges proceed from the first postulated stable position to the second and/or subsequent positions, resulting in straining of the elastic elements within the cross-bridges. Therefore, isometric force is generated by cross-bridges in the second or even subsequent stable positions. However, through mechanical measurements of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers, we found that during isometric contraction only the first stable state is significantly occupied; i.e., isometric force is generated by cross-bridges in the first of the stable states. Thus, isometric force and the quick tension recovery appear to result from two distinctly different molecular processes. We propose that isometric force results from a structural change in the actomyosin complex associated with the transition from a weakly bound configuration to a strongly bound configuration before the reaction steps in the Huxley-Simmons model, whereas a major component of quick tension recovery originates from transitions among the subsequent strongly bound states. Mechanical, biochemical, and structural evidence for the two distinct processes is summarized and reviewed.

  14. Concurrent Vaccination with two distinct vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen generates phenotypically and functionally distinct T-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Amanda L.; Higgins, Jack; Franzusoff, Alex; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Studies comparing two or more vaccine platforms have historically evaluated each platform based on its ability to induce an immune response and may conclude that one vaccine is more efficacious than the other(s), leading to a recommendation for development of the more effective vaccine for clinical studies. Alternatively, these studies have documented the advantages of a diversified prime and boost regimen due to amplification of the antigen-specific T-cell population. We hypothesize here that two vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen might induce shared and distinct antigen-specific T-cell populations, and examined the possibility that two distinct vaccines could be used concomitantly. Experimental design Using recombinant poxvirus and yeast vaccines, we compared the T-cell populations induced by these two platforms in terms of serum cytokine response, T-cell gene expression, T-cell receptor phenotype, antigen-specific cytokine expression, T-cell avidity, and T-cell antigen-specific tumor cell lysis. Results These studies demonstrate for the first time that vaccination with a recombinant poxvirus platform (rV/F-CEA/TRICOM) or a heat-killed yeast vaccine platform (yeast-CEA) elicits T-cell populations with both shared and unique phenotypic and functional characteristics. Furthermore, both the antigen and the vector play a role in the induction of distinct T-cell populations. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that concurrent administration of two vaccines targeting the same antigen induces a more diverse T-cell population that leads to enhanced antitumor efficacy. These studies provide the rationale for future clinical studies investigating concurrent administration of vaccine platforms targeting a single antigen to enhance the antigen-specific immune response. PMID:19756595

  15. Generating Tonal Distinctions in Mandarin Chinese Using an Electrolarynx with Preprogrammed Tone Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liana; Nagle, Kathy; Heaton, James T.

    2016-01-01

    An electrolarynx (EL) is a valuable rehabilitative option for individuals who have undergone laryngectomy, but current monotone ELs do not support controlled variations in fundamental frequency for producing tonal languages. The present study examined the production and perception of Mandarin Chinese using a customized hand-held EL driven by computer software to generate tonal distinctions (tonal EL). Four native Mandarin speakers were trained to articulate their speech coincidentally with preprogrammed tonal patterns in order to produce mono- and di-syllabic words with a monotone EL and tonal EL. Three native Mandarin speakers later transcribed and rated the speech samples for intelligibility and acceptability. Results indicated that words produced using the tonal EL were significantly more intelligible and acceptable than those produced using the monotone EL. PMID:26951783

  16. Generating Tonal Distinctions in Mandarin Chinese Using an Electrolarynx with Preprogrammed Tone Patterns.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liana; Nagle, Kathy; Heaton, James T

    2016-04-01

    An electrolarynx (EL) is a valuable rehabilitative option for individuals who have undergone laryngectomy, but current monotone ELs do not support controlled variations in fundamental frequency for producing tonal languages. The present study examined the production and perception of Mandarin Chinese using a customized hand-held EL driven by computer software to generate tonal distinctions (tonal EL). Four native Mandarin speakers were trained to articulate their speech coincidentally with preprogrammed tonal patterns in order to produce mono- and di-syllabic words with a monotone EL and tonal EL. Three native Mandarin speakers later transcribed and rated the speech samples for intelligibility and acceptability. Results indicated that words produced using the tonal EL were significantly more intelligible and acceptable than those produced using the monotone EL.

  17. Generation of a Functionally Distinct Rhizopus oryzae Lipase through Protein Folding Memory.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) has a propeptide at its N-terminus that functions as an intramolecular chaperone and facilitates the folding of mature ROL (mROL). In this study, we successfully generated a functionally distinct imprinted mROL (mROLimp) through protein folding memory using a mutated propeptide. The mutated propeptide left its structural memory on mROL and produced mROLimp that exhibited different substrate specificities compared with mROLWT (prepared from the wild type propeptide), although the amino acid sequences of both mROLs were the same. mROLimp showed a preference for substrates with medium chain-length acyl groups and, noticeably, recognized a peptidase-specific substrate. In addition, ROLimp was more stable than mROLWT. These results strongly suggest that proteins with identical amino acid sequences can fold into different conformations and that mutations in intramolecular chaperones can dynamically induce changes in enzymatic activity.

  18. Sequential generation of two distinct synapse-driven network patterns in developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Allène, Camille; Cattani, Adriano; Ackman, James B; Bonifazi, Paolo; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Cossart, Rosa

    2008-11-26

    Developing cortical networks generate a variety of coherent activity patterns that participate in circuit refinement. Early network oscillations (ENOs) are the dominant network pattern in the rodent neocortex for a short period after birth. These large-scale calcium waves were shown to be largely driven by glutamatergic synapses albeit GABA is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the cortex at such early stages, mediating synapse-driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in the hippocampus. Using functional multineuron calcium imaging together with single-cell and field potential recordings to clarify distinct network dynamics in rat cortical slices, we now report that the developing somatosensory cortex generates first ENOs then GDPs, both patterns coexisting for a restricted time period. These patterns markedly differ by their developmental profile, dynamics, and mechanisms: ENOs are generated before cortical GDPs (cGDPs) by the activation of glutamatergic synapses mostly through NMDARs; cENOs are low-frequency oscillations (approximately 0.01 Hz) displaying slow kinetics and gradually involving the entire network. At the end of the first postnatal week, GABA-driven cortical GDPs can be reliably monitored; cGDPs are recurrent oscillations (approximately 0.1 Hz) that repetitively synchronize localized neuronal assemblies. Contrary to cGDPs, cENOs were unexpectedly facilitated by short anoxic conditions suggesting a contribution of glutamate accumulation to their generation. In keeping with this, alterations of extracellular glutamate levels significantly affected cENOs, which are blocked by an enzymatic glutamate scavenger. Moreover, we show that a tonic glutamate current contributes to the neuronal membrane excitability when cENOs dominate network patterns. Therefore, cENOs and cGDPs are two separate aspects of neocortical network maturation that may be differentially engaged in physiological and pathological processes.

  19. Distinct IFT mechanisms contribute to the generation of ciliary structural diversity in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lu, Yun; Qin, Hongmin; Lanjuin, Anne; Shaham, Shai; Sengupta, Piali

    2007-06-20

    Individual cell types can elaborate morphologically diverse cilia. Cilia are assembled via intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors; however, the mechanisms that generate ciliary diversity are unknown. Here, we examine IFT in the structurally distinct cilia of the ASH/ASI and the AWB chemosensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, enabling us to compare IFT in specific cilia types. We show that unlike in the ASH/ASI cilia, the OSM-3 kinesin moves independently of the kinesin-II motor in the AWB cilia. Although OSM-3 is essential to extend the distal segments of the ASH/ASI cilia, it is not required to build the AWB distal segments. Mutations in the fkh-2 forkhead domain gene result in AWB-specific defects in ciliary morphology, and FKH-2 regulates kinesin-II subunit gene expression specifically in AWB. Our results suggest that cell-specific regulation of IFT contributes to the generation of ciliary diversity, and provide insights into the networks coupling the acquisition of ciliary specializations with other aspects of cell fate.

  20. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  1. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  2. Distinct populations of endoderm cells converge to generate the embryonic liver bud and ventral foregut tissues.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Kimberly D; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2005-04-01

    The location and movement of mammalian gut tissue progenitors, prior to the expression of tissue-specific genes, has been unknown, but this knowledge is essential to identify transitions that lead to cell type specification. To address this, we used vital dyes to label exposed anterior endoderm cells of early somite stage mouse embryos, cultured the embryos into the tissue bud phase of development, and determined the tissue fate of the dye labeled cells. This approach was performed at three embryonic stages that are prior to, or coincident with, foregut tissue patterning (1-3 somites, 4-6 somites, and 7-10 somites). Short-term labeling experiments tracked the movement of tissue progenitor cells during foregut closure. Surprisingly, we found that two distinct types of endoderm-progenitor cells, lateral and medial, arising from three spatially separated embryonic domains, converge to generate the epithelial cells of the liver bud. Whereas the lateral endoderm-progenitors give rise to descendants that are constrained in tissue fate and position along the anterior-posterior axis of the gut, the medial gut endoderm-progenitors give rise to descendants that stream along the anterior-posterior axis at the ventral midline and contribute to multiple gut tissues. The fate map reveals extensive morphogenetic movement of progenitors prior to tissue specification, it permits a detailed analysis of endoderm tissue patterning, and it illustrates that diverse progenitor domains can give rise to individual tissue cell types.

  3. Identification of distinct antibody epitopes and mimotopes from a peptide array of 5520 randomly generated sequences.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Ulrich; Ivascu, Claudia; Schlief, Marén; Landgraf, Christiane; Gericke, Seike; Zahn, Grit; Herzel, Hanspeter; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Schneider-Mergener, Jens

    2002-09-01

    We used a relatively small library of 5520 randomly generated single 15-mer peptides prepared by SPOT synthesis as an array of 28.5x19.0 cm to identify epitopes for three distinct monoclonal antibodies, namely anti-p24 (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1) monoclonal anibody (mab) CB4-1, anti-interleukin-10 (IL-10) mab CB/RS/13, and anti-transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) mab Tab2. Initially identified peptide ligands mostly had very low affinities for the antibodies with dissociation constants around 10(-4) M. Subsequent identification of residues critical for the antibody interactions involved complete L-amino acid substitutional analyses. Several substitutions resulted in analogs with dissociation constants in the low micromolar and high nanomolar range. Specifically binding peptides with key residue patterns matching the wild-type epitopes were identified for all three antibodies. In addition, for antibody CB4-1 mimotopes that showed no homology to the known epitope were selected. Our results suggest that a very limited library diversity, although far from covering the entire sequence repertoire, can suffice to rapidly and economically select peptidic antibody epitopes and mimotopes.

  4. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Chun -Jun; Sun, Wei -Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; ...

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPSlike genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. In hyphae this compound is converted to aspulvinones whereas inmore » conidia it is converted to melanin. The genes are expressed in different tissues and this spatial control is probably regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is located in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. Our data reveal the first case in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in which the tissue specific production of a single compound directs it into two separate pathways, producing distinct compounds with different functions. Our data also reveal that a single trans-prenyltransferase, AbpB, prenylates two substrates, aspulvinones and butyrolactones, revealing that genes outside of contiguous secondary metabolism gene clusters can modify more than one compound thereby expanding metabolite diversity. Our study raises the possibility of incorporation of spatial, cell-type specificity in expression of secondary metabolites of biological interest and provides new insight into designing and reconstituting their biosynthetic pathways.« less

  5. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun -Jun; Sun, Wei -Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Clay C. C.

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPSlike genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. In hyphae this compound is converted to aspulvinones whereas in conidia it is converted to melanin. The genes are expressed in different tissues and this spatial control is probably regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is located in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. Our data reveal the first case in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in which the tissue specific production of a single compound directs it into two separate pathways, producing distinct compounds with different functions. Our data also reveal that a single trans-prenyltransferase, AbpB, prenylates two substrates, aspulvinones and butyrolactones, revealing that genes outside of contiguous secondary metabolism gene clusters can modify more than one compound thereby expanding metabolite diversity. Our study raises the possibility of incorporation of spatial, cell-type specificity in expression of secondary metabolites of biological interest and provides new insight into designing and reconstituting their biosynthetic pathways.

  6. Divergence in a master variator generates distinct phenotypes and transcriptional responses

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Jennifer E.G.; Zheng, Wei; Rong, Xiaoqing; Miranda, Noraliz; Lin, Zhixiang; Dunn, Barbara; Zhao, Hongyu; Snyder, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic basis of phenotypic differences in individuals is an important area in biology and personalized medicine. Analysis of divergent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains grown under different conditions revealed extensive variation in response to both drugs (e.g., 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide [4NQO]) and different carbon sources. Differences in 4NQO resistance were due to amino acid variation in the transcription factor Yrr1. Yrr1YJM789 conferred 4NQO resistance but caused slower growth on glycerol, and vice versa with Yrr1S96, indicating that alleles of Yrr1 confer distinct phenotypes. The binding targets of Yrr1 alleles from diverse yeast strains varied considerably among different strains grown under the same conditions as well as for the same strain under different conditions, indicating that distinct molecular programs are conferred by the different Yrr1 alleles. Our results demonstrate that genetic variations in one important control gene (YRR1), lead to distinct regulatory programs and phenotypes in individuals. We term these polymorphic control genes “master variators.” PMID:24532717

  7. Optical Generation And Spatially Distinct Interferometric Detection Of Ultrahigh Frequency Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Hurley

    2006-05-01

    Generation and interferometric detection of 22 GHz surface acoustic waves (SAWs) using two laterally separated absorption gratings on a Si substrate are presented. Optical phase sensitive detection of SAWs is demonstrated using a modified Sagnac interferometer. The reflection characteristics of the suboptical wavelength grating necessitate the use of only linear polarization. This is accomplished by employing a Faraday rotator to ensure path reversal of the reference and signal pulses. The enhanced sensitivity of the interferometer is exploited to measure the acoustic disturbance on an identical absorption grating at a distance of ~4.5 µm from the generation site.

  8. Distinct biological events generated by ECM proteolysis by two homologous collagenases.

    PubMed

    Solomonov, Inna; Zehorai, Eldar; Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Wolf, Sharon G; Shainskaya, Alla; Zhuravlev, Alina; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Visse, Robert; Levin, Yishai; Kampf, Nir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Nagase, Hideaki; Sagi, Irit

    2016-09-27

    It is well established that the expression profiles of multiple and possibly redundant matrix-remodeling proteases (e.g., collagenases) differ strongly in health, disease, and development. Although enzymatic redundancy might be inferred from their close similarity in structure, their in vivo activity can lead to extremely diverse tissue-remodeling outcomes. We observed that proteolysis of collagen-rich natural extracellular matrix (ECM), performed uniquely by individual homologous proteases, leads to distinct events that eventually affect overall ECM morphology, viscoelastic properties, and molecular composition. We revealed striking differences in the motility and signaling patterns, morphology, and gene-expression profiles of cells interacting with natural collagen-rich ECM degraded by different collagenases. Thus, in contrast to previous notions, matrix-remodeling systems are not redundant and give rise to precise ECM-cell crosstalk. Because ECM proteolysis is an abundant biochemical process that is critical for tissue homoeostasis, these results improve our fundamental understanding its complexity and its impact on cell behavior.

  9. Distinct biological events generated by ECM proteolysis by two homologous collagenases

    PubMed Central

    Solomonov, Inna; Zehorai, Eldar; Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Shainskaya, Alla; Zhuravlev, Alina; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Visse, Robert; Levin, Yishai; Kampf, Nir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Nagase, Hideaki; Sagi, Irit

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the expression profiles of multiple and possibly redundant matrix-remodeling proteases (e.g., collagenases) differ strongly in health, disease, and development. Although enzymatic redundancy might be inferred from their close similarity in structure, their in vivo activity can lead to extremely diverse tissue-remodeling outcomes. We observed that proteolysis of collagen-rich natural extracellular matrix (ECM), performed uniquely by individual homologous proteases, leads to distinct events that eventually affect overall ECM morphology, viscoelastic properties, and molecular composition. We revealed striking differences in the motility and signaling patterns, morphology, and gene-expression profiles of cells interacting with natural collagen-rich ECM degraded by different collagenases. Thus, in contrast to previous notions, matrix-remodeling systems are not redundant and give rise to precise ECM–cell crosstalk. Because ECM proteolysis is an abundant biochemical process that is critical for tissue homoeostasis, these results improve our fundamental understanding its complexity and its impact on cell behavior. PMID:27630193

  10. Building the central complex in Drosophila: the generation and development of distinct neural subsets.

    PubMed

    Young, J M; Armstrong, J D

    2010-05-01

    The distinctive midline neuropil, the central complex (CX), is one of the most prominent features of the insect brain. We investigated the development of the four CX structures and several sets of CX neurons in the Drosophila brain using immunostaining for two cell adhesion molecules, DN-cadherin and Echinoid, and a set of seven enhancer trap lines. Our results showed that the CX is first identifiable in the third instar larva and that it elaborates over the first 48 hours of metamorphosis. The first identifiable structures to appear in their immature form are the protocerebral bridge and fan-shaped body, which are present in the brain of the third instar larva, followed by the noduli (from P12h), and finally the ellipsoid body (from P24h). We observed that neurons are added incrementally to the developing CX structure, with sets of small-field neurons projecting to the CX prior to the large-field neurons. The small-field neurons first project to the developing fan-shaped body, before arborizing or extending to the other structures. We found evidence to suggest that small-field neurons exist in sets of 16 and that they originate from eight common clusters of perikarya in the cortex, suggesting a common origin. We also identified a novel set of pontine neurons that connect contralateral segments in the fan-shaped body.

  11. Phage display and hybridoma generation of antibodies to human CXCR2 yields antibodies with distinct mechanisms and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Christine J; Carroll, Danielle; Huang, Ling; Elvin, John; Neal, Frances; Walker, Edward; Benschop, Joris J; Kim, Eldar E; Barry, Simon T; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    Generation of functional antibodies against integral membrane proteins such as the G-protein coupled receptor CXCR2 is technically challenging for several reasons, including limited epitope accessibility, the requirement for a lipid environment to maintain structure and their existence in dynamic conformational states. Antibodies to human CXCR2 were generated by immunization in vivo and by in vitro selection methods. Whole cell immunization of transgenic mice and screening of phage display libraries using CXCR2 magnetic proteoliposomes resulted in the isolation of antibodies with distinct modes of action. The hybridoma-derived antibody fully inhibited IL-8 and Gro-α responses in calcium flux and β-arrestin recruitment assays. The phage-display derived antibodies were allosteric antagonists that showed ligand dependent differences in functional assays. The hybridoma and phage display antibodies did not cross-compete in epitope competition assays and mapping using linear and CLIPS peptides confirmed that they recognized distinct epitopes of human CXCR2. This illustrates the benefits of using parallel antibody isolation approaches with different antigen presentation methods to successfully generate functionally and mechanistically diverse antagonistic antibodies to human CXCR2. The method is likely to be broadly applicable to other complex membrane proteins.

  12. Placental leucine aminopeptidase efficiently generates mature antigenic peptides in vitro but in patterns distinct from endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Dimitra; Hearn, Arron; Evnouchidou, Irini; Chroni, Angeliki; Leondiadis, Leondios; York, Ian A; Rock, Kenneth L; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2010-08-01

    All three members of the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidases, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), ERAP2, and placental leucine aminopeptidase (PLAP), also known as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, have been implicated in the generation of MHC class I-presented peptides. ERAP1 and 2 trim peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum for direct presentation, whereas PLAP has been recently implicated in cross-presentation. The best characterized member of the family, ERAP1, has unique enzymatic properties that fit well with its role in Ag processing. ERAP1 can trim a large variety of long peptide sequences and efficiently accumulate mature antigenic epitopes of 8-9 aa long. In this study, we evaluate the ability of PLAP to process antigenic peptide precursors in vitro and compare it with ERAP1. We find that, similar to ERAP1, PLAP can trim a variety of long peptide sequences efficiently and, in most cases, accumulates appreciable amounts of correct length mature antigenic epitope. Again, similar to ERAP1, PLAP continued trimming some of the epitopes tested and accumulated smaller products effectively destroying the epitope. However, the intermediate accumulation properties of ERAP1 and PLAP are distinct and epitope dependent, suggesting that these two enzymes may impose different selective pressures on epitope generation. Overall, although PLAP has the necessary enzymatic properties to participate in generating or destroying MHC class I-presented peptides, its trimming behavior is distinct from that of ERAP1, something that supports a separate role for these two enzymes in Ag processing.

  13. Generation of functionally distinct isoforms of PTBP3 by alternative splicing and translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lit-Yeen; Whitfield, Peter; Llorian, Miriam; Monzon-Casanova, Elisa; Diaz-Munoz, Manuel D.; Turner, Martin; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a widely expressed RNA binding protein that acts as a regulator of alternative splicing and of cytoplasmic mRNA functions. Vertebrates contain two closely-related paralogs with >75% amino acid sequence identity. Early replacement of PTBP1 by PTBP2 during neuronal differentiation causes a concerted set of splicing changes. By comparison, very little is known about the molecular functions or physiological roles of PTBP3, although its expression and conservation throughout the vertebrates suggest a role in haematopoietic cells. To begin to understand its functions we have characterized the mRNA and protein isoform repertoire of PTBP3. Combinatorial alternative splicing events at the 5′ end of the gene allow for the generation of eight mRNA and three major protein isoforms. Individual mRNAs generate up to three protein isoforms via alternative translation initiation by re-initiation and leaky scanning using downstream AUG codons. The N-terminally truncated PTBP3 isoforms lack nuclear localization signals and/or most of the RRM1 domain and vary in their RNA binding properties and nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution, suggesting that PTBP3 may have major post-transcriptional cytoplasmic roles. Our findings set the stage for understanding the non-redundant physiological roles of PTBP3. PMID:25940628

  14. Asbestos and multi-walled carbon nanotubes generate distinct oxidative responses in inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Satomi; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Ito, Daiki; Asakawa, Atsushi; Nagai, Hirotaka; Tajima, Masafumi; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is considered a social burden by causing mesothelioma. Despite the use of synthetic materials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are similar in dimension to asbestos and produce mesothelioma in animals. The role of inflammatory cells in mesothelial carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here, we evaluated the differences in inflammatory cell responses following exposure to these fibrous materials using a luminometer and L-012 (8-amino-5-chloro-7-phenylpyrido[3,4-d]pyridazine-1,4-(2H,3H) dione) to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS). Rat peripheral blood or RAW264.7 cells were used to assess the effects on neutrophils and macrophages, respectively. Crocidolite and amosite induced significant ROS generation by neutrophils with a peak at 10 min, whereas that of chrysotile was ~25% of the crocidolite/amosite response. MWCNTs with different diameters (~15, 50, 115 and 145 nm) and different carcinogenicity did not induce significant ROS in peripheral blood. However, the MWCNTs induced a comparable amount of ROS in RAW264.7 cells to that following asbestos treatment. The peaks for MWCNTs (0.5–1.5 h) were observed earlier than those for asbestos (1–5 h). Apocynin and superoxide dismutase significantly inhibited ROS generation for each fiber, suggesting an involvement of NADPH oxidase and superoxide. Thus, asbestos and MWCNTs induce different oxidative responses in inflammatory cells, indicating the importance of mesothelial cell evaluation for carcinogenesis. PMID:25759516

  15. Dual Processing of FAT1 Cadherin Protein by Human Melanoma Cells Generates Distinct Protein Products*

    PubMed Central

    Sadeqzadeh, Elham; de Bock, Charles E.; Zhang, Xu Dong; Shipman, Kristy L.; Scott, Naomi M.; Song, Chaojun; Yeadon, Trina; Oliveira, Camila S.; Jin, Boquan; Hersey, Peter; Boyd, Andrew W.; Burns, Gordon F.; Thorne, Rick F.

    2011-01-01

    The giant cadherin FAT1 is one of four vertebrate orthologues of the Drosophila tumor suppressor fat. It engages in several functions, including cell polarity and migration, and in Hippo signaling during development. Homozygous deletions in oral cancer suggest that FAT1 may play a tumor suppressor role, although overexpression of FAT1 has been reported in some other cancers. Here we show using Northern blotting that human melanoma cell lines variably but universally express FAT1 and less commonly FAT2, FAT3, and FAT4. Both normal melanocytes and keratinocytes also express comparable FAT1 mRNA relative to melanoma cells. Analysis of the protein processing of FAT1 in keratinocytes revealed that, like Drosophila FAT, human FAT1 is cleaved into a non-covalent heterodimer before achieving cell surface expression. The use of inhibitors also established that such cleavage requires the proprotein convertase furin. However, in melanoma cells, the non-cleaved proform of FAT1 is also expressed at the cell surface together with the furin-cleaved heterodimer. Moreover, furin-independent processing generates a potentially functional proteolytic product in melanoma cells, a persistent 65-kDa membrane-bound cytoplasmic fragment no longer in association with the extracellular fragment. In vitro localization studies of FAT1 showed that melanoma cells display high levels of cytosolic FAT1 protein, whereas keratinocytes, despite comparable FAT1 expression levels, exhibited mainly cell-cell junctional staining. Such differences in protein distribution appear to reconcile with the different protein products generated by dual FAT1 processing. We suggest that the uncleaved FAT1 could promote altered signaling, and the novel products of alternate processing provide a dominant negative function in melanoma. PMID:21680732

  16. Mission Immiscible: Distinct subduction components generate two primary magmas of Pagan Volcano, Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Stern, R. J.; Nunokawa, A.; Shukuno, H.; Kawabata, H.; Hirahara, Y.; Chang, Q.; Miyazaki, T.; Kimura, J.; Embley, R. W.; Bloomer, S. H.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    such higher pressures, hydrous fluid and sediment melt could mix into a uniform supercritical fluid, with different proportions yield distinct NWR1 COB and POB (Tamura et al., 2011). In conclusion, Pagan COB1 is enriched in aqueous fluid component and COB2 is enriched in sediment melt component. Why and how do these different primary magmas form in the same volcano? Hydrous fluid could not be miscible with sediment melt in the depth of the subducting slab below the volcanic front, which might have resulted in two neighboring, but completely different primary magmas.

  17. Distinct types of translation termination generate substrates for ribosome-associated quality control.

    PubMed

    Shcherbik, Natalia; Chernova, Tatiana A; Chernoff, Yury O; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2016-08-19

    Cotranslational degradation of polypeptide nascent chains plays a critical role in quality control of protein synthesis and the rescue of stalled ribosomes. In eukaryotes, ribosome stalling triggers release of 60S subunits with attached nascent polypeptides, which undergo ubiquitination by the E3 ligase Ltn1 and proteasomal degradation facilitated by the ATPase Cdc48. However, the identity of factors acting upstream in this process is less clear. Here, we examined how the canonical release factors Sup45-Sup35 (eRF1-eRF3) and their paralogs Dom34-Hbs1 affect the total population of ubiquitinated nascent chains associated with yeast ribosomes. We found that the availability of the functional release factor complex Sup45-Sup35 strongly influences the amount of ubiquitinated polypeptides associated with 60S ribosomal subunits, while Dom34-Hbs1 generate 60S-associated peptidyl-tRNAs that constitute a relatively minor fraction of Ltn1 substrates. These results uncover two separate pathways that target nascent polypeptides for Ltn1-Cdc48-mediated degradation and suggest that in addition to canonical termination on stop codons, eukaryotic release factors contribute to cotranslational protein quality control.

  18. Bottom-up and top-down processes in emotion generation: common and distinct neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ochsner, Kevin N; Ray, Rebecca R; Hughes, Brent; McRae, Kateri; Cooper, Jeffrey C; Weber, Jochen; Gabrieli, John D E; Gross, James J

    2009-11-01

    Emotions are generally thought to arise through the interaction of bottom-up and top-down processes. However, prior work has not delineated their relative contributions. In a sample of 20 females, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the neural correlates of negative emotions generated by the bottom-up perception of aversive images and by the top-down interpretation of neutral images as aversive. We found that (a) both types of responses activated the amygdala, although bottom-up responses did so more strongly; (b) bottom-up responses activated systems for attending to and encoding perceptual and affective stimulus properties, whereas top-down responses activated prefrontal regions that represent high-level cognitive interpretations; and (c) self-reported affect correlated with activity in the amygdala during bottom-up responding and with activity in the medial prefrontal cortex during top-down responding. These findings provide a neural foundation for emotion theories that posit multiple kinds of appraisal processes and help to clarify mechanisms underlying clinically relevant forms of emotion dysregulation.

  19. Be together, not the same: Spatiotemporal organization of different cilia types generates distinct transport functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; Ruby, Edward; Dabiri, John; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Motile cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures on the cell surface that can sense and propel the extracellular fluid environment. Cilia are often thought to be limited to stereotypic morphologies, beat kinematics and non-discriminatory clearance functions, but we find that the spatiotemporal organization of different cilia types and beat behaviors can generate complex flow patterns and transport functions. Here, we present a case study in the Hawaiian bobtail squid where collective ciliary activity and resulting flow fields help recruit symbiont bacteria to the animal host. In particular, we demonstrate empirically and computationally how the squid's internal cilia act like a microfluidic device that actively filters the water for potential bacterial candidates and also provides a sheltered zone allowing for accumulation of mucus and bacteria into a biofilm. Moreover, in this sheltered zone, different cilia-driven flows enhance diffusion of biochemical signals, which could accelerate specific bacteria-host recognition. These results suggest that studying cilia activity on the population level might reveal a diverse range of biological transport and sensing functions. Moreover, understanding cilia as functional building blocks could inspire the design of ciliated robots and devices.

  20. Antigenic diversity is generated by distinct evolutionary mechanisms in African trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew P; Berry, Andrew; Aslett, Martin; Allison, Harriet C; Burton, Peter; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Brown, Robert; Browne, Hilary; Corton, Nicola; Hauser, Heidi; Gamble, John; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Marcello, Lucio; McQuillan, Jacqueline; Otto, Thomas D; Quail, Michael A; Sanders, Mandy J; van Tonder, Andries; Ginger, Michael L; Field, Mark C; Barry, J David; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Berriman, Matthew

    2012-02-28

    Antigenic variation enables pathogens to avoid the host immune response by continual switching of surface proteins. The protozoan blood parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness") across sub-Saharan Africa and is a model system for antigenic variation, surviving by periodically replacing a monolayer of variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) that covers its cell surface. We compared the genome of Trypanosoma brucei with two closely related parasites Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax, to reveal how the variant antigen repertoire has evolved and how it might affect contemporary antigenic diversity. We reconstruct VSG diversification showing that Trypanosoma congolense uses variant antigens derived from multiple ancestral VSG lineages, whereas in Trypanosoma brucei VSG have recent origins, and ancestral gene lineages have been repeatedly co-opted to novel functions. These historical differences are reflected in fundamental differences between species in the scale and mechanism of recombination. Using phylogenetic incompatibility as a metric for genetic exchange, we show that the frequency of recombination is comparable between Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei but is much lower in Trypanosoma vivax. Furthermore, in showing that the C-terminal domain of Trypanosoma brucei VSG plays a crucial role in facilitating exchange, we reveal substantial species differences in the mechanism of VSG diversification. Our results demonstrate how past VSG evolution indirectly determines the ability of contemporary parasites to generate novel variant antigens through recombination and suggest that the current model for antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei is only one means by which these parasites maintain chronic infections.

  1. mTOR has distinct functions in generating versus sustaining humoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Derek D.; Gaudette, Brian T.; Wilmore, Joel R.; Chernova, Irene; Bortnick, Alexandra; Weiss, Brendan M.; Allman, David

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of mTOR signaling in plasma cell differentiation and function. Furthermore, for reasons not understood, mTOR inhibition reverses antibody-associated disease in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we have demonstrated that induced B lineage–specific deletion of the gene encoding RAPTOR, an essential signaling adaptor for rapamycin-sensitive mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), abrogated the generation of antibody-secreting plasma cells in mice. Acute treatment with rapamycin recapitulated the effects of RAPTOR deficiency, and both strategies led to the ablation of newly formed plasma cells in the spleen and bone marrow while also obliterating preexisting germinal centers. Surprisingly, although perturbing mTOR activity caused a profound decline in serum antibodies that were specific for exogenous antigen or DNA, frequencies of long-lived bone marrow plasma cells were unaffected. Instead, mTORC1 inhibition led to decreased expression of immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) and other factors needed for robust protein synthesis. Consequently, blockade of antibody synthesis was rapidly reversed after termination of rapamycin treatment. We conclude that mTOR signaling plays critical but diverse roles in early and late phases of antibody responses and plasma cell differentiation. PMID:27760048

  2. Distinct types of translation termination generate substrates for ribosome-associated quality control

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbik, Natalia; Chernova, Tatiana A.; Chernoff, Yury O.; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2016-01-01

    Cotranslational degradation of polypeptide nascent chains plays a critical role in quality control of protein synthesis and the rescue of stalled ribosomes. In eukaryotes, ribosome stalling triggers release of 60S subunits with attached nascent polypeptides, which undergo ubiquitination by the E3 ligase Ltn1 and proteasomal degradation facilitated by the ATPase Cdc48. However, the identity of factors acting upstream in this process is less clear. Here, we examined how the canonical release factors Sup45–Sup35 (eRF1–eRF3) and their paralogs Dom34-Hbs1 affect the total population of ubiquitinated nascent chains associated with yeast ribosomes. We found that the availability of the functional release factor complex Sup45–Sup35 strongly influences the amount of ubiquitinated polypeptides associated with 60S ribosomal subunits, while Dom34-Hbs1 generate 60S-associated peptidyl-tRNAs that constitute a relatively minor fraction of Ltn1 substrates. These results uncover two separate pathways that target nascent polypeptides for Ltn1-Cdc48-mediated degradation and suggest that in addition to canonical termination on stop codons, eukaryotic release factors contribute to cotranslational protein quality control. PMID:27325745

  3. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Clay C.

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes or non-ribosomal peptide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPS-like genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. More interestingly, further experiments revealed that the aspulvinone E produced by two different genes accumulates in different fungal compartments. And this spatial control of aspulvinone E production is likely to be regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is inserted in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. The study also identified one trans-prenyltransferase AbpB which is capable of prenylating two different substrates aspulvinones and butyrolactones. In total, our study shows the first example in which the locally distribution of the same natural product could lead to its incorporation into different SM pathways.

  4. Role of the cytokine environment and cytokine receptor expression on the generation of functionally distinct dendritic cells from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Conti, Lucia; Cardone, Marco; Varano, Barbara; Puddu, Patrizia; Belardelli, Filippo; Gessani, Sandra

    2008-03-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages evolve from a common precursor. However, factors controlling monocyte differentiation toward DC or macrophages are poorly defined. We report that the surface density of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) alpha subunit in human peripheral blood monocytes varies among donors. Although no correlation was found between the extent of GM-CSFR and monocyte differentiation into DC driven by GM-CSF and IL-4, GM-CSFR expression strongly influenced the generation of CD1a(+) dendritic-like cells in the absence of IL-4. CD1a(+) cells generated in the presence of GM-CSF express CD40, CD80, MHC class I and II, DC-SIGN, MR, CCR5, and partially retain CD14 expression. Interestingly, they spontaneously induce the expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) allogeneic T lymphocytes producing IFN-gamma, and migrate toward CCL4 and CCL19. Upon stimulation with TLR ligands, they acquire the phenotypic features of mature DC. In contrast, the allostimulatory capacity is not further increased upon LPS activation. However, by blocking LPS-induced IL-10, a higher T cell proliferative response and IL-12 production were observed. Interestingly, IL-23 secretion was not affected by endogenous IL-10. These results highlight the importance of GM-CSFR expression in monocytes for cytokine-induced DC generation and point to GM-CSF as a direct player in the generation of functionally distinct DC.

  5. Escherichia coli Quorum-Sensing EDF, A Peptide Generated by Novel Multiple Distinct Mechanisms and Regulated by trans-Translation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sathish; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Vesper, Oliver; Alam, Nawsad; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Moll, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eshcerichia coli mazEF is a stress-induced toxin-antitoxin module mediating cell death and requiring a quorum-sensing (QS) extracellular death factor (EDF), the pentapeptide NNWNN. Here we uncovered several distinct molecular mechanisms involved in its generation from the zwf mRNA encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. In particular, we show that, under stress conditions, the endoribonuclease MazF cleaves specific ACA sites, thereby generating a leaderless zwf mRNA which is truncated 30 codons after the EDF-encoding region. Since the nascent ribosome peptide exit tunnel can accommodate up to 40 amino acids, this arrangement allows the localization of the EDF residues inside the tunnel when the ribosome is stalled at the truncation site. Moreover, ribosome stalling activates the trans-translation system, which provides a means for the involvement of ClpPX in EDF generation. Furthermore, the trans-translation is described as a regulatory system that attenuated the generation of EDF, leading to low levels of EDF in the single cell. Therefore, the threshold EDF molecule concentration required is achieved only by the whole population, as expected for QS. PMID:26814184

  6. The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Katharina T; Kandrács, Ágnes; Ulbert, István; Pál, Ildikó; Szabó, Csilla; Héja, László; Wittner, Lucia

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) occur during slow wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to play an important role in memory formation. We investigated the cellular and network properties of SPW-Rs with simultaneous laminar multielectrode and intracellular recordings in a rat hippocampal slice model, using physiological bathing medium. Spontaneous SPW-Rs were generated in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions. These events were characterized by a local field potential gradient (LFPg) transient, increased fast oscillatory activity and increased multiple unit activity (MUA). Two types of SPW-Rs were distinguished in the CA3 region based on their different LFPg and current source density (CSD) pattern. Type 1 (T1) displayed negative LFPg transient in the pyramidal cell layer, and the associated CSD sink was confined to the proximal dendrites. Type 2 (T2) SPW-Rs were characterized by positive LFPg transient in the cell layer, and showed CSD sinks involving both the apical and basal dendrites. In both types, consistent with the somatic CSD source, only a small subset of CA3 pyramidal cells fired, most pyramidal cells were hyperpolarized, while most interneurons increased firing rate before the LFPg peak. Different neuronal populations, with different proportions of pyramidal cells and distinct subsets of interneurons were activated during T1 and T2 SPW-Rs. Activation of specific inhibitory cell subsets-with the possible leading role of perisomatic interneurons-seems to be crucial to synchronize distinct ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells finally resulting in the expression of different SPW-R activities. This suggests that the hippocampus can generate dynamic changes in its activity stemming from the same excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and so, might provide the cellular and network basis for an input-specific and activity-dependent information transmission.

  7. Generation, characterization and in vivo biological activity of two distinct monoclonal anti-PEG IgMs

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Yosuke; Shimizu, Taro; Mima, Yu; Abu Lila, Amr S.; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Kiwada, Hiroshi

    2014-05-15

    anti-PEG IgMs were generated against distinct PEGylated materials. • In vivo cross-reactivity to the immunized materials was limited. • Although in vitro cross-reactivity of generated monoclonal IgMs has been confirmed.

  8. Linking structure and function in food webs: maximization of different ecological functions generates distinct food web structures.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jian D L; Cabral, Reniel B; Cantor, Mauricio; Hatton, Ian; Kortsch, Susanne; Patrício, Joana; Yamamichi, Masato

    2016-03-01

    Trophic interactions are central to ecosystem functioning, but the link between food web structure and ecosystem functioning remains obscure. Regularities (i.e. consistent patterns) in food web structure suggest the possibility of regularities in ecosystem functioning, which might be used to relate structure to function. We introduce a novel, genetic algorithm approach to simulate food webs with maximized throughput (a proxy for ecosystem functioning) and compare the structure of these simulated food webs to real empirical food webs using common metrics of food web structure. We repeat this analysis using robustness to secondary extinctions (a proxy for ecosystem resilience) instead of throughput to determine the relative contributions of ecosystem functioning and ecosystem resilience to food web structure. Simulated food webs that maximized robustness were similar to real food webs when connectance (i.e. levels of interaction across the food web) was high, but this result did not extend to food webs with low connectance. Simulated food webs that maximized throughput or a combination of throughput and robustness were not similar to any real food webs. Simulated maximum-throughput food webs differed markedly from maximum-robustness food webs, which suggests that maximizing different ecological functions can generate distinct food web structures. Based on our results, food web structure would appear to have a stronger relationship with ecosystem resilience than with ecosystem throughput. Our genetic algorithm approach is general and is well suited to large, realistically complex food webs. Genetic algorithms can incorporate constraints on structure and can generate outputs that can be compared directly to empirical data. Our method can be used to explore a range of maximization or minimization hypotheses, providing new perspectives on the links between structure and function in ecological systems.

  9. Two functionally distinct domains generated by in vivo cleavage of Nup145p: a novel biogenesis pathway for nucleoporins.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, M T; Siniossoglou, S; Podtelejnikov, S; Bénichou, J C; Mann, M; Dujon, B; Hurt, E; Fabre, E

    1997-01-01

    Nup145p is an essential yeast nucleoporin involved in nuclear export of polyadenylated RNAs. We demonstrate here that Nup145p is cleaved in vivo to yield two functionally distinct domains: a carboxy-terminal domain (C-Nup145p) which is located at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and assembles into the Nup84p complex, and a GLFG-containing amino-terminal domain (N-Nup145p) which is not part of this complex. Whereas the essential C-Nup145p accomplishes the functions required for efficient mRNA export and normal NPC distribution, N-Nup145p, which is homologous to the GLFG-containing nucleoporins Nup100p and Nup116p, is not necessary for cell growth. However, the N-Nup145p becomes essential in a nup188 mutant background. Strikingly, generation of a free N-domain is a prerequisite for complementation of this peculiar synthetic lethal mutant. These data suggest that N- and C-domains of Nup145p perform independent functions, and that the in vivo cleavage observed is of functional importance. PMID:9305650

  10. Two distinct extracellular RNA signatures released by a single cell type identified by microarray and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lässer, Cecilia; Shelke, Ganesh Vilas; Yeri, Ashish; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Crescitelli, Rossella; Raimondo, Stefania; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Gho, Yong Song; Van Keuren Jensen, Kendall; Lötvall, Jan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cells secrete extracellular RNA (exRNA) to their surrounding environment and exRNA has been found in many body fluids such as blood, breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid. However, there are conflicting results regarding the nature of exRNA. Here, we have separated 2 distinct exRNA profiles released by mast cells, here termed high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) exRNA. The exRNA in both fractions was characterized by microarray and next-generation sequencing. Both exRNA fractions contained mRNA and miRNA, and the mRNAs in the LD exRNA correlated closely with the cellular mRNA, whereas the HD mRNA did not. Furthermore, the HD exRNA was enriched in lincRNA, antisense RNA, vault RNA, snoRNA, and snRNA with little or no evidence of full-length 18S and 28S rRNA. The LD exRNA was enriched in mitochondrial rRNA, mitochondrial tRNA, tRNA, piRNA, Y RNA, and full-length 18S and 28S rRNA. The proteomes of the HD and LD exRNA-containing fractions were determined with LC-MS/MS and analyzed with Gene Ontology term finder, which showed that both proteomes were associated with the term extracellular vesicles and electron microscopy suggests that at least a part of the exRNA is associated with exosome-like extracellular vesicles. Additionally, the proteins in the HD fractions tended to be associated with the nucleus and ribosomes, whereas the LD fraction proteome tended to be associated with the mitochondrion. We show that the 2 exRNA signatures released by a single cell type can be separated by floatation on a density gradient. These results show that cells can release multiple types of exRNA with substantial differences in RNA species content. This is important for any future studies determining the nature and function of exRNA released from different cells under different conditions. PMID:27791479

  11. Human Recombinant Cytochrome P450 Enzymes Display Distinct Hydrogen Peroxide Generating Activities During Substrate Independent NADPH Oxidase Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Microsomal enzymes generate H2O2 in the presence of NADPH. In this reaction, referred to as “oxidase” activity, H2O2 is generated directly or indirectly via the formation of superoxide anion. In the presence of redox active transition metals, H2O2 can form highly toxic hydroxyl radicals and, depending on the “oxidase” activity of individual cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, this can compromise cellular functioning and contribute to tissue injury. In the present studies, we compared the initial rates of H2O2 generating activity of microsomal preparations containing various human recombinant cytochromes P450s. In the absence of cytochrome P450s the human recombinant NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) generated low, but detectable amounts of H2O2 (∼0.04 nmol H2O2/min/100 units of reductase). Significantly greater activity was detected in preparations containing individual cytochrome P450s coexpressed with CPR (from 6.0 nmol H2O2/min/nmol P450 to 0.2 nmol/min/nmol P450); CYP1A1 was the most active, followed by CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP2E1, CYP4A11, CYP1A2, and CYP2C subfamily enzymes. H2O2 generating activity of the cytochrome P450s was independent of the ratio of CYP/CPR. Thus, similar H2O2 generating activity was noted with the same cytochrome P450s (CYP3A4, CYP2E1, and CYP2C9) expressed at or near the ratio of CYP/CPR in human liver microsomes (5–7), and when CPR was present in excess (CYP/CPR = 0.2–0.3). Because CYP3A4/5/7 represent up to 40% of total cytochrome P450 in the liver, these data indicate that these enzymes are the major source of H2O2 in human liver microsomes. PMID:25061110

  12. Two pathways of activation of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase of phagocytes in vitro--distinctive effects of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Natalia; Gorzalczany, Yara; Pick, Edgar

    2003-06-01

    The NADPH oxidase complex of phagocytes comprises a membrane-associated flavocytochrome b559, and 4 cytosolic components: p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and the small GTPase Rac. Activation of the oxidase in vivo is the result of assembly of the cytosolic components with cytochrome b559 and is mimicked in vitro by a cell-free system consisting of membranes, p47phox, p67phox, nonprenylated or prenylated Rac, and an anionic amphiphile as activator (defined as "p47phox and amphiphile-dependent" or canonical pathway). We reported that prenylated Rac1 is capable of activating the NADPH oxidase in vitro in the absence of p47phox and amphiphile (defined as "p47phox and amphiphile-independent" pathway). We now demonstrate that the 2 pathways exhibit distinctive susceptibilities to inhibitors: 1) The anionic amphiphile lithium dodecyl sulfate, an activator of the canonical pathway, has the opposite effect (inhibition) on oxidase activation by prenylated Rac and p67phox; 2) GDP and, paradoxically, GTP (but not GMP, ATP, ADP, and AMP) prevent oxidase activation by the p47phox and amphiphile-independent pathway but do not affect activation by the canonical pathway; 3) The Rac-binding domain of p21-activated kinase is a potent inhibitor of activation by the p47phox and amphiphile-independent pathway while exerting a milder inhibitory effect on the canonical pathway; 4) The C-terminal polybasic Rac1 peptide 177-191 and the cationic antibiotic neomycin sulfate inhibit activation by the canonical pathway but do not affect activation by the p47phox and amphiphile-independent pathway; 5) Binding of prenylated Rac1 to membrane-mimicking phospholipid vesicles is, nevertheless, enhanced when these contain negatively charged lipids. It is proposed that preferential inhibition of oxidase activation, via the p47phox and amphiphile-independent pathway, is a reflection of interference by the inhibitors with Rac-dependent recruitment of p67phox to the membrane.

  13. Predicting memory benefits in the production effect: the use and misuse of self-generated distinctive cues when making judgments of learning.

    PubMed

    Castel, Alan D; Rhodes, Matthew G; Friedman, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The production effect occurs when reading a word aloud leads to better memory for the item, relative to words that are read silently. In the present study, we assessed the degree to which judgments of learning (JOLs) are sensitive to the production effect, to determine whether people are aware of how distinctive cues can enhance memory. If the act of saying a word aloud is used as a cue for later memorability, then JOLs should be sensitive to production. Experiment 1 demonstrated that this was the case, as participants provided higher JOLs for produced items than for those read silently. This pattern of JOLs was also evident when participants silently mouthed words (Exp. 2). In Experiment 3, participants instead made a nonunique response as the production component (saying "yes" instead of the word itself). JOLs were still higher under production, although memory performance did not differ from that in a silent condition. The results suggest that the presence of both specific and nonspecific self-generated cues is used to make metacognitive judgments, likely due to the high accessibility of this information, but that participants are not precisely aware of how distinctiveness enhances encoding and retrieval. Such findings have implications for how distinctiveness is perceived by learners and for what cues would appropriately be incorporated when predicting future memory performance.

  14. Through which looking glass? Distinct sources of public regard and self-esteem among first- and second-generation immigrants of color.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Krystal; Wiley, Shaun; Deaux, Kay

    2014-04-01

    How we think other people see us has long been believed to influence how we see ourselves, a phenomenon known as reflected appraisal. Among members of ethnic minority groups and immigrant groups, however, inconsistent patterns have been found. This study examined how immigrants' views of their ethnic group and of themselves are tied the appraisals of specific others. We hypothesized that members of the heritage culture and of White Americans are implicated in the reflected appraisal process to differing degrees. Moreover, we hypothesized that immigrants (first-generation) and the children of immigrants (second-generation) are affected differently by the appraisals of White Americans and heritage culture members. Results showed that perceived appraisal by members of the heritage culture was linked to how immigrants felt about their group and to their personal self-esteem. Perceived appraisal of White Americans was not related to how immigrants felt about their group and was only weakly related to personal self-esteem. The results highlight the distinction between public regard from the heritage culture and from White Americans and underscore the importance of the former for immigrants' private regard and self-esteem.

  15. Cortical Divergent Projections in Mice Originate from Two Sequentially Generated, Distinct Populations of Excitatory Cortical Neurons with Different Initial Axonal Outgrowth Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Namikawa, Tomohiro; Yamauchi, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Excitatory cortical neurons project to various subcortical and intracortical regions, and exhibit diversity in their axonal connections. Although this diversity may develop from primary axons, how many types of axons initially occur remains unknown. Using a sparse-labeling in utero electroporation method, we investigated the axonal outgrowth of these neurons in mice and correlated the data with axonal projections in adults. Examination of lateral cortex neurons labeled during the main period of cortical neurogenesis (E11.5-E15.5) indicated that axonal outgrowth commonly occurs in the intermediate zone. Conversely, the axonal direction varied; neurons labeled before E12.5 and the earliest cortical plate neurons labeled at E12.5 projected laterally, whereas neurons labeled thereafter projected medially. The expression of Ctip2 and Satb2 and the layer destinations of these neurons support the view that lateral and medial projection neurons are groups of prospective subcortical and callosal projection neurons, respectively. Consistently, birthdating experiments demonstrated that presumptive lateral projection neurons were generated earlier than medial projection neurons, even within the same layer. These results suggest that the divergent axonal connections of excitatory cortical neurons begin from two types of primary axons, which originate from two sequentially generated distinct subpopulations: early-born lateral (subcortical) and later-born medial (callosal) projection neuron groups.

  16. Regulation of PURA gene transcription by three promoters generating distinctly spliced 5-prime leaders: a novel means of fine control over tissue specificity and viral signals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Purα is an evolutionarily conserved cellular protein participating in processes of DNA replication, transcription, and RNA transport; all involving binding to nucleic acids and altering conformation and physical positioning. The distinct but related roles of Purα suggest a need for expression regulated differently depending on intracellular and external signals. Results Here we report that human PURA (hPURA) transcription is regulated from three distinct and widely-separated transcription start sites (TSS). Each of these TSS is strongly homologous to a similar site in mouse chromosomal DNA. Transcripts from TSS I and II are characterized by the presence of large and overlapping 5'-UTR introns terminated at the same splice receptor site. Transfection of lung carcinoma cells with wild-type or mutated hPURA 5' upstream sequences identifies different regulatory elements. TSS III, located within 80 bp of the translational start codon, is upregulated by E2F1, CAAT and NF-Y binding elements. Transcription at TSS II is downregulated through the presence of adjacent consensus binding elements for interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that IRF-3 protein binds hPURA promoter sequences at TSS II in vivo. By co-transfecting hPURA reporter plasmids with expression plasmids for IRF proteins we demonstrate that several IRFs, including IRF-3, down-regulate PURA transcription. Infection of NIH 3T3 cells with mouse cytomegalovirus results in a rapid decrease in levels of mPURA mRNA and Purα protein. The viral infection alters the degree of splicing of the 5'-UTR introns of TSS II transcripts. Conclusions Results provide evidence for a novel mechanism of transcriptional control by multiple promoters used differently in various tissues and cells. Viral infection alters not only the use of PURA promoters but also the generation of different non-coding RNAs from 5'-UTRs of the resulting transcripts. PMID:21062477

  17. The differential expression of low-threshold K+ currents generates distinct firing patterns in different subtypes of adult mouse trigeminal ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Fioretti, Bernard; Pietrobon, Daniela; Franciolini, Fabio

    2008-11-01

    In adult mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurones we identified three neuronal subpopulations, defined in terms of their firing response to protracted depolarizations, namely MF neurones, characterized by a multiple tonic firing; DMF neurones, characterized by a delay before the beginning of repetitive firing; and SS neurones, characterized by a strongly adapting response. The three subpopulations also differed in several other properties important for defining their functional role in vivo, namely soma size, action potential (AP) shape and capsaicin sensitivity. MF neurones had small soma, markedly long AP and mostly responded to capsaicin, properties typical of a subgroup of C-type nociceptors. SS neurones had large soma, short AP duration and were mostly capsaicin insensitive, suggesting that most of them have functions other than nociception. DMF neurones were all capsaicin insensitive, had a small soma size and intermediate AP duration, making them functionally distinct from both MF and SS neurones. We investigated the ionic basis underlying the delay to the generation of the first AP of DMF neurones, and the strong adaptation of SS neurones. We found that the expression of a fast-inactivating, 4-AP- and CP-339,818-sensitive K+ current (I(A)) in DMF neurones plays a critical role in the generation of the delay, whereas a DTX-sensitive K+ current (I(DTX)) selectively expressed in SS neurones appeared to be determinant for their strong firing adaptation. A minimal theoretical model of TG neuronal excitability confirmed that I(A) and I(DTX) have properties congruent with their suggested role.

  18. Non-esterified fatty acids generate distinct low-molecular weight amyloid-β (Aβ42) oligomers along pathway different from fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Bullard, Rebekah L; Patel, Pritesh; Paslay, Lea C; Singh, Dipti; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Morgan, Sarah E; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2011-04-19

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide aggregation is known to play a central role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among various aggregates, low-molecular weight soluble oligomers of Aβ are increasingly believed to be the primary neurotoxic agents responsible for memory impairment. Anionic interfaces are known to influence the Aβ aggregation process significantly. Here, we report the effects of interfaces formed by medium-chain (C9-C12), saturated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) on Aβ42 aggregation. NEFAs uniquely affected Aβ42 aggregation rates that depended on both the ratio of Aβ:NEFA as well the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the NEFAs. More importantly, irrespective of the kind of NEFA used, we observed that two distinct oligomers, 12-18 mers and 4-5 mers were formed via different pathway of aggregation under specific experimental conditions: (i) 12-18 mers were generated near the CMC in which NEFAs augment the rate of Aβ42 aggregation towards fibril formation, and, (ii) 4-5 mers were formed above the CMC, where NEFAs inhibit fibril formation. The data indicated that both 12-18 mers and 4-5 mers are formed along an alternate pathway called 'off-pathway' that did not result in fibril formation and yet have subtle structural and morphological differences that distinguish their bulk molecular behavior. These observations, (i) reflect the possible mechanism of Aβ aggregation in physiological lipid-rich environments, and (ii) reiterate the fact that all oligomeric forms of Aβ need not be obligatory intermediates of the fibril formation pathway.

  19. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are professional APCs that play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. The limited ex vivo availability of dendritic cells inspires the widespread use of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as an alternative in research. However, the functional characteristics of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared functional and phenotypic characteristics of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3 ligand bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. A comparison of surface markers revealed that FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD103, and CD4 and baseline levels of MHC class II, CD40, and CD86, which were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Conversely, GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells constitutively expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD11c, and CD11b but only mildly up-regulated MHC class II, CD40, or CD86 following stimulation. Expression of dendritic cell-associated core transcripts was restricted to FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells . GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were superior at phagocytosis but were outperformed by FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at antigen presentation and T cell stimulation in vitro. Stimulated GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more TNF, CCL5, CCL20, and NO, whereas FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more IL-6 and IL-12. Finally, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants added to resting T cell cultures promoted forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T cell populations, FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants drove Th17 differentiation. We conclude that rat GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functionally distinct. Our data support the current rationale that FLT3

  20. The HIR corepressor complex binds to nucleosomes generating a distinct protein/DNA complex resistant to remodeling by SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Prochasson, Philippe; Florens, Laurence; Swanson, Selene K.; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2005-01-01

    The histone regulatory (HIR) and histone promoter control (HPC) repressor proteins regulate three of the four histone gene loci during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle. Here, we demonstrate that Hir1, Hir2, Hir3, and Hpc2 proteins form a stable HIR repressor complex. The HIR complex promotes histone deposition onto DNA in vitro and constitutes a novel nucleosome assembly complex. The HIR complex stably binds to DNA and nucleosomes. Furthermore, HIR complex binding to nucleosomes forms a distinct protein/DNA complex resistant to remodeling by SWI/SNF. Thus, the HIR complex is a novel nucleosome assembly complex which functions with SWI/SNF to regulate transcription. PMID:16264190

  1. In Arabidopsis thaliana distinct alleles encoding mitochondrial RNA PROCESSING FACTOR 4 support the generation of additional 5' termini of ccmB transcripts.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Katrin; Jonietz, Christian; Schleicher, Sarah; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Small, Ian; Binder, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    In plant mitochondria, the 5' ends of many transcripts are generated post-transcriptionally. We show that the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein RNA PROCESSING FACTOR 4 (RPF4) supports the generation of extra 5' ends of ccmB transcripts in Landsberg erecta (Ler) and a number of other Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes. RPF4 was identified in Ler applying a forward genetic approach supported by complementation studies of ecotype Columbia (Col), which generates the Ler-type extra ccmB 5' termini only after the introduction of the RPF4 allele from Ler. Studies with chimeric RPF4 proteins composed of various parts of the RPF4 proteins from Ler and Col identified differences in the N-terminal and central PPR motifs that explain ecotype-specific variations in ccmB processing. These results fit well with binding site predictions in ccmB transcripts based on the known determinants of nucleotide base recognition by PPR motifs.

  2. An alternative splicing event which occurs in mouse pachytene spermatocytes generates a form of DNA ligase III with distinct biochemical properties that may function in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Z B; Ramos, W; Levin, D S; Walter, C A; McCarrey, J R; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases have been identified. However, the role of each of these enzymes in mammalian DNA metabolism has not been established. In this study, we show that two forms of mammalian DNA ligase III, alpha and beta, are produced by a conserved tissue-specific alternative splicing mechanism involving exons encoding the C termini of the polypeptides. DNA ligase III-alpha cDNA, which encodes a 103-kDa polypeptide, is expressed in all tissues and cells, whereas DNA ligase III-beta cDNA, which encodes a 96-kDa polypeptide, is expressed only in the testis. During male germ cell differentiation, elevated expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA is restricted, beginning only in the latter stages of meiotic prophase and ending in the round spermatid stage. In 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta, the C-terminal 77 amino acids of DNA ligase III-alpha are replaced by a different 17- to 18-amino acid sequence. As reported previously, the 103-kDa DNA ligase III-alpha interacts with the DNA strand break repair protein encoded by the human XRCC1 gene. In contrast, the 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta does not interact with XRCC1, indicating that DNA ligase III-beta may play a role in cellular functions distinct from the DNA repair pathways involving the DNA ligase III-alpha x XRCC1 complex. The distinct biochemical properties of DNA ligase III-beta, in combination with the tissue- and cell-type-specific expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA, suggest that this form of DNA ligase III is specifically involved in the completion of homologous recombination events that occur during meiotic prophase. PMID:9001252

  3. Reversible linkage of two distinct small molecule inhibitors of Myc generates a dimeric inhibitor with improved potency that is active in myc over-expressing cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Jutta; Romashko, Darlene; Werner, Douglas S; May, Earl W; Peng, Yue; Schulz, Ryan; Foreman, Kenneth W; Russo, Suzanne; Arnold, Lee D; Pingle, Maneesh; Bergstrom, Donald E; Barany, Francis; Thomson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    We describe the successful application of a novel approach for generating dimeric Myc inhibitors by modifying and reversibly linking two previously described small molecules. We synthesized two directed libraries of monomers, each comprised of a ligand, a connector, and a bioorthogonal linker element, to identify the optimal dimer configuration required to inhibit Myc. We identified combinations of monomers, termed self-assembling dimeric inhibitors, which displayed synergistic inhibition of Myc-dependent cell growth. We confirmed that these dimeric inhibitors directly bind to Myc blocking its interaction with Max and affect transcription of MYC dependent genes. Control combinations that are unable to form a dimer do not show any synergistic effects in these assays. Collectively, these data validate our new approach to generate more potent and selective inhibitors of Myc by self-assembly from smaller, lower affinity components. This approach provides an opportunity for developing novel therapeutics against Myc and other challenging protein:protein interaction (PPI) target classes.

  4. Reversible Linkage of Two Distinct Small Molecule Inhibitors of Myc Generates a Dimeric Inhibitor with Improved Potency That Is Active in Myc Over-Expressing Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Jutta; Romashko, Darlene; Werner, Douglas S.; May, Earl W.; Peng, Yue; Schulz, Ryan; Foreman, Kenneth W.; Russo, Suzanne; Arnold, Lee D.; Pingle, Maneesh; Bergstrom, Donald E.; Barany, Francis; Thomson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    We describe the successful application of a novel approach for generating dimeric Myc inhibitors by modifying and reversibly linking two previously described small molecules. We synthesized two directed libraries of monomers, each comprised of a ligand, a connector, and a bioorthogonal linker element, to identify the optimal dimer configuration required to inhibit Myc. We identified combinations of monomers, termed self-assembling dimeric inhibitors, which displayed synergistic inhibition of Myc-dependent cell growth. We confirmed that these dimeric inhibitors directly bind to Myc blocking its interaction with Max and affect transcription of MYC dependent genes. Control combinations that are unable to form a dimer do not show any synergistic effects in these assays. Collectively, these data validate our new approach to generate more potent and selective inhibitors of Myc by self-assembly from smaller, lower affinity components. This approach provides an opportunity for developing novel therapeutics against Myc and other challenging protein:protein interaction (PPI) target classes. PMID:25875098

  5. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  6. Processing of lysozyme at distinct loops by pepsin: a novel action for generating multiple antimicrobial peptide motifs in the newborn stomach.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Inazaki, Daisuke; Abdou, Adham; Aoki, Takayoshi; Kim, Mujo

    2005-10-30

    C-type lysozyme (cLZ) is an antimicrobial enzyme that plays a major defense role in many human secretions. Recently, we have identified a helix-loop-helix antimicrobial peptide fragment of cLZ. This finding suggests that processing by coexisting proteases might be a relevant physiological process for generating peptides that contribute to the in vivo mucosal defense role of cLZ. In this study, we found that pepsin, under condition relevant to the newborn stomach (pH 4.0), generated various peptides from cLZ with potent bactericidal activity against several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Microsequencing and mass spectral analysis revealed that pepsin cleavage occurred at conserved loops within the alpha-domain of cLZ. We found that the bactericidal domain, which was isolated by gel filtration and reversed-phase HPLC, contains two cationic alpha-helical peptides generated from a helix-loop-helix domain (residues 1-38 of cLZ) by nicking at leucine17. A third peptide consisting of an alpha-helix (residues 18-38) and a two-stranded beta-sheet (residues 39-56) structure was also identified. These peptides share structural motifs commonly found in different innate immune defenses. Functional cellular studies with outer membrane-, cytoplasmic membrane vitality- and redox-specific fluorescence dyes revealed that the lethal effect of the isolated antimicrobial peptides is due to membrane permeabilization and inhibition of redox-driven bacterial respiration. The results provide the first demonstration that pepsin can fine-tune the antimicrobial potency of cLZ by generating multiple antimicrobial peptide motifs, delineating a new molecular switch of cLZ in the mucosal defense systems. Finally, this finding offers a new strategy for the design of antibiotic peptide drugs with potential use in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  7. Parallel-Distinct Structures of Internal World and External Reality: Disavowing and Re-Claiming the Self-Identity in the Aftermath of Trauma-Generated Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Şar, Vedat

    2017-01-01

    The nature of consciousness and the autonomy of the individual's mind have been a focus of interest throughout the past century and inspired many theories and models. Revival of studies on psychological trauma and dissociation, which remained outside mainstream psychiatry, psychology, and psychoanalysis for the most part of the past century, has provided a new opportunity to revisit this intellectual and scientific endeavor. This paper attempts to integrate a series of empirical and theoretical studies on psychological consequences of developmental traumatization, which may yield further insight into factors which threaten the integrity of human consciousness. The paper proposes that an individual's experience of distorted reality and betrayal precipitates a cyclical dynamic between the individual and the external world by disrupting the developmental function of mutuality which is essential for maintenance of the integrity of the internal world while this inner world is in turn regulated vis-à-vis external reality. Dissociation -the common factor in all types of post-traumatic syndromes- is facilitated by violation of boundaries by relational omission and intrusion as represented by distinct effects and consequences of childhood neglect and abuse. Recent research conducted on clinical and non-clinical populations shows both bimodal (undermodulation and overmodulation) and bipolar (intrusion and avoidance) neurobiological and phenomenological characteristics of post-traumatic response. These seem to reflect "parallel-distinct structures" that control separate networks covering sensori-motor and cognitive-emotional systems. This understanding provides a conceptual framework to assist explanation of diverse post-traumatic mental trajectories which culminate in a common final pathway comprised of partly overlapping clinical syndromes such as complex PTSD, dissociative depression, dissociative identity disorder (DID), or "borderline" phenomena. Of crucial theoretical

  8. Parallel-Distinct Structures of Internal World and External Reality: Disavowing and Re-Claiming the Self-Identity in the Aftermath of Trauma-Generated Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Şar, Vedat

    2017-01-01

    The nature of consciousness and the autonomy of the individual's mind have been a focus of interest throughout the past century and inspired many theories and models. Revival of studies on psychological trauma and dissociation, which remained outside mainstream psychiatry, psychology, and psychoanalysis for the most part of the past century, has provided a new opportunity to revisit this intellectual and scientific endeavor. This paper attempts to integrate a series of empirical and theoretical studies on psychological consequences of developmental traumatization, which may yield further insight into factors which threaten the integrity of human consciousness. The paper proposes that an individual's experience of distorted reality and betrayal precipitates a cyclical dynamic between the individual and the external world by disrupting the developmental function of mutuality which is essential for maintenance of the integrity of the internal world while this inner world is in turn regulated vis-à-vis external reality. Dissociation -the common factor in all types of post-traumatic syndromes- is facilitated by violation of boundaries by relational omission and intrusion as represented by distinct effects and consequences of childhood neglect and abuse. Recent research conducted on clinical and non-clinical populations shows both bimodal (undermodulation and overmodulation) and bipolar (intrusion and avoidance) neurobiological and phenomenological characteristics of post-traumatic response. These seem to reflect “parallel-distinct structures” that control separate networks covering sensori-motor and cognitive-emotional systems. This understanding provides a conceptual framework to assist explanation of diverse post-traumatic mental trajectories which culminate in a common final pathway comprised of partly overlapping clinical syndromes such as complex PTSD, dissociative depression, dissociative identity disorder (DID), or “borderline” phenomena. Of crucial

  9. Superoxide dismutases and glutaredoxins have a distinct role in the response of Candida albicans to oxidative stress generated by the chemical compounds menadione and diamide.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Guilherme Maranhão; da Silva, Walicyranison Plinio

    2012-12-01

    To cope with oxidative stress, Candida albicans possesses several enzymes involved in a number of biological processes, including superoxide dismutases (Sods) and glutaredoxins (Grxs). The resistance of C. albicans to reactive oxygen species is thought to act as a virulence factor. Genes such as SOD1 and GRX2, which encode for a Sod and Grx, respectively, in C. albicans are widely recognised to be important for pathogenesis. We generated a double mutant, Δgrx2/sod1, for both genes. This strain is very defective in hyphae formation and is susceptible to killing by neutrophils. When exposed to two compounds that generate reactive oxygen species, the double null mutant was susceptible to menadione and resistant to diamide. The reintegration of the SOD1 gene in the null mutant led to recovery in resistance to menadione, whereas reintegration of the GRX2 gene made the null mutant sensitive to diamide. Despite having two different roles in the responses to oxidative stress generated by chemical compounds, GRX2 and SOD1 are important for C. albicans pathogenesis because the double mutant Δgrx2/sod1 was very susceptible to neutrophil killing and was defective in hyphae formation in addition to having a lower virulence in an animal model of systemic infection.

  10. Generation of isotopically and compositionally distinct water during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in carbonate reservoirs: Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Worden, Richard H.; Cai, Chunfang

    2015-09-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), the reaction of petroleum with anhydrite in reservoirs resulting in the growth of calcite and the accumulation of H2S, has been documented in the Feixianguan Formation dolomite reservoir in the Sichuan Basin, China. Fluid inclusion salinity and homogenization temperature data have shown that TSR results in a decrease in salinity from a pre-TSR value of 25 wt.% down to 5 wt.% as a result of water created as a byproduct of progressive TSR. We have studied the isotopic character of the water that resulted from TSR in the Feixianguan Formation by analyzing the oxygen isotopes of TSR calcite and determining the oxygen isotopes of the water in equilibrium with the TSR calcite at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have compared these TSR-waters to water that would have been in equilibrium with the bulk rock, also at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have found that the TSR-waters are relatively depleted in oxygen isotopes (by up to 8‰ compared to what would be expected at equilibrium between the bulk rock and water) since this type of water was specifically derived from anhydrite. The generation of relatively large volumes of low salinity, low δ18O water associated with advanced TSR in the Feixianguan Formation has also been reported in the Permian Khuff Formation in Abu Dhabi and from sour Devonian fields in the Western Canada Basin. This suggests that TSR-derived water may be a common phenomenon, the effects of which on mesogenetic secondary porosity and reservoir quality have previously been underappreciated.

  11. Endopeptidase Cleavage Generates a Functionally Distinct Isoform of C1q/Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Protein-12 (CTRP12) with an Altered Oligomeric State and Signaling Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhikui; Lei, Xia; Seldin, Marcus M.; Wong, G. William

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived adipokines are an important class of secreted metabolic regulators that mediate tissue cross-talk to control systemic energy balance. We recently described C1q/TNF-related protein-12 (CTRP12), a novel insulin-sensitizing adipokine that regulates glucose metabolism in liver and adipose tissue. However, the biochemical properties of CTRP12 and its naturally occurring cleaved isoform have not been characterized. Here, we show that CTRP12 is a secreted hormone subjected to multiple functionally relevant posttranslational modifications at highly conserved residues. For example, Asn39 is glycosylated, whereas Cys85 mediates the assembly of higher order oligomeric structure. Endopeptidase cleavage at Lys91 generates a cleaved globular gCTRP12 isoform, the expression of which is increased by insulin. PCSK3/furin was identified as the major proprotein convertase expressed by adipocytes that mediates the endogenous cleavage of CTRP12. Cleavage at Lys91 is context-dependent: mutation of the charged Arg93 to Ala on the P2′ position enhanced cleavage, and triple mutations (K90A/K91A/R93A) abolished cleavage. Importantly, the two isoforms of CTRP12 differ in oligomeric structures and are functionally distinct. The full-length protein forms trimers and larger complexes, and the cleaved isoform consisted of predominantly dimers. Whereas full-length fCTRP12 strongly activated Akt signaling in H4IIE hepatocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, gCTRP12 preferentially activated MAP kinase (ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK) signaling. Further, only fCTRP12 improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. These results reveal a novel mechanism controlling signaling specificity and function of a hormone via cleavage-dependent alteration in oligomeric state. PMID:22942287

  12. Social conformity despite individual preferences for distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Smaldino, Paul E; Epstein, Joshua M

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that individual behaviours directed at the attainment of distinctiveness can in fact produce complete social conformity. We thus offer an unexpected generative mechanism for this central social phenomenon. Specifically, we establish that agents who have fixed needs to be distinct and adapt their positions to achieve distinctiveness goals, can nevertheless self-organize to a limiting state of absolute conformity. This seemingly paradoxical result is deduced formally from a small number of natural assumptions and is then explored at length computationally. Interesting departures from this conformity equilibrium are also possible, including divergence in positions. The effect of extremist minorities on these dynamics is discussed. A simple extension is then introduced, which allows the model to generate and maintain social diversity, including multimodal distinctiveness distributions. The paper contributes formal definitions, analytical deductions and counterintuitive findings to the literature on individual distinctiveness and social conformity.

  13. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  14. Distinct signaling pathways leading to the induction of human β-defensin 2 by stimulating an electrolyticaly-generated acid functional water and double strand RNA in oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gojoubori, Takahiro; Nishio, Yukina; Asano, Masatake; Nishida, Tetsuya; Komiyama, Kazuo; Ito, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Defensins, a major family of cationic antimicrobial peptides, play important roles in innate immunity. In the present study, we investigated whether double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a by-product of RNA virus replication, can induce human β-defensins-2 (hBD-2) expression in oral epithelial cells (OECs). We also examined the hBD-2-inducible activity of acid-electrolyzed functional water (FW). The results indicated that both dsRNA- and FW-induced hBD-2 expression in OECs. The induction efficiency was much higher for FW than for dsRNA. FW-induced production of hBD-2 was clearly observed by immunofluorescence staining. A luciferase assay was performed with 1.2 kb of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the hBD-2 gene. The results indicated that the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-binding site proximal to the translation initiation site was indispensable for dsRNA-stimulated hBD-2 expression, but not in the case of FW. Moreover, FW-stimulated hBD-2 expression did not depend on NF-κB activity; instead, FW inhibited NF-κB activity. Pretreatment of the cells with specific inhibitors against NF-κB further confirmed NF-κB-independent hBD-2 induction by FW. In analogy to the results for intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), the dsRNA signal, but not FW, was sensed by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in OECs. These results suggested that hBD-2 expression induced by dsRNA and FW is regulated by distinct mechanisms in OECs.

  15. Cfr and RlmN contain a single [4Fe-4S] cluster, which directs two distinct reactivities for S-adenosylmethionine: methyl transfer by SN2 displacement and radical generation.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler L; Radle, Matthew I; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J

    2011-12-14

    The radical SAM (RS) proteins RlmN and Cfr catalyze methylation of carbons 2 and 8, respectively, of adenosine 2503 in 23S rRNA. Both reactions are similar in scope, entailing the synthesis of a methyl group partially derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) onto electrophilic sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms via the intermediacy of a protein S-methylcysteinyl (mCys) residue. Both proteins contain five conserved Cys residues, each required for turnover. Three cysteines lie in a canonical RS CxxxCxxC motif and coordinate a [4Fe-4S]-cluster cofactor; the remaining two are at opposite ends of the polypeptide. Here we show that each protein contains only the one "radical SAM" [4Fe-4S] cluster and the two remaining conserved cysteines do not coordinate additional iron-containing species. In addition, we show that, while wild-type RlmN bears the C355 mCys residue in its as-isolated state, RlmN that is either engineered to lack the [4Fe-4S] cluster by substitution of the coordinating cysteines or isolated from Escherichia coli cultured under iron-limiting conditions does not bear a C355 mCys residue. Reconstitution of the [4Fe-4S] cluster on wild-type apo RlmN followed by addition of SAM results in rapid production of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and the mCys residue, while treatment of apo RlmN with SAM affords no observable reaction. These results indicate that in Cfr and RlmN, SAM bound to the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster displays two reactivities. It serves to methylate C355 of RlmN (C338 of Cfr), or to generate the 5'-deoxyadenosyl 5'-radical, required for substrate-dependent methyl synthase activity.

  16. Cfr and RlmN Contain a Single [4Fe-4S] Cluster, which Directs Two Distinct Reactivities for S-Adenosylmethionine: Methyl Transfer by SN2 Displacement and Radical Generation

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tyler L.; Radle, Matthew I.; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.

    2012-01-01

    The radical SAM (RS) proteins RlmN and Cfr catalyze methylation of carbons 2 and 8, respectively, of adenosine 2503 in 23S rRNA. Both reactions are similar in scope, entailing the synthesis of a methyl group partially derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) onto electrophilic sp2-hybridized carbon atoms via the intermediacy of a protein S-methylcysteinyl (mCys) residue. Both proteins contain five conserved Cys residues, each of which is required for turnover. Three cysteines lie in a canonical RS CxxxCxxC motif and coordinate a [4Fe–4S]-cluster cofactor. The remaining two cysteines are at opposite ends of the polypeptide. Herein we show that each protein contains only the one “radical SAM” [4Fe–4S] cluster, and that the two remaining conserved cysteines do not coordinate additional iron-containing species. In addition, we show that while wild-type RlmN bears the C355 mCys residue in its as-isolated state, RlmN that is either engineered to lack the [4Fe–4S] cluster by substitution of the coordinating cysteines, or isolated from Escherichia coli cultured under iron-limiting conditions, does not bear a C355 mCys residue. Reconstitution of the [4Fe–4S] cluster on wild-type apo RlmN followed by addition of SAM results in rapid production of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and the mCys residue, while treatment of apo RlmN with SAM affords no observable reaction. These results indicate that in Cfr and RlmN, SAM bound to the unique iron of the [4Fe–4S] cluster displays two reactivities. It serves to methylate C355 of RlmN (C338 of Cfr), or it serves to generate the 5’-deoxyadenosyl 5’-radical, required for substrate-dependent methyl synthase activity. PMID:21916495

  17. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  18. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  19. Development of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Peggy L.

    Since the beginning of man's awareness of his language capabilities and language structure, he has assumed that speech is composed of discrete entities. The linguist attempts to establish a model of the workings of these distinctive sounds in a language. Utilizing an historical basis for discussion, this general survey of the distinctive feature…

  20. Optimal Distinctiveness Signals Membership Trust.

    PubMed

    Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Loyd, Denise Lewin

    2016-07-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, sufficiently small minority groups are associated with greater membership trust, even among members otherwise unknown, because the groups are seen as optimally distinctive. This article elaborates on the prediction's motivational and cognitive processes and tests whether sufficiently small minorities (defined by relative size; for example, 20%) are associated with greater membership trust relative to mere minorities (45%), and whether such trust is a function of optimal distinctiveness. Two experiments, examining observers' perceptions of minority and majority groups and using minimal groups and (in Experiment 2) a trust game, revealed greater membership trust in minorities than majorities. In Experiment 2, participants also preferred joining minorities over more powerful majorities. Both effects occurred only when minorities were 20% rather than 45%. In both studies, perceptions of optimal distinctiveness mediated effects. Discussion focuses on the value of relative size and optimal distinctiveness, and when membership trust manifests.

  1. Neurobehavioral perspectives on the distinction between fear and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Perusini, Jennifer N.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the usefulness of the distinction between fear and anxiety. The clinical use of the labels is ambiguous, often defining one in terms of the other. We first consider what a useful, objective, and scientifically valid definition would entail and then evaluate several fear/anxiety distinctions that have been made in the neurobiological literature. A strong distinction should specify the difference in conditions that lead to fear versus anxiety. Additionally, fear and anxiety should generate distinct sets of behaviors. Ideally, the two states should be supported by distinguishable neuroanatomical circuits. Such a conceptualization would be consistent with the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoc). The majority of neurobiological approaches to the fear versus anxiety distinction fail to differentiate the two states in terms of behavior, often using the exact same behavioral measures as indicators. Of the two that do, only Predatory Imminence Theory provides a distinction both in terms of cause and effect. Indeed, that approach provides a ready distinction of anxiety, fear, and panic in terms of both antecedent conditions and response selection rules. Additionally, it appeals to distinct neural circuits to generate these modes of action. PMID:26286652

  2. Window generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William K.; May, Roger A.

    1989-03-01

    The present invention relates generally to video target recognition systems and more specifically to a window generator which receives a field of video data and applies an identification code to rectangular subregions to identify distinct target areas within a given background area. The present invention comprises a window generator which provides a 6 bit target identification number for up to 63 target areas and one background area in a frame of serially scanned data. The window generator receives a field of video data from an image data source. This video data consists of digitized frames of serially scanned data similar to a conventional television screen image, which is divided horizontally in pixels, and vertically in lines. The window generator permits any given frame to be subdivided into specific rectangular subregions, which may be located anywhere on the video picture. By allowing statistics to be collected on the individual subregions (or target areas) the window generator permits local processing of video data within the specified target areas as opposed to processing of video data over the entire video field. One embodiment of the window generator is composed of: a microprocessor, a random access memory (RAM), a comparator, a line memory, two counters, an OR gate, a frame initialization circuit, and a buffer. These elements function as described below.

  3. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  4. China English: Its Distinctive Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wei-dong; Dai, Wei-ping

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to expound that China English boasting its own distinctive features on the levels of phonology, words, sentences and discourse has been playing an irreplaceable role in intercultural activities, though still in its infancy and in the process of developing and perfecting itself, and it now makes every effort to move towards…

  5. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  6. Distinctiveness Maps for Image Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Tomasi, Carlo

    2000-01-01

    Stereo correspondence is hard because different image features can look alike. We propose a measure for the ambiguity of image points that allows matching distinctive points first and breaks down the matching task into smaller and separate subproblems. Experiments with an algorithm based on this measure demonstrate the ensuing efficiency and low likelihood of incorrect matches.

  7. Grima: A Distinct Emotion Concept?

    PubMed

    Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Fernández-Dols, José-Miguel; Gollwitzer, Peter M; Keil, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    People experience an unpleasant sensation when hearing a scratch on a board or plate. The present research focuses on this aversive experience known in Spanish as 'grima' with no equivalent term in English and German. We hypothesized that this aversive experience constitutes a distinctive, separate emotional concept. In Study 1, we found that the affective meaning of 'grima' was closer to disgust than to other emotion concepts. Thus, in Study 2 we explored the features of grima and compared them with disgust. As grima was reported to be predominantly elicited by certain auditory stimuli and associated with a distinctive physiological pattern, Study 3 used direct measures of physiological arousal to test the assumption of a distinctive pattern of physiological responses elicited by auditory stimuli of grima and disgust, and found different effects on heart rate but not on skin conductance. In Study 4, we hypothesized that only participants with an implementation intention geared toward down-regulating grima would be able to successfully weaken the grima- but not disgust- experience. Importantly, this effect was specific as it held true for the grima-eliciting sounds only, but did not affect disgust-related sounds. Finally, Study 5 found that English and German speakers lack a single accessible linguistic label for the pattern of aversive reactions termed by Spanish speaking individuals as 'grima', whereas the elicitors of other emotions were accessible and accurately identified by German, English, as well as Spanish speakers.

  8. Grima: A Distinct Emotion Concept?

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Fernández-Dols, José-Miguel; Gollwitzer, Peter M.; Keil, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    People experience an unpleasant sensation when hearing a scratch on a board or plate. The present research focuses on this aversive experience known in Spanish as ‘grima’ with no equivalent term in English and German. We hypothesized that this aversive experience constitutes a distinctive, separate emotional concept. In Study 1, we found that the affective meaning of ‘grima’ was closer to disgust than to other emotion concepts. Thus, in Study 2 we explored the features of grima and compared them with disgust. As grima was reported to be predominantly elicited by certain auditory stimuli and associated with a distinctive physiological pattern, Study 3 used direct measures of physiological arousal to test the assumption of a distinctive pattern of physiological responses elicited by auditory stimuli of grima and disgust, and found different effects on heart rate but not on skin conductance. In Study 4, we hypothesized that only participants with an implementation intention geared toward down-regulating grima would be able to successfully weaken the grima- but not disgust- experience. Importantly, this effect was specific as it held true for the grima-eliciting sounds only, but did not affect disgust-related sounds. Finally, Study 5 found that English and German speakers lack a single accessible linguistic label for the pattern of aversive reactions termed by Spanish speaking individuals as ‘grima’, whereas the elicitors of other emotions were accessible and accurately identified by German, English, as well as Spanish speakers. PMID:28217102

  9. BK Polyomavirus Genotypes Represent Distinct Serotypes with Distinct Entry Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Diana V.; Ray, Upasana; Magaldi, Thomas G.; Schowalter, Rachel M.; Çuburu, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) causes significant urinary tract pathogenesis in immunosuppressed individuals, including kidney and bone marrow transplant recipients. It is currently unclear whether BKV-neutralizing antibodies can moderate or prevent BKV disease. We developed reporter pseudoviruses based on seven divergent BKV isolates and performed neutralization assays on sera from healthy human subjects. The results demonstrate that BKV genotypes I, II, III, and IV are fully distinct serotypes. While nearly all healthy subjects had BKV genotype I-neutralizing antibodies, a majority of subjects did not detectably neutralize genotype III or IV. Surprisingly, BKV subgenotypes Ib1 and Ib2 can behave as fully distinct serotypes. This difference is governed by as few as two residues adjacent to the cellular glycan receptor-binding site on the virion surface. Serological analysis of mice given virus-like particle (VLP)-based BKV vaccines confirmed these findings. Mice administered a multivalent VLP vaccine showed high-titer serum antibody responses that potently cross-neutralized all tested BKV genotypes. Interestingly, each of the neutralization serotypes bound a distinct spectrum of cell surface receptors, suggesting a possible connection between escape from recognition by neutralizing antibodies and cellular attachment mechanisms. The finding implies that different BKV genotypes have different cellular tropisms and pathogenic potentials in vivo. Individuals who are infected with one BKV serotype may remain humorally vulnerable to other BKV serotypes after implementation of T cell immunosuppression. Thus, prevaccinating organ transplant recipients with a multivalent BKV VLP vaccine might reduce the risk of developing posttransplant BKV disease. PMID:23843634

  10. Distinct responses to reduplicated chromosomes require distinct Mad2 responses.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Benjamin M; Fox, Donald T

    2016-05-09

    Duplicating chromosomes once each cell cycle produces sister chromatid pairs, which separate accurately at anaphase. In contrast, reduplicating chromosomes without separation frequently produces polytene chromosomes, a barrier to accurate mitosis. Chromosome reduplication occurs in many contexts, including: polytene tissue development, polytene tumors, and following treatment with mitosis-blocking chemotherapeutics. However, mechanisms responding to or resolving polyteny during mitosis are poorly understood. Here, using Drosophila, we uncover two distinct reduplicated chromosome responses. First, when reduplicated polytene chromosomes persist into metaphase, an anaphase delay prevents tissue malformation and apoptosis. Second, reduplicated polytene chromosomes can also separate prior to metaphase through a spindle-independent mechanism termed Separation-Into-Recent-Sisters (SIRS). Both reduplication responses require the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2. While Mad2 delays anaphase separation of metaphase polytene chromosomes, Mad2's control of overall mitotic timing ensures efficient SIRS. Our results pinpoint mechanisms enabling continued proliferation after genome reduplication, a finding with implications for cancer progression and prevention.

  11. Magnetic mirror fusion systems: Characteristics and distinctive features

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1987-08-10

    A tutorial account is given of the main characteristics and distinctive features of conceptual magnetic fusion systems employing the magnetic mirror principle. These features are related to the potential advantages that mirror-based fusion systems may exhibit for the generation of economic fusion power.

  12. Nonlinear behavior of the tarka flute's distinctive sounds.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Arnaud; Yapu-Quispe, Luis; Sakuma, Sachiko; Ghezzi, Flavio; Ramírez-Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo

    2016-09-01

    The Andean tarka flute generates multiphonic sounds. Using spectral techniques, we verify two distinctive musical behaviors and the nonlinear nature of the tarka. Through nonlinear time series analysis, we determine chaotic and hyperchaotic behavior. Experimentally, we observe that by increasing the blow pressure on different fingerings, peculiar changes from linear to nonlinear patterns are produced, leading ultimately to quenching.

  13. Nonlinear behavior of the tarka flute's distinctive sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Arnaud; Yapu-Quispe, Luis; Sakuma, Sachiko; Ghezzi, Flavio; Ramírez-Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo

    2016-09-01

    The Andean tarka flute generates multiphonic sounds. Using spectral techniques, we verify two distinctive musical behaviors and the nonlinear nature of the tarka. Through nonlinear time series analysis, we determine chaotic and hyperchaotic behavior. Experimentally, we observe that by increasing the blow pressure on different fingerings, peculiar changes from linear to nonlinear patterns are produced, leading ultimately to quenching.

  14. Dementia: Continuum or Distinct Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Glenn D.

    2009-01-01

    The latent structure of dementia was examined in a group of 10,775 older adults with indicators derived from a neuropsychological test battery. Subjecting these data to taxometric analysis using mean above minus below a cut (MAMBAC), maximum covariance (MAXCOV), and latent mode factor analysis (L-Mode) produced results more consistent with dementia as a dimensional (lying along a continuum) than categorical (representing a distinct entity) construct. A second study conducted on a group of 2375 21-to-64-year olds produced similar results. These findings denote that dementia, as measured by deficits in episodic memory, attention/concentration, executive function, and language, differs quantitatively rather than qualitatively from the cognitive status of non-demented adults. The implications of these results for classification, assessment, etiology, and prevention are discussed. PMID:20677881

  15. Distinct responses to reduplicated chromosomes require distinct Mad2 responses

    PubMed Central

    Stormo, Benjamin M; Fox, Donald T

    2016-01-01

    Duplicating chromosomes once each cell cycle produces sister chromatid pairs, which separate accurately at anaphase. In contrast, reduplicating chromosomes without separation frequently produces polytene chromosomes, a barrier to accurate mitosis. Chromosome reduplication occurs in many contexts, including: polytene tissue development, polytene tumors, and following treatment with mitosis-blocking chemotherapeutics. However, mechanisms responding to or resolving polyteny during mitosis are poorly understood. Here, using Drosophila, we uncover two distinct reduplicated chromosome responses. First, when reduplicated polytene chromosomes persist into metaphase, an anaphase delay prevents tissue malformation and apoptosis. Second, reduplicated polytene chromosomes can also separate prior to metaphase through a spindle-independent mechanism termed Separation-Into-Recent-Sisters (SIRS). Both reduplication responses require the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2. While Mad2 delays anaphase separation of metaphase polytene chromosomes, Mad2’s control of overall mitotic timing ensures efficient SIRS. Our results pinpoint mechanisms enabling continued proliferation after genome reduplication, a finding with implications for cancer progression and prevention. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15204.001 PMID:27159240

  16. Distinct requirements for Wntless in habenular development

    PubMed Central

    Akitake, Courtney M.; Fortuno, Lea; Gamse, Joshua; Moens, Cecilia; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2015-01-01

    Secreted Wnt proteins play pivotal roles in development, including regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, progenitor maintenance and tissue patterning. The transmembrane protein Wntless (Wls) is necessary for secretion of most Wnts and essential for effective Wnt signaling. During a mutagenesis screen to identify genes important for development of the habenular nuclei in the dorsal forebrain, we isolated a mutation in the sole wls gene of zebrafish and confirmed its identity with a second, independent allele. Early embryonic development appears normal in homozygous wls mutants, but they later lack the ventral habenular nuclei, form smaller dorsal habenulae and otic vesicles, have truncated jaw and fin cartilages and lack swim bladders. Activation of a reporter for β-catenin-dependent transcription is decreased in wls mutants, indicative of impaired signaling by the canonical Wnt pathway, and expression of Wnt-responsive genes is reduced in the dorsal diencephalon. Wnt signaling was previously implicated in patterning of the zebrafish brain and in the generation of left–right (L–R) differences between the bilaterally paired dorsal habenular nuclei. Outside of the epithalamic region, development of the brain is largely normal in wls mutants and, despite their reduced size, the dorsal habenulae retain L–R asymmetry. We find that homozygous wls mutants show a reduction in two cell populations that contribute to the presumptive dorsal habenulae. The results support distinct temporal requirements for Wls in habenular development and reveal a new role for Wnt signaling in the regulation of dorsal habenular progenitors. PMID:26116173

  17. Distinct requirements for Wntless in habenular development.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yung-Shu; Roberson, Sara; Akitake, Courtney M; Fortuno, Lea; Gamse, Joshua; Moens, Cecilia; Halpern, Marnie E

    2015-10-15

    Secreted Wnt proteins play pivotal roles in development, including regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, progenitor maintenance and tissue patterning. The transmembrane protein Wntless (Wls) is necessary for secretion of most Wnts and essential for effective Wnt signaling. During a mutagenesis screen to identify genes important for development of the habenular nuclei in the dorsal forebrain, we isolated a mutation in the sole wls gene of zebrafish and confirmed its identity with a second, independent allele. Early embryonic development appears normal in homozygous wls mutants, but they later lack the ventral habenular nuclei, form smaller dorsal habenulae and otic vesicles, have truncated jaw and fin cartilages and lack swim bladders. Activation of a reporter for β-catenin-dependent transcription is decreased in wls mutants, indicative of impaired signaling by the canonical Wnt pathway, and expression of Wnt-responsive genes is reduced in the dorsal diencephalon. Wnt signaling was previously implicated in patterning of the zebrafish brain and in the generation of left-right (L-R) differences between the bilaterally paired dorsal habenular nuclei. Outside of the epithalamic region, development of the brain is largely normal in wls mutants and, despite their reduced size, the dorsal habenulae retain L-R asymmetry. We find that homozygous wls mutants show a reduction in two cell populations that contribute to the presumptive dorsal habenulae. The results support distinct temporal requirements for Wls in habenular development and reveal a new role for Wnt signaling in the regulation of dorsal habenular progenitors.

  18. Pit- and trench-forming osteoclasts: a distinction that matters.

    PubMed

    Merrild, Ditte Mh; Pirapaharan, Dinisha C; Andreasen, Christina M; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Møller, Anaïs Mj; Ding, Ming; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts (OCs) seeded on bone slices either drill round pits or dig long trenches. Whereas pits correspond to intermittent resorption, trenches correspond to continuous and faster resorption and require a distinct assembly of the resorption apparatus. It is unknown whether the distinction between pits and trenches has any biological relevance. Using OCs prepared from different blood donors, we found that female OCs achieved increased resorption mainly through pit formation, whereas male OCs did so through trench formation. Trench formation went along with high collagenolytic activity and high cathepsin K (CatK) expression, thereby allowing deeper demineralization. A specific CatK inhibitor abrogated the generation of trenches, while still allowing the generation of pits. OCs obtained from bone marrow were more prone to generate trenches than those obtained from blood. Scanning electron microscopy of bone surfaces eroded in vivo showed trenches and pits of similar size as those made by OCs in culture. We conclude that the distinction between trench- and pit-forming OCs is relevant to the differences among OCs from different skeletal sites, different individuals, including gender, and results from differences in collagenolytic power. This indicates a biological relevance and highlights the importance of discriminating between pits and trenches when assessing resorption.

  19. Pit- and trench-forming osteoclasts: a distinction that matters

    PubMed Central

    Merrild, Ditte MH; Pirapaharan, Dinisha C; Andreasen, Christina M; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Møller, Anaïs MJ; Ding, Ming; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts (OCs) seeded on bone slices either drill round pits or dig long trenches. Whereas pits correspond to intermittent resorption, trenches correspond to continuous and faster resorption and require a distinct assembly of the resorption apparatus. It is unknown whether the distinction between pits and trenches has any biological relevance. Using OCs prepared from different blood donors, we found that female OCs achieved increased resorption mainly through pit formation, whereas male OCs did so through trench formation. Trench formation went along with high collagenolytic activity and high cathepsin K (CatK) expression, thereby allowing deeper demineralization. A specific CatK inhibitor abrogated the generation of trenches, while still allowing the generation of pits. OCs obtained from bone marrow were more prone to generate trenches than those obtained from blood. Scanning electron microscopy of bone surfaces eroded in vivo showed trenches and pits of similar size as those made by OCs in culture. We conclude that the distinction between trench- and pit-forming OCs is relevant to the differences among OCs from different skeletal sites, different individuals, including gender, and results from differences in collagenolytic power. This indicates a biological relevance and highlights the importance of discriminating between pits and trenches when assessing resorption. PMID:26664853

  20. Molecular basis for DPY-30 association to COMPASS-like and NURF complexes.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Véronique; Zhang, Pamela; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Thornton, Janet; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Skiniotis, Georgios; Shilatifard, Ali; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François

    2014-12-02

    DPY-30 is a subunit of mammalian COMPASS-like complexes (complex of proteins associated with Set1) and regulates global histone H3 Lys-4 trimethylation. Here we report structural evidence showing that the incorporation of DPY-30 into COMPASS-like complexes is mediated by several hydrophobic interactions between an amphipathic α helix located on the C terminus of COMPASS subunit ASH2L and the inner surface of the DPY-30 dimerization/docking (D/D) module. Mutations impairing the interaction between ASH2L and DPY-30 result in a loss of histone H3K4me3 at the β locus control region and cause a delay in erythroid cell terminal differentiation. Using overlay assays, we defined a consensus sequence for DPY-30 binding proteins and found that DPY-30 interacts with BAP18, a subunit of the nucleosome remodeling factor complex. Overall, our results indicate that the ASH2L/DPY-30 complex is important for cell differentiation and provide insights into the ability of DPY-30 to associate with functionally divergent multisubunit complexes.

  1. Teaching Millennials and Generation Z: Bridging the Generational Divide.

    PubMed

    Shatto, Bobbi; Erwin, Kelly

    2017-02-01

    Most undergraduate students today are part of the millennial generation. However, the next wave of students-Generation Z-are just beginning to enter universities. Although these groups share many similarities, they each have unique characteristics that create challenges in the classroom. Incorporating technology, engaging students with adaptive learning activities, and understanding basic generational differences are ways to limit the effects of generational conflict while keeping both millennials and Generation Z students engaged in learning. It is important to understand basic differences and distinctions across generations for developing pedagogy that reaches these unique student populations.

  2. Teenage Drinking, Symbolic Capital and Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvinen, Margaretha; Gundelach, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article analyses alcohol-related lifestyles among Danish teenagers. Building on Bourdieu's reasoning on symbolic capital and distinction, we analyse three interrelated themes. First, we show that alcohol-related variables (drinking patterns, drinking debut, experience of intoxication, etc.) can be used to identify some very distinctive life…

  3. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  4. Triton College: One Institution's Search for Distinctiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.; Catanzaro, James L.

    1989-01-01

    Recounts Triton College's efforts to identify its distinctive elements. Reviews empirical evidence showing that Triton's school schedule, curricular offerings, and continuing education and support services are distinctive among local colleges. Discusses students' and staff members' perceptions of Triton. Considers the value of the research to the…

  5. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  6. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  7. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  8. Evidence for a Distinct Kind of Noun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soja, Nancy N.

    1994-01-01

    Examined the spontaneous speech of four children and their parents for use of determiners with NP-type nouns and count nouns. Found that the parents made a clear distinction between the two kinds of nouns, omitting determiners with the NP-type nouns but not with the count nouns. The children all made the same distinction by four years of age. (HTH)

  9. Computer-Generated Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige

    2011-01-01

    A distinction must be made between "computer-generated scoring" and "computer-generated feedback". Computer-generated scoring refers to the provision of automated scores derived from mathematical models built on organizational, syntactic, and mechanical aspects of writing. In contrast, computer-generated feedback, the focus of this article, refers…

  10. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  11. Hemispheric lateralization of semantic feature distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Reilly, M; Machado, N; Blumstein, S E

    2015-08-01

    Recent models of semantic memory propose that the semantic representation of concepts is based, in part, on a network of features. In this view, a feature that is distinctive for an object (a zebra has stripes) is processed differently from a feature that is shared across many objects (a zebra has four legs). The goal of this paper is to determine whether there are hemispheric differences in such processing. In a feature verification task, participants responded 'yes' or 'no' following concepts which were presented to a single visual field (left or right) paired with a shared or distinctive feature. Both hemispheres showed faster reaction times to shared features than to distinctive features, although right hemisphere responses were significantly slower overall and particularly in the processing of distinctive features. These findings support models of semantic processing in which the dominant left hemisphere more efficiently performs highly discriminating 'fine' encoding, in contrast to the right hemisphere which performs less discriminating 'coarse' encoding.

  12. Strategy, Distinctive Competence, and Organizational Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Charles C.; Hrebiniak, Lawrence G.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the perceptions of top managers in four industries (plastics, semiconductors, automotives, and air transportation) who examined relationships among strategy, distinctive competence, and organizational performance. (Author/IRT)

  13. Visual Support System for Report Distinctiveness Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Wataru; Kawaguchi, Toshiaki

    In recent years, as the Internet has grown, electronic reports have come to be used in educational organizations such as universities. Though reports written by hand must be evaluated by hand except for stereotype descriptions or numerical answers, electronic reports can be rated by computer. There are two major criteria in rating reports, correctness and distinctiveness. Correctness is rated by absolute criteria and distinctiveness is rated by relative criteria. Relative evaluation is difficult because raters should memorize all contents of submitted reports to provide objective rates. In addition, electronic data are easily copied or exchanged by students. This paper presents a report evaluation support system with which raters can compare each report and give objective rates for distinctiveness. This system evaluates each report by objective similarity criteria and visualizes them in a two-dimensional interface as the calculated distinctiveness order. Experimental results show the system is valid and effective for estimating associations between reports.

  14. Distinct photoresponse in graphene induced by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen Hui; Nan, Hai Yan; Liu, Qi; Liang, Zheng; Yu, Zhi Hao; Liu, Feng Yuan; Hu, Wei Da; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xin Ran; Ni, Zhen Hua

    2015-01-01

    The graphene-based photodetector with tunable p-p+-p junctions was fabricated through a simple laser irradiation process. Distinct photoresponse was observed at the graphene (G)-laser irradiated graphene (LIG) junction by scanning photocurrent measurements, and its magnitude can be modulated as a result of a positive correlation between the photocurrent and doping concentration in LIG region. Detailed investigation suggests that the photo-thermoelectric effect, instead of the photovoltaic effect, dominates the photocurrent generation at the G-LIG junctions. Such a simple and low-cost technique offers an alternative way for the fabrication of graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  15. Distinctions between transgenerational and non-transgenerational epimutations.

    PubMed

    McCarrey, John R

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have described numerous environmentally-induced disruptions of the epigenome (epimutations) in mammals. While some of these appear to be corrected by normal germline-specific epigenetic reprogramming and are therefore not transmitted transgenerationally, others are not corrected and are transmitted over multiple subsequent generations. The mechanism(s) that distinguish transgenerational and non-transgenerational epimutations have not been delineated. This review examines several potential molecular and developmental distinctions between transgenerational and non-transgenerational epimutations in the context of the likelihood that any of these may or may not contribute to transgenerational inheritance of epimutations.

  16. Distinct photoresponse in graphene induced by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wen Hui; Nan, Hai Yan; Liu, Qi; Ni, Zhen Hua; Liang, Zheng; Yu, Zhi Hao; Liu, Feng Yuan; Wang, Xin Ran; Hu, Wei Da; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-12

    The graphene-based photodetector with tunable p-p{sup +}-p junctions was fabricated through a simple laser irradiation process. Distinct photoresponse was observed at the graphene (G)-laser irradiated graphene (LIG) junction by scanning photocurrent measurements, and its magnitude can be modulated as a result of a positive correlation between the photocurrent and doping concentration in LIG region. Detailed investigation suggests that the photo-thermoelectric effect, instead of the photovoltaic effect, dominates the photocurrent generation at the G-LIG junctions. Such a simple and low-cost technique offers an alternative way for the fabrication of graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  17. Cluster modified projective synchronization between networks with distinct topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahedi, Shahed; Noorani, Mohd Salmi Md

    2016-02-01

    Cluster modified projective synchronization (CMPS) between two topologically distinct community networks is studied in this paper. Each cluster here has a unique dynamics at least with respect to the parameter sets. Using an adaptive feedback control gain and a matrix scaling factor, we show that CMPS between two community networks can be realized with considering minimum assumptions and imposing just few restrictions on the configuration set. We use Lyapunov stability theory for the proof and employ computer simulation to confirm our result on randomly generated community networks. Simulations also show the possibility of having hybrid synchronization between the two networks.

  18. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  19. Differential effects of distinct bacterial biofilms in a cave environment.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Maria C; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2010-06-01

    Current microbial surveys using molecular methods provide us with critical information on the major components of natural bacterial communities. However, limited investigation has been performed on the influence of bacterial metabolism on the environment. In this study, we analyzed the pH generated by distinct bacterial communities in a cave environment. Different bacterial biofilms developing on the walls of the cave were visually distinguished by their colorations (e.g., white, yellow, and gray) and mineral depositions, and previous studies have reported on their bacterial diversity and distribution. Using pH microelectrodes, we carried out in situ measurements and were able to detect differences among these bacterial biofilms. White biofilms and carbonate depositions resulted in alkaline pH values. Gray biofilms also increased the pH although these values remained lower than in white biofilms. A combination of gray-white biofilms resulted in alkaline pH values with highest values at the white edge of the colonies. Yellow biofilms generated a slightly acid pH. These results suggest that different bacterial communities can lead to distinct effects on their environment, for instance, precipitation or dissolution of carbonates in caves. These results add information about metabolic response to current knowledge from bacterial diversity surveys, providing information on the interaction between complex bacterial communities and the geological substrate.

  20. Chemical transformations that yield compounds with distinct activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-07-14

    We have systematically searched for chemical changes that generate compounds with distinct biological activity profiles. For this purpose, activity profiles were generated for ∼42000 compounds active against human targets. Unique activity profiles involving multiple target proteins were determined, and all possible matched molecular pairs (MMPs) were identified for compounds representing these profiles. An MMP is defined as a pair of compounds that are distinguished from each other only at a single site such as an R group or ring system. For example, in an MMP, a hydroxyl group might be replaced by a halogen atom or a benzene ring by an amide group. From ∼37500 MMPs, more than 300 nonredundant chemical transformations were isolated that yielded compounds with distinct activity profiles. None of these transformations was found in pairs of compounds with overlapping activity profiles. These transformations were ranked according to the number of MMPs, the number of activity profiles, and the total number of targets that they covered. In many instances, prioritized transformations involved ring systems of varying complexity. All transformations that were found to switch activity profiles are provided to enable further analysis and aid in compound design efforts.

  1. The Distinctive Difficulties of Disagreeable Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Brett; Hafen, Christopher A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether disagreeable youth are distinct from aggressive youth, victimized youth, and withdrawn youth. Young adolescents (120 girls and 104 boys, M = 13.59 years old) completed personality and adjustment inventories. Aggression, withdrawal, and victimization scores were derived from peer nominations (N = 807). Cluster analyses…

  2. Toward a Distinctive Christian Undergraduate Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas M.; VanderVeen, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We motivate and develop a theoretical framework for creating a distinctive Christian undergraduate management program that is directed toward providing (a) the necessary intellectual characteristics to do "well" and (b) the necessary emotional characteristics to do "good." This framework consists of seven propositions that connect the learning…

  3. Hemispheric lateralization of semantic feature distinctiveness

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, M.; Machado, N.; Blumstein, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models of semantic memory propose that the semantic representation of concepts is based, in part, on a network of features. In this view, a feature that is distinctive for an object (a zebra has stripes) is processed differently from a feature that is shared across many objects (a zebra has four legs). The goal of this paper is to determine whether there are hemispheric differences in such processing. In a feature verification task, participants responded ‘yes’ or ‘no’ following concepts which were presented to a single visual field (left or right) paired with a shared or distinctive feature. Both hemispheres showed faster reaction times to shared features than to distinctive features, although right hemisphere responses were significantly slower overall and particularly in the processing of distinctive features. These findings support models of semantic processing in which the dominant left hemisphere more efficiently performs highly discriminating ‘fine’ encoding, in contrast to the right hemisphere which performs less discriminating ‘coarse’ encoding. PMID:26022059

  4. Distinctiveness of Saudi Arabian EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habbash, Manssour; Idapalapati, Srinivasa Rao

    2016-01-01

    In view of the increasing concern among English language teachers dealing with students from Saudi Arabia, as it manifests in TESOL community discussions, about the uniqueness of Saudi Arabian EFL learners, this paper attempts to document the outcome of a study of their distinctiveness from the perspective of expatriate teachers working for PYPs…

  5. Indopithecus giganteus distinct from Sivapithecus indicus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madden, C.T.; Lewis, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The very large Eurasian Miocene ape Indopithecus giganteus is distinct from contemporanious Sivapithecus (non-Dryopithecus)indicus. The probabilities that length and width for the only specimen of I. giganteus could be sampled from populations similar or identical to those of S. indicus are less than six chances in 100,000 for both parameters. ?? 1980 Japan Monkey Centre.

  6. The Cosmology Distinction Course for Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollow, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Cosmology Distinction Course for gifted students completing their Higher School Certificate, which seeks to provide a challenging and stimulating broadly based one-year course that goes beyond the normal confines of traditional matriculation subjects. Presents a course outline, details on assessment, and reflections upon the first…

  7. Collegiate Educators: From Novice to Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Kimberly Ashton

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore reflective practices of lived experiences of collegiate educators as they progressed from novice to distinction. Specifically, this study investigated how a phenomenon connects to consciousness from lived experiences of teachers who proceeded from novice to a distinguished collegiate…

  8. Issues in Conducting Linkages between Distinct Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommerich, Mary; Hanson, Bradley A.; Harris, Deborah J.; Sconing, James A.

    2004-01-01

    Educational measurement practitioners are often asked to link scores on tests that are built to different content specifications. The goal in linking distinct tests is often similar to that for equating scores across different forms of the same test: to provide a set of comparable scores across the two measures. Traditional equating methods can be…

  9. Knowledge Affords Distinctive Processing in Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Rawson, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of knowledge on memory generally is processing. However, both conceptual and empirical reasons exist to suspect that the organizational account is incomplete. Recently a revised version of that account has been proposed under the rubric of distinctiveness theory (Rawson & Van Overschelde, 2008). The goal of the experiments reported…

  10. Pesticide Registration: Clarification for Ion Generating Equipment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA issued a Federal Register Notice that clarifies the Agency's position on the distinction between devices and pesticides with regard to ion-generating equipment and explains why such equipment will now be regulated as a pesticide.

  11. Thermally distinct ejecta blankets from Martian craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, B. H.; Murray, B. C.

    1993-06-01

    A study of Martian ejecta blankets is carried out using the high-resolution thermal IR/visible data from the Termoskan instrument aboard Phobos '88 mission. It is found that approximately 100 craters within the Termoskan data have an ejecta blanket distinct in the thermal infrared (EDITH). These features are examined by (1) a systematic examination of all Termoskan data using high-resolution image processing; (2) a study of the systematics of the data by compiling and analyzing a data base consisting of geographic, geologic, and mormphologic parameters for a significant fraction of the EDITH and nearby non-EDITH; and (3) qualitative and quantitative analyses of localized regions of interest. It is noted that thermally distinct ejecta blankets are excellent locations for future landers and remote sensing because of relatively dust-free surface exposures of material excavated from depth.

  12. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  13. Army nurses in wartime: distinction and pride.

    PubMed

    Higgins, L P

    1996-08-01

    Nurses have served with distinction in wartime since Florence Nightingale went to the Crimea. Women often accompanied their husbands to battle during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, caring for the sick and wounded. Although not officially given officer status until 1920, Army nurses served in the Spanish-American War and World War I. As officers, thousands of nurses served in subsequent wars, distinguishing themselves by their heroism, devotion to duty, and sheer tenacity of spirit.

  14. Different Functions of Phylogenetically Distinct Bacterial Complex I Isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Brickner, Joshua R.; Mollet, Jordan T.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a bioenergetic enzyme that transfers electrons from NADH to quinone, conserving the energy of this reaction by contributing to the proton motive force. While the importance of NADH oxidation to mitochondrial aerobic respiration is well documented, the contribution of complex I to bacterial electron transport chains has been tested in only a few species. Here, we analyze the function of two phylogenetically distinct complex I isozymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an alphaproteobacterium that contains well-characterized electron transport chains. We found that R. sphaeroides complex I activity is important for aerobic respiration and required for anaerobic dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respiration (in the absence of light), photoautotrophic growth, and photoheterotrophic growth (in the absence of an external electron acceptor). Our data also provide insight into the functions of the phylogenetically distinct R. sphaeroides complex I enzymes (complex IA and complex IE) in maintaining a cellular redox state during photoheterotrophic growth. We propose that the function of each isozyme during photoheterotrophic growth is either NADH synthesis (complex IA) or NADH oxidation (complex IE). The canonical alphaproteobacterial complex I isozyme (complex IA) was also shown to be important for routing electrons to nitrogenase-mediated H2 production, while the horizontally acquired enzyme (complex IE) was dispensable in this process. Unlike the singular role of complex I in mitochondria, we predict that the phylogenetically distinct complex I enzymes found across bacterial species have evolved to enhance the functions of their respective electron transport chains. IMPORTANCE Cells use a proton motive force (PMF), NADH, and ATP to support numerous processes. In mitochondria, complex I uses NADH oxidation to generate a PMF, which can drive ATP synthesis. This study analyzed the function of complex I in bacteria, which contain more

  15. Quantum information sharing between topologically distinct platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Refael, Gil; Shtengel, Kirill

    2016-12-01

    Can topological quantum entanglement between anyons in one topological medium "stray" into a different, topologically distinct medium? In other words, can quantum information encoded nonlocally in the combined state of non-Abelian anyons be shared between two distinct topological media? For one-dimensional topological superconductors with Majorana bound states at the end of system, the quantum information store in those Majorana bound states can be transfered by directly coupling nearby Majorana bound states. However, coupling of two one-dimensional Majorana states will produce a gap, indicating that distinct topological regions of one-dimensional wires unite into a single topological region through the information transfer process. In this paper, we consider a setup with two two-dimensional p -wave superconductors of opposite chirality adjacent to each other. Even two comoving chiral modes at the domain wall between them cannot be gapped through interactions; we demonstrate that information encoded in the fermionic parity of two Majorana zero modes, originally within the same superconducting domain, can be shared between the domains or moved entirely from one domain to another provided that vortices can tunnel between them in a controlled fashion.

  16. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  17. Generation X

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    service or government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT GENERATION X BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL NEIL YAMASHIRO United States Army National Guard CVI...WAR COLLEGE, CARLISLE BARRACKS, PA 17013-5050 ■"""" mimmm n USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT Generation X by LTC Neil Yamashiro COL Paul...is unlimited. 11 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: LTC Neil Yamashiro TITLE: Generation X FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 7 April 1998 PAGES: 26

  18. Methane Seep Carbonates Host Distinct, Diverse, and Dynamic Microbial Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Pasulka, Alexis L.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Levin, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marine methane seeps are globally distributed geologic features in which reduced fluids, including methane, are advected upward from the subsurface. As a result of alkalinity generation during sulfate-coupled methane oxidation, authigenic carbonates form slabs, nodules, and extensive pavements. These carbonates shape the landscape within methane seeps, persist long after methane flux is diminished, and in some cases are incorporated into the geologic record. In this study, microbial assemblages from 134 native and experimental samples across 5,500 km, representing a range of habitat substrates (carbonate nodules and slabs, sediment, bottom water, and wood) and seepage conditions (active and low activity), were analyzed to address two fundamental questions of seep microbial ecology: (i) whether carbonates host distinct microbial assemblages and (ii) how sensitive microbial assemblages are to habitat substrate type and temporal shifts in methane seepage flux. Through massively parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing and statistical analysis, native carbonates are shown to be reservoirs of distinct and highly diverse seep microbial assemblages. Unique coupled transplantation and colonization experiments on the seafloor demonstrated that carbonate-associated microbial assemblages are resilient to seep quiescence and reactive to seep activation over 13 months. Various rates of response to simulated seep quiescence and activation are observed among similar phylogenies (e.g., Chloroflexi operational taxonomic units) and similar metabolisms (e.g., putative S oxidizers), demonstrating the wide range of microbial sensitivity to changes in seepage flux. These results imply that carbonates do not passively record a time-integrated history of seep microorganisms but rather host distinct, diverse, and dynamic microbial assemblages. PMID:26695630

  19. Identification of New and Distinctive Exposures from Little Cigars

    PubMed Central

    Klupinski, Theodore P.; Strozier, Erich D.; Friedenberg, David A.; Brinkman, Marielle C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Clark, Pamela I.

    2016-01-01

    Little cigar mainstream smoke is less well-characterized than cigarette mainstream smoke in terms of chemical composition. This study compared four popular little cigar products against four popular cigarette products to determine compounds that are either unique to or more abundant in little cigars. These compounds are categorized as new or distinctive exposures, respectively. Total particulate matter samples collected from machine-generated mainstream smoke were extracted with methylene chloride, and the extracts were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The data were evaluated using novel data-processing algorithms that account for characteristics specific to the selected analytical technique and variability associated with replicate sample analyses. Among more than 25 000 components detected across the complete data set, ambrox was confirmed as a new exposure, and 3-methylbutanenitrile and 4-methylimidazole were confirmed as distinctive exposures. Concentrations of these compounds for the little cigar mainstream smoke were estimated at approximately 0.4, 0.7, and 12 μg/rod, respectively. In achieving these results, this study has demonstrated the capability of a powerful analytical approach to identify previously uncharacterized tobacco-related exposures from little cigars. The same approach could also be applied to other samples to characterize constituents associated with tobacco product classes or specific tobacco products of interest. Such analyses are critical in identifying tobacco-related exposures that may affect public health. PMID:26605856

  20. Chemical distinctions between Stradivari’s maple and modern tonewood

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Chian; Huang, Shing-Jong; Jhu, Chang-Ruei; Chung, Jen-Hsuan; Wang, Bo Y.; Hsu, Chia-Shuo; Brandmair, Brigitte; Chung, Dai-Ting; Chen, Hao Ming; Chan, Jerry Chun Chung

    2017-01-01

    Violins made by Antonio Stradivari are renowned for having been the preferred instruments of many leading violinists for over two centuries. There have been long-standing questions about whether wood used by Stradivari possessed unique properties compared with modern tonewood for violin making. Analyses of maple samples removed from four Stradivari and a Guarneri instrument revealed highly distinct organic and inorganic compositions compared with modern maples. By solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, we observed that about one-third of hemicellulose had decomposed after three centuries, accompanied by signs of lignin oxidation. No apparent changes in cellulose were detected by NMR and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. By thermogravimetric analysis, historical maples exhibited reduced equilibrium moisture content. In differential scanning calorimetry measurements, only maples from Stradivari violins, but not his cellos, exhibited unusual thermooxidation patterns distinct from natural wood. Elemental analyses by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry suggested that Stradivari’s maples were treated with complex mineral preservatives containing Al, Ca, Cu, Na, K, and Zn. This type of chemical seasoning was an unusual practice, unknown to later generations of violin makers. In their current state, maples in Stradivari violins have very different chemical properties compared with their modern counterparts, likely due to the combined effects of aging, chemical treatments, and vibrations. These findings may inspire further chemical experimentation with tonewood processing for instrument making in the 21st century. PMID:27994135

  1. Distinct Phyllosphere Bacterial Communities on Arabidopsis Wax Mutant Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Reisberg, Eva E.; Hildebrandt, Ulrich; Riederer, Markus; Hentschel, Ute

    2013-01-01

    The phyllosphere of plants is inhabited by diverse microorganisms, however, the factors shaping their community composition are not fully elucidated. The plant cuticle represents the initial contact surface between microorganisms and the plant. We thus aimed to investigate whether mutations in the cuticular wax biosynthesis would affect the diversity of the phyllosphere microbiota. A set of four Arabidopsis thaliana eceriferum mutants (cer1, cer6, cer9, cer16) and their respective wild type (Landsberg erecta) were subjected to an outdoor growth period and analysed towards this purpose. The chemical distinctness of the mutant wax phenotypes was confirmed by gas chromatographic measurements. Next generation amplicon pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities showed distinct community patterns. This observation was supported by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis experiments. Microbial community analyses revealed bacterial phylotypes that were ubiquitously present on all plant lines (termed “core” community) while others were positively or negatively affected by the wax mutant phenotype (termed “plant line-specific“ community). We conclude from this study that plant cuticular wax composition can affect the community composition of phyllosphere bacteria. PMID:24223831

  2. Identification of New and Distinctive Exposures from Little Cigars.

    PubMed

    Klupinski, Theodore P; Strozier, Erich D; Friedenberg, David A; Brinkman, Marielle C; Gordon, Sydney M; Clark, Pamela I

    2016-02-15

    Little cigar mainstream smoke is less well-characterized than cigarette mainstream smoke in terms of chemical composition. This study compared four popular little cigar products against four popular cigarette products to determine compounds that are either unique to or more abundant in little cigars. These compounds are categorized as new or distinctive exposures, respectively. Total particulate matter samples collected from machine-generated mainstream smoke were extracted with methylene chloride, and the extracts were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The data were evaluated using novel data-processing algorithms that account for characteristics specific to the selected analytical technique and variability associated with replicate sample analyses. Among more than 25 000 components detected across the complete data set, ambrox was confirmed as a new exposure, and 3-methylbutanenitrile and 4-methylimidazole were confirmed as distinctive exposures. Concentrations of these compounds for the little cigar mainstream smoke were estimated at approximately 0.4, 0.7, and 12 μg/rod, respectively. In achieving these results, this study has demonstrated the capability of a powerful analytical approach to identify previously uncharacterized tobacco-related exposures from little cigars. The same approach could also be applied to other samples to characterize constituents associated with tobacco product classes or specific tobacco products of interest. Such analyses are critical in identifying tobacco-related exposures that may affect public health.

  3. Subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria display distinct superoxide production profiles.

    PubMed

    Crochemore, C; Mekki, M; Corbière, C; Karoui, A; Noël, R; Vendeville, C; Vaugeois, J-M; Monteil, C

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) subpopulations display distinct biochemical, morphological, and functional characteristics. Moreover, they appear to be differently influenced during cardiac pathologies or toxic injuries. Although mitochondrial reactive oxygen species seem to play a critical role in cardiac function and diseases, limited information exists about the superoxide production characteristics of these mitochondrial subpopulations. In this work, using direct measurement of superoxide by electron paramagnetic resonance, we showed that differences in superoxide production profiles were present between cardiac IFM and SSM, in terms of intensity and major sites of superoxide generation. In SSM incubated with glutamate plus malate as substrates, the total observed superoxide levels were significantly higher than those observed with IFM, with an important contribution of the NADH-oxidizing site of complex I (site If) and the quinol-oxidizing site of complex III (site IIIQ0). In both IFM and SSM, succinate leads to similar rates of total superoxide levels with a substantial role for contribution of reverse electron transfer. Finally, using two spin probes with different membrane permeabilities, our data on complex III showed direct intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide release whereas complex I- and II-dependent superoxide were exclusively released inside the mitochondria, confirming previous studies. Feasibility of this approach to measure intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide levels and to characterize distinct superoxide production profiles of cardiac IFM and SSM has been demonstrated.

  4. Why have the peninsular "negritos" remained distinct?

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of this article is on the so-called negritos of Peninsular Malaysia and southern Thailand, but attention is also paid to other parts of Southeast Asia. I present a survey of current views on the "negrito" phenotype--is it single or many? If the phenotype is many (as now seems likely), it must have resulted from parallel evolution in the several different regions where it has been claimed to exist. This would suggest (contrary to certain views that have been expressed on the basis of very partial genetic data) that the phenotype originated recently and by biologically well-authenticated processes from within the neighboring populations. Whole-genome and physical-anthropological research currently support this view. Regardless of whether the negrito phenotype is ancient or recent-and to the extent that it retains any valid biological reality (which is worth questioning)-explanations are still needed for its continued distinctiveness. In the Malay Peninsula, a distinctive "Semang" societal pattern followed by most, but not all, so-called negritos may have been responsible for this by shaping familial, breeding, and demographic patterns to suit the two main modes of environmental appropriation that they have followed, probably for some millennia: nomadic foraging in the forest, and facultative dependence on exchange or labor relations with neighboring populations. The known distribution of "negritos" in the Malay Peninsula is limited to areas within relatively easy reach of archaeologically authenticated premodern transpeninsular trading and portage routes, as well as of other non-negrito, Aslian-speaking populations engaged in swidden farming. This suggests that their continued distinctiveness has resulted from a wish to maintain a complementary advantage vis-à-vis other, less specialized populations. Nevertheless, a significant degree of discordance exists between the associated linguistic, societal-tradition, and biological patterns which suggests

  5. Distinct Turbulence Saturation Regimes in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2017-03-01

    In the complex 3D magnetic fields of stellarators, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence is shown to have two distinct saturation regimes, as revealed by petascale numerical simulations and explained by a simple turbulence theory. The first regime is marked by strong zonal flows and matches previous observations in tokamaks. The newly observed second regime, in contrast, exhibits small-scale quasi-two-dimensional turbulence, negligible zonal flows, and, surprisingly, a weaker heat flux scaling. Our findings suggest that key details of the magnetic geometry control turbulence in stellarators.

  6. Visual Distinctness Determined by Partially Invariant Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    DISTINCTNESS DETERMINED BY PARTIALLY INVARIANT FEATURES. J.A. Garcia, J. Fdez-Valdivia Departamento de Ciencias de la Computacion e I.A. Univ. de Granada...E.T.S. de Ingenieria Informatica. 18071 Granada. Spain E-mail: jagsadecsai.ugr.es, J.Fdez-Valdivia@decsai.ugr.es Xose R. Fdez-Vidal Departamento de... Fisica Aplicada. Univ. de Santiago de Compostela. Facultad de Fisica . 15706 Santiago de Compostela. Spain E-mail: faxose@usc.es Rosa Rodriguez-Sanchez

  7. Catatonia in autism: a distinct subtype?

    PubMed

    Ghaziuddin, M; Quinlan, P; Ghaziuddin, N

    2005-01-01

    Catatonia is a life-threatening disorder characterized by motor abnormalities, mutism, and disturbances of behaviour, which is increasingly being diagnosed in persons with autism. In this report, we describe the presentation and course of catatonia in an adolescent with autism who responded to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The illness started with depressive symptoms, but the predominant feature was one of extreme obsessive slowing and immobility. We propose that catatonia should be ruled out as a cause of regression sometimes seen in adolescents with autism, and that catatonia of autism may index a distinct subtype with a particularly poor outcome.

  8. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Benevento, Marco; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-12-10

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis to probe in-depth dynamic proteome changes during somatic cell reprogramming. Our data reveal defined waves of proteome resetting, with the first wave occurring 48 h after the activation of the reprogramming transgenes and involving specific biological processes linked to the c-Myc transcriptional network. A second wave of proteome reorganization occurs in a later stage of reprogramming, where we characterize the proteome of two distinct pluripotent cellular populations. In addition, the overlay of our proteome resource with parallel generated -omics data is explored to identify post-transcriptionally regulated proteins involved in key steps during reprogramming.

  9. Distinct mechanisms and timing of language recovery after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jarso, Samson; Li, Muwei; Faria, Andreia; Davis, Cameron; Leigh, Richard; Sebastian, Rajani; Tsapkini, Kyrana; Mori, Susumu; Hillis, Argye E.

    2014-01-01

    The “language network” is remarkably stable across language tasks but changes in response to injury to specific components or in response to “disconnection” of input to one component. We investigated network changes during language recovery, hypothesizing that language recovery takes place through distinct mechanisms: (a) reperfusion; (b) recovery from diaschisis; (c) recovery from structural disconnection; and (d) “reorganization” of language, whereby various components assume function of a damaged component. We also tested the hypothesis that “reorganization” depends on: the language task, level of performance, size and site of stroke, and time post onset. We tested these hypotheses in five participants who had structural, perfusion, and functional imaging utilizing spelling, reading, word generation, and picture naming tasks at acute and subsequent stages after ischaemic stroke. These cases illustrate different mechanisms of aphasia recovery or illustrate that reorganization of language acutely depends on individual variables in addition to size and site of stroke. PMID:24472056

  10. Two Distinct Moral Mechanisms for Ascribing and Denying Intentionality.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Lawrence; Kelly, Meagan; Coutlee, Christopher G; Carter, R McKell; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Huettel, Scott A

    2015-12-04

    Philosophers and legal scholars have long theorized about how intentionality serves as a critical input for morality and culpability, but the emerging field of experimental philosophy has revealed a puzzling asymmetry. People judge actions leading to negative consequences as being more intentional than those leading to positive ones. The implications of this asymmetry remain unclear because there is no consensus regarding the underlying mechanism. Based on converging behavioral and neural evidence, we demonstrate that there is no single underlying mechanism. Instead, two distinct mechanisms together generate the asymmetry. Emotion drives ascriptions of intentionality for negative consequences, while the consideration of statistical norms leads to the denial of intentionality for positive consequences. We employ this novel two-mechanism model to illustrate that morality can paradoxically shape judgments of intentionality. This is consequential for mens rea in legal practice and arguments in moral philosophy pertaining to terror bombing, abortion, and euthanasia among others.

  11. The picture superiority effect: support for the distinctiveness model.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, M Z; Snodgrass, J G

    1999-01-01

    The form change paradigm was used to explore the basis for the picture superiority effect. Recognition memory for studied pictures and words was tested in their study form or the alternate form. Form change cost was defined as the difference between recognition performance for same and different form items. Based on the results of Experiment 1 and previous studies, it was difficult to determine the relative cost for studied pictures and words due to a reversal of the mirror effect. We hypothesized that the reversed mirror effect results from subjects' basing their recognition decisions on their assumptions about the study form. Experiments 2 and 3 confirmed this hypothesis and generated a method for evaluating the relative cost for pictures and words despite the reversed mirror effect. More cost was observed for pictures than words, supporting the distinctiveness model of the picture superiority effect.

  12. Two Distinct Moral Mechanisms for Ascribing and Denying Intentionality

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Lawrence; Kelly, Meagan; Coutlee, Christopher G.; Carter, R. McKell; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Huettel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Philosophers and legal scholars have long theorized about how intentionality serves as a critical input for morality and culpability, but the emerging field of experimental philosophy has revealed a puzzling asymmetry. People judge actions leading to negative consequences as being more intentional than those leading to positive ones. The implications of this asymmetry remain unclear because there is no consensus regarding the underlying mechanism. Based on converging behavioral and neural evidence, we demonstrate that there is no single underlying mechanism. Instead, two distinct mechanisms together generate the asymmetry. Emotion drives ascriptions of intentionality for negative consequences, while the consideration of statistical norms leads to the denial of intentionality for positive consequences. We employ this novel two-mechanism model to illustrate that morality can paradoxically shape judgments of intentionality. This is consequential for mens rea in legal practice and arguments in moral philosophy pertaining to terror bombing, abortion, and euthanasia among others. PMID:26634909

  13. Radionuclide Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, F.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ)

    Radionuclide generator systems continue to play a key role in providing both diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for various applications in nuclear medicine, oncology, and interventional cardiology. Although many parent/daughter pairs have been evaluated as radionuclide generator systems, there are a relatively small number of generators, which are currently in routine clinical and research use. Essentially every conceivable approach has been used for parent/separation strategies, including sublimation, thermochromatographic separation, solvent extraction, and adsorptive column chromatography. The most widely used radionuclide generator for clinical applications is the 99Mo/99mTc generator system, but recent years have seen an enormous increase in the use of generators to provide therapeutic radionuclides, which has paralleled the development of complementary technologies for targeting agents for therapy and in the general increased interest in the use of unsealed therapeutic radioactive sources. More recently, use of the 68Ge/68Ga generator is showing great potential as a source of positron-emitting 68Ga for positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Key advantages for the use of radionuclide generators include reasonable costs, the convenience of obtaining the desired daughter radionuclide on demand, and availability of the daughter radionuclide in high specific activity, no-carrier added form.

  14. Generative Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  15. The neural signatures of distinct psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin M; Hyde, Luke W; Neumann, Craig S; Viding, Essi; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that psychopathy may be associated with dysfunction in the neural circuitry supporting both threat- and reward-related processes. However, these studies have involved small samples and often focused on extreme groups. Thus, it is unclear to what extent current findings may generalize to psychopathic traits in the general population. Furthermore, no studies have systematically and simultaneously assessed associations between distinct psychopathy facets and both threat- and reward-related brain function in the same sample of participants. Here, we examined the relationship between threat-related amygdala reactivity and reward-related ventral striatum (VS) reactivity and variation in four facets of self-reported psychopathy in a sample of 200 young adults. Path models indicated that amygdala reactivity to fearful facial expressions is negatively associated with the interpersonal facet of psychopathy, whereas amygdala reactivity to angry facial expressions is positively associated with the lifestyle facet. Furthermore, these models revealed that differential VS reactivity to positive versus negative feedback is negatively associated with the lifestyle facet. There was suggestive evidence for gender-specific patterns of association between brain function and psychopathy facets. Our findings are the first to document differential associations between both threat- and reward-related neural processes and distinct facets of psychopathy and thus provide a more comprehensive picture of the pattern of neural vulnerabilities that may predispose to maladaptive outcomes associated with psychopathy.

  16. Distinct types of eigenvector localization in networks

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Castellano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The spectral properties of the adjacency matrix provide a trove of information about the structure and function of complex networks. In particular, the largest eigenvalue and its associated principal eigenvector are crucial in the understanding of nodes’ centrality and the unfolding of dynamical processes. Here we show that two distinct types of localization of the principal eigenvector may occur in heterogeneous networks. For synthetic networks with degree distribution P(q) ~ q−γ, localization occurs on the largest hub if γ > 5/2; for γ < 5/2 a new type of localization arises on a mesoscopic subgraph associated with the shell with the largest index in the K-core decomposition. Similar evidence for the existence of distinct localization modes is found in the analysis of real-world networks. Our results open a new perspective on dynamical processes on networks and on a recently proposed alternative measure of node centrality based on the non-backtracking matrix. PMID:26754565

  17. Distinct developmental profiles in typical speech acquisition.

    PubMed

    Vick, Jennell C; Campbell, Thomas F; Shriberg, Lawrence D; Green, Jordan R; Abdi, Hervé; Rusiewicz, Heather Leavy; Venkatesh, Lakshmi; Moore, Christopher A

    2012-05-01

    Three- to five-year-old children produce speech that is characterized by a high level of variability within and across individuals. This variability, which is manifest in speech movements, acoustics, and overt behaviors, can be input to subgroup discovery methods to identify cohesive subgroups of speakers or to reveal distinct developmental pathways or profiles. This investigation characterized three distinct groups of typically developing children and provided normative benchmarks for speech development. These speech development profiles, identified among 63 typically developing preschool-aged speakers (ages 36-59 mo), were derived from the children's performance on multiple measures. These profiles were obtained by submitting to a k-means cluster analysis of 72 measures that composed three levels of speech analysis: behavioral (e.g., task accuracy, percentage of consonants correct), acoustic (e.g., syllable duration, syllable stress), and kinematic (e.g., variability of movements of the upper lip, lower lip, and jaw). Two of the discovered group profiles were distinguished by measures of variability but not by phonemic accuracy; the third group of children was characterized by their relatively low phonemic accuracy but not by an increase in measures of variability. Analyses revealed that of the original 72 measures, 8 key measures were sufficient to best distinguish the 3 profile groups.

  18. Distinct immunosuppressive effect by Isodon serra extracts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jianwen; Jia, Wei; Zhao, Aihua; Li, Ting

    2005-12-01

    Distinct effect of ent-Kaurene Diterpenoids from Isodon serra on abnormal proliferation of murine lymphocytes was examined with MTT assay and Flow Cytometry Analyses (FCAS). After choosing the most appropriate monomer from these Diterpenoids, we introduced mouse tumescence model to investigate whether it could impact cytokine production in vivo with ELISA assay. The result of MTT assay showed that four ent-Kaurene Diterpenoids could effectively suppress the murine splenic T lymphocytes overproduction stimulated by Concanavalin A, while inhibitive effect was softer on normal sleep lymphocytes than the stimulated ones. Among four ent-Kaurene Diterpenoids, Enmein was the most sensitive one with IC50/EC50 equaling to 1.55. This inhibitive activity was due to interfering DNA replication in G1-S stage and to regulating cell cycle according to flow cytometry analyses (FCAS) result. Xylene-induced mouse tumescence model result further suggested that Enmein depressed the murine ear swelling extent and the level of Interleukin-2 in blood serum in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, it demonstrated that four ent-Kaurene Diterpenoids from I. serra had distinct immunosuppressive effect in vitro and in vivo systems, which primarily differentiated Enmein from the others. The experimental results provided insight into a potential immunosuppressive action of Enmein as a promising drug, though profound mechanism remained to be further studied.

  19. The Cosmology Distinction Course in NSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollow, Robert P.; McAdam, W. B.; O'Byrne, J.; White, Graeme L.; Holmes, R.; Webb, J. K.; Allen, L. R.; Zealey, W. J.; Hafner, R.

    1994-04-01

    The Cosmology Distinction Course is a new one-year course to be introduced for Year 12 candidates in the 1994 Higher School Certificate (HSC) examinations in NSW. It is one of three challenging courses of study that will enrich the HSC for talented students who accelerate and complete part of the HSC one year early. The courses will be taught through distance learning and will include residential seminars. They will be implemented on behalf of the Board of Studies by Charles Sturt University and the University of New England. The Cosmology Course is organized into nine modules of course work covering historical and social aspects of cosmology, observational techniques, key observatons and the various models developed--Newtonian, de Sitter, Friedmann, Lemaitre, steady-state, quasi-steady-state and big bang. Assessment will be through assignments, exams and a major project. As the first Distinction Course in a scientific area, the Cosmology Course represents an exciting and important educational initiative that needs the cooperation of NSW astronomers and, in return, promises to benefit the astronomical and general scientific community in Australia.

  20. Multifunctional pattern-generating circuits.

    PubMed

    Briggman, K L; Kristan, W B

    2008-01-01

    The ability of distinct anatomical circuits to generate multiple behavioral patterns is widespread among vertebrate and invertebrate species. These multifunctional neuronal circuits are the result of multistable neural dynamics and modular organization. The evidence suggests multifunctional circuits can be classified by distinct architectures, yet the activity patterns of individual neurons involved in more than one behavior can vary dramatically. Several mechanisms, including sensory input, the parallel activity of projection neurons, neuromodulation, and biomechanics, are responsible for the switching between patterns. Recent advances in both analytical and experimental tools have aided the study of these complex circuits.

  1. Energy generator

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a power booster. It comprises: at least one pendulum means suspended at one end to oscillate about the point of suspension; power generating means; mass means connected to one end of the pendulum means; spring means disposed in operative cooperation with the mass means to impart energy into the pendulum means and assist the pendulum means in oscillating about the point of suspension; and energy transfer linkage means between the pendulum means and the power generating means for transferring energy between the pendulum means and the power generating means.

  2. Characterizing Drug Non-Users as Distinctive in Prevention Messages: Implications of Optimal Distinctiveness Theory

    PubMed Central

    Comello, Maria Leonora G.

    2011-01-01

    Optimal Distinctiveness Theory posits that highly valued groups are those that can simultaneously satisfy needs to belong and to be different. The success of drug-prevention messages with a social-identity theme should therefore depend on the extent to which the group is portrayed as capable of meeting these needs. Specifically, messages that portray non-users as a large and undifferentiated majority may not be as successful as messages that emphasize uniqueness of non-users. This prediction was examined using marijuana prevention messages that depicted non-users as a distinctive or a majority group. Distinctiveness characterization lowered behavioral willingness to use marijuana among non-users (Experiment 1) and served as a source of identity threat (contingent on gender) among users (Experiment 2). PMID:21409672

  3. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  4. Generation Wrecked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Noshua

    2002-01-01

    Young adults in Generation X are facing financial problems. Because of their college and credit card debt, many in worse financial shape than anyone since the Depression and have little or no retirement savings. (JOW)

  5. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  6. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  7. Opioid receptors: distinct roles in mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of opioid receptors in pain and addiction have been extensively studied, but their function in mood disorders has received less attention. Accumulating evidence from animal research reveal that mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors (MORs, DORs and KORs, respectively) exert highly distinct controls over mood-related processes. DOR agonists and KOR antagonists have promising antidepressant potential, whereas the risk-benefit ratio of currently available MOR agonists as antidepressants remain difficult to evaluate, in addition to their inherent abuse liability. At present, both human and animal studies have mainly examined MORs in the etiology of depressive disorders, and future studies will address delta and kappa receptor function in established and emerging neurobiological aspects of depression, including neurogenesis, neurodevelopment and social behaviors. PMID:23219016

  8. Postpartum period: three distinct but continuous phases

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Mattea; Cacciatore, Alessandra; Giordano, Rosalba; La Rosa, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Postpartum period is distinct in three phases. The third phase is the delayed postpartum period, which can last up to 6 months. Some changes to the genitourinary system are much longer in resolving, and some may never fully revert to the prepregnant state. A burgeoning volume of literature on pelvic floor support implicates childbirth as the initiation of a whole host of conditions including stress urinary incontinence, incontinence of flatus or feces, uterine prolapse, cystocele, and rectocele. The duration and severity of these conditions affect many variables, including the patientʼs intrinsic collagen support, the size of the infant, the route of delivery, and the degree of perineal trauma occurring either naturally (lacerations) or iatrogenically (episiotomy). PMID:22439056

  9. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main entrées in plant-based diets is growing, supporting consumers’ efforts to follow dietary guidance recommendations. Mushrooms’ nutrient and culinary characteristics suggest it may be time to reevaluate food groupings and health benefits in the context of 3 separate food kingdoms: plants/botany, animals/zoology, and fungi/mycology. PMID:25435595

  10. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinctive facies.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sunkara Shree Ramalinga; Radharani, Chitturi; Sinha, Soumya; Kumar, Sv Kiran

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary gingival enlargement also known as gingivitis or familial elephantiasis is a rare type of gingival enlargement. It appears as an isolated autosomal dominant disorder or maybe associated with other conditions. Oral manifestations may vary from minimal involvement of only tuberosity area and the buccal gingiva around the lower molars to a generalized enlargement inhibiting eruption of the teeth. This paper discusses the case of a 13-year-old female patient with distinctive facial characteristics who presented to the department with a chief complaint of swollen gums since 1 year. She had severe diffuse gingival enlargement of the maxilla and mandible. Diagnosis was made based upon clinical examination and family history. Quadrant wise internal bevel gingivectomy procedure was done for the patient to restore her functional and esthetic needs.

  11. Two distinct mechanisms of fibroblast adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, P. A.; Juliano, R. L.

    1981-03-01

    The adhesion of cells to the connective tissue matrix is commonly thought to be governed by fibronectin, a pericellular glycoprotein with binding sites for cell surfaces, collagen and glycosaminoglycans. Here we report evidence that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells possess an alternative mechanism for adhesion which is independent of fibronectin. Cells of a variant CHO clone called ADVF11 are defective in their ability to adhere to fibronectin-coated substrata, but can adhere to a substratum coated with SAM (substrate-attached material), a pericellular material produced by fibroblasts. The adhesion of wild-type CHO cells to fibronectin-coated substrata and adhesion of ADVF11 cells to SAM-coated substrata are differentially sensitive to proteolytic treatment. This suggests that there are two distinct adhesion mechanisms for CHO cells, only one of which is dependent on fibronectin.

  12. Socioeconomic Distinction, Cultural Tastes, and Cigarette Smoking.

    PubMed

    Pampel, Fred C

    2006-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: The inverse relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and smoking is typically seen in terms of the greater economic and social resources of advantaged groups, but it may also relate to cultural resources. This study aims to test theories of symbolic distinction by examining relationships between smoking and ostensibly unrelated cultural preferences. METHODS: Using the 1993 General Social Survey, ordinal logistic regression models, and a three-category dependent variable (never, former, and current smoker), the analysis estimates relationships of musical likes and dislikes with smoking while controlling for SES and social strain. RESULTS: Preferences for classical music are associated with lower smoking, while preferences for bluegrass, jazz, and heavy metal music are associated with higher smoking. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that SES groups may use smoking, like other cultural tastes, to distinguish their lifestyles from those of others.

  13. Socioeconomic Distinction, Cultural Tastes, and Cigarette Smoking*

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Fred C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The inverse relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and smoking is typically seen in terms of the greater economic and social resources of advantaged groups, but it may also relate to cultural resources. This study aims to test theories of symbolic distinction by examining relationships between smoking and ostensibly unrelated cultural preferences. Methods Using the 1993 General Social Survey, ordinal logistic regression models, and a three-category dependent variable (never, former, and current smoker), the analysis estimates relationships of musical likes and dislikes with smoking while controlling for SES and social strain. Results Preferences for classical music are associated with lower smoking, while preferences for bluegrass, jazz, and heavy metal music are associated with higher smoking. Conclusions The results suggest that SES groups may use smoking, like other cultural tastes, to distinguish their lifestyles from those of others. PMID:21874073

  14. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  15. Independent Optical Excitation of Distinct Neural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Klapoetke, Nathan C; Murata, Yasunobu; Kim, Sung Soo; Pulver, Stefan R.; Birdsey-Benson, Amanda; Cho, Yong Ku; Morimoto, Tania K; Chuong, Amy S; Carpenter, Eric J; Tian, Zhijian; Wang, Jun; Xie, Yinlong; Yan, Zhixiang; Zhang, Yong; Chow, Brian Y; Surek, Barbara; Melkonian, Michael; Jayaraman, Vivek; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic tools enable the causal examination of how specific cell types contribute to brain circuit functions. A long-standing question is whether it is possible to independently activate two distinct neural populations in mammalian brain tissue. Such a capability would enable the examination of how different synapses or pathways interact to support computation. Here we report two new channelrhodopsins, Chronos and Chrimson, obtained through the de novo sequencing and physiological characterization of opsins from over 100 species of algae. Chrimson is 45 nm red-shifted relative to any previous channelrhodopsin, important for scenarios where red light would be preferred; we show minimal visual system mediated behavioral artifact in optogenetically stimulated Drosophila. Chronos has faster kinetics than any previous channelrhodopsin, yet is effectively more light-sensitive. Together, these two reagents enable crosstalk-free two-color activation of neural spiking and downstream synaptic transmission in independent neural populations in mouse brain slice. PMID:24509633

  16. Entrepreneurship research in Spain: developments and distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, José C; Gutiérrez, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    This article presents a review of research on entrepreneurship in Spain, paying particular attention to its beginnings, nature and main focus of interest. We have developed a database based on the review of 471 works produced between 1977 and 2009, including articles published in national and international journals and dissertations (read in Spain) that allowed us to extract the following results. There is a preference for qualitative methods, conceptual contributions and the entrepreneurial process as the privileged research theme. There is also a strong focus of interest on micro and small enterprises. These characteristics of Spanish research in areas of entrepreneurship can make a distinctive contribution to international research. However, the dissemination of knowledge and inadequate strategies for international publication limit the diffusion of Spanish research in entrepreneurship. Lastly, we discuss the implications for future research.

  17. ngravs: Distinct gravitational interactions in GADGET-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croker, K. A. S.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss an extension of the massively parallel cosmological simulation code GADGET-2, which now enables investigation of multiple and distinct gravitational force laws, provided they are dominated by a constant scaling of the Newtonian force. In addition to simplifying investigations of a universally modified force law, the ngravs extension provides a foundation for state-of-the-art collisionless cosmological simulations of exotic gravitational scenarios. We briefly review the algorithms used by GADGET-2, and present our extension to multiple gravities, highlighting additional features that facilitate consideration of exotic force laws. We discuss the accuracy and performance of the ngravs extension, both internally and with an unaltered GADGET-2, in the relevant operational modes. The ngravs extension is publicly released to the research community.

  18. Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity.

    PubMed

    Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; van den Broeke, Michiel R; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

    2014-10-28

    Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes.

  19. Oxytocin and vasopressin: distinct receptors in myometrium

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, G.; Balestre, M.N.; Roberts, J.M.; Bottari, S.P.

    1987-06-01

    The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)oxytocin (( /sup 3/H)OT) and (/sup 3/H)lysine vasopressin (( /sup 3/H)LVP) to nonpregnant human myometrium were investigated. Binding of both radioligands was saturable, time dependent, and reversible. Whereas (/sup 3/H)OT was found to bind to a single class of sites with high affinity (Kd, 1.5 +/- 0.4 (+/- SEM) nM) and low capacity (maximum binding (Bmax), 34 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein), (/sup 3/H)LVP bound to two classes of sites, one with high affinity (Kd, 2.2 +/- 0.1 nM) and low capacity (Bmax, 198 +/- 7 fmol/mg protein) and another with low affinity (Kd, 655 +/- 209 nM) and high capacity (Bmax, 5794 +/- 1616 fmol/mg protein). The binding of the labeled peptides also displayed a marked difference in sensitivity to Mg2+ and guanine nucleotides. These differences in binding characteristics as well as the differences in potency of analogs in competing for (/sup 3/H)OT and (/sup 3/H)LVP binding indicate the presence of distinct receptors for OT and vasopressin in human myometrium. Pharmacological characterization of the high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)LVP indicated that these are of the V1 subtype. Although, as suggested by others, vasopressin and OT can bind to the same sites, the presence of distinct receptors for both peptides provides an explanation for the previously reported difference in myometrial responsiveness to OT and vasopressin.

  20. The pursuit of optimal distinctiveness and consumer preferences.

    PubMed

    He, Lingnan; Cong, Feng; Liu, Yanping; Zhou, Xinyue

    2010-10-01

    This article investigates the effect of optimal distinctiveness on consumer product consumption. The authors argue that consumers acquire and display material possessions to restore their optimal levels of distinctiveness. Results showed that placing consumers in a state of low distinctiveness increased desire to acquire distinctive products, whereas perceptions of high distinctiveness reduced desire to acquire such products. Consumers' desire for distinctiveness-related products held true for various consumer choices, including willingness to pay more for limited-edition products and preference for unpopular gifts. This finding has implications for understanding consumer choice in expressing identity.

  1. Microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  2. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  3. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.R.

    1984-06-19

    A hydrogen generator decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, and includes an induction coil which is electrically heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose water passing therethrough. A generator coil is connected in communicating relation to the induction coil, and is positioned in a fire resistant crucible containing ferrous oxide pellets. Oxygen and hydrogen produced by decomposition of water pass through the ferrous oxide pellets where the oxygen reacts with the ferrous oxide and the hydrogen is burned to produce heat for heating a building, such as a conventional home.

  4. Solar Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Vanguard I dish-Stirling module program, initiated in 1982, produced the Vanguard I module, a commercial prototype erected by the Advanco Corporation. The module, which automatically tracks the sun, combines JPL mirrored concentrator technology, an advanced Stirling Solar II engine/generator, a low cost microprocessor-controlled parabolic dish. Vanguard I has a 28% sunlight to electricity conversion efficiency. If tests continue to prove the system effective, Advanco will construct a generating plant to sell electricity to local utilities. An agreement has also been signed with McDonnell Douglas to manufacture a similar module.

  5. Generational mentoring.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Della W

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations struggle with the best way to integrate new staff members, including novice and experienced nurses returning to practice, into the organization. One way of accomplishing this integration is mentoring. Mentoring is a process of guiding the development of another person. The methods used to mentor staff members can be influenced by the generation to which they belong. Each generation typically experiences different events that shape their expectations and responses. Consideration of the influence of these events can improve the effectiveness of the mentoring process.

  6. A Search for Institutional Distinctiveness: Overview of Process and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an overview of the process by which community college practitioners can research their institution's distinctive elements and features. Explains the use of information on institutional distinctiveness in program development, marketing, and college planning. (DMM)

  7. Morphologically and Functionally Distinct Lipid Droplet Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyan; Wang, Yang; Cui, Liujuan; Deng, Yaqin; Xu, Shimeng; Yu, Jinhai; Cichello, Simon; Serrero, Ginette; Ying, Yunshu; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD), a multi-functional organelle, is often found to associate with other cellular membranous structures and vary in size in a given cell, which may be related to their functional diversity. Here we established a method to separate LD subpopulations from isolated CHO K2 LDs into three different size categories. The subpopulation with smallest LDs was nearly free of ER and other membranous structures while those with larger LDs contained intact ER. These distinct subpopulations of LDs differed in their protein composition and ability to recruit proteins. This method was also applicable to LDs obtained from other sources, such as Huh7 cells, mouse liver and brown adipose tissue, et al. We developed an in vitro assay requiring only isolated LDs, Coenzyme A, and ATP to drive lipid synthesis. The LD subpopulation nearly depleted of ER was able to incorporate fatty acids into triacylglycerol and phospholipids. Together, our data demonstrate that LDs in a given cell are heterogeneous in size and function, and suggest that LDs are one of cellular lipid synthetic organelles. PMID:27386790

  8. Medical student empathy: interpersonal distinctions and correlates.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kevin D; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-12-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal quality, empathy is a social behavior well-suited to be examined from an interpersonal perspective. The present study used the interpersonal theory of clinical, personality, and social psychology to examine the construct of empathy and theorize about likely interpersonal correlates. One hundred and sixty-three students from an academic health center in the southeastern United States participated in this study. The medical student version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy was used to assess empathy and its factors: Perspective taking, compassionate care, and walking in the patient's shoes. Interpersonal assessments included the International Personality Item Pool-Interpersonal Circumplex, the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale. Distinct interpersonal styles and correlates emerged among empathy and its factors. While all factors of empathy were related to interpersonal warmth, perspective taking and compassionate care were also associated with submissiveness. Of note, only walking in the patient's shoes was correlated with both social support and less loneliness. These findings are discussed in light of interpersonal theory with particular attention paid to the implications for medical education and professional development.

  9. HYSTERESIS BETWEEN DISTINCT MODES OF TURBULENT DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Kitchatinov, Leonid L.

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear mean-field models of the solar dynamo show long-term variability, which may be relevant to different states of activity inferred from long-term radiocarbon data. This paper is aimed at probing the dynamo hysteresis predicted by the recent mean-field models of Kitchatinov and Olemskoy with direct numerical simulations. We perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale dynamos in a shearing box with helically forced turbulence. As an initial condition, we either take a weak random magnetic field or we start from a snapshot of an earlier simulation. Two quasi-stable states are found to coexist in a certain range of parameters close to the onset of the large-scale dynamo. The simulations converge to one of these states depending on the initial conditions. When either the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is increased between successive runs above the critical value for onset of the dynamo, the field strength jumps to a finite value. However, when the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is then decreased again, the field strength stays at a similar value (strong field branch) even below the original onset. We also observe intermittent decaying phases away from the strong field branch close to the point where large-scale dynamo action is just possible. The dynamo hysteresis seen previously in mean-field models is thus reproduced by 3D simulations. Its possible relation to distinct modes of solar activity such as grand minima is discussed.

  10. Ameloblastoma Phenotypes Reflected in Distinct Transcriptome Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Parker, Joel; Divaris, Kimon; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally invasive benign neoplasm derived from odontogenic epithelium and presents with diverse phenotypes yet to be characterized molecularly. High recurrence rates of 50–80% with conservative treatment in some sub-types warrants radical surgical resections resulting in high morbidity. The objective of the study was to characterize the transcriptome of ameloblastoma and identify relevant genes and molecular pathways using normal odontogenic tissue (human “dentome”) for comparison. Laser capture microdissection was used to obtain neoplastic epithelial tissue from 17 tumors which were examined using the Agilent 44 k whole genome microarray. Ameloblastoma separated into 2 distinct molecular clusters that were associated with pre-secretory ameloblast and odontoblast. Within the pre-secretory cluster, 9/10 of samples were of the follicular type while 6/7 of the samples in the odontoblast cluster were of the plexiform type (p < 0.05). Common pathways altered in both clusters included cell-cycle regulation, inflammatory and MAPkinase pathways, specifically known cancer-driving genes such as TP53 and members of the MAPkinase pathways. The pre-secretory ameloblast cluster exhibited higher activation of inflammatory pathways while the odontoblast cluster showed greater disturbances in transcription regulators. Our results are suggestive of underlying inter-tumor molecular heterogeneity of ameloblastoma sub-types and have implications for the use of tailored treatment. PMID:27491308

  11. Reservoir floodplains support distinct fish assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Wigen, S. L.; Dagel, Jonah D.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs constructed on floodplain rivers are unique because the upper reaches of the impoundment may include extensive floodplain environments. Moreover, reservoirs that experience large periodic water level fluctuations as part of their operational objectives seasonally inundate and dewater floodplains in their upper reaches, partly mimicking natural inundations of river floodplains. In four flood control reservoirs in Mississippi, USA, we explored the dynamics of connectivity between reservoirs and adjacent floodplains and the characteristics of fish assemblages that develop in reservoir floodplains relative to those that develop in reservoir bays. Although fish species richness in floodplains and bays were similar, species composition differed. Floodplains emphasized fish species largely associated with backwater shallow environments, often resistant to harsh environmental conditions. Conversely, dominant species in bays represented mainly generalists that benefit from the continuous connectivity between the bay and the main reservoir. Floodplains in the study reservoirs provided desirable vegetated habitats at lower water level elevations, earlier in the year, and more frequently than in bays. Inundating dense vegetation in bays requires raising reservoir water levels above the levels required to reach floodplains. Therefore, aside from promoting distinct fish assemblages within reservoirs and helping promote diversity in regulated rivers, reservoir floodplains are valued because they can provide suitable vegetated habitats for fish species at elevations below the normal pool, precluding the need to annually flood upland vegetation that would inevitably be impaired by regular flooding. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Distinct vascular conduction with cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kevin C; Beltrán-Parrazal, Luis; López-Valdés, Hector E; Theriot, Jeremy; Toga, Arthur W; Charles, Andrew C

    2007-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is associated with significant vasodilatation and vasoconstriction, but the relationship between the cortical parenchymal and vascular phenomena remains poorly understood. We used optical intrinsic signal (OIS) imaging and electrophysiology to simultaneously examine the vascular and parenchymal changes that occur with CSD in anesthetized mice and rats. CSD was associated with a propagated multiphasic change in optical reflectance, with correlated negative DC shift in field potential. Dilatation of cortical surface arterioles propagated with a significantly greater intrinsic velocity than the parenchymal CSD wavefront measured by OIS and electrophysiology. Dilatation traveled in a circuitous pattern along individual arterioles, indicating specific vascular conduction as opposed to concentric propagation of a parenchymal signal. Arteriolar dilatation propagated into areas beyond the spread of parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes of CSD. Conversely, vasomotor activity could be experimentally dissociated from the parenchymal CSD wave. Frequent repetitive CSD evoked by continuous stimulation was associated with a reduced or absent arteriolar response despite preserved parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes. Similarly, dimethylsulfoxide at high concentrations (10%) inhibited arteriolar reactivity despite preserved parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes. These results suggest a mechanism, intrinsic to the vasculature, for propagation of vasodilatation associated with CSD. Distinct vascular conduction could be important for the pathogenesis of conditions that involve CSD, including migraine, stroke, and traumatic brain injury.

  13. Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; van den Broeke, Michiel R; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes. Key Points First multi-region seasonal velocity measurements show regional differences Seasonal velocity fluctuations on most glaciers appear meltwater controlled Seasonal development of efficient subglacial drainage geographically divided PMID:25821275

  14. China's distinctive engagement in global health.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peilong; Guo, Yan; Qian, Xu; Tang, Shenglan; Li, Zhihui; Chen, Lincoln

    2014-08-30

    China has made rapid progress in four key domains of global health. China's health aid deploys medical teams, constructs facilities, donates drugs and equipment, trains personnel, and supports malaria control mainly in Africa and Asia. Prompted by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003, China has prioritised the control of cross-border transmission of infectious diseases and other health-related risks. In governance, China has joined UN and related international bodies and has begun to contribute to pooled multilateral funds. China is both a knowledge producer and sharer, offering lessons based on its health accomplishments, traditional Chinese medicine, and research and development investment in drug discovery. Global health capacity is being developed in medical universities in China, which also train foreign medical students. China's approach to global health is distinctive; different from other countries; and based on its unique history, comparative strength, and policies driven by several governmental ministries. The scope and depth of China's global engagement are likely to grow and reshape the contours of global health.

  15. Yeast cells can access distinct quiescent states.

    PubMed

    Klosinska, Maja M; Crutchfield, Christopher A; Bradley, Patrick H; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Broach, James R

    2011-02-15

    We conducted a phenotypic, transcriptional, metabolic, and genetic analysis of quiescence in yeast induced by starvation of prototrophic cells for one of three essential nutrients (glucose, nitrogen, or phosphate) and compared those results with those obtained with cells growing slowly due to nutrient limitation. These studies address two related questions: (1) Is quiescence a state distinct from any attained during mitotic growth, and (2) does the nature of quiescence differ depending on the means by which it is induced? We found that either limitation or starvation for any of the three nutrients elicits all of the physiological properties associated with quiescence, such as enhanced cell wall integrity and resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, the starvations result in a common transcriptional program, which is in large part a direct extrapolation of the changes that occur during slow growth. In contrast, the metabolic changes that occur upon starvation and the genetic requirements for surviving starvation differ significantly depending on the nutrient for which the cell is starved. The genes needed by cells to survive starvation do not overlap the genes that are induced upon starvation. We conclude that cells do not access a unique and discrete G(0) state, but rather are programmed, when nutrients are scarce, to prepare for a range of possible future stressors. Moreover, these survival strategies are not unique to quiescence, but are engaged by the cell in proportion to nutrient scarcity.

  16. Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rau, C L; Russell, I J

    2000-01-01

    The validity of the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) as a distinct clinical entity has been challenged for several reasons. Many skeptics express concern about the subjective nature of chronic pain, the subjectivity of the tender point (TeP) examination, the lack of a gold standard laboratory test, and the absence of a clear pathogenic mechanism by which to define FMS. Another expressed concern has been the relative nature of the pain-distress relationship in the rheumatology clinic. The apparently continuous relationship between TePs and somatic distress across a variety of clinical disorders is said to argue against FMS as a separate clinical disorder. The most aggressive challenges of the FMS concept have been from legal defenses of insurance carriers motivated by economic concerns. Other forms of critique have presented as psychiatric dogma, uninformed posturing, suspicion of malingering, ignorance of nociceptive physiology, and occasionally have resulted from honest misunderstanding. It is not likely that a few paragraphs of data and logic will cause an unbeliever to change an ingrained opinion. Therefore, this review describes the clinical manifestations of FMS, responds to some of the theoretic arguments against it, and discusses some possible pathophysiologic mechanisms by which FMS may develop and persist as a unique syndrome.

  17. Generative Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyles, Dan Allen

    Educational research has identified how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice and education have underperforming metrics in racial and gender diversity, despite decades of intervention. These disparities are part of the construction of a culture of science that is alienating to these populations. Recent studies in a social science framework described as "Generative Justice" have suggested that the context of social and scientific practice might be modified to bring about more just and equitable relations among the disenfranchised by circulating the value they and their non-human allies create back to them in unalienated forms. What is not known are the underlying principles of social and material space that makes a system more or less generative. I employ an autoethnographic method at four sites: a high school science class; a farm committed to "Black and Brown liberation"; a summer program geared towards youth environmental mapping; and a summer workshop for Harlem middle school students. My findings suggest that by identifying instances where material affinity, participatory voice, and creative solidarity are mutually reinforcing, it is possible to create educational contexts that generate unalienated value, and circulate it back to the producers themselves. This cycle of generation may help explain how to create systems of justice that strengthen and grow themselves through successive iterations. The problem of lack of diversity in STEM may be addressed not merely by recruiting the best and the brightest from underrepresented populations, but by changing the context of STEM education to provide tools for its own systematic restructuring.

  18. Generation Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of accounting professors with Ph.D.s who can prepare the next generation. To help reverse the faculty deficit, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) has created the new Accounting Doctoral Scholars program by pooling more than $17 million and soliciting commitments from more than 70 of the nation's…

  19. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Cinq-Mars, Robert S; Burke, Timothy; Irish, James; Gustafson, Brian; Kirtley, James; Alawa, Aiman

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. Completed final reporting and deliverables

  20. Langerhans cells are generated by two distinct PU.1-dependent transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Seillet, Cyril; Chevrier, Stéphane; Wu, Li; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Belz, Gabrielle T; Nutt, Stephen L

    2013-12-16

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique dendritic cells found in the epidermis. While a great deal of attention has focused on defining the developmental origins of LCs, reports addressing the transcriptional network ruling their differentiation remain sparse. We addressed the function of a group of key DC transcription factors-PU.1, ID2, IRF4, and IRF8-in the establishment of the LC network. We show that although steady-state LC homeostasis depends on PU.1 and ID2, the latter is dispensable for bone marrow-derived LCs. PU.1 controls LC differentiation by regulating the expression of the critical TGF-β responsive transcription factor RUNX3. PU.1 directly binds to the Runx3 regulatory elements in a TGF-β-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of RUNX3 rescued LC differentiation in the absence of PU.1 and promoted LC differentiation from PU.1-sufficient progenitors. These findings highlight the dual molecular network underlying LC differentiation, and show the central role of PU.1 in these processes.

  1. Prenatal Restraint Stress Generates Two Distinct Behavioral and Neurochemical Profiles in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Casolini, Paola; Cinque, Carlo; Alemà, Giovanni Sebastiano; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Chiodi, Valentina; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Gradini, Roberto; Catalani, Assia; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS) in rats is a validated model of early stress resulting in permanent behavioral and neurobiological outcomes. Although sexual dimorphism in the effects of PRS has been hypothesized for more than 30 years, few studies in this long period have directly addressed the issue. Our group has uncovered a pronounced gender difference in the effects of PRS (stress delivered to the mothers 3 times per day during the last 10 days of pregnancy) on anxiety, spatial learning, and a series of neurobiological parameters classically associated with hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Adult male rats subjected to PRS (“PRS rats”) showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM), a reduction in the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus, a reduction in the activity of mGlu1/5 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the ventral hippocampus, and an increase in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-BDNF in the hippocampus. In contrast, female PRS rats displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM, improved learning in the Morris water maze, an increase in the activity of mGlu1/5 receptors in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus, and no changes in hippocampal neurogenesis or BDNF levels. The direction of the changes in neurogenesis, BDNF levels and mGlu receptor function in PRS animals was not consistent with the behavioral changes, suggesting that PRS perturbs the interdependency of these particular parameters and their relation to hippocampus-dependent behavior. Our data suggest that the epigenetic changes in hippocampal neuroplasticity induced by early environmental challenges are critically sex-dependent and that the behavioral outcome may diverge in males and females. PMID:18478112

  2. Prenatal restraint stress generates two distinct behavioral and neurochemical profiles in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Zuena, Anna Rita; Mairesse, Jerome; Casolini, Paola; Cinque, Carlo; Alemà, Giovanni Sebastiano; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Chiodi, Valentina; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Gradini, Roberto; Catalani, Assia; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2008-05-14

    Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS) in rats is a validated model of early stress resulting in permanent behavioral and neurobiological outcomes. Although sexual dimorphism in the effects of PRS has been hypothesized for more than 30 years, few studies in this long period have directly addressed the issue. Our group has uncovered a pronounced gender difference in the effects of PRS (stress delivered to the mothers 3 times per day during the last 10 days of pregnancy) on anxiety, spatial learning, and a series of neurobiological parameters classically associated with hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Adult male rats subjected to PRS ("PRS rats") showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM), a reduction in the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus, a reduction in the activity of mGlu1/5 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the ventral hippocampus, and an increase in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-BDNF in the hippocampus. In contrast, female PRS rats displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM, improved learning in the Morris water maze, an increase in the activity of mGlu1/5 receptors in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus, and no changes in hippocampal neurogenesis or BDNF levels. The direction of the changes in neurogenesis, BDNF levels and mGlu receptor function in PRS animals was not consistent with the behavioral changes, suggesting that PRS perturbs the interdependency of these particular parameters and their relation to hippocampus-dependent behavior. Our data suggest that the epigenetic changes in hippocampal neuroplasticity induced by early environmental challenges are critically sex-dependent and that the behavioral outcome may diverge in males and females.

  3. Gene conversion variations generate structurally distinct pilin polypeptides in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J; Robbins, K; Barrera, O; Koomey, J M

    1987-04-01

    Pilus+ to pilus- phenotype change occurs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae through gene conversion of the gonococcus' complete, expressed pilin gene by nucleotides homologous to the pilS1 copy 5 partial pilin gene; assembly missense pilin is synthesized but pili are not. Reversion to pilus+ occurs by a subsequent recombinational event that replaces the complete pilin gene's pilS1 copy 5-like sequence with nucleotides from a different partial gene to effect expression of an orthodox (i.e., pilus producing) pilin. Sibling pilus+ revertants of common parentage can carry different sequences in their expressed pilin genes because they have undergone nonidentical gene conversion events such as recombinations with sequences from different partial genes, or recombinations with different length nucleotide stretches of the same partial gene; either can yield structurally and antigenically variant pilin polypeptides.

  4. Distinct binding of BRCA2 BRC repeats to RAD51 generates differential DNA damage sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Presti, Thomas; Nguyen, Tiffany; Jensen, Ryan B.

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 is a multi-faceted protein critical for the proper regulation of homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Elucidating the mechanistic features of BRCA2 is crucial for understanding homologous recombination and how patient-derived mutations impact future cancer risk. Eight centrally located BRC repeats in BRCA2 mediate binding and regulation of RAD51 on resected DNA substrates. Herein, we dissect the biochemical and cellular features of the BRC repeats tethered to the DNA binding domain of BRCA2. To understand how the BRC repeats and isolated domains of BRCA2 contribute to RAD51 binding, we analyzed both the biochemical and cellular properties of these proteins. In contrast to the individual BRC repeat units, we find that the BRC5–8 region potentiates RAD51-mediated DNA strand pairing and provides complementation functions exceeding those of BRC repeats 1–4. Furthermore, BRC5–8 can efficiently repair nuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and accelerate the assembly of RAD51 repair complexes upon DNA damage. These findings highlight the importance of the BRC5–8 domain in stabilizing the RAD51 filament and promoting homology-directed repair under conditions of cellular DNA damage. PMID:27084934

  5. Loading and pre-loading processes generate a distinct siRNA population in Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Kazufumi Kurth, Henriette M.

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •The Tetrahymena Argonaute protein Twi1p binds to ∼28–30-nt siRNAs called scnRNAs. •The size of scnRNAs is determined during a pre-loading process. •The 5′ uracil bias of scnRNAs is attributed to pre-loading and loading processes. •The thermodynamic asymmetry of scnRNA duplex doesnot affect the guide strand decision. •scnRNAs may be produced non-sequentially from dsRNA substrates by Dicer. -- Abstract: The various properties of small RNAs, such as length, terminal nucleotide, thermodynamic asymmetry and duplex mismatches, can impact their sorting into different Argonaute proteins in diverse eukaryotes. The developmentally regulated 26- to 32-nt siRNAs (scnRNAs) are loaded to the Argonaute protein Twi1p and display a strong bias for uracil at the 5′ end. In this study, we used deep sequencing to analyze loaded and unloaded populations of scnRNAs. We show that the size of the scnRNA is determined during a pre-loading process, whereas their 5′ uracil bias is attributed to both pre-loading and loading processes. We also demonstrate that scnRNAs have a strong bias for adenine at the third base from the 3′ terminus, suggesting that most scnRNAs are direct Dicer products. Furthermore, we show that the thermodynamic asymmetry of the scnRNA duplex does not affect the guide and passenger strand decision. Finally, we show that scnRNAs frequently have templated uracil at the last base without a strong bias for adenine at the second base indicating non-sequential production of scnRNAs from substrates. These findings provide a biochemical basis for the varying attributes of scnRNAs, which should help improve our understanding of the production and turnover of scnRNAs in vivo.

  6. Alternative mRNA splicing generates two distinct ADAM12 prodomain variants.

    PubMed

    Duhachek-Muggy, Sara; Li, Hui; Qi, Yue; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Human ADAM12, transcript variant 1 (later on referred to as Var-1b), present in publicly available databases contains the sequence 5'-GTAATTCTG-3' at the nucleotide positions 340-348 of the coding region, at the 3' end of exon 4. The translation product of this variant, ADAM12-Lb, includes the three amino acid motif (114)VIL(116) in the prodomain. This motif is not conserved in ADAM12 from different species and is not present in other human ADAMs. Currently, it is not clear whether a shorter variant, Var-1a, encoding the protein version without the (114)VIL(116) motif, ADAM12-La, is expressed in human. In this work, we have established that human mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells express both Var-1a and Var-1b transcripts. Importantly, the proteolytic processing and intracellular trafficking of the corresponding ADAM12-La and ADAM12-Lb proteins are different. While ADAM12-La is cleaved and trafficked to the cell surface in a manner similar to ADAM12 in other species, ADAM12-Lb is retained in the ER and is not proteolytically processed. Furthermore, the relative abundance of ADAM12-La and ADAM12-Lb proteins detected in several breast cancer cell lines varies significantly. We conclude that the canonical form of transmembrane ADAM12 is represented by Var-1a/ADAM12-La, rather than Var-1b/ADAM12-Lb currently featured in major sequence databases.

  7. Single cell sequencing: a distinct new field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Song, Yuanlin

    2017-12-01

    Single cell sequencing (SCS) has become a new approach to study biological heterogeneity. The advancement in technologies for single cell isolation, amplification of genome/transcriptome and next-generation sequencing enables SCS to reveal the inherent properties of a single cell from the large scale of the genome, transcriptome or epigenome at high resolution. Recently, SCS has been widely applied in various clinical and research fields, such as cancer biology and oncology, immunology, microbiology, neurobiology and prenatal diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the development of SCS methods and focus on the latest clinical and research applications of SCS.

  8. Distinct Genetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Daremipouran, Mohammad; Smoot, Duane T.; Lee, Edward; Brim, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Background Colon cancer (CRC) development often includes chromosomal instability (CIN) leading to amplifications and deletions of large DNA segments. Epidemiological, clinical, and cytogenetic studies showed that there are considerable differences between CRC tumors from African Americans (AAs) and Caucasian patients. In this study, we determined genomic copy number aberrations in sporadic CRC tumors from AAs, in order to investigate possible explanations for the observed disparities. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) using a 105k chip to identify copy number aberrations in samples from 15 AAs. In addition, we did a population comparative analysis with aCGH data in Caucasians as well as with a widely publicized list of colon cancer genes (CAN genes). There was an average of 20 aberrations per patient with more amplifications than deletions. Analysis of DNA copy number of frequently altered chromosomes revealed that deletions occurred primarily in chromosomes 4, 8 and 18. Chromosomal duplications occurred in more than 50% of cases on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, 20 and X. The CIN profile showed some differences when compared to Caucasian alterations. Conclusions/Significance Chromosome X amplification in male patients and chromosomes 4, 8 and 18 deletions were prominent aberrations in AAs. Some CAN genes were altered at high frequencies in AAs with EXOC4, EPHB6, GNAS, MLL3 and TBX22 as the most frequently deleted genes and HAPLN1, ADAM29, SMAD2 and SMAD4 as the most frequently amplified genes. The observed CIN may play a distinctive role in CRC in AAs. PMID:20126641

  9. Photostability and photodegradation pathways of distinctive pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Attila; Virág, Diána

    2009-01-01

    Transformation of pesticides in the environment is a highly complex process affected by different factors. Biological and physical-chemical factors may play a role in the degradation to variable extent. Photodecomposition might be regarded as one of the most crucial factors affecting the fate of pesticides. Therefore, our study focused on revealing specific details of the photolytic degradation of pesticides. The toxicity of the examined pesticides is well known; however, little information is available regarding their natural degradation processes. More detailed examinations are required to reveal the exact mechanism of the pesticide decomposition and the biological impacts of the degradates. Significance of this study is enhanced by the fact that decomposition of pesticides may result in the formation of toxic degradation products. The photolytic degradation of frequently applied pesticides (e.g., acetochlor, simazine, chlorpyrifos, and carbendazim) with different chemical structures was investigated. An immersible ultraviolet light source was applied to induce photodegradation. The degradation processes were followed by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. Electron ionization mass spectrometry was used to identify the degradation species. Detailed mechanisms of photolytic transformation were established by identification of each degradate. The photolytic degradation of pesticides of distinctive chemical character exhibited markedly different photodecomposition mechanisms. At least four degradation species were detected and identified in each case. Loss of alkyl, chloro, and hydroxyl groups as well as cleavage of alkyloxy, amide, amino-alkyl, and ester bonds might be regarded as typical decomposition patterns. Deamination and ring opening might be observed at the last stages of decomposition.

  10. Municipal solid waste landfills harbor distinct microbiomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamps, Blake W.; Lyles, Christopher N.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Stevenson, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Landfills are the final repository for most of the discarded material from human society and its “built environments.” Microorganisms subsequently degrade this discarded material in the landfill, releasing gases (largely CH4 and CO2) and a complex mixture of soluble chemical compounds in leachate. Characterization of “landfill microbiomes” and their comparison across several landfills should allow the identification of environmental or operational properties that influence the composition of these microbiomes and potentially their biodegradation capabilities. To this end, the composition of landfill microbiomes was characterized as part of an ongoing USGS national survey studying the chemical composition of leachates from 19 non-hazardous landfills across 16 states in the continental U.S. The landfills varied in parameters such as size, waste composition, management strategy, geography, and climate zone. The diversity and composition of bacterial and archaeal populations in leachate samples were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and compared against a variety of physical and chemical parameters in an attempt to identify their impact on selection. Members of the Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridia, and candidate division OP3 were the most abundant. The distribution of the observed phylogenetic diversity could best be explained by a combination of variables and was correlated most strongly with the concentrations of chloride and barium, rate of evapotranspiration, age of waste, and the number of detected household chemicals. This study illustrates how leachate microbiomes are distinct from those of other natural or built environments, and sheds light on the major selective forces responsible for this microbial diversity.

  11. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Harbor Distinct Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Stamps, Blake W.; Lyles, Christopher N.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Stevenson, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Landfills are the final repository for most of the discarded material from human society and its “built environments.” Microorganisms subsequently degrade this discarded material in the landfill, releasing gases (largely CH4 and CO2) and a complex mixture of soluble chemical compounds in leachate. Characterization of “landfill microbiomes” and their comparison across several landfills should allow the identification of environmental or operational properties that influence the composition of these microbiomes and potentially their biodegradation capabilities. To this end, the composition of landfill microbiomes was characterized as part of an ongoing USGS national survey studying the chemical composition of leachates from 19 non-hazardous landfills across 16 states in the continental U.S. The landfills varied in parameters such as size, waste composition, management strategy, geography, and climate zone. The diversity and composition of bacterial and archaeal populations in leachate samples were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and compared against a variety of physical and chemical parameters in an attempt to identify their impact on selection. Members of the Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridia, and candidate division OP3 were the most abundant. The distribution of the observed phylogenetic diversity could best be explained by a combination of variables and was correlated most strongly with the concentrations of chloride and barium, rate of evapotranspiration, age of waste, and the number of detected household chemicals. This study illustrates how leachate microbiomes are distinct from those of other natural or built environments, and sheds light on the major selective forces responsible for this microbial diversity. PMID:27148222

  12. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

    1981-06-08

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  13. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  14. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  15. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  16. Thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Pryslak, N.E.

    1974-02-26

    A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

  17. Electric generator

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  18. Structurally divergent human T cell receptor. gamma. proteins encoded by distinct C. gamma. genes

    SciTech Connect

    Krangel, M.S.; Band, H.; Hata, S.; McLean, J.; Brenner, M.B.

    1987-07-03

    The human T cell receptor (TCR) ..gamma.. polypeptide occurs in structurally distinct forms on certain peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Complementary DNA clones representing the transcripts of functionally rearranged TCR ..gamma.. genes in these cells have been analyzed. The expression of a disulfide-linked and a nondisulfide-linked form of TCR ..gamma.. correlates with the use of the C..gamma..1 and C..gamma..2 constant-region gene segments, respectively. Variability in TCR ..gamma.. polypeptide and disulfide linkage is determined by the number of copies and the sequence of a repeated segment of the constant region. Thus, C..gamma..1 and C..gamma..2 are used to generate structurally distinct, yet functional, T3-associated receptor complexes on peripheral blood lymphocytes. Tryptic peptide mapping suggests that the T3-associated TCR ..gamma.. and delta peptides in the nondisulfide-linked form are distinct.

  19. Independent control of gamma and theta activity by distinct interneuron networks in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Izumi; Herb, Jan; Kollo, Mihaly; Boyden, Edward S; Schaefer, Andreas T

    2014-01-01

    Circuits in the brain possess a remarkable ability to orchestrate activities on different timescales, but how distinct circuits interact to sculpt diverse rhythms remains unresolved. The olfactory bulb is a classic example where slow, theta, and fast, gamma, rhythms coexist. Furthermore inhibitory interneurons generally implicated in rhythm generation are segregated into distinct layers, neatly separating local from global motifs. Here, combining intracellular recordings in vivo with circuit-specific optogenetic interference we dissect the contribution of inhibition to rhythmic activity in the mouse olfactory bulb. We found that the two inhibitory circuits control rhythms on distinct timescales: local, glomerular networks coordinate theta activity, regulating baseline and odor-evoked inhibition; granule cells orchestrate gamma synchrony and spike timing. Surprisingly, they did not contribute to baseline rhythms, or sniff-coupled odor-evoked inhibition despite their perceived dominance. Thus, activities on theta and gamma time scales are controlled by separate, dissociable inhibitory networks in the olfactory bulb. PMID:24997762

  20. Distinct and extinct: genetic differentiation of the Hawaiian eagle.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank; James, Helen F; Olson, Storrs L; Fleischer, Robert C

    2015-02-01

    Eagles currently occur in the Hawaiian Islands only as vagrants, but Quaternary bones of Haliaeetus eagles have been found on three of the major islands. A previous study of a ∼3500-year-old skeleton from Maui found its mtDNA more similar to White-tailed (H. albicilla) than to Bald (H. leucocephalus) Eagles, but low intraspecific resolution of the markers and lack of comparative data from mainland populations precluded assessment of whether the individual was part of the diversity found in Eurasia, or whether it represented an endemic Hawaiian lineage. Using ancient DNA techniques, we sequenced part of the rapidly evolving mtDNA control region from the same specimen, and compared it to published range-wide control region data from White-tailed Eagles and newly generated sequences from Bald Eagles. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Hawaiian eagle represents a distinct (>3% divergent) mtDNA lineage most closely related to those of extant White-tailed Eagles. Based on fossil calibration, we estimate that the Hawaiian mtDNA lineage diverged from mainland sequences around the Middle Pleistocene. Although not clearly differentiated morphologically from mainland forms, the Hawaiian eagle thus likely constituted an isolated, resident population in the Hawaiian archipelago for more than 100,000 years, where it was the largest terrestrial predator.

  1. Phosphorylation induces distinct alpha-synuclein strain formation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng-Rong; Hu, Zhi-Wen; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Li, Yan-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Synucleinopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases associated with alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated the existence of different structural characteristics or ‘strains’ of α-Syn, supporting the concept that synucleinopathies share several common features with prion diseases and possibly explaining how a single protein results in different clinical phenotypes within synucleinopathies. In earlier studies, the different strains were generated through the regulation of solution conditions, temperature, or repetitive seeded fibrillization in vitro. Here, we synthesize homogeneous α-Syn phosphorylated at serine 129 (pS129 α-Syn), which is highly associated with the pathological changes, and demonstrate that phosphorylation at Ser129 induces α-Syn to form a distinct strain with different structures, propagation properties, and higher cytotoxicity compared with the wild-type α-Syn. The results are the first demonstration that post-translational modification of α-Syn can induce different strain formation, offering a new mechanism for strain formation. PMID:27853185

  2. Accurate three-dimensional documentation of distinct sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahesh K.; Dutta, Ashish; Subramanian, Venkatesh K.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most critical aspects of documenting distinct sites is acquiring detailed and accurate range information. Several three-dimensional (3-D) acquisition techniques are available, but each has its own limitations. This paper presents a range data fusion method with the aim to enhance the descriptive contents of the entire 3-D reconstructed model. A kernel function is introduced for supervised classification of the range data using a kernelized support vector machine. The classification method is based on the local saliency features of the acquired range data. The range data acquired from heterogeneous range sensors are transformed into a defined common reference frame. Based on the segmentation criterion, the fusion of range data is performed by integrating finer regions of range data acquired from a laser range scanner with the coarser region of Kinect's range data. After fusion, the Delaunay triangulation algorithm is applied to generate the highly accurate, realistic 3-D model of the scene. Finally, experimental results show the robustness of the proposed approach.

  3. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1(F22-24/F22-24)) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1(BRCA1/BRCA1)) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1(F22-24/5382insC)) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  4. Identification of two distinct Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, S; Sonenshein, A L

    1994-08-01

    Two distinct Bacillus subtilis genes (citA and citZ) were found to encode citrate synthase isozymes that catalyze the first step of the Krebs cycle. The citA gene was cloned by genetic complementation of an Escherichia coli citrate synthase mutant strain (W620) and was in a monocistronic transcriptional unit. A divergently transcribed gene, citR, could encode a protein with strong similarity to the bacterial LysR family of regulatory proteins. A null mutation in citA had little effect on citrate synthase enzyme activity or sporulation. The residual citrate synthase activity was purified from a citA null mutant strain, and the partial amino acid sequence for the purified protein (CitZ) was determined. The citZ gene was cloned from B. subtilis chromosomal DNA by using a PCR-generated probe synthesized with oligonucleotide primers derived from the partial amino acid sequence of purified CitZ. The citZ gene proved to be the first gene in a tricistronic cluster that also included citC (coding for isocitrate dehydrogenase) and citH (coding for malate dehydrogenase). A mutation in citZ caused a substantial loss of citrate synthase enzyme activity, glutamate auxotrophy, and a defect in sporulation.

  5. Smoke generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A smoke generator is disclosed which is particularly suitable for mounting on the wing tips of an aircraft and for conducting airflow studies. The device includes a network of thermally insulated tubes for carrying a fluid which is used to produce smoke. The fluid, which need not be combustible, is heated above its vaporization temperature by electric current which is passed through the fluid conduit tubes, so that the tubes serve both as fluid conduits and resistance heating elements. Fluid supply and monitoring systems and electrical control systems are also disclosed.

  6. Piezoelectrostatic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piezoelectrostatic generator includes a plurality of elongated piezoelectric elements having first and second ends, with the first ends fixedly mounted in a cylindrical housing and the second extending radially inwardly toward an axis. A shaft movable along the axis is connected to the inner ends of the elements to produce bending forces in piezoelectric strips within the elements. Each element includes a pair of strips mounted in surface contact and in electrical series to produce a potential upon bending. Electrodes spaced from the strips by a solid dielectric material act as capacitor plates to collect the potential charge.

  7. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  8. Tide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Feltenberger, B.D.

    1981-06-16

    A tidewater power system consisting of a high tide reservoir and a low tide reservoir. The high tide reservoir has an inlet adapted to be supported at high tide level and an outlet with a water wheel and generator between the outlet of the high tide reservoir and the low tide reservoir. The low tide reservoir has an outlet at the low tide level. The outlet from the high tide reservoir is adjustable to control the flow rate and the high tide reservoir can be closed at high tide to retain water for use over a period of time.

  9. Distinct trajectories in the transition to adulthood: are children of immigrants advantaged?

    PubMed

    Hao, Lingxin; Woo, Han S

    2012-01-01

    Studies on children of immigrants have generally ignored distinct developmental trajectories during adolescence and their role in the transition to adulthood. This study identifies distinct trajectories in cognitive, sociobehavioral, and psychological domains and estimates their consequences for young adults. Drawing data from a nationally representative sample of 10,795 adolescents aged 13-17 who were followed up to ages 25-32, the study uses growth mixture modeling to test advantages for children of immigrants. The analysis shows a 1.5-generation advantage in academic achievement and school engagement, as well as a weaker second-generation advantage in academic achievement, but no disadvantage in depression for children of immigrants. In addition, these results hold for children of Hispanic origin. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed.

  10. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, Joseph S.; Wheeler, Paul C.

    1983-01-01

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  11. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  12. Triboelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L; Fan, Fengru; Lin, Long; Zhu, Guang; Pan, Caofeng; Zhou, Yusheng

    2015-11-03

    A generator includes a thin first contact charging layer and a thin second contact charging layer. The thin first contact charging layer includes a first material that has a first rating on a triboelectric series. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer includes a second material that has a second rating on a triboelectric series that is more negative than the first rating. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer is disposed adjacent to the first contact charging layer so that the second side of the second contact charging layer is in contact with the second side of the first contact charging layer.

  13. Yours, Mine, Theirs: Multiple Generations in Today's Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotophorst, Julie

    2011-01-01

    For the first time in history, four distinct generations are sharing the same workspace. Veterans, Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Generation Y (the Millennials) are all bringing very different life experiences, expectations, and value systems to the work table. How do leaders bridge the gap among these generations and provide common ground on which…

  14. Twentieth-Century Spanish Textbooks: A Generational Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardinas-Barnes, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Examines the evolution of Spanish textbooks qualitatively using computerized pedagogical data. Results show distinct generational text style trends from 1860 to 1998 which chronicle a common engine of change and conflict in standardization movements and the production of generational text styles. Summarizes 20th-century textbook generations and…

  15. Distinct microenvironmental cues stimulate divergent TLR4-mediated signaling pathways in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini, Anna M.; Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Lim, Jenny M. P.; Midwood, Kim S.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit a phenotypic plasticity that enables them to orchestrate specific immune responses to distinct threats. The microbial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C are released during bacterial infection and tissue injury, respectively, and both activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We found that these two TLR4 ligands stimulated distinct signaling pathways in macrophages, resulting in cells with divergent phenotypes. Although macrophages activated by LPS or tenascin-C displayed some common features, including activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine synthesis, each ligand stimulated the production of different subsets of cytokines and generated different phosphoproteomic signatures. Moreover, tenascin-C promoted the generation of macrophages that exhibited increased synthesis and phosphorylation of extracellular matrix components, whereas LPS stimulated the production of macrophages that exhibited an enhanced capacity to degrade the matrix. These data reveal how the activation of one pattern recognition receptor by different microenvironmental cues generates macrophage with distinct phenotypes. PMID:27577261

  16. Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Le Gallo, Matthieu; Lozy, Fred; Bell, Daphne W

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancers are the most frequently diagnosed gynecological malignancy and were expected to be the seventh leading cause of cancer death among American women in 2015. The majority of endometrial cancers are of serous or endometrioid histology. Most human tumors, including endometrial tumors, are driven by the acquisition of pathogenic mutations in cancer genes. Thus, the identification of somatic mutations within tumor genomes is an entry point toward cancer gene discovery. However, efforts to pinpoint somatic mutations in human cancers have, until recently, relied on high-throughput sequencing of single genes or gene families using Sanger sequencing. Although this approach has been fruitful, the cost and throughput of Sanger sequencing generally prohibits systematic sequencing of the ~22,000 genes that make up the exome. The recent development of next-generation sequencing technologies changed this paradigm by providing the capability to rapidly sequence exomes, transcriptomes, and genomes at relatively low cost. Remarkably, the application of this technology to catalog the mutational landscapes of endometrial tumor exomes, transcriptomes, and genomes has revealed, for the first time, that serous and endometrioid endometrial cancers can be classified into four distinct molecular subgroups. In this chapter, we overview the characteristic genomic features of each subgroup and discuss the known and putative cancer genes that have emerged from next-generation sequencing of endometrial carcinomas.

  17. Mechanistically Distinct Mouse Models for CRX-Associated Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nicholas M.; Zhang, Alan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huecker, Julie B.; Hennig, Anne K.; Chen, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (CRX) protein is a “paired-like” homeodomain transcription factor that is essential for regulating rod and cone photoreceptor transcription. Mutations in human CRX are associated with the dominant retinopathies Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Cone-Rod Dystrophy (CoRD) and Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), with variable severity. Heterozygous Crx Knock-Out (KO) mice (“+/−”) have normal vision as adults and fail to model the dominant human disease. To investigate how different mutant CRX proteins produce distinct disease pathologies, we generated two Crx Knock-IN (K-IN) mouse models: CrxE168d2 (“E168d2”) and CrxR90W (“R90W”). E168d2 mice carry a frameshift mutation in the CRX activation domain, Glu168del2, which is associated with severe dominant CoRD or LCA in humans. R90W mice carry a substitution mutation in the CRX homeodomain, Arg90Trp, which is associated with dominant mild late-onset CoRD and recessive LCA. As seen in human patients, heterozygous E168d2 (“E168d2/+”) but not R90W (“R90W/+”) mice show severely impaired retinal function, while mice homozygous for either mutation are blind and undergo rapid photoreceptor degeneration. E168d2/+ mice also display abnormal rod/cone morphology, greater impairment of CRX target gene expression than R90W/+ or +/− mice, and undergo progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Surprisingly, E168d2/+ mice express more mutant CRX protein than wild-type CRX. E168d2neo/+, a subline of E168d2 with reduced mutant allele expression, displays a much milder retinal phenotype, demonstrating the impact of Crx expression level on disease severity. Both CRX[E168d2] and CRX[R90W] proteins fail to activate transcription in vitro, but CRX[E168d2] interferes more strongly with the function of wild type (WT) CRX, supporting an antimorphic mechanism. E168d2 and R90W are mechanistically distinct mouse models for CRX-associated disease that will allow the elucidation of molecular mechanisms and testing of

  18. Some conceptual distinctions are more useful than others.

    PubMed

    de Shazer, S

    1982-03-01

    Useful distinctions in conceptual schemes lead to explanatory or descriptive metaphors that have a clear form. Muddles, on the other hand, are created when useful distinctions that could be drawn are not or when an unnecessary distinction is drawn. The field of family therapy, now involved in an explicit epistemological and paradigmatic shift, has various muddles of each kind. The purpose of this essay is to describe some of these muddles and to suggest that making a distinction between "the study of the family-as-a-system" and "the study of family-therapy-as-a-system" leads to some useful and clear metaphors.

  19. Creating Distinctiveness: Lessons from Uncommon Colleges and Universities. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.; And Others

    This brief report summarizes a longer document with the same title. Distinctive colleges and universities possess a unifying theme or vision that is expressed in all their activities. They also usually respond to newly emerging societal or community needs unmet by existing schools of higher education. Distinctiveness, however, can limit the…

  20. Listening and Questioning: The "Apophatic/Cataphatic" Distinction Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waks, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    In an earlier article I drew a distinction between two general types of listening. In one the listener brings pre-determined categories to bear in extracting useful information from the speaker's utterance. In the other the listener suspends such categories to hear as much as possible in the utterance. This distinction has been challenged by…

  1. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  2. 34 CFR 110.24 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 110.24..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Duties of ED Recipients § 110.24 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) As...

  3. 34 CFR 110.24 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 110.24..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Duties of ED Recipients § 110.24 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) As...

  4. 34 CFR 110.24 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 110.24..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Duties of ED Recipients § 110.24 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) As...

  5. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  6. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  7. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  8. 34 CFR 110.24 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 110.24..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Duties of ED Recipients § 110.24 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) As...

  9. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  10. 14 CFR § 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Age distinctions. § 1252.411 Section Â... BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Investigation, Conciliation, and Enforcement Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes...

  11. 34 CFR 110.24 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 110.24..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Duties of ED Recipients § 110.24 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) As...

  12. Neurobehavioral Perspectives on the Distinction between Fear and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perusini, Jennifer N.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the usefulness of the distinction between fear and anxiety. The clinical use of the labels is ambiguous, often defining one in terms of the other. We first consider what a useful, objective, and scientifically valid definition would entail and then evaluate several fear/anxiety distinctions that have been made in the…

  13. Explicit-Implicit Distinction: A Review of Related Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrah, Marwan A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper sketches out the main views of the major pragmatic approaches (i.e., Grice's theory of conversation, Relevance Theory, and Neo-Gricean pragmatic theory) on explicit-implicit distinction. It makes clear how this distinction has been differently drawn for utterance interpretation. Additionally, it highlights several corresponding problems…

  14. The Curious Case of Orthographic Distinctiveness: Disruption of Categorical Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Cahill, Michael J.; Bugg, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    How does orthographic distinctiveness affect recall of structured (categorized) word lists? On one theory, enhanced item-specific information (e.g., more distinct encoding) in concert with robust relational information (e.g., categorical information) optimally supports free recall. This predicts that for categorically structured lists,…

  15. Sustained attention and prediction: distinct brain maturation trajectories during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Thillay, Alix; Roux, Sylvie; Gissot, Valérie; Carteau-Martin, Isabelle; Knight, Robert T.; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a key period for frontal cortex maturation necessary for the development of cognitive ability. Sustained attention and prediction are cognitive functions critical for optimizing sensory processing, and essential to efficiently adapt behaviors in an ever-changing world. The aim of the current study was to investigate the brain developmental trajectories of attentive and predictive processing through adolescence. We recorded EEG in 36 participants from the age of 12–24 years (three age groups: 12–14, 14–17, 18–24 years) to target development during early and late adolescence, and early adulthood. We chose a visual target detection task which loaded upon sustained attention, and we manipulated target predictability. Continued maturation of sustained attention after age 12 was evidenced by improved performance (hits, false alarms (FAs) and sensitivity) in a detection task, associated with a frontal shift in the scalp topographies of the Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) and P3 responses, with increasing age. No effect of age was observed on predictive processing, with all ages showing similar benefits in reaction time, increases in P3 amplitude (indexing predictive value encoding and memorization), increases in CNV amplitude (corresponding to prediction implementation) and reduction in target-P3 latency (reflecting successful prediction building and use), with increased predictive content. This suggests that adolescents extracted and used predictive information to generate predictions as well as adults. The present results show that predictive and attentive processing follow distinct brain developmental trajectories: prediction abilities seem mature by the age of 12 and sustained attention continues to improve after 12-years of age and is associated with maturational changes in the frontal cortices. PMID:26483653

  16. Methylome sequencing for fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma depicts distinctive features

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, Gabriel G; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Paradis, Valérie; Fabre, Monique; Guettier, Catherine; Yamazaki, Jumpei; Long, Hi; Lu, Yue; Raynal, Noël J-M; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Mouawad, Roger; Khayat, David; Brugières, Laurence; Raymond, Eric; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-01-01

    With the goal of studying epigenetic alterations in fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLC) and establish an associated DNA methylation signature, we analyzed LINE-1 methylation in a cohort of FLC and performed next-generation sequencing of DNA methylation in a training set of pure-FLCs and non-cirrhotic hepatocellular carcinomas (nc-HCC). DNA methylation was correlated with gene expression. Furthermore, we established and validated an epigenetic signature differentiating pure-FLC from other HCCs. LINE-1 methylation correlated with shorter recurrence-free survival and overall survival in resected pure-FLC patients. Unsupervised clustering using CG sites located in islands distinguished pure-FLC from nc-HCC. Major DNA methylation changes occurred outside promoters, mainly in gene bodies and intergenic regions located in the vicinity of liver developmental genes (i.e., SMARCA4 and RXRA). Partially methylated domains were more prone to DNA methylation changes. Furthermore, we identified several putative tumor suppressor genes (e.g., DLEU7) and oncogenes (e.g., DUSP4). While ∼70% of identified gene promoters gaining methylation were marked by bivalent histone marks (H3K4me3/H3K27me3) in embryonic stem cells, ∼70% of those losing methylation were marked by H3K4me3. Finally, we established a pure FLC DNA methylation signature and validated it in an independent dataset. Our analysis reveals a distinct epigenetic signature of pure FLC as compared to nc-HCC, with DNA methylation changes occurring in the vicinity of liver developmental genes. These data suggest new options for targeting FLC based on cancer epigenome aberrations. PMID:26224146

  17. Adenovirus Vectors Targeting Distinct Cell Types in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sweigard, J. Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5ΔRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5ΔRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5ΔRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5ΔRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  18. Positive and negative reinforcement: Should the distinction be preserved?

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Alan; Galizio, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Michael (1975) reviewed efforts to classify reinforcing events in terms of whether stimuli are added (positive reinforcement) or removed (negative reinforcement). He concluded that distinctions in these terms are confusing and ambiguous. Of necessity, adding a stimulus requires its previous absence and removing a stimulus its previous presence. Moreover, there is no good basis, either behavioral or physiological, that indicates the involvement of distinctly different processes, and on these grounds he proposed that the distinction be abandoned. Despite the cogency of Michael's analysis, the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement is still being taught. In this paper, we reconsider the issue from the perspective of 30 years. However, we could not find new evidence in contemporary research and theory that allows reliable classification of an event as a positive rather than a negative reinforcer. We conclude by reiterating Michael's admonitions about the conceptual confusion created by such a distinction. PMID:22478443

  19. Glucose and GLP-1 Stimulate cAMP Production via Distinct Adenylyl Cyclases in INS-1E Insulinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Zippin, Jonathan Hale; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    In β cells, both glucose and hormones, such as GLP-1, stimulate production of the second messenger cAMP, but glucose and GLP-1 elicit distinct cellular responses. We now show in INS-1E insulinoma cells that glucose and GLP-1 produce cAMP with distinct kinetics via different adenylyl cyclases. GLP-1 induces a rapid cAMP signal mediated by G protein–responsive transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). In contrast, glucose elicits a delayed cAMP rise mediated by bicarbonate, calcium, and ATP-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). This glucose-induced, sAC-dependent cAMP rise is dependent upon calcium influx and is responsible for the glucose-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. These results demonstrate that sAC-generated and tmAC-generated cAMP define distinct signaling cascades. PMID:18695009

  20. Distinct steps in yeast spore morphogenesis require distinct SMK1 MAP kinase thresholds.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M; Briza, P; Pierce, M; Winter, E

    1999-01-01

    The SMK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase is required for spore morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the multiple aberrant spore wall assembly patterns seen even within a single smk1 null ascus, different smk1 missense mutants block in a coordinated fashion at intermediate stages. One smk1 mutant forms asci in which the four spores are surrounded only by prospore wall-like structures, while another smk1 mutant forms asci in which the spores are surrounded by inner but not outer spore wall layers. Stepwise increases in gene dosage of a hypomorphic smk1 allele allow for the completion of progressively later morphological and biochemical events and for the acquisition of distinct spore-resistance phenotypes. Furthermore, smk1 allelic spore phenotypes can be recapitulated by reducing wild-type SMK1 expression. The data demonstrate that SMK1 is required for the execution of multiple steps in spore morphogenesis that require increasing thresholds of SMK1 activity. These results suggest that quantitative changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling play a role in coordinating multiple events of a single cellular differentiation program. PMID:10101160

  1. Compositionally distinct nuclear pore complexes of functionally distinct dimorphic nuclei in ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-04-06

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gateway for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, is composed of about 30 different proteins called nucleoporins. It remains unknown whether the NPCs within a species are homogeneous or vary depending on the cell type, or physiological condition. Here, we present evidence for compositionally distinct NPCs that form within a single cell in a binucleated ciliate. In Tetrahymena thermophila, each cell contains both a transcriptionally-active macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC). By combining in silico analysis, mass spectrometry analysis for immuno-isolated proteins, and subcellular localization analysis of GFP fused proteins, we identified numerous novel components of MAC and MIC NPCs. Core members of the Nup107-160 scaffold complex were enriched in MIC NPCs. Strikingly, two paralogs of Nup214 and of Nup153 localized exclusively to either MAC or MIC NPCs. Furthermore, the transmembrane components Pom121 and Pom82 localize exclusively to MAC and MIC NPCs, respectively. Our results argue that functional nuclear dimorphism in ciliates is likely to depend on compositional and structural specificity of NPCs.

  2. Aposematic signals and the relationship between conspicuousness and distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Merilaita, Sami; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2007-03-21

    It has long been recognized that prey that invest in toxic or other defenses often advertise these defenses by means of conspicuously coloured signals. One question that remains unanswered is why conspicuousness is such a universal trait of aposematic signals. Conspicuousness may allow more rapid avoidance learning by predators or improved retention of such learning. An alternative or complementary explanation is that defended species should adopt a conspicuous signal of their defence to make them visually distinct from inconspicuous undefended prey. Here, we use a neural network model of prey detection and attack decision making by a predator in combination with evolving, virtual prey to shed light on the relative importance of conspicuousness against the background and distinctiveness from other species as mechanisms underlying aposematic signalling. Our model suggests that prey conspicuousness may result from selection for distinctiveness, but that selection for distinctiveness does not result in maximization of conspicuousness. On the other hand, our model does not justify the exclusion of the possibility that conspicuousness as such may be a beneficial attribute of warning coloration. It is likely that the relative importance of the two selective forces (for conspicuousness and for distinctiveness) will differ on a case-by-case basis, however there is no empirical or logical reason for the current neglect of evolutionary pressure for distinctiveness. Thus, we suggest that description of aposematism as the teaming of a secondary defence with a conspicuous signal may be overly simplistic; we would rather that the signal were described as conspicuous and/or distinctive.

  3. Antigen affinity and antigen dose exert distinct influences on CD4 T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keck, Simone; Schmaler, Mathias; Ganter, Stefan; Wyss, Lena; Oberle, Susanne; Huseby, Eric S; Zehn, Dietmar; King, Carolyn G

    2014-10-14

    Cumulative T-cell receptor signal strength and ensuing T-cell responses are affected by both antigen affinity and antigen dose. Here we examined the distinct contributions of these parameters to CD4 T-cell differentiation during infection. We found that high antigen affinity positively correlates with T helper (Th)1 differentiation at both high and low doses of antigen. In contrast, follicular helper T cell (TFH) effectors are generated after priming with high, intermediate, and low affinity ligand. Unexpectedly, memory T cells generated after priming with very low affinity antigen remain impaired in their ability to generate secondary Th1 effectors, despite being recalled with high affinity antigen. These data challenge the view that only strongly stimulated CD4 T cells are capable of differentiating into the TFH and memory T-cell compartments and reveal that differential strength of stimulation during primary T-cell activation imprints unique and long lasting T-cell differentiation programs.

  4. Evaluation of Spatial Agreement of Distinct Landslide Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterlacchini, Simone; Bordogna, Gloria; Frigerio, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the degree of spatial agreement of different predicted patterns in a majority of coherent landslide prediction maps with almost similar success and prediction rate curves. If two or more models have a similar performance, the choice of the best one is not a trivial operation and cannot be based on success and prediction rate curves only. In fact, it may happen that two or more prediction maps with similar accuracy and predictive power do not have the same degree of agreement in terms of spatial predicted patterns. The selected study area is the high Valtellina valley, in North of Italy, covering a surface of about 450 km2 where mapping of historical landslides is available. In order to assess landslide susceptibility, we applied the Weights of Evidence (WofE) modeling technique implemented by USGS by means of ARC-SDM tool. WofE efficiently investigate the spatial relationships among past events and multiple predisposing factors, providing useful information to identify the most probable location of future landslide occurrences. We have carried out 13 distinct experiments by changing the number of morphometric and geo-environmental explanatory variables in each experiment with the same training set and thus generating distinct models of landslide prediction, computing probability degrees of occurrence of landslides in each pixel. Expert knowledge and previous results from indirect statistically-based methods suggested slope, land use, and geology the best "driving controlling factors". The Success Rate Curve (SRC) was used to estimate how much the results of each model fit the occurrence of landslides used for the training of the models. The Prediction Rate Curve (PRC) was used to estimate how much the model predict the occurrence of landslides in the validation set. We found that the performances were very similar for different models. Also the dendrogram of the Cohen's kappa statistic and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were

  5. Osterix marks distinct waves of primitive and definitive stromal progenitors during bone marrow development.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Pinho, Sandra; Ahmed, Jalal; Kunisaki, Yuya; Hanoun, Maher; Mendelson, Avital; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M; Frenette, Paul S

    2014-05-12

    Mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells (MSPCs) contribute to bone marrow (BM) homeostasis by generating multiple types of stromal cells. MSPCs can be labeled in the adult BM by Nestin-GFP, whereas committed osteoblast progenitors are marked by Osterix expression. However, the developmental origin and hierarchical relationship of stromal cells remain largely unknown. Here, by using a lineage-tracing system, we describe three distinct waves of contributions of Osterix(+) cells in the BM. First, Osterix(+) progenitors in the fetal BM contribute to nascent bone tissues and transient stromal cells that are replaced in the adult marrow. Second, Osterix-expressing cells perinatally contribute to osteolineages and long-lived BM stroma, which have characteristics of Nestin-GFP(+) MSPCs. Third, Osterix labeling in the adult marrow is osteolineage-restricted, devoid of stromal contribution. These results uncover a broad expression profile of Osterix and raise the intriguing possibility that distinct waves of stromal cells, primitive and definitive, may organize the developing BM.

  6. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-01-27

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities - a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Reassortment and distinct evolutionary dynamics of Rift Valley Fever virus genomic segments.

    PubMed

    Freire, Caio C M; Iamarino, Atila; Soumaré, Peinda O Ly; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A; Zanotto, Paolo M A

    2015-06-23

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) is a member of Bunyaviridae family that causes a febrile disease affecting mainly ruminants and occasionally humans in Africa, with symptoms that range from mid to severe. RVFV has a tri-segmented ssRNA genome that permits reassortment and could generate more virulent strains. In this study, we reveal the importance of reassortment for RVFV evolution using viral gene genealogy inference and phylodynamics. We uncovered seven events of reassortment that originated RVFV lineages with discordant origins among segments. Moreover, we also found that despite similar selection regimens, the three segments have distinct evolutionary dynamics; the longer segment L evolves at a significant lower rate. Episodes of discordance between population size estimates per segment also coincided with reassortment dating. Our results show that RVFV segments are decoupled enough to have distinct demographic histories and to evolve under different molecular rates.

  8. Damped propagation of cell polarization explains distinct PCP phenotypes of epithelial patterning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Owen, Markus R.

    2013-01-01

    During epithelial patterning in metazoans cells are polarized in the plane of a tissue, a process referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP). Interactions between a few molecules produce distinct phenotypes in diverse tissues in animals from flies to humans and make PCP tightly associated with tissue and organ growth control. An interesting question is whether these phenotypes share common traits. Previous computational models revealed how PCP signalling determines cell polarization in some specific contexts. We have developed a computational model, examined PCP signalling in varied molecular contexts, and revealed how details of molecular interactions and differences in molecular contexts affect the direction, speed, and propagation of cell polarization. The main finding is that damped propagation of cell polarization can generate rich variances in phenotypes of domineering non-autonomy and error correction in different contexts. These results impressively demonstrate how simple molecular interactions cause distinct, yet inherently analogous, developmental patterning. PMID:23995897

  9. Distinctions in Breast Tumor Recurrence Patterns Post-Therapy among Racially Distinct Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cantuaria, Guilherme; Klimov, Sergey; Jones, Mildred; Neema, Pranay; Il’yasova, Dora; Krishnamurti, Uma; Li, Xiaoxian; Reid, Michelle D.; Gupta, Meenakshi; Rida, Padmashree C. G.; Osan, Remus; Aneja, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical studies have revealed a higher risk of breast tumor recurrence in African-American (AA) patients compared to European-American (EA) patients, contributing to the alarming inequality in clinical outcomes among the ethnic groups. However, distinctions in recurrence patterns upon receiving hormone, radiation, and/or chemotherapy between the races remain poorly characterized. Methods We compared patterns and rates (per 1000 cancer patients per 1 year) of recurrence following each form of treatment between AA (n = 1850) and EA breast cancer patients (n = 7931) from a cohort of patients (n = 10504) treated between 2005–2015 at Northside Hospital in Atlanta, GA. Results Among patients who received any combination of adjuvant therapy, AA displayed higher overall rates of recurrence than EA (p = 0.015; HR: 1.699; CI: 1.108–2.606). Furthermore, recurrence rates were higher in AA than EA among stage I (p = 0.031; HR: 1.736; CI: 1.052–2.864) and T1 classified patients (p = 0.003; HR: 2.009; CI: 1.263–3.197). Interestingly, among patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, AA displayed higher rates of local recurrence than EA (p = 0.024; HR: 7.134; CI: 1.295–39.313). Conclusion Our analysis revealed higher incidence rates of recurrence in AA compared to EA among patients that received any combination of adjuvant therapy. Moreover, our data demonstrates an increased risk of tumor recurrence in AA than EA among patients diagnosed with minimally invasive disease. This is the first clinical study to suggest that neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves breast cancer recurrence rates and patterns in AA. PMID:28085947

  10. CONSIDERATION OF CHILDREN'S DISTINCTIVE SUSCEPTIBILITY IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration of children's distinctive susceptibility in environmental health studies.
    Pauline Mendola (US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711)

    Children are a particularly susceptible subpopulation with ...

  11. Education and Training: Is There Any Longer a Useful Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul; Laurent, John

    1990-01-01

    Although education and training were distinct concepts when Taylorism dominated the workplace, it is no longer appropriate to separate them. Today's highly competitive environment requires the education of a flexible, multiskilled workforce, not training for narrowly defined employment tasks. (SK)

  12. 4. West side of pier showing distinct piling configuration. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. West side of pier showing distinct piling configuration. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. 29 CFR 549.3 - Distinction between plan and trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinction between plan and trust. 549.3 Section 549.3... REQUIREMENTS OF A âBONA FIDE PROFIT-SHARING PLAN OR TRUSTâ § 549.3 Distinction between plan and trust. As used... profits; (b) Profit-sharing trust means any such program or arrangement as qualifies under this part...

  14. Generations of interdisciplinarity in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Andrew; Lewis, Jamie; Williams, Matthew L

    2016-04-02

    Bioinformatics, a specialism propelled into relevance by the Human Genome Project and the subsequent -omic turn in the life science, is an interdisciplinary field of research. Qualitative work on the disciplinary identities of bioinformaticians has revealed the tensions involved in work in this "borderland." As part of our ongoing work on the emergence of bioinformatics, between 2010 and 2011, we conducted a survey of United Kingdom-based academic bioinformaticians. Building on insights drawn from our fieldwork over the past decade, we present results from this survey relevant to a discussion of disciplinary generation and stabilization. Not only is there evidence of an attitudinal divide between the different disciplinary cultures that make up bioinformatics, but there are distinctions between the forerunners, founders and the followers; as inter/disciplines mature, they face challenges that are both inter-disciplinary and inter-generational in nature.

  15. Generations of interdisciplinarity in bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Andrew; Lewis, Jamie; Williams, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics, a specialism propelled into relevance by the Human Genome Project and the subsequent -omic turn in the life science, is an interdisciplinary field of research. Qualitative work on the disciplinary identities of bioinformaticians has revealed the tensions involved in work in this “borderland.” As part of our ongoing work on the emergence of bioinformatics, between 2010 and 2011, we conducted a survey of United Kingdom-based academic bioinformaticians. Building on insights drawn from our fieldwork over the past decade, we present results from this survey relevant to a discussion of disciplinary generation and stabilization. Not only is there evidence of an attitudinal divide between the different disciplinary cultures that make up bioinformatics, but there are distinctions between the forerunners, founders and the followers; as inter/disciplines mature, they face challenges that are both inter-disciplinary and inter-generational in nature. PMID:27453689

  16. Different AMPA receptor subtypes mediate the distinct kinetic components of a biphasic EPSC in hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Stincic, Todd L.; Frerking, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    CA1 hippocampal interneurons at the border between stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SLM) have AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that consist of two distinct phases: a typical fast component (FC), and a highly unusual slow component (SC) that persists for hundreds of milliseconds. To determine whether these kinetically distinct components of the EPSC are mediated by distinct AMPAR subpopulations, we examined the relative contributions of GluA2-containing and—lacking AMPARs to the SC. GluA2-containing AMPARs mediated the majority of the FC whereas GluA2-lacking AMPARs preferentially generated the SC. When glutamate uptake through the glial glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was inhibited, spill over-mediated AMPAR activation recruited an even slower third kinetic component that persisted for several seconds; however, this spillover-mediated current was mediated predominantly by GluA2-containing AMPARs and therefore was clearly distinct from the SC when uptake is intact. Thus, different AMPAR subpopulations that vary in GluA2 content mediate the distinct components of the AMPAR EPSC. The SC is developmentally downregulated in mice, declining after the second postnatal week. This downregulation affects both GluA2-containing and GluA2-lacking AMPARs mediating the SC, and is not accompanied by developmental changes in the GluA2 content of AMPARs underlying the FC. Thus, the downregulation of the SC appears to be independent of synaptic GluA2 expression, suggesting the involvement of another AMPAR subunit or an auxiliary protein. Our results therefore identify GluA2-dependent and GluA2-independent determinants of the SC: GluA2-lacking AMPARs preferentially contribute to the SC, while the developmental downregulation of the SC is independent of GluA2 content. PMID:26042027

  17. Distinct temperature sensitivity among taiga and tundra shrubs in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreu-Hayles, L.; Anchukaitis, K. J.; D'Arrigo, R.

    2014-12-01

    Shrub expansion into Arctic and alpine tundra ecosystems is well documented, mostly over the last 50 years, based on remote sensing data, aerial photography, and in-situ observations. Warming temperatures are considered the main driver of the observed change in shrub vegetation patterns. Here, we assess the relationship between temperatures and shrub growth from five populations of Salix spp. (willow) and Alnus spp. (alder) in Alaska growing within the tundra and the boreal forest (~taiga) using dendrochronological techniques. The three tundra shrub sites are located on the Dalton Highway north from Toolik Lake (~69ºN 148ºW), whereas the two taiga shrub sites are located closer to Fairbanks at the Twelve Mile Summit site (~65ºN 146ºW). Because shrub ages vary among the studied populations lead to different time spans for the ring-width chronologies generated, a common period with available satellite data spanning from 1982 to 2010 was selected for this study. All tundra shrub chronologies shared a strong positive response to summer temperatures despite growing in heterogeneous site conditions and belonging to different species. In contrast, in the taiga, summer temperatures enhance willow growth, whereas alder growth appears almost insensitive to temperature over the interval studied. Extending the analyses back in time, a very strong positive relationship was found between alder ring-width and June temperatures prior to 1970. This phenomenon, a weakening of the previously existing relationship between growth and temperatures, was also detected in white spruce (Picea glauca) growing at the same site, and it is known in the literature as the 'divergence problem'. Thus, at this taiga location, alder shrubs and trees seem to have similar growth patterns. Summer temperatures no longer seem to enhance taiga alder growth. Shrubs of different species exposed to the same climatic conditions can exhibit varied growth responses. The distinct temperature sensitivities

  18. Net Generation's Learning Styles in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Eleni; Kalokairinou, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Numerous surveys have confirmed that emerging technologies and Web 2.0 tools have been a defining feature in the lives of current students, estimating that there is a fundamental shift in the way young people communicate, socialize and learn. Nursing students in higher education are characterized as digital literate with distinct traits which influence their learning styles. Millennials exhibit distinct learning preferences such as teamwork, experiential activities, structure, instant feedback and technology integration. Higher education institutions should be aware of the implications of the Net Generation coming to university and be prepared to meet their expectations and learning needs.

  19. Distinctive Feature Extraction for Indian Sign Language (ISL) Gesture using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep Baburao; Sinha, G. R.

    2016-07-01

    India, having less awareness towards the deaf and dumb peoples leads to increase the communication gap between deaf and hard hearing community. Sign language is commonly developed for deaf and hard hearing peoples to convey their message by generating the different sign pattern. The scale invariant feature transform was introduced by David Lowe to perform reliable matching between different images of the same object. This paper implements the various phases of scale invariant feature transform to extract the distinctive features from Indian sign language gestures. The experimental result shows the time constraint for each phase and the number of features extracted for 26 ISL gestures.

  20. Distinctive Feature Extraction for Indian Sign Language (ISL) Gesture using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep Baburao; Sinha, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    India, having less awareness towards the deaf and dumb peoples leads to increase the communication gap between deaf and hard hearing community. Sign language is commonly developed for deaf and hard hearing peoples to convey their message by generating the different sign pattern. The scale invariant feature transform was introduced by David Lowe to perform reliable matching between different images of the same object. This paper implements the various phases of scale invariant feature transform to extract the distinctive features from Indian sign language gestures. The experimental result shows the time constraint for each phase and the number of features extracted for 26 ISL gestures.

  1. Characterization of two distinct, simultaneous hot electron beams in intense laser-solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Cho, B I; Osterholz, J; Bernstein, A C; Dyer, G M; Karmakar, A; Pukhov, A; Ditmire, T

    2009-11-01

    The transport of energetic electron beams generated from aluminum foils irradiated by ultraintense laser pulses has been studied by imaging coherent transition radiation from the rear side of the target. Two distinct beams of MeV electrons are emitted from the target rear side at the same time. This measurement indicates that two different mechanisms, namely resonance absorption and jxB heating, accelerate the electrons at the targets front side and drive them to different directions, with different temperatures. This interpretation is consistent with 3D-particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovely, Suzette; Buffum, Austin G.; Barth, Roland S.

    2007-01-01

    Today's workforce comprises distinct generational cohorts-Veterans, Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials. "Generations at School" provides educators with the knowledge and tools to create and sustain true collaboration, teamwork, and consensus. Suzette Lovely and Austin G. Buffum introduce the traits and tipping points of these diverse age…

  3. Central pattern generator for vocalization: Is there a vertebrate morphotype?

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Animals that generate acoustic signals for social communication are faced with two essential tasks: generate a temporally precise signal and inform the auditory system about the occurrence of one’s own sonic signal. Recent studies of sound producing fishes delineate a hindbrain network comprised of anatomically distinct compartments coding equally distinct neurophysiological properties that allow an organism to meet these behavioral demands. A set of neural characters comprising a vocal-sonic central pattern generator (CPG) morphotype is proposed for fishes and tetrapods that shares evolutionary developmental origins with pectoral appendage motor systems. PMID:25050813

  4. Central pattern generator for vocalization: is there a vertebrate morphotype?

    PubMed

    Bass, Andrew H

    2014-10-01

    Animals that generate acoustic signals for social communication are faced with two essential tasks: generate a temporally precise signal and inform the auditory system about the occurrence of one's own sonic signal. Recent studies of sound producing fishes delineate a hindbrain network comprised of anatomically distinct compartments coding equally distinct neurophysiological properties that allow an organism to meet these behavioral demands. A set of neural characters comprising a vocal-sonic central pattern generator (CPG) morphotype is proposed for fishes and tetrapods that shares evolutionary developmental origins with pectoral appendage motor systems.

  5. Preschoolers' fantasy-reality distinctions of emotional events.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Nathalie; Ramirez, Madisenne

    2012-08-01

    Research suggests that emotions influence children's ability to discern fantasy from reality; however, reasons for this association remain unknown. The current research sought to better understand the mechanisms underlying children's distinctions by examining the roles discrete emotions and context have in 3- to 5-year-olds' evaluations of fantasy and reality. In Study 1, children's fantasy-reality distinctions of images depicting happy, frightening, or sad events were obtained under two conditions: Children responded freely or were motivated to respond accurately. When responding freely, older children reported that happy and sad fantastic and real events could occur but frightening events could not. When motivated to respond accurately, children's accuracy improved for fantasy but not for reality. Study 2 examined real events exclusively and found that children may lack the knowledge that frightening, but not happy or sad, real events can occur. The findings provide new insight into how emotions affect children's fantasy-reality distinctions.

  6. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale.

  7. Liquidity Spillover in International Stock Markets through Distinct Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  8. Use of optical mapping to sort uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains into distinct subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, William R.; Briska, Adam; Stahl, Buffy; Wagner, Trevor K.; Zentz, Emily; Henkhaus, John; Lovrich, Steven D.; Agger, William A.; Callister, Steven M.; DuChateau, Brian; Dykes, Colin W.

    2010-01-01

    Optical maps were generated for 33 uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates. For individual genomes, the NcoI restriction fragments aligned into a unique chromosome map for each individual isolate, which was then compared with the in silico restriction maps of all of the sequenced E. coli and Shigella strains. All of the UPEC isolates clustered separately from the Shigella strains as well as the laboratory and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli strains. Moreover, the individual strains appeared to cluster into distinct subgroups based on the dendrogram analyses. Phylogenetic grouping of these 33 strains showed that 32/33 were the B2 subgroup and 1/33 was subgroup A. To further characterize the similarities and differences among the 33 isolates, pathogenicity island (PAI), haemolysin and virulence gene comparisons were performed. A strong correlation was observed between individual subgroups and virulence factor genes as well as haemolysis activity. Furthermore, there was considerable conservation of sequenced-strain PAIs in the specific subgroups. Strains with different antibiotic-resistance patterns also appeared to sort into separate subgroups. Thus, the optical maps distinguished the UPEC strains from other E. coli strains and further subdivided the strains into distinct subgroups. This optical mapping procedure holds promise as an alternative way to subgroup all E. coli strains, including those involved in infections outside of the intestinal tract and epidemic strains with distinct patterns of antibiotic resistance. PMID:20378655

  9. Distinct circuit-dependent functions of presynaptic neurexin-3 at GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Jason; Földy, Csaba; Ilcus, Silviana Maria Ciurea; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    α- and β-neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules whose general importance for synaptic transmission is well documented. The specific functions of neurexins, however, remain largely unknown because no conditional neurexin knockouts are available, and because targeting all α- and β-neurexins produced by a particular gene is challenging. Using newly-generated constitutive and conditional knockout mice that target all neurexin-3α and -3β isoforms, we here show that neurexin-3 is differentially required for distinct synaptic functions in different brain regions. Specifically, we find that in cultured neurons and acute slices of the hippocampus, presynaptic neurexin-3 mediates trans-synaptic regulation of postsynaptic AMPA-receptors via its extracellular sequences. In cultured neurons and acute slices of the olfactory bulb, however, presynaptic neurexin-3 is selectively required for GABA release by a mechanism involving its intracellular sequences. Thus, our data demonstrate that neurexin-3 performs distinct essential pre- or postsynaptic functions in different brain regions by distinct mechanisms. PMID:26030848

  10. Physiological and structural differences in spatially distinct subpopulations of cardiac mitochondria: influence of cardiac pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharendra; Shepherd, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue contains discrete pools of mitochondria that are characterized by their subcellular spatial arrangement. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) exist below the cell membrane, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) reside in rows between the myofibrils, and perinuclear mitochondria are situated at the nuclear poles. Microstructural imaging of heart tissue coupled with the development of differential isolation techniques designed to sequentially separate spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations have revealed differences in morphological features including shape, absolute size, and internal cristae arrangement. These findings have been complemented by functional studies indicating differences in biochemical parameters and, potentially, functional roles for the ATP generated, based upon subcellular location. Consequently, mitochondrial subpopulations appear to be influenced differently during cardiac pathologies including ischemia/reperfusion, heart failure, aging, exercise, and diabetes mellitus. These influences may be the result of specific structural and functional disparities between mitochondrial subpopulations such that the stress elicited by a given cardiac insult differentially impacts subcellular locales and the mitochondria contained within. The goal of this review is to highlight some of the inherent structural and functional differences that exist between spatially distinct cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations as well as provide an overview of the differential impact of various cardiac pathologies on spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations. As an outcome, we will instill a basis for incorporating subcellular spatial location when evaluating the impact of cardiac pathologies on the mitochondrion. Incorporation of subcellular spatial location may offer the greatest potential for delineating the influence of cardiac pathology on this critical organelle. PMID:24778166

  11. Leading Generation Y

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    autonomy. 36 Howe and Strauss show readers that this team ethic shows up in Generation Y’s political views.37 When teens from the Millennial ...April 2008 WORD COUNT: 5,582 PAGES: 30 KEY TERMS: Leadership, Millennial Generation , Next Generation , Recruiting, and Retention CLASSIFICATION... Millennial Generation , Generation Y or the Next Generation , the Army needs to consider the gap between Boomers, Generation X and the Soldiers that

  12. Radical behaviorism and the subjective-objective distinction.

    PubMed

    Moore, J

    1995-01-01

    The distinction between subjective and objective domains is central to traditional psychology, including the various forms of mediational stimulus-organism-response neobehaviorism that treat the elements of a subjective domain as hypothetical constructs. Radical behaviorism has its own unique perspective on the subjective-objective distinction. For radical behaviorism, dichotomies between subjective and objective, knower and known, or observer and agent imply at most unique access to a part of the world, rather than dichotomous ontologies. This perspective leads to unique treatments of such important philosophical matters as (a) dispositions and (b) the difference between first- and third-person psychological sentences.

  13. Mapping Phylogenetic Trees to Reveal Distinct Patterns of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Michelle; Colijn, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships are frequently described by phylogenetic trees, but a central barrier in many fields is the difficulty of interpreting data containing conflicting phylogenetic signals. We present a metric-based method for comparing trees which extracts distinct alternative evolutionary relationships embedded in data. We demonstrate detection and resolution of phylogenetic uncertainty in a recent study of anole lizards, leading to alternate hypotheses about their evolutionary relationships. We use our approach to compare trees derived from different genes of Ebolavirus and find that the VP30 gene has a distinct phylogenetic signature composed of three alternatives that differ in the deep branching structure. Key words: phylogenetics, evolution, tree metrics, genetics, sequencing. PMID:27343287

  14. Aggregates and Superaggregates of Soot with Four Distinct Fractal Morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, C. M.; Kim, W.; Fry, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Soot formed in laminar diffusion flames of heavily sooting fuels evolves through four distinct growth stages which give rise to four distinct aggregate fractal morphologies. These results were inferred from large and small angle static light scattering from the flames, microphotography of the flames, and analysis of soot sampled from the flames. The growth stages occur approximately over four successive orders of magnitude in aggregate size. Comparison to computer simulations suggests that these four growth stages involve either diffusion limited cluster aggregation or percolation in either three or two dimensions.

  15. Number of distinct sites visited by a subdiffusive random walker.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Santos Bravo; Klafter, J; Lindenberg, Katja

    2008-03-01

    The asymptotic mean number of distinct sites visited by a subdiffusive continuous-time random walker in two dimensions seems not to have been explicitly calculated anywhere in the literature. This number has been calculated for other dimensions for only one specific asymptotic behavior of the waiting time distribution between steps. We present an explicit derivation for two cases in all integer dimensions so as to formally complete a tableau of results. In this tableau we include the dominant as well as subdominant contributions in all integer dimensions. Other quantities that can be calculated from the mean number of distinct sites visited are also discussed.

  16. Radical behaviorism and the subjective—objective distinction

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jay

    1995-01-01

    The distinction between subjective and objective domains is central to traditional psychology, including the various forms of mediational stimulus—organism—response neobehaviorism that treat the elements of a subjective domain as hypothetical constructs. Radical behaviorism has its own unique perspective on the subjective—objective distinction. For radical behaviorism, dichotomies between subjective and objective, knower and known, or observer and agent imply at most unique access to a part of the world, rather than dichotomous ontologies. This perspective leads to unique treatments of such important philosophical matters as (a) dispositions and (b) the difference between first- and third-person psychological sentences. PMID:22478203

  17. D-D neutron generator development at LBNL.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, J; Gicquel, F; Hahto, S K; King, M; Lou, T-P; Leung, K-N

    2005-01-01

    The plasma and ion source technology group in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing advanced, next generation D-D neutron generators. There are three distinctive developments, which are discussed in this presentation, namely, multi-stage, accelerator-based axial neutron generator, high-output co-axial neutron generator and point source neutron generator. These generators employ RF-induction discharge to produce deuterium ions. The distinctive feature of RF-discharge is its capability to generate high atomic hydrogen species, high current densities and stable and long-life operation. The axial neutron generator is designed for applications that require fast pulsing together with medium to high D-D neutron output. The co-axial neutron generator is aimed for high neutron output with cw or pulsed operation, using either the D-D or D-T fusion reaction. The point source neutron generator is a new concept, utilizing a toroidal-shaped plasma generator. The beam is extracted from multiple apertures and focus to the target tube, which is located at the middle of the generator. This will generate a point source of D-D, T-T or D-T neutrons with high output flux. The latest development together with measured data will be discussed in this article.

  18. Distinct actions of Rab3 and Rab27 GTPases on late stages of exocytosis of insulin.

    PubMed

    Cazares, Victor A; Subramani, Arasakumar; Saldate, Johnny J; Hoerauf, Widmann; Stuenkel, Edward L

    2014-09-01

    Rab GTPases associated with insulin-containing secretory granules (SGs) are key in targeting, docking and assembly of molecular complexes governing pancreatic β-cell exocytosis. Four Rab3 isoforms along with Rab27A are associated with insulin granules, yet elucidation of the distinct roles of these Rab families on exocytosis remains unclear. To define specific actions of these Rab families we employ Rab3GAP and/or EPI64A GTPase-activating protein overexpression in β-cells from wild-type or Ashen mice to selectively transit the entire Rab3 family or Rab27A to a GDP-bound state. Ashen mice carry a spontaneous mutation that eliminates Rab27A expression. Using membrane capacitance measurements we find that GTP/GDP nucleotide cycling of Rab27A is essential for generation of the functionally defined immediately releasable pool (IRP) and central to regulating the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). By comparison, nucleotide cycling of Rab3 GTPases, but not of Rab27A, is essential for a kinetically rapid filling of the RRP with SGs. Aside from these distinct functions, Rab3 and Rab27A GTPases demonstrate considerable functional overlap in building the readily releasable granule pool. Hence, while Rab3 and Rab27A cooperate to generate release-ready SGs in β-cells, they also direct unique kinetic and functional properties of the exocytotic pathway.

  19. Redundant synthesis of a conidial polyketide by two distinct secondary metabolite clusters in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Throckmorton, Kurt; Lim, Fang Yun; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Zheng, Weifa; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Filamentous fungi are renowned for the production of bioactive secondary metabolites. Typically, one distinct metabolite is generated from a specific secondary metabolite cluster. Here, we characterize the newly described trypacidin (tpc) cluster in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We find that this cluster as well as the previously characterized endocrocin (enc) cluster both contribute to the production of the spore metabolite endocrocin. Whereas trypacidin is eliminated when only tpc cluster genes are deleted, endocrocin production is only eliminated when both the tpc and enc non-reducing polyketide synthase-encoding genes, tpcC and encA, respectively, are deleted. EncC, an anthrone oxidase, converts the product released from EncA to endocrocin as a final product. In contrast, endocrocin synthesis by the tpc cluster likely results from incomplete catalysis by TpcK (a putative decarboxylase), as its deletion results in a nearly 10-fold increase in endocrocin production. We suggest endocrocin is likely a shunt product in all related non-reducing polyketide synthase clusters containing homologues of TpcK and TpcL (a putative anthrone oxidase), e.g. geodin and monodictyphenone. This finding represents an unusual example of two physically discrete secondary metabolite clusters generating the same natural product in one fungal species by distinct routes. PMID:26242966

  20. Distinct populations of innate CD8+ T cells revealed in a CXCR3 reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Dong, Ran; Varikuti, Sanjay; Shawler, Todd; Kampfrath, Thomas; Terrazas, Cesar A; Lezama-Davila, Claudio; Ahmer, Brian M M; Whitacre, Caroline C; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Locksley, Richard; Sharpe, Arlene H; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2013-03-01

    CXCR3, expressed mainly on activated T and NK cells, is implicated in a host of immunological conditions and can contribute either to disease resolution or pathology. We report the generation and characterization of a novel CXCR3 internal ribosome entry site bicistronic enhanced GFP reporter (CIBER) mouse in which enhanced GFP expression correlates with surface levels of CXCR3. Using CIBER mice, we identified two distinct populations of innate CD8(+) T cells based on constitutive expression of CXCR3. We demonstrate that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells preferentially express higher levels of Ly6C and CD122, but lower levels of CCR9 compared with CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, we show that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells express higher transcript levels of antiapoptotic but lower levels of proapoptotic factors, respond more robustly to IL-2 and IL-15, and produce significantly more IFN-γ and granzyme B. Interestingly, CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells do not respond to IL-12 or IL-18 alone, but produce significant amounts of IFN-γ on stimulation with a combination of these cytokines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that CXCR3(+) and CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells are phenotypically and functionally distinct. These newly generated CIBER mice provide a novel tool for studying the role of CXCR3 and CXCR3-expressing cells in vivo.

  1. Yeast vacuoles fragment in an asymmetrical two-phase process with distinct protein requirements.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Martin; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Yeast vacuoles fragment and fuse in response to environmental conditions, such as changes in osmotic conditions or nutrient availability. Here we analyze osmotically induced vacuole fragmentation by time-lapse microscopy. Small fragmentation products originate directly from the large central vacuole. This happens by asymmetrical scission rather than by consecutive equal divisions. Fragmentation occurs in two distinct phases. Initially, vacuoles shrink and generate deep invaginations that leave behind tubular structures in their vicinity. Already this invagination requires the dynamin-like GTPase Vps1p and the vacuolar proton gradient. Invaginations are stabilized by phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) produced by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase complex II. Subsequently, vesicles pinch off from the tips of the tubular structures in a polarized manner, directly generating fragmentation products of the final size. This phase depends on the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate and the Fab1 complex. It is accelerated by the PI(3)P- and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate-binding protein Atg18p. Thus vacuoles fragment in two steps with distinct protein and lipid requirements.

  2. Distinctive Feature of Microbial Communities and Bacterial Functional Profiles in Tricholoma matsutake Dominant Soil

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Yoon; Fong, Jonathan J.; Park, Myung Soo; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, the pine mushroom, is a valuable forest product with high economic value in Asia, and plays an important ecological role as an ectomycorrhizal fungus. Around the host tree, T. matsutake hyphae generate a distinctive soil aggregating environment called a fairy ring, where fruiting bodies form. Because T. matsutake hyphae dominate the soil near the fairy ring, this species has the potential to influence the microbial community. To explore the influence of T. matsutake on the microbial communities, we compared the microbial community and predicted bacterial function between two different soil types—T. matsutake dominant and T. matsutake minor. DNA sequence analyses showed that fungal and bacterial diversity were lower in the T. matsutake dominant soil compared to T. matsutake minor soil. Some microbial taxa were significantly more common in the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations, many of which were previously identified as mycophillic or mycorrhiza helper bacteria. Between the two soil types, the predicted bacterial functional profiles (using PICRUSt) had significantly distinct KEGG modules. Modules for amino acid uptake, carbohydrate metabolism, and the type III secretion system were higher in the T. matsutake dominant soil than in the T. matsutake minor soil. Overall, similar microbial diversity, community structure, and bacterial functional profiles of the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations suggest that T. matsutake may generate a dominance effect. PMID:27977803

  3. Durable and scalable icephobic surfaces: similarities and distinctions from superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sojoudi, H; Wang, M; Boscher, N D; McKinley, G H; Gleason, K K

    2016-02-21

    Formation, adhesion, and accumulation of ice, snow, frost, glaze, rime, or their mixtures can cause severe problems for solar panels, wind turbines, aircrafts, heat pumps, power lines, telecommunication equipment, and submarines. These problems can decrease efficiency in power generation, increase energy consumption, result in mechanical and/or electrical failure, and generate safety hazards. To address these issues, the fundamentals of interfaces between liquids and surfaces at low temperatures have been extensively studied. This has lead to development of so called "icephobic" surfaces, which possess a number of overlapping, yet distinctive, characteristics from superhydrophobic surfaces. Less attention has been given to distinguishing differences between formation and adhesion of ice, snow, glaze, rime, and frost or to developing a clear definition for icephobic, or more correctly pagophobic, surfaces. In this review, we strive to clarify these differences and distinctions, while providing a comprehensive definition of icephobicity. We classify different canonical families of icephobic (pagophobic) surfaces providing a review of those with potential for scalable and robust development.

  4. Coordination of distinct motor structures through remote axonal coupling of projection interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jian; Sasaki, Kosei; Perkins, Matthew H; Siniscalchi, Michael J; Ludwar, Bjoern C; Cropper, Elizabeth C; Weiss, Klaudiusz R

    2011-01-01

    Complex behaviors often require coordinated movements of dissimilar motor structures. The underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated cycle-by-cycle coordination of two dissimilar feeding structures in Aplysia californica: the external lips and the internal radula. During feeding, the lips open while the radula protracts. Lip and radula motoneurons are located in the cerebral and buccal ganglia respectively, and radula motoneurons are controlled by a well-characterized buccal central pattern generator (CPG). Here, we examined whether the three electrically-coupled lip motoneurons C15/16/17 are controlled by the buccal CPG or by a previously-postulated cerebral CPG. Two buccal-cerebral projection interneurons, B34 and B63, which are part of the buccal CPG and mediate radula protraction, monosynaptically excite C15/16/17. Recordings from the B34 axon in the cerebral ganglion demonstrate its direct electrical coupling with C15/16/17, eliminating the need for a cerebral CPG. Moreover, when the multifunctional buccal CPG generates multiple forms of motor programs due to the activation of two inputs: the command-like neuron CBI-2 and the esophageal nerve (EN), C15/16 exhibit activity patterns that are distinct from C17. These distinct activity patterns result from combined activity of B34 and B63 and their differential excitation of C15/16 vs. C17. In more general terms, we identified neuronal mechanisms that allow a single CPG to coordinate the phasing and activity of remotely-located motoneurons innervating distinct structures that participate in the production of different motor outputs. We also demonstrated that axo-dendritic electrical coupling by projection interneurons plays a pivotal role in coordinating activity of these remotely-located neurons. PMID:22031890

  5. Distinct mechanisms are utilized to induce stress sensor gadd45b by different stress stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Steven D; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2009-12-01

    The GADD45 family of proteins consists of three small proteins, GADD45A, GADD45B, and GADD45G, implicated in modulating the cellular response to genotoxic/physiological stressors. Despite similarities in sequence, structure and function, each gadd45 gene is induced differentially by different stress stimuli. Studies on stress-mediated induction of the gadd45 genes have predominantly focused on gadd45a, with knowledge of gadd45b and gadd45g regulation lacking. To generate a more complete understanding of the regulation of gadd45 genes, a comprehensive analysis of stress-mediated induction of human gadd45b has been carried out using human RKO colorectal carcinoma cells as a model system. Novel data indicate that gadd45b induction in RKO cells is regulated by distinct mechanisms in a stress-specific manner. Methylmethane sulfonate (MMS), a DNA alkylating agent, induces gadd45b transcription through a cohort of both constitutive and inducible bound factors, including NFY, Sp1 and Egr1. In contrast, in a hyperosmotic environment generated with sorbitol, gadd45b mRNA is induced exclusively by mRNA stabilization. These findings indicate that the stress-mediated induction of gadd45b is largely distinct from gadd45a. Furthermore, data obtained provide a novel paradigm for stress-response gene induction, indicating that gadd45b induction by distinct stressors, in the same cell type and under the same experimental settings, is differentially regulated at the level of mRNA transcription or mRNA stability. Importantly, this study also provides the groundwork to further examine the regulation of gadd45b expression in in vivo settings using animal models and tissues obtained from normal individuals and cancer patients prior to and after chemotherapeutic intervention.

  6. Writers on Writers: Literary Biography, A Distinctive Genre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.

    This essay identifies and illustrates a number of significant features that, in combination, make literary biography a distinct and recognizable genre. Among these are considerations of the various aspects of the composition of literary works, such as sources of inspiration, authors' motives and methods in transforming life into art, and…

  7. Differential Recruitment of Distinct Amygdalar Nuclei across Appetitive Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; Powell, Daniel J.; Petrovich, Gorica D.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala is important for reward-associated learning, but how distinct cell groups within this heterogeneous structure are recruited during appetitive learning is unclear. Here we used Fos induction to map the functional amygdalar circuitry recruited during early and late training sessions of Pavlovian appetitive conditioning. We found that a…

  8. Visual Distinctiveness and the Development of Children's False Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Distinctiveness effects in children's (5-, 7-, and 11-year-olds) false memory illusions were examined using visual materials. In Experiment 1, developmental trends (increasing false memories with age) were obtained using Deese-Roediger-McDermott lists presented as words and color photographs but not line drawings. In Experiment 2, when items were…

  9. Forgetting in Immediate Serial Recall: Decay, Temporal Distinctiveness, or Interference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberauer, Klaus; Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Three hypotheses of forgetting from immediate memory were tested: time-based decay, decreasing temporal distinctiveness, and interference. The hypotheses were represented by 3 models of serial recall: the primacy model, the SIMPLE (scale-independent memory, perception, and learning) model, and the SOB (serial order in a box) model, respectively.…

  10. 48 CFR 307.7001 - Distinction between acquisition and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distinction between acquisition and assistance. 307.7001 Section 307.7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN... the individuals or specific groups whose members are to be trained or specifies the content of...

  11. 29 CFR 35.17 - Age distinctions in DOL regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Age distinctions in DOL regulations. 35.17 Section 35.17 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Standards for Determining...

  12. 28 CFR 42.722 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Federally Assisted Programs or Activities; Implementation of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 Duties of Recipients §...

  13. 28 CFR 42.722 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Federally Assisted Programs or Activities; Implementation of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 Duties of Recipients §...

  14. 29 CFR 35.17 - Age distinctions in DOL regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Age distinctions in DOL regulations. 35.17 Section 35.17 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Standards for Determining...

  15. 28 CFR 42.722 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Federally Assisted Programs or Activities; Implementation of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 Duties of Recipients §...

  16. 28 CFR 42.722 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Federally Assisted Programs or Activities; Implementation of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 Duties of Recipients §...

  17. 28 CFR 42.722 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Federally Assisted Programs or Activities; Implementation of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 Duties of Recipients §...

  18. 29 CFR 35.17 - Age distinctions in DOL regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Age distinctions in DOL regulations. 35.17 Section 35.17 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Standards for Determining...

  19. 29 CFR 35.17 - Age distinctions in DOL regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Age distinctions in DOL regulations. 35.17 Section 35.17 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Standards for Determining...

  20. 29 CFR 35.17 - Age distinctions in DOL regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Age distinctions in DOL regulations. 35.17 Section 35.17 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Standards for Determining...

  1. Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate–acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate–acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate–acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature–nurture debates. PMID:20234831

  2. Recursion and the Competence/Performance Distinction in AGL Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobina, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The term "recursion" is used in at least four distinct theoretical senses within cognitive science. Some of these senses in turn relate to the different levels of analysis described by David Marr some 20 years ago; namely, the underlying competence capacity (the "computational" level), the performance operations used in real-time processing (the…

  3. MAGDM linear-programming models with distinct uncertain preference structures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zeshui S; Chen, Jian

    2008-10-01

    Group decision making with preference information on alternatives is an interesting and important research topic which has been receiving more and more attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to investigate multiple-attribute group decision-making (MAGDM) problems with distinct uncertain preference structures. We develop some linear-programming models for dealing with the MAGDM problems, where the information about attribute weights is incomplete, and the decision makers have their preferences on alternatives. The provided preference information can be represented in the following three distinct uncertain preference structures: 1) interval utility values; 2) interval fuzzy preference relations; and 3) interval multiplicative preference relations. We first establish some linear-programming models based on decision matrix and each of the distinct uncertain preference structures and, then, develop some linear-programming models to integrate all three structures of subjective uncertain preference information provided by the decision makers and the objective information depicted in the decision matrix. Furthermore, we propose a simple and straightforward approach in ranking and selecting the given alternatives. It is worth pointing out that the developed models can also be used to deal with the situations where the three distinct uncertain preference structures are reduced to the traditional ones, i.e., utility values, fuzzy preference relations, and multiplicative preference relations. Finally, we use a practical example to illustrate in detail the calculation process of the developed approach.

  4. The Distinction between Positive and Negative Reinforcement: Use with Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, A.; Galizio, M.

    2006-01-01

    It is customary in behavior analysis to distinguish between positive and negative reinforcement in terms of whether the reinforcing event involves onset or offset of a stimulus. In a previous article (Baron & Galizio, 2005), we concluded that a distinction of these terms is not only ambiguous but has little if any functional significance. Here, we…

  5. Aspiring for Distinction: Gendered Educational Choices in an Indian Village

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Nitya

    2010-01-01

    Schooling is not a benign process, rather the choice of schooling is often an opportunity for marginalised groups to creatively express particular sets of values in an attempt to gain distinction. Educational attainments carry the potential to open up a range of employment opportunities, but even if these options fail due to structural…

  6. The identification of distinct patterns in California temperature trends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional changes in California surface temperatures over the last 80 years are analyzed using station data from the US Historical Climate Network and the National Weather Service Cooperative Network. Statistical analyses using annual and seasonal temperature data over the last 80 years show distinct...

  7. Distinct Kinesin-14 mitotic mechanisms in spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Dimitre R; Kenny, Katelyn; Seo, Lan; Moyer, Amanda; Allen, Jessica; Paluh, Janet L

    2009-11-01

    Kinesin-like proteins are integral to formation and function of a conserved mitotic spindle apparatus that directs chromosome segregation and precedes cell division. Ubiquitous to the mechanism of spindle assembly and stability are balanced Kinesin-5 promoting and Kinesin-14 opposing forces. Distinct Kinesin-14 roles in bipolarity in eukaryotes have not been shown, but are suggested by gamma-tubulin-based pole interactions that affect establishment and by microtubule cross-linking and sliding that maintain bipolarity and spindle length. Distinct roles also imply specialized functional domains. By cross-species analysis of compatible mechanisms in establishing mitotic bipolarity we demonstrate that Kinesin-14 human HSET (HsHSET) functionally replaces Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pkl1 and its action is similarly blocked by mutation in a Kinesin-14 binding site on gamma-tubulin. Drosophila DmNcd localizes preferentially to bundled interpolar microtubules in fission yeast and does not replace SpPkl1. Analysis of twenty-six Kinesin-14 derivatives, including Tail, Stalk or Neck-Motor chimeras, for spindle localization, spindle assembly and mitotic progression defined critical domains. The Tail of SpPkl1 contains functional elements enabling its role in spindle assembly that are distinct from but transferable to DmNcd, whereas HsHSET function utilizes both Tail and Stalk features. Our analysis is the first to demonstrate distinct mechanisms between SpPkl1 and DmNcd, and reveal that HsHSET shares functional overlap in spindle pole mechanisms.

  8. Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kronfeldner, Maria E

    2009-06-01

    This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate-acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate-acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate-acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature-nurture debates.

  9. Neural correlates of the food/non-food visual distinction.

    PubMed

    Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Shariat, Shahriar; Nejati, Hossein; Gandhi, Tapan K; Cardinaux, Annie; Simons, Christopher T; Cheung, Ngai-Man; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Sinha, Pawan

    2016-03-01

    An evolutionarily ancient skill we possess is the ability to distinguish between food and non-food. Our goal here is to identify the neural correlates of visually driven 'edible-inedible' perceptual distinction. We also investigate correlates of the finer-grained likability assessment. Our stimuli depicted food or non-food items with sub-classes of appealing or unappealing exemplars. Using data-classification techniques drawn from machine-learning, as well as evoked-response analyses, we sought to determine whether these four classes of stimuli could be distinguished based on the patterns of brain activity they elicited. Subjects viewed 200 images while in a MEG scanner. Our analyses yielded two successes and a surprising failure. The food/non-food distinction had a robust neural counterpart and emerged as early as 85 ms post-stimulus onset. The likable/non-likable distinction too was evident in the neural signals when food and non-food stimuli were grouped together, or when only the non-food stimuli were included in the analyses. However, we were unable to identify any neural correlates of this distinction when limiting the analyses only to food stimuli. Taken together, these positive and negative results further our understanding of the substrates of a set of ecologically important judgments and have clinical implications for conditions like eating-disorders and anhedonia.

  10. Individual Distinctiveness in Call Types of Wild Western Female Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, Roberta; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Doran-Sheehy, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Individually distinct vocalizations play an important role in animal communication, allowing call recipients to respond differentially based on caller identity. However, which of the many calls in a species' repertoire should have more acoustic variability and be more recognizable is less apparent. One proposed hypothesis is that calls used over long distances should be more distinct because visual cues are not available to identify the caller. An alternative hypothesis proposes that close calls should be more recognizable because of their importance in social interactions. To examine which hypothesis garners more support, the acoustic variation and individual distinctiveness of eight call types of six wild western gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) females were investigated. Acoustic recordings of gorilla calls were collected at the Mondika Research Center (Republic of Congo). Acoustic variability was high in all gorilla calls. Similar high inter-individual variation and potential for identity coding (PIC) was found for all call types. Discriminant function analyses confirmed that all call types were individually distinct (although for call types with lowest sample size - hum, grumble and scream - this result cannot be generalized), suggesting that neither the distance at which communication occurs nor the call social function alone can explain the evolution of identity signaling in western gorilla communication. PMID:25029238

  11. On the Distinction between Positive and Negative Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents his views on Michael's (1975) and Baron and Galizio's (2005) arguments on eliminating the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement. He first discusses Michael's concept of these two types of operations and contrasts it with the notions of Baron and Galizio. The author provides the readers his own…

  12. Distinctive Pattern of Behavioral Functioning in Angelman Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Jane A.; Feldman, Maurice A.

    1999-01-01

    A study compared 27 participants with Angelman syndrome to clinical and community participants (n=948) with developmental disabilities of mixed etiology to determine whether Angelman syndrome is associated with a distinctive patterns of behavioral functioning. Those with Angelman syndrome had significantly lower scores on measures of irritability…

  13. The Emergence of Three Distinct Worldviews among American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keysar, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    American college students' worldviews affect what they value, the way they behave and potentially how they learn. The study described in this article finds that today's students are divided not dichotomously, between religious and secular, but rather among three distinct worldviews: religious, secular, and spiritual. The author asserts that…

  14. When Does the Factor-Mixture Distinction Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loken, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Von Davier, Naemi, and Roberts (this issue) present a nice summary of the statistical ambiguity often encountered in making distinctions between qualitative and quantitative constructs. In this commentary, the author begins with two broad points. The first is that the mixture/factor arguments are most intriguing when firmly embedded in a…

  15. Positive and Negative Reinforcement: Should the Distinction Be Preserved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alan; Galizio, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Michael (1975) reviewed efforts to classify reinforcing events in terms of whether stimuli are added (positive reinforcement) or removed (negative reinforcement). He concluded that distinctions in these terms are confusing and ambiguous. Of necessity, adding a stimulus requires its previous absence and removing a stimulus its previous presence.…

  16. Preschoolers' Fantasy-Reality Distinctions of Emotional Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Nathalie; Ramirez, Madisenne

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that emotions influence children's ability to discern fantasy from reality; however, reasons for this association remain unknown. The current research sought to better understand the mechanisms underlying children's distinctions by examining the roles discrete emotions and context have in 3- to 5-year-olds' evaluations of fantasy…

  17. Different activation signals induce distinct mast cell degranulation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Marichal, Thomas; Reber, Laurent L.; Cenac, Nicolas; McNeil, Benjamin D.; Dong, Xinzhong; Hernandez, Joseph D.; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit; Hammel, Ilan; Roers, Axel; Valitutti, Salvatore; Tsai, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) influence intercellular communication during inflammation by secreting cytoplasmic granules that contain diverse mediators. Here, we have demonstrated that MCs decode different activation stimuli into spatially and temporally distinct patterns of granule secretion. Certain signals, including substance P, the complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, and endothelin 1, induced human MCs rapidly to secrete small and relatively spherical granule structures, a pattern consistent with the secretion of individual granules. Conversely, activating MCs with anti-IgE increased the time partition between signaling and secretion, which was associated with a period of sustained elevation of intracellular calcium and formation of larger and more heterogeneously shaped granule structures that underwent prolonged exteriorization. Pharmacological inhibition of IKK-β during IgE-dependent stimulation strongly reduced the time partition between signaling and secretion, inhibited SNAP23/STX4 complex formation, and switched the degranulation pattern into one that resembled degranulation induced by substance P. IgE-dependent and substance P–dependent activation in vivo also induced different patterns of mouse MC degranulation that were associated with distinct local and systemic pathophysiological responses. These findings show that cytoplasmic granule secretion from MCs that occurs in response to different activating stimuli can exhibit distinct dynamics and features that are associated with distinct patterns of MC-dependent inflammation. PMID:27643442

  18. Sector Distinctions and the Privatization of Public Education Policymaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubienski, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Current trends indicate declining distinctions between "public" and "private" sectors in education. Reformers see sector barriers as unnecessary impediments to innovation, distracting attention and effort from "what works". This analysis questions whether trends in education policy are simply a natural evolution away…

  19. Reasoning across Ontologically Distinct Levels: Students' Understandings of Molecular Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ravit Golan; Reiser, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we apply a novel analytical framework to explore students' difficulties in understanding molecular genetics--a domain that is particularly challenging to learn. Our analytical framework posits that reasoning in molecular genetics entails mapping across ontologically distinct levels--an information level containing the genetic…

  20. The Distinction between Positive and Negative Reinforcement: Some Additional Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Murray

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement and some additional considerations. He states that the concept of negative reinforcement has caused confusion, and he believes that the difficulty stems from conventions of ordinary speech, in which the term "negative" usually denotes the opposite of…

  1. Random Number Generation for High Performance Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    REPORT TYPE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...of Distinct Pseudorandom Number Streams Based on Program Context," and "A Statistical Test Method to Quantify Inter-Streams Based on Program Context...regarding the development and implementation of the context aware pseudorandom number generator test program . Provide subject matter expertise (testing

  2. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  3. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, Eduard; Wright, Alan; Gevorgian, Vahan; Donegan, James; Marnagh, Cian; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-06-01

    Renewable energy sources are the second largest contributor to global electricity production, after fossil fuels. The integration of renewable energy continued to grow in 2014 against a backdrop of increasing global energy consumption and a dramatic decline in oil prices during the second half of the year. As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded from primarily wind and solar to include new types with promising future applications, such as hydropower generation, including river and tidal generation. Today, hydropower is considered one of the most important renewable energy sources. In river and tidal generation, the input resource flow is slower but also steadier than it is in wind or solar generation, yet the level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another. This report focuses on hydrokinetic power conversion.

  5. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC GOVERNORS, CIRCUITS, VACUUM SEALS, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, VACUUM, ELECTRODES, FINISHES, SURFACE...FINISHING, SURFACE PROPERTIES, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, FIELD EMISSION.

  6. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, FIELD EMISSION, ELECTRODES, VACUUM, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ANODES, CATHODES, POLISHES...DIELECTRICS, COATINGS, PRESSURE, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, VACUUM SEALS, EQUATIONS.

  7. Directed networks' different link formation mechanisms causing degree distribution distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behfar, Stefan Kambiz; Turkina, Ekaterina; Cohendet, Patrick; Burger-Helmchen, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Within undirected networks, scientists have shown much interest in presenting power-law features. For instance, Barabási and Albert (1999) claimed that a common property of many large networks is that vertex connectivity follows scale-free power-law distribution, and in another study Barabási et al. (2002) showed power law evolution in the social network of scientific collaboration. At the same time, Jiang et al. (2011) discussed deviation from power-law distribution; others indicated that size effect (Bagrow et al., 2008), information filtering mechanism (Mossa et al., 2002), and birth and death process (Shi et al., 2005) could account for this deviation. Within directed networks, many authors have considered that outlinks follow a similar mechanism of creation as inlinks' (Faloutsos et al., 1999; Krapivsky et al., 2001; Tanimoto, 2009) with link creation rate being the linear function of node degree, resulting in a power-law shape for both indegree and outdegree distribution. Some other authors have made an assumption that directed networks, such as scientific collaboration or citation, behave as undirected, resulting in a power-law degree distribution accordingly (Barabási et al., 2002). At the same time, we claim (1) Outlinks feature different degree distributions than inlinks; where different link formation mechanisms cause the distribution distinctions, (2) in/outdegree distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition; therefore this distribution distinction is a property of directed networks. First, we emphasize in/outlink formation mechanisms as causal factors for distinction between indegree and outdegree distributions (where this distinction has already been noticed in Barker et al. (2010) and Baxter et al. (2006)) within a sample network of OSS projects as well as Java software corpus as a network. Second, we analyze whether this distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition: open

  8. The Hydrodynamic Distinctiveness of Living Organisms: Communication in Complex Hydraulic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Animals make decisions about the suitability of habitat and their reaction to other organisms based on the sensory information that they first obtain. This information is transmitted, masked and filtered by fluvial processes, such as turbulent flow. Despite governing how animals interact with the environment, limited attention has been paid to the controls on the propagation of sensory signals through rivers. Some animals interpret hydraulic events and use the characteristics of wakes to sense the presence of other organisms. This implies that at least some animals can differentiate turbulent flow generated by the presence of living organisms from ambient environmental turbulence. We investigate whether there are specific flow characteristics, distinct from the ambient environment, that potentially flag the presence of organisms to other animals. ADV and PIV measurements in a series of laboratory flume experiments quantified the flow around living Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and two inanimate objects of equivalent shape and size. Experiments were repeated across a gradient of turbulence intensities generated over nine combinations of flow velocity and relative submergence. Flows downstream of living crayfish were distinct from inanimate objects, with greater turbulent intensities, higher energy in low- to intermediate frequencies, and flow structures that were less coherent in comparison to those measured downstream of inanimate objects. However, the hydrodynamic signature of crayfish became masked as the intensity of ambient turbulence exceeded that generated by living crayfish. These results demonstrate the importance of the fluvial processes in the transmission of sensory information and suggest that the ability of animals to perceive hydraulic signatures is likely to be limited in many situations in rivers. Thus, animals may need to rely on other senses, such as sight or hearing, especially where depth is shallow relative to grain size.

  9. A distinct bacterial dysbiosis associated skin inflammation in ovine footrot

    PubMed Central

    Maboni, Grazieli; Blanchard, Adam; Frosth, Sara; Stewart, Ceri; Emes, Richard; Tötemeyer, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Ovine footrot is a highly prevalent bacterial disease caused by Dichelobacter nodosus and characterised by the separation of the hoof horn from the underlying skin. The role of innate immune molecules and other bacterial communities in the development of footrot lesions remains unclear. This study shows a significant association between the high expression of IL1β and high D. nodosus load in footrot samples. Investigation of the microbial population identified distinct bacterial populations in the different disease stages and also depending on the level of inflammation. Treponema (34%), Mycoplasma (29%) and Porphyromonas (15%) were the most abundant genera associated with high levels of inflammation in footrot. In contrast, Acinetobacter (25%), Corynebacteria (17%) and Flavobacterium (17%) were the most abundant genera associated with high levels of inflammation in healthy feet. This demonstrates for the first time there is a distinct microbial community associated with footrot and high cytokine expression. PMID:28338081

  10. Distinct phenotype and therapeutic potential of gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu; Fournier, Benjamin P J

    2014-09-01

    Gingiva of the oral mucosa provides a practical source to isolate fibroblasts for therapeutic purposes because the tissue is easily accessible, tissue discards are common during routine clinical procedures and wound healing after biopsy is fast and results in complete wound regeneration with very little morbidity or scarring. In addition, gingival fibroblasts have unique traits, including neural crest origin, distinct gene expression and synthetic properties and potent immunomodulatory functions. These characteristics may provide advantages for certain therapeutic approaches over other more commonly used cells, including skin fibroblasts, both in intraoral and extra-oral sites. However, identity and phenotype of gingival fibroblasts, like other fibroblasts, are still not completely understood. Gingival fibroblasts are phenotypically heterogeneous, and these…fibroblast subpopulations may play different roles in tissue maintenance, regeneration and pathologies. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is currently known about gingival fibroblasts, their distinct potential for tissue regeneration and their potential therapeutic uses in the future.

  11. Positioning Food Cultures: 'Alternative' Food as Distinctive Consumer Practice.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    Many sociological studies to date have explored the role of food in marking distinctions between groups. Less well understood is how 'alternative' means of food consumption become figured in such relations. Drawing on accounts of food practice derived from 20 in-depth interviews and a two-year period of participant observation, this article considers the role of class culture in the practice of alternative food consumption. As participants speak their position, expressions of class arise through discussions of food practice. Having explored how food plays a part in marking boundaries of distinction between foods 'for us' and 'for them', we are reminded that in reproducing certain ideas about proper eating, we confine our imagining of alternative food futures to a limited politics of the possible. The article highlights implications for future development of equitable alternatives to conventional foodways.

  12. Intracellular SERS Nanoprobes For Distinction Of Different Neuronal Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Distinction between closely related and morphologically similar cells is difficult by conventional methods especially without labeling. Using nuclear-targeted gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as intracellular probes we demonstrate the ability to distinguish between progenitor and differentiated cell types in a human neuroblastoma cell line using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS spectra from the whole cell area as well as only the nucleus were analyzed using principal component analysis that allowed unambiguous distinction of the different cell types. SERS spectra from the nuclear region showed the developments during cellular differentiation by identifying an increase in DNA/RNA ratio and proteins transcribed. Our approach using nuclear-targeted AuNPs and SERS imaging provides label-free and noninvasive characterization that can play a vital role in identifying cell types in biomedical stem cell research. PMID:23638825

  13. Recognition of distinctive patterns of gallium-67 distribution in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sulavik, S.B.; Spencer, R.P.; Weed, D.A.; Shapiro, H.R.; Shiue, S.T.; Castriotta, R.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Assessment of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga) uptake in the salivary and lacrimal glands and intrathoracic lymph nodes was made in 605 consecutive patients including 65 with sarcoidosis. A distinctive intrathoracic lymph node {sup 67}Ga uptake pattern, resembling the Greek letter lambda, was observed only in sarcoidosis (72%). Symmetrical lacrimal gland and parotid gland {sup 67}Ga uptake (panda appearance) was noted in 79% of sarcoidosis patients. A simultaneous lambda and panda pattern (62%) or a panda appearance with radiographic bilateral, symmetrical, hilar lymphadenopathy (6%) was present only in sarcoidosis patients. The presence of either of these patterns was particularly prevalent in roentgen Stages I (80%) or II (74%). We conclude that simultaneous (a) lambda and panda images, or (b) a panda image with bilateral symmetrical hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray represent distinctive patterns which are highly specific for sarcoidosis, and may obviate the need for invasive diagnostic procedures.

  14. Two distinct forms of functional lateralization in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Jo, Hang Joon; Wallace, Gregory L.; Saad, Ziad S.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The hemispheric lateralization of certain faculties in the human brain has long been held to be beneficial for functioning. However, quantitative relationships between the degree of lateralization in particular brain regions and the level of functioning have yet to be established. Here we demonstrate that two distinct forms of functional lateralization are present in the left vs. the right cerebral hemisphere, with the left hemisphere showing a preference to interact more exclusively with itself, particularly for cortical regions involved in language and fine motor coordination. In contrast, right-hemisphere cortical regions involved in visuospatial and attentional processing interact in a more integrative fashion with both hemispheres. The degree of lateralization present in these distinct systems selectively predicted behavioral measures of verbal and visuospatial ability, providing direct evidence that lateralization is associated with enhanced cognitive ability. PMID:23959883

  15. Distinct enzyme combinations in AKAP signalling complexes permit functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Naoto; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D

    2005-11-01

    Specificity in cell signalling can be influenced by the targeting of different enzyme combinations to substrates. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 is a multivalent scaffolding protein that coordinates the subcellular localization of second-messenger-regulated enzymes, such as protein kinase A, protein kinase C and protein phosphatase 2B. We developed a new strategy that combines RNA interference of the endogenous protein with a protocol that selects cells that have been rescued with AKAP79/150 forms that are unable to anchor selected enzymes. Using this approach, we show that AKAP79/150 coordinates different enzyme combinations to modulate the activity of two distinct neuronal ion channels: AMPA-type glutamate receptors and M-type potassium channels. Utilization of distinct enzyme combinations in this manner provides a means to expand the repertoire of cellular events that the same AKAP modulates.

  16. Morphological distinctiveness of Javan Tupaia hypochrysa (Scandentia, Tupaiidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargis, Eric J.; Woodman, Neal; Morningstar, Natalie C.; Reese, Aspen T.; Olson, Link E.

    2013-01-01

    The common treeshrew, Tupaia glis, represents a species complex with a complicated taxonomic history. It is distributed mostly south of the Isthmus of Kra on the Malay Peninsula and surrounding islands. In our recent revision of a portion of this species complex, we did not fully assess the population from Java (T. “glis” hypochrysa) because of our limited sample. Herein, we revisit this taxon using multivariate analyses in comparisons with T. glis, T. chrysogaster of the Mentawai Islands, and T. ferruginea from Sumatra. Analyses of both the manus and skull of Javan T. “glis” hypochrysa show it to be most similar to T. chrysogaster and distinct from both T. glis and T. ferruginea. Yet, the Javan population and T. chrysogaster have different mammae counts, supporting recognition of T. hypochrysa as a distinct species. The change in taxonomic status of T. hypochrysa has conservation implications for both T. glis and this Javan endemic.

  17. Suicide in India: Distinct Epidemiological Patterns and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Ebenezer, Johann Alex

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a societal crisis which also deeply impacts the personal and family realms. Indian suicidal data present distinctive epidemiological patterns when we compare it with the global suicide rates and trends. Higher proportions of young individuals are resorting to suicide compared to any other country in the world, and Indian suicide rates, especially South Indian rates, are one of the highest in the world. In this article, we present various historical aspects and theories of Indian suicide and review of available Indian research from various sources such as community, hospitals, schools and forensic settings. We discuss our findings which reveal the distinctiveness of Indian data when we compare these with global data and draw implications for practice and policy. PMID:28031581

  18. A distinct bacterial dysbiosis associated skin inflammation in ovine footrot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maboni, Grazieli; Blanchard, Adam; Frosth, Sara; Stewart, Ceri; Emes, Richard; Tötemeyer, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    Ovine footrot is a highly prevalent bacterial disease caused by Dichelobacter nodosus and characterised by the separation of the hoof horn from the underlying skin. The role of innate immune molecules and other bacterial communities in the development of footrot lesions remains unclear. This study shows a significant association between the high expression of IL1β and high D. nodosus load in footrot samples. Investigation of the microbial population identified distinct bacterial populations in the different disease stages and also depending on the level of inflammation. Treponema (34%), Mycoplasma (29%) and Porphyromonas (15%) were the most abundant genera associated with high levels of inflammation in footrot. In contrast, Acinetobacter (25%), Corynebacteria (17%) and Flavobacterium (17%) were the most abundant genera associated with high levels of inflammation in healthy feet. This demonstrates for the first time there is a distinct microbial community associated with footrot and high cytokine expression.

  19. Evidence for multiple, distinct representations of the human body.

    PubMed

    Schwoebel, John; Coslett, H Branch

    2005-04-01

    Previous data from single-case and small group studies have suggested distinctions among structural, conceptual, and online sensorimotor representations of the human body. We developed a battery of tasks to further examine the prevalence and anatomic substrates of these body representations. The battery was administered to 70 stroke patients. Fifty-one percent of the patients were impaired relative to controls on at least one body representation measure. Further, principal components analysis of the patient data as well as direct comparisons of patient and control performance suggested a triple dissociation between measures of the 3 putative body representations. Consistent with previous distinctions between the "what" and "how" pathways, lesions of the left temporal lobe were most consistently associated with impaired performance on tasks assessing knowledge of the shape or lexical-semantic information about the body, whereas lesions of the dorsolateral frontal and parietal regions resulted in impaired performance on tasks requiring on-line coding of body posture.

  20. Proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia, a distinct disease entity?

    PubMed

    Munday, William; Zhang, Xuchen

    2014-08-14

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of a patient population with esophageal eosinophilia that responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy. These patients are being referred to as having proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), which is currently classified as a distinct and separate disease entity from both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The therapeutic effect of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on PPI-REE is thought to act directly at the level of the esophageal mucosa with an anti-inflammatory capacity, and completely independent of gastric acid suppression. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the mechanistic data of the proposed immune modulation/anti-inflammatory role of the PPI at the esophageal mucosa, and the existence of PPI-REE as a distinct disease entity from GERD and EoE.

  1. [Gastric signet ring cell adenocarcinoma: A distinct entity].

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Rouquette, Alexandre; Brezault, Catherine; Beuvon, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-04-01

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (GSRC) is a distinct entity. Their incidence is increasing. The pathologist plays a central role in the identification of this entity. Diagnosis is based on an adenocarcinoma containing a majority of signet ring cells (above 50 %). The prognosis of GSRC is the same as gastric adenocarcinoma while GSRC appeared more aggressive. Signet ring cells present a low sensitivity to chemotherapy. This review aimed to discuss the histological, the prognostic and the therapeutic aspect of this entity.

  2. Identification of Thiothrix unzii in Two Distinct Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    2001-07-11

    Molecular procedures were used to identify Thiothrix spp. in biofilms from sulfide-rich waters in two distinct Florida ecosystems. These Thiothrix spp.-containing biofilms at these sites have been consistently observed for over 10 years. Clonal libraries of biofilm 16S rDNA from each site contained rDNA sequences that were 99 to 99.5 percent similar to Thiothrix unzii.

  3. Phylogenetic Relationships of Thiothrix spp. from Two Distinct Biofilm Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    2000-09-05

    Molecular procedures were used to investigate the relationship of Thiothrix spp. in biofilms from sulfide-rich waters in two distinct Florida ecosystems. These Thiothrix spp.-containing biofilms at these sites have been consistently observed for over 10 years. Analyzed biofilm samples from each site contained one clone that was 99 to 99.5 percent similar to Thiothrix unzii. This finding may be explained by the similarity of the groundwater supplying the two systems.

  4. Work Values across Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Leuty, Melanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Mainstream publication discussions of differences in generational cohorts in the workplace suggest that individuals of more recent generations, such as Generation X and Y, have different work values than do individuals of the Silent and Baby Boom generations. Although extant research suggests that age may influence work values, few of the…

  5. Talkin' 'bout My Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickes, Persis C.

    2010-01-01

    The monikers are many: (1) "Generation Y"; (2) "Echo Boomers"; (3) "GenMe"; (4) the "Net Generation"; (5) "RenGen"; and (6) "Generation Next". One name that appears to be gaining currency is "Millennials," perhaps as a way to better differentiate the current generation from its…

  6. Minding the Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2011-01-01

    Generational conflict is back. After years of relative silence, and mutual ignorance, the young and old are once more at war. With youth unemployment high on the political agenda, the fortunes of the "jobless generation" are being contrasted with those of the "golden generation" of baby boomers, but is one generation really…

  7. Auditory abnormalities in autism: toward functional distinctions among findings.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, Gabriella R; Fan, Jin; Gorman, Jack M

    2005-09-01

    Recently, findings on a wide range of auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism have been reported. To date, functional distinctions among these varied findings are poorly established. Such distinctions should be of interest to clinicians and researchers alike given their potential therapeutic and experimental applications. This review suggests three general trends among these findings as a starting point for future analyses. First, studies of auditory perception of linguistic and social auditory stimuli among individuals with autism generally have found impaired perception versus normal controls. Such findings may correlate with impaired language and communication skills and social isolation observed among individuals with autism. Second, studies of auditory perception of pitch and music among individuals with autism generally have found enhanced perception versus normal controls. These findings may correlate with the restrictive and highly focused behaviors observed among individuals with autism. Third, findings on the auditory perception of non-linguistic, non-musical stimuli among autism patients resist any generalized conclusions. Ultimately, as some researchers have already suggested, the distinction between impaired global processing and enhanced local processing may prove useful in making sense of apparently discordant findings on auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism.

  8. Motivational Spiral Models (MSM): common and distinct motivations in context.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Laurel J

    2013-01-01

    Motivational Spiral Models (MSM) show links over time among self concepts, feelings, strategies, skills and participation in everyday activities. In theory, MSM have many common features, with distinct features in particular contexts. This project examined children's motivation to participate in literacy (MSM-L), social (MSM-S) and physical activities (MSM-P). The participants in Study 1 (N = 32) were 9 to 11 years old, and in Study 2 (N = 73) were 4 to 12 year old children. Locations were close to the Australian national average in socio-economic indicators, and initial screening showed these were representative samples. Analyses used variable-oriented correlational models as well as person-oriented clusters that suggest the standard and alternative motivational pathways. The results of Study 1 suggested bi-directional links between children's self concepts and participation in activities. Study 2 identified the common features as: openness and stability over time; and self concepts that motivate and justify participation in activities. Distinct features of MSM-L show the few negative feelings that may limit reading. In MSM-S, self concepts support the positive feelings, and in MSM-P, positive feelings support the task strategies. In conclusion, findings support MSM theory with common features based on self concepts and distinct features of developing motivations in particular contexts. MSM provide a sound base for future research in the contexts of everyday activities for children. In addition, there are practical applications of the findings to prevention, monitoring and intervention programmes.

  9. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  10. Adaptation of flower and fruit colours to multiple, distinct mutualists.

    PubMed

    Renoult, Julien P; Valido, Alfredo; Jordano, Pedro; Schaefer, H Martin

    2014-01-01

    Communication in plant-animal mutualisms frequently involves multiple perceivers. A fundamental uncertainty is whether and how species adapt to communicate with groups of mutualists having distinct sensory abilities. We quantified the colour conspicuousness of flowers and fruits originating from one European and two South American plant communities, using visual models of pollinators (bee and fly) and seed dispersers (bird, primate and marten). We show that flowers are more conspicuous than fruits to pollinators, and the reverse to seed dispersers. In addition, flowers are more conspicuous to pollinators than to seed dispersers and the reverse for fruits. Thus, despite marked differences in the visual systems of mutualists, flower and fruit colours have evolved to attract multiple, distinct mutualists but not unintended perceivers. We show that this adaptation is facilitated by a limited correlation between flower and fruit colours, and by the fact that colour signals as coded at the photoreceptor level are more similar within than between functional groups (pollinators and seed dispersers). Overall, these results provide the first quantitative demonstration that flower and fruit colours are adaptations allowing plants to communicate simultaneously with distinct groups of mutualists.

  11. Number of perceptually distinct surface colors in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Marín-Franch, Iván; Foster, David H

    2010-09-30

    The ability to perceptually identify distinct surfaces in natural scenes by virtue of their color depends not only on the relative frequency of surface colors but also on the probabilistic nature of observer judgments. Previous methods of estimating the number of discriminable surface colors, whether based on theoretical color gamuts or recorded from real scenes, have taken a deterministic approach. Thus, a three-dimensional representation of the gamut of colors is divided into elementary cells or points which are spaced at one discrimination-threshold unit intervals and which are then counted. In this study, information-theoretic methods were used to take into account both differing surface-color frequencies and observer response uncertainty. Spectral radiances were calculated from 50 hyperspectral images of natural scenes and were represented in a perceptually almost uniform color space. The average number of perceptually distinct surface colors was estimated as 7.3 × 10(3), much smaller than that based on counting methods. This number is also much smaller than the number of distinct points in a scene that are, in principle, available for reliable identification under illuminant changes, suggesting that color constancy, or the lack of it, does not generally determine the limit on the use of color for surface identification.

  12. Elicited versus emitted behavior: Time to abandon the distinction.

    PubMed

    Domjan, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The concept of emitted behavior was formulated as a part of the original argument for the validity of a new kind of learning called operant conditioning. The rationale for operant conditioning contrasted it with Pavlovian or classical conditioning, which was (and remains) fundamentally based on responses to conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Classical conditioned responses were said to be elicited. In contrast, operant behavior was viewed as emitted and controlled primarily by response consequences rather than antecedents. I argue that the distinction between emitted and elicited behavior is no longer warranted for three major reasons. First, the distinction was based on a view of Pavlovian conditioning that is no longer viable. Second, the distinction is incompatible with both empirical data and contemporary conceptualizations of operant behavior. Third, the only way to overcome these problems is to define emitted and elicited in terms of the type of conditioning (operant and classical) that produces these behaviors, but that approach makes the definitions circular and does not avoid implications of the terms that are misleading and counterproductive in light of contemporary research and thinking.

  13. Distinctive molecular responses to ultraviolet radiation between keratinocytes and melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoyun; Kim, Arianna; Nakatani, Masashi; Shen, Yao; Liu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major risk factor for skin carcinogenesis. To gain new insights into the molecular pathways mediating UVR effects in the skin, we performed comprehensive transcriptomic analyses to identify shared and distinctive molecular responses to UVR between human keratinocytes and melanocytes. Keratinocytes and melanocytes were irradiated with varying doses of UVB (10, 20 and 30 mJ/cm2) then analysed by RNA-Seq at different time points post-UVB radiation (4, 24 and 72 h). Under basal conditions, keratinocytes and melanocytes expressed similar number of genes, although they each expressed a distinctive subset of genes pertaining to their specific cellular identity. Upon UVB radiation, keratinocytes displayed a clear pattern of time- and dose-dependent changes in gene expression that was different from melanocytes. The early UVB-responsive gene set (4 h post-UVR) differed significantly from delayed UVB-responsive gene sets (24 and 72 h). We also identified multiple novel UVB signature genes including PRSS23, SERPINH1, LCE3D and CNFN, which were conserved between melanocyte and keratinocyte lines from different individuals. Taken together, our findings elucidated both common and distinctive molecular features between melanocytes and keratinocytes and uncovered novel UVB signature genes that might be utilized to predict UVB photobiological effects on the skin. PMID:27119462

  14. Gamma ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  15. Natural Microbial Assemblages Reflect Distinct Organismal and Functional Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, P.; Andersson, A.; Kalnejais, L. H.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Lefsrud, M. G.; Wexler, M.; Singer, S. W.; Shah, M.; Bond, P. L.; Thelen, M. P.; Hettich, R. L.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    The ability to link microbial community structure to function has long been a primary focus of environmental microbiology. With the advent of community genomic and proteomic techniques, along with advances in microscopic imaging techniques, it is now possible to gain insights into the organismal and functional makeup of microbial communities. Biofilms growing within highly acidic solutions inside the Richmond Mine (Iron Mountain, Redding, California) exhibit distinct macro- and microscopic morphologies. They are composed of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life, including archaea, bacteria and eukarya. The proportion of each organismal type depends on sampling location and developmental stage. For example, mature biofilms floating on top of acid mine drainage (AMD) pools exhibit layers consisting of a densely packed bottom layer of the chemoautolithotroph Leptospirillum group II, a less dense top layer composed mainly of archaea, and fungal filaments spanning across the entire biofilm. The expression of cytochrome 579 (the most highly abundant protein in the biofilm, believed to be central to iron oxidation and encoded by Leptospirillum group II) is localized at the interface of the biofilm with the AMD solution, highlighting that biofilm architecture is reflected at the functional gene expression level. Distinct functional partitioning is also apparent in a biological wastewater treatment system that selects for distinct polyphosphate accumulating organisms. Community genomic data from " Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" dominated activated sludge has enabled high mass-accuracy shotgun proteomics for identification of key metabolic pathways. Comprehensive genome-wide alignment of orthologous proteins suggests distinct partitioning of protein variants involved in both core-metabolism and specific metabolic pathways among the dominant population and closely related species. In addition, strain- resolved proteogenomic analysis of the AMD biofilms

  16. Harnessing Dendritic Cells to Generate Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy of cancer, i.e., transfer of T cells or antibodies, can lead to some objective clinical responses, thus demonstrating that the immune system can reject tumors. However, passive immunotherapy is not expected to yield memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth. Active immunotherapy with dendritic cell (DCs) vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. Newer generation DC vaccines are build on the increased knowledge of the DC system including the existence of distinct DC subsets and their plasticity all leading to generation of distinct types of immunity. Rather than the quantity of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells, we should aim at generating high quality high avidity poly-functional effector CD8+ T cells able to reject tumors and long-lived memory CD8+ T cells able to prevent relapse. PMID:19769741

  17. Supersonic MHD generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.A.

    1983-11-29

    An improved MHD electrical power generating system of the type having a MHD topping cycle and a steam generating bottoming cycle is disclosed. The system typically includes a combustion system, a conventional MHD generator and a first diffuser radiant boiler. The improvement comprises a first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration operatively connected in series with each other and with the conventional MHD generator. The first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration increase the power output and improve the operating efficiency of the electrical generating system. A diffuser system is also disclosed which is in fluid communication with the supersonic MHD generator and the ramjet engine for collecting bypass plasma gas to be used for heating a second radiant boiler adapted for powering a steam turbine generator.

  18. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  19. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  20. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  1. Selective Gating of Neuronal Activity by Intrinsic Properties in Distinct Motor Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many neural circuits show fast reconfiguration following altered sensory or modulatory inputs to generate stereotyped outputs. In the motor circuit of Xenopus tadpoles, I study how certain voltage-dependent ionic currents affect firing thresholds and contribute to circuit reconfiguration to generate two distinct motor patterns, swimming and struggling. Firing thresholds of excitatory interneurons [i.e., descending interneurons (dINs)] in the swimming central pattern generator are raised by depolarization due to the inactivation of Na+ currents. In contrast, the thresholds of other types of neurons active in swimming or struggling are raised by hyperpolarization from the activation of fast transient K+ currents. The firing thresholds are then compared with the excitatory synaptic drives, which are revealed by blocking action potentials intracellularly using QX314 during swimming and struggling. During swimming, transient K+ currents lower neuronal excitability and gate out neurons with weak excitation, whereas their inactivation by strong excitation in other neurons increases excitability and enables fast synaptic potentials to drive reliable firing. During struggling, continuous sensory inputs lead to high levels of network excitation. This allows the inactivation of Na+ currents and suppression of dIN activity while inactivating transient K+ currents, recruiting neurons that are not active in swimming. Therefore, differential expression of these currents between neuron types can explain why synaptic strength does not predict firing reliability/intensity during swimming and struggling. These data show that intrinsic properties can override fast synaptic potentials, mediate circuit reconfiguration, and contribute to motor–pattern switching. PMID:26156983

  2. Immediate perception of a reward is distinct from the reward’s long-term salience

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, John P; Jiang, Huoqing; Agha, Moutaz Ali; Sanchez, Consuelo Perez; Lange, Jeff; Yu, Zulin; Marion-Poll, Frederic; Si, Kausik

    2016-01-01

    Reward perception guides all aspects of animal behavior. However, the relationship between the perceived value of a reward, the latent value of a reward, and the behavioral response remains unclear. Here we report that, given a choice between two sweet and chemically similar sugars—L- and D-arabinose—Drosophila melanogaster prefers D- over L- arabinose, but forms long-term memories of L-arabinose more reliably. Behavioral assays indicate that L-arabinose-generated memories require sugar receptor Gr43a, and calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings indicate that L- and D-arabinose differentially activate Gr43a-expressing neurons. We posit that the immediate valence of a reward is not always predictive of the long-term reinforcement value of that reward, and that a subset of sugar-sensing neurons may generate distinct representations of similar sugars, allowing for rapid assessment of the salient features of various sugar rewards and generation of reward-specific behaviors. However, how sensory neurons communicate information about L-arabinose quality and concentration—features relevant for long-term memory—remains unknown. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22283.001 PMID:28005005

  3. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matt Q.; McCumsey, Stephanie J.; Lopez-Darwin, Sereno; Heckscher, Ellie S.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons) are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence) of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines—chosen for sparse neuronal expression—to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°). A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program. PMID:27172197

  4. A Distinct Population of Microglia Supports Adult Neurogenesis in the Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Xavier, Anna L.; Kress, Benjamin T.; Goldman, Steven A.; Lacerda de Menezes, João R.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are involved in synaptic pruning both in development and in the mature CNS. In this study, we investigated whether microglia might further contribute to circuit plasticity by modulating neuronal recruitment from the neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse striatum. We found that microglia residing in the SVZ and adjacent rostral migratory stream (RMS) comprise a morphologically and antigenically distinct phenotype of immune effectors. Whereas exhibiting characteristics of alternatively activated microglia, the SVZ/RMS microglia were clearly distinguished by their low expression of purinoceptors and lack of ATP-elicitable chemotaxis. Furthermore, the in vivo depletion of these microglia hampered the survival and migration of newly generated neuroblasts through the RMS to the olfactory bulb. SVZ and RMS microglia thus appear to comprise a functionally distinct class that is selectively adapted to the support and direction of neuronal integration into the olfactory circuitry. Therefore, this unique microglial subpopulation may serve as a novel target with which to modulate cellular addition from endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells of the adult brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglial cells are a specialized population of macrophages in the CNS, playing key roles as immune mediators. As integral components in the CNS, the microglia stand out for using the same mechanisms, phagocytosis and cytochemokine release, to promote homeostasis, synaptic pruning, and neural circuitry sculpture. Here, we addressed microglial functions in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the major postnatal neurogenic niche. Our results depict microglia as a conspicuous component of SVZ and its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream, a pathway used by neuroblasts during their transit toward olfactory bulb layers. In addition to other unique populations residing in the SVZ niche, microglia display distinct morphofunctional properties that boost neuronal

  5. Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Schauer, M.W.; Frye, J.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are increasingly being used as in situ surface probes. These techniques are coherent and inherently surface sensitive by the nature of the mediums response to intense laser light. Here we will review these two techniques using aqueous corrosion as an example problem. Aqueous corrosion of technologically important materials such as Fe, Ni and Cr proceeds from a reduced metal surface with layer by layer growth of oxide films mitigated by compositional changes in the chemical makeup of the growing film. Passivation of the metal surface is achieved after growth of only a few tens of atomic layers of metal oxide. Surface Second Harmonic Generation and a related nonlinear laser technique, Sum Frequency Generation have demonstrated an ability to probe the surface composition of growing films even in the presence of aqueous solutions. 96 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Respiratory rhythm generation: triple oscillator hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tatiana M.; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is vital for survival but also interesting from the perspective of rhythm generation. This rhythmic behavior is generated within the brainstem and is thought to emerge through the interaction between independent oscillatory neuronal networks. In mammals, breathing is composed of three phases – inspiration, post-inspiration, and active expiration – and this article discusses the concept that each phase is generated by anatomically distinct rhythm-generating networks: the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the post-inspiratory complex (PiCo), and the lateral parafacial nucleus (pF L), respectively. The preBötC was first discovered 25 years ago and was shown to be both necessary and sufficient for the generation of inspiration. More recently, networks have been described that are responsible for post-inspiration and active expiration. Here, we attempt to collate the current knowledge and hypotheses regarding how respiratory rhythms are generated, the role that inhibition plays, and the interactions between the medullary networks. Our considerations may have implications for rhythm generation in general. PMID:28299192

  7. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  8. Refrigeration generation using expander-generator units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Agababov, V. S.; Koryagin, A. V.; Baidakova, Yu. O.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of using the expander-generator unit (EGU) to generate refrigeration, along with electricity were considered. It is shown that, on the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows using the EGU, one can provide the refrigeration supply of the different consumers: ventilation and air conditioning plants and industrial refrigerators and freezers. The analysis of influence of process parameters on the cooling power of the EGU, which depends on the parameters of the gas expansion process in the expander and temperatures of cooled environment, was carried out. The schematic diagram of refrigeration generation plant based on EGU is presented. The features and advantages of EGU to generate refrigeration compared with thermotransformer of steam compressive and absorption types were shown, namely: there is no need to use the energy generated by burning fuel to operate the EGU; beneficial use of the heat delivered to gas from the flow being cooled in equipment operating on gas; energy production along with refrigeration generation, which makes it possible to create, using EGU, the trigeneration plants without using the energy power equipment. It is shown that the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows, which can be obtained by using the EGU on existing technological decompression stations of the transported gas, allows providing the refrigeration supply of various consumers. The information that the refrigeration capacity of an expander-generator unit not only depends on the parameters of the process of expansion of gas flowing in the expander (flow rate, temperatures and pressures at the inlet and outlet) but it is also determined by the temperature needed for a consumer and the initial temperature of the flow of the refrigeration-carrier being cooled. The conclusion was made that the expander-generator units can be used to create trigeneration plants both at major power plants and at small energy.

  9. Human germline and pan-cancer variomes and their distinct functional profiles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Haichen; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Wan, Quan; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-10-01

    Identification of non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) has exponentially increased due to advances in Next-Generation Sequencing technologies. The functional impacts of these variations have been difficult to ascertain because the corresponding knowledge about sequence functional sites is quite fragmented. It is clear that mapping of variations to sequence functional features can help us better understand the pathophysiological role of variations. In this study, we investigated the effect of nsSNVs on more than 17 common types of post-translational modification (PTM) sites, active sites and binding sites. Out of 1 705 285 distinct nsSNVs on 259 216 functional sites we identified 38 549 variations that significantly affect 10 major functional sites. Furthermore, we found distinct patterns of site disruptions due to germline and somatic nsSNVs. Pan-cancer analysis across 12 different cancer types led to the identification of 51 genes with 106 nsSNV affected functional sites found in 3 or more cancer types. 13 of the 51 genes overlap with previously identified Significantly Mutated Genes (Nature. 2013 Oct 17;502(7471)). 62 mutations in these 13 genes affecting functional sites such as DNA, ATP binding and various PTM sites occur across several cancers and can be prioritized for additional validation and investigations.

  10. Constitutive and ligand-induced EGFR signaling triggers distinct and mutually exclusive downstream signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Li, Li; Puliyappadamba, VineshkumarThidil; Guo, Gao; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce; Souza, Rhonda F.; Vo, Peggy; Herz, Joachim; Chen, Mei-Ru; Boothman, David A.; Pandita, Tej K.; Wang, David H.; Sen, Ganes C.; Habib, Amyn A.

    2014-01-01

    EGFR overexpression plays an important oncogenic role in cancer. Regular EGFR protein levels are increased in cancer cells and the receptor then becomes constitutively active. However, downstream signals generated by constitutively activated EGFR are unknown. Here we report that the overexpressed EGFR oscillates between two distinct and mutually exclusive modes of signaling. Constitutive or non-canonical EGFR signaling activates the transcription factor IRF3 leading to expression of IFI27, IFIT1, and TRAIL. Ligand-mediated activation of EGFR switches off IRF3 dependent transcription, activates canonical ERK and Akt signals, and confers sensitivity to chemotherapy and virus-induced cell death. Mechanistically, the distinct downstream signals result from a switch of EGFR associated proteins. EGFR constitutively complexes with IRF3 and TBK1 leading to TBK1 and IRF3 phosphorylation. Addition of EGF dissociates TBK1, IRF3, and EGFR leading to a loss of IRF3 activity, Shc-EGFR association and ERK activation. Finally, we provide evidence for non-canonical EGFR signaling in glioblastoma. PMID:25503978

  11. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O.; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. {yields} The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. {yields} The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. {yields} Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Gene Expression Profiles in Eosinophilic and Noneosinophilic Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqing; Gao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaishan; Li, Taisheng; He, Wei; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP), one of the most prevalent chronic diseases, is characterized by persistent inflammation of sinonasal mucosa. However, the pathogenesis of CRSwNP remains unclear. Here, we performed next-generation RNA sequencing and a comprehensive bioinformatics analyses to characterize the transcriptome profiles, including mRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), in patients with eosinophilic and noneosinophilic CRSwNP. A total of 1917 novel lncRNAs and 280 known lncRNAs were identified. We showed eosinophilic CRSwNP (ECRSwNP) and noneosinophilic CRSwNP (non-ECRSwNP) display distinct transcriptome profiles. We identified crucial pathways, including inflammatory, immune response and extracellular microenvironment, connected to the pathogenetic mechanism of CRSwNP. We also discovered key lncRNAs differentially expressed, including lncRNA XLOC_010280, which regulates CCL18 and eosinophilic inflammation. The qRT-PCR and in situ RNA hybridization results verified the key differentially expressed genes. The feature of distinct transcriptomes between ECRSwNP and non-ECRSwNP suggests the necessity to develop specific biomarkers and personalized therapeutic strategies. Our findings lay a solid foundation for subsequent functional studies of mRNAs and lncRNAs as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in CRSwNP by providing a candidate reservoir. PMID:27216292

  13. Competition between two wood-degrading fungi with distinct influences on residues.

    PubMed

    Song, Zewei; Vail, Andrew; Sadowsky, Michael J; Schilling, Jonathan S

    2012-01-01

    Many wood-degrading fungi colonize specific types of forest trees, but often lack wood specificity in pure culture. This suggests that wood type affects competition among fungi and indirectly influences the soil residues generated. While assessing wood residues is an established science, linking this information to dominant fungal colonizers has proven to be difficult. In the studies presented here, we used isolate-specific quantitative PCR to quantify competitive success between two distinct fungi, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Irpex lacteus, brown and white rot fungi, respectively, colonizing three wood types (birch, pine, oak). Ergosterol (fungal biomass), fungal species-specific DNA copy numbers, mass loss, pH, carbon fractions, and alkali solubility were determined 3 and 8 weeks postinoculation from replicate wood sections. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated that I. lacteus consistently outcompeted G. trabeum, by several orders of magnitude, on all wood types. Consequently, wood residues exhibited distinct characteristics of white rot. Our results show that competitive interactions between fungal species can influence colonization success, and that this can have significant consequences on the outcomes of wood decomposition.

  14. Cortical connectivity maps reveal anatomically distinct areas in the parietal cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Aaron A; Clark, Benjamin J; Demecha, Alexis J; Mesina, Lilia; Vos, Jessica M; McNaughton, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas.

  15. Two distinct EF-Tu epitopes induce immune responses in rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takehito; Inagaki, Hiroaki; Takai, Ryota; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Che, Fang-Sik

    2014-02-01

    Plants sense potential pathogens by recognizing conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that cause PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). We previously reported that rice recognizes flagellin from the rice-incompatible N1141 strain of Acidovorax avenae and subsequently induces immune responses. Cell extracts isolated from flagellin-deficient N1141 (Δfla1141) still induced PTI responses, suggesting that Δfla1141 possesses an additional PAMP distinct from flagellin. Here, we show that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), one of the most abundant bacterial proteins, acts as a PAMP in rice and causes several PTI responses. In Brassicaceae species, EF-Tu and an N-acetylated peptide comprising the first 18 amino acids of the N-terminus, termed elf18, are fully active as inducers of PTI responses. By contrast, elf18 did not cause any immune responses in rice, whereas an EF-Tu middle region comprising Lys176 to Gly225, termed EFa50, is fully active as a PAMP in rice. In the leaves of rice plants, EF-Tu induced H2O2 generation and callose deposition, and also triggered resistance to coinfection with pathogenic bacteria. Taken together, these data demonstrate that rice recognizes EFa50, which is distinct from elf18, and that this epitope induces PTI responses.

  16. Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Whole Saliva Reveals a Distinct Phosphorylation Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew D.; Chen, Xiaobing; McGowan, Thomas; Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Cheng, Bin; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth knowledge of bodily fluid phosphoproteomes, such as whole saliva, is limited. To better understand the whole saliva phosphoproteome, we generated a large-scale catalog of phosphorylated proteins. To circumvent the wide dynamic range of phosphoprotein abundance in whole saliva, we combined dynamic range compression using hexapeptide beads, strong cation exchange HPLC peptide fractionation, and immobilized metal affinity chromatography prior to mass spectrometry. In total, 217 unique phosphopeptides sites were identified representing 85 distinct phosphoproteins at 2.3% global FDR. From these peptides, 129 distinct phosphorylation sites were identified of which 57 were previously known, but only 11 of which had been previously identified in whole saliva. Cellular localization analysis revealed salivary phosphoproteins had a distribution similar to all known salivary proteins, but with less relative representation in “extracellular” and “plasma membrane” categories compared to salivary glycoproteins. Sequence alignment showed that phosphorylation occurred at acidic-directed kinase, proline-directed, and basophilic motifs. This differs from plasma phosphoproteins, which predominantly occur at Golgi casein kinase recognized sequences. Collectively, these results suggest diverse functions for salivary phosphoproteins and multiple kinases involved in their processing and secretion. In all, this study should lay groundwork for future elucidation of the functions of salivary protein phosphorylation. PMID:21299198

  17. Genetic and antigenic heterogeneity among feline calicivirus isolates from distinct disease manifestations.

    PubMed

    Geissler, K; Schneider, K; Platzer, G; Truyen, B; Kaaden, O R; Truyen, U

    1997-05-01

    The capsid protein genes of five feline calicivirus (FCV) isolates associated with different disease manifestations were cloned and sequenced. The viruses represented two recent isolates from cats with chronic stomatitis, one recent isolate from a cat with acute stomatitis, one recent isolate each from a cat with acute respiratory symptoms and the classical limping syndrome strain FCV-2280. The amino acid sequences were compared with eight other published sequences and analyzed for their relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete capsid protein sequences or of known antigenic regions of that protein (hypervariable regions A and E) did not group the isolates of different disease manifestations in distinct subclusters. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated against either a chronic stomatitis isolate or a recent isolate associated with respiratory symptoms were tested against a panel of 11 recent isolates and four "classical' FCV strains, covering all known disease associations. With those MAbs no obvious clustering with respect to disease manifestation could be seen. Four specific sera prepared in rabbits against our prototype isolates also failed to cluster those isolates according to the disease manifestations when examined in neutralization tests. From these antigenic and genetic analyses of the capsid protein the hypothesis of the existence of biotypes of FCV responsible for distinct disease manifestations could not be confirmed.

  18. Abdominal wall reconstruction by a regionally distinct biocomposite of extracellular matrix digest and a biodegradable elastomer.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Huber, Alexander; Amoroso, Nicholas J; D'Amore, Antonio; Badylak, Stephen F; Wagner, William R

    2016-09-01

    Current extracellular matrix (ECM) derived scaffolds offer promising regenerative responses in many settings, however in some applications there may be a desire for more robust and long lasting mechanical properties. A biohybrid composite material that offers both strength and bioactivity for optimal healing towards native tissue behavior may offer a solution to this problem. A regionally distinct biocomposite scaffold composed of a biodegradable elastomer (poly(ester urethane)urea) and porcine dermal ECM gel was generated to meet this need by a concurrent polymer electrospinning/ECM gel electrospraying technique where the electrosprayed component was varied temporally during the processing. A sandwich structure was achieved with polymer fiber rich upper and lower layers for structural support and an ECM-rich inner layer to encourage cell ingrowth. Increasing the upper and lower layer fiber content predictably increased tensile strength. In a rat full thickness abdominal wall defect model, the sandwich scaffold design maintained its thickness whereas control biohybrid scaffolds lacking the upper and lower fiber-rich regions failed at 8 weeks. Sandwich scaffold implants also showed higher collagen content 4 and 8 weeks after implantation, exhibited an increased M2 macrophage phenotype response at later times and developed biaxial mechanical properties better approximating native tissue. By employing a processing approach that creates a sheet-form scaffold with regionally distinct zones, it was possible to improve biological outcomes in body wall repair and provide the means for further tuning scaffold mechanical parameters when targeting other applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Distinct CCR7 glycosylation pattern shapes receptor signaling and endocytosis to modulate chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Mark A; Kindinger, Ilona; Laufer, Julia M; Späte, Anne-Katrin; Bucher, Delia; Vanes, Sarah L; Krueger, Wolfgang A; Wittmann, Valentin; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 and their common cognate chemokine receptor CCR7 orchestrate immune cell trafficking by eliciting distinct signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that human CCR7 is N-glycosylated on 2 specific residues in the N terminus and the third extracellular loop. Conceptually, CCR7 glycosylation adds steric hindrance to the receptor N terminus and extracellular loop 3, acting as a "swinging door" to regulate receptor sensitivity and cell migration. We found that freshly isolated human B cells, as well as expanded T cells, but not naïve T cells, express highly sialylated CCR7. Moreover, we identified that human dendritic cells imprint T cell migration toward CCR7 ligands by secreting enzymes that deglycosylate CCR7, thereby boosting CCR7 signaling on T cells, permitting enhanced T cell locomotion, while simultaneously decreasing receptor endocytosis. In addition, dendritic cells proteolytically convert immobilized CCL21 to a soluble form that is more potent in triggering chemotactic movement and does not desensitize the receptor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that soluble CCL21 functionally resembles neither the CCL19 nor the CCL21 phenotype but acts as a chemokine with unique features. Thus, we advance the concept of dendritic cell-dependent generation of micromilieus and lymph node conditioning by demonstrating a novel layer of CCR7 regulation through CCR7 sialylation. In summary, we demonstrate that leukocyte subsets express distinct patterns of CCR7 sialylation that contribute to receptor signaling and fine-tuning chemotactic responses.

  20. Two Rumex species from contrasting hydrological niches regulate flooding tolerance through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Hans; Mustroph, Angelika; Barding, Gregory A; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen; Welschen-Evertman, Rob A M; Pedersen, Ole; Visser, Eric J W; Larive, Cynthia K; Pierik, Ronald; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2013-11-01

    Global climate change has increased flooding events, which affect both natural vegetation dynamics and crop productivity. The flooded environment is lethal for most plant species because it restricts gas exchange and induces an energy and carbon crisis. Flooding survival strategies have been studied in Oryza sativa, a cultivated monocot. However, our understanding of plant adaptation to natural flood-prone environments remains scant, even though wild plants represent a valuable resource of tolerance mechanisms that could be used to generate stress-tolerant crops. Here we identify mechanisms that mediate the distinct flooding survival strategies of two related wild dicot species: Rumex palustris and Rumex acetosa. Whole transcriptome sequencing and metabolite profiling reveal flooding-induced metabolic reprogramming specific to R. acetosa. By contrast, R. palustris uses the early flooding signal ethylene to increase survival by regulating shade avoidance and photomorphogenesis genes to outgrow submergence and by priming submerged plants for future low oxygen stress. These results provide molecular resolution of flooding survival strategies of two species occupying distinct hydrological niches. Learning how these contrasting flood adaptive strategies evolved in nature will be instrumental for the development of stress-tolerant crop varieties that deliver enhanced yields in a changing climate.

  1. Distinct signaling mechanisms in multiple developmental pathways by the SCRAMBLED receptor of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Woo, Sooah; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-10-01

    SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for positional signaling in the root epidermis and for tissue/organ development in the shoot. To further understand SCM action, we generated a series of kinase domain variants and analyzed their ability to complement scm mutant defects. We found that the SCM kinase domain, but not kinase activity, is required for its role in root epidermal patterning, supporting the view that SCM is an atypical receptor kinase. We also describe a previously uncharacterized role for SCM in fruit dehiscence, because mature siliques from scm mutants fail to open properly. Interestingly, the kinase domain of SCM appears to be dispensable for this developmental process. Furthermore, we found that most of the SCM kinase domain mutations dramatically inhibit inflorescence development. Because this process is not affected in scm null mutants, it is likely that SCM acts redundantly to regulate inflorescence size. The importance of distinct kinase residues for these three developmental processes provides an explanation for the maintenance of the conserved kinase domain in the SCM protein, and it may generally explain its conservation in other atypical kinases. Furthermore, these results indicate that individual leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases may participate in multiple pathways using distinct signaling mechanisms to mediate diverse cellular communication events.

  2. Distinct development of the cerebral cortex in platypus and echidna.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    Both lineages of the modern monotremes have distinctive features in the cerebral cortex, but the developmental mechanisms that produce such different adult cortical architecture remain unknown. Similarly, nothing is known about the differences and/or similarities between monotreme and therian cortical development. We have used material from the Hill embryological collection to try to answer key questions concerning cortical development in monotremes. Our findings indicate that gyrencephaly begins to emerge in the echidna brain shortly before birth (crown-rump length 12.5 mm), whereas the cortex of the platypus remains lissencephalic throughout development. The cortices of both monotremes are very immature at the time of hatching, much like that seen in marsupials, and both have a subventricular zone (SubV) within both the striatum and pallium during post-hatching development. It is particularly striking that in the platypus, this region has an extension from the palliostriatal angle beneath the developing trigeminoreceptive part of the somatosensory cortex of the lateral cortex. The putative SubV beneath the trigeminal part of S1 appears to accommodate at least two distinct types of cell and many mitotic figures and (particularly in the platypus) appears to be traversed by large numbers of thalamocortical axons as these grow in. The association with putative thalamocortical fibres suggests that this region may also serve functions similar to the subplate zone of Eutheria. These findings suggest that cortical development in each monotreme follows distinct paths from at least the time of birth, consistent with a long period of independent and divergent cortical evolution.

  3. Peptidomic and transcriptomic profiling of four distinct spider venoms.

    PubMed

    Oldrati, Vera; Koua, Dominique; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Hulo, Nicolas; Arrell, Miriam; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lisacek, Frédérique; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Stöcklin, Reto

    2017-01-01

    Venom based research is exploited to find novel candidates for the development of innovative pharmacological tools, drug candidates and new ingredients for cosmetic and agrochemical industries. Moreover, venomics, as a well-established approach in systems biology, helps to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of the production of such a great molecular biodiversity. Today the advances made in the proteomics, transcriptomics and bioinformatics fields, favor venomics, allowing the in depth study of complex matrices and the elucidation even of minor compounds present in minute biological samples. The present study illustrates a rapid and efficient method developed for the elucidation of venom composition based on NextGen mRNA sequencing of venom glands and LC-MS/MS venom proteome profiling. The analysis of the comprehensive data obtained was focused on cysteine rich peptide toxins from four spider species originating from phylogenetically distant families for comparison purposes. The studied species were Heteropoda davidbowie (Sparassidae), Poecilotheria formosa (Theraphosidae), Viridasius fasciatus (Viridasiidae) and Latrodectus mactans (Theridiidae). This led to a high resolution profiling of 284 characterized cysteine rich peptides, 111 of which belong to the Inhibitor Cysteine Knot (ICK) structural motif. The analysis of H. davidbowie venom revealed a high richness in term of venom diversity: 95 peptide sequences were identified; out of these, 32 peptides presented the ICK structural motif and could be classified in six distinct families. The profiling of P. formosa venom highlighted the presence of 126 peptide sequences, with 52 ICK toxins belonging to three structural distinct families. V. fasciatus venom was shown to contain 49 peptide sequences, out of which 22 presented the ICK structural motif and were attributed to five families. The venom of L. mactans, until now studied for its large neurotoxins (Latrotoxins), revealed the presence of 14 cysteine rich

  4. Puerto Rico and Florida manatees represent genetically distinct groups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A.; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; King, Timothy L.; Bonde, Robert K.; Gray, Brian A.; McGuire, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) populations in Florida (T. m. latirostris) and Puerto Rico (T. m. manatus) are considered distinct subspecies and are listed together as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act. Sustained management and conservation efforts for the Florida subspecies have led to the suggested reclassification of the species to a threatened or delisted status. However, the two populations are geographically distant, morphologically distinct, and habitat degradation and boat strikes continue to threaten the Puerto Rico population. Here, 15 microsatellite markers and mitochondrial control region sequences were used to determine the relatedness of the two populations and investigate the genetic diversity and phylogeographic organization of the Puerto Rico population. Highly divergent allele frequencies were identified between Florida and Puerto Rico using microsatellite (F ST = 0.16; R ST = 0.12 (P ST = 0.66; Φ ST = 0.50 (P E = 0.45; NA = 3.9), were similar, but lower than those previously identified in Florida (HE = 0.48, NA = 4.8). Within Puerto Rico, the mitochondrial genetic diversity values (π = 0.001; h = 0.49) were slightly lower than those previously reported (π = 0.002; h = 0.54) and strong phylogeographic structure was identified (F ST global = 0.82; Φ ST global = 0.78 (P < 0.001)). The genetic division with Florida, low diversity, small population size (N = 250), and distinct threats and habitat emphasize the need for separate protections in Puerto Rico. Conservation efforts including threat mitigation, migration corridors, and protection of subpopulations could lead to improved genetic variation in the endangered Puerto Rico manatee population.

  5. Distinct transport regimes for two elastically coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2012-05-18

    Cooperative cargo transport by two molecular motors involves an elastic motor-motor coupling, which can reduce the motors' velocity and/or enhance their unbinding from the filament. We show theoretically that these interference effects lead, in general, to four distinct transport regimes. In addition to a weak coupling regime, kinesin and dynein motors are found to exhibit a strong coupling and an enhanced unbinding regime, whereas myosin motors are predicted to attain a reduced velocity regime. All of these regimes, which we derive by explicit calculations and general time scale arguments, can be explored experimentally by varying the elastic coupling strength.

  6. Structural studies of several distinct metastable forms of amorphous ice.

    PubMed

    Tulk, C A; Benmore, C J; Urquidi, J; Klug, D D; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2002-08-23

    Structural changes during annealing of high-density amorphous ice were studied with both neutron and x-ray diffraction. The first diffraction peak was followed from the high- to the low-density amorphous form. Changes were observed to occur through a series of intermediate forms that appear to be metastable at each anneal temperature. Five distinct amorphous forms were studied with neutron scattering, and many more forms may be possible. Radial distribution functions indicate that the structure evolves systematically between 4 and 8 angstroms. The phase transformations in low-temperature liquid water may be much more complex than currently understood.

  7. Ferroan anorthosite - A widespread and distinctive lunar rock type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1974-01-01

    Eight of eleven Apollo 16 rake-sample anorthosites are very similar to each other, to hand-specimen Apollo 16 anorthosites, and to Apollo 15 anorthosites. They have feldspar An-96.6, both high- and low-Ca pyroxene with a restricted range of (low-magnesium) composition, minor olivine, traces of ilmenite and chromite, and originally coarse-grained, but now cataclastic texture. Such ferroan anorthosite is evidently a coherent, distinctive and widespread lunar rock type of cumulate origin which may not necessarily be very closely related genetically to other highland rock types.

  8. Marquette Island: A Distinct Mafic Lithology Discovered by Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Gellert, R.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; Fleischer, I.; Jolliff, B. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Ming, D. W.; Yingst, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    While rolling over the Meridiani Planum sedimentary terrane, the rover Opportunity has occasionally discovered large, > 10 cm erratics. Most of these have proven to be meteorites [1], but one - Bounce Rock - is a martian basaltic rock similar in composition to the meteorite EETA79001 lithology B [2]. Presently, Opportunity is intensively investigating an --30 cm tall rock named Marquette Island that may be a distinct type of martian mafic lithology. We report the results of its continuing investigation using the Microscopic Imager (MI); Mossbauer Spectrometer (MB) and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). A companion abstract discusses the results of Panoramic Camera (Pancam) imaging of the rock [3].

  9. Distinct Element Modeling of the Large Block Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, S. R.; Blair, S. C.; Wagoner, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential nuclear waste repository site. As part of this effort, the Large Block, a 3m x 3m x 4.5m rectangular prism of Topopah Spring tuff, was excavated at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain. The Large Block was heated to a peak temperature of 145\\deg C along a horizontal plane 2.75m below the top of the block over a period of about one-year. Displacements were measured in three orthogonal directions with an array of six Multiple Point Borehole Extensometers (MPBX) and were numerically simulated in three dimensions with 3DEC, a distinct element code. The distinct element method was chosen to incorporate discrete fractures in the simulations. The model domain was extended 23m below the ground surface and, in the subsurface, 23m outward from each vertical face so that fixed displacement boundary conditions could be applied well away from the heated portion of the block. A single continuum model and three distinct element models, incorporating six to twenty eight mapped fractures, were tested. Two thermal expansion coefficients were tested for the six-fracture model: a higher value taken from laboratory measurements and a lower value from an earlier field test. The MPBX data show that the largest displacements occurred in the upper portion of the block despite the higher temperatures near the center. The continuum model was found to under-predict the MPBX displacements except in the east west direction near the base of the block. The high thermal expansion model over-predicted the MPBX displacements except in the north south direction near the top of the block. The highly fractured model under-predicted most of the MPBX displacements and poorly simulated the cool-down portion of the test. Although no model provided the single best fit to all of the MPBX data, the six and seven fracture models consistently provided good fits and in most cases showed much improvement over the

  10. Distinct phenotype in maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, S.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; McGill, J.; Battersby, M.

    1994-06-01

    We report on the occurrence of maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 (mUPD14) in a 4-year-old girl with a de novo Robertsonian translocation, 45,XX,t (13q,14q). The child has arrested hydrocephalus, short stature, minor anomalies, small hands with hyperextensible joints, and mild to moderate developmental delay. Comparison of her phenotype with those of three previously described individuals show some common distinct traits which suggest a mUPD14 syndrome. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. UDEC - A Generalised Distinct Element Program for Modelling Jointed Rock.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    7 AD-AO87 610 CUNDALL (PETER ) ASSOCIATES VIRGINIA WATER (ENGLAND FIG 8/7 MA0 C UNALDJ39C04C ENERALISED DISTINCT ELEMENT PROGR AM FOR MODELLING SOl I...circular linked-list that corresponds to its boundary. Each corner on the boundary is represented by an array of words that stores the coordinates of...come into contact their corner lists are broken at the points of contact and an array of words (corresponding to a contact) is inserted into the break

  12. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  13. Distinct but complementary contributions of PPAR isotypes to energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2017-04-03

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate energy metabolism and hence are therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. While they share anti-inflammatory activities, the PPAR isotypes distinguish themselves by differential actions on lipid and glucose homeostasis. In this Review we discuss the complementary and distinct metabolic effects of the PPAR isotypes together with the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, as well as the synthetic PPAR ligands that are used in the clinic or under development. We highlight the potential of new PPAR ligands with improved efficacy and safety profiles in the treatment of complex metabolic disorders.

  14. Distinct circuits for the formation and retrieval of an imprinted olfactory memory

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Pokala, Navin; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Memories formed early in life are particularly stable and influential, representing privileged experiences that shape enduring behaviors. Here we show that exposing newly-hatched C. elegans to pathogenic bacteria results in persistent aversion to those bacterial odors, whereas adult exposure generates only transient aversive memory. Long-lasting imprinted aversion has a critical period in the first larval stage, and is specific to the experienced pathogen. Distinct groups of neurons are required during formation (AIB, RIM) and retrieval (AIY, RIA) of the imprinted memory. RIM synthesizes the neuromodulator tyramine, which is required in the L1 stage for learning. AIY memory retrieval neurons sense tyramine via the SER-2 receptor, which is essential for imprinted but not for adult-learned aversion. Odor responses in several neurons, most notably RIA, are altered in imprinted animals. These findings provide insight into neuronal substrates of different forms of memory, and lay a foundation for further understanding of early learning. PMID:26871629

  15. Distinct NMDA receptors provide differential modes of transmission at mossy fiber-interneuron synapses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Saobo; McBain, Chris J

    2002-03-14

    Dentate gyrus granule cells innervate inhibitory interneurons via a continuum of synapses comprised of either Ca(2+)-impermeable (CI) or Ca(2+)-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors. Synapses at the extreme ends of this continuum engage distinct postsynaptic responses, with activity at CI synapses being strongly influenced by NMDA receptor activation. NMDARs at CI synapses have a lower NR2B subunit composition and a higher open probability, which generate larger amplitude and more rapid EPSCs than their CP counterparts. A novel form of NMDAR-dependent long-term depression (iLTD) is associated with CI-mossy fiber synapses, whereas iLTD at CP synapses is dependent on Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor activation. Induction of both forms of iLTD required elevation of postsynaptic calcium. Thus mossy fibers engage CA3 interneurons via multiple synapse types that will act to expand the computational repertoire of the mossy fiber-CA3 network.

  16. Distinct innate responses are induced by attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants.

    PubMed

    Powell, Daniel A; Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Curtiss, Roy; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Upon bacterial infection the host cells generate a wide variety of cytokines. Genetic attenuation of bacterial physiological pathogens can be accomplished not only by disruption of normal bacterial processes, but also by the loss of the ability to redirect the host immune system. We examined nine attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium mutants for their ability to replicate as well as the cytokines produced after infection of Bone Marrow Derived Macrophages (BMDM). Infection of BMDM with attenuated Salmonella mutants led to host cytokine patterns distinct from those that followed WT infection. Surprisingly, each bacterial mutant had a unique cytokine signature. Because some of the mutants induced an IL-10 response not seen in WT, we examined the role of IL-10 on Salmonella replication. Surprisingly, addition of IL-10 before or concurrent with infection restricted growth of WT Salmonella in BMDM. Bacterial attenuation is not a single process and results in attenuated host responses, which result in unique patterns for each attenuated mutants.

  17. Distinct Innate Responses are Induced by Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel A.; Roberts, Lydia M.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Curtiss, Roy; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Upon bacterial infection the host cells generate a wide variety of cytokines. Genetic attenuation of bacterial physiological pathogens can be accomplished not only by disruption of normal bacterial processes, but also by the loss of the ability to redirect the host immune system. We examined nine attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium mutants for their ability to replicate as well as the cytokines produced after infection of Bone Marrow Derived Macrophages (BMDM). Infection of BMDM with attenuated Salmonella mutants led to host cytokine patterns distinct from those that followed WT infection. Surprisingly, each bacterial mutant had a unique cytokine signature. Because some of the mutants induced an IL-10 response not seen in WT, we examined the role of IL-10 on Salmonella replication. Surprisingly, addition of IL-10 before or concurrent with infection restricted growth of WT Salmonella in BMDM. Bacterial attenuation is not a single process and results in attenuated host responses, which result in unique patterns for each attenuated mutants. PMID:26546408

  18. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies distinct mouse medial ganglionic eminence cell types

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Jiun J.; Friedman, Brad A.; Ha, Connie; Durinck, Steffen; Liu, Jinfeng; Rubenstein, John L.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Modrusan, Zora

    2017-01-01

    Many subtypes of cortical interneurons (CINs) are found in adult mouse cortices, but the mechanism generating their diversity remains elusive. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on the mouse embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), the major birthplace for CINs, and on MGE-like cells differentiated from embryonic stem cells. Two distinct cell types were identified as proliferating neural progenitors and immature neurons, both of which comprised sub-populations. Although lineage development of MGE progenitors was reconstructed and immature neurons were characterized as GABAergic, cells that might correspond to precursors of different CINs were not identified. A few non-neuronal cell types were detected, including microglia. In vitro MGE-like cells resembled bona fide MGE cells but expressed lower levels of Foxg1 and Epha4. Together, our data provide detailed understanding of the embryonic MGE developmental program and suggest how CINs are specified. PMID:28361918

  19. Key regulators control distinct transcriptional programmes in blood progenitor and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Ng, Felicia S; Wilson, Nicola K; Hannah, Rebecca; Moignard, Victoria; Leal-Cervantes, Ana I; Jimenez-Madrid, Isabel; Diamanti, Evangelia; Wernisch, Lorenz; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Despite major advances in the generation of genome-wide binding maps, the mechanisms by which transcription factors (TFs) regulate cell type identity have remained largely obscure. Through comparative analysis of 10 key haematopoietic TFs in both mast cells and blood progenitors, we demonstrate that the largely cell type-specific binding profiles are not opportunistic, but instead contribute to cell type-specific transcriptional control, because (i) mathematical modelling of differential binding of shared TFs can explain differential gene expression, (ii) consensus binding sites are important for cell type-specific binding and (iii) knock-down of blood stem cell regulators in mast cells reveals mast cell-specific genes as direct targets. Finally, we show that the known mast cell regulators Mitf and c-fos likely contribute to the global reorganisation of TF binding profiles. Taken together therefore, our study elucidates how key regulatory TFs contribute to transcriptional programmes in several distinct mammalian cell types. PMID:24760698

  20. Parallel polyploid speciation: distinct sympatric gene-pools of recurrently derived allo-octoploid Asplenium ferns.

    PubMed

    Perrie, Leon R; Shepherd, Lara D; De Lange, Peter J; Brownsey, Patrick J

    2010-07-01

    Although polyploidy is widespread, its significance to the generation of biodiversity remains unclear. Many polyploids have been derived recurrently. For a particular polyploid, gene-flow between the products of independent origin is typical where they come into contact. Here, we use AFLP DNA-fingerprinting and chloroplast DNA sequences to demonstrate parallel polyploid speciation within both of the ferns Asplenium cimmeriorum and A. gracillimum. Both of these taxa comprise at least two allopolyploids, recurrently derived from the same progenitor pair. Each of these allopolyploids remain genetically distinguishable even with extensive sympatry, and could therefore be considered distinct species. To our knowledge, parallel speciation on this scale amongst recurrent polyploids has not been previously reported. With their parallel origins, these 'evolutionary replicates' provide an unrivalled opportunity to investigate how the reproductive barriers and ecological differentiation necessary for speciation arise following polyploidy.

  1. Size evolution of highly amphiphilic macromolecular solution assemblies via a distinct bimodal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Murphy, Ryan P.; Seppala, Jonathan E.; Smart, Thomas P.; Hann, Sarah D.

    2014-01-01

    The solution self-assembly of macromolecular amphiphiles offers an efficient, bottom-up strategy for producing well--defined nanocarriers, with applications ranging from drug delivery to nanoreactors. Typically, the generation of uniform nanocarrier architecturesis controlled by processing methods that rely upon cosolvent mixtures. These preparation strategies hinge on the assumption that macromolecular solution nanostructures are kinetically stable following transfer from an organic/aqueous cosolvent into aqueous solution. Herein we demonstrate that unequivocal step-change shifts in micelle populations occur over several weeks following transfer into a highly selective solvent. The unexpected micelle growth evolves through a distinct bimodal distribution separated by multiple fusion events and critically depends on solution agitation. Notably, these results underscore fundamental similarities between assembly processes in amphiphilic polymer, small molecule, and protein systems. Moreover, the non-equilibrium micelle size increase can have a major impact on the assumed stability of solution assemblies, for which performance is dictated by nanocarrier size and structure. PMID:24710204

  2. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  3. Distinct Defects in Spine Formation or Pruning in Two Gene Duplication Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Li, Huiping; Takumi, Toru; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu; Yu, Xiang; Bian, Wen-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses a complex set of developmental neurological disorders, characterized by deficits in social communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. In recent years, ASD is increasingly being considered as a disease of the synapse. One main type of genetic aberration leading to ASD is gene duplication, and several mouse models have been generated mimicking these mutations. Here, we studied the effects of MECP2 duplication and human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication on synaptic development and neural circuit wiring in the mouse sensory cortices. We showed that mice carrying MECP2 duplication had specific defects in spine pruning, while the 15q11-13 duplication mouse model had impaired spine formation. Our results demonstrate that spine pathology varies significantly between autism models and that distinct aspects of neural circuit development may be targeted in different ASD mutations. Our results further underscore the importance of gene dosage in normal development and function of the brain.

  4. ULF Generation by Modulated Ionospheric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Wallace, T.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating experiments designed to generate ULF waves using the HAARP heater have been conducted since 2007. Artificial ULF waves in the Pc1 frequency range were observed from space and by ground induction magnetometers located in the vicinity of the heater as well as at long distances. Two distinct generation mechanisms of artificial ULF waves were identified. The first was electroject modulation under geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The second was pressure modulation in the E and F regions of the ionosphere under quiet conditions. Ground detections of ULF waves near the heater included both Shear Alfven waves and Magnetosonic waves generated by electrojet and/or pressure modulations. Distant ULF detections involved Magnetosonic wave propagation in the Alfvenic duct with pressure modulation as the most likely source. Summary of our observations and theoretical interpretations will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the staff at the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.

  5. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  6. Meet the Millennial Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The "Millennial Generation" has grown up with prosperity, working parents, the Internet, divorce, and Columbine. They are fundamentally different in outlook and ambition from preceding generations and have their own ideas about how they want to live and work. (JOW)

  7. Geochemically distinct sources for interstratified lavas from the Nejapa cinder cone alignment, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenson, M.D.; Carr, J.J.; Walker, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Nejapa cinder cone alignment, near Managua, Nicaragua, produces mafic subalkaline basalts that are similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). The Nejapa basalts can be divided into high- and low-titanium suites that are interstratified. Although major element compositions are similar to MORB, concentrations of Ba and Sr in the Nejapa basalts are higher, ranging from 2 x MORB in the high-titanium suite to 10 X MORB for the low-titanium lavas. Recently determined Nd and Sr isotopic and rare earth element (REE) concentrations for Nejapa basalts show that the high and low titanium suites have distinct sources and cannot be related by simple crystallization trends. For example, although the high-Ti lavas are light REE depleted and have overall MORB-like REE concentrations, they are systematically lower in /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd and higher in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr. Low-Ti lavas, on the other hand, are LREE-enriched but have Nd isotopes identical to MORB (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr is distinctly higher). The contradictory geochemical characteristics displayed by the Nejapa lavas can be explained in a general sense by a mixing model that involves upper mantle peridotite and a fluid derived from hydrothermally-altered subducted oceanic crust. This fluid may enrich overlying mantle in Ba, Sr, and /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr, and may supply enough water to stabilize an accessory phase such as rutile at high pressure. Melts generated from this source will be low in Ti, but high in Ba, Sr, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr and /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd. Subjacent peridotite melting with less of the hydrous flux will generate lavas with higher Ti, lower Sr and Ba, and isotopic ratios of the peridotite.

  8. Generating Customized Verifiers for Automatically Generated Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Program verification using Hoare-style techniques requires many logical annotations. We have previously developed a generic annotation inference algorithm that weaves in all annotations required to certify safety properties for automatically generated code. It uses patterns to capture generator- and property-specific code idioms and property-specific meta-program fragments to construct the annotations. The algorithm is customized by specifying the code patterns and integrating them with the meta-program fragments for annotation construction. However, this is difficult since it involves tedious and error-prone low-level term manipulations. Here, we describe an annotation schema compiler that largely automates this customization task using generative techniques. It takes a collection of high-level declarative annotation schemas tailored towards a specific code generator and safety property, and generates all customized analysis functions and glue code required for interfacing with the generic algorithm core, thus effectively creating a customized annotation inference algorithm. The compiler raises the level of abstraction and simplifies schema development and maintenance. It also takes care of some more routine aspects of formulating patterns and schemas, in particular handling of irrelevant program fragments and irrelevant variance in the program structure, which reduces the size, complexity, and number of different patterns and annotation schemas that are required. The improvements described here make it easier and faster to customize the system to a new safety property or a new generator, and we demonstrate this by customizing it to certify frame safety of space flight navigation code that was automatically generated from Simulink models by MathWorks' Real-Time Workshop.

  9. Starter/generator testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anon

    1994-10-01

    Sundstrand Aerospace and GE Aircraft Engines have studied the switched reluctance machine for use as an integral starter/generator for future aircraft engines. They have conducted an initial, low-power testing of the starter/generator, which is based on power inverters using IGBT-technology semiconductors, to verify its feasibility in the externally mounted version of the integral starter/generator. This preliminary testing of the 250-kW starter/generator reveals favorable results.

  10. Distinct generation, pharmacology, and distribution of sphingosine 1-phosphate and dihydro-sphingosine 1-phosphate in human neural progenitor cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-vivo and in-vitro studies suggest a crucial role for Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptors in the development of the nervous system. Dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate (dhS1P), a reduced form of S1P, is an active ligand at S1P receptors, but the pharmacology and physiology of dhS1P has not...

  11. Novel exons in the tbx5 gene locus generate protein isoforms with distinct expression domains and function.

    PubMed

    Yamak, Abir; Georges, Romain O; Sheikh-Hassani, Massomeh; Morin, Martin; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona

    2015-03-13

    TBX5 is the gene mutated in Holt-Oram syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder with complex heart and limb deformities. Its protein product is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors and an evolutionarily conserved dosage-sensitive regulator of heart and limb development. Understanding TBX5 regulation is therefore of paramount importance. Here we uncover the existence of novel exons and provide evidence that TBX5 activity may be extensively regulated through alternative splicing to produce protein isoforms with differing N- and C-terminal domains. These isoforms are also present in human heart, indicative of an evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism. The newly identified isoforms have different transcriptional properties and can antagonize TBX5a target gene activation. Droplet Digital PCR as well as immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antibodies reveal differential as well as overlapping expression domains. In particular, we find that the predominant isoform in skeletal myoblasts is Tbx5c, and we show that it is dramatically up-regulated in differentiating myotubes and is essential for myotube formation. Mechanistically, TBX5c antagonizes TBX5a activation of pro-proliferative signals such as IGF-1, FGF-10, and BMP4. The results provide new insight into Tbx5 regulation and function that will further our understanding of its role in health and disease. The finding of new exons in the Tbx5 locus may also be relevant to mutational screening especially in the 30% of Holt-Oram syndrome patients with no mutations in the known TBX5a exons.

  12. Two Types of Neurons in the Primate Globus Pallidus External Segment Play Distinct Roles in Antisaccade Generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    The globus pallidus external segment (GPe) constitutes part of the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia. Because of inhibitory projections from the striatum, most GPe neurons are expected to reduce activity during movements. However, many GPe neurons in fact display increased activity. We previously found that both excitatory and inhibitory responses were modulated during antisaccades, when eyes were directed away from a visual stimulus. To elucidate the roles of these neurons during antisaccades, we examined neuronal activities as monkeys performed antisaccades, prosaccades, and NoGo tasks under 2 conditions. In the Deliberate condition, the task-rule was instructed by color of the fixation point, while in the Immediate condition, it was given by color of the target. Under both conditions, the increase-type neurons exhibited greater activity during antisaccades compared with the other tasks and neuronal activity negatively correlated with saccade latency. The decrease-type neurons also showed greater modulation during antisaccades but their activity was comparable between NoGo and antisaccade trials in the Immediate condition. These results suggest that the increase-type neurons might play a role in facilitating antisaccades, whereas the decrease-type neurons could mediate signals for reflexive saccade suppression. We propose that these GPe neurons are differently involved in basal ganglia pathways.

  13. Altering the interaction between σ70 and RNA polymerase generates complexes with distinct transcription-elongation properties

    PubMed Central

    Berghöfer-Hochheimer, Yvonne; Lu, Chi Zen; Gross, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    We compare the elongation behavior of native Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme assembled in vivo, holoenzyme reconstituted from σ70 and RNA polymerase in vitro, and holoenzyme with a specific alteration in the interface between σ70 and RNA polymerase. Elongating RNA polymerase from each holoenzyme has distinguishable properties, some of which cannot be explained by differential retention or rebinding of σ70 during elongation, or by differential presence of elongation factors. We suggest that interactions between RNA polymerase and σ70 may influence the ensemble of conformational states adopted by RNA polymerase during initiation. These states, in turn, may affect the conformational states adopted by the elongating enzyme, thereby physically and functionally imprinting RNA polymerase. PMID:15650048

  14. Distinctive amygdala subregions involved in emotion-modulated Stroop interference.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyun Jung; Lee, Kanghee; Kim, Hyun Taek; Kim, Hackjin

    2014-05-01

    Despite the well-known role of the amygdala in mediating emotional interference during tasks requiring cognitive resources, no definite conclusion has yet been reached regarding the differential roles of functionally and anatomically distinctive subcomponents of the amygdala in such processes. In this study, we examined female participants and attempted to separate the neural processes for the detection of emotional information from those for the regulation of cognitive interference from emotional distractors by adding a temporal gap between emotional stimuli and a subsequent cognitive Stroop task. Reaction time data showed a significantly increased Stroop interference effect following emotionally negative stimuli compared with neutral stimuli, and functional magnetic resonance imaging data revealed that the anterior ventral amygdala (avAMYG) showed greater responses to negative stimuli compared with neutral stimuli. In addition, individuals who scored high in neuroticism showed greater posterior dorsal amygdala (pdAMYG) responses to incongruent compared with congruent Stroop trials following negative stimuli, but not following neutral stimuli. Taken together, the findings of this study demonstrated functionally distinctive contributions of the avAMYG and pdAMYG to the emotion-modulated Stroop interference effect and suggested that the avAMYG encodes associative values of emotional stimuli whereas the pdAMYG resolves cognitive interference from emotional distractors.

  15. Distinct FAK activities determine progenitor and mammary stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Song; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Mammary stem (MaSCs) and progenitor cells are important for mammary gland development and maintenance and may give rise to mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs). Yet there remains limited understanding of how these cells contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we show that conditional deletion of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in embryonic mammary epithelial cells (MaECs) decreases luminal progenitors (LPs) and basal MaSCs, reducing their colony-forming and regenerative potentials in a cell autonomous manner. Loss of FAK kinase activity in MaECs specifically impaired LP proliferation and alveologenesis, whereas a kinase-independent activity of FAK supported ductal invasion and basal MaSC activity. Deficiency in LPs suppressed tumorigenesis and MaCSC formation in a mouse model of breast cancer. In contrast to the general inhibitory effect of FAK attenuation, inhibitors of FAK kinase preferentially inhibited proliferation and tumorsphere formation of LP-like, but not MaSC-like, human breast cancer cells. Our findings establish distinct kinase dependent and independent activities of FAK that differentially regulate LPs and basal MaSCs. We suggest that targeting these distinct functions may tailor therapeutic strategies to address breast cancer heterogeneity more effectively. PMID:23832665

  16. Distinct molecular underpinnings of Drosophila olfactory trace conditioning.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Yichun; Hu, Ying; Qin, Hongtao; Campbell, Robert A A; Zhong, Yi

    2011-12-13

    Trace conditioning is valued as a simple experimental model to assess how the brain associates events that are discrete in time. Here, we adapted an olfactory trace conditioning procedure in Drosophila melanogaster by training fruit flies to avoid an odor that is followed by foot shock many seconds later. The molecular underpinnings of the learning are distinct from the well-characterized simultaneous conditioning, where odor and punishment temporally overlap. First, Rutabaga adenylyl cyclase (Rut-AC), a putative molecular coincidence detector vital for simultaneous conditioning, is dispensable in trace conditioning. Second, dominant-negative Rac expression, thought to sustain early labile memory, significantly enhances learning of trace conditioning, but leaves simultaneous conditioning unaffected. We further show that targeting Rac inhibition to the mushroom body (MB) but not the antennal lobe (AL) suffices to achieve the enhancement effect. Moreover, the absence of trace conditioning learning in D1 dopamine receptor mutants is rescued by restoration of expression specifically in the adult MB. These results suggest the MB as a crucial neuroanatomical locus for trace conditioning, which may harbor a Rac activity-sensitive olfactory "sensory buffer" that later converges with the punishment signal carried by dopamine signaling. The distinct molecular signature of trace conditioning revealed here shall contribute to the understanding of how the brain overcomes a temporal gap in potentially related events.

  17. Distinctive personality profiles of fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Zohar, Ada H.; Zaraya-Blum, Reut; Buskila, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The current study is an innovative exploratory investigation, aiming at identifying differences in personality profiles within Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) patients. Method In total, 344 participants (309 female, 35 male) reported suffering from FMS and/or CFS and consented to participate in the study. Participants were recruited at an Israeli FM/CFS patient meeting held in May 2013, and through an announcement posted on several social networks. Participants were asked to complete a research questionnaire, which included FMS criteria and severity scales, and measures of personality, emotional functioning, positivity, social support and subjective assessment of general health. In total, 204 participants completed the research questionnaire (40.7% attrition rate). Results A cluster analysis produced two distinct clusters, which differed significantly on psychological variables, but did not differ on demographic variables or illness severity. As compared to cluster number 2 (N = 107), participants classified into cluster number 1 (N = 97) showed a less adaptive pattern, with higher levels of Harm Avoidance and Alexithymia; higher prevalence of Type D personality; and lower levels of Persistence (PS), Reward dependence (RD), Cooperation, Self-directedness (SD), social support and positivity. Conclusion The significant pattern of results indicates at least two distinct personality profiles of FM and CFS patients. Findings from this research may help improve the evaluation and treatment of FM and CFS patients, based on each patient’s unique needs, psychological resources and weaknesses, as proposed by the current trend of personalized medicine. PMID:27672497

  18. The uses and abuses of the coherence – correspondence distinction

    PubMed Central

    Polonioli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Kenneth Hammond introduced a distinction between coherence and correspondence criteria of rationality as a tool in the study of judgment and decision-making. This distinction has been widely used in the field. Yet, as this paper seeks to show, the relevant notions of coherence and correspondence have been progressively considered to be too narrow and have undergone non-trivial conceptual changes since their original introduction. I try to show, first, that the proliferation of conceptualizations of coherence and correspondence has created confusion in the literature and that appealing to such notions has not helped to elucidate discussions over the nature of rational judgment and decision-making. Nevertheless, I also argue for a reframing of the debate. In fact, what seems to underlie several contemporary appeals to the notions of coherence and correspondence is best explained in terms of a contrast between what I call rule-based and goal-based rationality. Whilst these categories do need further refinement, they do seem to be useful for organizing and understanding research on rational judgment and decision-making. PMID:25983700

  19. Role of Distinct Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Anticancer Response

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Helena; Fionda, Cinzia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, the prototypic member of innate lymphoid cells, are important effectors of anticancer immune response. These cells can survey and control tumor initiation due to their capability to recognize and kill malignant cells and to regulate the adaptive immune response via cytokines and chemokines release. However, several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK cells associated with advanced disease can have profound functional defects and display protumor activity. This evidence indicates that NK cell behavior undergoes crucial alterations during cancer progression. Moreover, a further level of complexity is due to the extensive heterogeneity and plasticity of these lymphocytes, implying that different NK cell subsets, endowed with specific phenotypic and functional features, may be involved and play distinct roles in the tumor context. Accordingly, many studies reported the enrichment of selective NK cell subsets within tumor tissue, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. A malignant microenvironment can significantly impact NK cell activity, by recruiting specific subpopulations and/or influencing their developmental programming or the acquisition of a mature phenotype; in particular, neoplastic, stroma and immune cells, or tumor-derived factors take part in these processes. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recently acquired knowledge on the possible contribution of distinct NK cell subsets in the control and/or progression of solid and hematological malignancies. Moreover, we will address emerging evidence regarding the role of different components of tumor microenvironment on shaping NK cell response. PMID:28360915

  20. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

    PubMed

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-10-07

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th) century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease.

  1. Distinct OGT-Binding Sites Promote HCF-1 Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Tanja; Waridel, Patrice; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Zoete, Vincent; Herr, Winship

    2015-01-01

    Human HCF-1 (also referred to as HCFC-1) is a transcriptional co-regulator that undergoes a complex maturation process involving extensive O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis. HCF-1 proteolysis results in two active, noncovalently associated HCF-1N and HCF-1C subunits that regulate distinct phases of the cell-division cycle. HCF-1 O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis are both catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which thus displays an unusual dual enzymatic activity. OGT cleaves HCF-1 at six highly conserved 26 amino acid repeat sequences called HCF-1PRO repeats. Here we characterize the substrate requirements for OGT cleavage of HCF-1. We show that the HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal possesses particular OGT-binding properties. The glutamate residue at the cleavage site that is intimately involved in the cleavage reaction specifically inhibits association with OGT and its bound cofactor UDP-GlcNAc. Further, we identify a novel OGT-binding sequence nearby the first HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal that enhances cleavage. These results demonstrate that distinct OGT-binding sites in HCF-1 promote proteolysis, and provide novel insights into the mechanism of this unusual protease activity. PMID:26305326

  2. Reward and punishment act as distinct factors in guiding behavior.

    PubMed

    Kubanek, Jan; Snyder, Lawrence H; Abrams, Richard A

    2015-06-01

    Behavior rests on the experience of reinforcement and punishment. It has been unclear whether reinforcement and punishment act as oppositely valenced components of a single behavioral factor, or whether these two kinds of outcomes play fundamentally distinct behavioral roles. To this end, we varied the magnitude of a reward or a penalty experienced following a choice using monetary tokens. The outcome of each trial was independent of the outcome of the previous trial, which enabled us to isolate and study the effect on behavior of each outcome magnitude in single trials. We found that a reward led to a repetition of the previous choice, whereas a penalty led to an avoidance of the previous choice. Surprisingly, the effects of the reward magnitude and the penalty magnitude revealed a pronounced asymmetry. The choice repetition effect of a reward scaled with the magnitude of the reward. In a marked contrast, the avoidance effect of a penalty was flat, not influenced by the magnitude of the penalty. These effects were mechanistically described using a reinforcement learning model after the model was updated to account for the penalty-based asymmetry. The asymmetry in the effects of the reward magnitude and the punishment magnitude was so striking that it is difficult to conceive that one factor is just a weighted or transformed form of the other factor. Instead, the data suggest that rewards and penalties are fundamentally distinct factors in governing behavior.

  3. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Hall, David P; MacCormick, Ian J C; Phythian-Adams, Alex T; Rzechorzek, Nina M; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G D; Collier, David J; Hume, David A; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A A Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  4. Distinct bacterial communities exist beneath a high Arctic polythermal glacier.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maya; Sharp, Martin; Foght, Julia

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial communities reside in basal ice, sediment, and meltwater in the supra-, sub-, and proglacial environments of John Evans Glacier, Nunavut, Canada. We examined whether the subglacial bacterial community shares common members with the pro- and supraglacial communities, and by inference, whether it could be derived from communities in either of these environments (e.g., by ice overriding proglacial sediments or by in-wash of surface meltwaters). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes amplified from these environments revealed that the subglacial water, basal ice, and sediment communities were distinct from those detected in supraglacial meltwater and proglacial sediments, with 60 of 142 unique terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) detected exclusively in subglacial samples and only 8 T-RFs detected in all three environments. Supraglacial waters shared some T-RFs with subglacial water and ice, likely reflecting the seasonal flow of surface meltwater into the subglacial drainage system, whereas supraglacial and proglacial communities shared the fewest T-RFs. Thus, the subglacial community at John Evans Glacier appears to be predominantly autochthonous rather than allochthonous, and it may be adapted to subglacial conditions. Chemical analysis of water and melted ice also revealed differences between the supraglacial and proglacial environments, particularly regarding electrical conductivity and nitrate, sulfate, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Whereas the potential exists for common bacterial types to be broadly distributed throughout the glacial system, we have observed distinct bacterial communities in physically and chemically different glacial environments.

  5. Network Analysis Reveals Distinct Clinical Syndromes Underlying Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P.; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Phythian-Adams, Alex T.; Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G. D.; Collier, David J.; Hume, David A.; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A. A. Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes. PMID:24465370

  6. Distinct populations of inflammatory fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Handly-Santana, Abram; Biffi, Giulia; Elyada, Ela; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Lee, Eun Jung; Chio, Iok In Christine; Tiriac, Hervé; Feig, Christine; Kultti, Anne; Crawford, James M.; Clevers, Hans; Park, Youngkyu

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) differentiate into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that produce desmoplastic stroma, thereby modulating disease progression and therapeutic response in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). However, it is unknown whether CAFs uniformly carry out these tasks or if subtypes of CAFs with distinct phenotypes in PDA exist. We identified a CAF subpopulation with elevated expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) located immediately adjacent to neoplastic cells in mouse and human PDA tissue. We recapitulated this finding in co-cultures of murine PSCs and PDA organoids, and demonstrated that organoid-activated CAFs produced desmoplastic stroma. The co-cultures showed cooperative interactions and revealed another distinct subpopulation of CAFs, located more distantly from neoplastic cells, which lacked elevated αSMA expression and instead secreted IL6 and additional inflammatory mediators. These findings were corroborated in mouse and human PDA tissue, providing direct evidence for CAF heterogeneity in PDA tumor biology with implications for disease etiology and therapeutic development. PMID:28232471

  7. Four phenotypically and phylogenetically distinct lineages in Phytophthora lateralis.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Clive M; Franceschini, Selma; Vettraino, Anna Maria; Hansen, Everett M; Green, Sarah; Robin, Cecile; Webber, Joan F; Vannini, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Until recently Phytophthora lateralis was known only as the cause of dieback and mortality of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana in its native range in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Since the 1990s however disease outbreaks have occurred increasingly on ornamental C. lawsoniana in Europe; and in 2007 the pathogen was discovered in soil around old growth Chamaecyparis obtusa in Taiwan, where it may be endemic. When the phenotypes of over 150 isolates of P. lateralis from Taiwan, across the PNW (British Columbia to California) and from France, the Netherlands and the UK were compared three growth rate groups were resolved: one slow growing from Taiwan, one fast growing from the PNW and Europe, and one of intermediate growth from a small area of the UK. Within these growth groups distinct subtypes were identified based on colony patterns and spore metrics and further discriminated in a multivariate analysis. The assumption that the three main growth groups represented phylogenetic units was tested by comparative sequencing of two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes. This assumption was confirmed. In addition two phenotype clusters within the Taiwan growth group were also shown to be phylogenetically distinct. These four phenotypically and genotypically unique populations are informally designated as the PNW lineage, the UK lineage, the Taiwan J lineage, and the Taiwan K lineage. Their characteristics and distribution are described and their evolution, taxonomic, and plant health significance is discussed.

  8. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  9. The uses and abuses of the coherence - correspondence distinction.

    PubMed

    Polonioli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Kenneth Hammond introduced a distinction between coherence and correspondence criteria of rationality as a tool in the study of judgment and decision-making. This distinction has been widely used in the field. Yet, as this paper seeks to show, the relevant notions of coherence and correspondence have been progressively considered to be too narrow and have undergone non-trivial conceptual changes since their original introduction. I try to show, first, that the proliferation of conceptualizations of coherence and correspondence has created confusion in the literature and that appealing to such notions has not helped to elucidate discussions over the nature of rational judgment and decision-making. Nevertheless, I also argue for a reframing of the debate. In fact, what seems to underlie several contemporary appeals to the notions of coherence and correspondence is best explained in terms of a contrast between what I call rule-based and goal-based rationality. Whilst these categories do need further refinement, they do seem to be useful for organizing and understanding research on rational judgment and decision-making.

  10. Distinct neural patterns of social cognition for cooperation versus competition.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Lily; Dungan, James; Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane

    2016-08-15

    How do people consider other minds during cooperation versus competition? Some accounts predict that theory of mind (ToM) is recruited more for cooperation versus competition or competition versus cooperation, whereas other accounts predict similar recruitment across these two contexts. The present fMRI study examined activity in brain regions for ToM (bilateral temporoparietal junction, precuneus, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex) across cooperative and competitive interactions with the same individual within the same paradigm. Although univariate analyses revealed that ToM regions overall were recruited similarly across interaction contexts, multivariate pattern analyses revealed that these regions nevertheless encoded information separating cooperation from competition. Specifically, ToM regions encoded differences between cooperation and competition when people believed the outcome was determined by their and their partner's choices but not when the computer determined the outcome. We propose that, when people are motivated to consider others' mental states, ToM regions encode different aspects of mental states during cooperation versus competition. Given the role of these regions for ToM, these findings reveal distinct patterns of social cognition for distinct motivational contexts.

  11. Branchial Cilia and Sperm Flagella Recruit Distinct Axonemal Components

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Alu; Shiba, Kogiku; Cai, Chunhua; Inaba, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella have highly conserved 9 + 2 structures. They are functionally diverged to play cell-type-specific roles even in a multicellular organism. Although their structural components are therefore believed to be common, few studies have investigated the molecular diversity of the protein components of the cilia and flagella in a single organism. Here we carried out a proteomic analysis and compared protein components between branchial cilia and sperm flagella in a marine invertebrate chordate, Ciona intestinalis. Distinct feature of protein recruitment in branchial cilia and sperm flagella has been clarified; (1) Isoforms of α- and β-tubulins as well as those of actins are distinctly used in branchial cilia or sperm flagella. (2) Structural components, such as dynein docking complex, tektins and an outer dense fiber protein, are used differently by the cilia and flagella. (3) Sperm flagella are specialized for the cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of outer arm dynein and for energy metabolism by glycolytic enzymes. Our present study clearly demonstrates that flagellar or ciliary proteins are properly recruited according to their function and stability, despite their apparent structural resemblance and conservation. PMID:25962172

  12. Distinct Urban Mines: Exploiting secondary resources in unique anthropogenic spaces.

    PubMed

    Ongondo, F O; Williams, I D; Whitlock, G

    2015-11-01

    Fear of scarcity of resources highlight the need to exploit secondary materials from urban mines in the anthroposphere. Analogous to primary mines rich in one type of material (e.g. copper, gold, etc.), some urban mines are unique/distinct. We introduce, illustrate and discuss the concept of Distinct Urban Mines (DUM). Using the example of a university DUM in the UK, analogous to a primary mine, we illustrate potential product/material yields in respect of size, concentration and spatial location of the mine. Product ownership and replacement cycles for 17 high-value electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) among students showed that 20 tonnes of valuable e-waste were in stockpile in this DUM and a further 87 tonnes would 'soon' be available for exploitation. We address the opportunities and challenges of exploiting DUMs and conclude that they are readily available reservoirs for resource recovery. Two original contributions arise from this work: (i) a novel approach to urban mining with a potential for maximising resource recovery within the anthroposphere is conceptualised; and (ii) previously unavailable data for high-value products for a typical university DUM are presented and analysed.

  13. How Distinctive Processing Enhances Hits and Reduces False Alarms

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive processing is a concept designed to account for precision in memory, both correct responses and avoidance of errors. The principal question addressed in two experiments is how distinctive processing of studied material reduces false alarms to familiar distractors. Jacoby (Jacoby, Kelley, & McElree, 1999) has used the metaphors early selection and late correction to describe two different types of control processes. Early selection refers to limitations on access whereas late correction describes controlled monitoring of accessed information. The two types of processes are not mutually exclusive, and previous research has provided evidence for the operation of both. The data reported here extend previous work to a criterial recollection paradigm and to a recognition memory test. The results of both experiments show that variables that reduce false memory for highly familiar distracters continue to exert their effect under conditions of minimal post-access monitoring. Level of monitoring was reduced in the first experiment through test instructions and in the second experiment through speeded test responding. The results were consistent with the conclusion that both early selection and late correction operate to control accuracy in memory. PMID:26034343

  14. Three spectrally distinct photoreceptors in diurnal and nocturnal Australian ants

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yuri; Falkowski, Marcin; Narendra, Ajay; Zeil, Jochen; Hemmi, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Ants are thought to be special among Hymenopterans in having only dichromatic colour vision based on two spectrally distinct photoreceptors. Many ants are highly visual animals, however, and use vision extensively for navigation. We show here that two congeneric day- and night-active Australian ants have three spectrally distinct photoreceptor types, potentially supporting trichromatic colour vision. Electroretinogram recordings show the presence of three spectral sensitivities with peaks (λmax) at 370, 450 and 550 nm in the night-active Myrmecia vindex and peaks at 370, 470 and 510 nm in the day-active Myrmecia croslandi. Intracellular electrophysiology on individual photoreceptors confirmed that the night-active M. vindex has three spectral sensitivities with peaks (λmax) at 370, 430 and 550 nm. A large number of the intracellular recordings in the night-active M. vindex show unusually broad-band spectral sensitivities, suggesting that photoreceptors may be coupled. Spectral measurements at different temporal frequencies revealed that the ultraviolet receptors are comparatively slow. We discuss the adaptive significance and the probability of trichromacy in Myrmecia ants in the context of dim light vision and visual navigation. PMID:25994678

  15. Two Distinct Scene-Processing Networks Connecting Vision and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, Andre; Fei-Fei, Li

    2016-01-01

    A number of regions in the human brain are known to be involved in processing natural scenes, but the field has lacked a unifying framework for understanding how these different regions are organized and interact. We provide evidence from functional connectivity and meta-analyses for a new organizational principle, in which scene processing relies upon two distinct networks that split the classically defined parahippocampal place area (PPA). The first network of strongly connected regions consists of the occipital place area/transverse occipital sulcus and posterior PPA, which contain retinotopic maps and are not strongly coupled to the hippocampus at rest. The second network consists of the caudal inferior parietal lobule, retrosplenial complex, and anterior PPA, which connect to the hippocampus (especially anterior hippocampus), and are implicated in both visual and nonvisual tasks, including episodic memory and navigation. We propose that these two distinct networks capture the primary functional division among scene-processing regions, between those that process visual features from the current view of a scene and those that connect information from a current scene view with a much broader temporal and spatial context. This new framework for understanding the neural substrates of scene-processing bridges results from many lines of research, and makes specific functional predictions. PMID:27822493

  16. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  17. BARE Retrotransposons Are Translated and Replicated via Distinct RNA Pools

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei; Jääskeläinen, Marko; Li, Song-ping; Schulman, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon. PMID:23940808

  18. Distinct Clones of Yersinia pestis Caused the Black Death

    PubMed Central

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A.; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18th century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease. PMID:20949072

  19. The mechanism of the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Although multiple overstretched DNA states were identified in experiments, the mechanism of the emergence of distinct states is still unclear. Molecular dynamics simulation is an ideal tool to clarify the mechanism, but the force loading rates in stretching achieved by conventional all-atom DNA models are much faster, which essentially affect overstretching states. We employed a modified coarse-grained DNA model with an unprecedented low loading rate in simulations to study the overstretching transitions of end-opened double-stranded DNA. We observed two-strand peeling off for DNA with low stability and the S-DNA with high stability under tension. By introducing a melting-forbidden model which prevents base-pair breaking, we still observed the overstretching transition induced by the formation of S-DNA due to the change of dihedral angle. Hence, we confirmed that the competition between the two strain-softening manners, i.e., base-pair breaking and dihedral angle variation, results in the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states.

  20. Energetics reveals physiologically distinct castes in a eusocial mammal.

    PubMed

    Scantlebury, M; Speakman, J R; Oosthuizen, M K; Roper, T J; Bennett, N C

    2006-04-06

    Eusociality, which occurs among mammals only in two species of African mole-rat, is characterized by division of labour between morphologically distinct 'castes'. In Damaraland mole-rats (Cryptomys damarensis), colony labour is divided between 'infrequent worker' and 'frequent worker' castes. Frequent workers are active year-round and together perform more than 95% of the total work of the colony, whereas infrequent workers typically perform less than 5% of the total work. Anecdotal evidence suggests that infrequent workers may act as dispersers, with dispersal being limited to comparatively rare periods when the soil is softened by moisture. Here we show that infrequent workers and queens increase their daily energy expenditure after rainfall whereas frequent workers do not. Infrequent workers are also fatter than frequent workers. We suggest that infrequent workers constitute a physiologically distinct dispersing caste, the members of which, instead of contributing to the work of the colony and helping the queen to reproduce, build up their own body reserves in preparation for dispersal and reproduction when environmental conditions are suitable.

  1. Memory Without Consolidation: Temporal Distinctiveness Explains Retroactive Interference.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Ullrich K H; Brown, Gordon D A; Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Is consolidation needed to account for retroactive interference in free recall? Interfering mental activity during the retention interval of a memory task impairs performance, in particular if the interference occurs in temporal proximity to the encoding of the to-be-remembered (TBR) information. There are at least two rival theoretical accounts of this temporal gradient of retroactive interference. The cognitive neuroscience literature has suggested neural consolidation is a pivotal factor determining item recall. According to this account, interfering activity interrupts consolidation processes that would otherwise stabilize the memory representations of TBR items post-encoding. Temporal distinctiveness theory, by contrast, proposes that the retrievability of items depends on their isolation in psychological time. According to this theory, information processed after the encoding of TBR material will reduce the temporal distinctiveness of the TBR information. To test between these accounts, implementations of consolidation were added to the SIMPLE model of memory and learning. We report data from two experiments utilizing a two-list free recall paradigm. Modeling results imply that SIMPLE was able to model the data and did not benefit from the addition of consolidation. It is concluded that the temporal gradient of retroactive interference cannot be taken as evidence for memory consolidation.

  2. Evidence for pharmacologically distinct subsets of GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Scherer, R W; Ferkany, J W; Enna, S J

    1988-09-01

    Activation of GABAB receptors augments neurotransmitter-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation while inhibiting forskolin-mediated second messenger production. Previous studies have revealed that GABAB receptors are associated with a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein, such as Gi. While such a linkage is consistent with the finding that GABAB receptor activation inhibits forskolin-mediated second messenger accumulation, it fails to explain how GABAB agonists are capable of augmenting receptor-mediated cyclic AMP production. The present experiments were undertaken to explore the possible existence of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptors in an attempt to explain this apparent discrepancy. For the study, a variety of agents were examined for their ability to inhibit GABAB binding to brain membranes and to modify isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated second messenger production in rat brain slices. Of the compounds studied, only 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid were found to inhibit GABAB binding. However, 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid failed to influence either isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. On the other hand, while 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid also failed to affect isoproterenol-stimulated second messenger accumulation, it inhibited the forskolin-mediated response. Given this finding, and the fact that some of the agents tested are known to influence GABAB receptor function in other systems, the results indicate a multiplicity of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptor recognition sites. This discovery paves the way for the development of more selective GABAB receptor agonists and antagonists possessing different therapeutic potentials.

  3. Three spectrally distinct photoreceptors in diurnal and nocturnal Australian ants.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yuri; Falkowski, Marcin; Narendra, Ajay; Zeil, Jochen; Hemmi, Jan M

    2015-06-07

    Ants are thought to be special among Hymenopterans in having only dichromatic colour vision based on two spectrally distinct photoreceptors. Many ants are highly visual animals, however, and use vision extensively for navigation. We show here that two congeneric day- and night-active Australian ants have three spectrally distinct photoreceptor types, potentially supporting trichromatic colour vision. Electroretinogram recordings show the presence of three spectral sensitivities with peaks (λmax) at 370, 450 and 550 nm in the night-active Myrmecia vindex and peaks at 370, 470 and 510 nm in the day-active Myrmecia croslandi. Intracellular electrophysiology on individual photoreceptors confirmed that the night-active M. vindex has three spectral sensitivities with peaks (λmax) at 370, 430 and 550 nm. A large number of the intracellular recordings in the night-active M. vindex show unusually broad-band spectral sensitivities, suggesting that photoreceptors may be coupled. Spectral measurements at different temporal frequencies revealed that the ultraviolet receptors are comparatively slow. We discuss the adaptive significance and the probability of trichromacy in Myrmecia ants in the context of dim light vision and visual navigation.

  4. Distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Nadine; Bruentgens, Felicitas; Geilenkirchen, Petra; Machado, Patricia A.; Veitinger, Thomas; Veitinger, Sophie; Lipartowski, Susanne M.; Engelhardt, Corinna H.; Oldiges, Marco; Spehr, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis ranks among the most complex, yet least understood, developmental processes. The physiological principles that control male germ cell development in mammals are notoriously difficult to unravel, given the intricate anatomy and complex endo- and paracrinology of the testis. Accordingly, we lack a conceptual understanding of the basic signaling mechanisms within the testis, which control the seminiferous epithelial cycle and thus govern spermatogenesis. Here, we address paracrine signal transduction in undifferentiated male germ cells from an electrophysiological perspective. We identify distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia, both in vitro and in situ. ATP—a dynamic, widespread, and evolutionary conserved mediator of cell to cell communication in various developmental contexts—activates at least two different spermatogonial purinoceptor isoforms. Both receptors operate within nonoverlapping stimulus concentration ranges, display distinct response kinetics and, in the juvenile seminiferous cord, are uniquely expressed in spermatogonia. We further find that spermatogonia express Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channels that appear to function as a safeguard against prolonged ATP-dependent depolarization. Quantitative purine measurements additionally suggest testicular ATP-induced ATP release, a mechanism that could increase the paracrine radius of initially localized signaling events. Moreover, we establish a novel seminiferous tubule slice preparation that allows targeted electrophysiological recordings from identified testicular cell types in an intact epithelial environment. This unique approach not only confirms our in vitro findings, but also supports the notion of purinergic signaling during the early stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:27574293

  5. The mechanism of the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2016-01-14

    Although multiple overstretched DNA states were identified in experiments, the mechanism of the emergence of distinct states is still unclear. Molecular dynamics simulation is an ideal tool to clarify the mechanism, but the force loading rates in stretching achieved by conventional all-atom DNA models are much faster, which essentially affect overstretching states. We employed a modified coarse-grained DNA model with an unprecedented low loading rate in simulations to study the overstretching transitions of end-opened double-stranded DNA. We observed two-strand peeling off for DNA with low stability and the S-DNA with high stability under tension. By introducing a melting-forbidden model which prevents base-pair breaking, we still observed the overstretching transition induced by the formation of S-DNA due to the change of dihedral angle. Hence, we confirmed that the competition between the two strain-softening manners, i.e., base-pair breaking and dihedral angle variation, results in the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia ontogeny is defined by distinct somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, R. Coleman; Mar, Brenton G.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Grauman, Peter V.; Shareef, Sarah; Allen, Steven L.; Pigneux, Arnaud; Wetzler, Meir; Stuart, Robert K.; Erba, Harry P.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Powell, Bayard L.; Lindeman, Neal; Steensma, David P.; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Neuberg, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can develop after an antecedent myeloid malignancy (secondary AML [s-AML]), after leukemogenic therapy (therapy-related AML [t-AML]), or without an identifiable prodrome or known exposure (de novo AML). The genetic basis of these distinct pathways of AML development has not been determined. We performed targeted mutational analysis of 194 patients with rigorously defined s-AML or t-AML and 105 unselected AML patients. The presence of a mutation in SRSF2, SF3B1, U2AF1, ZRSR2, ASXL1, EZH2, BCOR, or STAG2 was >95% specific for the diagnosis of s-AML. Analysis of serial samples from individual patients revealed that these mutations occur early in leukemogenesis and often persist in clonal remissions. In t-AML and elderly de novo AML populations, these alterations define a distinct genetic subtype that shares clinicopathologic properties with clinically confirmed s-AML and highlights a subset of patients with worse clinical outcomes, including a lower complete remission rate, more frequent reinduction, and decreased event-free survival. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00715637. PMID:25550361

  7. Gremlin 2 regulates distinct roles of BMP and Endothelin 1 signaling in dorsoventral patterning of the facial skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga, Elizabeth; Rippen, Marie; Alexander, Courtney; Schilling, Thomas F.; Crump, J. Gage

    2011-01-01

    Patterning of the upper versus lower face involves generating distinct pre-skeletal identities along the dorsoventral (DV) axes of the pharyngeal arches. Whereas previous studies have shown roles for BMPs, Endothelin 1 (Edn1) and Jagged1b-Notch2 in DV patterning of the facial skeleton, how these pathways are integrated to generate different skeletal fates has remained unclear. Here, we show that BMP and Edn1 signaling have distinct roles in development of the ventral and intermediate skeletons, respectively, of the zebrafish face. Using transgenic gain-of-function approaches and cell-autonomy experiments, we find that BMPs strongly promote hand2 and msxe expression in ventral skeletal precursors, while Edn1 promotes the expression of nkx3.2 and three Dlx genes (dlx3b, dlx5a and dlx6a) in intermediate precursors. Furthermore, Edn1 and Jagged1b pattern the intermediate and dorsal facial skeletons in part by inducing the BMP antagonist Gremlin 2 (Grem2), which restricts BMP activity to the ventral-most face. We therefore propose a model in which later cross-inhibitory interactions between BMP and Edn1 signaling, in part mediated by Grem2, separate an initially homogenous ventral region into distinct ventral and intermediate skeletal precursor domains. PMID:22031546

  8. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8+ T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; Robinson, H.; Wang, R.; Kong, W.-P.; Kanekiyo, M.; Akahata, W.; Xu, L.; Matsuo, K.; Natarajan, K.; Asher, T. E.; Price, D. A.; Douek, D. C.; Margulies, D. H.; Nabel, G. J.

    2009-08-15

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  9. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8plus T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    M Honda; R Wang; W Kong; M Kanekiyo; Q Akahata; L Xu; K Matsuo; K Natarajan; H Robinson; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  10. Epistemological Distinctions and Cultural Politics: Educational Reform and the Naturwissenschaft/Geisteswissenschaft Distinction in Nineteenth-Century Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Denise

    The Erklären/Verstehen debates of the late nineteenth century were, as several essays in this collection point out, peculiar to German-speaking Europe. Even when French or British scholars dealt with similar philosophical arguments, an epistemological distinction between two kinds of knowledge - one about human beings and texts, the other about the natural world - never took on the ubiquity or importance that it held in the German context (see Smith and Schmaus, in this volume). Why was this the case? What about the German intellectual scene made the issue of methodological differences between the sciences such an important theme in the second half of the nineteenth century?

  11. Motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  12. A Transparent and Flexible Graphene-Piezoelectric Fiber Generator.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Yiin Kuen; Kuo, Chien Cheng; Huang, Zih Ming; Li, Shan Chien; Liu, En Rui

    2016-04-13

    Piezoelectric fiber-based generators are prepared by combining two distinctive materials - poly(vinlyidene fluoride) fibers and monolayer/bilayer graphene. Novelty lies in the replacement of opaque metal electrodes with transparent graphene electrodes which enable the graphene-piezoelectric fiber generator to exhibit high flexibility and transparency as well as a great performance with an achievable output of voltage/current about 2 V/200 nA.

  13. Solar thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Toberer, Eric S.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-05-03

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from concentrated sunlight. A novel detailed balance model for STEGs is provided and applied to both state-of-the-art and idealized materials. STEGs can produce electricity by using sunlight to heat one side of a thermoelectric generator. While concentrated sunlight can be used to achieve extremely high temperatures (and thus improved generator efficiency), the solar absorber also emits a significant amount of black body radiation. This emitted light is the dominant loss mechanism in these generators. In this invention, we propose a solution to this problem that eliminates virtually all of the emitted black body radiation. This enables solar thermoelectric generators to operate at higher efficiency and achieve said efficient with lower levels of optical concentration. The solution is suitable for both single and dual axis solar thermoelectric generators.

  14. Category Cued Recall Evokes a Generate-Recognize Retrieval Process

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Toth, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    The experiments reported here were designed to replicate and extend McCabe, Roediger, and Karpicke’s (2011) finding that retrieval in category cued recall involves both controlled and automatic processes. The extension entailed identifying whether distinctive encoding affected one or both of these two processes. The first experiment successfully replicated McCabe et al., but the second, which added a critical baseline condition, produced data inconsistent with a two independent process model of recall. The third experiment provided evidence that retrieval in category cued recall reflects a generate-recognize strategy, with the effect of distinctive processing being localized to recognition. Overall, the data suggest that category cued recall evokes a generate-recognize retrieval strategy and that the sub-processes underlying this strategy can be dissociated as a function of distinctive versus relational encoding processes. PMID:26280355

  15. Detection of evolutionarily distinct avian influenza a viruses in antarctica.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Butler, Jeffrey; Baas, Chantal; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Silva-de-la-Fuente, M Carolina; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo; Olsen, Bjorn; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2014-05-06

    ABSTRACT Distinct lineages of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are harbored by spatially segregated birds, yet significant surveillance gaps exist around the globe. Virtually nothing is known from the Antarctic. Using virus culture, molecular analysis, full genome sequencing, and serology of samples from Adélie penguins in Antarctica, we confirmed infection by H11N2 subtype AIVs. Their genetic segments were distinct from all known contemporary influenza viruses, including South American AIVs, suggesting spatial separation from other lineages. Only in the matrix and polymerase acidic gene phylogenies did the Antarctic sequences form a sister relationship to South American AIVs, whereas distant phylogenetic relationships were evident in all other gene segments. Interestingly, their neuraminidase genes formed a distant relationship to all avian and human influenza lineages, and the polymerase basic 1 and polymerase acidic formed a sister relationship to the equine H3N8 influenza virus lineage that emerged during 1963 and whose avian origins were previously unknown. We also estimated that each gene segment had diverged for 49 to 80 years from its most closely related sequences, highlighting a significant gap in our AIV knowledge in the region. We also show that the receptor binding properties of the H11N2 viruses are predominantly avian and that they were unable to replicate efficiently in experimentally inoculated ferrets, suggesting their continuous evolution in avian hosts. These findings add substantially to our understanding of both the ecology and the intra- and intercontinental movement of Antarctic AIVs and highlight the potential risk of an incursion of highly pathogenic AIVs into this fragile environment. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are typically maintained and spread by migratory birds, resulting in the existence of distinctly different viruses around the world. However, AIVs have not previously been detected in Antarctica. In this study, we

  16. Peptidomic and transcriptomic profiling of four distinct spider venoms

    PubMed Central

    Oldrati, Vera; Koua, Dominique; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Hulo, Nicolas; Arrell, Miriam; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lisacek, Frédérique; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Stöcklin, Reto

    2017-01-01

    Venom based research is exploited to find novel candidates for the development of innovative pharmacological tools, drug candidates and new ingredients for cosmetic and agrochemical industries. Moreover, venomics, as a well-established approach in systems biology, helps to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of the production of such a great molecular biodiversity. Today the advances made in the proteomics, transcriptomics and bioinformatics fields, favor venomics, allowing the in depth study of complex matrices and the elucidation even of minor compounds present in minute biological samples. The present study illustrates a rapid and efficient method developed for the elucidation of venom composition based on NextGen mRNA sequencing of venom glands and LC-MS/MS venom proteome profiling. The analysis of the comprehensive data obtained was focused on cysteine rich peptide toxins from four spider species originating from phylogenetically distant families for comparison purposes. The studied species were Heteropoda davidbowie (Sparassidae), Poecilotheria formosa (Theraphosidae), Viridasius fasciatus (Viridasiidae) and Latrodectus mactans (Theridiidae). This led to a high resolution profiling of 284 characterized cysteine rich peptides, 111 of which belong to the Inhibitor Cysteine Knot (ICK) structural motif. The analysis of H. davidbowie venom revealed a high richness in term of venom diversity: 95 peptide sequences were identified; out of these, 32 peptides presented the ICK structural motif and could be classified in six distinct families. The profiling of P. formosa venom highlighted the presence of 126 peptide sequences, with 52 ICK toxins belonging to three structural distinct families. V. fasciatus venom was shown to contain 49 peptide sequences, out of which 22 presented the ICK structural motif and were attributed to five families. The venom of L. mactans, until now studied for its large neurotoxins (Latrotoxins), revealed the presence of 14 cysteine rich

  17. Disease Severity and Immune Activity Relate to Distinct Interkingdom Gut Microbiome States in Ethnically Distinct Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Jordan S.; LaMere, Brandon J.; Lin, Din L.; Levan, Sophia; Nazareth, Michelle; Mahadevan, Uma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Significant gut microbiota heterogeneity exists among ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, though the clinical implications of this variance are unknown. We hypothesized that ethnically distinct UC patients exhibit discrete gut microbiotas with unique metabolic programming that differentially influence immune activity and clinical status. Using parallel 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer 2 sequencing of fecal samples (UC, 30; healthy, 13), we corroborated previous observations of UC-associated bacterial diversity depletion and demonstrated significant Saccharomycetales expansion as characteristic of UC gut dysbiosis. Furthermore, we identified four distinct microbial community states (MCSs) within our cohort, confirmed their existence in an independent UC cohort, and demonstrated their coassociation with both patient ethnicity and disease severity. Each MCS was uniquely enriched for specific amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism pathways and exhibited significant luminal enrichment of the metabolic products of these pathways. Using a novel ex vivo human dendritic cell and T-cell coculture assay, we showed that exposure to fecal water from UC patients caused significant Th2 skewing in CD4+ T-cell populations compared to that of healthy participants. In addition, fecal water from patients in whom their MCS was associated with the highest level of disease severity induced the most dramatic Th2 skewing. Combined with future investigations, these observations could lead to the identification of highly resolved UC subsets based on defined microbial gradients or discrete microbial features that may be exploited for the development of novel, more effective therapies. PMID:27531910

  18. Lamellar self-assemblies of single-chain amphiphiles and sterols and their derived liposomes: distinct compositions and distinct properties.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhong-Kai; Lafleur, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Typically, single-chain amphiphiles and sterols do not form fluid lamellar phases once hydrated individually. Most of the single-chain amphiphiles form actually micelles in aqueous environments, while sterols display a very limited solubility in water. However, under certain conditions, mixtures of single-chain amphiphiles and sterols lead to the formation of stable fluid bilayers. Over the past decade, several of these systems leading to fluid lamellar self-assemblies have been identified and this article reviews the current knowledge relative to these non-phospholipid bilayers made of single-chain amphiphiles and sterols. It presents an integrated view about the molecular features that are required for their stability, the properties they share, and the origin of these characteristics. It was also shown that these lamellar systems could lead to the formation of unilamellar vesicles, similar to phospholipid based liposomes. These vesicles display distinct properties that make them potentially appealing for technological applications; they display a limited permeability, they are stable, they are formed with molecules that are relatively chemically inert (and relatively cheap), and they can be readily functionalized. The features of these distinct liposomes and their technological applications are reviewed. Finally, the putative biological implications of these non-phospholipid fluid bilayers are also discussed.

  19. Second-sound generation in superfluids: Critically driven porous loudspeakers

    SciTech Connect

    Grabinski, M.; Liu, M.

    1985-08-01

    The function of a porous loudspeaker or oscillating superleak transducer driven hard enough to generate critical velocity in its pores, is investigated theoretically. Two distinct regions of critical behavior with a number of experimentally accessible phenomena are predicted and summarized in a graphic exposition. In addition, the recently found discrepancy between theory and experiment is resolved.

  20. Generating Ideas in Jazz Improvisation: Where Theory Meets Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Idea generation is an integral component of jazz improvising. This article merges theoretical origins and practical experiences through the examination of two seminal works from Pressing and Sudnow. A comparative analysis yields three common sources with distinct characteristics. The greater body of jazz literature supports this potential link…

  1. Distinct contribution of the striatum and cerebellum to motor learning.

    PubMed

    Laforce, R; Doyon, J

    2001-03-01

    The striatum and cerebellum have been shown to be key structures of a distributed system for the control of skilled movements. However, the mechanisms under which they operate remain unclear. This study compared the performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or with cerebellar damage (CE) to that of age-matched controls. Each group performed two visuomotor paradigms: a random variant of the serial reaction time (SRT) task that tested the subject's ability to make efficient stimulus-response associations and an adapted version of the mirror-tracing task that measured their capacity to combine simple movements into complex ones. PD patients with bilateral striatal damage showed an impaired learning profile on the SRT task and a normal facilitation effect in the tracing task, while CE patients showed the reverse pattern. Although further research is needed, the present findings suggest that the striatum and cerebellum are involved in distinct learning mechanisms.

  2. The Anthropocene is functionally and stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Waters, Colin N; Zalasiewicz, Jan; Summerhayes, Colin; Barnosky, Anthony D; Poirier, Clément; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Cearreta, Alejandro; Edgeworth, Matt; Ellis, Erle C; Ellis, Michael; Jeandel, Catherine; Leinfelder, Reinhold; McNeill, J R; Richter, Daniel deB; Steffen, Will; Syvitski, James; Vidas, Davor; Wagreich, Michael; Williams, Mark; Zhisheng, An; Grinevald, Jacques; Odada, Eric; Oreskes, Naomi; Wolfe, Alexander P

    2016-01-08

    Human activity is leaving a pervasive and persistent signature on Earth. Vigorous debate continues about whether this warrants recognition as a new geologic time unit known as the Anthropocene. We review anthropogenic markers of functional changes in the Earth system through the stratigraphic record. The appearance of manufactured materials in sediments, including aluminum, plastics, and concrete, coincides with global spikes in fallout radionuclides and particulates from fossil fuel combustion. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles have been substantially modified over the past century. Rates of sea-level rise and the extent of human perturbation of the climate system exceed Late Holocene changes. Biotic changes include species invasions worldwide and accelerating rates of extinction. These combined signals render the Anthropocene stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene and earlier epochs.

  3. Two distinct groups of fungal catalase/peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2009-08-01

    Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional haem b-containing (Class I) peroxidases with overwhelming catalase activity and substantial peroxidase activity with various one-electron donors. These unique oxidoreductases evolved in ancestral bacteria revealing a complex gene-duplicated structure. Besides being found in numerous bacteria of all phyla, katG genes were also detected in genomes of lower eukaryotes, most prominently of sac and club fungi. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates the occurrence of two distinct groups of fungal KatGs that differ in localization, structural and functional properties. Analysis of lateral gene transfer of bacterial katGs into fungal genomes reveals that the most probable progenitor was a katG from a bacteroidetes predecessor. The putative physiological role(s) of both fungal KatG groups is discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships in bacterial KatGs and is related with the acquisition of (phyto)pathogenicity in fungi.

  4. Distinctive striatal dopamine signaling after dieting and gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Ashrafian, Hutan; Hesse, Swen; Horstmann, Annette; Fenske, Wiebke K

    2015-05-01

    Highly palatable and/or calorically dense foods, such as those rich in fat, engage the striatum to govern and set complex behaviors. Striatal dopamine signaling has been implicated in hedonic feeding and the development of obesity. Dieting and bariatric surgery have markedly different outcomes on weight loss, yet how these interventions affect central homeostatic and food reward processing remains poorly understood. Here, we propose that dieting and gastric bypass produce distinct changes in peripheral factors with known roles in regulating energy homeostasis, resulting in differential modulation of nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic reward circuits. Enhancement of intestinal fat metabolism after gastric bypass may also modify striatal dopamine signaling contributing to its unique long-term effects on feeding behavior and body weight in obese individuals.

  5. Pachydermoperiostosis, a unique entity with distinctive clinical features.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Fragoso, Fátima; Méndez-Flores, Silvia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2015-05-18

    Pachydermoperiostosis, which occurs more frequently in men, is a rare entity with distinctive clinical features and an insidious onset.. We report the case of a 30-year-old man with a one-year history of acropachy, arthralgias, hiperhidrosis, and progressive skin thickening of the face and scalp. The radiological findings were consistent with periostosis and the histopathological analysis from a facial skin biopsy showed a pandermal increase in the thickness and number of collagen bundles. The pathogenesis of PDP is currently unknown, although an increased secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which stimulates the overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has been suggested as a major factor. No specific treatment exists; however, in most cases, the disease tends to stabilize over time.

  6. Toward Distinct Element Method Simulations of Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akatyeva, Evgeniya; Anderson, Tyler; Nikiforov, Ilia; Potyondy, David; Ballarini, Roberto; Dumitrica, Traian

    2011-03-01

    We propose distinct element method modeling of carbon nanotube systems. The atomic-level description of an individual nanotube is coarse-grained into a chain of spherical elements that interact by parallel bonds located at their contacts. The spherical elements can lump multiple translational unit cells of the carbon nanotube and have both translational and rotational degrees of freedom. The discrete long ranged interaction between nanotubes is included in a van der Waals contact of nonmechanical nature that acts simultaneously with the parallel bonds. The created mesoscopic model is put into service by simulating a realistic carbon nanotube ring. The ring morphology arises from the energy balance stored in both parallel and van der Waals bonds. We thank NSF CAREER under Grant No. CMMI-0747684, NSF under Grant No. CMMI 0800896.

  7. Two distinct superconducting phases in LiFeAs

    PubMed Central

    Nag, P. K.; Schlegel, R.; Baumann, D.; Grafe, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Wurmehl, S.; Büchner, B.; Hess, C.

    2016-01-01

    A non-trivial temperature evolution of superconductivity including a temperature-induced phase transition between two superconducting phases or even a time-reversal symmetry breaking order parameter is in principle expected in multiband superconductors such as iron-pnictides. Here we present scanning tunnelling spectroscopy data of LiFeAs which reveal two distinct superconducting phases: at = 18 K a partial superconducting gap opens, evidenced by subtle, yet clear features in the tunnelling spectra, i.e. particle-hole symmetric coherence peak and dip-hump structures. At Tc = 16 K, these features substantiate dramatically and become characteristic of full superconductivity. Remarkably, the distance between the dip-hump structures and the coherence peaks remains practically constant in the whole temperature regimeT ≤ . This rules out the connection of the dip-hump structures to an antiferromagnetic spin resonance. PMID:27297474

  8. Intervertebral disc degeneration: evidence for two distinct phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    We review the evidence that there are two types of disc degeneration. ‘Endplate-driven’ disc degeneration involves endplate defects and inwards collapse of the annulus, has a high heritability, mostly affects discs in the upper lumbar and thoracic spine, often starts to develop before age 30 years, usually leads to moderate back pain, and is associated with compressive injuries such as a fall on the buttocks. ‘Annulus-driven’ disc degeneration involves a radial fissure and/or a disc prolapse, has a low heritability, mostly affects discs in the lower lumbar spine, develops progressively after age 30 years, usually leads to severe back pain and sciatica, and is associated with repetitive bending and lifting. The structural defects which initiate the two processes both act to decompress the disc nucleus, making it less likely that the other defect could occur subsequently, and in this sense the two disc degeneration phenotypes can be viewed as distinct. PMID:22881295

  9. Molecular distinctions among clinical isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Su, C J; Dallo, S F; Baseman, J B

    1990-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fingerprinting of genomic DNA and Southern blots probed with subclones of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae cytadhesin P1 gene were used to characterize clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. On the basis of the examination of 29 individual M. pneumoniae isolates, two distinct groups were established. Group 1, which displayed a 12-kilobase band following DNA digestion with HindIII, consisted of strain M129-B16 and three others obtained in the state of Washington during the 1960s. The remaining M. pneumoniae strains belonged to group 2, which lacked the 12-kilobase band and included samples from the 1940s, 1970s, and 1980s. This category also included the only M. pneumoniae strain isolated from the synovial fluid of an arthritic patient. Images PMID:2166088

  10. Amygdala and Ventral Striatum Make Distinct Contributions to Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vincent D; Dal Monte, Olga; Lucas, Daniel R; Murray, Elisabeth A; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2016-10-19

    Reinforcement learning (RL) theories posit that dopaminergic signals are integrated within the striatum to associate choices with outcomes. Often overlooked is that the amygdala also receives dopaminergic input and is involved in Pavlovian processes that influence choice behavior. To determine the relative contributions of the ventral striatum (VS) and amygdala to appetitive RL, we tested rhesus macaques with VS or amygdala lesions on deterministic and stochastic versions of a two-arm bandit reversal learning task. When learning was characterized with an RL model relative to controls, amygdala lesions caused general decreases in learning from positive feedback and choice consistency. By comparison, VS lesions only affected learning in the stochastic task. Moreover, the VS lesions hastened the monkeys' choice reaction times, which emphasized a speed-accuracy trade-off that accounted for errors in deterministic learning. These results update standard accounts of RL by emphasizing distinct contributions of the amygdala and VS to RL.

  11. Distinct critical cerebellar subregions for components of verbal working memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between cognitive performance and cerebellar integrity in a specific degeneration of the cerebellar cortex: Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6). The results demonstrate a critical relationship between verbal working memory and grey matter density in superior (bilateral lobules VI and crus I of lobule VII) and inferior (bilateral lobules VIIIa and VIIIb, and right lobule IX) parts of the cerebellum. We demonstrate that distinct cerebellar regions subserve different components of the prevalent psychological model for verbal working memory based on a phonological loop. The work confirms the involvement of the cerebellum in verbal working memory and defines specific subsystems for this within the cerebellum. PMID:22133495

  12. MC Chang--Reproductive biologist of distinction 1908-1991.

    PubMed

    Hunter, R H F

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the remarkable life and major scientific achievements of the reproductive biologist M.C. Chang. His scholarly career progressed from university in Peking, via Edinburgh, Scotland, and Cambridge, England, to the newly founded Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology in Massachusetts. At each stage, the hand of fate is noted as are the support and encouragement of key professors. Chang's own contributions on capacitation of spermatozoa, in vitro fertilisation of mammalian eggs, and transplantation of oocytes and embryos are all brought out, as is his essential input to the creation and development of a steroid contraceptive pill. He strongly encouraged young reproductive biologists who worked in his laboratory, and applauded the world-wide distinction of his student and associate, R. Yanagimachi, as a specialist in mammalian fertilisation. Finally, Chang's continued feelings towards his homeland are contrasted with the reality of his American life after 1945, itself a study in poignancy.

  13. Radial stretch reveals distinct populations of mechanosensitive mammalian somatosensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Martha R. C.; Bautista, Diana M.; Wu, Karin; Haeberle, Henry; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Julius, David

    2008-01-01

    Primary afferent somatosensory neurons mediate our sense of touch in response to changes in ambient pressure. Molecules that detect and transduce thermal stimuli have been recently identified, but mechanisms underlying mechanosensation, particularly in vertebrate organisms, remain enigmatic. Traditionally, mechanically evoked responses in somatosensory neurons have been assessed one cell at a time by recording membrane currents in response to application of focal pressure, suction, or osmotic challenge. Here, we used radial stretch in combination with live-cell calcium imaging to gain a broad overview of mechanosensitive neuronal subpopulations. We found that different stretch intensities activate distinct subsets of sensory neurons as defined by size, molecular markers, or pharmacological attributes. In all subsets, stretch-evoked responses required extracellular calcium, indicating that mechanical force triggers calcium influx. This approach extends the repertoire of stimulus paradigms that can be used to examine mechanotransduction in mammalian sensory neurons, facilitating future physiological and pharmacological studies. PMID:19060212

  14. Parsing polyphyletic Pueraria: Delimiting distinct evolutionary lineages through phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Egan, Ashley N; Vatanparast, Mohammad; Cagle, William

    2016-11-01

    Several taxonomic and phylogenetic studies have hypothesized polyphyly within Pueraria DC., a genus comprising 19 species (24 with varieties) including the highly invasive Pueraria montana var. lobata (Kudzu) introduced to the U.S.A. about 150years ago. Previous efforts to investigate monophyly of the genus have been hampered by limited taxon sampling or a lack of comprehensive evolutionary context that would enable definitive taxonomic associations. This work presents a comprehensive phylogenetic investigation of Pueraria within the context of tribe Phaseoleae (Leguminosae). Polyphyly was found to be more extensive than previously thought, with five distinct lineages spread across the tribe and spanning over 25mya of divergence strongly supported by two chloroplast and one nuclear marker, AS2, presented here as a phylogenetic marker for the first time. Our phylogenies support taxonomic revisions to rectify polyphyly within Pueraria, including the resurrection of Neustanthus, moving one species to Teyleria, and the creation of two new genera, Haymondia and Toxicopueraria (taxonomic revisions published elsewhere).

  15. A Distinct Type of Pilus from the Human Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingping; Shoji, Mikio; Shibata, Satoshi; Naito, Mariko; Sato, Keiko; Elsliger, Marc-André; Grant, Joanna C; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Curtis, Michael A; Nakayama, Koji; Wilson, Ian A

    2016-04-21

    Pili are proteinaceous polymers of linked pilins that protrude from the cell surface of many bacteria and often mediate adherence and virulence. We investigated a set of 20 Bacteroidia pilins from the human microbiome whose structures and mechanism of assembly were unknown. Crystal structures and biochemical data revealed a diverse protein superfamily with a common Greek-key β sandwich fold with two transthyretin-like repeats that polymerize into a pilus through a strand-exchange mechanism. The assembly mechanism of the central, structural pilins involves proteinase-assisted removal of their N-terminal β strand, creating an extended hydrophobic groove that binds the C-terminal donor strands of the incoming pilin. Accessory pilins at the tip and base have unique structural features specific to their location, allowing initiation or termination of the assembly. The Bacteroidia pilus, therefore, has a biogenesis mechanism that is distinct from other known pili and likely represents a different type of bacterial pilus.

  16. Three distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, Karolina; Gargasz, Anne Elizabeth; Dabrow, Sharon; Rodriguez, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Although copper deficiency is a rare occurrence in the developed world, attention should be given to the proper supplementation of minerals to at-risk pediatric patients. This study presents 3 distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized patients aged 14 months, 6 years, and 12 years. Two patients had short bowel syndrome, requiring prolonged parenteral nutrition or complex intravenous fluid supplementation. The third patient was severely malnourished. Copper deficiency manifested in all of our patients as either microcytic anemia or pancytopenia with myelodysplastic syndrome. Copper deficiency is an important diagnosis to be considered in patients with prematurity, parenteral nutrition dependency, malabsorption, and/or those with malnutrition. More studies are needed to establish appropriate amounts of copper supplementation to replenish copper stores in deficient patients.

  17. Pediatric schwannomatosis, a rare but distinct form of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anna K; Egelhoff, John C; Curran, John G; Thomas, Bobby

    2016-03-01

    Schwannomatosis is the third major form of neurofibromatosis, distinct from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and type 1 (NF1). This condition is rare with a variable phenotypic presentation and complex molecular and genetic findings. In this case, a previously healthy teenager was found to have multiple spinal lesions and an enhancing right parotid mass on MRI. On extensive further work-up, this patient met the existing clinical criteria for schwannomatosis. This case report aims to review the clinical features and current diagnostic criteria for schwannomatosis and compare it to NF1 and NF2. Special emphasis will be placed on imaging features that should prompt the radiologist to suggest this rare diagnosis.

  18. A crack problem with four distinct harmonic functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Kassir, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of an elastic solid containing a semi-infinite plane crack subjected to concentrated shears parallel to the edge of the crack is considered. A closed form solution using four distinct harmonic functions (none of which can be taken arbitrarily) is found to satisfy the finite displacement and inverse square root stress singularity at the edge of the crack. Explicit expressions in terms of elementary functions are given for the distribution of stress and displacement in the solid. These are obtained by employing Fourier and Kontorovich-Lebedev integral transforms and certain singular solutions of Laplace equations in three dimensions. The variations of the intensity of the local stress field along the crack border are shown graphically. An example is presented, which is in contrast with the conclusion established in the literature that one of the four Papkovich-Neuber functions in three-dimensional elasticity may be arbitrarily set to zero.

  19. Hydrocephalus and Neurocysticercosis: Cases Illustrative of Three Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Faillot, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Background Cysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic infection of the nervous system. Most lesions are intracranial, and spinal involvement is rare. We describe here in two cases of neurocysticercosis (NCC) in the brain and one in the spinal cord that illustrate three distinct mechanisms leading to symptomatic acute hydrocephalus. Case Report Hydrocephalus was related to intracranial NCC in two of them. In the first case the hydrocephalus was due to an extensive arachnoiditis to the craniocervical junction, while in the second it was caused by obstruction of Magendie's foramen in the fourth ventricle by the scolex of Taenia solium. For the third patient, hydrocephalus revealed cysticercosis of the cauda equina due to the scolex. Conclusions NCC should be considered as a possible diagnosis for patients suffering from hydrocephalus when they originate from or have traveled in endemic areas, MRI of the spine is mandatory to search for intraspinal lesions. PMID:25324888

  20. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246