Science.gov

Sample records for generating extreme conditions

  1. Generation of multivariate near shore extreme wave conditions based on an extreme value copula for offshore boundary conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyssen, Gert; Mercelis, Peter; De Schoesitter, Philippe; Blanckaert, Joris

    2013-04-01

    Near shore extreme wave conditions, used as input for numerical wave agitation simulations and for the dimensioning of coastal defense structures, need to be determined at a harbour entrance situated at the French North Sea coast. To obtain significant wave heights, the numerical wave model SWAN has been used. A multivariate approach was used to account for the joint probabilities. Considered variables are: wind velocity and direction, water level and significant offshore wave height and wave period. In a first step a univariate extreme value distribution has been determined for the main variables. By means of a technique based on the mean excess function, an appropriate member of the GPD is selected. An optimal threshold for peak over threshold selection is determined by maximum likelihood optimization. Next, the joint dependency structure for the primary random variables is modeled by an extreme value copula. Eventually the multivariate domain of variables was stratified in different classes, each of which representing a combination of variable quantiles with a joint probability, which are used for model simulation. The main variable is the wind velocity, as in the area of concern extreme wave conditions are wind driven. The analysis is repeated for 9 different wind directions. The secondary variable is water level. In shallow waters extreme waves will be directly affected by water depth. Hence the joint probability of occurrence for water level and wave height is of major importance for design of coastal defense structures. Wind velocity and water levels are only dependent for some wind directions (wind induced setup). Dependent directions are detected using a Kendall and Spearman test and appeared to be those with the longest fetch. For these directions, wind velocity and water level extreme value distributions are multivariately linked through a Gumbel Copula. These distributions are stratified into classes of which the frequency of occurrence can be

  2. Mineralogy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Jinfu

    2012-02-07

    We have performed measurements of minerals based on the synchrotron source for single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, inelastic scattering, spectroscopy and radiography by using diamond anvil cells. We investigated the properties of iron (Fe), iron-magnesium oxides (Fe, Mg)O, silica(SiO{sub 2}), iron-magnesium silicates (Fe, Mg)SiO{sub 3} under simulated high pressure-high temperature extreme conditions of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, low mantle, core-mantle boundary, outer core, and inner core. The results provide a new window on the investigation of the mineral properties at Earth's conditions.

  3. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, G.; Carini, G.; Carron, S.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.; Hasi, J.; Herrmann, S.; Kenney, C.; Segal, J.; Tomada, A.

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  4. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  5. How Cells Endure Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    One of natures most gripping feats of survival is now better understood. For the first time, Berkeley Lab scientists observed the chemical changes in individual cells that enable them to survive in conditions that should kill them. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/07/07/cells-endure-extremes/

  6. Communication: A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael Sneed, Daniel; White, Melanie; Wang, Yonggang

    2014-09-07

    We have successfully created a segregated mixture of hydrogen and oxygen at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell using hard x-ray photochemistry. A keyhole (two holes connected by an opening) sample chamber was created in a metallic gasket to support two segregated powders of ammonia borane and potassium perchlorate, respectively, in each hole at a pressure of ∼5.0 GPa. Both holes were separately irradiated with synchrotron hard x-rays to release molecular oxygen and molecular hydrogen, respectively. Upon irradiation of the first KClO{sub 4}-containing hole, solid reddish-orange O{sub 2} appeared in the region of irradiation and molecular oxygen was found to diffuse throughout the entire sample region. The second ammonia borane-containing hole was then irradiated and H{sub 2} was observed to form via Raman spectroscopy. Water also was observed in the ammonia borane-containing hole and possibly (in the form of ice VII) in the second hole. This unique experiment demonstrates the ability to easily create solid mixtures of simple molecular systems via x-ray irradiation and then react them via further irradiation which will aid the study of chemistry under extreme conditions.

  7. Carbon tetrachloride under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael Sneed, Daniel; Wang, Yonggang; Smith, Quinlan; Subrahmanyam, Garimella

    2014-05-21

    We report on three experiments on carbon tetrachloride subjected to extreme conditions. In the first experiment, Raman spectra of CCl{sub 4} were acquired up to 28 GPa. Evidence was observed for at least two new phases of CCl{sub 4} above 14 GPa (phase VI) and above 22 GPa (phase VII). Decompression of the sample showed no evidence of pressure-induced decomposition. In the second experiment, a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study was performed up to 30 GPa verifying phase V and potential phases above 14 (VI) and 22 GPa (VII), respectively. In the third study, we examined irradiated CCl{sub 4} using synchrotron infrared spectroscopy to reduce fluorescent contamination. Some sort of carbon allotrope appears as a byproduct suggesting the following reaction with hard x-rays: CCl{sub 4}+ hν → C + 2Cl{sub 2}.

  8. Magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of hypervelocity neutral plasma jets and their interactions with materials generating extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan; Sitaraman, Hariswaran

    2014-10-01

    The development of a Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high density thermal plasma in a co-axial plasma gun is presented. The MHD governing equations are numerically solved using a matrix free implicit scheme in an unstructured grid finite volume framework. The MHD model is used to characterize the high energy jet which emanates from the accelerator. The solver is then used to predict the conditions created at the surface of a flat plate placed at a fixed distance from the exit of the gun. The model parameters are adjusted so that the energy density of the jet impacting the plate is of the same order of magnitude as that of the Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruptions in thermonuclear fusion reactors. The idea is to use the pressure and temperature on the plate surface to obtain an estimate of the stress created on the plate due to jet impact. The model is used to quantify damage caused by ELM disruptions on the confining material surface.

  9. Raman spectroscopy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-11-05

    We report the results of Raman measurements of various materials under simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC). High temperatures are generated by laser heating or internal resistive (ohmic) heating or a combination of both. We present Raman spectra of cubic boron nitride (cBN) to 40 GPa and up to 2300 K that show a continuous pressure and temperature shift of the frequency of the transverse optical mode. We have also obtained high-pressure Raman spectra from a new noble metal nitride, which we synthesized at approximately 50 GPa and 2000 K. We have obtained high-temperature spectra from pure nitrogen to 39 GPa and up to 2000 K, which show the presence of a hot band that has previously been observed in CARS measurements. These measurements have also allowed us to constrain the melting curve and to examine changes in the intramolecular potential with pressure.

  10. Materials Response under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Lorenz, K T; Pollaine, S; McNaney, J M

    2005-10-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures, 10-100 GPa (0.1-1 Mbar) and strain rates (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities. The goal is an experimental capability to test constitutive models for high-pressure, solid-state strength for a variety of materials. Relevant constitutive models are discussed, and our progress in developing a quasi-isentropic, ramped-pressure, shockless drive is given. Designs to test the constitutive models with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples are presented.

  11. Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Osamu

    2008-09-07

    Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

  12. Study of extreme nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sudhee Ranjan

    2014-08-14

    Studies of extreme nuclear shapes have always fascinated scientists and are being pursued quite strongly over the years. Nuclei present themselves with interesting shapes and structures at different conditions of spin, excitation and also with the number of neutrons and/or protons in them. Gamma decays from the Giant dipole Resonances in nuclei can probe directly their shapes at different extreme conditions by looking at their resonant line-shapes, e.g., Jacobi shapes and shape-transitions, super/hyper-deformation etc. Similar such studies, done for the first time, using the LAMBDA high energy gamma spectrometer developed at VECC, is discussed here.

  13. Conditional simulations for fields of extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechler, Aurélien; Vrac, Mathieu; Bel, Liliane

    2014-05-01

    Many environmental models, such as hydrological models, require input data, e.g. precipitation values, correctly simulated and distributed, even at locations where no observation is available. This is particularly true for extreme events that may be of high importance for impact studies. The last decade has seen max-stable processes emerge as a powerful tool for the statistical modeling of spatial extremes. Recently, such processes have been used in climate context to perform simulations at ungauged sites based on empirical distributions of a spatial field conditioned by observed values in some locations. In this work conditional simulations of extremal t process are investigated, taking benefits of its spectral construction. The methodology of conditional simulations proposed by Dombry et al. [2013] for Brown-Resnick and Schlather models is adapted for the extremal t process with some improvements which enlarge the possible number of conditional points. A simulation study enables to highlight the role of the different parameters of the model and to emphasize the importance of the steps of the algorithm. In this work, we focus on the French Mediterranean basin, which is a key spot of occurrences of meteorological extremes such as heavy precipitation. Indeed, major extreme precipitation are regularly observed in this region near the 'cévenol" mountains. The modeling and the understanding of these extreme precipitation - the so-called 'cévenol events" - are of major importance for hydrological studies in this complex terrain since they often trigger major floods in this region. The application of our methodology on real data in this region shows that the model and the algorithm perform well provided the stationary assumptions are fulfilled.

  14. Nature versus nurture: developing enzymes that function under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Liszka, Michael J; Clark, Melinda E; Schneider, Elizabeth; Clark, Douglas S

    2012-01-01

    Many industrial processes used to produce chemicals and pharmaceuticals would benefit from enzymes that function under extreme conditions. Enzymes from extremophilic microorganisms have evolved to function in a variety of extreme environments, and bioprospecting for these microorganisms has led to the discovery of new enzymes with high tolerance to nonnatural conditions. However, bioprospecting is inherently limited by the diversity of enzymes evolved by nature. Protein engineering has also been successful in generating extremophilic enzymes by both rational mutagenesis and directed evolution, but screening for activity under extreme conditions can be difficult. This review examines the emerging synergy between bioprospecting and protein engineering in developing extremophilic enzymes. Specific topics include unnatural industrial conditions relevant to biocatalysis, biophysical properties of extremophilic enzymes, and industrially relevant extremophilic enzymes found either in nature or through protein engineering. PMID:22468597

  15. Benchmark Generation and Simulation at Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Lagadapati, Mahesh; Mueller, Frank; Engelmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The path to extreme scale high-performance computing (HPC) poses several challenges related to power, performance, resilience, productivity, programmability, data movement, and data management. Investigating the performance of parallel applications at scale on future architectures and the performance impact of different architectural choices is an important component of HPC hardware/software co-design. Simulations using models of future HPC systems and communication traces from applications running on existing HPC systems can offer an insight into the performance of future architectures. This work targets technology developed for scalable application tracing of communication events. It focuses on extreme-scale simulation of HPC applications and their communication behavior via lightweight parallel discrete event simulation for performance estimation and evaluation. Instead of simply replaying a trace within a simulator, this work promotes the generation of a benchmark from traces. This benchmark is subsequently exposed to simulation using models to reflect the performance characteristics of future-generation HPC systems. This technique provides a number of benefits, such as eliminating the data intensive trace replay and enabling simulations at different scales. The presented work features novel software co-design aspects, combining the ScalaTrace tool to generate scalable trace files, the ScalaBenchGen tool to generate the benchmark, and the xSim tool to assess the benchmark characteristics within a simulator.

  16. Mixtures of planetary ices at extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Scandolo, Sandro

    2011-02-08

    The interiors of Neptune and Uranus are believed to be primarily composed of a fluid mixture of methane and water. The mixture is subjected to pressures up to several hundred gigapascal, causing the ionization of water. Laboratory and simulation studies so far have focused on the properties of the individual components. Here we show, using first-principle molecular dynamic simulations, that the properties of the mixed fluid are qualitatively different with respect to those of its components at the same conditions. We observe a pressure-induced softening of the methane-water intermolecular repulsion that points to an enhancement of mixing under extreme conditions. Ionized water causes the progressive ionization of methane and the mixture becomes electronically conductive at milder conditions than pure water, indicating that the planetary magnetic field of Uranus and Neptune may originate at shallower depths than currently assumed.

  17. Mixtures of planetary ices at extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Scandolo, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    The interiors of Neptune and Uranus are believed to be primarily composed of a fluid mixture of methane and water. The mixture is subjected to pressures up to several hundred gigapascal, causing the ionization of water. Laboratory and simulation studies so far have focused on the properties of the individual components. Here we show, using first-principle molecular dynamic simulations, that the properties of the mixed fluid are qualitatively different with respect to those of its components at the same conditions. We observe a pressure-induced softening of the methane-water intermolecular repulsion that points to an enhancement of mixing under extreme conditions. Ionized water causes the progressive ionization of methane and the mixture becomes electronically conductive at milder conditions than pure water, indicating that the planetary magnetic field of Uranus and Neptune may originate at shallower depths than currently assumed. PMID:21304514

  18. Response of Simple, Model Systems to Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2015-07-30

    The focus of the research was on the application of high-pressure/high-temperature techniques, together with intense energetic ion beams, to the study of the behavior of simple oxide systems (e.g., SiO2, GeO2, CeO2, TiO2, HfO2, SnO2, ZnO and ZrO2) under extreme conditions. These simple stoichiometries provide unique model systems for the analysis of structural responses to pressure up to and above 1 Mbar, temperatures of up to several thousands of kelvin, and the extreme energy density generated by energetic heavy ions (tens of keV/atom). The investigations included systematic studies of radiation- and pressure-induced amorphization of high P-T polymorphs. By studying the response of simple stoichiometries that have multiple structural “outcomes”, we have established the basic knowledge required for the prediction of the response of more complex structures to extreme conditions. We especially focused on the amorphous state and characterized the different non-crystalline structure-types that result from the interplay of radiation and pressure. For such experiments, we made use of recent technological developments, such as the perforated diamond-anvil cell and in situ investigation using synchrotron x-ray sources. We have been particularly interested in using extreme pressures to alter the electronic structure of a solid prior to irradiation. We expected that the effects of modified band structure would be evident in the track structure and morphology, information which is much needed to describe theoretically the fundamental physics of track-formation. Finally, we investigated the behavior of different simple-oxide, composite nanomaterials (e.g., uncoated nanoparticles vs. core/shell systems) under coupled, extreme conditions. This provided insight into surface and boundary effects on phase stability under extreme conditions.

  19. Extraordinary survival of nanobacteria under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria show high resistance to gamma irradiation. To further examine their survival in extreme conditions several disinfecting and sterilizing chemicals as well as autoclaving, UV light, microwaves, heating and drying treatments were carried out. The effect of antibiotics used in cell culture were also evaluated. Two forms of nanobacteria were used in the tests: nanobacteria cultured in serum containing medium, and nanobacteria cultured in serum-free medium, the latter being more mineralized. Nanobacteria, having various amounts of apatite on their surfaces, were used to analyze the degree of protection given by the mineral. The chemicals tested included ethanol, glutaraldehyde, formalin, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, detergents, and commercial disinfectants at concentrations generally used for disinfection. After chemical and physical treatments for various times, the nanobacteria were subcultered to detect their survival. The results show unique and wide resistance of nanobacteria to common agents used in disinfection. It can also be seen that the mineralization of the nanobacterial surface furthermore increases the resistance. Survival of nanobacteria is unique among living bacteria, but it can be compared with that observed in spores. Interestingly, nanobacteria have metabolic rate as slow as bacterial spores. A slow metabolic rate and protective structures, like mineral, biofilm and impermeable cell wall, can thus explain the observations made.

  20. Matter Under Extreme Conditions: The Early Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, R. Norris; Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-03-01

    Extreme conditions in natural flows are examined, starting with a turbulent big bang. A hydro-gravitational-dynamics cosmology model is adopted. Planck-Kerr turbulence instability causes Planck-particle turbulent combustion. Inertial-vortex forces induce a non-turbulent ki- netic energy cascade to Planck-Kolmogorov scales where vorticity is produced, overcoming 10113 Pa Planck-Fortov pressures. The spinning, expanding fireball has a slight deficit of Planck antiparticles. Space and mass-energy powered by gluon viscous stresses expand exponentially at speeds >1025 c. Turbulent temperature and spin fluctuations fossilize at scales larger than ct, where c is light speed and t is time. Because "dark-energy" antigravity forces vanish when infla- tion ceases, and because turbulence produces entropy, the universe is closed and will collapse and rebound. Density and spin fossils of big bang turbulent mixing trigger structure formation in the plasma epoch. Fragmenting protosuperclustervoids and protoclustervoids produce weak tur- bulence until the plasma-gas transition give chains of protogalaxies with the morphology of tur- bulence. Chain galaxy clusters observed at large redshifts ~8.6 support this interpretation. Pro- togalaxies fragment into clumps, each with a trillion Earth-mass H-He gas planets. These make stars, supernovae, the first chemicals, the first oceans and the first life soon after the cosmologi- cal event.

  1. Extremely strong thermohaline sources/sinks generated by diagnostic initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peter C.; Lan, Jian

    2003-03-01

    One difficulty for ocean modeling is the lack of velocity data for specifying the initial condition. Diagnostic initialization is widely used; it integrates the model from known temperature (Tc) and salinity (Sc) and zero velocity fields while holding (Tc, Sc) unchanged. After a period (around 30 days) of the diagnostic run, the velocity field (Vc) is established, and (Tc, Sc, Vc) fields are then treated as the initial conditions for the prognostic numerical modeling. During the diagnostic initialization period, the heat and salt `source/sink' terms are generated at each time step. Maximum time rates of absolute change of the monthly mean T, S (0.1°/day, 0.1 ppt/day) are taken as the standard measures to identify the strength of the thermohaline `sources/sinks'. Twenty four times of the standard measures (0.1°/hr, 0.1 ppt/hr) represent strong `sources/sinks'. Ten times of the strong `sources/sinks' (1°/hr, 1 ppt/hr) represent extremely strong `sources/sinks'. The Princeton Ocean Model implemented for the Japan/East Sea is used to demonstrate the existence of extremely strong thermohaline sources and sinks generated by the diagnostic initialization with the annual mean Tc, Sc from the Navy's Global Digital Environmental Model. The effects of extremely strong and spatially nonuniform initial heating/cooling (salting/freshening) rates on thermohaline and velocity fields need to be further investigated.

  2. Adapting standards of care under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Kristine M; Peterson, Cheryl A; Subbarao, Italo; White, Kathleen M

    2009-06-01

    The filing of criminal charges against a group of clinicians in New Orleans for failure to meet expected standards of care following the hurricanes of 2005 made the growing concern among health professionals about care provided during extreme emergencies or disasters all too real. Questions about what may lead to censure, penalties from licensing boards, or lawsuits have come from nurses, physicians, and many other licensed health professionals. A panel convened by the American Nurses Association that included representatives of medical, public health, hospital, and government agencies considered the ethical, professional, and practical aspects of meeting standards of care in such circumstances. Clinicians are reminded that in emergencies, it is only the circumstances that change (perhaps radically); neither the individual's professional competency nor the basic professional standard of care is different. In making prioritized decisions under such circumstances, the individual's ethical framework is utilitarian, and there are 3 areas for action, even when some routine tasks are set aside: maintain worker and patient safety; maintain airway, breathing, and circulation; and establish or maintain infection control. Policy recommendations such as state legislation for the adoption of comprehensive immunity for volunteer health care workers, and the establishment of a medical review panel as arbitration board are also suggested. The resulting white paper summarizes the issues and provides guidance to individual professionals, institutions in which they work, and emergency planners.

  3. Evaluating environmental joint extremes for the offshore industry using the conditional extremes model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Understanding extreme ocean environments and their interaction with fixed and floating structures is critical for the design of offshore and coastal facilities. The joint effect of various ocean variables on extreme responses of offshore structures is fundamental in determining the design loads. For example, it is known that mean values of wave periods tend to increase with increasing storm intensity, and a floating system responds in a complex way to both variables. Specification of joint extremes in design criteria has often been somewhat ad hoc, being based on fairly arbitrary combinations of extremes of variables estimated independently. Such approaches are even outlined in design guidelines. Mathematically more consistent estimates of the joint occurrence of extreme environmental variables fall into two camps in the offshore industry - response-based and response-independent. Both are outlined here, with emphasis on response-independent methods, particularly those based on the conditional extremes model recently introduced by (Heffernan and Tawn, 2004), which has a solid theoretical motivation. We illustrate an application of the conditional extremes model to joint estimation of extreme storm peak significant wave height and peak period at a northern North Sea location, incorporating storm direction as a model covariate. We also discuss joint estimation of extreme current profiles with depth off the North West Shelf of Australia. Methods such as the conditional extremes model provide valuable additions to the metocean engineer's toolkit.

  4. Dynamic ionization of water under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Goldman, N; Fried, L E; Crowhurst, J C; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J; Zaug, J M

    2004-07-19

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study fluid water at approximately 1000 K and 2 to 60 GPa in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have also been employed to simulate water under similar conditions. The experimental Raman intensity of the O-H stretch mode was observed to decrease with pressure, and beyond 50 GPa this mode was no longer visible. At approximately the same pressure we inferred a change in the slope of the melting curve. Consistent with these experimental observations, the MD simulations show that water under these conditions forms a dynamically ionized liquid state, which is dominated by very short lived (<10 fs) H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}O{sup +} and O{sup 2-} species.

  5. Extreme Rivers for Future Climates - Simulation Using Spatial Weather Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchar, Leszek; Kosierb, Ryszard; Iwański, Sławomir; Jelonek, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    -80 years. The probability distribution of the extreme river flow gives detailed information on the moment characteristics, confidence intervals and critical values. It is an important tool for a decision support system. In case of extreme daily flow in the Kaczawa River, the catchment shows significant changes depending on the climate change scenario and time to lead. REFERENCES Iwanski, S. and L. Kuchar (2003). Spatial generation of daily meteorological data. Acta Scientiarum Polonorum - Formatio Circumiectu, 2(1): 113-121 (in Polish). Katz, R.W. (1996). Use of conditional stochastic models to generate climate change scenarios. Clim. Change, 35: 397-414. Walpole R.E., Myers R.H., Myers S.L. and K. Ye (2002). Probability and statistics for engineers and scientists. Prentice Hall, 7th Ed., New Jersey.

  6. Bioenergetics and solute uptake under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Albers, S V; Van de Vossenberg, J L; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    2001-10-01

    The ion and particularly the proton and sodium ion permeabilities of cytoplasmic membranes play crucial roles in the bioenergetics of microorganisms. The proton and sodium permeabilities of membranes increase with temperature. Psychrophilic and mesophilic bacteria and mesophilic, (hyper)thermophilic, and halophilic archaea are capable of adjusting the lipid composition of their membranes in such a way that the proton permeability at the respective growth temperature remains constant (homeoproton permeability). Thermophilic bacteria are an exception. They rely on the less permeable sodium ions to generate a sodium motive force, which is subsequently used to drive energy-requiring membrane-bound processes. Transport of solutes across bacterial and archaeal membranes is mainly catalyzed by primary ATP-driven transport systems or by proton- or sodium-motive-force-driven secondary transport systems. Unlike most bacteria, hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea prefer primary uptake systems. Several high-affinity ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters for sugars from hyperthermophiles have been identified and characterized. The activities of these ABC transporters allow these organisms to thrive in their nutrient-poor environments.

  7. [Guidelines on asthma in extreme environmental conditions].

    PubMed

    Drobnic, Franchek; Borderías Clau, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent chronic disease which, if not properly controlled, can limit the patient's activities and lifestyle. In recent decades, owing to the diffusion of educational materials, the application of clinical guidelines and, most importantly, the availability of effective pharmacological treatment, most patients with asthma are now able to lead normal lives. Significant social changes have also taken place during the same period, including more widespread pursuit of sporting activities and tourism. As a result of these changes, individuals with asthma can now participate in certain activities that were inconceivable for these patients only a few years ago, including winter sports, underwater activities, air flight, and travel to remote places with unusual environmental conditions (deserts, high mountain environments, and tropical regions). In spite of the publication of several studies on this subject, our understanding of the effects of these situations on patients with asthma is still limited. The Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) has decided to publish these recommendations based on the available evidence and expert opinion in order to provide information on this topic to both doctors and patients and to avert potentially dangerous situations that could endanger the lives of these patients.

  8. The electrical conductivity of silicate liquids at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipioni, R.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Could the Earth have had a silicate dynamo early in its history? One requirement is that the electrical conductivity of silicate liquids be sufficiently high. However, very little is known about this property at the extreme conditions of pressure and temperature that prevailed in the magma ocean. We have computed from first principles molecular dynamics simulations the dc conductivity of liquid Silica SiO2 at pressure and temperature conditions spanning those of the magma ocean and super-Earth interiors. We find semi-metallic values of the conductivity at conditions typical of the putative basal magma ocean in the Early Earth. The variation of the conductivity with pressure and temperature displays interesting behavior that we rationalize on the basis of the closing the pseudo-gap at the Fermi level. For temperatures lower than T < 20,000 K electrical conductivity exhibits a maximum at intermediate compressions. We further explain this behavior in terms of stuctural changes that occur in silica liquid at high pressure; we find that the structure approaches that of the iso-electronic rare earth element Ne. We compare with Hugoniot data, including the equation of state, heat capacity, and reflectivity. The behavior of the heat capacity is different to that inferred from multiple Hugoniot experiments. These differences and the effect of including exact exchange on the calculations are discussed. Our results have important consequences for magnetic field generation in the early Earth and super-Earths.

  9. Pulmonary Edema in Healthy Subjects in Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Garbella, Erika; Catapano, Giosuè; Pratali, Lorenza; Pingitore, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    There are several pieces of evidence showing occurrence of pulmonary edema (PE) in healthy subjects in extreme conditions consisting of extreme psychophysical demand in normal environment and psychophysical performances in extreme environment. A combination of different mechanisms, such as mechanical, hemodynamic, biochemical, and hypoxemic ones, may underlie PE leading to an increase in lung vascular hydrostatic pressure and lung vascular permeability and/or a downregulation of the alveolar fluid reabsorption pathways. PE can be functionally detected by closing volume measurement and lung diffusing capacity test to different gases or directly visualized by multiple imaging techniques. Among them chest ultrasonography can detect and quantify the extravascular lung water, creating “comet-tail” ultrasound artefacts (ULCs) from water-thickened pulmonary interlobular septa. In this paper the physiopathological mechanisms of PE, the functional and imaging techniques applied to detect and quantify the phenomenon, and three models of extreme conditions, that is, ironman athletes, climbers and breath-hold divers, are described. PMID:21766015

  10. Structures under extreme loading conditions -- 1996. PVP-Volume 325

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.S.; Zukas, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    High-energy excitations are a continuing challenge to experimental, analytical, and computational approaches for learning the behavior of materials and structures under extreme loading conditions. Problems involving underwater explosions and their effects on structures lead off this volume. These are followed by problems traditionally falling in the category of structural dynamics: the buckling and large plastic deformation of structures and structural elements subjected to intense, short-duration distributed or localized loads. As load intensity increases and both load duration and response times decrease, analyses using wave propagation concepts become important. The focus shifts to the local response of the material at the load point rather than the global response of the structure. Many papers herein present experimental, analytical, and numerical solutions to problems of blast and impact loading on diverse structures or structural elements. Others deal with techniques required to generate such loading in the laboratory and the instrumentation required to establish loading conditions and measure response characteristics. This broad coverage of topics should make this a valuable volume for those working in shock and impact loading, high rate material behavior, penetration and perforation, and also hypervelocity impact. Separate abstracts were prepared for some papers in this volume.

  11. Porous materials for thermal management under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Clyne, T W; Golosnoy, I O; Tan, J C; Markaki, A E

    2006-01-15

    A brief analysis is presented of how heat transfer takes place in porous materials of various types. The emphasis is on materials able to withstand extremes of temperature, gas pressure, irradiation, etc. i.e. metals and ceramics, rather than polymers. A primary aim is commonly to maximize either the thermal resistance (i.e. provide insulation) or the rate of thermal equilibration between the material and a fluid passing through it (i.e. to facilitate heat exchange). The main structural characteristics concern porosity (void content), anisotropy, pore connectivity and scale. The effect of scale is complex, since the permeability decreases as the structure is refined, but the interfacial area for fluid-solid heat exchange is, thereby, raised. The durability of the pore structure may also be an issue, with a possible disadvantage of finer scale structures being poor microstructural stability under service conditions. Finally, good mechanical properties may be required, since the development of thermal gradients, high fluid fluxes, etc. can generate substantial levels of stress. There are, thus, some complex interplays between service conditions, pore architecture/scale, fluid permeation characteristics, convective heat flow, thermal conduction and radiative heat transfer. Such interplays are illustrated with reference to three examples: (i) a thermal barrier coating in a gas turbine engine; (ii) a Space Shuttle tile; and (iii) a Stirling engine heat exchanger. Highly porous, permeable materials are often made by bonding fibres together into a network structure and much of the analysis presented here is oriented towards such materials. PMID:18272456

  12. Porous materials for thermal management under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Clyne, T W; Golosnoy, I O; Tan, J C; Markaki, A E

    2006-01-15

    A brief analysis is presented of how heat transfer takes place in porous materials of various types. The emphasis is on materials able to withstand extremes of temperature, gas pressure, irradiation, etc. i.e. metals and ceramics, rather than polymers. A primary aim is commonly to maximize either the thermal resistance (i.e. provide insulation) or the rate of thermal equilibration between the material and a fluid passing through it (i.e. to facilitate heat exchange). The main structural characteristics concern porosity (void content), anisotropy, pore connectivity and scale. The effect of scale is complex, since the permeability decreases as the structure is refined, but the interfacial area for fluid-solid heat exchange is, thereby, raised. The durability of the pore structure may also be an issue, with a possible disadvantage of finer scale structures being poor microstructural stability under service conditions. Finally, good mechanical properties may be required, since the development of thermal gradients, high fluid fluxes, etc. can generate substantial levels of stress. There are, thus, some complex interplays between service conditions, pore architecture/scale, fluid permeation characteristics, convective heat flow, thermal conduction and radiative heat transfer. Such interplays are illustrated with reference to three examples: (i) a thermal barrier coating in a gas turbine engine; (ii) a Space Shuttle tile; and (iii) a Stirling engine heat exchanger. Highly porous, permeable materials are often made by bonding fibres together into a network structure and much of the analysis presented here is oriented towards such materials.

  13. 49 CFR 392.14 - Hazardous conditions; extreme caution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hazardous conditions, such as those caused by snow, ice, sleet, fog, mist, rain, dust, or smoke, adversely... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous conditions; extreme caution. 392.14... DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Driving of Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.14 Hazardous...

  14. Focus issue on the Study of Matter at Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Naurang L.; Saxena, Surendra K.; Bansil, Arun

    2015-09-01

    Study of matter at extreme conditions encompasses many different approaches for understanding the physics, chemistry and materials science underlying processes, products and technologies important for society. Although extreme conditions have been associated traditionally with research in areas of geology, mineral and earth sciences, the field has expanded in the recent years to include work on energy related materials and quantum functional materials from hard to soft matter. With the motivation to engage a large number of scientists with various disciplinary interests, ranging from physics, chemistry, geophysics to materials science, the study of matter at extreme conditions has been the theme of a series of conferences hosted by the High Pressure Science Society of America (HiPSSA) and the Center for the Study of Matter at Extreme Conditions (CeSMEC) of Florida International University (FIU), Miami. These SMEC (Study of Matter at Extreme Conditions) conferences are aimed at providing a unique platform for leading researchers to meet and share cutting-edge developments, and to bridge established fields under this interdisciplinary umbrella for research on materials. The seventh meeting in the SMEC series was held during March 23-30, 2013, while sailing from Miami to the Caribbean Islands, and concluded with great enthusiasm.

  15. Transcontinental hydrometeorological extremes and streamflow generation in the Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Arriola, F.; Lavado, W.; Oglesby, R. J.; Rowe, C. M.; Vazquez-Aguirre, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Streamflow is a key integrative variable of the hydrologic cycle at the basin scale. In regions along the Pacific coast of the Americas, the role of streamflow varies according to varying physical, biological, and socioeconomical contexts. Improving our understanding of the relationships between those components is a key element to improving the predictability of water availability to sustain food and energy security. However, it is still unclear how large-scale phenomena such as El Niño - Southern Oscillation affect streamflow generation along the Pacific Coast. The present work aims (a) to understand the temporal variability and spatial distribution of hydrometeorological extremes in different basins along the Pacific Coast and (b) how hydrometeorological extreme events contribute to the water year. We hypothesize that hydrometeorologic extreme contributions are to some extent regulated by ENSO, increasing their effect on streamflow generation during extreme-wet and -dry years. Hydrometeorological extreme events are estimated through the use of percentiles of precipitation and streamflow based on a GEV distribution. We assess the Sacramento River Basin (USA), Yaqui and Grijalva River Basins (Mexico) and Chillon River Basin (Perú). Preliminary results show important effects of ENSO negative phase (La Niña) on large streamflow generation in the Grijalva River Basin (Mexico), while in the Sacramento River Basin (USA), the effect is more conspicuous during El Niño, affecting the sustainability of hydropower generation and agricultural activities.

  16. Conditional Generation of Monthly Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Kaluarachchi, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Monthly precipitation models can be used in basin-wide modeling to develop long-term strategies for water resources planning and management and to estimate the change of water yield due to climate change. Such precipitation models are especially important for effective management of river basins in developing countries such as the upper Blue Nile River basin of Ethiopia where the water resource utilization is limited. Many studies have been previously performed to preserve historical temporal and spatial structures when generating precipitation series. The main focus of those studies was to preserve the historical statistics. Other important factors to be considered are transition and spatial correlations. A few recent studies attempted to preserve transition as well as the statistics of historical record. These studies provided satisfactory results while showing the difficulty and complexity of computations in their methods. The conditional generation method (CGM) that can preserve both historical temporal and spatial structures is presented in this study. Because the CGM is driven from the historical conditional probabilities occurring given amounts of precipitation between two successive months or two stations, it is computationally simple and reliable, i.e., parameterization, inverse matrix, or optimum band width is not required. The CGM was applied to reproducing the precipitation pattern of the upper Blue Nile River basin in Ethiopia using monthly precipitation data of 10 stations to demonstrate its applicability. Comparing to the method of inverse transformation of cumulative distribution functions of the gamma distribution and nonparametric kernel estimator with variable band width selected from the goodness-of-fit tests, the CGM showed improved performance, especially in representing the transition characteristics. The CGM also generated the historical spatial correlations between the stations with acceptable accuracy. The results suggested that the CGM

  17. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Simeoni, G. G.; Valicu, R. G.; Borchert, G.; Böni, P.; Rasmussen, N. G.; Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A.

    2015-12-14

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4–10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  18. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeoni, G. G.; Valicu, R. G.; Borchert, G.; Böni, P.; Rasmussen, N. G.; Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4-10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  19. Study for Germination Under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, H.

    2010-04-01

    In order to investigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. As a result, seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species.

  20. Atomistic Simulations of Material Properties under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi

    Extreme conditions involve low or high temperatures (> 1500 K), high pressures (> 30 MPa), high strains or strain rates, high radiation fluxes (> 100 dpa), and high electromagnetic fields (> 15T). Material properties under extreme conditions can be extremely different from those under normal conditions. Understanding material properties and performance under extreme conditions, including their dynamic evolution over time, plays an essential role in improving material properties and developing novel materials with desired properties. To understand material properties under extreme conditions, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with recently developed reactive force fields (ReaxFF) and traditional embedded atom methods (EAM) potentials to examine various materials (e.g., energetic materials and binary liquids) and processes. The key results from the simulations are summarized below. Anisotropic sensitivity of RDX crystals: Based on the compress-and-shear reactive dynamics (CS-RD) simulations of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) crystals, we predict that for mechanical shocks between 3 and 7 GPa, RDX is the most sensitive to shocks perpendicular to the (100) and (210) planes, while it is insensitive to those perpendicular to the (120), (111), and (110) planes. The simulations demonstrate that the molecular origin of anisotropic shock sensitivity is the steric hindrance to shearing of adjacent slip planes. Mechanisms of hotspot formation in polymer bonded explosives (PBXs): The simulations of a realistic model of PBXs reveal that hotspots may form at the nonplanar interfaces where shear relaxation leads to a dramatic temperature increase that persists long after the shock front has passed the interface. For energetic materials this temperature increase is coupled to chemical reactions that eventually lead to detonation. We show that decreasing the density of the binder eliminates the hotspots or reduces the sensitivity. Cavitation in binary metallic liquids

  1. Final Report for Project. Quark matter under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian; Ferrer, Efrain

    2015-12-31

    The results obtained in the two years of the grant have served to shine new light on several important questions about the phases of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under extreme conditions that include quark matter at high density, as well quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures, both in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The interest in including an external magnetic field on these studies is motivated by the generation of large magnetic fields in off-central heavy-ion collisions and by their common presence in astrophysical compact objects, the two scenarios where the physics of quark matter becomes relevant. The tasks carried out in this DOE project led us, among other things, to discover the first connection between the physics of very dense quark matter and novel materials as for instance topological insulators and Weyl semimetals; they allowed us to find a physical explanation for and a solution to a standing puzzle in the apparent effect of a magnetic field on the critical temperature of the QCD chiral transition; and they led us to establish by the first time that the core of the observed two-solar-mass neutron stars could be made up of quark matter in certain inhomogeneous chiral phases in a magnetic field and that this was consistent with current astrophysical observations. A major goal established by the Nuclear Science Advisory committee in its most recent report “Reaching for the Horizon” has been “to truly understand how nuclei and strongly interacting matter in all its forms behave and can predict their behavior in new settings.” The results found in this DOE project have all contributed to address this goal, and thus they are important for advancing fundamental knowledge in the area of nuclear physics and for enhancing our understanding of the role of strong magnetic fields in the two settings where they are most relevant, neutron stars and heavy-ion collisions.

  2. Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an Ion Track

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaming; Lang, Maik; Ewing, Rodney C.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, William; Toulemonde, M.

    2011-01-31

    The dynamics of track development due to the passage of relativistic heavy ions through solids is a long-standing issue relevant to nuclear materials, age dating of minerals, space exploration, and nanoscale fabrication of novel devices. We have integrated experimental and simulation approaches to investigate nanoscale phase transitions under the extreme conditions created within single tracks of relativistic ions in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(TiO{sub 2}){sub x} and Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2–x} Ti{sub x} O{sub 7}. Track size and internal structure depend on energy density deposition, irradiation temperature, and material composition. Based on the inelastic thermal spike model, molecular dynamics simulations follow the time evolution of individual tracks and reveal the phase transition pathways to the concentric track structures observed experimentally. Individual ion tracks have nanoscale core-shell structures that provide a unique record of the phase transition pathways under extreme conditions.

  3. RIXS in correlated electron systems under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balédent, V.; Rueff, J.-P.

    2016-07-01

    We report here on the application of Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in correlated electrons systems under pressure. Thanks to its bulk sensitivity and superior resolving power, RIXS appears as a powerful spectroscopic technique to unravel the local electronic and magnetic properties of materials at extreme conditions. The method is illustrated in vanadium-oxides- and Fe-based superconductors at high pressure.

  4. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-08-07

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10(-3) g/cm(3) (1%).

  5. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%). PMID:26262619

  6. Civic Engagement in Extreme Times: The Remaking of Justice among Guatemala's "Postwar" Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellino, Michelle J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic growth in the field of youth civic engagement, although little of this work has been conducted in fragile democracies contending with legacies of war and authoritarianism. This study explores how Guatemalan postwar generation youth develop as civic actors under extreme conditions of violence, social and…

  7. Dissolved carbon in extreme conditions characterized by first principles simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ding; Galli, Giulia

    One key component to understanding carbon transport in the Earth interior is the determination of the molecular species formed when carbon bearing materials are dissolved in water at extreme conditions. We used first principles molecular dynamics to investigate oxidized carbon in water at high pressure (P) and high temperature (T), up to the conditions of the Earth's upper mantle. Contrary to popular geochemistry models assuming that CO2 is the major carbon species present in water, we found that most of the dissolved carbon at 10 GPa and 1000 K is in the form of solvated CO32- and HCO3-anions. We also found that ion pairing between alkali metal cations and CO32- or HCO3-anions is greatly affected by P-T conditions, decreasing with pressure along an isotherm. Our study shows that it is crucial to take into account the specific molecular structure of water under extreme conditions and the changes in hydrogen bonding occurring at high P and T, in order to predict chemical reactions in dissolved carbon. Our findings also shed light on possible reduction mechanisms of CO2 when it is geologically stored, depending on the availability of water. The work is supported by the Sloan Foundation through the Deep Carbon Observatory.

  8. The Reactivity of Energetic Materials At Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E

    2006-10-23

    Energetic materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Energetic materials are commonly divided into high explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics. We will focus on high explosive (HE) materials here, although there is a great deal of commonality between the classes of energetic materials. Although the history of HE materials is long, their condensed-phase properties are poorly understood. Understanding the condensed-phase properties of HE materials is important for determining stability and performance. Information regarding HE material properties (for example, the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors of the constituents in plastic-bonded explosive, or PBX, formulations) is necessary for efficiently building the next generation of explosives as the quest for more powerful energetic materials (in terms of energy per volume) moves forward. In modeling HE materials there is a need to better understand the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors from fundamental theoretical principles. Among the quantities of interest in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs), for example, are thermodynamic stabilities, reaction kinetics, equilibrium transport coefficients, mechanical moduli, and interfacial properties between HE materials and the polymeric binders. These properties are needed (as functions of stress state and temperature) for the development of improved micro-mechanical models, which represent the composite at the level of grains and binder. Improved micro-mechanical models are needed to describe the responses of PBXs to dynamic stress or thermal loading, thus yielding information for use in developing continuum models. Detailed descriptions of the chemical reaction mechanisms of condensed energetic materials at high densities and temperatures are essential for understanding events that occur at the reactive front under combustion or detonation conditions. Under

  9. Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae

    2013-06-01

    The behavior and physical properties of matter under extreme conditions are of fundamental scientific interest. Extreme conditions created by intense light source generates dense state with densities of up to several times of solid density, temperatures of 0.1 eV to 100s eV, and pressures of 10s kbar to 10s Mbar. Model calculations in this regime predict electronic and structural phase transitions with new atomic and electronic band structure, anomalous transport, and changes of scattering properties and opacity. A new technique using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), an x-ray free electron laser source, was developed at Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation to study wide range of extreme conditions in phase space. The LCLS has >=3 mJ per 60 fs pulse enabling an intensity x-ray beam between 4 keV -9.5 keV to be focused onto a small spot ~1 micron at MEC. The research areas that MEC instrument will address include equation of state, behavior of materials under high-pressure, and phenomena of solid materials under extreme conditions. We operate MEC instrument for users' experiments studying warm dense matter, hot dense matter, and high pressure physics. Here, we present the details of the MEC instrument, capabilities and progress. The MEC Instrument is funded by fusion energy science of the U.S. Department of Energy. The author would like to thank the LCLS MECi project team.

  10. The dissociation constant of water at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Vazquez, Otto; Giacomazzi, Luigi; Pinilla, C.; Scandolo, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    Only one out of 107 water molecules is dissociated in liquid water at ambient conditions, but the concentration of dissociated molecules increases with pressure ad temperature, and water eventually reaches a fully dissociated state when pressure exceeds 50-100 GPa and temperature reaches a few thousand Kelvin. The behavior of the dissociation constant of water (pKa) at conditions intermediate between ambient and the fully dissociated state is poorly known. Yet, the water pKa is a parameter of primary importance in the aqueous geochemistry as it controls the solubility of ions in geological fluids. We present results of molecular dynamics calculations of the pKa water at extreme conditions. Free-energy differences between the undissociated and the dissociated state are calculated by thermodynamic integration along the dissociation path. The calculations are based on a recently developed all-atom polarizable force-field for water, parametrized on density-functional theory calculations.

  11. The Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Bob

    2015-06-01

    The last five years have seen the commissioning of and first user experiments on both the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in Stanford, and more are slated to come online in the next couple of years . The high photon frequency (i.e. larger than the plasma frequency of solid density), short pulse length (i.e. 10s to 100s of femtoseconds) and large photon number per pulse (i.e. 1012 photons per pulse) make it an ideal source to create and study states of matter at high energy density, a long-standing scientific challenge. Indeed, while matter in extreme conditions, which for the purpose of this talk we define as states under pressure up to hundreds of GPa and with temperatures ranging between 1eV and 1000eV, has been studied through dynamic shock compression and there has been significant progress made over many decades. However, large uncertainties still exist in the atomic structure and crystallographic structure, existence of high pressure phases, scattering factors, and equation of state of matter in extreme conditions. The Matter in Extreme Condition (MEC) instrument at LCLS is designed to overcome the unique experimental challenges that the study of matter in extreme conditions bring. It combines a suite of diagnostics and high power and energy optical lasers, which are standard fare in this research field, with the unmatched LCLS X-ray beam, to create an instrument that will be at the forefront of, and have a major impact on MEC science, in particular in the field of high pressure, warm dense matter, high energy density, and ultra-high intensity laser-matter interaction studies. The LCLS beam allows for unique investigation in all these extreme states using diagnostic methods such as X-ray Thomson Scattering, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray phase-contrast imaging, and pumping specific absorption lines to study (dense) plasma kinetics. Augmented with optical

  12. Wireless pilot monitoring system for extreme race conditions.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Arias, Diego E; Aqueveque, Pablo; Melin, Pedro; Curtis, Dorothy W

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an assistive device to monitor car drivers under extreme conditions. In particular, this system is designed in preparation for the 2012 Atacama Solar Challenge to be held in the Chilean desert. Actual preliminary results show the feasibility of such a project including physiological and ambient sensors, real-time processing algorithms, wireless data transmission and a remote monitoring station. Implementation details and field results are shown along with a discussion of the main problems found in real-life telemetry monitoring.

  13. Hypersaline Microbial Systems of Sabkhas: Examples of Life's Survival in "Extreme" Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbein, Wolfgang Elisabeth; Gorbushina, Anna A.; Holtkamp-Tacken, Elisabeth

    2004-12-01

    Life and living systems need several important factors to establish themselves and to have a continued tradition. In this article the nature of the borderline situation for microbial life under heavy salt stress is analyzed and discussed using the example of biofilms and microbial mats of sabkha systems of the Red Sea. Important factors ruling such environments are described, and include the following: (1) Microbial life is better suited for survival in extremely changing and only sporadically water-supplied environments than are larger organisms (including humans). (2) Microbial life shows extremely poikilophilic adaptation patterns to conditions that deviate significantly from conditions normal for life processes on Earth today. (3) Microbial life adapts itself to such extremely changing and only ephemerally supportive conditions by the capacity of extreme changes (a) in morphology (pleomorphy), (b) in metabolic patterns (poikilotrophy), (c) in survival strategies (poikilophily), and (d) by trapping and enclosing all necessary sources of energy matter in an inwardly oriented diffusive cycle. All this is achieved without any serious attempt at escaping from the extreme and extremely changing conditions. Furthermore, these salt swamp systems are geophysiological generators of energy and material reservoirs recycled over a geological time scale. Neither energy nor material is wasted for propagation by spore formation. This capacity is summarized as poikilophilic and poikilotroph behavior of biofilm or microbial mat communities in salt and irradiationstressed environmental conditions of the sabkha or salt desert type. We use mainly cyanobacteria as an example, although other bacteria and even eukaryotic fungi may exhibit the same potential of living and surviving under conditions usually not suitable for life on Earth. It may, however, be postulated that such poikilophilic organisms are the true candidates for life support and survival under conditions never recorded

  14. Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument - Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, R.F.; Boyce, R.M.; Haller, G.; Hastings, J.B.; Hays, G.; Lee, H.J.; Lee, R.W.; Nagler, B.; Scharfenstein, M.; Marsh, D.; White, W.E.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) research facility. The FEL has already met its performance goals in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This facility, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC 2-Mile Linear Accelerator (linac) and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac is used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons are transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which houses a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons are bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength is tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS includes two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing an X-ray instrument in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of LCLS by creating extreme conditions and study the behavior of plasma under those controlled conditions. This instrument will address the Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, mission objective related to study of Plasma and Warm Dense Matter as described in the report titled LCLS, the First Experiments, prepared by the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in September 2000. The technical objective of the LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument project is

  15. X-ray diffraction at Matter in Extreme Conditions endstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhou; Galtier, Eric; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob

    2015-11-01

    Understanding dynamic response at the atomic level under extreme conditions is highly sought after goal to science frontiers studying warm dense matter, high pressure, geoscience, astrophysics, and planetary science. Thus it is of importance to determine the high pressure phases or metastable phases of material under shock compression. In situ X-ray diffraction technique using LCLS free electron laser X-ray is a powerful tool to record structural behavior and microstructure evolution in dense matter. Shock-induced compression and phase transitions of material lead to changes of the lattice spacing or evolution of new X-ray diffraction patterns. In this talk, we describe a platform dedicated for the X-ray diffraction studies at Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC), which can be used to reconstruct a complete diffraction pattern from numerous detectors, optimize detector positioning in a timely manner, extract the lattice spacing profiles and texture features. This platform is available to the user community for real-time analysis. We will also discuss experimental results, using this platform, on the crystalline silicon phase transitions up to 60 GPa.

  16. Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

    2005-09-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  17. Extreme mechanical properties of materials under extreme pressure and temperature conditions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, A.; Armentrout, M. M.; Xie, M.; Weinberger, M.; Kaner, R. B.; Tolbert, S. H.

    2010-12-01

    A strong synergy ties together the high-pressure subfields of mineral physics, solid-state physics, and materials engineering. The catalog of studies measuring the mechanical properties of materials subjected to large differential stresses in the diamond anvil cell demonstrates a significant pressure-enhancement of strength across many classes of materials, including elemental solids, salts, oxides, silicates, and borides and nitrides. High pressure techniques—both radial diffraction and laser heating in the diamond anvil cell—can be used to characterize the behavior of ultrahard materials under extreme conditions, and help test hypotheses about how composition, structure, and bonding work together to govern the mechanical properties of materials. The principles that are elucidated by these studies can then be used to help design engineering materials to encourage desired properties. Understanding Earth and planetary interiors requires measuring equations of state of relevant materials, including oxides, silicates, and metals under extreme conditions. If these minerals in the diamond anvil cell have any ability to support a differential stress, the assumption of quasi-hydrostaticity no longer applies, with a resulting non-salubrious effect on attempts to measure equation of state. We illustrate these applications with the results of variety of studies from our laboratory and others’ that have used high-pressure radial diffraction techniques and also laser heating in the diamond anvil cell to characterize the mechanical properties of a variety of ultrahard materials, especially osmium metal, osmium diboride, rhenium diboride, and tungsten tetraboride. We compare ambient condition strength studies such as hardness testing with high-pressure studies, especially radial diffraction under differential stress. In addition, we outline criteria for evaluating mechanical properties of materials at combination high pressures and temperatures. Finally, we synthesize our

  18. Lower Extremity Overuse Conditions Affecting Figure Skaters During Daily Training

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Valentina; Piscitelli, Francesco; Verardi, Luciano; Maillard, Pauline; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Most ice figure skaters train and compete with ongoing issues in the lower extremities, which are often overlooked by the skaters and considered injuries only when they prevent the athletes from skating. Although not severe, these conditions impair the quality of daily training and compromise the skaters’ state of mind and performances. Purpose (1) To determine the point prevalence of the ongoing lower extremity overuse conditions in a population of ice figure skaters of all ages and levels and (2) to identify the risk factors contributing to the development of the most common ongoing conditions. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A total of 95 skaters of all ages and skating levels were evaluated in a single examination in the middle of the competitive season. Data collection consisted of a questionnaire, clinical examination, and measurement of the skaters’ characteristics and the equipment used. Results Retrocalcaneal bursitis was the most common problem, affecting at least 1 foot in 34% of the skaters evaluated, followed by posterior heel skin calluses and superficial calcaneal bursitis, which affected 29% and 28% of skaters, respectively. The prevalence of the majority of these conditions was 10% to 32% higher in elite skaters than in nonelite skaters. Higher boot–foot length difference was associated with greater risk of superficial calcaneal bursitis in the landing foot of elite skaters, while higher body weight and greater in-skate ankle flexibility were associated with the development of retrocalcaneal bursitis in nonelite skaters. Only 30 skaters (32%) wore the appropriate boot size, while 57 skaters (51%) could not dorsiflex their ankles properly while wearing skates. Conclusion The heel represents a major area of concern for the high prevalence of calcaneal bursitis and calluses in proximity of the Achilles tendon, suggesting that improvements on the boot heel cup design should take priority. The

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Survival Strategies in Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Mondelli, Claudia; Parker, Stewart F.; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2012-01-01

    Today, one of the major challenges in biophysics is to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes. In such a frame, the understanding of the survival strategies in extreme conditions received a lot of attention both from the scientific and applicative points of view. Since nature provides precious suggestions to be applied for improving the quality of life, extremophiles are considered as useful model-systems. The main goal of this review is to present an overview of some systems, with a particular emphasis on trehalose playing a key role in several extremophile organisms. The attention is focused on the relation among the structural and dynamic properties of biomolecules and bioprotective mechanisms, as investigated by complementary spectroscopic techniques at low- and high-temperature values. PMID:25371270

  20. Extraction of aerodynamic parameters for aircraft at extreme flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    The maximum likelihood estimator has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. Most of the literature on aircraft estimation concentrates on new developments and applications, assuming familiarity with basic concepts. This paper briefly discusses the maximum likelihood estimator and the aircraft equations of motion that the estimator uses. The current strength and limitations associated with obtaining flight-determined aerodynamic coefficients in extreme flight conditions is assessed. The importance of the careful combining of wind tunnel results (or calculations) and flight results and the thorough evaluation of the mathematical model is emphasized. The basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple computed aircraft example, and the cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to help illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation of stability and control derivatives from flight data is discussed.

  1. Extraction of aerodynamic parameters for aircraft at extreme flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    The maximum likelihood estimator was used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. Most of the literature on aircraft estimation concentrates on new development and applications, assuming familiarity with basic concepts. The maximum likelihood estimator and the aircraft equations of motion that the estimator uses are discussed. The current strength and limitations associated with obtaining flight-determined aerodynamic coefficients in extreme flight conditions are assessed. The importance of the careful combining of wind tunnel results (or calculations) and flight results and the thorough evaluation of the mathematical model is emphasized. The basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple computed aircraft example, and the cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to help illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation of stability and control derivatives from flight data is discussed.

  2. Extreme Precision Environmental Control for Next Generation Radial Velocity Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur K.; Hearty, Fred; Levi, Eric; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matt; Halverson, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radial velocity precisions of order 10cm/s will enable the discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. Temperature and pressure variations inside a spectrograph can lead to thermomechanical instabilities in the optics and mounts, and refractive index variations in both the optical elements as well as the surrounding air. Together, these variations can easily induce instrumental drifts of several tens to hundreds of meters per second. Enclosing the full optical train in thermally stabilized high-vacuum environments minimizes such errors. In this talk, I will discuss the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) spectrograph: a near infrared (NIR) facility class instrument we will commission at the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2016. The ECS will maintain the HPF optical bench stable at 180K at the sub milli-Kelvin level on the timescale of days, and at the few milli-Kelvin level over months to years. The entire spectrograph is kept under high-quality vacuum (<10-6 Torr), and environmental temperature fluctuations are compensated for with an actively controlled radiation shield outfitted with custom feedback electronics. High efficiency Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blankets, and a passive external thermal enclosure further isolate the optics from ambient perturbations. This environmental control scheme is versatile, suitable to stabilize both next generation NIR, and optical spectrographs. I will show how we are currently testing this control system for use with our design concept of the Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrograph (EPDS), the next generation optical spectrograph for the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Our most recent results from full-scale stability tests will be presented.

  3. Synthesis, structure, and properties of glasses under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerette, Michael J.

    Anomalous mechanical properties of silica glass include stiffening upon heating, initially softening under pressure, and non-linear elastic response to strains. Through understanding structural changes in silica glass under a broad range of temperature, pressure, and strain conditions and how they influence the mechanical properties, insight was gained for how to change the silica glass network to better suit specific uses in extreme conditions. In this dissertation, pressure-quenching routes were used to effectively change the glass atomic packing and to make densified glass. Applied in the non-rigid state near the glass transition temperature, quench pressures up to 8 GPa have been used to achieve density increase of 25% in silica glass. The resulting structure and properties of as-quenched samples have been investigated using XRD, Raman and Brillouin spectroscopy. In-situ Raman and Brillouin light scattering techniques were developed to study the structure, elastic and dynamic properties of silica glass under high temperature, high pressure and high strain conditions. High temperature measurements were carried out in an optical furnace up to 1500°C, a diamond anvil cell was used to carry out high pressure experiments up to 25 GPa, and a two-point bender was used for measuring glasses in excess of 6% strain in both tensile and compressive regions. Pressure-quenching from the non-rigid state near the glass transition temperature imparts structural signatures to densified silica glass that cannot be accomplished through cold compression at room temperature. The unique structures of pressure-quenched silica glass are reflected in decreased anomalous response of silica glass to external stimuli of high temperature or high pressure, and therefore greater thermo-mechanical stability. The nonlinear elastic behavior of silica glass has been directly probed from the compressive to the tensile side of silica fibers in bend by using in-situ Brillouin light scattering. This

  4. Parasite adaptation to extreme conditions in a desert environment.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, R C

    1999-01-01

    Deserts represent universally recognized extreme environments for animal life. This paper documents the highly specialized adaptations of Pseudodiplorchis americanus, a monogenean parasite of the desert toad, Scaphiopus couchii. Building on a long-term record of parasite population ecology (continuing since the early 1980s), field studies focus on the effects of severe drought in the Sonoran Desert, Arizona, in the mid 1990s. This provides a test of the ability of the host-parasite system to tolerate exceptional perturbation. The analysis provides new insight into parasite infection dynamics in a natural wildlife system through integration of host and parasite population age structure. The environmental check interrupted host recruitment in 1993-95 and parasite recruitment in 1995-97. This produced an imprint in age structure and infection levels recognizable over several years: parasite recruitment failure reduced transmission 2-3 years later. The host (maximum life span 17 years) tolerated the disruption but the impact was more serious for the parasite (life span 3 years) leading to extinction of some previously stable populations. Despite this demonstration of a rare event exacerbating external environmental constraints, experimental studies suggest that the internal (host) environment normally creates the most severe conditions affecting P. americanus. Only about 3% of parasites survive from invasion until first reproduction. Post-invasion factors including host immunity, characteristic of most parasite life cycles, constitute a greater constraint upon survival than external conditions, even in a desert environment.

  5. Proton delocalization under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Crowhurst, Jonathan

    2008-10-02

    Knowledge of the behaviour of light hydrogen-containing molecules under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature is crucial to a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental physics and chemistry that is relevant under such conditions. It is also vital for interpreting the results of planetary observations, in particular those of the gas giants, and also for various materials science applications. On a fundamental level, increasing pressure causes the redistribution of the electronic density, which results in a modification of the interatomic potentials followed by a consequent qualitative change in the character of the associated bonding. Ultimately, at sufficiently high pressure, one may anticipate a transformation to a homogeneously bonded material possessing unusual physical properties (e.g. a quantum fluid). As temperature increases so does the concentration of ionised species leading ultimately to a plasma. Considerable improvements have recently been made in both the corresponding experimental and theoretical investigations. Here we review recent results for hydrogen and water that reveal unexpected routes of transformation to nonmolecular materials. We stress the importance of quantum effects, which remain significant even at high temperatures.

  6. Synoptic conditions during wintertime temperature extremes in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassano, John J.; Cassano, Elizabeth N.; Seefeldt, Mark W.; Gutowski, William J.; Glisan, Justin M.

    2016-04-01

    The large-scale atmospheric state associated with widespread wintertime warm and cold extremes in southern Alaska was identified using 1989 to 2007 European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-I) data. Extremes were defined as days with the coldest and warmest 1% of daily temperatures. Widespread extreme events were identified for days when at least 25 50 km grid cells in the study domain met the extreme temperature criteria. A total of 55 cold and 74 warm extreme days were identified in 19 winters. Composites of the atmospheric state from 5 days before through the day of the extreme events were analyzed to assess the large-scale atmospheric state associated with the extremes. The method of self-organizing maps (SOMs) was used to identify the range of sea level pressure (SLP) patterns present in the ERA-I December-February data, and these SLP patterns were then used to stratify the extreme days by their large-scale atmospheric circulation. Composites for all warm or cold extreme days showed less intense features than those for specific SLP patterns. In all of the composites temperature advection, strongest at 700 hPa, and anomalous longwave radiation were the primary factors that led to the extreme events. The anomalous downwelling longwave radiation was due to either reduced cloud cover, during cold extremes, or to increased cloud cover, during warm extremes. The SOM composites provided additional insight into the temporal evolution of the extreme days and highlighted different portions of southern Alaska most likely to experience temperature extremes for a given SOM SLP pattern.

  7. 21st century increases in the likelihood of extreme hydrologic conditions for the mountainous basins of the Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Iris T.; Ficklin, Darren L.; Carrillo, Carlos A.; McIntosh, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Extreme hydrologic conditions, such as floods, droughts, and elevated stream temperatures, significantly impact the societal fabric and ecosystems, and there is rising concern about increases in the frequency of extreme conditions with projected climate changes. Here we ask what changes in the occurrence of extreme hydrologic conditions can be expected by the end of the century for the important water-generating, mountainous basins of the Southwestern United States, namely the Sierra Nevada and Upper Colorado River Basins. The extreme conditions considered are very high flows, low flows, and elevated stream temperature as derived from historic and future simulations using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrologic model and downscaled output from a General Circulation Model ensemble. Results indicate noteworthy differences in the frequency changes of extremes based on geographic region, season, elevation, and stream size. We found wide-spread increases in the occurrence of stream flows exceeding 150% of historic monthly averages for winter by the end of the century, and extensive increases in the occurrence of both extreme low flows (representing <50% of historic monthly averages), and elevated stream temperatures (>3 °C of monthly averages) during the summer months, with some basins expecting extreme conditions 90-100% of the time by the end of the century. Understanding the differences in the changes of extreme conditions can identify climate-sensitive regions and assist in targeted planning for climate change adaptation and mitigation.

  8. Fast temperature spectrometer for samples under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. Ercan; Toellner, Thomas S.; Hu, Michael Y.

    2015-01-15

    We have developed a multi-wavelength Fast Temperature Readout (FasTeR) spectrometer to capture a sample’s transient temperature fluctuations, and reduce uncertainties in melting temperature determination. Without sacrificing accuracy, FasTeR features a fast readout rate (about 100 Hz), high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and a well-constrained focus. Complimenting a charge-coupled device spectrometer, FasTeR consists of an array of photomultiplier tubes and optical dichroic filters. The temperatures determined by FasTeR outside of the vicinity of melting are, generally, in good agreement with results from the charge-coupled device spectrometer. Near melting, FasTeR is capable of capturing transient temperature fluctuations, at least on the order of 300 K/s. A software tool, SIMFaster, is described and has been developed to simulate FasTeR and assess design configurations. FasTeR is especially suitable for temperature determinations that utilize ultra-fast techniques under extreme conditions. Working in parallel with the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, we have applied the FasTeR spectrometer to measure the melting temperature of {sup 57}Fe{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1} at high pressure.

  9. Fast temperature spectrometer for samples under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E Ercan; Toellner, Thomas S; Hu, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multi-wavelength Fast Temperature Readout (FasTeR) spectrometer to capture a sample's transient temperature fluctuations, and reduce uncertainties in melting temperature determination. Without sacrificing accuracy, FasTeR features a fast readout rate (about 100 Hz), high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and a well-constrained focus. Complimenting a charge-coupled device spectrometer, FasTeR consists of an array of photomultiplier tubes and optical dichroic filters. The temperatures determined by FasTeR outside of the vicinity of melting are, generally, in good agreement with results from the charge-coupled device spectrometer. Near melting, FasTeR is capable of capturing transient temperature fluctuations, at least on the order of 300 K/s. A software tool, SIMFaster, is described and has been developed to simulate FasTeR and assess design configurations. FasTeR is especially suitable for temperature determinations that utilize ultra-fast techniques under extreme conditions. Working in parallel with the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, we have applied the FasTeR spectrometer to measure the melting temperature of (57)Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressure.

  10. Ab initio Raman spectroscopy of water under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozsa, Viktor; Pan, Ding; Wan, Quan; Galli, Giulia

    Water exhibits one of the most complex phase diagrams of any binary compound. Despite extensive studies, the melting lines of high-pressure ice phases remain very controversial, with reports differing by hundreds of Kelvin. The boundary between ice VII and liquid phase is particularly disputed, with recent work exploring plasticity and amorphization mediating the transition. Raman measurements are often used to fingerprint melting, yet their interpretation is difficult without atomistic modeling. Here, we report a study of high P/T water where we computed Raman spectra using a method combining ab initio molecular dynamics and density functional perturbation theory, as implemented in the Qbox code. Spectra were computed for the liquid at 10 and 20 GPa, both at 1000 K, and for solid ice VII (20 GPa, 500 K). Decomposing the spectra into inter and intra molecular contributions provided insight into the dynamics of the hydrogen-bonded network at extreme conditions. The relevance of our simulation results for models of water in Earth, Uranus, and Neptune will be discussed, and an interpretation of existing experiments at high pressure will be presented.

  11. [Sports and extreme conditions. Cardiovascular incidence in long term exertion and extreme temperatures (heat, cold)].

    PubMed

    Melin, B; Savourey, G

    2001-06-30

    During ultra-endurance exercise, both increase in body temperature and dehydration due to sweat losses, lead to a decrease in central blood volume. The heart rate drift allows maintaining appropriate cardiac output, in order to satisfy both muscle perfusion and heat transfer requirements by increasing skin blood flow. The resulting dehydration can impair thermal regulation and increase the risks of serious accidents as heat stroke. Endurance events, lasting more than 8 hours, result in large sweat sodium chloride losses. Thus, ingestion of large amounts of water with poor salt intake can induce symptomatic hyponatremia (plasma sodium < 130 mEq/L) which is also a serious accident. Heat environment increases the thermal constraint and when the air humidity is high, evaporation of sweat is compromise. Thus, thermal stress becomes uncompensable which increases the risk of cardiovascular collapse. Cold exposure induces physiological responses to maintain internal temperature by both limiting thermal losses and increasing metabolic heat production. Cold can induce accidental hypothermia and local frost-bites; moreover, it increases the risk of arrhythmia during exercise. Some guidelines (cardiovascular fitness, water and electrolyte intakes, protective clothing) are given for each extreme condition. PMID:11505864

  12. Condition monitoring system of wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdusamad, Khaled B.

    The development and implementation of the condition monitoring systems (CMS) play a significant role in overcoming the number of failures in the wind turbine generators that result from the harsh operation conditions, such as over temperature, particularly when turbines are deployed offshore. In order to increase the reliability of the wind energy industry, monitoring the operation conditions of wind generators is essential to detect the immediate faults rapidly and perform appropriate preventative maintenance. CMS helps to avoid failures, decrease the potential shutdowns while running, reduce the maintenance and operation costs and maintain wind turbines protected. The knowledge of wind turbine generators' faults, such as stator and rotor inter-turn faults, is indispensable to perform the condition monitoring accurately, and assist with maintenance decision making. Many techniques are utilized to avoid the occurrence of failures in wind turbine generators. The majority of the previous techniques that are applied to monitor the wind generator conditions are based on electrical and mechanical concepts and theories. An advanced CMS can be implemented by using a variety of different techniques and methods to confirm the validity of the obtained electrical and mechanical condition monitoring algorithms. This thesis is focused on applying CMS on wind generators due to high temperature by contributing the statistical, thermal, mathematical, and reliability analyses, and mechanical concepts with the electrical methodology, instead of analyzing the electrical signal and frequencies trends only. The newly developed algorithms can be compared with previous condition monitoring methods, which use the electrical approach in order to establish their advantages and limitations. For example, the hazard reliability techniques of wind generators based on CMS are applied to develop a proper maintenance strategy, which aims to extend the system life-time and reduce the potential

  13. Extreme Conditioning Programs: Potential Benefits and Potential Risks.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    CrossFit, Insanity, Gym Jones, and P90X are examples of extreme conditioning programs (ECPs). ECPs typically involve high-volume and high-intensity physical activities with short rest periods between movements and use of multiple joint exercises. Data on changes in fitness with ECPs are limited to CrossFit investigations that demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, muscular endurance, aerobic fitness, and body composition. However, no study has directly compared CrossFit or other ECPs to other more traditional forms of aerobic and resistance training within the same investigation. These direct comparisons are needed to more adequately evaluate the effectiveness of ECPs. Until these studies emerge, the comparisons with available literature suggest that improvements in CrossFit, in terms of muscular endurance (push-ups, sit-ups), strength, and aerobic capacity, appear to be similar to those seen in more traditional training programs. Investigations of injuries in ECPs are limited to two observational studies that suggest that the overall injury rate is similar to that seen in other exercise programs. Several cases of rhabdomyolysis and cervical carotid artery dissections have been reported during CrossFit training. The symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of these are reviewed here. Until more data on ECPs emerge, physical training should be aligned with US Army doctrine. If ECPs are included in exercise programs, trainers should (1) have appropriate training certifications, (2) inspect exercise equipment regularly to assure safety, (3) introduce ECPs to new participants, (4) ensure medical clearance of Soldiers with special health problems before participation in ECPs, (4) tailor ECPs to the individual Soldier, (5) adjust rest periods to optimize recovery and reduce fatigue, (6) monitor Soldiers for signs of overtraining, rhabdomyolysis, and other problems, and (7) coordinate exercise programs with other unit training activities to eliminate redundant activities

  14. Extreme Conditioning Programs: Potential Benefits and Potential Risks.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    CrossFit, Insanity, Gym Jones, and P90X are examples of extreme conditioning programs (ECPs). ECPs typically involve high-volume and high-intensity physical activities with short rest periods between movements and use of multiple joint exercises. Data on changes in fitness with ECPs are limited to CrossFit investigations that demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, muscular endurance, aerobic fitness, and body composition. However, no study has directly compared CrossFit or other ECPs to other more traditional forms of aerobic and resistance training within the same investigation. These direct comparisons are needed to more adequately evaluate the effectiveness of ECPs. Until these studies emerge, the comparisons with available literature suggest that improvements in CrossFit, in terms of muscular endurance (push-ups, sit-ups), strength, and aerobic capacity, appear to be similar to those seen in more traditional training programs. Investigations of injuries in ECPs are limited to two observational studies that suggest that the overall injury rate is similar to that seen in other exercise programs. Several cases of rhabdomyolysis and cervical carotid artery dissections have been reported during CrossFit training. The symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of these are reviewed here. Until more data on ECPs emerge, physical training should be aligned with US Army doctrine. If ECPs are included in exercise programs, trainers should (1) have appropriate training certifications, (2) inspect exercise equipment regularly to assure safety, (3) introduce ECPs to new participants, (4) ensure medical clearance of Soldiers with special health problems before participation in ECPs, (4) tailor ECPs to the individual Soldier, (5) adjust rest periods to optimize recovery and reduce fatigue, (6) monitor Soldiers for signs of overtraining, rhabdomyolysis, and other problems, and (7) coordinate exercise programs with other unit training activities to eliminate redundant activities

  15. Extreme anthropogenic loads and the northern ecosystem condition

    SciTech Connect

    Kryuckkov, V.V. )

    1993-11-01

    In the extreme North, the polar region of siberian Russia, the largest mining and processing enterprises for metallic and nonmetallic ores, coal, oil, and gas are situated. The extremely vulnerable boreal and polar ecosystems of the north are responding adversely to the impact of these activities, and are in danger of collapse because of them. The mechanisms of such impacts, their formation, continuous extension, and merger have been studied. The deforested and destroyed areas of former forest-tundra and taiga ecosystems resemble the Arctic zones of a much harsher environment more than the typical Arctic zones where they occur. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Method for generating extreme ultraviolet with mather-type plasma accelerators for use in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Konkashbaev, Isak

    2006-10-03

    A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave uses two intersecting plasma beams generated by two plasma accelerators. The intersection of the two plasma beams emits electromagnetic radiation and in particular radiation in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength. In the preferred orientation two axially aligned counter streaming plasmas collide to produce an intense source of electromagnetic radiation at the 13.5 nm wavelength. The Mather type plasma accelerators can utilize tin, or lithium covered electrodes. Tin, lithium or xenon can be used as the photon emitting gas source.

  17. OB-stars as extreme condition test beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Joachim; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Rivero González, Jorge G.

    2011-07-01

    Massive stars are inherently extreme objects, in terms of radiation, mass loss, rotation, and sometimes also magnetic fields. Concentrating on a (personally biased) subset of processes related to pulsations, rapid rotation and its interplay with mass-loss, and the bi-stability mechanism, we will discuss how active (and normal) OB stars can serve as appropriate laboratories to provide further clues.

  18. Condition Monitoring of the SSE Generation Fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twiddle, J.; Muthuraman, S.; Connolly, N.

    2012-05-01

    SSE (previously known as Scottish and Southern Energy) operates a diverse portfolio of generation plant, including coal, gas and renewable plant with a total generation capacity of 11,375MW (Sept 2011). In recent years a group of specialists dedicated to providing condition monitoring services has been established at the Equipment Performance Centre (EPC) based at Knottingley, West Yorkshire. We aim to illustrate the role of the EPC and the methods used for monitoring the generation fleet with the objective of maintaining asset integrity, reducing risk of plant failure and unplanned outages and describe the challenges which have been overcome in establishing the EPC. This paper describes methods including vibration and process data analysis, model-based techniques and on-site testing used for monitoring of generation plant, including gas turbines, steam turbines, generators and steam raising plant. These condition monitoring processes utilise available data, adding value to the business, by bringing services in-house and capturing knowledge of plant operation for the benefit of the whole fleet.

  19. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  20. Generation and structure of extremely large clusters in pulsed jets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, Daniela Adolph, Marcus; Flückiger, Leonie; Müller, Jan Philippe; Müller, Maria; Sauppe, Mario; Wolter, David; Möller, Thomas; Gorkhover, Tais; Schorb, Sebastian; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-07-28

    Extremely large xenon clusters with sizes exceeding the predictions of the Hagena scaling law by several orders of magnitude are shown to be produced in pulsed gas jets. The cluster sizes are determined using single-shot single-particle imaging experiments with short-wavelength light pulses from the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Scanning the time delay between the pulsed cluster source and the intense femtosecond x-ray pulses first shows a main plateau with size distributions in line with the scaling laws, which is followed by an after-pulse of giant clusters. For the extremely large clusters with radii of several hundred nanometers the x-ray scattering patterns indicate a grainy substructure of the particles, suggesting that they grow by cluster coagulation.

  1. Generation and structure of extremely large clusters in pulsed jets.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Flückiger, Leonie; Gorkhover, Tais; Müller, Jan Philippe; Müller, Maria; Sauppe, Mario; Wolter, David; Schorb, Sebastian; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas

    2014-07-28

    Extremely large xenon clusters with sizes exceeding the predictions of the Hagena scaling law by several orders of magnitude are shown to be produced in pulsed gas jets. The cluster sizes are determined using single-shot single-particle imaging experiments with short-wavelength light pulses from the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Scanning the time delay between the pulsed cluster source and the intense femtosecond x-ray pulses first shows a main plateau with size distributions in line with the scaling laws, which is followed by an after-pulse of giant clusters. For the extremely large clusters with radii of several hundred nanometers the x-ray scattering patterns indicate a grainy substructure of the particles, suggesting that they grow by cluster coagulation. PMID:25084909

  2. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  3. Estimation of extreme offshore wave climate of Hong Kong using a third-generation discrete-spectral wave model

    SciTech Connect

    Ralston, J.; Ip, K.L.; Li, Y.S.; Li, C.W.

    1993-12-31

    Extreme wave conditions offshore of Hong Kong, which are predominantly caused by the passage of typhoons, were predicted by means of a third-generation discrete-spectral wave model. For each three-year period, the typhoon that affected Hong Kong most severely was selected, and its wind field was generated by a typhoon wind model. A total of 14 typhoons were chosen for simulation to cover a period of 42 years. An extreme value analysis was then performed for the computed maximum significant wave heights.

  4. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, A. Lee, C. J.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-08-07

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy lower than 80 eV. After e-beam irradiation, it is found that the D peak, I(D), appears in the Raman spectrum, indicating defect formation in graphene. The evolution of I(D)/I(G) follows the amorphization trajectory with increasing irradiation dose, indicating that graphene goes through a transformation from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline and then further to amorphous carbon. Further, irradiation of graphene with increased water partial pressure does not significantly change the Raman spectra, which suggests that, in the extremely low energy range, e-beam induced chemical reactions between residual water and graphene are not the dominant mechanism driving defect formation in graphene. Single layer graphene, partially suspended over holes was irradiated with EUV radiation. By comparing with the Raman results from e-beam irradiation, it is concluded that the photoelectrons, especially those from the valence band, contribute to defect formation in graphene during irradiation.

  5. The Extreme Conditions Beamline P02.2 and the Extreme Conditions Science Infrastructure at PETRA III

    PubMed Central

    Liermann, H.-P.; Konôpková, Z.; Morgenroth, W.; Glazyrin, K.; Bednarčik, J.; McBride, E. E.; Petitgirard, S.; Delitz, J. T.; Wendt, M.; Bican, Y.; Ehnes, A.; Schwark, I.; Rothkirch, A.; Tischer, M.; Heuer, J.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Kracht, T.; Franz, H.

    2015-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the Extreme Conditions Beamline P02.2 for micro X-ray diffraction studies of matter at simultaneous high pressure and high/low temperatures at PETRA III, in Hamburg, Germany. This includes performance of the X-ray optics and instrumental resolution as well as an overview of the different sample environments available for high-pressure studies in the diamond anvil cell. Particularly emphasized are the high-brilliance and high-energy X-ray diffraction capabilities of the beamline in conjunction with the use of fast area detectors to conduct time-resolved compression studies in the millisecond time regime. Finally, the current capability of the Extreme Conditions Science Infrastructure to support high-pressure research at the Extreme Conditions Beamline and other PETRA III beamlines is described. PMID:26134794

  6. Atmosphere and water loss from early Mars under extreme solar wind and extreme ultraviolet conditions.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naoki; Kulikov, Yuri N; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Tanaka, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Tielong

    2009-01-01

    The upper limits of the ion pickup and cold ion outflow loss rates from the early martian atmosphere shortly after the Sun arrived at the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence (ZAMS) were investigated. We applied a comprehensive 3-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to an early martian CO(2)-rich atmosphere, which was assumed to have been exposed to a solar XUV [X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] flux that was 100 times higher than today and a solar wind that was about 300 times denser. We also assumed the late onset of a planetary magnetic dynamo, so that Mars had no strong intrinsic magnetic field at that early period. We found that, due to such extreme solar wind-atmosphere interaction, a strong magnetic field of about approximately 4000 nT was induced in the entire dayside ionosphere, which could efficiently protect the upper atmosphere from sputtering loss. A planetary obstacle ( approximately ionopause) was formed at an altitude of about 1000 km above the surface due to the drag force and the mass loading by newly created ions in the highly extended upper atmosphere. We obtained an O(+) loss rate by the ion pickup process, which takes place above the ionopause, of about 1.5 x 10(28) ions/s during the first < or =150 million years, which is about 10(4) times greater than today and corresponds to a water loss equivalent to a global martian ocean with a depth of approximately 8 m. Consequently, even if the magnetic protection due to the expected early martian magnetic dynamo is neglected, ion pickup and sputtering were most likely not the dominant loss processes for the planet's initial atmosphere and water inventory. However, it appears that the cold ion outflow into the martian tail, due to the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to the ionospheric plasma, could have removed a global ocean with a depth of 10-70 m during the first < or =150 million years after the Sun arrived at the ZAMS.

  7. Atmosphere and water loss from early Mars under extreme solar wind and extreme ultraviolet conditions.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naoki; Kulikov, Yuri N; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Tanaka, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Tielong

    2009-01-01

    The upper limits of the ion pickup and cold ion outflow loss rates from the early martian atmosphere shortly after the Sun arrived at the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence (ZAMS) were investigated. We applied a comprehensive 3-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to an early martian CO(2)-rich atmosphere, which was assumed to have been exposed to a solar XUV [X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] flux that was 100 times higher than today and a solar wind that was about 300 times denser. We also assumed the late onset of a planetary magnetic dynamo, so that Mars had no strong intrinsic magnetic field at that early period. We found that, due to such extreme solar wind-atmosphere interaction, a strong magnetic field of about approximately 4000 nT was induced in the entire dayside ionosphere, which could efficiently protect the upper atmosphere from sputtering loss. A planetary obstacle ( approximately ionopause) was formed at an altitude of about 1000 km above the surface due to the drag force and the mass loading by newly created ions in the highly extended upper atmosphere. We obtained an O(+) loss rate by the ion pickup process, which takes place above the ionopause, of about 1.5 x 10(28) ions/s during the first < or =150 million years, which is about 10(4) times greater than today and corresponds to a water loss equivalent to a global martian ocean with a depth of approximately 8 m. Consequently, even if the magnetic protection due to the expected early martian magnetic dynamo is neglected, ion pickup and sputtering were most likely not the dominant loss processes for the planet's initial atmosphere and water inventory. However, it appears that the cold ion outflow into the martian tail, due to the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to the ionospheric plasma, could have removed a global ocean with a depth of 10-70 m during the first < or =150 million years after the Sun arrived at the ZAMS. PMID:19216683

  8. Chemistry of H2O and HF Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L; Goldman, N; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C

    2005-11-28

    The predicted high pressure superionic phases of water and HF are investigated via ab initio molecular dynamics. These phases could potentially be achieved through either static compression with heating or through shock compression. We study water at densities of 2.0-3.0 g/cc (34-115 GPa) along the 2000K isotherm.We find that extremely rapid (superionic) diffusion of protons occurs in a fluid phase at pressures between 34 and 58 GPa. A transition to a stable body-centered cubic (bcc) O lattice with superionic proton conductivity is observed between 70 and 75 GPa, a much higher pressure than suggested in prior work. We find that all molecular species at pressures greater than 75 GPa are too short lived to be classified as bound states. Up to 95 GPa, we find a solid superionic phase characterized by covalent O-H bonding. Above 95 GPa, a transient network phase is found characterized by symmetric O-H hydrogen bonding with nearly 50% covalent character. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF were conducted at densities of 1.8-4.0 g/cc along the 900 K isotherm. According to our simulations, a unique form of (symmetric) hydrogen bonding could play a significant role in superionic conduction. Our work shows that superionic phases could be more prevalent in hydrogen bonded systems than previously thought, such as HCl and HBr.

  9. A chaotic system for the generation of extreme mechanical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Gregory, D.L.; Kelton, D.; Coleman, R.

    1991-01-01

    A proposed system and technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments is presented. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. Previous analytical studies (Refs. 1 and 2) predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHx could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random-like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 80 kHz. A theoretical model of the system is described and the results are compared with the experimental results for the simplified system. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of the Mitochondrial Proteomes of Drosophila melanogaster Adapted to Extreme Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Songyue; Xue, Jin; Sun, Haidan; Wen, Bo; Wang, Quanhui; Perkins, Guy; Zhao, Huiwen W.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Hsiao, Yu-hsin; Yin, Liang; Xie, Yingying; Hou, Guixue; Zi, Jin; Lin, Liang; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the primary organelles that consume oxygen and provide energy for cellular activities. To investigate the mitochondrial mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions, we generated Drosophila strains that could survive in low- or high-oxygen environments (LOF or HOF, respectively), examined their mitochondria at the ultrastructural level via transmission electron microscopy, studied the activity of their respiratory chain complexes, and quantitatively analyzed the protein abundance responses of the mitochondrial proteomes using Isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). A total of 718 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 55 and 75 mitochondrial proteins displayed significant differences in abundance in LOF and HOF, respectively, compared with the control flies. Importantly, these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins are primarily involved in respiration, calcium regulation, the oxidative response, and mitochondrial protein translation. A correlation analysis of the changes in the levels of the mRNAs corresponding to differentially regulated mitochondrial proteins revealed two sets of proteins with different modes of regulation (transcriptional vs. post-transcriptional) in both LOF and HOF. We believe that these findings will not only enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions in Drosophila but also provide a clue in studying human disease induced by altered oxygen tension in tissues and cells. PMID:24069262

  11. Behavior of whey protein concentrates under extreme storage conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overseas demand for whey protein concentrates (WPC) has increased steadily in recent years. Emergency aid foods often include WPC, but shelf-life studies of whey proteins under different shipment and storage conditions have not been conducted in the last 50 yr. Microbial quality, compound form...

  12. Electronic test instrument generates extremely small current signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookshier, W. K.

    1967-01-01

    Generator produces dynamic test signals in the range from 0.0001 and 10 to the minus 12th power amperes. It involves an extension of the technique of applying a triangular voltage waveform to a small capacitor to obtain a square-wave output current. The effects of stray capacitance are minimized by appropriate shielding.

  13. Communities that thrive in extreme conditions captured from a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Low-Décarie, Etienne; Fussmann, Gregor F; Dumbrell, Alex J; Bell, Graham

    2016-09-01

    Organisms that can grow in extreme conditions would be expected to be confined to extreme environments. However, we were able to capture highly productive communities of algae and bacteria capable of growing in acidic (pH 2), basic (pH 12) and saline (40 ppt) conditions from an ordinary freshwater lake. Microbial communities may thus include taxa that are highly productive in conditions that are far outside the range of conditions experienced in their host ecosystem. The organisms we captured were not obligate extremophiles, but were capable of growing in both extreme and benign conditions. The ability to grow in extreme conditions may thus be a common functional attribute in microbial communities. PMID:27601726

  14. Extreme drought to extreme floods: summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Pojunas, Timothy K.; Peck, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center (WSC) maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 317 real-time streamgages, more than 180 groundwater wells of which 31 are real-time, and 10 lake-level monitoring stations. One of the many benefits of data collected from this monitoring network is that analysis of the data provides an overview of the hydrologic conditions of rivers, creeks, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.

  15. Operational conditions for random-number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compagner, A.

    1995-11-01

    Ensemble theory is used to describe arbitrary sequences of integers, whether formed by the decimals of π or produced by a roulette or by any other means. Correlation coefficients of any range and order are defined as Fourier transforms of the ensemble weights. Competing definitions of random sequences are considered. Special attention is given to sequences of random numbers needed for Monte Carlo calculations. Different recipes for those sequences lead to correlations that vary in range and order, but the total amount of correlation is the same for all sequences of a given length (without internal periodicities). For maximum-length sequences produced by linear algorithms, most correlation coefficients are zero, but the remaining ones are of absolute value 1. In well-tempered sequences, these complete correlations are of high order or of very long range. General conditions to be obeyed by random-number generators are discussed and a qualitative method for comparing different recipes is given.

  16. Local Ordering in Disordered Systems under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Di Cicco, Andrea; Principi, Emiliano; Minicucci, Marco; De Panfilis, Simone; Trapananti, Angela; Filipponi, Adriano

    2007-02-02

    Recent advances in data-analysis and instrumentation allowed us to perform x-ray absorption (XAS) studies of liquids, undercooled liquids and glasses under high-temperature and/or high-pressure conditions. The experimental set-up used for combined XAS and x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation at the ESRF is briefly shown. Advances in XAS data-analysis allowing detailed structural insight about pair and higher-order distributions are also mentioned. Applications to liquid and undercooled liquid metals like Cu, and Sn under pressure are briefly discussed.

  17. Extreme Environments of Next-Generation Energy Systems and Materials: Can They Peacefully Co-Exist? (452nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, Nikolaos

    2009-06-17

    "What happens to conventional metals near the ocean?" you might ask the workers who are repairing the water tower at Jones Beach. They will tell you that both the tower's steel framework and copper roof show extensive corrosion from the salty air. To power future generations of cars, homes, utility plants, and even particle accelerators, unprecedented levels of efficiency will be needed. Such efficiency will require new unconventional alloys and composite materials that can also withstand high temperatures, intense radiation fluxes, high stresses, and other extreme conditions in highly corrosive environments that accelerate the aging and weakening of materials, as salty air weakens steel and copper. During the lecture, Simos will discuss the demands of next-generation energy systems and focus on the extreme conditions that materials used in these systems will perform under. He will also explain Brookhaven Lab's role in past, ongoing, and future experiments aimed to analyze and address materials' abilities to endure these conditions.

  18. [Individual adaptation strategy under extreme environmental conditions in humans].

    PubMed

    Soroko, S I; Aldasheva, A A

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the researches of I.M. Sechenov, I.P. Pavlov, A.A. Uchtomskii, the Russian psychophysiological school considers adaptation in connection with the biological and social origin of a man as the integrated, coordinated and self-controlled human organism's reaction to maintain the vital functions in the constantly changing environmental conditions. On the base of well-known systemic-dynamic methodology and scrutinizing the issue of man and environment interaction V.I. Medvedev added to the theory of man's adaptation the activity paradigm that enable to uncover the distinctive features of professional activities in various environment conditions. The theoretical and practical investigations based on the activity methodology gave the opportunity to find out the new principles of interaction between man and environment and on the strategy of adaptive behavior. From this investigations one could see that the main characteristic of interaction "man-environment" is that man represents proactive side, man simulate different adaptation strategies using both genetically-fixed and acquired mechanisms of adaptive behavior. PMID:23393785

  19. Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe.

    PubMed

    Suslick, Kenneth S; Eddingsaas, Nathan C; Flannigan, David J; Hopkins, Stephen D; Xu, Hangxun

    2011-07-01

    We review recent work on the use of sonoluminescence (SL) to probe spectroscopically the conditions created during cavitation, both in clouds of collapsing bubbles (multibubble sonoluminescence, (MBSL)) and in single bubble events. The effective MBSL temperature can be controlled by the vapor pressure of the liquid or the thermal conductivity of the dissolved gas over a range from ∼1600 to ∼9000K. The effective pressure during MBSL is ∼300bar, based on atomic line shifts. Given nanosecond emission times, this means that cooling rates are >10(12)K/s. In sulfuric and phosphoric acid, the low volatility and high solubility of any sonolysis products make bubble collapse more efficient and evidence for an optically opaque plasma core is found. PMID:21247788

  20. Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe.

    PubMed

    Suslick, Kenneth S; Eddingsaas, Nathan C; Flannigan, David J; Hopkins, Stephen D; Xu, Hangxun

    2011-07-01

    We review recent work on the use of sonoluminescence (SL) to probe spectroscopically the conditions created during cavitation, both in clouds of collapsing bubbles (multibubble sonoluminescence, (MBSL)) and in single bubble events. The effective MBSL temperature can be controlled by the vapor pressure of the liquid or the thermal conductivity of the dissolved gas over a range from ∼1600 to ∼9000K. The effective pressure during MBSL is ∼300bar, based on atomic line shifts. Given nanosecond emission times, this means that cooling rates are >10(12)K/s. In sulfuric and phosphoric acid, the low volatility and high solubility of any sonolysis products make bubble collapse more efficient and evidence for an optically opaque plasma core is found.

  1. TRISO-Coated Fuel Durability Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reimanis, Ivar; Gorman, Brian; Butt, Darryl

    2014-03-30

    The PIs propose to examine TRISO-coated particles (SiC and ZrC coatings) in an integrated two-part study. In the first part, experiments will be performed to assess the reaction kinetics of the carbides under CO-CO2 environments at temperatures up to 1800 degree C. Kinetic model will be applied to describe the degradation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy will be employed to establish the chemical and microstructure evolution under the imposed environmental conditions. The second part of the proposed work focuses on establishing the role of the high temperature, environmental exposure described above on the mechanical behavior of TRISO-coated particles. Electron microscopy and other advanced techniques will be subsequently performed to evaluate failure mechanisms. The work is expected to reveal relationships between corrosion reactions, starting material characteristics (polytype of SiC, impurity concentration, flaw distribution), flaw healing behavior, and crack growth.

  2. The Sphagnum microbiome supports bog ecosystem functioning under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Bragina, Anastasia; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Zachow, Christin; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-09-01

    Sphagnum-dominated bogs represent a unique yet widely distributed type of terrestrial ecosystem and strongly contribute to global biosphere functioning. Sphagnum is colonized by highly diverse microbial communities, but less is known about their function. We identified a high functional diversity within the Sphagnum microbiome applying an Illumina-based metagenomic approach followed by de novo assembly and MG-RAST annotation. An interenvironmental comparison revealed that the Sphagnum microbiome harbours specific genetic features that distinguish it significantly from microbiomes of higher plants and peat soils. The differential traits especially support ecosystem functioning by a symbiotic lifestyle under poikilohydric and ombrotrophic conditions. To realise a plasticity-stability balance, we found abundant subsystems responsible to cope with oxidative and drought stresses, to exchange (mobile) genetic elements, and genes that encode for resistance to detrimental environmental factors, repair and self-controlling mechanisms. Multiple microbe-microbe and plant-microbe interactions were also found to play a crucial role as indicated by diverse genes necessary for biofilm formation, interaction via quorum sensing and nutrient exchange. A high proportion of genes involved in nitrogen cycle and recycling of organic material supported the role of bacteria for nutrient supply. 16S rDNA analysis indicated a higher structural diversity than that which had been previously detected using PCR-dependent techniques. Altogether, the diverse Sphagnum microbiome has the ability to support the life of the host plant and the entire ecosystem under changing environmental conditions. Beyond this, the moss microbiome presents a promising bio-resource for environmental biotechnology - with respect to novel enzymes or stress-protecting bacteria. PMID:25113243

  3. Social and Economic Consequences of Extreme Hydrological Regimes in Relationship to Federal Hydropower Generation on the Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    parrish, M. A.; Otstot, R.; Moradkhani, H.

    2011-12-01

    After suffering from a ten year drought the main-stem Missouri reservoir system has now reached full capacity with flooding across a significant part of the region. Hydropower generation as a secondary purpose to both navigation and flood control is both directly and indirectly effected by these extreme hydrological regimes with sub-optimal generation timing, loss of dependable capacity, decrease in turbine efficiency, and operating in-flexibilities to buffer other renewable resources such as wind power. Hydropower operations under these extreme conditions are expected to continue with the recent SECURE Water Act Report issued by the Bureau of Reclamation predicting that the mean annual basin runoff may increase as much as 9.7% over the next fifty years. This study seeks to map the social and economic consequences of these extreme hydrologic regimes. First, using fifty years of historical generation a cumulative monthly frequency curve for each of the six federal plants on the Missouri River is developed. Then following the scenario analysis technique performed by the Department of Interior's study on the Deepwater Horizon Spill social and economic consequence chains are mapped into quartiles of the monthly frequency curves utilizing guidance from U.S Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation, and Western area Power Administration. Locating the placement of the monthly generation for periods of extreme hydrological conditions within the frequency curve provides an objective relationship between the extreme event and the social and economic consequences. Using this approach over the fifty year period of record provides a way to analyze the cumulative multi-year effect of drought and flood, while also providing a way to calculate the uncertainty of the consequence associated with the extreme event.

  4. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl P.; Martinez, Daniel Tito; Gray, George T. III

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  5. Quasi-real-time Adaptive Optics Simulations on GPUs for the Next Generation Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratadour, D.

    2012-09-01

    Final design studies for the first generation of Adaptive Optics (AO) systems for the E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) should begin in 2012, the first step of which will involve realistic end-to-end numerical simulations of the instruments and their environment. In this paper we present the first performance analysis of our simulation code, showing its ability to provide Shack-Hartmann (SH) images and measurements at the kHz scale for VLT-sized AO system and in quasi-real-time (up to 100 iterations per second) for ELT-sized on a single top-end GPU. The simulation code includes multiple layers atmospheric turbulence generation, ray tracing through these layers, image formation at the focal plane of every sub-aperture of a SH sensor using either natural or laser guide stars and centroiding on these images using various algorithms. Turbulence is generated on-the-fly giving the ability to simulate hours of observations without the need of loading extremely large phase screens in the global memory. Because of its performance this code additionally provides the unique ability to test real-time controllers for future AO systems under nominal conditions. This open source project is distributed under a GPL license and can be used to simulate a wide range of AO systems from classical AO on a medium size telescope to multi-conjugate AO on an ELT. Simulation parameters (number of turbulent layers, turbulence strength, number and position of targets, etc.) can be modified dynamically thanks to the modular underlying implementation using the Standard Template Library. While a simulation run is fully scriptable, a Graphical User Interface is also provided for easier fine tuning of the system parameters and easier access to sophisticated system designs.

  6. The matter in extreme conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nagler, Bob; Arnold, Brice; Bouchard, Gary; Boyce, Richard F.; Boyce, Richard M.; Callen, Alice; Campell, Marc; Curiel, Ruben; Galtier, Eric; Garofoli, Justin; et al

    2015-04-21

    The LCLS beam provides revolutionary capabilities for studying the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument is that it combines the unique LCLS beam with high-power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science. In this paper an overview of the beamline, the capabilities of the instrumentation, and selected highlights of experiments and commissioning results are presented.

  7. The Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Bob; Arnold, Brice; Bouchard, Gary; Boyce, Richard F; Boyce, Richard M; Callen, Alice; Campell, Marc; Curiel, Ruben; Galtier, Eric; Garofoli, Justin; Granados, Eduardo; Hastings, Jerry; Hays, Greg; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard W; Milathianaki, Despina; Plummer, Lori; Schropp, Andreas; Wallace, Alex; Welch, Marc; White, William; Xing, Zhou; Yin, Jing; Young, James; Zastrau, Ulf; Lee, Hae Ja

    2015-05-01

    The LCLS beam provides revolutionary capabilities for studying the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument is that it combines the unique LCLS beam with high-power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science. In this paper an overview of the beamline, the capabilities of the instrumentation, and selected highlights of experiments and commissioning results are presented.

  8. The Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Nagler, Bob; Arnold, Brice; Bouchard, Gary; Boyce, Richard F.; Boyce, Richard M.; Callen, Alice; Campell, Marc; Curiel, Ruben; Galtier, Eric; Garofoli, Justin; Granados, Eduardo; Hastings, Jerry; Hays, Greg; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard W.; Milathianaki, Despina; Plummer, Lori; Schropp, Andreas; Wallace, Alex; Welch, Marc; White, William; Xing, Zhou; Yin, Jing; Young, James; Zastrau, Ulf; Lee, Hae Ja

    2015-01-01

    The LCLS beam provides revolutionary capabilities for studying the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument is that it combines the unique LCLS beam with high-power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science. In this paper an overview of the beamline, the capabilities of the instrumentation, and selected highlights of experiments and commissioning results are presented. PMID:25931063

  9. Impacts of extreme hydro-meteorological conditions on ecosystem functioning and productivity patterns across Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huete, Alfredo; Ma, Xuanlong; Xie, Zunyi; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    significant drought-induced mortality. Semi-arid rangelands were most sensitive to drought and wet pulses, generating large land carbon sinks with subsequent rapid carbon dissipation rates. We also found an intensification of drought and wet cycles from the 1980's, inducing similar impacts on the carbon cycle. More efforts are needed to understand and generalize vegetation responses to extreme hydro-meteorological conditions in order to better inform land managers and other stakeholders of potential environmental and economic impacts.

  10. Improving the simulation of extreme precipitation events by stochastic weather generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, Eva M.; Katz, Richard W.

    2008-12-01

    Stochastic weather generators are commonly used to generate scenarios of climate variability or change on a daily timescale. So the realistic modeling of extreme events is essential. Presently, parametric weather generators do not produce a heavy enough upper tail for the distribution of daily precipitation amount, whereas those based on resampling have inherent limitations in representing extremes. Regarding this issue, we first describe advanced statistical tools from ultimate and penultimate extreme value theory to analyze and model extremal behavior of precipitation intensity (i.e., nonzero amount), which, although interesting in their own right, are mainly used to motivate approaches to improve the treatment of extremes within a weather generator framework. To this end we propose and discuss several possible approaches, none of which resolves the problem at hand completely, but at least one of them (i.e., a hybrid technique with a gamma distribution for low to moderate intensities and a generalized Pareto distribution for high intensities) can lead to a substantial improvement. An alternative approach, based on fitting the stretched exponential (or Weibull) distribution to either all or only high intensities, is found difficult to implement in practice.

  11. Sudden pore pressure rise and rapid landslide initiation induced under extreme rainfall conditions - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Wang, Fawu; Wang, Gonghui

    2010-05-01

    Since July 19 to 26, 2009, western Japan had a severe rainstorms and caused floods and landslides. Most of the landslides are debris slide - debris flows. Most devastated case took place in Hofu city, Japan. On July 21, extremely intense rainstorm caused numerous debris flows and mud flows in the hillslopes Some of the debris flows destroyed residential houses and home for elderly people, and finally killed 14 residents. Debris flow distribution map was prepared soon based on airphoto interpretation. Japanese Meteorological Agency runs nation-wide ground-based rain gauge network as well as radar rain gauges, which provide hourly to 10 minutes precipitation distribution real-time with spatial resolution of about 5 km. Distribution of daily (cumulative) precipitation of July 21 shows (1) The cumulative precipitation from 6 am -- 12 am of the day was evaluated that their return period could be 200 - 600 years statistically. In 2009, another extraordinary rainfall, of which intensity was evaluated as less than 100 years more more, caused floods in another city claiming many residents lives on the way to evacuation area. Those frequent extraordinary extreme rainfall is not concluded as the consequence of global warming nor climate change, however, those frequency of extreme rainfall events affecting societies are obviously increasing in Japan, too. As for the Hofu city case, it was proved that debris flows took place in the high precipitation area and covered by covered by weathered granite sands and silts which is called "masa". This sands has been proved susceptible against landslides under extreme rainfall conditions. However, the transition from slide - debris flow process is not well revealed, except authors past experiment on the similar masa samples in June 1999 Hiroshima debris flow case. Authors have embedded pore pressure control system for the undrained ring shear apparatus. Strongly weathered sandy soils were sampled just on the smooth and flat granitic

  12. Resistance of Microorganisms to Extreme Environmental Conditions and Its Contribution to Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampelotto, Pabulo Henrique

    2010-06-01

    In the last decades, substantial changes have occurred regarding what scientists consider the limits of habitable environmental conditions. For every extreme environmental condition investigated, a variety of microorganisms have shown that not only can they tolerate these conditions, but that they also often require these extreme conditions for survival. Microbes can return to life even after hundreds of millions of years. Furthermore, a variety of studies demonstrate that microorganisms can survive under extreme conditions, such as ultracentrifugation, hypervelocity, shock pressure, high temperature variations, vacuums, and different ultraviolet and ionizing radiation intensities, which simulate the conditions that microbes could experience during the ejection from one planet, the journey through space, as well as the impact in another planet. With these discoveries, our knowledge about the biosphere has grown and the putative boundaries of life have expanded. The present work examines the recent discoveries and the principal advances concerning the resistance of microorganisms to extreme environmental conditions, and analyzes its contributions to the development of the main themes of astrobiology: the origins of life, the search for extraterrestrial life, and the dispersion of life in the Universe.

  13. Influence of extreme ambient temperatures and anaerobic conditions on Peltigera aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakov, M. Yu.; Insarova, I. D.; Kharabadze, D. E.; Ptushenko, V. V.; Shtaer, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Lichen are symbiotic systems constituted by heterotrophic fungi (mycobionts) and photosynthetic microorganism (photobionts). These organisms can survive under extreme stress conditions. The aim of this work was to study the influence of low (- 70 °C) or high (+ 70 °C) temperatures, temperature fluctuations from + 70 °C to - 70 °C, and anaerobic conditions on P. aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability. None of the studied stress factors affected significantly photosynthetic and respiratory activity of the thalli. No changes in morphology or ultrastructure of the cells were revealed for both photobiont and mycobiont components after extreme temperature treatment of P. aphthosa thalli. The data show the extreme tolerance of P. aphthosa to some stress factors inherent to the space flight conditions.

  14. High-resolution stochastic generation of extreme rainfall intensity for urban drainage modelling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Blumensaat, Frank; Molnar, Peter; Fatichi, Simone; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Urban drainage response is highly dependent on the spatial and temporal structure of rainfall. Therefore, measuring and simulating rainfall at a high spatial and temporal resolution is a fundamental step to fully assess urban drainage system reliability and related uncertainties. This is even more relevant when considering extreme rainfall events. However, the current space-time rainfall models have limitations in capturing extreme rainfall intensity statistics for short durations. Here, we use the STREAP (Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation) model, which is a novel stochastic rainfall generator for simulating high-resolution rainfall fields that preserve the spatio-temporal structure of rainfall and its statistical characteristics. The model enables a generation of rain fields at 102 m and minute scales in a fast and computer-efficient way matching the requirements for hydrological analysis of urban drainage systems. The STREAP model was applied successfully in the past to generate high-resolution extreme rainfall intensities over a small domain. A sub-catchment in the city of Luzern (Switzerland) was chosen as a case study to: (i) evaluate the ability of STREAP to disaggregate extreme rainfall intensities for urban drainage applications; (ii) assessing the role of stochastic climate variability of rainfall in flow response and (iii) evaluate the degree of non-linearity between extreme rainfall intensity and system response (i.e. flow) for a small urban catchment. The channel flow at the catchment outlet is simulated by means of a calibrated hydrodynamic sewer model.

  15. CONDITIONED CHOROPLETH MAPS AND HYPOTHESIS GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a recently developed for multivariate data analysis template called conditioned choropleth maps (CCmaps). This template is a two-way layout of maps designed to facilitate comparisons. The template can show the association between a dependent variable, as repre...

  16. The Extreme Male Brain Theory and Gender Role Behaviour in Persons with an Autism Spectrum Condition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauder, J. E. A.; Cornet, L. J. M.; Ponds, R. W. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Extreme Male Brain theory persons with autism possess masculinised cognitive traits. In this study masculinisation of gender role behaviour is evaluated in 25 persons with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) and matched controls with gender role behaviour as part of a shortened version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality…

  17. Characterization of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from diesel, gasoline and hybrid cars under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Hareuveny, Ronen; Sudan, Madhuri; Halgamuge, Malka N; Yaffe, Yoav; Tzabari, Yuval; Namir, Daniel; Kheifets, Leeka

    2015-01-30

    This study characterizes extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) levels in 10 car models. Extensive measurements were conducted in three diesel, four gasoline, and three hybrid cars, under similar controlled conditions and negligible background fields. Averaged over all four seats under various driving scenarios the fields were lowest in diesel cars (0.02 μT), higher for gasoline (0.04-0.05 μT) and highest in hybrids (0.06-0.09 μT), but all were in-line with daily exposures from other sources. Hybrid cars had the highest mean and 95th percentile MF levels, and an especially large percentage of measurements above 0.2 μT. These parameters were also higher for moving conditions compared to standing while idling or revving at 2500 RPM and higher still at 80 km/h compared to 40 km/h. Fields in non-hybrid cars were higher at the front seats, while in hybrid cars they were higher at the back seats, particularly the back right seat where 16%-69% of measurements were greater than 0.2 μT. As our results do not include low frequency fields (below 30 Hz) that might be generated by tire rotation, we suggest that net currents flowing through the cars' metallic chassis may be a possible source of MF. Larger surveys in standardized and well-described settings should be conducted with different types of vehicles and with spectral analysis of fields including lower frequencies due to magnetization of tires.

  18. Characterization of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from diesel, gasoline and hybrid cars under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Hareuveny, Ronen; Sudan, Madhuri; Halgamuge, Malka N; Yaffe, Yoav; Tzabari, Yuval; Namir, Daniel; Kheifets, Leeka

    2015-02-01

    This study characterizes extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) levels in 10 car models. Extensive measurements were conducted in three diesel, four gasoline, and three hybrid cars, under similar controlled conditions and negligible background fields. Averaged over all four seats under various driving scenarios the fields were lowest in diesel cars (0.02 μT), higher for gasoline (0.04-0.05 μT) and highest in hybrids (0.06-0.09 μT), but all were in-line with daily exposures from other sources. Hybrid cars had the highest mean and 95th percentile MF levels, and an especially large percentage of measurements above 0.2 μT. These parameters were also higher for moving conditions compared to standing while idling or revving at 2500 RPM and higher still at 80 km/h compared to 40 km/h. Fields in non-hybrid cars were higher at the front seats, while in hybrid cars they were higher at the back seats, particularly the back right seat where 16%-69% of measurements were greater than 0.2 μT. As our results do not include low frequency fields (below 30 Hz) that might be generated by tire rotation, we suggest that net currents flowing through the cars' metallic chassis may be a possible source of MF. Larger surveys in standardized and well-described settings should be conducted with different types of vehicles and with spectral analysis of fields including lower frequencies due to magnetization of tires. PMID:25647323

  19. Characterization of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields from Diesel, Gasoline and Hybrid Cars under Controlled Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hareuveny, Ronen; Sudan, Madhuri; Halgamuge, Malka N.; Yaffe, Yoav; Tzabari, Yuval; Namir, Daniel; Kheifets, Leeka

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) levels in 10 car models. Extensive measurements were conducted in three diesel, four gasoline, and three hybrid cars, under similar controlled conditions and negligible background fields. Averaged over all four seats under various driving scenarios the fields were lowest in diesel cars (0.02 μT), higher for gasoline (0.04–0.05 μT) and highest in hybrids (0.06–0.09 μT), but all were in-line with daily exposures from other sources. Hybrid cars had the highest mean and 95th percentile MF levels, and an especially large percentage of measurements above 0.2 μT. These parameters were also higher for moving conditions compared to standing while idling or revving at 2500 RPM and higher still at 80 km/h compared to 40 km/h. Fields in non-hybrid cars were higher at the front seats, while in hybrid cars they were higher at the back seats, particularly the back right seat where 16%–69% of measurements were greater than 0.2 μT. As our results do not include low frequency fields (below 30 Hz) that might be generated by tire rotation, we suggest that net currents flowing through the cars’ metallic chassis may be a possible source of MF. Larger surveys in standardized and well-described settings should be conducted with different types of vehicles and with spectral analysis of fields including lower frequencies due to magnetization of tires. PMID:25647323

  20. Matter under extreme conditions probed by a seeded free-electron-laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bencivenga, F.; Principi, E.; Cucini, R.; Danailov, M. B.; Demidovich, A.; D’Amico, F.; Di Fonzo, S.; Gessini, A.; Kurdi, N.; Mahne, N.; Raimondi, L.; Zangrando, M.; Masciovecchio, C.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Battistoni, A.; Svetina, C.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Hatada, K.; Filipponi, A.; and others

    2015-08-17

    FERMI is the first user dedicated seeded free-electron-laser (FEL) working in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray range. The EIS-TIMEX experimental end-station was availabe to external users since from the beginning of the user operation of the facility, in Dicember 2012. EIS-TIMEX has been conceived to exploit the unique properties of the FERMI source to study matter under extreme and metastable thermodynamic conditions. We hereby report on its basic parameters and applications, which includes very low jitter (i.e., high time resolution) pump-probe measurements.

  1. Lower extremity control and dynamics during backward angular impulse generation in forward translating tasks.

    PubMed

    Mathiyakom, W; McNitt-Gray, J L; Wilcox, R

    2006-01-01

    Observation of complex whole body movements suggests that the nervous system coordinates multiple operational subsystems using some type of hierarchical control. When comparing two forward translating tasks performed with and without backward angular impulse, we have learned that both trunk-leg coordination and reaction force-time characteristics are significantly different between tasks. This led us to hypothesize that differences in trunk-leg coordination and reaction force generation would induce between-task differences in the control of the lower extremity joints during impulse generation phase of the tasks. Eight highly skilled performers executed a series of forward jumps with and without backward rotation (reverse somersault and reverse timer, respectively). Sagittal plane kinematics, reaction forces, and electromyograms of lower extremity muscles were acquired during the take-off phase of both tasks. Lower extremity joint kinetics were calculated using inverse dynamics. The results demonstrated between-task differences in the relative angles between the lower extremity segments and the net joint forces/reaction force and the joint angular velocity profiles. Significantly less knee extensor net joint moments and net joint moment work and greater hip extensor net joint moments and net joint moment work were observed during the push interval of the reverse somersault as compared to the reverse timer. Between-task differences in lower extremity joint kinetics were regulated by selectively activating the bi-articular muscles crossing the knee and hip. These results indicate that between-task differences in the control of the center of mass relative to the reaction force alters control and dynamics of the multijoint lower extremity subsystem. PMID:15878165

  2. Deterioration modeling for condition assessment of flexible pavements considering extreme weather events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Tari, Yasamin; Shahini Shamsabadi, Salar; Birken, Ralf; Wang, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Accurate pavement management systems are essential for states' Department Of Transportation and roadway agencies to plan for cost-effective maintenance and repair (M and R) strategies. Pavement deterioration model is an imperative component of any pavement management system since the future budget and M and R plans would be developed based on the predicted pavement performance measures. It is crucial for the pavement deterioration models to consider the factors that significantly aggravate the pavement condition. While many studies have highlighted the impact of different environmental, load, and pavement's structure on the life cycle of the pavement, effect of extreme weather events such as Floods and Snow Storms have often been overlooked. In this study, a pavement deterioration model is proposed which would consider the effect of traffic loads, climate conditions, and extreme weather events. Climate, load and performance data has been compiled for over twenty years and for eight states using the Long Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) databases. A stepwise regression approach is undertaken to quantify the effect of the extreme weather events, along with other influential factors on pavement performance in terms of International Roughness Index (IRI). Final results rendered more than 90% correlation with the quantified impact values of extreme weather events.

  3. In-situ transmission electron microscopy growth of nanoparticles under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, F. P.; Oliviero, E.; Azevedo, G. de M.; Baptista, D. L.; Zawislak, F. C.; Fichtner, P. F. P.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and time resolved behavior of individual Pb nanoparticles embedded in silica have been studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy observations at high temperatures (400-1100 °C) and under 200 keV electron irradiation. It is shown that under such extreme conditions, nanoparticles can migrate at long distances presenting a Brownian-like behavior and eventually coalesce. The particle migration phenomenon is discussed considering the influence of the thermal energy and the electron irradiation effects on the atomic diffusion process which is shown to control particle migration. These results and comparison with ex-situ experiments tackle the stability and the microstructure evolution of nanoparticles systems under extreme conditions. It elucidates on the effects of energetic particle irradiation-annealing treatments either as a tool or as a detrimental issue that could hamper their long-term applications in radiation-harsh environments such as in space or nuclear sectors.

  4. The limits of the adaptation of life to extreme conditions (in connection with problems of exobiology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksenov, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Accommodation is discussed as a universal evolutionary principle which essentially will apply to all life forms, regardless of chemical base (carbon, silicon, etc.). Life forms must either adapt to extreme conditions or perish, and for any life form an extremum factor is any significant deviation in environmental parameters. The possibility of life forms existing in specific extraterrestrial environments is discussed, and a conclusion is drawn which unequivocally states that through many forms of accommodation life is possible in many different environments.

  5. Extreme conditions over Europe and North America: role of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprich-Robert, Yohan; Msadek, Rym; Delworth, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV) is the result and possibly the source of marked modulations of the climate over many areas of the globe. For instance, the relatively warm and dry climate of North America throughout the 30-yr interval of 1931-60, during which the Dust Bowl and the 1950's drought occurred, has been linked to the concomitant warm phase of the AMV. During this period relative warm and wet conditions prevailed over Europe. After 1960, the Atlantic began to cool, and for almost three decades the North American climate turned wetter and cooler whereas Europe experienced cooler and dryer conditions. However, the shortness of the historical observations compared to the AMV period suggested by longer proxy (~60-80yr) does not allow to firmly conclude on the causal effect of the AMV. We use a model approach to isolate the causal role of the AMV on the occurrence of extreme events over Europe and North America. We present experiments based on two GFDL global climate models, a low resolution version, CM2.1 and a higher resolution model for the atmospheric component, FLOR. In both model experiments sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic sector are restored to the observed AMV pattern, while the other basins are left fully coupled. In order to explore and robustly isolate the AMV impacts on extreme events, we use large ensemble simulations (100 members for CM2.1 and 50 for FLOR) that we run for 20 years. We find that a positive phase of the AMV increases the frequency of occurrence of drought over North America and of extremely cold/warm conditions over Northern/Central Europe during winter/summer. Interestingly, we find that the AMV impacts on these extreme conditions are modulated by the Pacific response to the AMV itself. Members that develop a weak Pacific response show more extreme events over Europe whereas those that develop a strong Pacific response show more extreme events over North America.

  6. Straw mulching reduces the harmful effects of extreme hydrological and temperature conditions in citrus orchards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Liu, Dongbi; Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guoshi; Tao, Yong; Xie, Juan; Pan, Junfeng; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Extreme weather conditions with negative impacts can strongly affect agricultural production. In the Danjiangkou reservoir area, citrus yields were greatly influenced by cold weather conditions and drought stress in 2011. Soil straw mulching (SM) practices have a major effect on soil water and thermal regimes. A two-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate whether the SM practices can help achieve favorable citrus fruit yields. Results showed that the annual total runoff was significantly (P<0.05) reduced with SM as compared to the control (CK). Correspondingly, mean soil water storage in the top 100 cm of the soil profile was increased in the SM as compared to the CK treatment. However, this result was significant only in the dry season (Jan to Mar), and not in the wet season (Jul to Sep) for both years. Interestingly, the SM treatment did not significantly increase citrus fruit yield in 2010 but did so in 2011, when the citrus crop was completely destroyed (zero fruit yield) in the CK treatment plot due to extremely low temperatures during the citrus overwintering stage. The mulch probably acted as an insulator, resulting in smaller fluctuations in soil temperature in the SM than in the CK treatment. The results suggested that the small effects on soil water and temperature changes created by surface mulch had limited impact on citrus fruit yield in a normal year (e.g., in 2010). However, SM practices can positively impact citrus fruit yield in extreme weather conditions.

  7. Realtime Monitoring of the Extreme Oceanic Conditions in the Kangjin Bay, South Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Y.; Jung, K.

    2006-05-01

    Realtime(RT) monitoring system for the oceanic state variables was developed and has been operating since April, 2004 in the Kangjin Bay, South Sea, Korea shown. The RT production of data stream and display on the Internet web page are made possible in continuous functions of various system elements. Detailed technical information for the RT monitoring system can be referred to Ro et al. (2004). The water quality parameters, current and meteorological conditions are continuously monitored with very high sampling resolution (10 min.) throughout the year and are being published on the Internet web pages (http://oceaninfo.co.kr/kangjin). The research project encompass several important subjects focusing on the extreme oceanic conditions such as very cold water mass formation during the wintertime cold outbreak, highly diluted sea water during the dam water discharge in the summertime monsoon and the subsequent formation of the hypoxia in the shallow Kangjin Bay. These are the typical extreme events captured possibly by the RT monitoring system, without which could never have been observed and understood. These extreme conditions would exert dramatic ecological impact to the local aqua-culture ecology. This study would elucidate the series of physico-chemical processes and its implication of the local eco-system. To understand the complicated processes, various research tools have been employed such as numerical modeling of tidal circulation, density-driven current, water-quality and formation of hypoxia, time series analyses of various water quality properties including multi-variate correlation.

  8. Straw mulching reduces the harmful effects of extreme hydrological and temperature conditions in citrus orchards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Liu, Dongbi; Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guoshi; Tao, Yong; Xie, Juan; Pan, Junfeng; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Extreme weather conditions with negative impacts can strongly affect agricultural production. In the Danjiangkou reservoir area, citrus yields were greatly influenced by cold weather conditions and drought stress in 2011. Soil straw mulching (SM) practices have a major effect on soil water and thermal regimes. A two-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate whether the SM practices can help achieve favorable citrus fruit yields. Results showed that the annual total runoff was significantly (P<0.05) reduced with SM as compared to the control (CK). Correspondingly, mean soil water storage in the top 100 cm of the soil profile was increased in the SM as compared to the CK treatment. However, this result was significant only in the dry season (Jan to Mar), and not in the wet season (Jul to Sep) for both years. Interestingly, the SM treatment did not significantly increase citrus fruit yield in 2010 but did so in 2011, when the citrus crop was completely destroyed (zero fruit yield) in the CK treatment plot due to extremely low temperatures during the citrus overwintering stage. The mulch probably acted as an insulator, resulting in smaller fluctuations in soil temperature in the SM than in the CK treatment. The results suggested that the small effects on soil water and temperature changes created by surface mulch had limited impact on citrus fruit yield in a normal year (e.g., in 2010). However, SM practices can positively impact citrus fruit yield in extreme weather conditions. PMID:24489844

  9. Modelling hydrological extremes under non-stationary conditions using climate covariates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliades, Lampros; Galiatsatou, Panagiota; Loukas, Athanasios

    2013-04-01

    Extreme value theory is a probabilistic theory that can interpret the future probabilities of occurrence of extreme events (e.g. extreme precipitation and streamflow) using past observed records. Traditionally, extreme value theory requires the assumption of temporal stationarity. This assumption implies that the historical patterns of recurrence of extreme events are static over time. However, the hydroclimatic system is nonstationary on time scales that are relevant to extreme value analysis, due to human-mediated and natural environmental change. In this study the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is used to assess nonstationarity in annual maximum daily rainfall and streamflow timeseries at selected meteorological and hydrometric stations in Greece and Cyprus. The GEV distribution parameters (location, scale, and shape) are specified as functions of time-varying covariates and estimated using the conditional density network (CDN) as proposed by Cannon (2010). The CDN is a probabilistic extension of the multilayer perceptron neural network. Model parameters are estimated via the generalized maximum likelihood (GML) approach using the quasi-Newton BFGS optimization algorithm, and the appropriate GEV-CDN model architecture for the selected meteorological and hydrometric stations is selected by fitting increasingly complicated models and choosing the one that minimizes the Akaike information criterion with small sample size correction. For all case studies in Greece and Cyprus different formulations are tested with combinational cases of stationary and nonstationary parameters of the GEV distribution, linear and non-linear architecture of the CDN and combinations of the input climatic covariates. Climatic indices such as the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), which describes atmospheric circulation in the eastern tropical pacific related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index that varies on an interdecadal

  10. Analysis of extreme summers and prior late winter/spring conditions in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träger-Chatterjee, C.; Müller, R. W.; Bendix, J.

    2013-05-01

    Drought and heat waves during summer in mid-latitudes are a serious threat to human health and agriculture and have negative impacts on the infrastructure, such as problems in energy supply. The appearance of such extreme events is expected to increase with the progress of global warming. A better understanding of the development of extremely hot and dry summers and the identification of possible precursors could help improve existing seasonal forecasts in this regard, and could possibly lead to the development of early warning methods. The development of extremely hot and dry summer seasons in central Europe is attributed to a combined effect of the dominance of anticyclonic weather regimes and soil moisture-atmosphere interactions. The atmospheric circulation largely determines the amount of solar irradiation and the amount of precipitation in an area. These two variables are themselves major factors controlling the soil moisture. Thus, solar irradiation and precipitation are used as proxies to analyse extreme sunny and dry late winter/spring and summer seasons for the period 1958-2011 in Germany and adjacent areas. For this purpose, solar irradiation data from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast 40-yr and interim re-analysis dataset, as well as remote sensing data are used. Precipitation data are taken from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project. To analyse the atmospheric circulation geopotential data at 850 hPa are also taken from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast 40-yr and interim re-analysis datasets. For the years in which extreme summers in terms of high solar irradiation and low precipitation are identified, the previous late winter/spring conditions of solar irradiation and precipitation in Germany and adjacent areas are analysed. Results show that if the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is not very intensely developed, extremely high solar irradiation amounts, together with extremely low precipitation

  11. [Hygienic problems of population health maintenance under the extremal conditions of North].

    PubMed

    Potapov, A I; Istomin, A V; Shushkova, T S; Ustiushin, B V; Iudina, T V; Maĭmulov, V G; Raengulov, B M; Shagdarova, A N

    2005-01-01

    A range of multi-sided studies, carried out in various regions of Far North (Jamalo-Nenets autonomous region, Komi republic, Sakha republic (Yakutia)) have established the leading hygienic risk factors of population health deterioration, including those characteristic of small nationalities of North. The consideration of the obtained data, including regional alimentary status peculiarities, the condition of metabolic processes and antioxidant balance of the organism, allowed establishment of effective approaches to the maintenance of notherners' health. These approaches are based upon the optimization of nutrition as an element of population health control under extremal conditions.

  12. Lichens as a Model-System for Symbiotic Organisms under Simulated Extreme Space Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, J.; Horneck, G.; Rettberg, P.; Ott, S.

    As a consequence of the symbiotic state of lichens both the bionts are able to colonize habitats where the separate bionts would not be able to survive. The symbiosis of lichens reflects a high degree of complexity and plasticity. The combination of the different bionts enables these organisms to colonize most extreme habitats worldwide from the Arctic and Alpine zones to the Antarctic. Besides the already well investigated microorganisms lichens are good model -systems to examine adaptation strategies to most extreme environments. Because of the symbiotic nature of the lichens a 3-component -system can be used for investigations: the mycobiont (fungi), the photobiont (algae) and the lichen itself. Our investigations are based on such a system related to simulated extreme conditions. The influence of different doses of UV A, B, C (>200nm) on the vitality of fungal (mycobiont) fruiting bodys and their spores and the germination process has been investigated. The spores are cultivated on a variety of different substrates, especially on a Martian Regolith Simulant JSC - 1-A g a r- Extract for testing the influence of the UV radiation related to the dependency of different soil-substrate-extracts. The influence of vacuum conditions has been investigated. The aim of this research is to test the reaction of a symbiotic organism complex and its respective bionts to highly extreme space conditions looking forward to a possibly survival strategy of lichenized associations in space; probably supporting the theory of Panspermia. For the interpretation of results especially refering to the vitality potential of the photobionts in damaged and healthy lichens the method of modern confocal lasermicroscopy (CLSM) - a novel method in lichenology is presented.

  13. High-order harmonic generation yielding tunable extreme-ultraviolet radiation of high spectral purity.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Neshev, D; Ubachs, W

    2003-10-17

    Production of extreme-ultraviolet radiation by high-order harmonic generation is demonstrated to yield unprecedented spectral purity of lambda/Delta lambda=2.5 x 10(5) at wavelengths covering the entire range 40-100 nm. Tunability and sub-cm(-1) bandwidth of the harmonics are demonstrated in recordings of the He (1s4p) and Ar (3p(5)3d') resonance lines at 52.2 and 86.6 nm. Frequency shift of the harmonics due to chirp-induced phenomena are investigated and found to be small, resulting in a frequency accuracy of about 5 x 10(-7) in the domain of extreme-ultraviolet radiation.

  14. Spin-on-glass coatings for the generation of super-polishedsubstrates for extreme ultraviolet optics

    SciTech Connect

    Salmassi, Farhad; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Substrates intended for use as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optics have extremely stringent requirements in terms of finish. These requirements can dramatically increase the cost and fabrication time, especially when non-conventional shapes, such as toroids, are required. Here we present a spin-on-glass resist process capable of generating super-polished parts from inexpensive substrates. The method has been used to render diamond-turned substrates compatible for use as EUV optics. Toroidal diamond-turned optics with starting rms roughness in the 3.3 to 3.7 nm range have been smoothed to the 0.4 to 0.6 nm range. EUV reflectometry characterization of these optics has demonstrated reflectivities of approximately 63%.

  15. A power conditioning system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator energy sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The use of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) as the primary source of energy in unmanned spacecraft is discussed. RTG output control, power conditioning system requirements, the electrical design, and circuit performance are also discussed.

  16. Lower extremity control and dynamics during backward angular impulse generation in backward translating tasks.

    PubMed

    Mathiyakom, W; McNitt-Gray, J L; Wilcox, R

    2006-03-01

    Observation of complex whole-body movements suggests that the nervous system coordinates multiple operational subsystems using some type of hierarchical control. When comparing two backward translating tasks performed with and without backward angular impulse, we have learned that task-specific modifications in trunk-leg coordination contribute to the regulation of total-body center of mass (CoM) position relative to the reaction force (RF). In this study, we hypothesized that task-specific differences in trunk-leg coordination would affect the control of the lower extremity joints during the impulse-generation phase of the tasks. Eight highly skilled performers executed a series of backward translating jumps with and without backward rotation (back somersault and back timer, respectively). Sagittal plane kinematics, RFs and electromyograms of lower extremity muscles were acquired during the take-off phase of both tasks. Lower extremity joint kinetics was calculated using inverse dynamics. The results indicate that between-task differences in the relative angles between the lower extremity segments and the net joint forces/RF contributed to significant reductions in knee-extensor net joint moments and increases in hip-extensor net joint moments during the push interval of the back somersault as compared to the back timer. Between-task differences in backward trunk angular velocity also contributed to the re-distribution of work done by the lower extremity net joint moments. Between-task differences in lower extremity joint kinetics were associated with synergistic activation of the bi-articular muscles crossing the knee and hip. These results indicated that task-specific control of CoM relative to the RF in order to regulate the backward angular-impulse-involved modification in the control and dynamics of the knee and hip joints. These results indicate that between-task differences in the control objectives at the total-body level (position of CoM relative to the

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Germination of Nosema bombycis Spores under Extremely Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Chen, Bosheng; Hu, Sirui; Liang, Xili; Lu, Xingmeng; Shao, Yongqi

    2016-01-01

    The microsporidian Nosema bombycis is an obligate intracellular pathogen of the silkworm Bombyx mori, causing the epidemic disease Pebrine and extensive economic losses in sericulture. Although N. bombycis forms spores with rigid spore walls that protect against various environmental pressures, ingested spores germinate immediately under the extremely alkaline host gut condition (Lepidoptera gut pH > 10.5), which is a key developmental turning point from dormant state to infected state. However, to date this process remains poorly understood due to the complexity of the animal digestive tract and the lack of genetic tools for microsporidia. Here we show, using an in vitro spore germination model, how the proteome of N. bombycis changes during germination, analyse specific metabolic pathways employed in detail, and validate key functional proteins in vivo in silkworms. By a label-free quantitative proteomics approach that is directly based on high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) data, a total of 1136 proteins were identified with high confidence, with 127 proteins being significantly changed in comparison to non-germinated spores. Among them, structural proteins including polar tube protein 1 and 3 and spore wall protein (SWP) 4 and 30 were found to be significantly down-regulated, but SWP9 significantly up-regulated. Some nucleases like polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase and flap endonucleases 1, together with a panel of hydrolases involved in protein degradation and RNA cleavage were overrepresented too upon germination, which implied that they might play important roles during spore germination. The differentially regulated trends of these genes were validated, respectively, by quantitative RT-PCR and 3 proteins of interest were confirmed by Western blotting analyses in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the pathway analysis showed that abundant up- and down-regulations appear involved in the glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, purine, and pyrimidine metabolism

  18. Multilayer mirror with enhanced spectral selectivity for the next generation extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, V. V. Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Novikova, N. N.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Louis, E.; Bijkerk, F.; Yakunin, A. M.

    2013-11-25

    We have demonstrated a hybrid extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer mirror for 6.x nm radiation that provides selective suppression for infrared (IR) radiation. The mirror consists of an IR-transparent LaN∕B multilayer stack which is used as EUV-reflective coating and antireflective (AR) coating to suppress IR. The AR coating can be optimized to suppress CO{sub 2} laser radiation at the wavelength of 10.6 μm, which is of interest for application in next-generation EUV lithography systems.

  19. Attosecond extreme ultraviolet generation in cluster by using spatially inhomogeneous field

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Liqiang; Liu, Hang

    2015-01-15

    A promising method to generate the attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources has been theoretically investigated emerging from the two-dimensional Ar{sup +} cluster driven by the spatially inhomogeneous field. The results show that with the introduction of the Ar{sup +} cluster model, not only the harmonic cutoffs are enhanced, but also the harmonic yields are reinforced. Furthermore, by properly moderating the inhomogeneity as well as the laser parameters of the inhomogeneous field, the harmonic cutoff can be further extended. As a result, three almost linearly polarized XUV pulses with durations of 40 as, 42 as, and 45 as can be obtained.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteria Capable of Tolerating the Extreme Conditions of Clean Room Environments▿

    PubMed Central

    La Duc, Myron T.; Dekas, Anne; Osman, Shariff; Moissl, Christine; Newcombe, David; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2007-01-01

    In assessing the bacterial populations present in spacecraft assembly, spacecraft test, and launch preparation facilities, extremophilic bacteria (requiring severe conditions for growth) and extremotolerant bacteria (tolerant to extreme conditions) were isolated. Several cultivation approaches were employed to select for and identify bacteria that not only survive the nutrient-limiting conditions of clean room environments but can also withstand even more inhospitable environmental stresses. Due to their proximity to spacefaring objects, these bacteria pose a considerable risk for forward contamination of extraterrestrial sites. Samples collected from four geographically distinct National Aeronautics and Space Administration clean rooms were challenged with UV-C irradiation, 5% hydrogen peroxide, heat shock, pH extremes (pH 3.0 and 11.0), temperature extremes (4°C to 65°C), and hypersalinity (25% NaCl) prior to and/or during cultivation as a means of selecting for extremotolerant bacteria. Culture-independent approaches were employed to measure viable microbial (ATP-based) and total bacterial (quantitative PCR-based) burdens. Intracellular ATP concentrations suggested a viable microbial presence ranging from below detection limits to 106 cells/m2. However, only 0.1 to 55% of these viable cells were able to grow on defined culture medium. Isolated members of the Bacillaceae family were more physiologically diverse than those reported in previous studies, including thermophiles (Geobacillus), obligate anaerobes (Paenibacillus), and halotolerant, alkalophilic species (Oceanobacillus and Exiguobacterium). Non-spore-forming microbes (α- and β-proteobacteria and actinobacteria) exhibiting tolerance to the selected stresses were also encountered. The multiassay cultivation approach employed herein enhances the current understanding of the physiological diversity of bacteria housed in these clean rooms and leads us to ponder the origin and means of translocation of

  1. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and evaporation under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme heating of soils during fires can have long-term and irreversible consequences and given the increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing probability of wildfires associated with global warming, one approach to improving understanding of these consequences is to better understand and model the dynamics of the coupled heat, (liquid) moisture, and vapor transport in soils during extreme heating events. The present study describes a model developed to simulate non-equilibrium soil evaporation and the transport of heat, moisture, and water vapor under conditions during fires where the surface heating of the soil often ranges between 10,000 and 100,000 Wm-2 for several minutes to several hours. The Hertz-Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. Model performance is tested against laboratory measurements of soil temperature and moisture changes. Testing the present model with different formulations for soil hydraulic conductivity, water retention curve, water activity, and the non-equilibrium evaporative source term, indicates that virtually all the model's successes result from the use of a temperature dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term, a rather surprising and unexpected result. On the other hand, the model solution is not a completely faithful representation of the laboratory data. Nevertheless, this new non-equilibrium model circumvents many of the problems that plagued an equilibrium model developed for the same purpose (Massman 2012: Water Resources Research 48, WR011710) and provides a much more physically realistic simulation than the earlier model. Finally, the present model should provide insight into modeling of heat and mass transport and evaporation, not only during high temperature and low moisture conditions, but for modeling these soil processes under less extreme environmental conditions as well.

  2. Normal and Extreme Wind Conditions for Power at Coastal Locations in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Ning, Jicai; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the normal and extreme wind conditions for power at 12 coastal locations along China’s coastline were investigated. For this purpose, the daily meteorological data measured at the standard 10-m height above ground for periods of 40–62 years are statistically analyzed. The East Asian Monsoon that affects almost China’s entire coastal region is considered as the leading factor determining wind energy resources. For most stations, the mean wind speed is higher in winter and lower in summer. Meanwhile, the wind direction analysis indicates that the prevalent winds in summer are southerly, while those in winter are northerly. The air densities at different coastal locations differ significantly, resulting in the difference in wind power density. The Weibull and lognormal distributions are applied to fit the yearly wind speeds. The lognormal distribution performs better than the Weibull distribution at 8 coastal stations according to two judgement criteria, the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test and absolute error (AE). Regarding the annual maximum extreme wind speed, the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution performs better than the commonly-used Gumbel distribution. At these southeastern coastal locations, strong winds usually occur in typhoon season. These 4 coastal provinces, that is, Guangdong, Fujian, Hainan, and Zhejiang, which have abundant wind resources, are also prone to typhoon disasters. PMID:26313256

  3. Normal and Extreme Wind Conditions for Power at Coastal Locations in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Ning, Jicai; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the normal and extreme wind conditions for power at 12 coastal locations along China's coastline were investigated. For this purpose, the daily meteorological data measured at the standard 10-m height above ground for periods of 40-62 years are statistically analyzed. The East Asian Monsoon that affects almost China's entire coastal region is considered as the leading factor determining wind energy resources. For most stations, the mean wind speed is higher in winter and lower in summer. Meanwhile, the wind direction analysis indicates that the prevalent winds in summer are southerly, while those in winter are northerly. The air densities at different coastal locations differ significantly, resulting in the difference in wind power density. The Weibull and lognormal distributions are applied to fit the yearly wind speeds. The lognormal distribution performs better than the Weibull distribution at 8 coastal stations according to two judgement criteria, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and absolute error (AE). Regarding the annual maximum extreme wind speed, the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution performs better than the commonly-used Gumbel distribution. At these southeastern coastal locations, strong winds usually occur in typhoon season. These 4 coastal provinces, that is, Guangdong, Fujian, Hainan, and Zhejiang, which have abundant wind resources, are also prone to typhoon disasters. PMID:26313256

  4. Combined Micro-chemical and Micro-structural Analysis of New Minerals Representing Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Tschauner, O. D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent improvements in micro-chemical analysis in combination with novel tools for micrometer-scale structural analysis of minerals from synchrotron X-ray diffraction open a pathway towards studies of mineral paragenesis that were previously not or barely accessible. Often mineral assemblies that represent extreme conditions also pose extreme challenges to analysis: very small size scale, complex matrix, minor amounts of material. Examples of such extreme, but also quite relevant environments are: a) High pressure shock-metamorphic minerals in meteorites and terrestrial impact sites, b) inclusions in diamonds from the deep mantle, c) ultrarefractory phases in Ca-Al-inlcusions from the solar nebula, d) presolar condensates. We show how a combination of synchrotron-based structural and semi-quantitative chemical techniques, with electron-microscopy based high-resolution imaging and fully quantitative chemical analysis and qualitative structural identification establish a powerful tool for discovery and characterization of important and interesting new minerals on micron- to submicron size scale.

  5. Normal and Extreme Wind Conditions for Power at Coastal Locations in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Ning, Jicai; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the normal and extreme wind conditions for power at 12 coastal locations along China's coastline were investigated. For this purpose, the daily meteorological data measured at the standard 10-m height above ground for periods of 40-62 years are statistically analyzed. The East Asian Monsoon that affects almost China's entire coastal region is considered as the leading factor determining wind energy resources. For most stations, the mean wind speed is higher in winter and lower in summer. Meanwhile, the wind direction analysis indicates that the prevalent winds in summer are southerly, while those in winter are northerly. The air densities at different coastal locations differ significantly, resulting in the difference in wind power density. The Weibull and lognormal distributions are applied to fit the yearly wind speeds. The lognormal distribution performs better than the Weibull distribution at 8 coastal stations according to two judgement criteria, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and absolute error (AE). Regarding the annual maximum extreme wind speed, the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution performs better than the commonly-used Gumbel distribution. At these southeastern coastal locations, strong winds usually occur in typhoon season. These 4 coastal provinces, that is, Guangdong, Fujian, Hainan, and Zhejiang, which have abundant wind resources, are also prone to typhoon disasters.

  6. [On the treatment of gunshot wounds of extremities in the conditions of local military actions].

    PubMed

    Agakhanian, N V; Ter-Avetikian, Z A; Mkrtchian, M E; Amirian, E G

    2009-04-01

    Together with the improvement of new types of weapons with more destroying effect, the treatment methods of gunshot wounds including laser therapy, extrafocal osteosynthesis, new antibacterial means are also developing. The application of these methods makes it possible to create optimal conditions for the treatment of different types of injuries of extremities with positive results in 88% cases. These results were received due to early and thorough first surgical processing of wounds by wide usage of helium-neon laser radiation as well as with the help of traumatologists who are the skilled in the new treatment methods including the extrafocal compressional osteosynthesis. PMID:19430037

  7. [Effect of extreme conditions on seasonal patterns of endocrine and metabolic processes].

    PubMed

    Barabash, L V; Levitskiĭ, E F; Khon, V B; Zaĭtsev, A A

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to clarify seasonal patterns of endocrine and metabolic processes and their changes under extreme conditions in Special Police Force servicemen. Hormonal status, lipid spectra, activity of lipid peroxidation and nonspecific protection systems were assessed during transition seasons. It was shown that the stay in a local armed conflict zone had marked effect on the structure of adaptive reactions. Hormonal dysregulation and impaired efficiency of protective systems were most pronounced during the autumn/winter season. Disturbed endocrine regulation in winter/spring resulted in undesirable changes of lipid metabolism and increased load on the protective function mediated through bioactive radicals. PMID:19705792

  8. [On the treatment of gunshot wounds of extremities in the conditions of local military actions].

    PubMed

    Agakhanian, N V; Ter-Avetikian, Z A; Mkrtchian, M E; Amirian, E G

    2009-04-01

    Together with the improvement of new types of weapons with more destroying effect, the treatment methods of gunshot wounds including laser therapy, extrafocal osteosynthesis, new antibacterial means are also developing. The application of these methods makes it possible to create optimal conditions for the treatment of different types of injuries of extremities with positive results in 88% cases. These results were received due to early and thorough first surgical processing of wounds by wide usage of helium-neon laser radiation as well as with the help of traumatologists who are the skilled in the new treatment methods including the extrafocal compressional osteosynthesis.

  9. The phase-contrast imaging instrument at the matter in extreme conditions endstation at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Brown, Shaughnessy B.; Fry, Alan; Gleason, Arianna; Granados, Eduardo; Hashim, Akel; Hastings, Jerome B.; Samberg, Dirk; Seiboth, Frank; Tavella, Franz; Xing, Zhou; Lee, Hae Ja; Schroer, Christian G.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the phase-contrast imaging instrument at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The instrument can image phenomena with a spatial resolution of a few hundreds of nanometers and at the same time reveal the atomic structure through X-ray diffraction, with a temporal resolution better than 100 fs. It was specifically designed for studies relevant to high-energy-density science and can monitor, e.g., shock fronts, phase transitions, or void collapses. This versatile instrument was commissioned last year and is now available to the MEC user community.

  10. Modeling soil heating and moisture transport under extreme conditions: Forest fires and slash pile burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    Heating any soil during a sufficiently intense wildfire or prescribed burn can alter it irreversibly, causing many significant, long-term biological, chemical, and hydrological effects. Given the climate-change-driven increasing probability of wildfires and the increasing use of prescribed burns by land managers, it is important to better understand the dynamics of the coupled heat and moisture transport in soil during these extreme heating events. Furthermore, improved understanding and modeling of heat and mass transport during extreme conditions should provide insights into the associated transport mechanisms under more normal conditions. The present study describes a numerical model developed to simulate soil heat and moisture transport during fires where the surface heating often ranges between 10,000 and 100,000 W m-2 for several minutes to several hours. Basically, the model extends methods commonly used to model coupled heat flow and moisture evaporation at ambient conditions into regions of extreme dryness and heat. But it also incorporates some infrequently used formulations for temperature dependencies of the soil specific heat, thermal conductivity, and the water retention curve, as well as advective effects due to the large changes in volume that occur when liquid water is rapidly volatilized. Model performance is tested against laboratory measurements of soil temperature and moisture changes at several depths during controlled heating events. Qualitatively, the model agrees with the laboratory observations, namely, it simulates an increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front (due to the condensation of evaporated soil water at the front) and a hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of the soil drying. Nevertheless, it is shown that the model is incapable of producing a physically realistic solution because it does not (and, in fact, cannot) represent the relationship between soil water potential and soil

  11. Soil heating and evaporation under extreme conditions: Forest fires and slash pile burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    Heating any soil during a sufficiently intense wild fire or prescribed burn can alter soil irreversibly, resulting in many significant and well known, long term biological, chemical, and hydrological effects. To better understand how fire impacts soil, especially considering the increasing probability of wildfires that is being driven by climate change and the increasing use of prescribe burns by land managers, it is important to better understand the dynamics of the coupled heat and moisture transport in soil during these extreme heating events. Furthermore, improving understanding of heat and mass transport during such extreme conditions should also provide insights into the associated transport mechanisms under more normal conditions as well. Here I describe the development of a new model designed to simulate soil heat and moisture transport during fires where the surface heating often ranges between 10,000 and 100,000 Wm-2 for several minutes to several hours. Model performance is tested against laboratory measurements of soil temperature and moisture changes at several depths during controlled heating events created with an extremely intense radiant heater. The laboratory tests employed well described soils with well known physical properties. The model, on the other hand, is somewhat unusual in that it employs formulations for temperature dependencies of the soil specific heat, thermal conductivity, and the water retention curve (relation between soil moisture and soil moisture potential). It also employs a new formulation for the surface evaporation rate as a component of the upper boundary condition, as well as the Newton-Raphson method and the generalized Thomas algorithm for inverting block tri-diagonal matrices to solve for soil temperature and soil moisture potential. Model results show rapid evaporation rates with significant vapor transfer not only to the free atmosphere above the soil, but to lower depths of the soil, where the vapor re

  12. Condition Driven Adaptive Music Generation for Computer Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naushad, Alamgir; Muhammad, Tufail

    2013-02-01

    The video game industry has grown to a multi-billion dollar, worldwide industry. The background music tends adaptively in reference to the specific game content during the game length of the play. Adaptive music should be further explored by looking at the particular condition in the game; such condition is driven by generating a specific music in the background which best fits in with the active game content throughout the length of the gameplay. This research paper outlines the use of condition driven adaptive music generation for audio and video to dynamically incorporate adaptively.

  13. PHz-wide Supercontinua of Nondispersing Subcycle Pulses Generated by Extreme Modulational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, F.; Travers, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2013-07-01

    Modulational instability (MI) of 500 fs, 5μJ pulses, propagating in gas-filled hollow-core kagome photonic crystal fiber, is studied numerically and experimentally. By tuning the pressure and launched energy, we control the duration of the pulses emerging as a consequence of MI and hence are able to study two regimes: the classical MI case leading to few-cycle solitons of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation; and an extreme case leading to the formation of nondispersing subcycle pulses (0.5 to 2 fs) with peak intensities of order 1014Wcm-2. Insight into the two regimes is obtained using a novel statistical analysis of the soliton parameters. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements show that, when a train of these pulses is generated, strong ionization of the gas occurs. This extreme MI is used to experimentally generate a high energy (>1μJ) and spectrally broad supercontinuum extending from the deep ultraviolet (320 nm) to the infrared (1300 nm).

  14. PHz-wide supercontinua of nondispersing subcycle pulses generated by extreme modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Tani, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2013-07-19

    Modulational instability (MI) of 500 fs, 5 μJ pulses, propagating in gas-filled hollow-core kagome photonic crystal fiber, is studied numerically and experimentally. By tuning the pressure and launched energy, we control the duration of the pulses emerging as a consequence of MI and hence are able to study two regimes: the classical MI case leading to few-cycle solitons of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation; and an extreme case leading to the formation of nondispersing subcycle pulses (0.5 to 2 fs) with peak intensities of order 10(14) W cm(-2). Insight into the two regimes is obtained using a novel statistical analysis of the soliton parameters. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements show that, when a train of these pulses is generated, strong ionization of the gas occurs. This extreme MI is used to experimentally generate a high energy (>1 μJ) and spectrally broad supercontinuum extending from the deep ultraviolet (320 nm) to the infrared (1300 nm).

  15. A resampling procedure for generating conditioned daily weather sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, M.P.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Brandon, D.; Werner, K.; Hay, L.; Rajagopalan, B.; Yates, D.

    2004-01-01

    [1] A method is introduced to generate conditioned daily precipitation and temperature time series at multiple stations. The method resamples data from the historical record "nens" times for the period of interest (nens = number of ensemble members) and reorders the ensemble members to reconstruct the observed spatial (intersite) and temporal correlation statistics. The weather generator model is applied to 2307 stations in the contiguous United States and is shown to reproduce the observed spatial correlation between neighboring stations, the observed correlation between variables (e.g., between precipitation and temperature), and the observed temporal correlation between subsequent days in the generated weather sequence. The weather generator model is extended to produce sequences of weather that are conditioned on climate indices (in this case the Nin??o 3.4 index). Example illustrations of conditioned weather sequences are provided for a station in Arizona (Petrified Forest, 34.8??N, 109.9??W), where El Nin??o and La Nin??a conditions have a strong effect on winter precipitation. The conditioned weather sequences generated using the methods described in this paper are appropriate for use as input to hydrologic models to produce multiseason forecasts of streamflow.

  16. Study on extreme turbulence wind conditions of multibody dynamics simulation for MW-class wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P.; Li, C.; Ye, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Parametric modeling of NREL 5MW wind turbine was set up for multi-body dynamics simulation by the TurbSim, AeroDyn, FAST (fatigue, aerodynamics, structures, and turbulence) software respectively. According to the analysis of the characteristics of wind in the space discrete point, using TurbSim to establish the steady-state wind and random changes with time and space wind. Based on the AeroDyn software, which can coupled to FAST, we calculated the aerodynamic load. Loading the aerodynamic data which has been calculated, FAST can establish a fully parameterized simulation model. Making a comparison of the results obtained by FAST in 3 different wind conditions, the different of dynamic responses of the structure were obtained. The results obtained by FAST have some meaning in the study of wind turbine under extreme turbulence wind conditions.

  17. Fitness to work of astronauts in conditions of action of the extreme emotional factors.

    PubMed

    Prisniakova, L M

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical model for the quantitative determination of influence of a level of emotional exertion on the success of human activity is presented. The learning curves of fixed words in the groups with a different level of the emotional exertion are analyzed. The obtained magnitudes of time constant T depending on a type of the emotional exertion are a quantitative measure of the emotional exertion. Time constants could also be of use for a prediction of the characteristic of fitness to work of an astronaut in conditions of extreme factors. The inverse of the sign of influencing on efficiency of activity of the man is detected. The paper offers a mathematical model of the relation between successful activity and motivations or the emotional exertion (Yerkes-Dodson law). Proposed models can serve by the theoretical basis of the quantitative characteristics of an estimation of activity of astronauts in conditions of the emotional factors at a phase of their selection. PMID:15803632

  18. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Nozomi Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2015-09-14

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9–25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ∼10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2}. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.

  19. Concrete Condition Assessment Using Impact-Echo Method and Extreme Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Kui; Yan, Weizhong; Cui, De-Mi

    2016-01-01

    The impact-echo (IE) method is a popular non-destructive testing (NDT) technique widely used for measuring the thickness of plate-like structures and for detecting certain defects inside concrete elements or structures. However, the IE method is not effective for full condition assessment (i.e., defect detection, defect diagnosis, defect sizing and location), because the simple frequency spectrum analysis involved in the existing IE method is not sufficient to capture the IE signal patterns associated with different conditions. In this paper, we attempt to enhance the IE technique and enable it for full condition assessment of concrete elements by introducing advanced machine learning techniques for performing comprehensive analysis and pattern recognition of IE signals. Specifically, we use wavelet decomposition for extracting signatures or features out of the raw IE signals and apply extreme learning machine, one of the recently developed machine learning techniques, as classification models for full condition assessment. To validate the capabilities of the proposed method, we build a number of specimens with various types, sizes, and locations of defects and perform IE testing on these specimens in a lab environment. Based on analysis of the collected IE signals using the proposed machine learning based IE method, we demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in performing full condition assessment of concrete elements or structures. PMID:27023563

  20. Concrete Condition Assessment Using Impact-Echo Method and Extreme Learning Machines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Kui; Yan, Weizhong; Cui, De-Mi

    2016-01-01

    The impact-echo (IE) method is a popular non-destructive testing (NDT) technique widely used for measuring the thickness of plate-like structures and for detecting certain defects inside concrete elements or structures. However, the IE method is not effective for full condition assessment (i.e., defect detection, defect diagnosis, defect sizing and location), because the simple frequency spectrum analysis involved in the existing IE method is not sufficient to capture the IE signal patterns associated with different conditions. In this paper, we attempt to enhance the IE technique and enable it for full condition assessment of concrete elements by introducing advanced machine learning techniques for performing comprehensive analysis and pattern recognition of IE signals. Specifically, we use wavelet decomposition for extracting signatures or features out of the raw IE signals and apply extreme learning machine, one of the recently developed machine learning techniques, as classification models for full condition assessment. To validate the capabilities of the proposed method, we build a number of specimens with various types, sizes, and locations of defects and perform IE testing on these specimens in a lab environment. Based on analysis of the collected IE signals using the proposed machine learning based IE method, we demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in performing full condition assessment of concrete elements or structures. PMID:27023563

  1. Concrete Condition Assessment Using Impact-Echo Method and Extreme Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Kui; Yan, Weizhong; Cui, De-Mi

    2016-03-26

    The impact-echo (IE) method is a popular non-destructive testing (NDT) technique widely used for measuring the thickness of plate-like structures and for detecting certain defects inside concrete elements or structures. However, the IE method is not effective for full condition assessment (i.e., defect detection, defect diagnosis, defect sizing and location), because the simple frequency spectrum analysis involved in the existing IE method is not sufficient to capture the IE signal patterns associated with different conditions. In this paper, we attempt to enhance the IE technique and enable it for full condition assessment of concrete elements by introducing advanced machine learning techniques for performing comprehensive analysis and pattern recognition of IE signals. Specifically, we use wavelet decomposition for extracting signatures or features out of the raw IE signals and apply extreme learning machine, one of the recently developed machine learning techniques, as classification models for full condition assessment. To validate the capabilities of the proposed method, we build a number of specimens with various types, sizes, and locations of defects and perform IE testing on these specimens in a lab environment. Based on analysis of the collected IE signals using the proposed machine learning based IE method, we demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in performing full condition assessment of concrete elements or structures.

  2. Three responses of wetland conditions to climatic extremes in the Prairie Pothole Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressey, Ryann L.; Austin, Jane; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands in central North Dakota were revisited after 50 years to assess changes following extreme drought and a prolonged wet period. We compared data collected during 1961–1966 to current (2013–2014) wetland conditions. We revisited 80 wetlands in 2013 and 2014 across three study areas and measured wetland area, ponded-water depth, and specific conductance. Wetlands at the three study areas responded to prolonged wet conditions in one of three ways. Wetlands at Crystal Springs became larger, and had deeper ponds of lower specific conductance in 2013–14 compared to the 1960s. Wetlands at Cottonwood were larger with deeper ponds of slightly higher specific conductance in 2013–2014. Wetlands at Mt. Moriah had only subtle changes in size, pond depth, and specific conductance between periods. Prolonged wet conditions led to merging of most wetlands (defined as the outer edge of wet-meadow vegetation) at Crystal Springs and a few wetlands at Cottonwood. Low topographic relief at Crystal Springs and Cottonwood contributed to storage of excess water in wetlands with associated responses to prolonged wet conditions. In contrast, higher topographic relief and natural outlets into two intermittent streams at Mt. Moriah resulted in wetlands being less impacted by prolonged wet conditions.

  3. Can environmental conditions experienced in early life influence future generations?

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Tim; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of early developmental conditions for performance in later life are now subjected to convergent interest from many different biological sub-disciplines. However, striking data, largely from the biomedical literature, show that environmental effects experienced even before conception can be transmissible to subsequent generations. Here, we review the growing evidence from natural systems for these cross-generational effects of early life conditions, showing that they can be generated by diverse environmental stressors, affect offspring in many ways and can be transmitted directly or indirectly by both parental lines for several generations. In doing so, we emphasize why early life might be so sensitive to the transmission of environmentally induced effects across generations. We also summarize recent theoretical advancements within the field of developmental plasticity, and discuss how parents might assemble different ‘internal’ and ‘external’ cues, even from the earliest stages of life, to instruct their investment decisions in offspring. In doing so, we provide a preliminary framework within the context of adaptive plasticity for understanding inter-generational phenomena that arise from early life conditions. PMID:24807254

  4. Influenza transmission during extreme indoor conditions in a low-resource tropical setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamerius, James; Ojeda, Sergio; Uejio, Christopher K.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Lopez, Brenda; Sanchez, Nery; Gordon, Aubree

    2016-08-01

    Influenza transmission occurs throughout the planet across wide-ranging environmental conditions. However, our understanding of the environmental factors mediating transmission is evaluated using outdoor environmental measurements, which may not be representative of the indoor conditions where influenza is transmitted. In this study, we examined the relationship between indoor environment and influenza transmission in a low-resource tropical population. We used a case-based ascertainment design to enroll 34 households with a suspected influenza case and then monitored households for influenza, while recording indoor temperature and humidity data in each household. We show that the indoor environment is not commensurate with outdoor conditions and that the relationship between indoor and outdoor conditions varies significantly across homes. We also show evidence of influenza transmission in extreme indoor environments. Specifically, our data suggests that indoor environments averaged 29 °C, 18 g/kg specific humidity, and 68 % relative humidity across 15 transmission events observed. These indoor settings also exhibited significant temporal variability with temperatures as high as 39 °C and specific and relative humidity increasing to 22 g/kg and 85 %, respectively, during some transmission events. However, we were unable to detect differences in the transmission efficiency by indoor temperature or humidity conditions. Overall, these results indicate that laboratory studies investigating influenza transmission and virus survival should increase the range of environmental conditions that they assess and that observational studies investigating the relationship between environment and influenza activity should use caution using outdoor environmental measurements since they can be imprecise estimates of the conditions that mediate transmission indoors.

  5. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering: an insight into life at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Meersman, Filip; Daniel, Isabelle; Forsyth, Trevor; McMillan, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Microbes have been found to thrive in diverse environments characterised by a wide range of pressure-temperature-composition conditions. The range of physicochemical conditions under which microbial life has been observed has continually expanded as microbiologists explore additional remote and apparently hostile environments. The studies provide us with clues about the current extent of biological organisms and allow us to explore the fundamental limits to survival of bacterial life forms under extreme conditions. We are developing quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) studies to help us to understand the dynamic processes associated with H-/D-containing microbes under high P conditions. We have begun our study using samples of Shewanella oneidensis. We obtained pioneering QENS results carried out in situ on live organisms into the 200 MPa range that provide new information on H2O/D2O exchange dynamics across the cell walls. To achieve this result we prepared D2O-substituted bacteria within the Deuteration Facility in Grenoble and transferred samples to the Munich FRM-II neutron reactor for QENS experiments at the high resolution TOFTOF spectrometer station. Our initial results show clear P dependence of H2O/D2O transfer dynamics across the bacterial cell walls. DCO

  6. The fate of carbon dioxide in water-rich fluids under extreme conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ding; Galli, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the fate of dissolved carbon dioxide under extreme conditions is critical to understanding the deep carbon cycle in Earth, a process that ultimately influences global climate change. We used first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to study carbonates and carbon dioxide dissolved in water at pressures (P) and temperatures (T) approximating the conditions of Earth’s upper mantle. Contrary to popular geochemical models assuming that molecular CO2(aq) is the major carbon species present in water under deep Earth conditions, we found that at 11 GPa and 1000 K, carbon exists almost entirely in the forms of solvated carbonate (CO32−) and bicarbonate (HCO3−) ions and that even carbonic acid [H2CO3(aq)] is more abundant than CO2(aq). Furthermore, our simulations revealed that ion pairing between Na+ and CO32−/HCO3− is greatly affected by P-T conditions, decreasing with increasing pressure at 800 to 1000 K. Our results suggest that in Earth’s upper mantle, water-rich geofluids transport a majority of carbon in the form of rapidly interconverting CO32− and HCO3− ions, not solvated CO2(aq) molecules. PMID:27757424

  7. The National Ignition Facility: an experimental platform for studying behavior of matter under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward

    2011-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As the world's largest and most energetic laser system, NIF serves as the national center for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration to achieve thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and to explore the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from all of its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm3-sized target, NIF can reach the conditions required to initiate fusion reactions. NIF can also provide access to extreme scientific environments: temperatures about 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions have never been created before in a laboratory and exist naturally only in interiors of the planetary and stellar environments as well as in nuclear weapons. Since August 2009, the NIF team has been conducting experiments in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)—a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, General Atomics, the University of Rochester, Sandia National Laboratories, as well as a number of universities and international collaborators. The results from these initial experiments show promise for the relatively near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.2 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 10%. Cryogenic target capability and additional diagnostics are being installed in preparation for layered target deuterium-tritium implosions to be conducted later in 2010. Important national security and basic science experiments have

  8. Evaluation of Oxygen Concentrators and Chemical Oxygen Generators at Altitude and Temperature Extremes.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Thomas C; Rodriquez, Dario; Britton, Tyler J; Johannigman, Jay A; Petro, Michael C; Branson, Richard D

    2016-05-01

    Oxygen cylinders are heavy and present a number of hazards, and liquid oxygen is too heavy and cumbersome to be used in far forward environments. Portable oxygen concentrators (POCs) and chemical oxygen generators (COGs) have been proposed as a solution. We evaluated 3 commercially available POCs and 3 COGs in a laboratory setting. Altitude testing was done at sea level and 8,000, 16,000, and 22,000 ft. Temperature extreme testing was performed after storing devices at 60°C and -35°C for 24 hours. Mean FIO2 decreased after storage at -35°C with Eclipse and iGo POCs and also at the higher volumes after storage at 60°C with the Eclipse. The iGo ceased to operate at 16,000 ft, but the Eclipse and Saros were unaffected by altitude. Oxygen flow, duration of operation, and total oxygen volume varied between COGs and within the same device type. Output decreased after storage at -35°C, but increased at each altitude as compared to sea level. This study showed significant differences in the performance of POCs and COGs after storage at temperature extremes and with the COGs at altitude. Clinicians must understand the performance characteristics of devices in all potential environments. PMID:27168568

  9. The Proteome of a Healthy Human during Physical Activity under Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Larina, I. M.; Ivanisenko, V. A.; Nikolaev, E. N.; Grigorev, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    The review examines the new approaches in modern systems biology, in terms of their use for a deeper understanding of the physiological adaptation of a healthy human in extreme environments. Human physiology under extreme conditions of life, or environmental physiology, and systems biology are natural partners. The similarities and differences between the object and methods in systems biology, the OMICs (proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics) disciplines, and other related sciences have been studied. The latest data on environmental human physiology obtained using systems biology methods are discussed. The independent achievements of systems biology in studying the adaptation of a healthy human to physical activity, including human presence at high altitude, to the effects of hypoxia and oxidative stress have been noted. A reasonable conclusion is drawn that the application of the methods and approaches used in systems biology to study the molecular pattern of the adaptive mechanisms that develop in the human body during space flight can provide valuable fundamental knowledge and fill the picture of human metabolic pathways. PMID:25349715

  10. Assessing the Land-Ocean Interaction under Extreme Climate Change Condition - a Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Wang, T.; Leung, R.; Balaguru, K.; Hibbard, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Many modeling applications, at global and regional scales, have demonstrated that numerical models are useful tools to quantify the uncertainty and the interactions between natural physical and biogeochemical processes and human activities in coastal regions. A regional integrated assessment modeling framework to investigate the interactions of agriculture and land use, coastal ecological issues, energy supply and effects of climate changes is under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with specific application to the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf is vulnerable to the direct impacts of climate changes, such as sea level rise, hurricane-induced storm surge and extreme floods due to high precipitation and river run-off. This presentation will focus on the coastal modeling aspect of this integrated modeling approach. An unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model, which has the capability of simulating coastal circulation, wave and storm surges, sediment transport and biogeochemical processes, is applied to simulate hurricane storm surges and extreme flood events in the coastal region of Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, storm surge along the US Southeast coasts and freshwater plume in the Mississippi Delta were simulated and compared to observations. Numerical sensitivity studies with boundary conditions and forcing indicated the urgent need of a real observation network as well as the importance of accurate model predictions at regional scales to drive the model at smaller scales. The implication of natural pressures, such as storm surge and flooding to biogeochemical processes and marine ecosystem will be discussed.

  11. Behavior of the ionosphere and thermosphere subject to extreme solar cycle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithtro, C. G.; Sojka, J. J.

    2005-08-01

    A 1-D global average ionosphere and thermosphere (GAIT) model is used to examine the climatological behavior of the upper atmosphere, subject to both extremely low and high solar flux. These extremes are justified, in part, by the Maunder Minimum and Grand Maximum epochs described by J. A. Eddy, as well as other studies involving cosmogenic isotopes and Sun-like stars. As the irradiance falls below normal solar minimum levels, the concentration of O+ decreases rapidly relative to the molecular ions, such that the ratio foF2/foF1 approaches unity. When subject to exceptionally high solar fluxes, the ionospheric peak electron density (NmF2) unexpectedly plateaus, remaining relatively constant even as the photon flux continues to increase. In both cases, the state of the underlying thermosphere, particularly the neutral gas temperature, is found to be largely responsible. Model trends are discussed in relation to ionospheric observations, specifically the preponderance of so-called ionospheric G conditions at solar minimum and foF2 saturation at solar maximum, as well as the problem of Earth's global helium budget.

  12. Extreme summer temperatures in Iberia: health impacts and associated synoptic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Herrera, R.; Díaz, J.; Trigo, R. M.; Hernández, E.

    2005-02-01

    This paper examines the effect of extreme summer temperatures on daily mortality in two large cities of Iberia: Lisbon (Portugal) and Madrid (Spain). Daily mortality and meteorological variables are analysed using the same methodology based on Box-Jenkins models. Results reveal that in both cases there is a triggering effect on mortality when maximum daily temperature exceeds a given threshold (34°C in Lisbon and 36°C in Madrid). The impact of most intense heat events is very similar for both cities, with significant mortality values occurring up to 3 days after the temperature threshold has been surpassed. This impact is measured as the percentual increase of mortality associated to a 1°C increase above the threshold temperature. In this respect, Lisbon shows a higher impact, 31%, as compared with Madrid at 21%. The difference can be attributed to demographic and socio-economic factors. Furthermore, the longer life span of Iberian women is critical to explain why, in both cities, females are more susceptible than males to heat effects, with an almost double mortality impact value. The analysis of Sea Level Pressure (SLP), 500hPa geopotential height and temperature fields reveals that, despite being relatively close to each other, Lisbon and Madrid have relatively different synoptic circulation anomalies associated with their respective extreme summer temperature days. The SLP field reveals higher anomalies for Lisbon, but extending over a smaller area. Extreme values in Madrid seem to require a more western location of the Azores High, embracing a greater area over Europe, even if it is not as deep as for Lisbon. The origin of the hot and dry air masses that usually lead to extreme heat days in both cities is located in Northern Africa. However, while Madrid maxima require wind blowing directly from the south, transporting heat from Southern Spain and Northern Africa, Lisbon maxima occur under more easterly conditions, when Northern African air flows over the

  13. Generation, temporal characterization and applications of femtosecond-/ attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, Isabell

    The work of this thesis is arranged into three parts: (A) Generation and temporal characterization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) attosecond pulses. In this work I present the generation and first temporal characterization of sub-optical cycle EUV radiation generated in a noble-gas filled hollow-core waveguide. Two regimes of EUV radiation were characterized, ranging from 200 attoseconds to ˜ 1 femtosecond in duration. The first regime that was characterized distinguishes itself from EUV radiation generated by other methods by its narrow (˜ 1 eV) spectral width, its simple energy tunability and its temporal confinement to ˜ 1 femtosecond. In the second regime, single isolated pulses of 200 attoseconds duration (and accordingly larger bandwidth) were generated. In both regimes dynamic phase-matching effects create an extremely short time window within which efficient nonlinear conversion is possible, while it is suppressed outside this window. Temporal characterization of the generated EUV pulses was approached by two-color pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy. Therefore an efficient photoelectron spectrometer was set up, detecting electrons in a 2pi collection angle. For the interpretation of the experimental data, an analytical model as well as an iterative algorithm were developed, to allow extraction of complex EUV waveforms. The demonstrated radiation will allow for time-resolved studies of the fastest processes in molecules and condensed matter, while at the same time ensuring adequate energy resolution for addressing individual electronic states. (B) Application of a COLTRIMS reaction microscope in combination with femtosecond EUV pulses to questions in molecular physics. The combination of the sensitive detection capabilities of a COLTRIMS reaction microscope with the high time resolution of pump-probe experiments using femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses makes it possible to answer very fundamental open questions in molecular physics such as the

  14. The microbial sulfur cycle at extremely haloalkaline conditions of soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Soda lakes represent a unique ecosystem with extremely high pH (up to 11) and salinity (up to saturation) due to the presence of high concentrations of sodium carbonate in brines. Despite these double extreme conditions, most of the lakes are highly productive and contain a fully functional microbial system. The microbial sulfur cycle is among the most active in soda lakes. One of the explanations for that is high-energy efficiency of dissimilatory conversions of inorganic sulfur compounds, both oxidative and reductive, sufficient to cope with costly life at double extreme conditions. The oxidative part of the sulfur cycle is driven by chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB), which are unique for soda lakes. The haloalkaliphilic SOB are present in the surface sediment layer of various soda lakes at high numbers of up to 10(6) viable cells/cm(3). The culturable forms are so far represented by four novel genera within the Gammaproteobacteria, including the genera Thioalkalivibrio, Thioalkalimicrobium, Thioalkalispira, and Thioalkalibacter. The latter two were only found occasionally and each includes a single species, while the former two are widely distributed in various soda lakes over the world. The genus Thioalkalivibrio is the most physiologically diverse and covers the whole spectrum of salt/pH conditions present in soda lakes. Most importantly, the dominant subgroup of this genus is able to grow in saturated soda brines containing 4 M total Na(+) - a so far unique property for any known aerobic chemolithoautotroph. Furthermore, some species can use thiocyanate as a sole energy source and three out of nine species can grow anaerobically with nitrogen oxides as electron acceptor. The reductive part of the sulfur cycle is active in the anoxic layers of the sediments of soda lakes. The in situ measurements of sulfate reduction rates and laboratory experiments with sediment slurries using sulfate, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur as

  15. The Microbial Sulfur Cycle at Extremely Haloalkaline Conditions of Soda Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Soda lakes represent a unique ecosystem with extremely high pH (up to 11) and salinity (up to saturation) due to the presence of high concentrations of sodium carbonate in brines. Despite these double extreme conditions, most of the lakes are highly productive and contain a fully functional microbial system. The microbial sulfur cycle is among the most active in soda lakes. One of the explanations for that is high-energy efficiency of dissimilatory conversions of inorganic sulfur compounds, both oxidative and reductive, sufficient to cope with costly life at double extreme conditions. The oxidative part of the sulfur cycle is driven by chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB), which are unique for soda lakes. The haloalkaliphilic SOB are present in the surface sediment layer of various soda lakes at high numbers of up to 106 viable cells/cm3. The culturable forms are so far represented by four novel genera within the Gammaproteobacteria, including the genera Thioalkalivibrio, Thioalkalimicrobium, Thioalkalispira, and Thioalkalibacter. The latter two were only found occasionally and each includes a single species, while the former two are widely distributed in various soda lakes over the world. The genus Thioalkalivibrio is the most physiologically diverse and covers the whole spectrum of salt/pH conditions present in soda lakes. Most importantly, the dominant subgroup of this genus is able to grow in saturated soda brines containing 4 M total Na+ – a so far unique property for any known aerobic chemolithoautotroph. Furthermore, some species can use thiocyanate as a sole energy source and three out of nine species can grow anaerobically with nitrogen oxides as electron acceptor. The reductive part of the sulfur cycle is active in the anoxic layers of the sediments of soda lakes. The in situ measurements of sulfate reduction rates and laboratory experiments with sediment slurries using sulfate, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur as

  16. Extreme weather conditions reduce the CO2 fertilization effect in temperate C3 grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, Wolfgang; Lehnert, Lukas; Kammann, Claudia; Müller, Christoph; Grünhage, Ludger; Luterbacher, Jürg; Erbs, Martin; Yuan, Naiming; Bendix, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations from anthropogenic activities is the major driver of global climate change. The rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations may stimulate plant photosynthesis and, thus, cause a net sink effect in the global carbon cycle. As a consequence of an enhanced photosynthesis, an increase in the net primary productivity (NPP) of C3 plants (termed CO2 fertilization) is widely assumed. This process is associated with a reduced stomatal conductance of leaves as the carbon demand of photosynthesis is met earlier. This causes a higher water-use efficiency and, hence, may reduce water stress in plants exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations ([eCO2]). However, the magnitude and persistence of the CO2 fertilization effect under a future climate including more frequent weather extremes are controversial. To test the CO2 fertilization effect for Central European grasslands, a data set comprising 16 years of biomass samples and environmental variables such as local weather and soil conditions was analysed by means of a novel approach. The data set was recorded on a "Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment" (FACE) experimental site which allows to quantify the CO2 fertilization effect under naturally occurring climate variations. The results indicate that the CO2 fertilization effect on the aboveground biomass is strongest under local average environmental conditions. Such intermediate regimes were defined by the mean +/- 1 standard deviation of the long-term average in the respective variable three months before harvest. The observed CO2 fertilization effect was reduced or vanished under drier, wetter and hotter conditions when the respective variable exceeded the bounds of the intermediate regimes. Comparable conditions, characterized by a higher frequency of more extreme weather conditions, are predicted for the future by climate projections. Consequently, biogeochemical models may overestimate the future NPP sink

  17. Equations of state of novel solids synthesized under extreme pressure-temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakevych, O. O.; Le Godec, Y.; Solozhenko, V. L.

    2015-11-01

    The pressure-volume-temperature equations of state have been constructed by combining experimental data and semiempirical estimations for a number of compounds recently synthesized under extreme pressure-temperature conditions. The solids with various bonding types were considered: covalent hard and superhard boron-rich and diamond-like compounds (e.g. B6O, B13N2, BP, c-BC5, and nano-cBN), ionic semiconductors (e.g. Mg2C and Mg2C3), as well as intercalation compounds (e.g. clathrates Na4Si24 and Na24+xSi136), and simple substances (e.g. boron allotropes γ-B28 and t'-B52, and open-framework silicon allotrope o-Si24 with quasi-direct bandgap). We also showed how the reliable p-V-T equations of state may be constructed using different types of data available.

  18. Towards a better understanding of the structure of nano-minerals at ambient and extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John B.; Ehm, Lars; Michel, F. Marc; Antao, Sytle; Chupas, Peter J.; Lee, Peter L.; Martin, C. David; Shastri, Sarvjit

    2009-01-29

    The high-pressure (HP) behavior of nano-crystalline mackinawite (n-FeS) with particle sizes of 6, 7, and 8 nm has been investigated by high-energy X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function analysis. An irreversible first-order structural phase transition from tetragonal mackinawite to orthorhombic FeS-II was observed at about 3 GPa. The transition is induced by the closure of the van-der-Waals gap in the layered mackinawite structure. A grain size effect on the transition pressure and the compressibility was observed. The n-FcS study is an example of a broad class of nano-crystalline minerals where the total scattering (TS) approach provides significant new information on local-, intermediate- and long-range structure. Under extreme conditions, of pressure in this case, straightforward modifications allow quantitative descriptions of the transformations mechanisms.

  19. Why can tiAicrsiYN-based adaptive coatings deliver exceptional performance under extreme frictional conditions?

    PubMed

    Beake, Ben D; Fox-Rabinovich, German S; Losset, Yannick; Yamamoto, Kenji; Agguire, Myriam H; Veldhuis, Stephen C; Endrino, Jose L; Kovalev, Anatoliy I

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive TiAlCrSiYN-based coatings show promise under the extreme tribological conditions of dry ultra-high-speed (500-700 m min-1) machining of hardened tool steels. During high speed machining, protective sapphire and mullite-like tribo-films form on the surface of TiAlCrSiYN-based coatings resulting in beneficial heat-redistribution in the cutting zone. XRD and HRTEM data show that the tribo-films act as a thermal barrier creating a strong thermal gradient. The data are consistent with the temperature decreasing from approximately 1100-1200 degrees C at the outer surface to approximately 600 degrees C at the tribo-film/coating interface. The mechanical properties of the multilayer TiAICrSiYN/TiA1CrN coating were measured by high temperature nanoindentation. It retains relatively high hardness (21 GPa) at 600 degrees C. The nanomechanical properties of the underlying coating layer provide a stable low wear environment for the tribo-films to form and regenerate so it can sustain high temperatures under operation (600 degrees C). This combination of characteristics explains the high wear resistance of the multilayer TiAlCrSiYN/TiAICrN coating under extreme operating conditions. TiAlCrSiYN and TiAlCrN monolayer coatings have a less effective combination of adaptability and mechanical characteristics and therefore lower tool life. The microstructural reasons for different optimum hardness and plasticity between monolayer and multilayer coatings are discussed.

  20. Diurnal variations of hormonal secretion, alertness and cognition in extreme chronotypes under different lighting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Maierova, L.; Borisuit, A.; Scartezzini, J.-L.; Jaeggi, S. M.; Schmidt, C.; Münch, M.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior are modulated by external factors such as light or temperature. We studied whether self-selected office lighting during the habitual waking period had a different impact on alertness, cognitive performance and hormonal secretion in extreme morning and evening chronotypes (N = 32), whose preferred bed- and wake-up times differed by several hours. The self-selected lighting condition was compared with constant bright light and a control condition in dim light. Saliva samples for hormonal analyses, subjective ratings of alertness, wellbeing, visual comfort and cognitive performance were regularly collected. Between the self-selected and the bright, but not the dim lighting condition, the onset of melatonin secretion in the evening (as marker for circadian phase) was significantly different for both chronotypes. Morning chronotypes reported a faster increase in sleepiness during the day than evening chronotypes, which was associated with higher cortisol secretion. Wellbeing, mood and performance in more difficult cognitive tasks were better in bright and self-selected lighting than in dim light for both chronotypes, whereas visual comfort was best in the self-selected lighting. To conclude, self-selection of lighting at work might positively influence biological and cognitive functions, and allow for inter-individual differences. PMID:27646174

  1. Recent Extreme Forest Fire Activity in Western Russia: Fire Danger Conditions, Fire Behavior and Smoke Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, B. J.; Fromm, M.; Goldammer, J.; Carr, R.; Sukhinin, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    During the summer of 2010, widespread forest and peatland fires in western Russia burned over hundreds of thousands of hectares, burning over croplands, destroying hundreds of homes, and directly causing the death of more than 50 people. Unprecedented drought conditions, combined with an extended heat wave, resulted in extreme fire danger conditions and explosive fire behavior in a region of Russia not noted for large fires. Several fires exhibited pyroconvection, injecting smoke directly into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, while deep-burning fires created major regional smoke problems. This smoke persisted in the heavily-populated areas around Moscow, exposing millions to high levels of ozone and particulate matter, and creating both immediate and longer-term health risks. This presentation will explore the drought conditions leading to the catastrophic fire behavior experienced in western Russia, and analyze fire behavior in terms of fuel consumption, smoke production, fire intensity levels, and pyroconvection. Impacts of regional and long-range smoke transport will also be discussed.

  2. Diurnal variations of hormonal secretion, alertness and cognition in extreme chronotypes under different lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Maierova, L; Borisuit, A; Scartezzini, J-L; Jaeggi, S M; Schmidt, C; Münch, M

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior are modulated by external factors such as light or temperature. We studied whether self-selected office lighting during the habitual waking period had a different impact on alertness, cognitive performance and hormonal secretion in extreme morning and evening chronotypes (N = 32), whose preferred bed- and wake-up times differed by several hours. The self-selected lighting condition was compared with constant bright light and a control condition in dim light. Saliva samples for hormonal analyses, subjective ratings of alertness, wellbeing, visual comfort and cognitive performance were regularly collected. Between the self-selected and the bright, but not the dim lighting condition, the onset of melatonin secretion in the evening (as marker for circadian phase) was significantly different for both chronotypes. Morning chronotypes reported a faster increase in sleepiness during the day than evening chronotypes, which was associated with higher cortisol secretion. Wellbeing, mood and performance in more difficult cognitive tasks were better in bright and self-selected lighting than in dim light for both chronotypes, whereas visual comfort was best in the self-selected lighting. To conclude, self-selection of lighting at work might positively influence biological and cognitive functions, and allow for inter-individual differences. PMID:27646174

  3. Diurnal variations of hormonal secretion, alertness and cognition in extreme chronotypes under different lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Maierova, L; Borisuit, A; Scartezzini, J-L; Jaeggi, S M; Schmidt, C; Münch, M

    2016-09-20

    Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior are modulated by external factors such as light or temperature. We studied whether self-selected office lighting during the habitual waking period had a different impact on alertness, cognitive performance and hormonal secretion in extreme morning and evening chronotypes (N = 32), whose preferred bed- and wake-up times differed by several hours. The self-selected lighting condition was compared with constant bright light and a control condition in dim light. Saliva samples for hormonal analyses, subjective ratings of alertness, wellbeing, visual comfort and cognitive performance were regularly collected. Between the self-selected and the bright, but not the dim lighting condition, the onset of melatonin secretion in the evening (as marker for circadian phase) was significantly different for both chronotypes. Morning chronotypes reported a faster increase in sleepiness during the day than evening chronotypes, which was associated with higher cortisol secretion. Wellbeing, mood and performance in more difficult cognitive tasks were better in bright and self-selected lighting than in dim light for both chronotypes, whereas visual comfort was best in the self-selected lighting. To conclude, self-selection of lighting at work might positively influence biological and cognitive functions, and allow for inter-individual differences.

  4. The importance of the eastward zonal current for generating extreme El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, WonMoo; Cai, Wenju

    2014-06-01

    Extreme El Niño (e.g., 1983/1983 and 1997/1998) causes severe weather and climate impacts globally, but the associated dynamics is not fully understood. The present study shows that advection of mean temperature by anomalous eastward zonal current plays an important role in producing such extreme events especially during the early part of the developing period. While the climatological direction of the upper oceanic current in the equatorial Pacific is westward, at times the direction reverses. These eastward current events are well distinguished from the normal, westward conditions. The upper-layer zonal current in the equatorial Pacific is basically in geostrophic balance and forced by wind stress. However, in the case of the eastward zonal current events, persistent westerly winds are observed in the Western Pacific, and the current becomes synchronized with the westerly wind stress above. The advection of the mean temperature by the anomalous zonal current in the early developing period always precedes strong El Niño, though it does not significantly contribute to the growth of La Niña, neutral, and moderate El Niño; and is the major contributor of asymmetry in the early developing phase.

  5. Statistical Analysis of TEC Enhancements during Geomagnetic Disturbances in Extreme Solar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the past decades, a remarkable set of comprehensive studies and review articles enriched theresearch of the Earth's ionospheric response to geomagnetic disturbances[Prolss, 1995; Buonsanto,1999; Mendillo, 2006]. However, comparative studies of TEC response during geomagnetic disturbances in solar minimum and solar maximum have not been reported yet. Here we present some new results of TEC enhancements during geomagnetic disturbancesin extreme solar maximum and deep solar minimum. The JPL TEC maps from 12/01/2000 to 12/31/2003 during high solar activity and from 01/01/2007 to 12/31/2010 during low solar activity are used. The deviation of TEC is defined as the differences between TEC and TECq, which represents the 27-day sliding smooth median. The geomagnetic disturbances selected have peaks of geomagnetic index Ap>20. We found that the winter anomaly appears in both extreme solar cycle conditions and has longer-lived patterns than other seasons.The nighttime enhancement is more significant in solar maximum than solar minimum. The mean duration of TEC enhancements is longer in solar minimum than solar maximum. The mean delay at the beginning of positive anomaly responds fastest at around 1500 LT and slowest at around midnight during solar minimum.The mean intensity of enhancements is stronger at higher latitudes and weaker at lower latitudes, and the mean delay is smaller at higher latitudes and larger at lower latitudes in both extreme solar cycle conditions. Acknowledgments: Thiswork was supportedby the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grants 41204107. We thank JPL and Word Data Center for Geomagnetism at Kyoto University for making available the data. Prolss, G. W., Ionospheric F region storms, in Handbook of Atmospheric Electrodynamics, vol. 2, edited by H. Volland, pp. 195 - 248, CRC Press,Boca Raton, Fla., 1995. Buonsanto, M., Ionospheric storm: A review,Space Science Review, vol. 88, pp. 563 - 601, 1999. Mendillo, M.: Storms in the

  6. Establishment and performance of an experimental green roof under extreme climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Petra M; Coffman, Reid

    2015-04-15

    Green roofs alter the surface energy balance and can help in mitigating urban heat islands. However, the cooling of green roofs due to evapotranspiration strongly depends on the climatic conditions, and vegetation type and density. In the Southern Central Plains of the United States, extreme weather events, such as high winds, heat waves and drought conditions pose challenges for successful implementation of green roofs, and likely alter their standard performance. The National Weather Center Experimental Green Roof, an interdisciplinary research site established in 2010 in Norman, OK, aimed to investigate the ecological performance and surface energy balance of green roof systems. Starting in May 2010, 26 months of vegetation studies were conducted and the radiation balance, air temperature, relative humidity, and buoyancy fluxes were monitored at two meteorological stations during April-October 2011. The establishment of a vegetative community trended towards prairie plant dominance. High mortality of succulents and low germination of grasses and herbaceous plants contributed to low vegetative coverage. In this condition succulent diversity declined. Bouteloua gracilis and Delosperma cooperi showed typological dominance in harsh climatic conditions, while Sedum species experienced high mortality. The plant community diversified through volunteers such as Euphorbia maculate and Portulaca maculate. Net radiation measured at a green-roof meteorological station was higher than at a control station over the original, light-colored roofing material. These findings indicate that the albedo of the green roof was lower than the albedo of the original roofing material. The low vegetative coverage during the heat and drought conditions in 2011, which resulted in the dark substrate used in the green roof containers being exposed, likely contributed to the low albedo values. Nevertheless, air temperatures and buoyancy fluxes were often lower over the green roof indicating

  7. Establishment and performance of an experimental green roof under extreme climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Petra M; Coffman, Reid

    2015-04-15

    Green roofs alter the surface energy balance and can help in mitigating urban heat islands. However, the cooling of green roofs due to evapotranspiration strongly depends on the climatic conditions, and vegetation type and density. In the Southern Central Plains of the United States, extreme weather events, such as high winds, heat waves and drought conditions pose challenges for successful implementation of green roofs, and likely alter their standard performance. The National Weather Center Experimental Green Roof, an interdisciplinary research site established in 2010 in Norman, OK, aimed to investigate the ecological performance and surface energy balance of green roof systems. Starting in May 2010, 26 months of vegetation studies were conducted and the radiation balance, air temperature, relative humidity, and buoyancy fluxes were monitored at two meteorological stations during April-October 2011. The establishment of a vegetative community trended towards prairie plant dominance. High mortality of succulents and low germination of grasses and herbaceous plants contributed to low vegetative coverage. In this condition succulent diversity declined. Bouteloua gracilis and Delosperma cooperi showed typological dominance in harsh climatic conditions, while Sedum species experienced high mortality. The plant community diversified through volunteers such as Euphorbia maculate and Portulaca maculate. Net radiation measured at a green-roof meteorological station was higher than at a control station over the original, light-colored roofing material. These findings indicate that the albedo of the green roof was lower than the albedo of the original roofing material. The low vegetative coverage during the heat and drought conditions in 2011, which resulted in the dark substrate used in the green roof containers being exposed, likely contributed to the low albedo values. Nevertheless, air temperatures and buoyancy fluxes were often lower over the green roof indicating

  8. Extreme-Wind Observation Capability for a Next Generation Satellite Wind Scatterometer Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffelen, Ad; van Zadelhoff, Gerd Jan; Belmonte, Maria; Chang, Paul; Vachon, Paris; Lin, Chung-Chi; Accadia, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The ocean surface vector wind information, derived from satellite-based wind scatterometer observations, is one of the essential inputs for operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) services. The local wind speed and direction are retrieved from accurate measurements of the ocean surface backscatter, performed from at least three largely-spaced satellite positions during an over-flight. As a result, each of the wind resolution cells is characterised by a set of radar backscatter coefficients which are associated with their respective observation angles in azimuth and elevation with respect to the cell. The azimuth anisotropy of the backscatter coefficient with respect to the wind direction and its magnitude as a function of the wind speed, as captured in a so-called geophysical model function (GMF), are exploited in order to retrieve a unique vector wind. The current generation of scatterometer instruments operate at C-band with a single vertical polarisation (i.e. VV), or at Ku-band with VV for the first beam and HH for the second beam. The co-polarised radar backscatter, i.e., VV and to a lesser extend HH, saturate above a wind speed of about 25 to 30 m/s, which imposes a serious limitation on the capability of the existing observation systems. Such a limitation leads, e.g., to misestimation of extreme winds, errors in storm predictions and limitations in weather prediction warnings. Recently, observations of storm events along the North American coasts by Radarsat-2 and comparisons with in-situ buoy data revealed a high sensitivity of C-band cross-polarised backscatter signal intensity (i.e. VH or HV) with high wind speeds. This prompted the ocean vector wind community to further explore the limit of the cross-polar response. Establishing a new GMF requires accurate in-situ information of the vector wind field together with collocated scatterometer observation data, but these are extremely rare at extreme winds. A more successful collocation approach

  9. Characterization of Multi-Scale Atmospheric Conditions Associated with Extreme Precipitation in the Transverse Ranges of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, N.; Kaplan, M.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The east-west oriented Transverse Ranges of Southern California have historically experienced shallow landslides and debris flows that threaten life and property. Steep topography, soil composition, and frequent wildfires make this area susceptible to mass wasting. Extreme rainfall often acts as a trigger for these events. This work characterizes atmospheric conditions at multiple scales during extreme (>99th percentile) 1-day precipitation events in the major sub-ranges of the Transverse Ranges. Totals from these 1-day events generally exceed the established sub-daily intensity-duration thresholds for shallow landslides and debris flows in this region. Daily extreme precipitation values are derived from both gridded and station-based datasets over the period 1958-2014. For each major sub-range, extreme events are clustered by atmospheric feature and direction of moisture transport. A composite analysis of synoptic conditions is produced for each cluster to create a conceptual model of atmospheric conditions favoring extreme precipitation. The vertical structure of the atmosphere during these extreme events is also examined using observed and modeled soundings. Preliminary results show two atmospheric features to be of importance: 1) closed and cutoff low-pressure systems, areas of counter-clockwise circulation that can produce southerly flow orthogonal to the Transverse Range ridge axes; and 2) atmospheric rivers that transport large quantities of water vapor into the region. In some cases, the closed lows and atmospheric rivers work in concert with each other to produce extreme precipitation. Additionally, there is a notable east-west dipole of precipitation totals during some extreme events between the San Gabriel and Santa Ynez Mountains where extreme values are observed in one range and not the other. The cause of this relationship is explored. The results of this work can help forecasters and emergency responders determine the likelihood that an event will

  10. Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Neil; Guillod, Benoit; Otto, Friederike; Allen, Myles; Jones, Richard; Hall, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models Neil Massey, Benoit P. Guillod, Friederike E. L. Otto, Myles R. Allen, Richard Jones, Jim W. Hall Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Extreme events can have large impacts on societies and are therefore being increasingly studied. In particular, climate change is expected to impact the frequency and intensity of these events. However, a major limitation when investigating extreme weather events is that, by definition, only few events are present in observations. A way to overcome this issue it to use large ensembles of model simulations. Using the volunteer distributed computing (VDC) infrastructure of weather@home [1], we run a very large number (10'000s) of RCM simulations over the European domain at a resolution of 25km, with an improved land-surface scheme, nested within a free-running GCM. Using VDC allows many thousands of climate model runs to be computed. Using observations for the GCM boundary forcings we can run historical "hindcast" simulations over the past 100 to 150 years. This allows us, due to the chaotic variability of the atmosphere, to ascertain how likely an extreme event was, given the boundary forcings, and to derive synthetic event sets. The events in these sets did not actually occur in the observed record but could have occurred given the boundary forcings, with an associated probability. The event sets contain time-series of fields of meteorological variables that allow impact modellers to assess the loss the event would incur. Projections of events into the future are achieved by modelling projections of the sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice boundary forcings, by combining the variability of the SST in the observed record with a range of warming signals derived from the varying responses of SSTs in the CMIP5 ensemble to elevated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in three RCP scenarios. Simulating the future with a

  11. Hemoglobin system of Sparus aurata: changes in fishes farmed under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Campo, Salvatore; Nastasi, Giancarlo; D'Ascola, Angela; Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; Traina, Paola; Calatroni, Alberto; Burrascano, Emanuele; Ferlazzo, Alida; Lupidi, Giulio; Gabbianelli, Rosita; Falcioni, Giancarlo

    2008-09-15

    In order to gain more knowledge on the stress responses of gilhead seabream (Sparus aurata) under extreme conditions, this study investigated the functional properties of the hemoglobin system and globin gene expression under hypoxia and low salinity. The oxygen affinity for the two hemoglobin components present inside the S. aurata erythrocyte was practically identical as was the influence of protons and organic phosphates (Root effect). The quantification of S. aurata hemoglobin fractions performed by HPLC and the data on gene expression of globin chains assayed by PCR indicate that under hypoxia and low salinity there is a change in the ratio between the two different hemoglobin components. The result indicating that the distinct hemoglobins present in S. aurata erythrocyte have almost identical functional properties, does not explain the adaptive response (expression change) following exposure of the animal to hypoxia or low salinity on the basis of their function as oxygen transporter. We hypothesize that other parallel biological functions that the hemoglobin molecule is known to display within the erythrocyte are involved in adaptive molecular mechanisms. The autoxidation-reduction cycle of hemoglobin could be involved in the response to particular living conditions.

  12. Extreme sensory processing patterns and their relation with clinical conditions among individuals with major affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Engel-Yeger, Batya; Muzio, Caterina; Rinosi, Giorgio; Solano, Paola; Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Pompili, Maurizio; Amore, Mario; Serafini, Gianluca

    2016-02-28

    Previous studies highlighted the involvement of sensory perception in emotional processes. However, the role of extreme sensory processing patterns expressed in hyper- or hyposensitivity was not thoroughly considered. The present study, in real life conditions, examined the unique sensory processing patterns of individuals with major affective disorders and their relationship with psychiatric symptomatology. The sample consisted of 105 participants with major affective conditions ranging in age from 20 to 84 years (mean=56.7±14.6). All participants completed the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego (TEMPS-A), the second version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP). Sensory sensitivity/avoiding hypersensitivity patterns and low registration (a hyposensitivity pattern) were prevalent among our sample as compared to normative data. About seventy percent of the sample showed lower seeking tendency. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that depression and anxious/cyclothymic affective temperaments were predicted by sensory sensory/avoiding. Anxious and irritable affective temperaments were predicted by low registration. Hyperthymic affective temperament and lower severity of depression were predicted by sensation seeking. Hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity may be "trait" markers of individuals with major affective disorders. Interventions should refer to the individual unique sensory profiles and their behavioral and functional impact in the context of real life.

  13. Nutritional condition of Pacific Black Brant wintering at the extremes of their range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, D.D.; Barboza, P.S.; Ward, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous stores of energy allow birds to survive periods of severe weather and food shortage during winter. We documented changes in lipid, protein, moisture, and ash in body tissues of adult female Pacific Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) and modeled the energetic costs of wintering. Birds were collected at the extremes of their winter range, in Alaska and Baja California, Mexico. Body lipids decreased over winter for birds in Alaska but increased for those in Baja California. Conversely, body protein increased over winter for Brant in Alaska and remained stable for birds in Baja California. Lipid stores likely fuel migration for Brant wintering in Baja California and ensure winter survival for those in Alaska. Increases in body protein may support earlier reproduction for Brant in Alaska. Predicted energy demands were similar between sites during late winter but avenues of expenditure were different. Birds in Baja California spent more energy on lipid synthesis while those in Alaska incurred higher thermoregulatory costs. Estimated daily intake rates of eelgrass were similar between sites in early winter; however, feeding time was more constrained in Alaska because of high tides and short photoperiods. Despite differences in energetic costs and foraging time, Brant wintering at both sites appeared to be in good condition. We suggest that wintering in Alaska may be more advantageous than long-distance migration if winter survival is similar between sites and constraints on foraging time do not impair body condition. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  14. Predicting the solubility of gases in Nitrile Butadiene Rubber in extreme conditions using molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, Musab; Molinari, Nicola; Sutton, Adrian; Mostofi, Arash

    In the oil and gas industry, elastomer seals play an important role in protecting sensitive monitoring equipment from contamination by gases - a problem that is exacerbated by the high pressures and temperatures found down-hole. The ability to predict and prevent such permeative failure has proved elusive to-date. Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) is a common choice of elastomer for seals due to its resistance to heat and fuels. In the conditions found in the well it readily absorbs small molecular weight gases. How this behaviour changes quantitatively for different gases as a function of temperature and pressure is not well-understood. In this work a series of fully atomistic simulations are performed to understand the effect of extreme conditions on gas solubility in NBR. Widom particle insertion is used to compute solubilities. The importance of sampling and allowing structural relaxation upon compression are highlighted, and qualitatively reasonable trends reproduced. Finally, while at STP it has previously been shown that the solubility of CO2 is higher than that of He in NBR, we observe that under the right circumstances it is possible to reverse this trend.

  15. Mercury's core fraction and ancient crustal composition: Predictions from planetary formation under extremely reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. M.; Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2007-12-01

    Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the paradox of Mercury's large core, which is on the order of sixty percent of the mass of the planet and recently demonstrated to be at least partially molten. Here we suggest that extremely reducing conditions in the earliest stages of planetary accretion nearest to the Sun may have produced the unusual metallic iron fraction by reducing iron otherwise bound into silicates. We demonstrate the formation conditions necessary for various meteoritic bulk compositions to produce the core/mantle ratio of Mercury. During this hypothetical core formation, we assume the remaining silicate fraction of Mercury (now largely lacking iron) has been heated to produce a magma ocean. The resulting cumulate mantle composition is calculated in a Matlab simulation of magma ocean solidification using a CMAS system adapted for Mercury. Plagioclase flotation, frequently cited as the necessary signature of a magma ocean, is highly dependent upon initial bulk composition. We demonstrate the initial silicate iron content of the magma ocean necessary to make plagioclase buoyant and thus produce a plagioclase flotation crust as seen on the Moon. In addition, over a range of bulk compositions the solidified mantle cumulates are unstable to gravitational overturn. During overturn hot cumulates rise from depth and may cross their solidi and melt, producing an earliest planetary crust. This crust may still exist on Mercury. With the first flyby results of the MESSENGER mission coming this winter, predictions from these models can be compared with initial ground measurements.

  16. Development under extreme conditions: forensic bioinformatics in the wake of the World Trade Center disaster.

    PubMed

    Cash, Howard D; Hoyle, Jonathan W; Sutton, Amy J

    2003-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 resulted in death and devastation in three locations, and extraordinary efforts have been exerted to identify the remains of all victims. As mass fatalities go, this one has been unusual at a policy level because the goal has been not merely to identify remains for every decedent, but to identify every bit of remains found so that even small pieces of tissue can be returned to families for burial. While the human impact at the Pentagon and Shanksville, PA was horrific, the World Trade Center site presented a particularly complex challenge for forensic DNA matching and data handling. A complete and definitive list of all those killed is still elusive, and human remains were crushed and co-mingled by the falling towers. Software tools had never been considered for a problem of this scale and scope. New data handling systems had to be created under extreme software development conditions characterized by incomplete requirements specifications, chaotically changing priorities, truly impossible deadlines and rapidly rolling production releases. Partly because of the company's experience with mtDNA tools built for the Armed Forces DNA Identification Lab starting in 1997, the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner [OCME] contacted Gene Codes Corporation in late September as existing data-handling tools began to fail. We began work on the project in mid-October, 2001. Our approach to the problem included: Extreme Programming [XP] methodology for functional software development, On-site time and motion analysis at the OCME for user interface design, Evidentiary references between STR, SNP and mtDNA analysis results, and Separate data Quality Control [QC] and software Quality Assurance [QA] initiatives. A substantial software suite was developed called M-FISys, an acronym for Mass-Fatality Identification System. PMID:12603064

  17. Synoptic conditions of extreme windstorms over Switzerland in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyette, Stéphane

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports on a method using composites for studying synoptic conditions of a series of windstorm events selected on the basis of maximum wind speeds in Switzerland. The composite storm-averaged conditions indicate how flow fields, as well as related surface conditions, are organised so as to produce high wind speeds near the surface. On average, high winds in Switzerland, mainly generated by transient synoptic-scale eddies, are characterised by a minimum in the mean sea level pressure field over southern Norway, anticyclonic conditions south of 35°N and a steep pressure gradient over continental western Europe. The geopotential aloft has a predominant zonal structure, producing high winds between 45°N and 50°N over the eastern Atlantic and further inland; the jet stream has its maximum speed at 50°N over the Celtic Sea and Brittany at 250 hPa. Close to the surface, large temperature contrasts between the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea and the cooler continent are diagnosed. The results thus obtained differ to those produced by other methods based on the analysis of deep cyclones or of strong vorticity in the northern North Atlantic Ocean basin. Differences of the composite mean synoptic conditions for current (1961-1990) and future climate (2071-2100) as simulated by the Global Climate Model HadAM3H in the context of the EU PRUDENCE project indicate that windstorms in a warmer world are generated by a subtle modification of the atmospheric baroclinicity, especially over the ocean and where greater ocean-continent temperature contrasts are simulated during winters. However, there are no signs of reduced storm activity as the climate warms by the end of the twenty-first century.

  18. Spring Ephemerals Adapt to Extremely High Light Conditions via an Unusual Stabilization of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenfeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Wu; Wu, Lishuan; Xie, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yuanming; Wilhelm, Christian; Yang, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    Ephemerals, widely distributed in the Gobi desert, have developed significant characteristics to sustain high photosynthetic efficiency under high light (HL) conditions. Since the light reaction is the basis for photosynthetic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy, the photosynthetic performances in thylakoid membrane of the spring ephemerals in response to HL were studied. Three plant species, namely two C3 spring ephemeral species of Cruciferae: Arabidopsis pumila (A. pumila) and Sisymbrium altissimum (S. altissimum), and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) were chosen for the study. The ephemeral A. pumila, which is genetically close to A. thaliana and ecologically in the same habitat as S. altissimum, was used to avoid complications arising from the superficial differences resulted from comparing plants from two extremely contrasting ecological groups. The findings manifested that the ephemerals showed significantly enhanced activities of photosystem (PS) II under HL conditions, while the activities of PSII in A. thaliana were markedly decreased under the same conditions. Detailed analyses of the electron transport processes revealed that the increased plastoquinone pool oxidization, together with the enhanced PSI activities, ensured a lowered excitation pressure to PSII of both ephemerals, and thus facilitated the photosynthetic control to avoid photodamage to PSII. The analysis of the reaction centers of the PSs, both in terms of D1 protein turnover kinetics and the long-term adaptation, revealed that the unusually stable PSs structure provided the basis for the ephemerals to carry out high photosynthetic performances. It is proposed that the characteristic photosynthetic performances of ephemerals were resulted from effects of the long-term adaptation to the harsh environments. PMID:26779223

  19. Bioreactor coupled with electromagnetic field generator: effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Perez, Victor H; Reyes, Alfredo F; Justo, Oselys R; Alvarez, David C; Alegre, Ranulfo M

    2007-01-01

    The effect of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae using sugar cane molasses was studied during batch fermentation. The cellular suspension from the fermentor was externally recycled through a stainless steel tube inserted in two magnetic field generators, and consequently, the ethanol production was intensified. Two magnetic field generators were coupled to the bioreactor, which were operated conveniently in simple or combined ways. Therefore, the recycle velocity and intensity of the magnetic field varied in a range of 0.6-1.4 m s(-1) and 5-20 mT, respectively. However, under the best conditions with the magnetic field treatment (0.9-1.2 m s(-1) and 20 mT plus solenoid), the overall volumetric ethanol productivity was approximately 17% higher than in the control experiment. These results made it possible to verify the effectiveness of the dynamic magnetic treatment since the fermentations with magnetic treatment reached their final stage in less time, i.e., approximately 2 h earlier, when compared with the control experiment.

  20. Surf zone, infragravity wave energy flux, and runup in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, J. W.; Brodie, K. L.; McNinch, J.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves, currents, and sand levels were observed on a 1.4 km-long cross-shore transect extending from the back beach to ~11 m water depth at Agate Beach, Oregon in Fall 2013. Wave runup and water table fluctuations on this low slope (1:80) beach were measured with a cliff-mounted scanning Lidar and buried pressure sensors. Significant wave heights at an offshore buoy in 128m depth ranged from small (0.5m) to extreme (7.5m), with peak periods between 4-22 seconds. Infragravity frequency (nominally 0.01 Hz) horizontal runup excursions exceeded 100m, and infragravity cross-shore velocity exceeded 3 m/s. Cross-shore patterns of infragravity wave energy flux, observed with seven co-located pressure and current meters, indicate 'proto-saturation' of the inner surfzone in extreme conditions. That is, the intensification of incident wave forcing (e.g. higher energy, longer swell) leads to a wider surfzone and an increase in the shoreward infragravity wave energy seaward of the surfzone, but produces more modest increases in flux in the inner surfzone, and in the runup. Nonlinear energy balances, based on the observations, show transfer of energy from sea-swell to infragravity waves, and vice-versa. The infragravity energy balance closes in cases with low energy incident sea-swell. With more energetic incident waves, there is an unexplained inner surfzone energy sink at the lowest IG frequencies (0.004-0.02 Hz). Ongoing work aims to quantify the effect on infragravity energy balances by infragravity wave breaking and bottom friction. Additionally, the estimates may be degraded by contamination with rotational velocities of surfzone eddies. Whatever the dynamical explanation, infragravity wave runup on a low slope beach in high-energy conditions is limited significantly by dissipation. The slow rate of runup increase suggests nascent, or 'proto' saturation. This work was supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

  1. Construction of an extreme ultraviolet polarimeter based on high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimhall, N.; Painter, J. C.; Turner, M.; Voronov, S. V.; Turley, R. S.; Ware, M.; Peatross, J.

    2006-08-01

    We report on the development of a polarimeter for characterizing reflective surfaces throughout the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The instrument relies on laser high-order harmonics generated in helium, neon, or argon gas. The 800 nm laser generates a discrete comb of odd harmonics up to order 100 (wavelengths from 8-62 nm). The flux of EUV light is a couple orders of magnitude less than a synchrotron source but 30,000 times greater than a plasma source currently in operation at BYU. The polarimeter determines the reflectance from surfaces as a function of incident angle, linear light polarization orientation, and wavelength. The instrument uses a wave plate in the laser beam to control the orientation of the harmonic polarization (linear, same as laser). After reflecting from the sample, the harmonic beams are dispersed by a grating and focused onto a micro-channel plate coupled to a phosphor screen. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this project with a simple prototype instrument, which measured the reflectance of samples from 30 nm to 62 nm. The prototype demonstrated that sensitivity is sufficient for measuring reflectances as low as 0.5% for both s- and p-polarized light. The full instrument employs extensive scanning mobility as opposed to the fixed angle and fixed wavelength range of our earlier prototype. An advantage of employing harmonics as a source for EUV polarimetry is that a wide range of wavelengths can be measured simultaneously. This project represents an authentic 'work-horse' application for high-order harmonics, as opposed to merely demonstrating proof of concept.

  2. Extreme-ultraviolet polarimeter utilizing laser-generated high-order harmonics.

    PubMed

    Brimhall, Nicole; Turner, Matthew; Herrick, Nicholas; Allred, David D; Turley, R Steven; Ware, Michael; Peatross, Justin

    2008-10-01

    We describe an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) polarimeter that employs laser-generated high-order harmonics as the light source. The polarimeter is designed to characterize materials and thin films for use with EUV light. Laser high harmonics are highly directional with easily rotatable linear polarization, not typically available with other EUV sources. The harmonics have good wavelength coverage, potentially spanning the entire EUV from a few to a hundred nanometers. Our instrument is configured to measure reflectances from 14 to 30 nm and has approximately 180 spectral resolution (lambda/Delta lambda). The reflection from a sample surface can be measured over a continuous range of incident angles (5 degrees-75 degrees). A secondary 14 cm gas cell attenuates the harmonics in a controlled way to keep signals within the linear dynamic range of the detector, comprised of a microchannel plate coupled to a phosphorous screen and charge coupled device camera. The harmonics are produced using approximately 10 mJ, approximately 35 fs, and approximately 800 nm laser pulses with a repetition rate of 10 Hz. Per-shot energy monitoring of the laser discriminates against fluctuations. The polarimeter reflectance data agree well with data obtained at the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron (Beamline 6.3.2).

  3. A Trial Intercomparison of Humidity Generators at Extremes of Range Using Relative Humidity Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, M.; Benyon, R.; Bell, S. A.; Vicente, T.

    2008-10-01

    In order to effectively implement the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM), national metrology institutes (NMIs) are required to support their claims of calibration and measurement capability (CMC) with a quality system compliant with ISO/IEC 17025, and with suitable evidence of participation in key or supplementary comparisons. The CMC review process, both at regional and inter-regional levels, uses criteria that combine the provisions mentioned above, together with additional evidence demonstrating scientific and technical competence of the institutes. For dew-point temperatures, there are key comparisons in progress under the Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT) and under the European regional metrology organisation (EUROMET), together with information available on past regional supplementary comparisons. However, for relative humidity there are, to date, no such comparisons available to support CMC entries. This paper presents and discusses the results of a preliminary investigation of the use of relative humidity and temperature transmitters in order to determine their suitability for the intercomparison of standard humidity generators in support of CMC claims for the calibration of relative humidity instruments. The results of a recent bilateral comparison between 2 NMIs at the extremes of the range up to 98%rh at 70 °C, and down to 1%rh at -40 °C are reported. Specific precautions and recommendations on the use of the devices as transfer standards are presented.

  4. Cyclone-induced rapid creation of extreme Antarctic sea ice conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaomin; Turner, John; Sun, Bo; Li, Bingrui; Liu, Chengyan

    2014-01-01

    Two polar vessels, Akademik Shokalskiy and Xuelong, were trapped by thick sea ice in the Antarctic coastal region just to the west of 144°E and between 66.5°S and 67°S in late December 2013. This event demonstrated the rapid establishment of extreme Antarctic sea ice conditions on synoptic time scales. The event was associated with cyclones that developed at lower latitudes. Near the event site, cyclone-enhanced strong southeasterly katabatic winds drove large westward drifts of ice floes. In addition, the cyclones also gave southward ice drift. The arrival and grounding of Iceberg B9B in Commonwealth Bay in March 2011 led to the growth of fast ice around it, forming a northward protruding barrier. This barrier blocked the westward ice drift and hence aided sea ice consolidation on its eastern side. Similar cyclone-induced events have occurred at this site in the past after the grounding of Iceberg B9B. Future events may be predictable on synoptic time scales, if cyclone-induced strong wind events can be predicted. PMID:24937550

  5. Cyclone-induced rapid creation of extreme Antarctic sea ice conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaomin; Turner, John; Sun, Bo; Li, Bingrui; Liu, Chengyan

    2014-01-01

    Two polar vessels, Akademik Shokalskiy and Xuelong, were trapped by thick sea ice in the Antarctic coastal region just to the west of 144°E and between 66.5°S and 67°S in late December 2013. This event demonstrated the rapid establishment of extreme Antarctic sea ice conditions on synoptic time scales. The event was associated with cyclones that developed at lower latitudes. Near the event site, cyclone-enhanced strong southeasterly katabatic winds drove large westward drifts of ice floes. In addition, the cyclones also gave southward ice drift. The arrival and grounding of Iceberg B9B in Commonwealth Bay in March 2011 led to the growth of fast ice around it, forming a northward protruding barrier. This barrier blocked the westward ice drift and hence aided sea ice consolidation on its eastern side. Similar cyclone-induced events have occurred at this site in the past after the grounding of Iceberg B9B. Future events may be predictable on synoptic time scales, if cyclone-induced strong wind events can be predicted.

  6. Phase transition and chemical decomposition of liquid carbon dioxide and nitrogen mixture under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xu, Jiang; Guan-Yu, Chen; Yu-Tong, Li; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Cui-Ming, Tang

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic and chemical properties of liquid carbon dioxide and nitrogen (CO2-N2) mixture under the conditions of extremely high densities and temperatures are studied by using quantum molecular dynamic (QMD) simulations based on density functional theory including dispersion corrections (DFT-D). We present equilibrium properties of liquid mixture for 112 separate density and temperature points, by selecting densities ranging from ρ = 1.80 g/cm3 to 3.40 g/cm3 and temperatures from T = 500 K to 8000 K. In the range of our study, the liquid CO2-N2 mixture undergoes a continuous transition from molecular to atomic fluid state and liquid polymerization inferred from pair correlation functions (PCFs) and the distribution of various molecular components. The insulator-metal transition is demonstrated by means of the electronic density of states (DOS). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374217, 11135012, and 11375262) and the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 11176020).

  7. Sporosarcina pasteurii use in extreme alkaline conditions for recycling solid industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Cuzman, Oana A; Rescic, Silvia; Richter, Katharina; Wittig, Linda; Tiano, Piero

    2015-11-20

    The ureolytic bacteria are one of the most efficient organisms able to produce high amounts of carbonate that easily react with the free calcium ions from the environment. Sporosarcina pasteurii, a robust microbe in alkaline environments, was tested in this work for its potential use in an eco-cementation process that involves the biomediated calcite precipitation (BCP). Bacterial behavior in extreme alkaline environment (pH values of 9-13) was tested in controlled laboratory conditions and in the presence of solid industry wastes, such as Cement Kiln Dust (CKD) and Lime Kiln Dust (LKD), by evaluating the enzymatic activity and the calcite precipitation capacity. Grain consolidation potential of S. pasteurii was tested for one type of CKD mixed with ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS), with possible bioclogging and biocementation applications. The results revealed the formation of stable biocalcite in the presence of CKD, with a performance depending on the pH-value and free calcium ion content. The BCP induced by S. pasteurii and the recycling of solid wastes, such as CKD with high lime content, is a promising way for different bioclogging and biocementation applications, with benefits in construction costs and reduction of environmental pollution. PMID:26376469

  8. Modified and double-clad large mode-area leakage channel fibers for extreme temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thavasi Raja, G.; Varshney, Shailendra K.

    2015-03-01

    Recently large-mode-area hybrid leakage channel fibers (HLCFs) were reported to overcome the limitation on mode area with single-mode (SM) operation for the practical bending radius of 7.5 cm at the preferred wavelength of 1064 nm. In this paper, we present the effects of a thermally induced refractive index change on the mode area of bend-compensated extremely LMA modified HLCFs (M-HLCFs) and double-clad M-HLCFs. A full-vectorial finite-element method-based modal solver is used to obtain the modal characteristics of M-HLCFs in various heat load conditions. Numerical simulations reveal that the effective mode area of M-HLCFs is ˜1433 μm2 at room temperature, which marginally decreases to ˜1387 μm2 while SM operation is maintained when the temperature distribution rises to ˜125 °C over the fiber geometry during high-power operations. We have also investigated a double-clad M-HLCF design exhibiting a mode area > ˜ 1000 μm2 for all heat load density variations up to a maximum of 12 × 109 W m-3, corresponding to a 250 °C temperature in the center of the fiber core region.

  9. Behavior of NiTi Wires for Dampers and Actuators in Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isalgue, A.; Auguet, C.; Grau, R.; Torra, V.; Cinca, N.; Fernandez, J.

    2015-09-01

    Shape memory alloys are considered smart materials because of their singular thermo-mechanical properties, due to a thermoelastic martensitic transformation, enabling possible uses as actuators (because of mechanical recovery induced from temperature changes) and as dampers (because of hysteresis). NiTi wires for dampers in Civil Engineering had been characterized and tested in facilities. Guaranteed performance needs to know behavior during fatigue life and knowledge of effects in the event of extreme conditions, as eventual overstraining. In this work, we check the possibilities to absorb mechanical energy on the fatigue life depending on stress level and explore the consequences of overstraining the material during installation, the possibilities of partial healing by moderate heating, and some effects of over-stressing the wires. The mechanical energy absorbed by the unit weight of damper wire might be very high during its lifetime if maximum stresses remain relatively low allowing high fatigue life. We show also some results on NiTi wire working as an actuator. The lifetime mechanical work performed by an actuator wire can be very high if applied stresses are limited. The overstraining produces relevant "residual" deformation, which can be to some extent reversed by moderate heating at zero stress. The reason for the observed characteristics seems to be that when external high stresses are applied to an NiTi wire, it undergoes some plastic deformation, leaving a distribution of internal stresses that alter the shape and position of the macroscopic stress-strain transformation path.

  10. Smell-taste dysfunctions in extreme weight/eating conditions: analysis of hormonal and psychological interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Agüera, Zaida; Fernández-García, Jose C; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Alcaide-Torres, Juan; Tinahones, Francisco J; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Cebolla, Ausias; de la Torre, Rafael; Fernández-Real, Jose M; Ortega, Francisco J; Frühbeck, Gema; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Granero, Roser; Islam, Mohamed A; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Tárrega, Salomé; Menchón, José M; Fagundo, Ana B; Sancho, Carolina; Estivill, Xavier; Treasure, Janet; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2016-02-01

    (1) The objective of this study is to analyze differences in smell-taste capacity between females in extreme weight/eating conditions (EWC) and (2) to explore the interaction between smell/taste capacity, gastric hormones, eating behavior and body mass index (BMI). The sample comprised 239 females in EWC [64 Anorexia nervosa (AN) and 80 age-matched healthy-weight controls, and 59 obese and 36 age-matched healthy-weight controls]. Smell and taste assessments were performed through "Sniffin' Sticks" and "Taste Strips," respectively. The assessment measures included the eating disorders inventory-2, the symptom check list 90-revised, and The Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, as well as peptides from the gastrointestinal tract [Ghrelin, peptide YY, cholecystokinin]. Smell capacity was differentially associated across EWC groups. Smell was clearly impaired in obese participants and increased in AN (hyposmia in Obesity was 54.3 and 6.4 % in AN), but taste capacity did not vary across EWC. Ghrelin levels were significantly decreased in obese subjects and were related to smell impairment. EWC individuals showed a distinct smell profile and circulating ghrelin levels compared to controls. Smell capacity and ghrelin may act as moderators of emotional eating and BMI.

  11. Biofiltration of high concentration of H2S in waste air under extreme acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ben Jaber, Mouna; Couvert, Annabelle; Amrane, Abdeltif; Rouxel, Franck; Le Cloirec, Pierre; Dumont, Eric

    2016-01-25

    Removal of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide using a biofilter packed with expanded schist under extreme acidic conditions was performed. The impact of various parameters such as H2S concentration, pH changes and sulfate accumulation on the performances of the process was evaluated. Elimination efficiency decreased when the pH was lower than 1 and the sulfate accumulation was more than 12 mg S-SO4(2-)/g dry media, due to a continuous overloading by high H2S concentrations. The influence of these parameters on the degradation of H2S was clearly underlined, showing the need for their control, performed through an increase of watering flow rate. A maximum elimination capacity (ECmax) of 24.7 g m(-3) h(-1) was recorded. As a result, expanded schist represents an interesting packing material to remove high H2S concentration up to 360 ppmv with low pressure drops. In addition, experimental data were fitted using both Michaelis-Menten and Haldane models, showing that the Haldane model described more accurately experimental data since the inhibitory effect of H2S was taken into account.

  12. Modeling of the Human - Operator in a Complex System Functioning Under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzov, Peter; Hubenova, Zoia; Yordanov, Dimitar; Popov, Wiliam

    2013-12-01

    Problems, related to the explication of sophisticated control systems of objects, operating under extreme conditions, have been examined and the impact of the effectiveness of the operator's activity on the systems as a whole. The necessity of creation of complex simulation models, reflecting operator's activity, is discussed. Organizational and technical system of an unmanned aviation complex is described as a sophisticated ergatic system. Computer realization of main subsystems of algorithmic system of the man as a controlling system is implemented and specialized software for data processing and analysis is developed. An original computer model of a Man as a tracking system has been implemented. Model of unmanned complex for operators training and formation of a mental model in emergency situation, implemented in "matlab-simulink" environment, has been synthesized. As a unit of the control loop, the pilot (operator) is simplified viewed as an autocontrol system consisting of three main interconnected subsystems: sensitive organs (perception sensors); central nervous system; executive organs (muscles of the arms, legs, back). Theoretical-data model of prediction the level of operator's information load in ergatic systems is proposed. It allows the assessment and prediction of the effectiveness of a real working operator. Simulation model of operator's activity in takeoff based on the Petri nets has been synthesized.

  13. Trace element partitioning between vapor, brine and halite under extreme phase separation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2007-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the partitioning of Li, Br, Rb, Cs and B between vapor, brine and halite during subcritical and supercritical phase separation in the NaCl-H 2O system (388-550 °C, 250-350 bars). Results indicate that Li and Br partition preferentially into the low-salinity vapor fluids, while Rb and Cs become more enriched in the coexisting brines. Under more extreme conditions of pressure and temperature in the two-phase region, especially near the vapor-brine-halite boundary, strong salting-out effects imposed on neutral aqueous species enhance significantly partitioning of all trace elements into the low-salinity fluid. Dissolved boron is strongly affected by this and a particularly strong enrichment into vapors is observed, a trend that can be effectively correlated with changes in reduced density. Exclusion of Li, Br, Rb, Cs and B from halite, when precipitated, further increases the solubility of these species in the coexisting Cl-poor fluid. In general, the lack of distortion in the partitioning behavior of trace elements between vapor, brine and/or halite with the transition from subcritical to supercritical conditions in the NaCl-H 2O system precludes the need for special reference to the critical point of seawater when interpreting phase relations in submarine hydrothermal systems. The combination of experimentally determined trace element partitioning data with constraints imposed by mineral solubility provides a means to better understand the origin and evolution of hot spring vent fluids. For example, in Brandon hydrothermal system (21°S EPR) supercritical phase separation and subseafloor mixing appear to be the main heat and mass transport mechanisms fueled by a shallow magmatic intrusion, with boron systematics ruling out major contributions from magmatic degassing processes accompanying the near-seafloor volcanism.

  14. Tree growth and forest ecosystem functioning in Eurasia under extreme climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurer, Matthias; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Bryukhanova, Marina; Knorre, Anastasia; Nasyrov, Muhtor; Frank, David; Treydte, Kerstin; Sidorova, Olga; Siegwolf, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of this study is to improve our understanding of the influence of a changing climate on trees in extreme conditions by a detailed analysis of the factors controlling tree-ring growth. We investigated forest ecosystems in regions that are very sensitive to climatic changes and where rapid and dramatic environmental and climatic changes are on-going, namely, the high latitude permafrost region in Central Siberia (Russia), the semi-arid dry areas in Central Asia (Uzbekistan) and high-altitude sites in the Alps (Switzerland). Tree-ring parameters studied were ring-width, density, cell number and structure and the ratio of carbon and oxygen isotopes. An important aspect of the work was the characterization of seasonal growth and water supply of trees. Intra-seasonal dynamics of tree-ring formation was correlated with monitored environmental factors, such as air and soil temperature and moisture, permafrost depth and the isotope composition of soil water, of precipitation, and of stream water. Intra-annual and long-term variability of the main tree-ring parameters were compared for the different regions. The results obtained help us to understand better tree-physiological processes valid under contrasting environmental conditions. For instance, the relationship between the onset of cell division in the cambium and the thermo-hydrological soil regime was used to determine the period of the year with the highest influence on the start of tree-ring formation. Seasonally resolved oxygen isotope depth profiles of soil water and concurrent xylem and leaf water measurements show the importance of time-lags between precipitation, leaf processes and growth. The data obtained are important for improving tree-ring growth models and estimating future tree growth under climate change. Funding: SNF SCOPES IZ73Z0_128035

  15. Methanogenesis at extremely haloalkaline conditions in the soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Pimenov, Nikolai V; Sukhacheva, Marina V; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2015-04-01

    Microbial methanogenesis at extreme conditions of saline alkaline soda lakes has, so far, been poorly investigated. Despite the obvious domination of sulfidogenesis as the therminal anaerobic process in the hypersaline soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, southwestern Siberia), high concentrations of methane were detected in the anaerobic sediments. Potential activity measurements with different substrates gave results significantly deviating from what is commonly found in hypersaline habitats with neutral pH. In particular, not only a non-competitive methylotrophic pathway was active, but also lithotrophic and, in some cases, even acetate-dependent methanogenesis was found to be present in hypersaline soda lake sediments. All three pathways were functioning exclusively within the alkaline pH range between 8 and 10.5, while the salt concentration was the key factor influencing the activity. Methylotrophic and, to a lesser extent, lithotrophic methanogenesis were active up to soda-saturating conditions (4 M total Na(+)). Acetate-dependent methanogenesis was observed at salinities below 3 M total Na(+). Detection of methanogens in sediments using the mcrA gene as a functional marker demonstrated domination of methylotrophic genera Methanolobus and Methanosalsum and lithotrophic Methanocalculus. In a few cases, acetoclastic Methanosaeta was detected, as well as two deep lineage methanogens. Cultivation results corresponded well to the mcrA-based observations. Enrichments for natronophilic methylotrophic methanogens resulted in isolation of Methanolobus strains at moderate salinity, while at salt concentrations above 2 M Na(+) a novel member of the genus Methanosalsum was dominating. Enrichments with H2 or formate invariably resulted in domination of close relatives of Methanocalculus natronophilus. Enrichments with acetate at low salt concentration yielded two acetoclastic alkaliphilic Methanosaeta cultures, while at salinity above 1 M Na(+) syntrophic associations

  16. Methanogenesis at extremely haloalkaline conditions in the soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Pimenov, Nikolai V; Sukhacheva, Marina V; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2015-04-01

    Microbial methanogenesis at extreme conditions of saline alkaline soda lakes has, so far, been poorly investigated. Despite the obvious domination of sulfidogenesis as the therminal anaerobic process in the hypersaline soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, southwestern Siberia), high concentrations of methane were detected in the anaerobic sediments. Potential activity measurements with different substrates gave results significantly deviating from what is commonly found in hypersaline habitats with neutral pH. In particular, not only a non-competitive methylotrophic pathway was active, but also lithotrophic and, in some cases, even acetate-dependent methanogenesis was found to be present in hypersaline soda lake sediments. All three pathways were functioning exclusively within the alkaline pH range between 8 and 10.5, while the salt concentration was the key factor influencing the activity. Methylotrophic and, to a lesser extent, lithotrophic methanogenesis were active up to soda-saturating conditions (4 M total Na(+)). Acetate-dependent methanogenesis was observed at salinities below 3 M total Na(+). Detection of methanogens in sediments using the mcrA gene as a functional marker demonstrated domination of methylotrophic genera Methanolobus and Methanosalsum and lithotrophic Methanocalculus. In a few cases, acetoclastic Methanosaeta was detected, as well as two deep lineage methanogens. Cultivation results corresponded well to the mcrA-based observations. Enrichments for natronophilic methylotrophic methanogens resulted in isolation of Methanolobus strains at moderate salinity, while at salt concentrations above 2 M Na(+) a novel member of the genus Methanosalsum was dominating. Enrichments with H2 or formate invariably resulted in domination of close relatives of Methanocalculus natronophilus. Enrichments with acetate at low salt concentration yielded two acetoclastic alkaliphilic Methanosaeta cultures, while at salinity above 1 M Na(+) syntrophic associations

  17. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filaments under Extreme Conditions and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation as well as participate in signal transduction. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the biochemical properties of these protein molecules contribute to their biomechanical functions. In this research we investigate the material function of intermediate filaments under various extreme mechanical conditions as well as disease states. We use a full atomistic model and study its response to mechanical stresses. Learning from the mechanical response obtained from atomistic simulations, we build mesoscopic models following the finer-trains-coarser principles. By using this multiple-scale model, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanical properties and associated deformation mechanisms of intermediate filament network. We reveal the mechanism of a transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets with subsequent intermolecular sliding under mechanical force, which has been inferred previously from experimental results. This nanoscale mechanism results in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve, which leads to a delocalization of mechanical energy and prevents catastrophic fracture. This explains how intermediate filament can withstand extreme mechanical deformation of > 1 00% strain despite the presence of structural defects. We combine computational and experimental techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a premature aging disease. We find that the mutated lamin tail .domain is more compact and stable than the normal one. This altered structure and stability may enhance the association of intermediate filaments with the nuclear membrane, providing a molecular mechanism of the disease. We study the nuclear membrane association

  18. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  19. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-31

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n{sub 0}, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  20. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Davies, A. J.; Lavaleye, M. M. S.; Ross, S. W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M. J. N.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T. C. E.

    2014-05-01

    day, which is the largest temperature variability as measured so far in a cold-water coral habitat. Warm events, related to Gulf Stream meanders, had the duration of roughly 1 week and the current during these events was directed to the NNE. The consequences of such events must be significant given the strong effects of temperature on the metabolism of cold-water corals. Furthermore, elevated acoustic backscatter values and high mass fluxes were also recorded during these events, indicating a second stressor that may affect the corals. The abrasive nature of sand in combination with strong currents might sand blast the corals. We conclude that cold-water corals near Cape Lookout live under extreme conditions that limit mound growth at present.

  1. Heat generation in aircraft tires under free rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire while free rolling under load. The method uses an approximate stress analysis of each point in the tire as it rolls through the contact patch, and from this stress change the mechanical work done on each volume element may be obtained and converted into a heat release rate through a knowledge of material characteristics. The tire cross-section is then considered as a body with internal heat generation, and the diffusion equation is solved numerically with appropriate boundary conditions of the wheel and runway surface. Comparison with data obtained with buried thermocouples in tires shows good agreement.

  2. Extremality Conditions and Regularity of Solutions to Optimal Partition Problems Involving Laplacian Eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Tavares, Hugo; Terracini, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Let {Ω subset {R}^N} be an open bounded domain and {m in {N}}. Given {k_1,ldots,k_m in {N}}, we consider a wide class of optimal partition problems involving Dirichlet eigenvalues of elliptic operators, of the following form inf{F({λ_{k1}}(ω_1),ldots,λ_{k_m}(ω_m)): (ω_1,ldots, ω_m) in {P}_m(Ω)}, where {λ_{k_i}(ω_i)} denotes the k i -th eigenvalue of {(-Δ,H10(ω_i))} counting multiplicities, and {{P}_m(Ω)} is the set of all open partitions of {Ω}, namely {P}_m(Ω)={(ω_1, ldots, ω_m):ω_i subset Ω open, ωi \\capω_j=emptyset forall i ≠ j }. While the existence of a quasi-open optimal partition {(ω_1,ldots, ω_m)} follows from a general result by Bucur, Buttazzo and Henrot [Adv Math Sci Appl 8(2):571-579, 1998], the aim of this paper is to associate with such minimal partitions and their eigenfunctions some suitable extremality conditions and to exploit them, proving as well the Lipschitz continuity of some eigenfunctions, and the regularity of the partition in the sense that the free boundary {\\cup_{i=1}^m partial ωi \\cap Ω} is, up to a residual set, locally a {C^{1,α}} hypersurface. This last result extends the ones in the paper by Caffarelli and Lin [J Sci Comput 31(1-2):5-18, 2007] to the case of higher eigenvalues.

  3. Complex layered dental restorations: Are they recognizable and do they survive extreme conditions?

    PubMed

    Soon, Alistair S; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has shown that restorative dental materials can be recognized by microscopy and elemental analysis (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence; SEM/EDS and XRF) and that this is possible even in extreme conditions, such as cremation. These analytical methods and databases of dental materials properties have proven useful in DVI (disaster victim identification) of a commercial plane crash in 2009, and in a number of other victim identification cases. Dental materials appear on the market with ever expanding frequency. With their advent, newer methods of restoration have been proposed and adopted in the dental office. Methods might include placing multiple layers of dental materials, where they have different properties including adhesion, viscosity, or working time. These different dental materials include filled adhesives, flowable resins, glass ionomer cements, composite resins, liners and sealants. With possible combinations of different materials in these restorations, the forensic odontologist is now confronted with a new difficulty; how to recognize each individual material. The question might be posed if it is even possible to perform this task. Furthermore, an odontologist might be called upon to identify a victim under difficult circumstances, such as when presented with fragmented or incinerated remains. In these circumstances the ability to identify specific dental materials could assist in the identification of the deceased. Key to use of this information is whether these new materials and methods are detailed in the dental chart. Visual or radiographic inspection may not reveal the presence of a restoration, let alone the possible complex nature of that restoration. This study demonstrates another scientific method in forensic dental identification. PMID:26151675

  4. Complex layered dental restorations: Are they recognizable and do they survive extreme conditions?

    PubMed

    Soon, Alistair S; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has shown that restorative dental materials can be recognized by microscopy and elemental analysis (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence; SEM/EDS and XRF) and that this is possible even in extreme conditions, such as cremation. These analytical methods and databases of dental materials properties have proven useful in DVI (disaster victim identification) of a commercial plane crash in 2009, and in a number of other victim identification cases. Dental materials appear on the market with ever expanding frequency. With their advent, newer methods of restoration have been proposed and adopted in the dental office. Methods might include placing multiple layers of dental materials, where they have different properties including adhesion, viscosity, or working time. These different dental materials include filled adhesives, flowable resins, glass ionomer cements, composite resins, liners and sealants. With possible combinations of different materials in these restorations, the forensic odontologist is now confronted with a new difficulty; how to recognize each individual material. The question might be posed if it is even possible to perform this task. Furthermore, an odontologist might be called upon to identify a victim under difficult circumstances, such as when presented with fragmented or incinerated remains. In these circumstances the ability to identify specific dental materials could assist in the identification of the deceased. Key to use of this information is whether these new materials and methods are detailed in the dental chart. Visual or radiographic inspection may not reveal the presence of a restoration, let alone the possible complex nature of that restoration. This study demonstrates another scientific method in forensic dental identification.

  5. Reactive Force Fields Based on Quantum Mechanics for Applications to Materials at Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duin, Adri C. T.; Zybin, Sergey V.; Chenoweth, Kimberley; Zhang, Luzheng; Han, Si-Ping; Strachan, Alejandro; Goddard, William A.

    2006-07-01

    Understanding the response of energetic materials (EM) to thermal or shock loading at the atomistic level demands a highly accurate description of the reaction dynamics of multimillion-atom systems to capture the complex chemical and mechanical behavior involved: nonequilibrium energy/mass transfer, molecule excitation and decomposition under high strain/heat rates, formation of defects, plastic flow, and phase transitions. To enable such simulations, we developed the ReaxFF reactive force fields based on quantum mechanics (QM) calculations of reactants, products, high-energy intermediates and transition states, but using functional forms suitable for large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of chemical reactions under extreme conditions. The elements of ReaxFF are: - charge distributions change instantaneously as atomic coordinates change, - all valence interactions use bond orders derived uniquely from the bond distances which in turn describe uniquely the energies and forces, - three body (angle) and four body (torsion and inversion) terms are allowed but not required, - a general "van der Waals" term describes short range Pauli repulsion and long range dispersion interactions, which with Coulomb terms are included between all pairs of atoms (no bond or angle exclusions), - no environmental distinctions are made of atoms involving the same element; thus every carbon has the same parameters whether in diamond, graphite, benzene, porphyrin, allyl radical, HMX or TATP. ReaxFF uses the same functional form and parameters for reactive simulations in hydrocarbons, polymers, metal oxides, and metal alloys, allowing mixtures of all these systems into one simulation. We will present an overview of recent progress in ReaxFF developments, including the extension of ReaxFF to nitramine-based (nitromethane, HMX) and peroxide-based (TATP) explosives. To demonstrate the versatility and transferability of ReaxFF, we also present applications to silicone polymer poly

  6. PREFACE: International Symposium on Molecular Conductors: Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions (ISMC 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiro; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2008-02-01

    The International Symposium on Molecular Conductors 2008 (ISMC2008) was held as the second international symposium of the project entitled `Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions', which was supported by the Grant-in-aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. The project lasted from September 2003 to March 2008, and was completed by this symposium held at Okazaki Conference Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan (23-25 July 2008), which about 100 scientists attended. During the symposium, five project teams gave summary talks and exciting talks were given on the topics developed recently not only by the members of the project but also by other scientists including invited speakers from abroad, who are doing active research on molecular conductors. It is expected that papers presented in the symposium will give valuable hints for the next step in the research of this field. Therefore the organizers of this symposium decided to publish this proceedings in order to demonstrate these activities, not only for the local community of the project, but also for the broad society of international scientists who are interested in molecular conductors. The editors, who are also the organizers of this symposium, believe that this proceedings provides a significant and relevant contribution to the field of molecular conductors since it is the first time we have published such a proceedings as an electronic journal. We note that all papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed by expert referees. Editors made every effort to satisfy the criterion of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. Toshihiro Takahashi and Yoshikazu Suzumura Editors: Toshihiro Takahashi (Gakushuin University) (Chairman) Kazushi Kanoda (University of Tokyo) Seiichi Kagoshima (University of Tokyo) Takehiko Mori (Tokyo

  7. An Invariant-Preserving ALE Method for Solids under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Christon, Mark A

    2012-07-17

    We are proposing a fundamentally new approach to ALE methods for solids undergoing large deformation due to extreme loading conditions. Our approach is based on a physically-motivated and mathematically rigorous construction of the underlying Lagrangian method, vector/tensor reconstruction, remapping, and interface reconstruction. It is transformational because it deviates dramatically from traditionally accepted ALE methods and provides the following set of unique attributes: (1) a three-dimensional, finite volume, cell-centered ALE framework with advanced hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories for solids; (2) a new physically and mathematically consistent reconstruction method for vector/tensor fields; (3) advanced invariant-preserving remapping algorithm for vector/tensor quantities; (4) moment-of-fluid (MoF) interface reconstruction technique for multi-material problems with solids undergoing large deformations. This work brings together many new concepts, that in combination with emergent cell-centered Lagrangian hydrodynamics methods will produce a cutting-edge ALE capability and define a new state-of-the-art. Many ideas in this work are new, completely unexplored, and hence high risk. The proposed research and the resulting algorithms will be of immediate use in Eulerian, Lagrangian and ALE codes under the ASC program at the lab. In addition, the research on invariant preserving reconstruction/remap of tensor quantities is of direct interest to ongoing CASL and climate modeling efforts at LANL. The application space impacted by this work includes Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), Z-pinch, munition-target interactions, geological impact dynamics, shock processing of powders and shaped charges. The ALE framework will also provide a suitable test-bed for rapid development and assessment of hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories. Today, there are no invariant-preserving ALE algorithms for treating solids with large deformations. Therefore

  8. Matter under extreme conditions experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Fletcher, L. B.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Barbrel, B.; Brown, S. B.; Chapman, D. A.; Chen, Z.; Curry, C. B.; Fiuza, F.; Gamboa, E.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Gleason, A.; Goede, S.; Granados, E.; Heimann, P.; Kim, J.; Kraus, D.; MacDonald, M. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mishra, R.; Ravasio, A.; Roedel, C.; Sperling, P.; Schumaker, W.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Vorberger, J.; Zastrau, U.; Fry, A.; White, W. E.; Hasting, J. B.; Lee, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    The matter in extreme conditions end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a new tool enabling accurate pump–probe measurements for studying the physical properties of matter in the high-energy density (HED) physics regime. This instrument combines the world’s brightest x-ray source, the LCLS x-ray beam, with high-power lasers consisting of two nanosecond Nd:glass laser beams and one short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser. These lasers produce short-lived states of matter with high pressures, high temperatures or high densities with properties that are important for applications in nuclear fusion research, laboratory astrophysics and the development of intense radiation sources. In the first experiments, we have performed highly accurate x-ray diffraction and x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on shock-compressed matter resolving the transition from compressed solid matter to a co-existence regime and into the warm dense matter state. These complex charged-particle systems are dominated by strong correlations and quantum effects. They exist in planetary interiors and laboratory experiments, e.g., during high-power laser interactions with solids or the compression phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Applying record peak brightness x-rays resolves the ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and measure the static structure factor, which is a key quantity for determining equation of state data and important transport coefficients. Simultaneously, spectrally resolved measurements of plasmon features provide dynamic structure factor information that yield temperature and density with unprecedented precision at micron-scale resolution in dynamic compression experiments. These studies have demonstrated our ability to measure fundamental thermodynamic properties that determine the state of matter in the HED physics regime.

  9. Matter under extreme conditions experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Fletcher, L. B.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Barbrel, B.; Brown, S. B.; Chapman, D. A.; Chen, Z.; Curry, C. B.; Fiuza, F.; Gamboa, E.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Gleason, A.; Goede, S.; Granados, E.; Heimann, P.; Kim, J.; Kraus, D.; MacDonald, M. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mishra, R.; Ravasio, A.; Roedel, C.; Sperling, P.; Schumaker, W.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Vorberger, J.; Zastrau, U.; Fry, A.; White, W. E.; Hasting, J. B.; Lee, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    The matter in extreme conditions end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a new tool enabling accurate pump-probe measurements for studying the physical properties of matter in the high-energy density (HED) physics regime. This instrument combines the world’s brightest x-ray source, the LCLS x-ray beam, with high-power lasers consisting of two nanosecond Nd:glass laser beams and one short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser. These lasers produce short-lived states of matter with high pressures, high temperatures or high densities with properties that are important for applications in nuclear fusion research, laboratory astrophysics and the development of intense radiation sources. In the first experiments, we have performed highly accurate x-ray diffraction and x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on shock-compressed matter resolving the transition from compressed solid matter to a co-existence regime and into the warm dense matter state. These complex charged-particle systems are dominated by strong correlations and quantum effects. They exist in planetary interiors and laboratory experiments, e.g., during high-power laser interactions with solids or the compression phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Applying record peak brightness x-rays resolves the ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and measure the static structure factor, which is a key quantity for determining equation of state data and important transport coefficients. Simultaneously, spectrally resolved measurements of plasmon features provide dynamic structure factor information that yield temperature and density with unprecedented precision at micron-scale resolution in dynamic compression experiments. These studies have demonstrated our ability to measure fundamental thermodynamic properties that determine the state of matter in the HED physics regime.

  10. Executive Functions Profile in Extreme Eating/Weight Conditions: From Anorexia Nervosa to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fagundo, Ana B.; de la Torre, Rafael; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Agüera, Zaida; Granero, Roser; Tárrega, Salomé; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa; Fernández-Real, Jose M.; Rodríguez, Roser; Forcano, Laura; Frühbeck, Gema; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Fernández-García, Jose C.; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Background Extreme weight conditions (EWC) groups along a continuum may share some biological risk factors and intermediate neurocognitive phenotypes. A core cognitive trait in EWC appears to be executive dysfunction, with a focus on decision making, response inhibition and cognitive flexibility. Differences between individuals in these areas are likely to contribute to the differences in vulnerability to EWC. The aim of the study was to investigate whether there is a common pattern of executive dysfunction in EWC while comparing anorexia nervosa patients (AN), obese subjects (OB) and healthy eating/weight controls (HC). Methods Thirty five AN patients, fifty two OB and one hundred thirty seven HC were compared using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST); Stroop Color and Word Test (SCWT); and Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). All participants were female, aged between 18 and 60 years. Results There was a significant difference in IGT score (F(1.79); p<.001), with AN and OB groups showing the poorest performance compared to HC. On the WCST, AN and OB made significantly more errors than controls (F(25.73); p<.001), and had significantly fewer correct responses (F(2.71); p<.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that the two clinical groups were not significantly different from each other. Finally, OB showed a significant reduced performance in the inhibition response measured with the Stroop test (F(5.11); p<.001) compared with both AN and HC. Conclusions These findings suggest that EWC subjects (namely AN and OB) have similar dysfunctional executive profile that may play a role in the development and maintenance of such disorders. PMID:22927962

  11. EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS IN THE MILKY WAY: A SECOND GENERATION FORMED AFTER REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, Michele; Shull, J. Michael E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.ed

    2010-03-20

    Cosmological simulations of Population III star formation suggest an initial mass function (IMF) biased toward very massive stars (M {approx}> 100 M{sub sun}) formed in minihalos at redshift z {approx}> 20, when the cooling is driven by molecular hydrogen. However, this result conflicts with observations of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars in the Milky Way (MW) halo, whose r-process elemental abundances appear to be incompatible with those expected from very massive Population III progenitors. We propose a new solution to the problem in which the IMF of second-generation stars formed at z {approx}> 10, before reionization, is deficient in sub-solar mass stars, owing to the high cosmic microwave background temperature floor. The observed EMP stars are formed preferentially at z {approx}< 10 in pockets of gas enriched to metallicity Z {approx}> 10{sup -3.5} Z{sub sun} by winds from Population II stars. Our cosmological simulations of dark matter halos like the MW show that current samples of EMP stars can only constrain the IMF of late-time Population III stars, formed at z {approx}< 13 in halos with virial temperature T{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 4} K. This suggests that pair instability supernovae were not produced primarily by this population. To begin probing the IMF of Population III stars formed at higher redshift will require a large survey, with at least 500 and probably several thousand EMP stars of metallicities Z {approx} 10{sup -3.5} Z{sub sun}.

  12. In situ insights to Se (S) partitioning between silicate and metallic melts at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, M.; Petitgirard, S.; Appel, K.; Watenphul, A.; Morgenroth, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's core mainly consists of a metallic Fe-Ni mixture. However, seismic observations show that the density is about 5-10% lower than expected for an Fe-Ni alloy under similar pressure and temperature conditions (e.g., [1,2]). This discovery initiated numerous studies to identify and quantify light elements in the Earth0s core. Among others, sulphur has been suggested to be a promisingly candidate to alloy with the metallic core because of its depletion in the crust and the mantle relative to other volatile elements by several orders of magnitude (e.g., [3-5]). In the last decades, several experimental studies have aimed to quantify the sulphur content in the Earth's core and to determine its influence on the physical properties (e.g., [6]). However, experimental data on sulphur partitioning between silicate and metallic liquids at pressures and temperatures relevant for core-mantle boundary conditions are missing. This lack is due to pressure and temperature limitations of conventional experimental approaches (up to 25 GPa and 2200 K). New developments, like laser-heated diamond-anvil cells (LDAC), allow studies at core-mantle boundary conditions, but in-situ chemical analysis of sulphur in LDACs is impossible due to the high absorption of S fluorescence in the diamonds. Instead of sulphur, selenium can be used to model sulphur partitioning between silicate and metallic melts at elevated PT conditions. This is based on the fact that sulphur and selenium can be considered as geochemical twins ([7,8]). The main advantage of this approach is the much higher excitation energy of selenium compared to sulphur, which enables in-situ XRF analysis in LDACs. Here, we present preliminary data on Se partitioning between silicate and metallic melt at extreme conditions. The experiments have been performed in double-sided laser-heated LDACs at the high pressure beamlines P02.2 (DESY, Germany) and ID27 (ESRF, France) as described in [9]. Micro-XRF mappings are used to

  13. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.; Davies, A. J.; Lavaleye, M. J. N.; Ross, S. W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T.

    2013-12-01

    far in a cold-water coral habitat. Warm events, related to Gulf Stream meanders, had the duration of roughly one week and the current during these events was directed to the NNE. The consequences of such events must be significant given the strong effects of temperature on the metabolism of cold-water corals. Furthermore, elevated acoustic backscatter values and high mass fluxes were also recorded during these events, indicating a second stressor that may affect the corals. The abrasive nature of sand in combination with strong currents might sand blast the corals. We conclude that cold-water corals near Cape Lookout live under extreme conditions that limit mound growth at present.

  14. High-energy X-ray diffraction of melts and amorphous solids at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescher, C.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.; Eng, P. J.; Skinner, L. B.; Stubbs, J.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    The structural analysis of amorphous materials, glasses and liquids at extreme conditions using X-ray diffraction is a very challenging endeavor. The samples are typically very small and surrounded by pressure vessels, which result in a huge background signal which may be orders of magnitude stronger than the actual sample signal. Furthermore, the background signal changes during compression in diamond anvil cells (DAC), making analysis of the diffraction data impossible at large pressures (>60 GPa). A key factor for obtaining high quality structural data is the maximum obtainable Q of the data collection. While at ambient conditions a maximum Q of more than 20 Å-1 has become standard, at high pressures data have been reported and analyzed with a maximum Q as low as 7 Å-1, which significantly reduces the resolution of the obtained real space data for multicomponent systems. In order to overcome those challenges, we have successfully installed a multichannel collimator (MCC) for the DAC setup at APS/GSECARS 13-IDD and for the Paris Edinburgh Press (PEP) at 13-IDC. The MCC leads to a significant increase in signal to background ratio and the background remains almost constant during compression in a DAC and removes the additional diffraction signal from the pressure media in the PEP. The combination of MCC and the high-energy X-ray optics of the 13ID beamline enables data collection of melts, glasses and amorphous materials up to 10 GPa in the PEP with a maximum Q of about 16 Å-1 and the collection of amorphous materials and glasses up to pressures above 150 GPa with a maximum Q of about 13 Å-1, thus, enabling the structural investigation of amorphous materials at much larger pressures than previously achievable. Further, we have developed several new user-friendly software packages for the analysis of X-ray diffraction data with specific data reduction and optimization algorithms for the analysis of amorphous materials at high-pressure. In order to show the

  15. Downscaling future precipitation extremes to urban hydrology scales using a spatio-temporal Neyman-Scott weather generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomo Danielsen Sørup, Hjalte; Bøssing Christensen, Ole; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten; Steen Mikkelsen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Spatio-temporal precipitation is modelled for urban application at 1 h temporal resolution on a 2 km grid using a spatio-temporal Neyman-Scott rectangular pulses weather generator (WG). Precipitation time series used as input to the WG are obtained from a network of 60 tipping-bucket rain gauges irregularly placed in a 40 km × 60 km model domain. The WG simulates precipitation time series that are comparable to the observations with respect to extreme precipitation statistics. The WG is used for downscaling climate change signals from regional climate models (RCMs) with spatial resolutions of 25 and 8 km, respectively. Six different RCM simulation pairs are used to perturb the WG with climate change signals resulting in six very different perturbation schemes. All perturbed WGs result in more extreme precipitation at the sub-daily to multi-daily level and these extremes exhibit a much more realistic spatial pattern than what is observed in RCM precipitation output. The WG seems to correlate increased extreme intensities with an increased spatial extent of the extremes meaning that the climate-change-perturbed extremes have a larger spatial extent than those of the present climate. Overall, the WG produces robust results and is seen as a reliable procedure for downscaling RCM precipitation output for use in urban hydrology.

  16. Numerical Generation of Asymmetric Flows about Slender Bodies of Revolution at Extreme Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Schiff, Lewis B.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that slender bodies of revolution will develop an asymmetric, unsteady flow pattern in experimental tests, if the angle of incidence to the oncoming stream is above a critical value. It has been suggested that the origin of these asymmetric flows may stem from geometric imperfections of the model being tested, or from disturbances in the oncoming stream. In numerical simulations, it is possible to generate bodies of revolution which are perfectly symmetric about their longitudinal axis, and to impose uniform flow conditions which are free from disturbances. The current work presents numerical simulations of the flow about an ogive-cylinder configuration at 40 and 60 degree angle of incidence. These simulations. were performed using numerical algorithms which are also symmetric about the lateral plane of the cylinder body. The flowfields at 40 degree angle of attack were seen to remain symmetric to the round-off accuracy of the computer. At 60 degree angle of attack, a lateral force coefficient developed of O(1) which progressed to an alternate vortex shedding in time. The nature of this lateral force generation and vortex shedding was dependent on the choice of numerical algorithm. The origin of the asymmetries observed in the 60 degree angle of attack computations were traced to round-off errors in the implicit block-matrix inverter. A means of inverting the implicit operator matrices, which maintains the symmetry of the overall numerical algorithm was implemented.

  17. Oxygen Loss from Venus and the Influence of Extreme Solar Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnulty, Tess Rose

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to expand our understanding of oxygen ion escape to space from Venus and its dependence on extreme solar wind conditions found during interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The solar wind dynamic pressure outside of the Venus bow shock did not exceed ˜12 nPa, during 2006-2009, while the solar wind dynamic pressure was higher than this for ˜10% of the time during the PVO mission. Oxygen ions escape Venus through multiple regions near the planet. One of these regions is the magnetosheath, where high energy pick-up ions are accelerated by the solar wind convection electric field. High energy (>1 keV) O+ pick-up ions within the Venus magnetosheath reached higher energy at lower altitude when the solar wind was disturbed by ICMEs compared to pick-up ions when the external solar wind was not disturbed, between 2006-2007. However, the count rate of O+ was not obviously affected by the ICMEs during this time period. In addition to high energy pick-up ions, VEX also detects low energy (˜10-100 eV) O+ within the ionosphere and wake of Venus. These low energy oxygen ions are difficult to interpret, because the spacecraft's relative velocity and potential can significantly affect the measured energy. If VEX ion data is not corrected for the spacecraft's relative velocity and potential, gravitationally bound O+ could be misinterpreted as escaping. These gravitationally bound oxygen ions can extend on the nightside to ˜-2 Venus radii and may even return to the planet after reaching high altitudes in the wake. Gravitationally bound ions will lower the total O+ escape estimated from Venus if total escape is calculated including these ions. However, if the return flux is low compared to the total escaping outflow, this effect is not significant. An ICME with a dynamic pressure of 17.6 nPa impacted Venus on November 11, 2011. During this ICME, the high energy pick-up O+ and the low energy O+ ions were affected. Oxygen ions in the

  18. Materials response under extreme conditions: a path to materials science above 1000 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2005-07-01

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates (1.e6 -- 1.e8 1/s) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities. [1] A quasi-isentropic, ramped-pressure (shockless) drive is being developed on the Omega laser. [2] Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. [3] Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced alpha-omega phase transition in Ti is inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. [4] Time resolved lattice response and phase can be inferred from dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (sub-nsec). [5] Large-scale MD simulations have elucidated the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. [6] Deformation mechanisms, such as the slip-twinning transition in shocked single-crystal Cu, are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. [7] Designs will be shown for reaching much higher pressures, (greater than 1000 GPa), in the solid state on the NIF laser. [8] *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. [1] B.A. Remington et al., Met. Mat. Trans. 35A, 2587 (2004). [2] J. Edwards et al., PRL 92, 075002 (2004). [3] K.T. Lorenz et al., PoP, in press (May, 2005). [4] B. Yaakobi et al., PRL 92, 095504 (2004). [5] A. Loveridge-Smith et al., PRL 86, 2349 (2001). [6] E.M. Bringa et al., Nature, submitted (March, 2005). [7] M.S. Schneider et al., Met. Mat. Trans. 35A, 2633 (2004). [8] B.A. Remington et al., in press, ApSS 298 (July, 2005).

  19. Household hazardous waste and conditionally exempt small-quantity generators

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, T.K.

    1993-02-01

    Each year, US consumers buy millions of pounds of paint, disinfectant, toilet bowl cleaner; furniture polish, drain cleaner, bleach and other products designed to beautify and clean their homes. Many do-it-yourselfers also buy automotive supplies, such as brake fluid, batteries, starting fluid, oil and antifreeze. Unused portions of these products often find their way into local landfills as household hazardous waste (HHW). Untreated, these wastes represent a possible threat to landfill employees, and a potential source of groundwater and surface water contamination. Recognizing the potential hazards posed by these materials, most states have established HHW management programs. California, Florida, Minnesota, Washington and New Jersey have well-established programs serving state residents and conditionally exempt small-quantity generators (CESQGs). CESQGs are commercial facilities that generate less than 100 kilograms (220 pounds) of hazardous waste per calendar month. RCRA established the statutory framework for identifying and managing hazardous wastes. However, household waste, including HHW, a specifically is excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b)(1). Therefore, there are no current federal regulations governing HHW. Implementing and enforcing pollution legislation aimed at private citizens is a complex, if not impossible, task.

  20. Nonideal Plasma Under Exreme Conditions Generated by Intense Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2004-05-01

    Physical properties of hot dense matter at megabar pressures are the physical basis for astrophysics, planetary physics, energetics, ICF target design, beam-matter interaction, and for many other applications. The new experimental results of pressure ionization investigation of the hot dense matter generated by multiple shock compression of metals, H2, He, noble gases, S, I, fullerene C60, and H2O in the megabar pressure range are presented. High energy plasma states were generated by single and multiple shock compression and adiabatic expansion of initially warm and cryogenic solid, liquid, porous and low-density foams (aerogels) samples. These data in combination with exploding wire conductivity measurements demonstrate an ionization rate increase up to ten orders of magnitude as a result of compression of dense matter. Multiple shock compression of H2, Ar, He, Kr, Ne, Xe, and fullerene C60 in initially gaseous and cryogenic liquid state allows to measure the electrical conductivity, equation of state, and laser beam reflectivity. Thermal and pressure ionization of strongly coupled states of matter is the most prominent effects under the experimental conditions. It was shown that plasma compression strongly deforms the ionization potentials, emission spectra and scattering cross-sections of the neutrals and ions in the strongly coupled matter. Comparison of the data obtained with theoretical models (percolation, Mott transition, Zeeman and Lorenz approach etc.) is presented. In contrast to the plasma compression experiments the multiple shock compression of solid Li, Na, and Ca shows dielectrization of these elements.

  1. Hydrologic conditions controlling runoff generation immediately after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, Brian A.; Moody, John A.; Martin, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the control of postwildfire runoff by physical and hydraulic properties of soil, hydrologic states, and an ash layer immediately following wildfire. The field site is within the area burned by the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in Colorado, USA. Physical and hydraulic property characterization included ash thickness, particle size distribution, hydraulic conductivity, and soil water retention curves. Soil water content and matric potential were measured indirectly at several depths below the soil surface to document hydrologic states underneath the ash layer in the unsaturated zone, whereas precipitation and surface runoff were measured directly. Measurements of soil water content showed that almost no water infiltrated below the ash layer into the near-surface soil in the burned site at the storm time scale (i.e., minutes to hours). Runoff generation processes were controlled by and highly sensitive to ash thickness and ash hydraulic properties. The ash layer stored from 97% to 99% of rainfall, which was critical for reducing runoff amounts. The hydrologic response to two rain storms with different rainfall amounts, rainfall intensity, and durations, only ten days apart, indicated that runoff generation was predominantly by the saturation-excess mechanism perched at the ash-soil interface during the first storm and predominantly by the infiltration-excess mechanism at the ash surface during the second storm. Contributing area was not static for the two storms and was 4% (saturation excess) to 68% (infiltration excess) of the catchment area. Our results showed the importance of including hydrologic conditions and hydraulic properties of the ash layer in postwildfire runoff generation models.

  2. Conditionals by inversion provide a universal method for the generation of conditional alleles

    PubMed Central

    Economides, Aris N.; Frendewey, David; Yang, Peter; Dominguez, Melissa G.; Dore, Anthony T.; Lobov, Ivan B.; Persaud, Trikaldarshi; Rojas, Jose; McClain, Joyce; Lengyel, Peter; Droguett, Gustavo; Chernomorsky, Rostislav; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; DeChiara, Thomas M.; Pouyemirou, William; Cruz, Joseph M.; Feeley, Kieran; Mellis, Ian A.; Yasenchack, Jason; Hatsell, Sarah J.; Xie, LiQin; Latres, Esther; Huang, Lily; Zhang, Yuhong; Pefanis, Evangelos; Skokos, Dimitris; Deckelbaum, Ron A.; Croll, Susan D.; Davis, Samuel; Valenzuela, David M.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Conditional mutagenesis is becoming a method of choice for studying gene function, but constructing conditional alleles is often laborious, limited by target gene structure, and at times, prone to incomplete conditional ablation. To address these issues, we developed a technology termed conditionals by inversion (COIN). Before activation, COINs contain an inverted module (COIN module) that lies inertly within the antisense strand of a resident gene. When inverted into the sense strand by a site-specific recombinase, the COIN module causes termination of the target gene’s transcription and simultaneously provides a reporter for tracking this event. COIN modules can be inserted into natural introns (intronic COINs) or directly into coding exons as part of an artificial intron (exonic COINs), greatly simplifying allele design and increasing flexibility over previous conditional KO approaches. Detailed analysis of over 20 COIN alleles establishes the reliability of the method and its broad applicability to any gene, regardless of exon–intron structure. Our extensive testing provides rules that help ensure success of this approach and also explains why other currently available conditional approaches often fail to function optimally. Finally, the ability to split exons using the COIN’s artificial intron opens up engineering modalities for the generation of multifunctional alleles. PMID:23918385

  3. Identifying the lost generation of adults with autism spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Meng-Chuan; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum conditions comprise a set of early-onset neurodevelopmental syndromes with a prevalence of 1% across all ages. First diagnosis in adulthood has finally become recognised as an important clinical issue due to the increasing awareness of autism, broadening of diagnostic criteria, and the introduction of the spectrum concept. Thus, the idea of a lost generation of people who were previously excluded from a diagnosis of classic autism has arisen. Making a first diagnosis of autism spectrum conditions in adults can be challenging for practical reasons (eg, no person to provide a developmental history), developmental reasons (eg, the acquisition of learnt or camouflaging strategies), and clinical reasons (eg, high frequency of co-occurring disorders). The diagnostic process includes referral, screening, interviews with informants and patients, and functional assessments. In delineating differential diagnoses, true comorbidities, and overlapping behaviour with other psychiatric diagnoses, particular attention should be paid to anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, psychosis, personality disorders, and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Possible misdiagnosis, especially in women, should be explored. The creation of supportive, accepting, and autism-friendly social and physical environments is important and requires a coordinated effort across agencies and needs support from government policies. PMID:26544750

  4. Identifying the lost generation of adults with autism spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Meng-Chuan; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum conditions comprise a set of early-onset neurodevelopmental syndromes with a prevalence of 1% across all ages. First diagnosis in adulthood has finally become recognised as an important clinical issue due to the increasing awareness of autism, broadening of diagnostic criteria, and the introduction of the spectrum concept. Thus, the idea of a lost generation of people who were previously excluded from a diagnosis of classic autism has arisen. Making a first diagnosis of autism spectrum conditions in adults can be challenging for practical reasons (eg, no person to provide a developmental history), developmental reasons (eg, the acquisition of learnt or camouflaging strategies), and clinical reasons (eg, high frequency of co-occurring disorders). The diagnostic process includes referral, screening, interviews with informants and patients, and functional assessments. In delineating differential diagnoses, true comorbidities, and overlapping behaviour with other psychiatric diagnoses, particular attention should be paid to anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, psychosis, personality disorders, and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Possible misdiagnosis, especially in women, should be explored. The creation of supportive, accepting, and autism-friendly social and physical environments is important and requires a coordinated effort across agencies and needs support from government policies.

  5. Extreme-Ultraviolet-Initated High-Order Harmonic Generation: Driving Inner-Valence Electrons Using Below-Threshold-Energy Extreme-Ultraviolet Light.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; van der Hart, H W

    2016-08-26

    We propose a novel scheme for resolving the contribution of inner- and outer-valence electrons in extreme-ultraviolet (XUV)-initiated high-harmonic generation in neon. By probing the atom with a low-energy (below the 2s ionization threshold) ultrashort XUV pulse, the 2p electron is steered away from the core, while the 2s electron is enabled to describe recollision trajectories. By selectively suppressing the 2p recollision trajectories, we can resolve the contribution of the 2s electron to the high-harmonic spectrum. We apply the classical trajectory model to account for the contribution of the 2s electron, which allows for an intuitive understanding of the process.

  6. Extreme-Ultraviolet-Initated High-Order Harmonic Generation: Driving Inner-Valence Electrons Using Below-Threshold-Energy Extreme-Ultraviolet Light.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; van der Hart, H W

    2016-08-26

    We propose a novel scheme for resolving the contribution of inner- and outer-valence electrons in extreme-ultraviolet (XUV)-initiated high-harmonic generation in neon. By probing the atom with a low-energy (below the 2s ionization threshold) ultrashort XUV pulse, the 2p electron is steered away from the core, while the 2s electron is enabled to describe recollision trajectories. By selectively suppressing the 2p recollision trajectories, we can resolve the contribution of the 2s electron to the high-harmonic spectrum. We apply the classical trajectory model to account for the contribution of the 2s electron, which allows for an intuitive understanding of the process. PMID:27610852

  7. Extreme-Ultraviolet-Initated High-Order Harmonic Generation: Driving Inner-Valence Electrons Using Below-Threshold-Energy Extreme-Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. C.; van der Hart, H. W.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme for resolving the contribution of inner- and outer-valence electrons in extreme-ultraviolet (XUV)-initiated high-harmonic generation in neon. By probing the atom with a low-energy (below the 2 s ionization threshold) ultrashort XUV pulse, the 2 p electron is steered away from the core, while the 2 s electron is enabled to describe recollision trajectories. By selectively suppressing the 2 p recollision trajectories, we can resolve the contribution of the 2 s electron to the high-harmonic spectrum. We apply the classical trajectory model to account for the contribution of the 2 s electron, which allows for an intuitive understanding of the process.

  8. ON THE EXTREME POSITIVE STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK CONDITION IN SCUBA SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Wuensch, Richard; Palous, Jan

    2010-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted by massive stars via stellar winds and supernovae explosions in young assembling galaxies. We show that the interplay between the thermalization of the kinetic energy provided by massive stars, radiative cooling of the thermalized plasma, and the gravitational pull of the host galaxy lead to three different hydrodynamic regimes. These are: (1) the quasi-adiabatic supergalactic winds; (2) the bimodal flows, with mass accumulation in the central zones and gas expulsion from the outer zones of the assembling galaxy; and (3) the gravitationally bound regime, for which all of the gas returned by massive stars remains bound to the host galaxy and is likely to be reprocessed into further generations of stars. Which of the three possible solutions takes place depends on the mass of the star-forming region, its mechanical luminosity (or star formation rate), and its size. The model predicts that massive assembling galaxies with large star formation rates similar to those detected in Submillimeter Common-User Bolometric Array sources ({approx}1000 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) are likely to evolve in a positive star formation feedback condition, either in the bimodal or in the gravitationally bound regime. This implies that star formation in these sources may have little impact on the intergalactic medium and result instead into a fast interstellar matter enrichment, as observed in high redshift quasars.

  9. Drop-box Weir for Measuring Flow Rates Under Extreme Flow Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment and large rocks often are transported in runoff during extreme events. The sediment can deposit in a runoff-measuring structure and give erroneous readings. The drop-box weir (DBW) is one of only a few flow-measuring devices capable of measuring sediment-laden flows. Recent studies have ...

  10. Investigating the Effects of Simulated Space conditions on Novel Extremely Halophilic Archaea: Halovarius Luteus gen. nov., sp. nov.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshangsaz, Niloofar; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Nazmi, Kamran; Semsarha, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Studying halophiles from different environments of Earth provide new insights into our search for life in the universe. Haloarchaea show some unique characteristics and physiological adaptations like acidic proteins against harsh environments such as natural brine with salt concentration approaching saturation (5 M) and regions with low active water. These properties make haloarchaea interesting candidate for astrobiological studies. Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov. a novel extremely halophilic archaeon from Urmia salt lake, in Iran has been chosen to explore its resistance against a series of extreme conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the resistance of strain DA50T under the effects of simulated space conditions like simulated microgravity, hypergravity, and desiccation. In this paper we will discuss the results of these studies where we specifically focus on changes in carotenoid pigments production and whole cell proteome. This is the first report of very novel Iranian archaea in response to extreme space conditions. The pigments were extracted by acetone and methanol. Pigments were analyzed by scanning the absorbance spectrum in the UV-VIS spectrophotometer. And they were separated by TLC. Whole protein from cell lysate supernatant was extracted after lysis with Bacterial Protein Extraction Reagent and fractionated by RP-HPLC using C18 column. Proteome analyzed by electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and MALDI-TOF. Carotenoid pigments are formed under different extreme conditions such as dry environment and gravitational changes. Also the protein composition exhibits alterations after exposure to the same conditions. Our conclusion is that pigments and proteins formation depend on the growth circumstances. Halophiles use this as an adaptation to survive under different environmental conditions.

  11. How extreme are extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchi, Marco; Petitta, Marcello; Calmanti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    High temperatures have an impact on the energy balance of any living organism and on the operational capabilities of critical infrastructures. Heat-wave indicators have been mainly developed with the aim of capturing the potential impacts on specific sectors (agriculture, health, wildfires, transport, power generation and distribution). However, the ability to capture the occurrence of extreme temperature events is an essential property of a multi-hazard extreme climate indicator. Aim of this study is to develop a standardized heat-wave indicator, that can be combined with other indices in order to describe multiple hazards in a single indicator. The proposed approach can be used in order to have a quantified indicator of the strenght of a certain extreme. As a matter of fact, extremes are usually distributed in exponential or exponential-exponential functions and it is difficult to quickly asses how strong was an extreme events considering only its magnitude. The proposed approach simplify the quantitative and qualitative communication of extreme magnitude

  12. A hybrid fuzzy logic and extreme learning machine for improving efficiency of circulating water systems in power generation plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Nur Liyana Afiqah Abdul; Siah Yap, Keem; Afif Bunyamin, Muhammad

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach of the fault detection for improving efficiency of circulating water system (CWS) in a power generation plant using a hybrid Fuzzy Logic System (FLS) and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) neural network. The FLS is a mathematical tool for calculating the uncertainties where precision and significance are applied in the real world. It is based on natural language which has the ability of "computing the word". The ELM is an extremely fast learning algorithm for neural network that can completed the training cycle in a very short time. By combining the FLS and ELM, new hybrid model, i.e., FLS-ELM is developed. The applicability of this proposed hybrid model is validated in fault detection in CWS which may help to improve overall efficiency of power generation plant, hence, consuming less natural recourses and producing less pollutions.

  13. 78 FR 48503 - Proposed Revision to Missiles Generated by Extreme Winds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... extreme winds. The revision also incorporates guidance on regulatory treatment of nonsafety systems. DATES... Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition.'' This revision incorporates guidance and... Power Plants,'' and Interim Staff Guidance DC/COL- ISG-024, ``Implementation of Regulatory Guide...

  14. Molecular basis of the structural stability of a Top7-based scaffold at extreme pH and temperature conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Straatsma, TP

    2010-07-01

    The development of stable scaffolds that can tolerate environmental extremes has an immense potential for applications in industry and defense. Recently, we have engineered an eight-residue loop into the de novo designed Top7 protein, which specifically binds the glycoprotein CD4. The robust properties of the Top7, coupled with the ease in production, make it a robust scaffold to design novel functionalities for use under extreme environmental conditions. In the present work, a series of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are reported which investigates the effect of mutations and extreme conditions of temperature and pH on the structure, stability, and dynamics of the native and engineered Top7. These simulations indicate that i. The structural dynamics of the engineered and native Top7 in solution are equivalent under corresponding conditions of pH and temperature. Ensemble-averaged structures of the native and engineered Top7 maintain the overall tertiary structure pattern, albeit with loss of helical content when at low pH and high-temperature conditions. Mutations of residues E43A, D46A, E67A, E69A, EA81A along the ?-helices of the engineered Top7 did not lead to significant changes in the native fold under pH 2 and 400 K, suggesting that the helices can accommodate varying sequences. iii. The anti-parallel ?-sheet is the structural core responsible for the stability of the native and engineered Top7 and is well maintained under extreme pH and temperature conditions. These findings indicate that the insertion of an eight-residue loop into the structure of Top7 does not adversely affect the global fold or the structural stability of the Top7 scaffold.

  15. Seasonal variations in microbial populations and environmental conditions in an extreme acid mine drainage environment.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K J; Gihring, T M; Banfield, J F

    1999-08-01

    Microbial populations, their distributions, and their aquatic environments were studied over a year (1997) at an acid mine drainage (AMD) site at Iron Mountain, Calif. Populations were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridizations with group-specific probes. Probes were used for the domains Eucarya, Bacteria, and Archaea and the two species most widely studied and implicated for their role in AMD production, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Results show that microbial populations, in relative proportions and absolute numbers, vary spatially and seasonally and correlate with geochemical and physical conditions (pH, temperature, conductivity, and rainfall). Bacterial populations were in the highest proportion (>95%) in January. Conversely, archaeal populations were in the highest proportion in July and September ( approximately 50%) and were virtually absent in the winter. Bacterial and archaeal populations correlated with conductivity and rainfall. High concentrations of dissolved solids, as reflected by high conductivity values (up to 125 mS/cm), occurred in the summer and correlated with high archaeal populations and proportionally lower bacterial populations. Eukaryotes were not detected in January, when total microbial cell numbers were lowest (<10(5) cells/ml), but eukaryotes increased at low-pH sites ( approximately 0.5) during the remainder of the year. This correlated with decreasing water temperatures (50 to 30 degrees C; January to November) and increasing numbers of prokaryotes (10(8) to 10(9) cells/ml). T. ferrooxidans was in highest abundance (>30%) at moderate pHs and temperatures ( approximately 2.5 and 20 degrees C) in sites that were peripheral to primary acid-generating sites and lowest (0 to 5%) at low-pH sites (pH approximately 0.5) that were in contact with the ore body. L. ferrooxidans was more widely distributed with respect to geochemical conditions (pH = 0 to 3; 20 to 50 degrees C) but was more abundant at

  16. Response of shoal grass, Halodule wrightii, to extreme winter conditions in the Lower Laguna Madre, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, D.W.; Onuf, C.P.; Tunnell, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of a severe freeze on the shoal grass, Halodule wrightii, were documented through analysis of temporal and spatial trends in below-ground biomass. The coincidence of the second lowest temperature (-10.6??C) in 107 years of record, 56 consecutive hours below freezing, high winds and extremely low water levels exposed the Laguna Madre, TX, to the most severe cold stress in over a century. H. wrightii tolerated this extreme freeze event. Annual pre- and post-freeze surveys indicated that below-ground biomass estimated from volume was Unaffected by the freeze event. Nor was there any post-freeze change in biomass among intertidal sites directly exposed to freezing air temperatures relative to subtidal sites which remained submerged during the freezing period.

  17. Men in extreme conditions: some medical and psychological aspects of the Auschwitz concentration camp.

    PubMed

    Radil-Weiss, T

    1983-08-01

    The second world war ended many years ago. Most of those who survived the stay at the German concentration camp at Auschwitz have already died of the consequences of their imprisonment; those still alive are already in the last third of their life. Is there any point in returning to the experiences of those days? Consideration of the mental hygiene of former prisoners cautions us that perhaps we should not do it. But consideration of the general interest holds that we are not entitled to ignore any knowledge that can contribute to social development--including medicine and psychology--even if acquired under unspeakably awful conditions. In addition, since the war new generations have grown up that play an increasingly significant role in various spheres of life but have little concrete information about those events; they can neither rationally nor emotionally understand how the horrors connected with fascism and the war could have happened. In a sense it is encouraging that they cannot grasp such inhuman behavior; nevertheless, we must adhere to the following motto: "Nothing must be forgotten, nobody will be forgotten." We owe it to those millions who did not survive--both the victims of the Holocaust and those who fought against it. These are arguments in favor of returning to the facts that are ineffaceably recorded somewhere in our memories. In doing so, however, we must remember that at times we are revisiting experiences of a boy of 14 as recalled by a 50-year-old man. The material below, examining the medical as well as psychological aspects of imprisonment at Auschwitz, is based on my own memories, as an adolescent imprisoned at Auschwitz. I have tried to move from this individual account to more general statements, although the methodological apparatus on which scientific analysis is usually based is absent. PMID:6622601

  18. Spirituality and Aging in Place: The Impact of Extreme Climatic Conditions on Domestic Gardening Practice.

    PubMed

    Adams, Joanne; Pascal, Jan; Dickson-Swift, Virginia

    2014-12-01

    There is limited research exploring how domestic water restrictions imposed as a result of drought conditions impact upon the lives of independently living older people. Within this age group (60 years plus), the domestic garden frequently forms an intrinsic component of ongoing health and well-being. Gardening practice offers components of both mental and physical activity and, for many older people, leads to emotional and spiritual connection on a number of levels. The capacity of older people to maintain a garden during a period of water restrictions is greatly reduced, and the resulting impact on health and well-being is considerable. A recent study, conducted in south-eastern Australia, aimed to determine the benefits to health and well-being of maintaining a domestic garden for older people and the impact of water restrictions on garden practice. This occurred at a time following a prolonged period of drought and, in central Victoria, a complete ban on outside watering. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 gardeners aged between 60 and 83 who had tended their garden over an extended period. The lived experience of gardening was explored through hermeneutic phenomenological analysis. Clear benefits to health and well-being were established, and yet, the essence of this experience lay in the capacity of gardeners to remain connected to their garden despite change. The crisis imposed by ongoing drought and restricted use of water generated a strong impetus for adaptation, resilience and acceptance of change. The spiritual nature of gardening practice clearly emerged and appeared to intensify the experience of gardening and consolidate adaption to change on a number of levels.

  19. Inner Magnetosphere Simulations: Exploring Magnetosonic Wave Generation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharia, S. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; MacDonald, E.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the conditions for magnetosonic wave generation in the near-Earth magnetosphere by performing numerical simulations with our newly improved self-consistent model, RAM-SCB. The magnetosonic (ion Bernstein) instability, a potential electron acceleration mechanism in the outer radiation belt, is driven by a positive slope in the ion distribution function perpendicular to the magnetic field, a so-called "velocity ring" distribution at energies above 1 keV. The formation of such distributions is dependent on the interplay of magnetic and electric drifts, as well as ring current losses, and therefore its study requires a realistic treatment of both plasma and field dynamics. The RAM-SCB model represents a 2-way coupling of the kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model (RAM) with a 3D plasma equilibrium code. In RAM-SCB the magnetic field is computed in force balance with the RAM anisotropic pressures and then returned to RAM to guide the particle dynamics. RAM-SCB thus properly treats both the kinetic drift physics crucial in the inner magnetosphere and the self-consistent interaction between plasma and magnetic field (required due to the strong field depressions during storms, depressions that strongly affect particle drifts). In order to provide output at geosynchronous locations, recently the RAM-SCB boundary has been expanded to 9 RE from Earth, with plasma pressure and magnetic field boundary conditions prescribed there from empirical models. This presentation will analyze, using event simulations with the improved model and comparisons with LANL MPA geosynchronous observations, the occurrence and location of magnetosonic unstable regions in the inner magnetosphere and their dependence on the following factors: 1). geomagnetic activity level (including quiet time, storm main phase and recovery); 2). magnetic field self-consistency (stretched vs. dipole fields). We will also discuss the physical mechanism for the occurrence of the velocity

  20. Sediment Dynamics Within Buffer Zone and Sinkhole Splay Areas Under Extreme Soil Disturbance Conditions.

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Jon E; Crim, Jackie F; Williard, Karl W J; Groninger, John W; Zaczek, James J; Pattumma, Klairoong

    2015-09-01

    Sedimentation dynamics were assessed in sinkholes within training areas at Ft. Knox Military Installation, a karst landscape subjected to decades of tracked vehicle use and extreme soil disturbance. Sinkholes sampled were sediment-laden and behaved as intermittent ponds. Dendrogeomorphic analyses were conducted using willow trees (Salix spp.) located around the edge of 18 sinkholes to estimate historical sedimentation rates, and buried bottles were installed in 20 sinkholes at the center, outer edge, and at the midpoint between the center and edge to estimate annual sedimentation rates. Sedimentation data were coupled with vegetation characteristics of sinkhole buffers to determine relationships among these variables. The dendrogeomorphic method estimated an average accumulation rate of 1.27 cm year(-1) translating to a sediment loss rate of 46.1 metric ton year(-1) from the training areas. However, sediment export to sinkholes was estimated to be much greater (118.6 metric ton year(-1)) via the bottle method. These data suggest that the latter method provided a more accurate estimate since accumulation was greater in the center of sinkholes compared to the periphery where dendrogeomorphic data were collected. Vegetation data were not tightly correlated with sedimentation rates, suggesting that further research is needed to identify a viable proxy for direct measures of sediment accumulation in this extreme deposition environment. Mitigation activities for the sinkholes at Ft. Knox's tank training area, and other heavily disturbed karst environments where extreme sedimentation exists, should consider focusing on flow path and splay area management.

  1. Sediment Dynamics Within Buffer Zone and Sinkhole Splay Areas Under Extreme Soil Disturbance Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonover, Jon E.; Crim, Jackie F.; Williard, Karl W. J.; Groninger, John W.; Zaczek, James J.; Pattumma, Klairoong

    2015-09-01

    Sedimentation dynamics were assessed in sinkholes within training areas at Ft. Knox Military Installation, a karst landscape subjected to decades of tracked vehicle use and extreme soil disturbance. Sinkholes sampled were sediment-laden and behaved as intermittent ponds. Dendrogeomorphic analyses were conducted using willow trees ( Salix spp.) located around the edge of 18 sinkholes to estimate historical sedimentation rates, and buried bottles were installed in 20 sinkholes at the center, outer edge, and at the midpoint between the center and edge to estimate annual sedimentation rates. Sedimentation data were coupled with vegetation characteristics of sinkhole buffers to determine relationships among these variables. The dendrogeomorphic method estimated an average accumulation rate of 1.27 cm year-1 translating to a sediment loss rate of 46.1 metric ton year-1 from the training areas. However, sediment export to sinkholes was estimated to be much greater (118.6 metric ton year-1) via the bottle method. These data suggest that the latter method provided a more accurate estimate since accumulation was greater in the center of sinkholes compared to the periphery where dendrogeomorphic data were collected. Vegetation data were not tightly correlated with sedimentation rates, suggesting that further research is needed to identify a viable proxy for direct measures of sediment accumulation in this extreme deposition environment. Mitigation activities for the sinkholes at Ft. Knox's tank training area, and other heavily disturbed karst environments where extreme sedimentation exists, should consider focusing on flow path and splay area management.

  2. Detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation microlensing events via next-generation ground-based surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2014-04-20

    Even though the recently discovered high-magnification event MOA-2010-BLG-311 had complete coverage over its peak, confident planet detection did not happen due to extremely weak central perturbations (EWCPs, fractional deviations of ≲ 2%). For confident detection of planets in EWCP events, it is necessary to have both high cadence monitoring and high photometric accuracy better than those of current follow-up observation systems. The next-generation ground-based observation project, Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), satisfies these conditions. We estimate the probability of occurrence of EWCP events with fractional deviations of ≤2% in high-magnification events and the efficiency of detecting planets in the EWCP events using the KMTNet. From this study, we find that the EWCP events occur with a frequency of >50% in the case of ≲ 100 M {sub E} planets with separations of 0.2 AU ≲ d ≲ 20 AU. We find that for main-sequence and sub-giant source stars, ≳ 1 M {sub E} planets in EWCP events with deviations ≤2% can be detected with frequency >50% in a certain range that changes with the planet mass. However, it is difficult to detect planets in EWCP events of bright stars like giant stars because it is easy for KMTNet to be saturated around the peak of the events because of its constant exposure time. EWCP events are caused by close, intermediate, and wide planetary systems with low-mass planets and close and wide planetary systems with massive planets. Therefore, we expect that a much greater variety of planetary systems than those already detected, which are mostly intermediate planetary systems, regardless of the planet mass, will be significantly detected in the near future.

  3. The Design and Algorithms of a Verification Condition Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, Sarah

    Current strategies for low temperature bonding (<300 C) and 3D integration employ polymer interfaces (1--3 um) with low thermal conductivity which can result in poor heat transfer between bonded elements. The introduction of thinner interfaces to improve heat transfer is desirable; however, deposition of thin polymer films (<100 nm) for bonding applications can lead to reduced film uniformity and negatively affect bonding strength. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) chemistries provide a potential solution and can yield nanometer control of the interfacial layer thickness without a significant effect on surface roughness. Siloxanes are one available option to realize these nanometer thin reactive layers. Due to their propensity to crosslink and form multilayers, careful control of the reaction conditions is required. Considering this, we have evaluated the molecular vapor deposition of siloxane precursors to generate molecular layers with reactive end-groups for potential use in bonding applications. Film stability, morphology, thickness, and composition were monitored after deposition using atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Modeling Extreme Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration with Self-Consistent Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, A. D.; le Roux, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with coronal mass ejection driven shocks have detected particle energies up to a few GeV at 1 AU within the first ~10 minutes to 1 hour of shock acceleration. Whether or not acceleration by a single shock is sufficient in these events or if some combination of multiple shocks or solar flares is required is currently not well understood. Furthermore, the observed onset times of the extreme SEP events place the shock in the corona when the particles escape upstream. We have updated our focused transport theory model that has successfully been applied to the termination shock and traveling interplanetary shocks in the past to investigate extreme SEP acceleration in the solar corona. This model solves the time-dependent Focused Transport Equation including particle preheating due to the cross shock electric field and the divergence, adiabatic compression, and acceleration of the solar wind flow. Diffusive shock acceleration of SEPs is included via the first-order Fermi mechanism for parallel shocks. To investigate the effects of the solar corona on the acceleration of SEPs, we have included an empirical model for the plasma number density, temperature, and velocity. The shock acceleration process becomes highly time-dependent due to the rapid variation of these coronal properties with heliocentric distance. Additionally, particle interaction with MHD wave turbulence is modeled in terms of gyroresonant interactions with parallel propagating Alfven waves. However, previous modeling efforts suggest that the background amplitude of the solar wind turbulence is not sufficient to accelerate SEPs to extreme energies over the short time scales observed. To account for this, we have included the transport and self-consistent amplification of MHD waves by the SEPs through wave-particle gyroresonance. We will present the results of this extended model for a single fast quasi-parallel CME driven shock in the

  5. Differing Response of Extreme Precipitation to Changing Boundary Conditions in Simulations with Parametrized and Explicit Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Edmund; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir; Park, Wonsun

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the representation of extreme precipitation in climate models is much more sensitive to model resolution than that of mean precipitation. With global and regional circulation models simulating both present and future climates at ever-increasing resolution, it is only a matter of time before convection resolving climate projections become the norm. In the meantime, regional climate models provide an efficient and inexpensive tool to assess what, if any, impact explicitly resolved convection may have on the representation of precipitation extremes in warmer climates with enhanced boundary forcings. To compare the response of precipitation extremes in models with parametrized and explicitly resolved convection to changing boundary forcings, we select the July 2012 precipitation extreme near the Black Sea town of Krymsk as a recent showcase example. The event was related to a slow moving low pressure system crossing the eastern Black Sea, advecting warm and moist air towards the coast. Two waves of convection resulted in precipitation totals that dwarfed all previous events in the instrumental record, dating back to the 1930s, and over 170 deaths. We carry out ensemble sensitivity experiments with a triply nested configuration of the WRF regional model, for a domain covering the eastern Black Sea. The event is simulated at 15 km, 3 km and 600 m resolution. The model's ability to reproduce the event with observed forcings is first verified, before a series of additional ensembles with altered boundary forcings, in our case sea surface temperature (SST), is created. These ensembles consist of subtracting (adding) the 1982 - 2012 trend in Black Sea SST from (to) the observed 2012 SST field in 20% increments, giving a total of 11 ensembles whose SST differ from the observed field by between -100% and +100% of the warming trend. Aggregating all data to the 15 km grid, we compare the responses of hourly precipitation maxima to incrementally

  6. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A fast approximate model for oxide and silicate melts at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A. S.; Asimow, P. D.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent first-principles calculations (e.g. Stixrude, 2009; de Koker, 2013), shock-wave experiments (Mosenfelder, 2009), and diamond-anvil cell investigations (Sanloup, 2013) indicate that silicate melts undergo complex structural evolution at high pressure. The observed increase in cation-coordination (e.g. Karki, 2006; 2007) induces higher compressibilities and lower adiabatic thermal gradients in melts as compared with their solid counterparts. These properties are crucial for understanding the evolution of impact-generated magma oceans, which are dominated by the poorly understood behavior of silicates at mantle pressures and temperatures (e.g. Stixrude et al. 2009). Probing these conditions is difficult for both theory and experiment, especially given the large compositional space (MgO-SiO2-FeO-Al2O3-etc). We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme P-T conditions (Wolf et al., 2015). The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) extends the Hard Sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states for each cation in the liquid. Using approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this fast statistical method compliments classical and first-principles methods, providing accurate thermodynamic and structural property predictions for melts. This framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide P-T range. Typical Mg-coordination numbers are predicted to evolve continuously from 5.25 (0 GPa) to 8.5 (250 GPa), comparing favorably with first-principles Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We begin extending the model to a simplified mantle chemistry using empirical potentials (generally accurate over moderate pressure ranges, <~30 GPa), yielding predictions rooted in statistical representations of melt structure

  7. Model selection and validation of extreme distribution by goodness-of-fit test based on conditional position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Nahdiya Zainal; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2014-09-01

    In Extreme Value Theory, the important aspect of model extrapolation is to model the extreme behavior. This is because the choice of the extreme value distribution model affects the prediction that is about to be made. Thus, model validation which is called Goodness-of-fit (GoF) test is necessary. In this study, the GoF tests were used to fit the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) Type-II model against the simulated observed values. The μ, σ and ξ were estimated by Maximum Likelihood. The critical values based on conditional points were developed by Monte-Carlo simulation. The powers of the tests were identified by power study. The data that is distributed according to GEV Type-II distribution was used to test whether the critical values developed are able to confirm the fit between GEV Type-II model and the data. To confirm the fit, the statistics value of the GOF test should be smaller than the critical value.

  8. A Multivariate Statistical Approach based on a Dynamic Moving Storms (DMS) Generator for Estimating the Frequency of Extreme Storm Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N. Z.; Gao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Challenges of fully considering the complexity among spatially and temporally varied rainfall always exist in flood frequency analysis. Conventional approaches that simplify the complexity of spatiotemporal interactions generally undermine their impacts on flood risks. A previously developed stochastic storm generator called Dynamic Moving Storms (DMS) aims to address the highly-dependent nature of precipitation field: spatial variability, temporal variability, and movement of the storm. The authors utilize a multivariate statistical approach based on DMS to estimate the occurrence probability or frequency of extreme storm events. Fifteen years of radar rainfall data is used to generate a large number of synthetic storms as basis for statistical assessment. Two parametric retrieval algorithms are developed to recognize rain cells and track storm motions respectively. The resulted parameters are then used to establish probability density functions (PDFs), which are fitted to parametric distribution functions for further Monte Carlo simulations. Consequently, over 1,000,000 synthetic storms are generated based on twelve retrieved parameters for integrated risk assessment and ensemble forecasts. Furthermore, PDFs for parameters are used to calculate joint probabilities based on 2-dimensional Archimedean-Copula functions to determine the occurrence probabilities of extreme events. The approach is validated on the Upper Trinity River watershed and the generated results are compared with those from traditional rainfall frequency studies (i.e. Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves, and Areal Reduction Factors).

  9. Evaluation Of Different Power Conditioning Options For Stirling Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigos, A.; Blanes, J. M.; Carrasco, J. A.; Maset, E.; Montalban, G.; Ejea, J.; Ferreres, A.; Sanchis, E.

    2011-10-01

    Free-piston Stirling engines are an interesting alternative for electrical power systems, especially in deep space missions where photovoltaic systems are not feasible. This kind of power generators contains two main parts, the Stirling machine and the linear alternator that converts the mechanical energy from the piston movement to electrical energy. Since the generated power is in AC form, several aspects should be assessed to use such kind of generators in a spacecraft power system: AC/DC topologies, power factor correction, power regulation techniques, integration into the power system, etc. This paper details power generator operation and explores different power conversion approaches.

  10. Static and dynamic mooring analysis - Stability of floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) risers for extreme environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Yu-Ho; Kim, Kookhyun; Jo, Chul-Hee; Kim, Do-Youb

    2013-06-01

    Floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) facilities are used at most of the offshore oil fields worldwide. FPSO usage is expected to grow as oil fields move to deeper water, thus requiring the reliability and stability of mooring wires and risers in extreme environmental conditions. Except for the case of predictable attack angles of external loadings, FPSO facilities with turret single point mooring (SPM) systems are in general use. There are two types of turret systems: permanent systems and disconnectable turret mooring systems. Extreme environment criteria for permanent moorings are usually based on a 100-year return period event. It is common to use two or three environments including the 100-year wave with associated wind and current, and the 100-year wind with associated waves and current. When fitted with a disconnectable turret mooring system, FPSOs can be used in areas where it is desirable to remove the production unit from the field temporarily to prevent exposure to extreme events such as cyclones or large icebergs. Static and dynamic mooring analyses were performed to evaluate the stability of a spider buoy after disconnection from a turret during cyclone environmental conditions

  11. Carbon under extreme conditions: phase boundaries and electronic properties from first-principles theory.

    PubMed

    Correa, Alfredo A; Bonev, Stanimir A; Galli, Giulia

    2006-01-31

    At high pressure and temperature, the phase diagram of elemental carbon is poorly known. We present predictions of diamond and BC8 melting lines and their phase boundary in the solid phase, as obtained from first-principles calculations. Maxima are found in both melting lines, with a triple point located at approximately 850 GPa and approximately 7,400 K. Our results show that hot, compressed diamond is a semiconductor that undergoes metalization upon melting. In contrast, in the stability range of BC8, an insulator to metal transition is likely to occur in the solid phase. Close to the diamond/liquid and BC8/liquid boundaries, molten carbon is a low-coordinated metal retaining some covalent character in its bonding up to extreme pressures. Our results provide constraints on the carbon equation of state, which is of critical importance for devising models of Neptune, Uranus, and white dwarf stars, as well as of extrasolar carbon-rich planets.

  12. Water Under the Extreme Conditions of Planetary Interiors: Symmetric Hydrogen Bonding in the Superionic Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2005-07-08

    The predicted superionic phase of water is investigated via ab initio molecular dynamics at densities of 2.0-3.0 g/cc (34-115 GPa) along the 2000 K isotherm. They find that extremely rapid (superionic) diffusion of protons occurs in a fluid phase at pressures between 34 and 58 GPa. A transition to a stable body-centered cubic (bcc) O lattice with superionic proton conductivity is observed between 70 and 75 GPa, a much higher pressure than suggested in prior work. They find that all molecular species at pressures greater than 75 GPa are too short lived to be classified as bound states. Above 95 GPa, a transient network phase is found characterized by symmetric O-H hydrogen bonding with nearly 50% covalent character.

  13. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  14. 40 CFR 273.8 - Applicability-household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. 273.8 Section 273.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....8 Applicability—household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. (a) Persons... universal wastes defined at § 273.9; and/or (2) Conditionally exempt small quantity generator wastes...

  15. 40 CFR 273.8 - Applicability-household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. 273.8 Section 273.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....8 Applicability—household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. (a) Persons... universal wastes defined at § 273.9; and/or (2) Conditionally exempt small quantity generator wastes...

  16. 40 CFR 273.8 - Applicability-household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. 273.8 Section 273.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....8 Applicability—household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. (a) Persons... universal wastes defined at § 273.9; and/or (2) Conditionally exempt small quantity generator wastes...

  17. 40 CFR 273.8 - Applicability-household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. 273.8 Section 273.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....8 Applicability—household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. (a) Persons... universal wastes defined at § 273.9; and/or (2) Conditionally exempt small quantity generator wastes...

  18. 40 CFR 273.8 - Applicability-household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. 273.8 Section 273.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....8 Applicability—household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. (a) Persons... universal wastes defined at § 273.9; and/or (2) Conditionally exempt small quantity generator wastes...

  19. Colliding laser-produced plasmas as targets for laser-generated extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, T.; O'Gorman, C.; Dunne, P.; Sokell, E.; O'Sullivan, G.; Hayden, P.

    2014-07-28

    Colliding plasmas produced by neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser illumination of tin wedge targets form stagnation layers, the physical parameters of which can be controlled to optimise coupling with a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) heating laser pulse and subsequent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) production. The conversion efficiency (CE) of total laser energy into EUV emission at 13.5 nm ± 1% was 3.6%. Neglecting both the energy required to form the stagnation layer and the EUV light produced before the CO{sub 2} laser pulse is incident results in a CE of 5.1% of the CO{sub 2} laser energy into EUV light.

  20. Electro-optical system for scanning microscopy of extreme ultraviolet masks with a high harmonic generation source.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Anderson, Christopher N; Anderson, Erik H; Andreson, Nord; Chao, Weilun; Choi, Changhoon; Goldberg, Kenneth A; Gullikson, Eric M; Kim, Seong-Sue; Lee, Donggun; Miyakawa, Ryan; Park, Jongju; Rekawa, Seno; Salmassi, Farhad

    2014-08-25

    A self-contained electro-optical module for scanning extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflection microscopy at 13.5 nm wavelength has been developed. The system has been designed to work with stand-alone commercially available EUV high harmonic generation (HHG) sources through the implementation of narrowband harmonic selecting multilayers and off-axis elliptical short focal length zoneplates. The module has been successfully integrated into an EUV mask scanning microscope achieving diffraction limited imaging performance (84 nm point spread function). PMID:25321224

  1. [ASSESSMENT OF EXTREME FACTORS OF SHIFT WORK IN ARCTIC CONDITIONS BY WORKERS WITH DIFFERENT REGULATORY PROCESSES].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Ya A; Simonova, N N

    2016-01-01

    A man working on a shift basis in the Arctic, every day is under the influence of various extreme factors which are inevitable for oil and gas indudtry. To adapt to shift work employees use various resources of the individual. The purpose of research is the determination of personal resources of shift workers to overcome the adverse factors of the environment in the Arctic. The study involved 191 builder of main gas pipelines, working in shifts in the Tyumen region (the length of the shift 52 days of arrival) at the age of 23 to 59 (mean age 34.9 ± 8.1) years. Methods: psychological testing, questioning, observation, descriptive statistics, discriminant step by step analysis. There was revealed the correlation between the subjective assessment of the majority of adverse climatic factors in the regulatory process "assessment of results"; production factors--regulatory processes such as flexibility, autonomy, simulation, and the general level of self-regulation; social factors are more associated with the severity of such regulatory processes, flexibility and evaluation of results. PMID:27430072

  2. Short-Lived HF Molecules in Superionic Hydrogen Fluoride at Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Kazuo; Ohde, Yoshiyuki; Oshimi, Tadaaki

    2015-02-01

    The first principles molecular dynamics study enables us to elucidate the existence of short-lived HF molecules in the superionic hydrogen fluoride at an extreme high pressure and a temperature. Three fourth of the immobile fluorines constructs the molecules with lifetime of 8 fs. The ionized fluorines form weak HF bond with the proton in the nearest HF molecule of which the lifetime is 3 fs. The covalent and the Coulomb bonds between the fluorines and the protons form indirect covalent and indirect Coulomb attractions between the di-interstitial protons on the mid-fluorines. The attractions reduce the Haven's ratio of the protons. The absence of the proton dimers indicates a failure of the caterpillar diffusion model or the Frenkel-Kontorova chain model for the superionic diffusion of the protons. The incompletely ionized cations and anions reduce their Coulomb attractions which induce the sublattice melting of smaller size and smaller mass of the protons than the fluorines. The electronic states of the fluoride are intermediate between the ionic crystals and the covalent bonded molecular crystals. The superionic conductors are classified into three groups: they are molecular type, covalent metalloid type, and metallic type conductors.

  3. Halophilic archaea on Earth and in space: growth and survival under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-13

    Salts are abundant on Mars, and any liquid water that is present or may have been present on the planet is expected to be hypersaline. Halophilic archaea (family Halobacteriaceae) are the microorganisms best adapted to life at extremes of salinity on Earth. This paper reviews the properties of the Halobacteriaceae that may make the group good candidates for life also on Mars. Many species resist high UV and gamma radiation levels; one species has survived exposure to vacuum and radiation during a space flight; and there is at least one psychrotolerant species. Halophilic archaea may survive for millions of years within brine inclusions in salt crystals. Many species have different modes of anaerobic metabolism, and some can use light as an energy source using the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. They are also highly tolerant to perchlorate, recently shown to be present in Martian soils, and some species can even use perchlorate as an electron acceptor to support anaerobic growth. The presence of characteristic carotenoid pigments (α-bacterioruberin and derivatives) makes the Halobacteriaceae easy to identify by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, if present on Mars, such organisms may be detected by Raman instrumentation planned to explore Mars during the upcoming ExoMars mission.

  4. [Deep-sea research ground for the study of living matter properties in extreme conditions].

    PubMed

    Polikarpov, G G

    2011-01-01

    The Black Sea hollow bottom is a promising research ground in the field of deep-sea radiochemoecology and exobiology. It has turned out to be at the intersection of the earth and cosmic scientific interests such as deep-sea marine radiochemoecology from the perspective of the study of extreme biogeocenological properties of the Earth biosphere and exobiology from the standpoint of the study of life phenomena (living matter) outside the Earth biosphere, i.e. on other planets and during hypothetical transfer of spores in the outer space. The potential of this ground is substantiated with the data published by the author and co-workers on accumulation of 90Sr, 137Cs and Pu isotopes with silts of bathyal pelo-contour, on the quality of deep-sea hydrogen sulphide waters (after their contact with air) for vital functions of planktonic and benthic aerobes, as well as the species composition of marine, freshwater and terrestrial plants grown from the spores collected from the bottom sediments of the Black Sea bathyal. Discussion was based on V.I. Vernadsky's ideas about the living matter and biosphere, which allowed conclusions about the biospheric and outer space role of the described phenomena. PMID:22279770

  5. Carbon under extreme conditions: phase boundaries and electronic properties from first-principles theory.

    PubMed

    Correa, Alfredo A; Bonev, Stanimir A; Galli, Giulia

    2006-01-31

    At high pressure and temperature, the phase diagram of elemental carbon is poorly known. We present predictions of diamond and BC8 melting lines and their phase boundary in the solid phase, as obtained from first-principles calculations. Maxima are found in both melting lines, with a triple point located at approximately 850 GPa and approximately 7,400 K. Our results show that hot, compressed diamond is a semiconductor that undergoes metalization upon melting. In contrast, in the stability range of BC8, an insulator to metal transition is likely to occur in the solid phase. Close to the diamond/liquid and BC8/liquid boundaries, molten carbon is a low-coordinated metal retaining some covalent character in its bonding up to extreme pressures. Our results provide constraints on the carbon equation of state, which is of critical importance for devising models of Neptune, Uranus, and white dwarf stars, as well as of extrasolar carbon-rich planets. PMID:16432191

  6. [Deep-sea research ground for the study of living matter properties in extreme conditions].

    PubMed

    Polikarpov, G G

    2011-01-01

    The Black Sea hollow bottom is a promising research ground in the field of deep-sea radiochemoecology and exobiology. It has turned out to be at the intersection of the earth and cosmic scientific interests such as deep-sea marine radiochemoecology from the perspective of the study of extreme biogeocenological properties of the Earth biosphere and exobiology from the standpoint of the study of life phenomena (living matter) outside the Earth biosphere, i.e. on other planets and during hypothetical transfer of spores in the outer space. The potential of this ground is substantiated with the data published by the author and co-workers on accumulation of 90Sr, 137Cs and Pu isotopes with silts of bathyal pelo-contour, on the quality of deep-sea hydrogen sulphide waters (after their contact with air) for vital functions of planktonic and benthic aerobes, as well as the species composition of marine, freshwater and terrestrial plants grown from the spores collected from the bottom sediments of the Black Sea bathyal. Discussion was based on V.I. Vernadsky's ideas about the living matter and biosphere, which allowed conclusions about the biospheric and outer space role of the described phenomena.

  7. Halophilic archaea on Earth and in space: growth and survival under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-13

    Salts are abundant on Mars, and any liquid water that is present or may have been present on the planet is expected to be hypersaline. Halophilic archaea (family Halobacteriaceae) are the microorganisms best adapted to life at extremes of salinity on Earth. This paper reviews the properties of the Halobacteriaceae that may make the group good candidates for life also on Mars. Many species resist high UV and gamma radiation levels; one species has survived exposure to vacuum and radiation during a space flight; and there is at least one psychrotolerant species. Halophilic archaea may survive for millions of years within brine inclusions in salt crystals. Many species have different modes of anaerobic metabolism, and some can use light as an energy source using the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. They are also highly tolerant to perchlorate, recently shown to be present in Martian soils, and some species can even use perchlorate as an electron acceptor to support anaerobic growth. The presence of characteristic carotenoid pigments (α-bacterioruberin and derivatives) makes the Halobacteriaceae easy to identify by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, if present on Mars, such organisms may be detected by Raman instrumentation planned to explore Mars during the upcoming ExoMars mission. PMID:25368347

  8. Spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet light pulses from high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Plötzing, M; Adam, R; Weier, C; Plucinski, L; Eich, S; Emmerich, S; Rollinger, M; Aeschlimann, M; Mathias, S; Schneider, C M

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental mechanism responsible for optically induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films has been under intense debate since almost two decades. Currently, numerous competing theoretical models are in strong need for a decisive experimental confirmation such as monitoring the triggered changes in the spin-dependent band structure on ultrashort time scales. Our approach explores the possibility of observing femtosecond band structure dynamics by giving access to extended parts of the Brillouin zone in a simultaneously time-, energy- and spin-resolved photoemission experiment. For this purpose, our setup uses a state-of-the-art, highly efficient spin detector and ultrashort, extreme ultraviolet light pulses created by laser-based high-order harmonic generation. In this paper, we present the setup and first spin-resolved spectra obtained with our experiment within an acquisition time short enough to allow pump-probe studies. Further, we characterize the influence of the excitation with femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses by comparing the results with data acquired using a continuous wave light source with similar photon energy. In addition, changes in the spectra induced by vacuum space-charge effects due to both the extreme ultraviolet probe- and near-infrared pump-pulses are studied by analyzing the resulting spectral distortions. The combination of energy resolution and electron count rate achieved in our setup confirms its suitability for spin-resolved studies of the band structure on ultrashort time scales.

  9. Unusual salinity conditions in the Yangtze estuary in 2006: impacts of an extreme drought or of the Three Gorges Dam?

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhijun; Chu, Ao; Stive, Marcel; Zhang, Xiaoling; Yan, Hong

    2011-07-01

    During the extreme dry year of 2006, abnormal salinity conditions in the Changjiang Estuary of the Yangtze River occurred in partial coincidence with the second impoundment phase of the TGD (Three Gorges Dam). Analysis of discharge observations in the upper reaches of the estuary and of salinity observations in the estuary as a whole reveals that in 2006 salinity was over 100 mg/l during 275 days, over 250 mg/l during 75 days and over 400 mg/l during 48 days. It is well known that this is due to extreme low discharges from the upper catchment area into the estuary. Moreover, large amounts of water consumed along the lower reaches of the Yangtze River can also aggravate the low discharges that lead to stronger saltwater intrusion in the estuary. Of the 75 days that salinity was over 250 mg/l, the low discharge was decreased further by 10 to 20% due to water consumption. The additional impact of the impoundment phase of the TGD (lasting 37 days in autumn) was noticeable only during 7 days in 2006. During that period, the relative contributions of the TGD and the water consumption in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River amounted to 70 and 30%, respectively. It may be concluded that the impact of the second impoundment phase of the TGD on salinity intrusion in the estuary was modest, while the extreme drought of 2006 was the dominant cause.

  10. Unusual salinity conditions in the Yangtze estuary in 2006: impacts of an extreme drought or of the Three Gorges Dam?

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhijun; Chu, Ao; Stive, Marcel; Zhang, Xiaoling; Yan, Hong

    2011-07-01

    During the extreme dry year of 2006, abnormal salinity conditions in the Changjiang Estuary of the Yangtze River occurred in partial coincidence with the second impoundment phase of the TGD (Three Gorges Dam). Analysis of discharge observations in the upper reaches of the estuary and of salinity observations in the estuary as a whole reveals that in 2006 salinity was over 100 mg/l during 275 days, over 250 mg/l during 75 days and over 400 mg/l during 48 days. It is well known that this is due to extreme low discharges from the upper catchment area into the estuary. Moreover, large amounts of water consumed along the lower reaches of the Yangtze River can also aggravate the low discharges that lead to stronger saltwater intrusion in the estuary. Of the 75 days that salinity was over 250 mg/l, the low discharge was decreased further by 10 to 20% due to water consumption. The additional impact of the impoundment phase of the TGD (lasting 37 days in autumn) was noticeable only during 7 days in 2006. During that period, the relative contributions of the TGD and the water consumption in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River amounted to 70 and 30%, respectively. It may be concluded that the impact of the second impoundment phase of the TGD on salinity intrusion in the estuary was modest, while the extreme drought of 2006 was the dominant cause. PMID:21848138

  11. Role of the tissue free amino acids in adaptation of medicinal leeches Hirudo medicinalis L., 1758 to extreme climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chernaya, L V; Kovalchuk, L A; Nokhrina, E S

    2016-01-01

    The first comparison of the spectra of free amino acids in tissues of the medicinal leeches H. medicinalis from different climatic and geographical Eurasian areas has been performed. Adaptation of H. medicinalis to extreme climatic conditions occurs via intensification of the amino acid metabolism resulting from a significant increase in the content of essential amino acids. Accumulation of arginine, histidine, and lysine (3.6-, 3.9-, and 2.0-fold increases, respectively) has proved to play a special protective role in adaptation of H. medicinalis to the low positive temperatures.

  12. Transformation and accumulation of PAH and bound residues in soil under extreme conditions - a risk assessment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, Annette

    2010-05-01

    The degradation of PAH in contaminated soil does not proceed completely in the majority of cases. However microorganisms which are able to degrade PAH are present in PAH-contaminated soils normally. A total degradation of PAH in contaminated soils is often limited by a lack of bioavailability, which results from a lack of mass transfer. The analytical depletion of contaminants in soil is not only based on degradation processes but also on a fixation or immobilization of the xenobiotic substances as stronger adsorbed to or bound residues in the soil matrix. These bound residues were verified by using 14C-labelled PAH in different soil samples. To evaluate the long term fate of theses PAH-residues the stability and transformation of 14C-labelled non-extractable PAH-residues was investigated in detail under different extreme ecological and climate conditions such as biological stress, freezing and thawing cycles, and chemical worst case conditions. The transformation and remobilization of non-extractable PAH-residues was observed in long-time experiments and was very limited in general (Eschenbach et al. 2001). Only small amounts of non extractable residues were transformed and converted to CO2 and thereby detoxified. However the treatment with a complexing agent led to an increase of extractable 14C-activity. In a further set of experiments the long term risk of a groundwater contamination was assessed. Therefore the elution rate of 14C-PAH was investigated by a routinely usable column test system. It was found that the PAH elution was not solely controlled by desorption processes. The extractable PAH concentrations and elution rates were affected by the mineralization and formation of bound residues as well. For the assessment of the maximum PAH release rate the soil material was treated by extreme and worst case conditions as well. The impact of the elution of bidestillated water, of repeated freeze-thaw cycles and a simulation of acidic rain was investigated. The

  13. High-pressure matrix isolation of heterogeneous condensed phase chemical reactions under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Jane K.; Russell, T. P.

    1995-03-01

    A new technique which combines high-pressure and thermal-shock conditions with low-temperature matrix isolation in a gem anvil cell is presented. This serves to partially quench or arrest the reaction sequence of an energetic material. New chemical species are observed which indicate that intermediates are trapped in addition to final products. This combination of high pressure and low temperature helps elucidate the complicated reaction pathways in the deflagration to detonation regime. We have applied this technique to hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW, chemical name: 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo[5.5.0.0 5,9.0 3,11]dodecane). Products are identified using infrared spectroscopy and comparisons are made to previously reported data taken under thermal, ambient pressure conditions.

  14. Extreme electromagnetic boundary conditions and their manifestation at the inner surfaces of spherical and cylindrical cloaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    2010-08-01

    Generalized electromagnetic boundary conditions are derived for interfaces containing surface layers of electric and magnetic polarization. Next, the singularities in the fields and polarization densities at the inner surfaces of spherical and circular cylindrical cloaks illuminated by sources inside the cavities of the cloaks are determined from a plane-wave analysis of fields incident on a half space of material characterized by a relative permittivity-permeability dyadic equal to that of the inner material surfaces of the cloaks. Lastly, these singular fields and polarization densities are shown to satisfy the generalized boundary conditions. For sources inside the cloak cavities, it is found that the inner surfaces of spherical cloaks, unlike the inner surfaces of cylindrical cloaks, behave as "DB boundaries" at which nˆṡD and nˆṡB are zero.

  15. Electricity generation by microorganisms in the sediment-water interface of an extreme acidic microcosm.

    PubMed

    García-Muñoz, Juan; Amils, Ricardo; Fernández, Víctor M; De Lacey, Antonio L; Malki, Moustafa

    2011-06-01

    The attachment of microorganisms to electrodes is of great interest for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) or other applications in bioelectrochemical systems (BES). In this work, a microcosm of the acidic ecosystem of Río Tinto was built and graphite electrodes were introduced at different points. This allowed the study of electricity generation in the sediment/water interface and the involvement of acidophilic microorganisms as biocatalysts of the anodic and cathodic reactions in a fuel-cell configuration. Current densities and power outputs of up to 3.5 A/m² and 0.3 W/m², respectively, were measured at pH 3. Microbial analyses of the electrode surfaces showed that Acidiphilium spp., which uses organic compounds as electron donors, were the predominant biocatalysts of the anodic reactions, whereas the aerobic iron oxidizers Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum spp. were detected mainly on the cathode surface.

  16. EFFECTS OF EXTREME AND UNUSUAL CONDITIONS ON LANA ALLOYS: INTERIM REPORT, FY14 (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Kirk L.

    2014-04-25

    The TTP proposed research aimed at determining: a) the rate at which these changes occurred and the effect of initial conditions, especially in the early phases of Hydrogen Heat Treatment (HHT), b) whether or not different LANA alloys would show similar effects, and c) whether common contaminants/poisons impacted LANA alloy hydride chemistry similarly to what had been found for Pd and Pd-alloy hydride chemistry.

  17. Extremely Efficient Multiple Electron-hole Pair Generation in Carbon Nanotube Photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Nathaniel

    2010-03-01

    The efficient generation of multiple electron-hole (e-h) pairs from a single photon could improve the efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells beyond standard thermodynamic limits [1] and has been the focus of much recent work in semiconductor nanomaterials [2,3]. In single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the small Fermi velocity and low dielectric constant suggests that electron-electron interactions are very strong and that high-energy carriers should efficiently generate e-h pairs. Here, I will discuss observations of highly efficient generation of e-h pairs due to impact excitation in SWNT p-n junction photodiodes [4]. To investigate optoelectronic transport properties of individual SWNT photodiodes, we focus a laser beam over the device while monitoring the electronic characteristics. Optical excitation into the second electronic subband E22 ˜ 2 EGAP leads to striking photocurrent steps in the device I-VSD characteristics that occur at voltage intervals of the band gap energy EGAP/ e. Spatially and spectrally resolved photocurrent combined with temperature-dependent studies suggest that these steps result from efficient generation of multiple e-h pairs from a single hot E22 carrier. We conclude that in the SWNT photodiode, a single photon with energy greater than 2EGAP is converted into multiple e-h pairs, leading to enhanced photocurrent and increased photo-conversion efficiency. [1] W. Shockley, and H. J. Queisser, Journal of Applied Physics 32, 510 (1961). [2] R. D. Schaller, and V. I. Klimov, Physical Review Letters 92 (18), 186601 (2004). [3] R. J. Ellingson, et al, Nano Letters, 5 (5), 865-871 (2005). [4] Nathaniel M. Gabor, Zhaohui Zhong, Ken Bosnick, Jiwoong Park, and Paul McEuen, Science, 325, 1367 (2009).

  18. Hyper-dry conditions provide new insights into the cause of extreme floods after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, John A.; Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    A catastrophic wildfire in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado provided a unique opportunity to investigate soil conditions immediately after a wildfire and before alteration by rainfall. Measurements of near-surface (θ; and matric suction, ψ), rainfall, and wind velocity were started 8 days after the wildfire began. These measurements established that hyper-dryconditions (θ 3 cm-3; ψ > ~ 3 x 105 cm) existed and provided an in-situ retention curve for these conditions. These conditions exacerbate the effects of water repellency (natural and fire-induced) and limit the effectiveness of capillarity and gravity driven infiltration into fire-affected soils. The important consequence is that given hyper-dryconditions, the critical rewetting process before the first rain is restricted to the diffusion–adsorption of water-vapor. This process typically has a time scale of days to weeks (especially when the hydrologic effects of the ash layer are included) that is longer than the typical time scale (minutes to hours) of some rainstorms, such that under hyper-dryconditions essentially no rain infiltrates. The existence of hyper-dryconditions provides insight into why, frequently during the first rain storm after a wildfire, nearly all rainfall becomes runoff causing extremefloods and debris flows.

  19. Dielectric properties of water under extreme conditions and transport of carbonates in the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ding; Spanu, Leonardo; Harrison, Brandon; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Galli, Giulia

    2013-04-23

    Water is a major component of fluids in the Earth's mantle, where its properties are substantially different from those at ambient conditions. At the pressures and temperatures of the mantle, experiments on aqueous fluids are challenging, and several fundamental properties of water are poorly known; e.g., its dielectric constant has not been measured. This lack of knowledge of water dielectric properties greatly limits our ability to model water-rock interactions and, in general, our understanding of aqueous fluids below the Earth's crust. Using ab initio molecular dynamics, we computed the dielectric constant of water under the conditions of the Earth's upper mantle, and we predicted the solubility products of carbonate minerals. We found that MgCO3 (magnesite)--insoluble in water under ambient conditions--becomes at least slightly soluble at the bottom of the upper mantle, suggesting that water may transport significant quantities of oxidized carbon. Our results suggest that aqueous carbonates could leave the subducting lithosphere during dehydration reactions and could be injected into the overlying lithosphere. The Earth's deep carbon could possibly be recycled through aqueous transport on a large scale through subduction zones.

  20. Boundary conditions for direct computation of aerodynamic sound generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colonius, Tim; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    A numerical scheme suitable for the computation of both the near field acoustic sources and the far field sound produced by turbulent free shear flows utilizing the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. To produce stable numerical schemes in the presence of shear, damping terms must be added to the boundary conditions. The numerical technique and boundary conditions are found to give stable results for computations of spatially evolving mixing layers.

  1. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  2. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  3. Explosive Chemistry: Simulating the Chemistry of Energetic Materials at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, E J; Manaa, M R; Fried, L E

    2003-11-18

    In the brief instant of a high-explosive detonation, the shock wave produces a pressure 500,000 times that of the Earth's atmosphere, the detonation wave travels as fast as 10 kilometers per second, and internal temperatures soar up to 5,500 Kelvin. As the shock propagates through the energetic material, the rapid heating coupled with compression that results in almost 30% volume reduction, initiate complex chemical reactions. A dense, highly reactive supercritical fluid is established behind the propagating detonation front. Energy release from the exothermic chemical reactions serve in turn to drive and sustain the detonation process until complete reactivity is reached. Several experimental results suggest the existence of strong correlations between the applied mechanical stress and shocks, the local heterogeneity and defects (dislocations, vacancies, cracks, impurities, etc.), and the onset of chemical reactions. The reaction chemistry of energetic materials at high pressure and temperature is, therefore, of considerable importance in understanding processes that these materials experience under impact and detonation conditions. Chemical decomposition models are critical ingredients in order to predict, among other things, the measured times to explosion and the conditions for ignition of hot spots, localized regions of highly concentrated energy associated with defects. To date, chemical kinetic rates of condense-phase energetic materials at detonation conditions are virtually non-existent, and basic questions such as: (a) which bond in a given energetic molecule breaks first, and (b) what type of chemical reactions (unimolecular versus bimolecular, etc.) that dominate early in the decomposition process, are still largely unknown.

  4. SIPEX 2012: Extreme sea-ice and atmospheric conditions off East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, P.; Stammerjohn, S.; Reid, P.; Massom, R. A.; Hutchings, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    In 2012, Antarctic sea-ice coverage was marked by weak annual-mean climate anomalies that consisted of opposing anomalies early and late in the year (some setting new records) which were interspersed by near-average conditions for most of the austral autumn and winter. Here, we investigate the ocean-ice-atmosphere system off East Antarctica, prior to and during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment [SIPEX] 2012, by exploring relationships between atmospheric and oceanic forcing together with the sea-ice and snow characteristics. During August and September 2012, just prior to SIPEX 2012, atmospheric circulation over the Southern Ocean was near-average, setting up the ocean-ice-atmosphere system for near-average conditions. However, below-average surface pressure and temperature as well as strengthened circumpolar winds prevailed during June and July 2012. This led to a new record (19.48×106 km2) in maximum Antarctic sea-ice extent recorded in late September. In contrast to the weak circum-Antarctic conditions, the East Antarctic sector (including the SIPEX 2012 region) experienced positive sea-ice extent and concentration anomalies during most of 2012, coincident with negative atmospheric pressure and sea-surface temperature anomalies. Heavily deformed sea ice appeared to be associated with intensified wind stress due to increased cyclonicity as well as an increased influx of sea ice from the east. This increased westward ice flux is likely linked to the break-up of nearly 80% of the Mertz Glacier Tongue in 2010, which strongly modified the coastal configuration and hence the width of the westward coastal current. Combined with favourable atmospheric conditions the associated changed coastal configuration allowed more sea ice to remain within the coastal current at the expense of a reduced northward flow in the region around 141°-145°E. In addition a westward propagating positive anomaly of sea-ice extent from the western Ross Sea during austral winter

  5. Generating a taxonomy for genetic conditions relevant to reproductive planning.

    PubMed

    Korngiebel, Diane M; McMullen, Carmit K; Amendola, Laura M; Berg, Jonathan S; Davis, James V; Gilmore, Marian J; Harding, Cary O; Himes, Patricia; Jarvik, Gail P; Kauffman, Tia L; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Simpson, Dana Kostiner; Leo, Michael C; Lynch, Frances L; Quigley, Denise I; Reiss, Jacob A; Richards, C Sue; Rope, Alan F; Schneider, Jennifer L; Goddard, Katrina A B; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2016-03-01

    As genome or exome sequencing (hereafter genome-scale sequencing) becomes more integrated into standard care, carrier testing is an important possible application. Carrier testing using genome-scale sequencing can identify a large number of conditions, but choosing which conditions/genes to evaluate as well as which results to disclose can be complicated. Carrier testing generally occurs in the context of reproductive decision-making and involves patient values in a way that other types of genetic testing may not. The Kaiser Permanente Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research program is conducting a randomized clinical trial of preconception carrier testing that allows participants to select their preferences for results from among broad descriptive categories rather than selecting individual conditions. This paper describes (1) the criteria developed by the research team, the return of results committee (RORC), and stakeholders for defining the categories; (2) the process of refining the categories based on input from patient focus groups and validation through a patient survey; and (3) how the RORC then assigned specific gene-condition pairs to taxonomy categories being piloted in the trial. The development of four categories (serious, moderate/mild, unpredictable, late onset) for sharing results allows patients to select results based on their values without separately deciding their interest in knowing their carrier status for hundreds of conditions. A fifth category, lifespan limiting, was always shared. The lessons learned may be applicable in other results disclosure situations, such as incidental findings. PMID:26889673

  6. Laboratory measurements of materials in extreme conditions; The use of high energy radiation sources for high pressure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1998-06-01

    High energy lasers can be used to study material conditions that are appropriate fort inertial confinement fusion: that is, materials at high densities, temperatures, and pressures. Pulsed power devices can offer similar opportunities. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be a high energy multi-beam laser designed to achieve the thermonuclear ignition of a mm-scale DT-filled target in the laboratory. At the same time, NE will provide the physics community with a unique tool for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers and pulsed power tools can contribute to investigations of high energy density matter in the areas of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  7. Extremely high-pressure generation and compression with laser implosion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shigemori, K.; Hironaka, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.; Sunahara, A.; Kadono, T.; Shimizu, K.

    2013-05-06

    We have tested a scheme for using laser implosion plasmas to generate pressures in the gigabar (100 TPa) regime. Cone-in-shell targets employed in fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion were irradiated to create a high-pressure source for compression of materials. The imploded plasmas pushed a foil embedded on the tip of a cone. The pressure was estimated from the shock velocity into the material; the shock velocity was obtained from an optical measurement. The measured shock velocity of the foil was above 100 km/s, corresponding to a pressure greater than 1 Gbar.

  8. Southern giant Petrel Macronectes giganteus nest attendance patterns under extreme weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Uwe Horst; Krüger, Lucas; Petry, Maria Virginia

    2014-08-01

    Differences in nest attendance between genders in seabirds may be related to morphological differences. Southern giant petrel is a dimorphic species with gender-specific foraging behavior. The objective of this study was to investigate sex-related differences in nest attendance during the breeding period of southern giant petrels by presence/absence patterns of both sexes during incubation and compare use of the colony after nest failure. Fourteen birds were tagged with digitally coded radio-transmitters in a colony at Elephant Island, Antarctica, in the beginning of 2009/2010 breeding season. Females were present during 18 periods (min. 3 days, max. 9 days) and males only in five periods (min. 2 days, max. 13 days). The difference in mean number of radio signals per day between females (4330; s.e. 313.5) and males (2691; s.e. 248.6) was highly significant (t = 4.3; d.f. = 199; P < 0.001; Fig. 4 ). As consequence of the severe weather conditions that year, all tagged birds failed to reproduce. After abandonment of the nests, the presence of both genders decreased drastically, although the tagged individuals stayed in the area. Under severe weather conditions female Southern Giant Petrels continue breeding while males abandon the nest earlier. PMID:25088590

  9. Sputtering at Mars: MAVEN observations of precipitating and escaping oxygen during nominal and extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Dong, Chuanfei; Ma, Yingjuan; Leblanc, Francois; Modolo, Ronan; Brain, David; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Hara, Takuya; Halekas, Jasper; Dong, Yaxue; Williamson, Hayley N.; Johnson, Robert E.; McFadden, James; Espley, Jared R.; Mitchell, David; Connerney, Jack; Eparvier, Frank; Lillis, Robert J.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Sputtering is believed to be one of the dominant escape mechanisms during the early epochs of our solar system when the solar activity and EUV intensities were much higher than the present day. Mars lacks a global dynamo magnetic field, which creates a scenario where the solar wind directly interacts with the upper atmosphere and newly created ions can be picked up and swept away by the background convection electric field. These pick-up ions can directly escape or precipitate back into the atmosphere and induce atmospheric sputtering of neutrals.The MAVEN spacecraft has observed the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetic topology and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during numerous Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) impacts spanning from March 2015 to June 2016. ICMEs are associated with enhanced solar wind velocities, densities and magnetic field strength, and often drive heavy ion precipitation at much higher rates than during nominal conditions. Thus, ICMEs provide a unique environment for observing sputtering. We will compare MAVEN observations of heavy ion precipitation during nominal conditions as well as during ICMEs. Additionally, we will present global MHD and test particle simulations of the ICMEs in order to calculate sputtering escape rates for oxygen. Finally, we will use the observed and modeled sputtering escape rates to provide an initial estimate of the total sputtered atmospheric escape from Mars over billions of years.

  10. A New Force-Matched Reactive Force Field for Bulk Water Under Extreme Thermodynamic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Laurence; Koziol, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    A many-body classical force field is presented for water under dissociative thermodynamic conditions. The force field is optimized by force-matching to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The force field contains short-ranged central and many-body over-coordination terms, and long-range Ewald electrostatics. It is optimized and tested on water at density 1.5 g/mL and 2000 K, which is approximately 10% dissociated according to DFT. Molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce DFT radial distribution functions, as well as the distribution of wat and dissociation products. The calculated atomic self-diffusion constants appear about 50% lower than in DFT, although precise comparison is impossible due to the short timescale accessible to AIMD (about 20 ps). The force field is also compared to ReaxFF using the CHO parameter set of Chenowith et al. ReaxFF structural and dynamical properties are in overall fair agreement with DFT, although ReaxFF water is not dissociative at these conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Helium bubble formation in ultrafine and nanocrystalline tungsten under different extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    El-atwani, O.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Hinks, J. A.; Greaves, G.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-12-25

    We investigated the effects of helium ion irradiation energy and sample temperature on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks in ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten. Irradiations were performed at displacement and non-displacement energies and at temperatures above and below that required for vacancy migration. Microstructural investigations were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) combined with either in-situ or ex-situ ion irradiation. Under helium irradiation at an energy which does not cause atomic displacements in tungsten (70 eV), regardless of temperature and thus vacancy migration conditions, bubbles were uniformly distributed with no preferential bubble formation on grain boundaries. Moreover, at energies that can cause displacements, bubbles were observed to be preferentially formed on the grain boundaries only at high temperatures where vacancy migration occurs. Under these conditions, the decoration of grain boundaries with large facetted bubbles occurred on nanocrystalline grains with dimensions less than 60 nm. Finally, we discuss the importance of vacancy supply and the formation and migration of radiation-induced defects on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks and the resulting irradiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten to bubble formation.

  12. Helium bubble formation in ultrafine and nanocrystalline tungsten under different extreme conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    El-atwani, O.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Hinks, J. A.; Greaves, G.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-12-25

    We investigated the effects of helium ion irradiation energy and sample temperature on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks in ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten. Irradiations were performed at displacement and non-displacement energies and at temperatures above and below that required for vacancy migration. Microstructural investigations were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) combined with either in-situ or ex-situ ion irradiation. Under helium irradiation at an energy which does not cause atomic displacements in tungsten (70 eV), regardless of temperature and thus vacancy migration conditions, bubbles were uniformly distributed with no preferential bubble formation on grain boundaries. Moreover,more » at energies that can cause displacements, bubbles were observed to be preferentially formed on the grain boundaries only at high temperatures where vacancy migration occurs. Under these conditions, the decoration of grain boundaries with large facetted bubbles occurred on nanocrystalline grains with dimensions less than 60 nm. Finally, we discuss the importance of vacancy supply and the formation and migration of radiation-induced defects on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks and the resulting irradiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten to bubble formation.« less

  13. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; Martin-Uriz, Patxi San; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets. PMID:24755961

  14. Changing pattern of natural hazards due to extreme hydro-meteorological conditions (Apulia, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polemio, Maurizio; Lonigro, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Recent international researches have underlined the evidences of climate changes throughout the world. Among the consequences of climate change, there is the increase in the frequency and magnitude of natural disasters, such as droughts, windstorms, heat waves, landslides, floods and secondary floods (i.e. rapid accumulation or pounding of surface water with very low flow velocity). The Damaging Hydrogeological Events (DHEs) can be defined as the occurrence of one or more simultaneous aforementioned phenomena causing damages. They represent a serious problem, especially in DHE-prone areas with growing urbanisation. In these areas the increasing frequency of extreme hydrological events could be related to climate variations and/or urban development. The historical analysis of DHEs can support decision making and land-use planning, ultimately reducing natural risks. The paper proposes a methodology, based on both historical and time series approaches, used for describing the influence of climatic variability on the number of phenomena observed. The historical approach is finalised to collect phenomenon historical data. The historical flood and landslide data are important for the comprehension of the evolution of a study area and for the estimation of risk scenarios as a basis for civil protection purposes. Phenomenon historical data is useful for expanding the historical period of investigation in order to assess the occurrence trend of DHEs. The time series approach includes the collection and the statistical analysis of climatic and rainfall data (monthly rainfall, wet days, rainfall intensity, and temperature data together with the annual maximum of short-duration rainfall data, from 1 hour to 5 days), which are also used as a proxy for floods and landslides. The climatic and rainfall data are useful to characterise the climate variations and trends and to roughly assess the effects of these trends on river discharge and on the triggering of landslides. The time

  15. Electrojet-independent ionospheric extremely low frequency/very low frequency wave generation by powerful high frequency waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold; Chang, Chia-Lie

    2010-08-15

    Results of extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) wave generation by intensity-modulated high frequency (HF) heaters of 3.2 MHz in Gakona, Alaska, near local solar noon during a geomagnetic quiet time, are presented to support an electrojet-independent ELF/VLF wave generation mechanism. The modulation was set by splitting the HF transmitter array into two subarrays; one was run at cw full power and the other run alternatively at 50% and 100% power modulation by rectangular waves of 2.02, 5, 8, and 13 kHz. The most effective generation was from the X-mode heater with 100% modulation. While the 8 kHz radiation has the largest wave amplitude, the spectral intensity of the radiation increases with the modulation frequency, i.e., 13 kHz line is the strongest. Ionograms recorded significant virtual height spread of the O-mode sounding echoes. The patterns of the spreads and the changes of the second and third hop virtual height traces caused by the O/X-mode heaters are distinctively different, evidencing that it is due to differently polarized density irregularities generated by the filamentation instability of the O/X-mode HF heaters.

  16. Does the shift to higher capacities for isoprene emission at extreme temperatures in some oak species reflect acclimation to extreme drought and high temperature conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, C.; Gramann, J. H.; White, S. L.; Schade, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    Isoprene emission from the vegetation accounts for a substantial fraction of assimilated carbon and is an important biosphere-atmosphere interaction, being a key constraint to the chemical properties of the troposphere. Isoprene synthesis is controlled by isoprene synthase and is connected to photosynthesis through production of precursor metabolites, while subsequent emission is affected by the physical environment and is altered by exposure to environmental stress. An intricate, yet not completely understood balance exists between the impact of isoprene on the atmosphere and the feedback of global change on the eco-physiology of vegetation that defines future emission potentials, affecting to a yet unknown extent future isoprene emissions. To address the nature of these interactions, we set up a field study that characterizes the effects of climate and pollution gradients on carbon assimilation and isoprene emission fluxes of dominant oak tree species in Texas. We followed selected oak species throughout their growth season during the exceptional drought in 2011 and following recovery during 2012 and 2013, by comparing tree response to their growth environment at three selected sites along an urban to rural transect from downtown Houston to the Sam Houston National Forest. As urban areas are warmer, more polluted and often drier than rural regions, they are used in our study as an environment that mimics conditions expected from global climate change. Our results revealed significant differences in the drought stress response of the investigated oak species, Quercus nigra and Q.stellata. The early onset of drought in 2011 affected mostly the urban trees: the assimilation of Q. nigra decreased by 90% below optimum already in the beginning of the season, while only by 35% in the more resistant Q. stellata. The extreme drought uncoupled isoprene emission from photosynthesis: though correlated with photosynthesis, emission rates were less affected, with a maximum

  17. Anaerobic digestion of the microalga Spirulina at extreme alkaline conditions: biogas production, metagenome, and metatranscriptome.

    PubMed

    Nolla-Ardèvol, Vímac; Strous, Marc; Tegetmeyer, Halina E

    2015-01-01

    A haloalkaline anaerobic microbial community obtained from soda lake sediments was used to inoculate anaerobic reactors for the production of methane rich biogas. The microalga Spirulina was successfully digested by the haloalkaline microbial consortium at alkaline conditions (pH 10, 2.0 M Na(+)). Continuous biogas production was observed and the obtained biogas was rich in methane, up to 96%. Alkaline medium acted as a CO2 scrubber which resulted in low amounts of CO2 and no traces of H2S in the produced biogas. A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days and 0.25 g Spirulina L(-1) day(-1) organic loading rate (OLR) were identified as the optimal operational parameters. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis of the supplied substrate was mainly carried out by Bacteroidetes of the "ML635J-40 aquatic group" while the hydrogenotrophic pathway was the main producer of methane in a methanogenic community dominated by Methanocalculus. PMID:26157422

  18. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  19. Comparison of wetlands in different hydrogeological settings under conditions of extreme climate variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.; Rosenberry, D.; Kelly, E.; LaBaugh, J.

    2005-01-01

    Wetlands in the Cottonwood Lake area in North Dakota, USA, are underlain by poorly permeable till and have little groundwater input. Lakes and wetlands in the Shingobee River headwaters in Minnesota are underlain by permeable sand and have substantial groundwater input. Hydrological, chemical, and biological characteristics of these ecosystems have been monitored since 1977. Both sites experienced the second worst drought of the 20th century followed by the wettest period in more than a century. At Cottonwood Lake, plants that invaded the dry wetlands during the drought were flooded during the wet period and became a food source for animals. This resulted in successive substantial population increases and declines of plankton, invertebrates, amphibians and waterfowl. Substantial groundwater input buffered the lakes and wetlands in the Shingobee area against the changing water conditions. Only subtle changes in water chemistry and plankton populations were observed during the transition from drought to deluge.

  20. Updating Small Generator Interconnection Procedures for New Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Fox, K.; Stanfield, S.; Varnado, L.; Culley, T.; Sheehan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Federal and state regulators are faced with the challenge of keeping interconnection procedures updated against a backdrop of evolving technology, new codes and standards, and considerably transformed market conditions. This report is intended to educate policymakers and stakeholders on beneficial reforms that will keep interconnection processes efficient and cost-effective while maintaining a safe and reliable power system.

  1. Extremely reducing conditions reached during basaltic intrusion in organic matter-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Polozov, Alexander G.; Marecal, Virginie; Pirre, Michel; Arndt, Nicholas T.

    2012-12-01

    Redox conditions in magma are widely interpreted as internally buffered and closely related to that of their mantle source regions. We use thermodynamic calculations to show that high-temperature interaction between magma and organic matter can lead to a dramatic reduction of the magma redox state, and significant departure from that of the original source. Field studies provide direct evidence of the process that we describe, with reported occurrences of graphite and native iron in igneous mafic rocks, implying very reducing conditions that are almost unknown in average terrestrial magmas. We calculate that the addition of 0.6 wt% organic matter (in the form of CH or CH2) to a standard basalt triggers graphite and native iron crystallization at depths of few hundred meters. Interaction with organic matter also profoundly affects the abundance and the redox state of the gases in equilibrium with the magma, which are CO-dominated with H2 as the second most abundant species on a molar basis, H2O and CO2 being minor constituents. The assimilation of only 0.1 wt% organic matter by a basalt causes a decrease in its oxygen fugacity of 2-orders of magnitude. The assimilation of 0.6 wt% organic matter at depths<500 m implies minimum CO content in the magma of 1 wt%, other gas components being less than 0.1 wt%. In the light of our calculations, we suggest that the production of native iron-bearing lava flows and associated intrusions was most likely accompanied by degassing of CO-rich gases, whose fluxes depended on the magma production rates.

  2. Charging studies of heat packs using parabolic dish solar energy concentrator for extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohitash; Vyas, Sumita; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Ambesh

    2016-05-01

    Parabolic dish solar energy concentrator with aperture diameter 1.4 m and focal length 0.32 m is designed and fabricated to charge and store solar thermal energy in phase change material (PCM) based heat packs. Overall heat loss factor, heat duty, over all thermal efficiency, and optical efficiency factor are calculated using water sensible heating and cooling tests and values are 16.11 W m-2 K-1, 546.9 W, 49.2% and 0.62 respectively. The performance characteristic curve is generated using these parameters to understand its performance at different ambient temperatures and solar insolation. The fabricated concentrator has been used to charge 16 PCM heat packs with 150 g PCM in each heat pack, which took about 35 minutes for complete charging of PCM heat packs at average ambient temperature 39 °C and solar radiation flux density 715 W m-2 K-1. The charged heat packs are subjected to discharge studies at average ambient temperature about - 7 °C and observed heat release in the temperature range of 48 to 40 °C for 50 minutes, suggesting its applications for comfort and therapeutic applications in high altitude areas.

  3. The molecular gas in luminous infrared galaxies - I. CO lines, extreme physical conditions and their drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; van der Werf, Paul P.; Xilouris, E. M.; Isaak, K. G.; Gao, Yu; Mühle, S.

    2012-11-01

    We report results from a large molecular line survey of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs; L IR ≳1011 L) in the local Universe (z ≤ 0.1), conducted during the last decade with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the IRAM 30-m telescope. This work presents the CO and 13CO line data for 36 galaxies, further augmented by multi-J total CO line luminosities available for other infrared (IR) bright galaxies from the literature. This yields a combined sample of N = 70 galaxies with the star formation (SF) powered fraction of their IR luminosities spanning L IR (*)˜(1010-2×1012) L and a wide range of morphologies. Simple comparisons of their available CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) with local ones, as well as radiative transfer models, discern a surprisingly wide range of average interstellar medium (ISM) conditions, with most of the surprises found in the high-excitation regime. These take the form of global CO SLEDs dominated by a very warm (Tkin ≳100 K) and dense (n ≥ 104 cm-3) gas phase, involving galaxy-sized (˜(few) × 109 M⊙) gas mass reservoirs under conditions that are typically found only for ˜(1-3) per cent of mass per typical SF molecular cloud in the Galaxy. Furthermore, some of the highest excitation CO SLEDs are found in ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; LIR ≥ 1012 L⊙) and surpass even those found solely in compact SF-powered hot spots in Galactic molecular clouds. Strong supersonic turbulence and high cosmic ray energy densities rather than far-ultraviolet/optical photons or supernova remnant induced shocks from individual SF sites can globally warm the large amounts of dense gas found in these merger-driven starbursts and easily power their extraordinary CO line excitation. This exciting possibility can now be systematically investigated with Herschel and the Atacama Large Milimeter Array (ALMA). As expected for an IR-selected (and thus SF rate selected) galaxy sample, only few 'cold' CO SLEDs are found, and for

  4. X-ray Raman Scattering at Extreme Conditions: Insights to Local Structure, Oxidation and Spin state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, M.; Sternemann, C.; Sahle, C.; Spiekermann, G.; Nyrow, A.; Weis, C.; Cerantola, V.; Schmidt, C.; Yavas, H.

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, X-ray spectroscopic techniques using very intense synchrotron radiation (SR) have become indispensable tools for studying geomaterials. Due to the rather low absorption of hard X-rays, SR opens up the possibility to perform measurements in high-pressure, high temperature cells. The range of elements accessible by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS) techniques in these cells is limited by the absorption of X-rays due to the sample environment, i.e. the diamond windows. The indirect measurement of XAFS spectra by inelastic X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) provides a workaround to access absorption edges at low energies (e.g. low Z elements). Therefore, XRS enables measurements that are similar to electron energy loss spectroscopy but offer to measure at in-situ conditions and not just in vacuum. Measurements of the O K-edge of H2O from ambient to supercritical PT-conditions (up to 600°C @ 134 MPa; 400°C @ 371 MPa) were used to trace structural changes of the hydrogen-bonded network, which controls many physical and chemical properties of H2O [1]. The Fe M3,2-edge measured by XRS were used to characterize the oxidation state and local structure in crystalline compounds and glasses [2]. Furthermore, the M3,2 yields detailed insight to the crystal-field splitting and electronic spin state. In a reconnaissance study, the pressure-induced high-spin to low-spin transition of Fe in FeS between 6 and 8 GPa was measured. By multiplet calculations of the spectra for octahedral Fe2+, a difference in crystal field splitting between the two states of ca. 1.7 eV was estimated [3]. Finally, we successfully assessed the electronic structure of Fe in siderite by measurements of M and L-edge up to 50 GPa, covering the spin transition between 40 and 45 GPa. [1] Sahle et al. (2013) PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1220301110.. [2] Nyrow et al. (2014) Contrib Mineral Petrol 167, 1012. [3] Nyrow et al. (2014) Appl Phys Lett 104, 262408.

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Tissue Simulants and Soft Tissues Under Extreme Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalcioglu, Zeynep Ilke

    Recent developments in computer-integrated surgery and in tissue-engineered constructs necessitate advances in experimental and analytical techniques in characterizing properties of mechanically compliant materials such as gels and soft tissues, particularly for small sample volumes. One goal of such developments is to quantitatively predict and mimic tissue deformation due to high rate impact events typical of industrial accidents and ballistic insults. This aim requires advances in mechanical characterization to establish tools and design principles for tissue simulant materials that can recapitulate the mechanical responses of hydrated soft tissues under dynamic contact-loading conditions. Given this motivation, this thesis studies the mechanical properties of compliant synthetic materials developed for tissue scaffold applications and of soft tissues, via modifying an established contact based technique for accurate, small scale characterization under fully hydrated conditions, and addresses some of the challenges in the implementation of this method. Two different engineered material systems composed of physically associating block copolymer gels, and chemically crosslinked networks including a solvent are presented as potential tissue simulants for ballistic applications, and compared directly to soft tissues from murine heart and liver. In addition to conventional quasistatic and dynamic bulk mechanical techniques that study macroscale elastic and viscoelastic properties, new methodologies are developed to study the small scale mechanical response of the aforementioned material systems to concentrated impact loading. The resistance to penetration and the energy dissipative constants are quantified in order to compare the deformation of soft tissues and mechanically optimized simulants, and to identify the underlying mechanisms by which the mechanical response of these tissue simulant candidates are modulated. Finally, given that soft tissues are biphasic in

  6. Source Process of the 2003 Bam, Iran, Earthquake: Subsurface Rupture that Generated Extreme Ground Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Miyake, H.; Koketsu, K.; Hikima, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Bam earthquake occurred on December 26, 2003 in southeast Iran. This moderate size event (Mw 6.5) caused heavy damage in the city of Bam and killed about 26,000 people. According to previous studies of geodetic data (e.g., Talebian et al., 2004; Wang et al., 2004) and aftershock distribution (Nakamura et al., 2005), the earthquake was caused by a rupture on a previously unknown strike-slip fault. The strong-motion station located inside the heavily damaged area of the city of Bam in vicinity of the fault recorded a PGA of 988 gal in the UD component and two pulses with a dominant frequency of 1 Hz in the horizontal components. This large PGA and the proportion of damage due to this event might be explained by the combination of source directivity effect and large speed of the rupture front over the fault (Bouchon et al., 2005). To estimate the slip pattern in the source rupture area, precise hypocentral depth, and rupture velocity along the fault, we applied the moment tensor analysis as well as the source inversion method developed by Kikuchi and Kanamori (1991) and Kikuchi et al. (2003) to the IRIS broadband teleseismic data. The result of the source inversion shows the slip distribution that confirms a single asperity, as suggested by Yamanaka (2003), with the rupture propagating in S-N direction along an almost vertical strike-slip fault with dimensions of 25 km in length by 20 km in width. The hypocentral depth for the best fit model is estimated to be 8 km. The maximum slip occurred around the hypocenter at depths of 4-10 km; no slip is associated at a shallower depth. This agrees with the result of subsurface rupture and 'shallow slip deficit' obtained from geodetic data by Fialko et al. (2005) and might explain the extreme ground motion observed at the Bam station as being the result of the subsurface faulting on the immature fault. We also determined the rupture velocity that minimizes the residuals between observed and synthetic waveforms to be 2.8 km

  7. First-Principles Investigations on Thermal Conductivity and Average Ionization of CH Ablators Under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    A plastic CH ablator (polystyrene) is often used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target designs. Upon intense laser or x-ray ablations, a CH ablator can be shocked to warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions. Many-body coupling and quantum electron degeneracy are expected to play an essential role in determining the properties of such warm dense plasmas. Using ab initio methods of quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), we have performed investigations on the principal Hugoniot of a CH ablator, the first-principles equation-of-state table of CH, and its effect on ICF simulations. In this presentation, we focus on the thermal conductivity and average ionization of CH-ablators under a wide range of plasma temperatures and densities. The resulting thermal conductivity (κ) and average ionization () show large differences from the usual model predictions in the WDM regime. These results, being fitted with analytical functions of plasma density and temperature, have been incorporated into radiation -hydrodynamics codes. Their effects on the ICF implosion simulations will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Scientific Campaign 10 at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  8. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard; Rodriguez, George; Gibson, Lee; Dattelbaum, Dana; Udd, Eric

    2013-06-01

    We present a new technique for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400 °C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution in situ pressure measurements in inert materials under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating - FBG) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. Fiber Bragg grating sensors have predictable thermal and mechanical response properties with pressure spectrally shifting the reflectance peak at λ = 1550 nm to the blue and temperature shifting the peak to the red. By applying well-controlled steady shock wave pressure profiles to soft materials such as PMMA, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with in situ particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  9. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, R. L.; Rodriguez, G.; Gibson, L. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Grover, M.; Lalone, B. M.; Udd, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop sensors for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400°C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution, in situ pressure measurements in inert materials. We present two experimental demonstrations of pressure measurements: (1) under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact and (2) under high explosive driven shock in a water filled vessel. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. By applying well-controlled shock wave pressure profiles to these inert materials, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  10. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Chemical Reactions of Solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C J; Manaa, M R; Fried, L E

    2006-05-30

    We have carried out density functional based tight binding (DFTB) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study energetic reactions of solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) at conditions approximating the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation state. We found that the initial decomposition of PETN molecular solid is characterized by uni-molecular dissociation of the NO{sub 2}groups. Interestingly, energy release from this powerful high explosive was found to proceed in several stages. The large portion of early stage energy release was found to be associated with the formation of H{sub 2}O molecules within a few picoseconds of reaction. It took nearly four times as long for majority of CO{sub 2} products to form, accompanied by a slow oscillatory conversion between CO and CO{sub 2}. The production of N{sub 2} starts after NO{sub 2} loses its oxygen atoms to hydrogen or carbon atoms to form H{sub 2}O or CO. We identified many intermediate species that emerge and contribute to reaction kinetics, and compared our simulation with a thermo-chemical equilibrium calculation. In addition, a detailed chemical kinetics of formation of H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} were developed. Rate constants of formations of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} were reported.

  11. Survival of Microorganisms under the Extreme Conditions of the Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dose, Klaus; Bieger-Dose, Angelika; Ernst, Birgit; Feister, Uwe; Gómez-Silva, Benito; Klein, Anke; Risi, Sergio; Stridde, Christine

    2001-06-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis, conidia of Aspergillus niger, versicolor and ochraceus andcells of Deinococcus radiodurans have been exposed in the dark at two locations (at about 23°S and 24°S) in the Atacama Desert for up to 15 months. B. subtilis spores (survival ˜15%) and A. niger conidia (survival ˜30%) outlived the other species. The survival of the conidiaand spores species was only slightly poorer than that of thecorresponding laboratory controls. However, the Deinococcus radiodurans cells did not survive the desertexposure, because they are readily inactivated at relativehumidities between 40 and 80% which typically occurduring desert nights. Cellular monolayers of the dry sporesand conidia have in addition been exposed to the full sunlight for up to several hours. The solar fluences causing 63% loss in viability (F37-values) have been determined.These F37-values are compared with those determined atother global locations such as Punta Arenas (53°S), Key Largo (25°N) or Mainz (50°N) during the same season. Thesolar UVB radiation kills even the most resistantmicroorganisms within a few hours due to DNA damages. Thedata are also discussed with respect to possible similaritiesbetween the climatic conditions of the recent Atacama Desertand the deserts of early Mars.

  12. Anaerobic digestion of the microalga Spirulina at extreme alkaline conditions: biogas production, metagenome, and metatranscriptome

    PubMed Central

    Nolla-Ardèvol, Vímac; Strous, Marc; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.

    2015-01-01

    A haloalkaline anaerobic microbial community obtained from soda lake sediments was used to inoculate anaerobic reactors for the production of methane rich biogas. The microalga Spirulina was successfully digested by the haloalkaline microbial consortium at alkaline conditions (pH 10, 2.0 M Na+). Continuous biogas production was observed and the obtained biogas was rich in methane, up to 96%. Alkaline medium acted as a CO2 scrubber which resulted in low amounts of CO2 and no traces of H2S in the produced biogas. A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days and 0.25 g Spirulina L−1 day−1 organic loading rate (OLR) were identified as the optimal operational parameters. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis of the supplied substrate was mainly carried out by Bacteroidetes of the “ML635J-40 aquatic group” while the hydrogenotrophic pathway was the main producer of methane in a methanogenic community dominated by Methanocalculus. PMID:26157422

  13. Hydrogen generation along simulated faults at coseismic slip conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2009-12-01

    Since the discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the late 1970s, the most ancient microbial ecosystems are considered to evolve at habitable environments in the vicinity of H2-rich hydrothermal fluids (e.g., Russell & Hall, 1997). In the modern ocean, the H2-rich hydrothermal fluids that are often observed along the slow-spreading Mid Ocean Ridges (MOR) are most likely to be provided by the ultramafic rock-water reaction (serpentinization) (e.g., Seyfried et al., 1979). However, such H2-rich fluids can be also found at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) where ultramafic rocks are not exposed. In this study, we hypothesized that the H2-rich fluids at the EPR are produced during the seismic events in basaltic rocks, and that the H2 generation associated with seismic faulting could contribute to sustaining the subsurface biological communities. In order to confirm above hypotheses, we performed laboratory friction experiments on gabbro, dunite and granite at a constant normal stress of 1.0 MPa, slip velocities, V, of 0.09~1.6 m/s (nearly coseismic slip rates) and displacements of more than 10 m using a rotary-shear apparatus. Slip on the simulated fault was conducted within a small pressure vessel that was filled with air. H2 gas released during experiments was measured by a micro gas chromatograph which was directly connected to the pressure vessel. The main findings of our preliminary experimental work are: (1) H2 gas could not be detected at V < 0.09 m/s, while it was detected and increased with slip velocities over 0.3 m/s for all rock types. The amount of H2 generation in granite samples at 0.6 m/s is more than 20 times higher than that of dunite and gabbro. (2) When a few drops of distilled water were added to the sliding surfaces, the H2 production was enhanced for all rock types. (3) When the wet dunite specimen was sheared at V of 1.3 m/s corresponding to a total mechanical work energy of ~4.5 kJ (calculated as shear stress multiplied by displacement), the H2

  14. Genetic adaptation to extreme hypoxia: study of high-altitude pulmonary edema in a three-generation Han Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, V Felipe; Yang, Yingzhong; Simonson, Tatum S; Nussenzveig, Roberto; Jorde, Lynn B; Prchal, Josef T; Ge, Ri-Li

    2009-01-01

    Organismal response to hypoxia is essential for critical regulation of erythropoiesis, other physiological functions, and survival. There is evidence of individual variation in response to hypoxia as some but not all of the affected individuals develop polycythemia, and or pulmonary and cerebral edema. A significant population difference in response to hypoxia exist as many highland Tibetan, Ethiopian, and Andean natives developed adaptive mechanisms to extreme hypoxia. A proportion of non-adapted individuals exposed to high altitude develop pulmonary edema (HAPE), pulmonary hypertension, cerebral edema, and extreme polycythemia. The isolation of causative gene(s) responsible for HAPE and other extreme hypoxia complications would provide a rational basis for specific targeted therapy of HAPE, allow its targeted prevention for at-risk populations, and clarify the pathophysiology of other hypoxic maladaptations. The only suggested genetic linkage among unrelated individuals with HAPE has been with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene. Here we describe a family with multiple members affected with HAPE in three generations. Families with multiple affected members with HAPE have not been described. We first ruled out linkage of HAPE with the eNOS gene. We then performed an analysis of the whole genome using high-density SNP arrays (Affymetrix v5.0) and, assuming a single gene causation of HAPE, ruled out linkage with 34 other candidate genes. Only the HIF2A haplotype was shared by individuals who exhibit the HAPE phenotype, and work on its possible causative role in HAPE is in progress. The small size of our family does not provide sufficient power for a conclusive analysis of linkage. We hope that collaboration with other investigators with access to more HAPE patients will lead to the identification of gene(s) responsible for HAPE and possibly other maladaptive hypoxic complications. PMID:19481479

  15. Underwater Ambient Noise and Sperm Whale Click Detection during Extreme Wind Speed Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, Joal J.; Wright, Andrew J.; Kuczaj, Stan; Thames, Rachel; Hillstrom, Wesley R.; Goodman, Ralph

    2004-11-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LA DC) deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summers of 2001 (LADC 01) and 2002 (LADC 02). The hydrophone of each buoy was approximately 50m from the bottom in water depths of 645m to 1034m. During LADC 01 Tropical Storm Barry passed within 93nmi east of the EARS buoys. During LADC 02 Tropical Storm Isidore and Hurricane Lili passed within approximately 73nmi and 116nmi, respectively, west of the EARS buoys. The proximity of these storm systems to the EARS buoys, in conjunction with wind speed data from three nearby NDBC weather buoys, allows for the direct comparison of underwater ambient noise levels with high wind speeds. These results are compared to the G. M. Wenz spectra at frequencies from 1kHz to 5.5kHz. In addition, the impact of storm conditions on sperm whale clicks was assessed. In particular, although the time period during the closest approach of TS Barry tended to produce lower click rates, this time period did not have the greatest incidence of non-detection at all the EARS buoys. It follows that storm-related masking noise could not have been responsible for all the observed trends. The data suggest that sperm whales may have left the vicinity of the deepest EARS buoy (nearest TS Barry's storm track) during the storm and possibly moved into the shallower waters around the other EARS buoys. It also appears that sperm whales may not have returned to the deepest EARS area, or did not resume normal behavior immediately after the storm, as the click rate did not recover to pre-storm levels during the period after TS Barry had dissipated. Results of these analyses and the ambient noise analysis will be presented. (Research supported by ONR).

  16. SOFI/Substrate integrity testing for cryogenic propellant tanks at extreme thermal gradient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; Fabian, P.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid propellant tank insulation for space flight requires low weight as well as high insulation factors. Use of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI) is an accepted, cost effective technique for insulating a single wall cryogenic propellant tank and has been used extensively throughout the aerospace industry. Determining the bond integrity of the SOFI to the metallic substrate as well as its ability to withstand the in-service strains, both mechanical and thermal, is critical to the longevity of the insulation. This determination has previously been performed using highly volatile, explosive cryogens, which increases the test costs enormously, as well as greatly increasing the risk to both equipment and personnel. CTD has developed a new test system, based on a previous NASA test that simulates the mechanical and thermal strains associated with filling a large fuel tank with a cryogen. The test enables a relatively small SOFI/substrate sample to be monitored for any deformations, delaminations, or disjunctures during the cooling and mechanical straining process of the substrate, and enables the concurrent application of thermal and physical strains to two specimens at the same time. The thermal strains are applied by cooling the substrate to the desired cryogen temperature (from 4 K to 250 K) while maintaining the outside surface of the SOFI foam at ambient conditions. Multiple temperature monitoring points are exercised to ensure even cooling across the substrate, while at the same time, surface temperatures of the SOFI can be monitored to determine the heat flow. The system also allows for direct measurement of the strains in the substrate during the test. The test system as well as test data from testing at 20 K, for liquid Hydrogen simulation, will be discussed.

  17. The family as a determinant of stunting in children living in conditions of extreme poverty: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Hortensia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Sandoval, Araceli; Castillo, Raúl; Santos, José Ignacio; Doubova, Svetlana V; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2004-01-01

    Background Malnutrition in children can be a consequence of unfavourable socioeconomic conditions. However, some families maintain adequate nutritional status in their children despite living in poverty. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether family-related factors are determinants of stunting in young Mexican children living in extreme poverty, and whether these factors differ between rural or urban contexts. Methods A case-control study was conducted in one rural and one urban extreme poverty level areas in Mexico. Cases comprised stunted children aged between 6 and 23 months. Controls were well-nourished children. Independent variables were defined in five dimensions: family characteristics; family income; household allocation of resources and family organisation; social networks; and child health care. Information was collected from 108 cases and 139 controls in the rural area and from 198 cases and 211 controls in the urban area. Statistical analysis was carried out separately for each area; unconditional multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to obtain the best explanatory model for stunting. Results In the rural area, a greater risk of stunting was associated with father's occupation as farmer and the presence of family networks for child care. The greatest protective effect was found in children cared for exclusively by their mothers. In the urban area, risk factors for stunting were father with unstable job, presence of small social networks, low rate of attendance to the Well Child Program activities, breast-feeding longer than six months, and two variables within the family characteristics dimension (longer duration of parents' union and migration from rural to urban area). Conclusions This study suggests the influence of the family on the nutritional status of children under two years of age living in extreme poverty areas. Factors associated with stunting were different in rural and urban communities. Therefore, developing and

  18. Syntrophic associations from hypersaline soda lakes converting organic acids and alcohols to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2016-09-01

    Until now anaerobic oxidation of VFA at high salt-pH has been demonstrated only at sulfate-reducing conditions. Here, we present results of a microbiological investigation of anaerobic conversion of organic acids and alcohols at methanogenic conditions by syntrophic associations enriched from hypersaline soda lakes in Central Asia. Sediment incubation experiments showed active, albeit very slow, methane formation from acetate, propionate, butyrate and C2 C4 alcohols at pH 10 and various levels of salinity. Enrichments of syntrophic associations using hydrogenotrophic members of the genus Methanocalculus from soda lakes as partners resulted in several highly enriched cultures converting acetate, propionate, butyrate, benzoate and EtOH to methane. Most syntrophs belonged to Firmicutes, while the propionate-oxidizer formed a novel lineage within the family Syntrophobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The acetate-oxidizing syntroph was identified as 'Ca. Syntrophonatronum acetioxidans' previously found to oxidize acetate at sulfate-reducing conditions up to salt-saturating concentrations. Butyrate and a benzoate-degrading syntrophs represent novel genus-level lineages in Syntrophomonadales which are proposed as Candidatus taxons 'Syntrophobaca', 'Syntrophocurvum' and 'Syntropholuna'. Overall, despite very slow growth, the results indicated the presence of a functionally competent syntrophic community in hypersaline soda lakes, capable of efficient oxidation of fermentation products to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions. PMID:27387660

  19. Syntrophic associations from hypersaline soda lakes converting organic acids and alcohols to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2016-09-01

    Until now anaerobic oxidation of VFA at high salt-pH has been demonstrated only at sulfate-reducing conditions. Here, we present results of a microbiological investigation of anaerobic conversion of organic acids and alcohols at methanogenic conditions by syntrophic associations enriched from hypersaline soda lakes in Central Asia. Sediment incubation experiments showed active, albeit very slow, methane formation from acetate, propionate, butyrate and C2 C4 alcohols at pH 10 and various levels of salinity. Enrichments of syntrophic associations using hydrogenotrophic members of the genus Methanocalculus from soda lakes as partners resulted in several highly enriched cultures converting acetate, propionate, butyrate, benzoate and EtOH to methane. Most syntrophs belonged to Firmicutes, while the propionate-oxidizer formed a novel lineage within the family Syntrophobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The acetate-oxidizing syntroph was identified as 'Ca. Syntrophonatronum acetioxidans' previously found to oxidize acetate at sulfate-reducing conditions up to salt-saturating concentrations. Butyrate and a benzoate-degrading syntrophs represent novel genus-level lineages in Syntrophomonadales which are proposed as Candidatus taxons 'Syntrophobaca', 'Syntrophocurvum' and 'Syntropholuna'. Overall, despite very slow growth, the results indicated the presence of a functionally competent syntrophic community in hypersaline soda lakes, capable of efficient oxidation of fermentation products to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

  20. Generating Optimal Initial Conditions for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Rockefeller, G.; Fryer, C. L.; Riethmiller, D.; Statler, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    We review existing smoothed particle hydrodynamics setup methods and outline their advantages, limitations, and drawbacks. We present a new method for constructing initial conditions for smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations, and demonstrate this method on a number of applications. This new method is inspired by adaptive binning techniques using weighted Voronoi tessellations. Particles are placed and iteratively moved based on their proximity to neighbouring particles and the desired spatial resolution. This new method can satisfy arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements.

  1. Generating optimal initial conditions for smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    We present a new optimal method to set up initial conditions for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations. This new method is based on weighted Voronoi tesselations (WVTs) and can meet arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements. We conduct a comprehensive review of existing SPH setup methods, and outline their advantages, limitations and drawbacks. A serial version of our WVT setup method is publicly available and we give detailed instruction on how to easily implement the new method on top of an existing parallel SPH code.

  2. PRESS-MAG-O: a unique instrument to probe materials and phenomena under extreme conditions at Frascati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gioacchino, Daniele; Marcelli, Augusto; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela; Puri, Alessandro; Postorino, Paolo; Pace, Emanuele; De Sio, Antonio; Gambicorti, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    PRESS-MAG-O is a new instrument under commission at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) designed to investigate materials under extreme conditions. The instrument, once completed, will allow combining high harmonic AC magnetic susceptibility measurements and magneto-optic experiments on samples under high pressures (HP), with a variable DC magnetic field in a wide temperature range. The system is designed to work at SINBAD, the IR synchrotron radiation beamline operational since 2001 at DAΦNE (Double AnnularΦ-factory for Nice Experiments), the storage ring of the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the INFN. HP will be applied up to about 20 GPa to samples inside a Cu-Be diamond anvil cell designed to allow concurrent FTIR experiments and high harmonic AC susceptibility measurements in a DC magnetic field up to 8 T and in a wide temperature range.

  3. Detecting life traces in extreme cold and dry conditions on earth: possible analogues of life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzchos, J.; de Los Rios, A.; Ascaso, C.

    2004-03-01

    Microbial life in the harsh conditions of Antarctica's cold desert may be considered an analogue of potential life of early Mars. The microbial ecology of these lithobiontic, extremophile microorganism communities could provide clues to the challenging question of how life (if ever present) became extinct on Mars. Application of the SEM-BSE plus EDS technique has allowed us to demonstrate the presence of microbial fossils and biomarkers within Antarctic sandstone rocks collected from Ross Desert for the first time. There is an obvious need for extensive further work on live, dead, mummified and mineralized lithobiontic Antarctic microorganisms. The in situ examination of the interior of Antarctic rocks might represent the best option available to improve our knowledge on these extreme cold and dry microbial habitats and it is foreseen that this type of work will have applications in future astrobiological investigations performed on geological material obtained from Mars.

  4. Exploring Mbar shock conditions and isochorically heated aluminum at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Gauthier, M.; et al

    2014-08-11

    Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatterx-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. Furthermore, the combination of experiments fully demonstratesmore » the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.« less

  5. Exploring Mbar shock conditions and isochorically heated aluminum at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (invited).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, L B; Lee, H J; Barbrel, B; Gauthier, M; Galtier, E; Nagler, B; Döppner, T; LePape, S; Ma, T; Pak, A; Turnbull, D; White, T; Gregori, G; Wei, M; Falcone, R W; Heimann, P; Zastrau, U; Hastings, J B; Glenzer, S H

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatter x-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. The combination of experiments fully demonstrates the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.

  6. Exploring Mbar shock conditions and isochorically heated aluminum at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Gauthier, M.; Heimann, P.; Hastings, J. B.; Zastrau, U.; Glenzer, S. H.; White, T.; Gregori, G.; Wei, M.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.

    2014-08-11

    Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatterx-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. Furthermore, the combination of experiments fully demonstrates the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.

  7. Exploring Mbar shock conditions and isochorically heated aluminum at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; Gauthier, M.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Döppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D.; White, T.; Gregori, G.; Wei, M.; Zastrau, U.

    2014-11-15

    Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatter x-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. The combination of experiments fully demonstrates the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.

  8. Monitoring Surface Moisture of Crater-fill Sediment in Extreme hydroclimatic conditions (Ubehebe Volcanic Field, Death Valley, California).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Zent, A.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    The long term monitoring of soil surface moisture is key for constraining surface hydrology processes in extreme weather and climatic settings and their impact on biological and geological components of desert environments. We tested and applied the use of miniature data loggers to acquire novel Temperature (T) and water content (weight percent, wt%) of fine-grained sediments deposited during rain events at Ubehebe Crater (UC), the larger and deeper crater within a volcanic field in Death Valley. The Miniaturized in situ systems are compliant with Death Valley National Park's regulations to conduct scientific research in wilderness and sacred sites. About 130,000 hours of recorded soil moisture and temperature were acquired in relation to the hydroclimatic conditions (2009-current). Total annual rainfall in the area range from ~50mm to <250 mm/y in water years (WY) 2004-to date. These values are representative of the climatic context of the Mojave Region as they encompass the wettest (2005, 2011) and driest years (2002, 2007, 2012, 2013, 2014) of the last ~120 years (Western Regional Climate Center, www.wrcc.dri.edu). To date, surface (0.5 cm to 2 cm-depth) moisture of intra-crater deposits can vary from dry-very dry (1-3wt % to - 10 wt%) to wet-saturated (10-60 wt%). Over saturated conditions occur in ephemeral ponds, which appear to form once a year as a result of winter and summer rainstorms, and may last for one-two weeks (2009-2014 study years). Summer storms can yield ca. 40% to 60% of the total annual precipitation (WY 2011 thru 2014). The intensity and temporal distribution of annual storms together with ground temperature extremes (-16 to +67 ºC) influence moisture distribution and retention within the crater's floor.

  9. Energy Storage and Generation for Extreme Temperature and Pressure and Directional Measurement While Drilling Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Signorelli, Riccardo; Cooley, John

    2015-10-14

    of 10x. The electronics have demonstrated a substantially reduced design cycle time by way of process and material selection innovations and have been qualified for 250°C / 10 Grms for at least 200 hours. FastCAP has also invented a rotary inertial energy generator (RIEG) to harvest various mechanical energy sources that exist downhole. This device is flow-independent and has been demonstrated as a proof of concept to survive geothermal well temperatures under this project. The herein energy harvester has been developed to provide operational power by harvesting rotational mechanical energy that exists downhole in geothermal drilling. The energy harvester has been tested at 250°C / 10 Grms for 200 hours. Deployment of these technologies in geothermal drilling and exploration applications could have an immediate and significant impact on the effectiveness and efficiency of drilling processes, particularly with regard to use of advanced logging and monitoring techniques. The ultimate goal of this work is to reduce drilling risk to make geothermal energy more attractive and viable to the customer. Generally speaking, we aim to support the transfer of MWD techniques from oil and gas to geothermal exploration with considerations toward the practical differences between the two. One of the most significant obstacles to the deployment of advanced drilling and production techniques in the geothermal context are limitations related to the maximum operating temperatures of downhole batteries used to provide power for downhole sensors, steering tools, telemetry equipment and other MWD/LWD technologies. FastCAP’s higher temperature ultracapacitor technology will provide power solutions for similar advanced drilling and production techniques, even in the harsher environments associated with geothermal energy production. This ultracapacitor will enable downhole power solutions for the geothermal industry capable of the same reliable and safe operation our team has demonstrated

  10. Exploring thermal and mechanical properties of selected transition elements under extreme conditions: Experiments at high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubiak, Rostislav

    Transition metals (Ti, Zr, Hf, Mo, W, V, Nb, Ta, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au) are essential building units of many materials and have important industrial applications. Therefore, it is important to understand their thermal and physical behavior when they are subjected to extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. This dissertation presents: • An improved experimental technique to use lasers for the measurement of thermal conductivity of materials under conditions of very high pressure (P, up to 50 GPa) and temperature (T up to 2500 K). • An experimental study of the phase relationship and physical properties of selected transition metals, which revealed new and unexpected physical effects of thermal conductivity in Zr, and Hf under high P-T.. • New phase diagrams created for Hf, Ti and Zr from experimental data. • P-T dependence of the lattice parameters in α-hafnium. Contrary to prior reports, the α-ω phase transition in hafnium has a negative dT/dP slope. • New data on thermodynamic and physical properties of several transition metals and their respective high P-T phase diagrams. • First complete thermodynamic database for solid phases of 13 common transition metals was created. This database has: All the thermochemical data on these elements in their standard state (mostly available and compiled); All the equations of state (EoS) formulated from pressure-volume-temperature data (measured as a part of this study and from literature); Complete thermodynamic data for selected elements from standard to extreme conditions. The thermodynamic database provided by this study can be used with available thermodynamic software to calculate all thermophysical properties and phase diagrams at high P-T conditions. For readers who do not have access to this software, tabulated values of all thermodynamic and volume data for the 13 metals at high P-T are included in the APPENDIX. In the APPENDIX, a description of several other high-pressure studies of selected

  11. QCD In Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    Introduction Symmetry and the Phenomena of QCD Apparent and Actual Symmetries Asymptotic Freedom Confinement Chiral Symmetry Breaking Chiral Anomalies and Instantons High Temperature QCD: Asymptotic Properties Significance of High Temperature QCD Numerical Indications for Quasi-Free Behavior Ideas About Quark-Gluon Plasma Screening Versus Confinement Models of Chiral Symmetry Breaking More Refined Numerical Experiments High-Temperature QCD: Phase Transitions Yoga of Phase Transitions and Order Parameters Application to Glue Theories Application to Chiral Transitions Close Up on Two Flavors A Genuine Critical Point! (?) High-Density QCD: Methods Hopes, Doubts, and Fruition Another Renormalization Group Pairing Theory Taming the Magnetic Singularity High-Density QCD: Color-Flavor Locking and Quark-Hadron Continuity Gauge Symmetry (Non)Breaking Symmetry Accounting Elementary Excitations A Modified Photon Quark-Hadron Continuity Remembrance of Things Past More Quarks Fewer Quarks and Reality

  12. Chemistry at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J M; Fried, L E; Abramson, E H; Hansen, D W; Crowhurst, J C; Howard, W M

    2002-08-08

    We present equation of state results from impulsively stimulated light scattering (ISLS) experiments conducted in diamond anvil cells on pure supercritical fluids. We have made measurements on fluid H{sub 2}O (water), and CH{sub 3}OH (methanol). Sound speeds measured through ISLS have allowed us to refine existing potential models used in the exponential-6 (EXP-6) detonation product library [Fried, L. E., and Howard, W. M., J. Chem. Phys. 109 (17): 7338-7348 (1998).]. The refined models allow us to more accurately assess the chemical composition at the Chapman-Jouget (C-J) state of common energetic materials. We predict that water is present in appreciable quantities at the C-J state of energetic materials HMX, RDX, and nitro methane.

  13. Habitability in Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lobkowicz, Ysaline; de Crombrugghe, Guerric; Le Maire, Victor; Jago, Alban; Denies, Jonathan; van Vynckt, Delphine; Reydams, Marc; Mertens, Alexandre

    A manned space mission could be perfectly prepared in terms of sciences and technologies, but without a good habitat, a place where the needs of the crew are respected, this isolation and confinement can turn into a nightmare. There is the limitation of engineering: it is more than important to take care about architecture, when human lives are part of the experiment. The goal of the research is the analysis of the hard life of isolation and confinement in Mars' hostile environment and how architecture is a way to improve it. The objective is to place the human in the middle of the analysis. What does a person really need? Therefore Maslow's idea, the pyramid of primary needs, gives us the hierarchy to follow: first survival, food and beverage, then sleep, and only then protection, social activities and work. [1] No more luxury. If all these aspects are respected, a human is able to survive, like it did since so many years. The idea is that each of these main activities has to be related to a different type of space, to provide variability in this close environment. For example, work and relaxing areas have to be separated; a human being needs time for himself, without concentration. A workspace and a relaxing area have a different typology, different colours and lighting, dimensions, furniture. This has also to be respected in a spacecraft. For this research, different sources are used, mainly in the psychological aspect, which is the most important. [2] Therefore questionnaires, interviews, diaries of past expeditions are full of treasures. We do not have to search too far: on earth; polar expeditions, submarines, military camps, etc., give a lot of information. Some very realistic simulations, as on the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), will also be used as material: a good analysis of the defaults and well-organized part of the station can conduct to important conclusions. [3] A found analysis and a well-designed habitat are considerable keys for the success of the mission. References: [1] A. Maslow (1943) Theory of Human Motivation [2] J. Stuster (1996) Bold Endeavors, Lessons from Polar and Space Exploration [3] Mars Society, Mars Desert Research Station in Utah

  14. HELIOS—A laboratory based on high-order harmonic generation of extreme ultraviolet photons for time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plogmaker, S.; Terschlüsen, J. A.; Krebs, N.; Svanqvist, M.; Forsberg, J.; Cappel, U. B.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Siegbahn, H.; Söderström, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the HELIOS (High Energy Laser Induced Overtone Source) laboratory, an in-house high-order harmonic generation facility which generates extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photon pulses in the range of 15-70 eV with monochromatized XUV pulse lengths below 35 fs. HELIOS is a source for time-resolved pump-probe/two-color spectroscopy in the sub-50 fs range, which can be operated at 5 kHz or 10 kHz. An optical parametric amplifier is available for pump-probe experiments with wavelengths ranging from 240 nm to 20 000 nm. The produced XUV radiation is monochromatized by a grating in the so-called off-plane mount. Together with overall design parameters, first monochromatized spectra are shown with an intensity of 2 ṡ 1010 photons/s (at 5 kHz) in the 29th harmonic, after the monochromator. The XUV pulse duration is measured to be <25 fs after monochromatization.

  15. HELIOS—A laboratory based on high-order harmonic generation of extreme ultraviolet photons for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plogmaker, S. E-mail: Joachim.Terschluesen@physics.uu.se Terschlüsen, J. A. E-mail: Joachim.Terschluesen@physics.uu.se Krebs, N.; Svanqvist, M.; Forsberg, J.; Cappel, U. B.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Siegbahn, H.; Söderström, J. E-mail: Joachim.Terschluesen@physics.uu.se

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we present the HELIOS (High Energy Laser Induced Overtone Source) laboratory, an in-house high-order harmonic generation facility which generates extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photon pulses in the range of 15-70 eV with monochromatized XUV pulse lengths below 35 fs. HELIOS is a source for time-resolved pump-probe/two-color spectroscopy in the sub-50 fs range, which can be operated at 5 kHz or 10 kHz. An optical parametric amplifier is available for pump-probe experiments with wavelengths ranging from 240 nm to 20 000 nm. The produced XUV radiation is monochromatized by a grating in the so-called off-plane mount. Together with overall design parameters, first monochromatized spectra are shown with an intensity of 2 ⋅ 10{sup 10} photons/s (at 5 kHz) in the 29th harmonic, after the monochromator. The XUV pulse duration is measured to be <25 fs after monochromatization.

  16. HELIOS--A laboratory based on high-order harmonic generation of extreme ultraviolet photons for time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Plogmaker, S; Terschlüsen, J A; Krebs, N; Svanqvist, M; Forsberg, J; Cappel, U B; Rubensson, J-E; Siegbahn, H; Söderström, J

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the HELIOS (High Energy Laser Induced Overtone Source) laboratory, an in-house high-order harmonic generation facility which generates extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photon pulses in the range of 15-70 eV with monochromatized XUV pulse lengths below 35 fs. HELIOS is a source for time-resolved pump-probe/two-color spectroscopy in the sub-50 fs range, which can be operated at 5 kHz or 10 kHz. An optical parametric amplifier is available for pump-probe experiments with wavelengths ranging from 240 nm to 20,000 nm. The produced XUV radiation is monochromatized by a grating in the so-called off-plane mount. Together with overall design parameters, first monochromatized spectra are shown with an intensity of 2 ⋅ 10(10) photons/s (at 5 kHz) in the 29th harmonic, after the monochromator. The XUV pulse duration is measured to be <25 fs after monochromatization.

  17. HELIOS--A laboratory based on high-order harmonic generation of extreme ultraviolet photons for time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Plogmaker, S; Terschlüsen, J A; Krebs, N; Svanqvist, M; Forsberg, J; Cappel, U B; Rubensson, J-E; Siegbahn, H; Söderström, J

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the HELIOS (High Energy Laser Induced Overtone Source) laboratory, an in-house high-order harmonic generation facility which generates extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photon pulses in the range of 15-70 eV with monochromatized XUV pulse lengths below 35 fs. HELIOS is a source for time-resolved pump-probe/two-color spectroscopy in the sub-50 fs range, which can be operated at 5 kHz or 10 kHz. An optical parametric amplifier is available for pump-probe experiments with wavelengths ranging from 240 nm to 20,000 nm. The produced XUV radiation is monochromatized by a grating in the so-called off-plane mount. Together with overall design parameters, first monochromatized spectra are shown with an intensity of 2 ⋅ 10(10) photons/s (at 5 kHz) in the 29th harmonic, after the monochromator. The XUV pulse duration is measured to be <25 fs after monochromatization. PMID:26724006

  18. Extreme thermodynamic conditions: novel stoichiometries, violations of textbook chemistry, and intriguing possibilities for the synthesis of new materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, Elissaios

    As evidenced by numerous experimental and theoretical studies, application of high pressure can dramatically modify the atomic arrangement and electronic structures of both elements and compounds. However, the great majority of research has been focused on the effect of pressure on compounds with constant stoichiometries (typically those stable under ambient conditions). Recent theoretical predictions, using advanced search algorithms, suggest that composition is another important variable in the search for stable compounds, i.e. that the more stable stoichiometry at elevated pressures is not a priory the same as that at ambient pressure. Indeed, thermodynamically stable compounds with novel compositions were theoretically predicted and experimentally verified even in relatively simple chemical systems including: Na-Cl, C-N, Li-H, Na-H, Cs-N, H-N, Na-He, Xe-Fe. These materials are stable due to the formation of novel chemical bonds that are absent, or even forbidden, at ambient conditions. Tuning the composition of the system thus represents another important, but poorly explored approach to the synthesis of novel materials. By varying the stoichiometry one can design novel materials with enhanced properties (e.g. high energy density, hardness, superconductivity etc.), that are metastable at ambient conditions and synthesized at thermodynamic conditions less extreme than that those required for known stoichiometries. Moreover, current outstanding questions, ``anomalies'' and ``paradoxes'' in geo- and planetary science (e.g. the Xenon paradox) could be addressed based on the stability of surprising, stoichiometries that challenge our traditional ``textbook'' picture. In this talk, I will briefly present recent results and highlight the need of close synergy between experimental and theoretical efforts to understand the challenging and complex field of variable stoichiometry under pressure. Finally, possible new routes for the synthesis of novel materials will be

  19. Correlation of denitrification-accepted fraction of electrons with NAD(P)H fluorescence for Pseudomonas aeruginosa performing simultaneous denitrification and respiration at extremely low dissolved oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fan; Xia, Qing; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2004-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis airway infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms a microaerobic biofilm and undergoes significant physiological changes. It is important to understand the bacterium's metabolism at microaerobic conditions. In this work, the culture properties and two indicators (the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and an NAD(P)H fluorescence fraction) for the culture's "fractional approach" to a fully anaerobic denitrifying state were examined in continuous cultures with practically zero DO but different aeration rates. With decreasing aeration, specific OUR decreased while specific NAR and NIR increased and kept Y(ATP/S) relatively constant. P. aeruginosa thus appeared to effectively compensate for energy generation at microaerobic conditions with denitrification. At the studied dilution rate of 0.06 h(-1), the maximum specific OUR was 2.8 mmol O2/g cells-h and the Monod constant for DO, in the presence of nitrate, was extremely low (<0.001 mg/L). The cell yield Y(X/S) increased significantly (from 0.24 to 0.34) with increasing aeration, attributed to a roughly opposite trend of Y(ATP/X) (ATP generation required for cell growth). As for the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and the fluorescence fraction, both decreased with increasing aeration as expected. The two fractions, however, were not directly proportional. The fluorescence fraction changed more rapidly than the e- fraction at very low aeration rates, whereas the opposite was true at higher aeration. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using online NAD(P)H fluorescence to monitor sensitive changes of cellular physiology and provided insights to the shift of e- -accepting mechanisms of P. aeruginosa under microaerobic conditions.

  20. The Conditions Underpinning Extreme Star Formation in ULIRGs and LIRGs as Revealed by Herschel Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Gabriel A.; Ashby, Matthew; Smith, Howard Alan; McTier, Moiya; Melendez, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic survey of molecular and atomic line fluxes in all star-forming galaxies observed by the Herschel PACs instrument with detectable OH lines that also contain Herschel SPIRE FTS spectra, to determine how physical conditions vary as a function of star formation rate. Specifically, we measured selected CO, H2O, [CI], and [NII] integrated line fluxes in a sample of 145 star-forming galaxies covering a range of far-infrared luminosities ranging from 109 to above 1012 LSun . Thus, our sample includes typical, quiescent galaxies as well as Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), known to be creating stars extremely rapidly. We find evidence suggesting that ULIRGs with far-infrared luminosities of LFIR> 1012 LSun require an additional heating mechanism other than UV heating from star formation, while LIRGs and less luminous star-forming galaxies may be heated primarily by their star formation. We also find that the [NII] 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line flux and those of the CO J=5-4, CO J=7-6, and CO J=8-7 transitions are generally weaker for ULIRGs compared to LIRGs and less luminous star-forming galaxies, while we find the CO J=11-10, CO J=12-11, and CO J=13-12 transitions are generally stronger. In all these respects, ULIRGs are shown to differ significantly from other galaxies undergoing less extreme star formation. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  1. The role of synoptic and intraseasonal anomalies on the life cycle of rainfall extremes over South America: non-summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Fernando E.; Grimm, Alice M.

    2016-09-01

    Previous study showed that the interaction of synoptic disturbances with intraseasonal anomalies is important for heavy rainfall in the South Atlantic Convergence Zone and the La Plata basin during the austral summer. Here, we conduct similar analysis to study the evolution of rainfall extremes during austral spring (SON), fall (MAM) and winter (JJA). A relatively homogeneous region over southeastern South America, whose limits change little from season to season, is heavily affected by extreme precipitation events, as indicated by the value of the 95th percentile of daily rainfall, higher during the spring season (16.94 mm day-1) and lower in winter (13.79 mm day-1). From 1979 to 2013, extreme rainfall events are more frequent in spring (131 events) and less frequent in fall (112 events). Similar to summertime extreme events, synoptic-scale waves continue to be the main drivers of extreme precipitation over the region. The interaction between these waves and intraseasonal anomalies during the development of rainfall extremes over southeastern South America is observed especially during neutral ENSO and La Niña conditions. Warm ENSO phases tend to favor more frequent extremes in all three seasons and extreme events during El Niños are associated with synoptic waves, with no significant interaction with intraseasonal anomalies.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  3. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5-17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations. PMID:27379105

  4. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5–17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations. PMID:27379105

  5. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5-17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations.

  6. Exploratory results from a new rotary shear designed to reproduce the extreme deformation conditions of crustal earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Spagnuolo, E.; Smith, S.; Violay, M. E.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Di Felice, F.; Di Stefano, G.; Romeo, G.; Scarlato, P.

    2011-12-01

    A challenging goal in experimental rock deformation is to reproduce the extreme deformation conditions typical of coseismic slip in crustal earthquakes: large slip (up to 50 m), slip rates (0.1-10 m/s), accelerations (> 10 m/s2) and normal stress (> 50 MPa). Moreover, fault zones usually contain non-cohesive rocks (gouges) and fluids. The integration of all these deformation conditions is such a technical challenge that there is currently no apparatus in the world that can reproduce seismic slip. Yet, the determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates remains one of the main unknowns in earthquake physics, as it cannot be determined (or very approximately) by seismic wave inversion analysis. In the last thirty years, rotary shear apparatus were designed that combine large normal stresses and slip but low slip rates (high-pressure rotary shears first designed by Tullis) or low normal stresses but large slip rates and slip (rotary shears first designed by Shimamoto). Here we present the results of experiments using a newly-constructed Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), installed at INGV in Rome, which extends the combination of normal stress, slip and slip rate achieved by previous apparatus and reproduces the conditions likely to occur during an earthquake in the shallow crust. SHIVA uses two brushless engines (max power 300 kW, max torque 930 Nm) and an air actuator (thrust 5 tons) in a rotary shear configuration (nominally infinite displacement) to slide hollow rock cylinders (30/50 mm int./ext. diameter) at slip rates ranging from 10 micron/s up to 6.5 m/s, accelerations up to 80 m/s2 and normal stresses up to 50 MPa. SHIVA can also perform experiments in which the torque on the sample (rather than the slip rate) is progressively increased until spontaneous failure occurs: this experimental capability should better reproduce natural conditions. The apparatus is equipped with a sample chamber to carry out experiments in the presence of fluids (up to 15

  7. The potential of the lichen symbiosis to cope with the extreme conditions of outer space II: germination capacity of lichen ascospores in response to simulated space conditions.

    PubMed

    de Vera, J-P; Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Ott, S

    2004-01-01

    Complementary to the already well-studied microorganisms, lichens, symbiotic organisms of the mycobiont (fungi) and the photobiont (algae), were used as "model systems" in which to examine the ecological potential to resist to extreme environments of outer space. Ascospores (sexual propagules of the mycobiont) of the lichens Fulgensia bracteata, Xanthoria elegans and Xanthoria parietina were exposed to selected space-simulating conditions (up to 16 h of space vacuum at 10(-3) Pa and UV radiation at 160 nm < or = lambda < or = 400 nm), while embedded in the lichen fruiting bodies. After exposure, the ascospores were discharged and their viability was tested as germination capacity on different culture media including those containing Mars regolith simulant. It was found that (i) the germination rate on media containing Mars regolith simulant was as high as on other mineral-containing media, (ii) if enclosed in the ascocarps, the ascospores survived the vacuum exposure, the UV-irradiation as well as the combined treatment of vacuum and UV to a high degree. In general, 50 % or more viable spores were recovered, with ascospores of X. elegans showing the highest survival. It is suggested that ascospores inside the ascocarps are well protected by the anatomical structure, the gelatinous layer and the pigments (parietin and carotene) against the space parameters tested.

  8. Extreme late chronotypes and social jetlag challenged by Antarctic conditions in a population of university students from Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Tassino, Bettina; Horta, Stefany; Santana, Noelia; Levandovski, Rosa; Silva, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In humans, a person's chronotype depends on environmental cues and on individual characteristics, with late chronotypes prevailing in youth. Social jetlag (SJL), the misalignment between an individual׳s biological clock and social time, is higher in late chronotypes. Strong SJL is expected in Uruguayan university students with morning class schedules and very late entertainment activities. Sleep disorders have been reported in Antarctic inhabitants, that might be a response to the extreme environment or to the strictness of Antarctic life. We evaluated, for the first time in Uruguay, the chronotypes and SJL of 17 undergraduate students of the First Uruguayan Summer School on Antarctic Research, using Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ) and sleep logs (SL) recorded during 3 phases: pre-Antarctic, Antarctic, and post-Antarctic. The midsleep point of free days corrected for sleep debt on work days (MSFsc,) was used as proxy of individuals' chronotype, whose values (around 6 a.m.) are the latest ever reported. We found a SJL of around 2 h in average, which correlated positively with MSFsc, confirming that late chronotypes generate a higher sleep debt during weekdays. Midsleep point and sleep duration significantly decreased between pre-Antarctic and Antarctic phases, and sleep duration rebounded to significant higher values in the post-Antarctic phase. Waking time, but not sleep onset time, significantly varied among phases. This evidence suggests that sleep schedules more likely depended on the social agenda than on the environmental light-dark shifts. High motivation of students towards Antarctic activities likely induced a subjective perception of welfare non-dependent on sleep duration. PMID:27226819

  9. Extreme late chronotypes and social jetlag challenged by Antarctic conditions in a population of university students from Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Tassino, Bettina; Horta, Stefany; Santana, Noelia; Levandovski, Rosa; Silva, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In humans, a person’s chronotype depends on environmental cues and on individual characteristics, with late chronotypes prevailing in youth. Social jetlag (SJL), the misalignment between an individual׳s biological clock and social time, is higher in late chronotypes. Strong SJL is expected in Uruguayan university students with morning class schedules and very late entertainment activities. Sleep disorders have been reported in Antarctic inhabitants, that might be a response to the extreme environment or to the strictness of Antarctic life. We evaluated, for the first time in Uruguay, the chronotypes and SJL of 17 undergraduate students of the First Uruguayan Summer School on Antarctic Research, using Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ) and sleep logs (SL) recorded during 3 phases: pre-Antarctic, Antarctic, and post-Antarctic. The midsleep point of free days corrected for sleep debt on work days (MSFsc,) was used as proxy of individuals’ chronotype, whose values (around 6 a.m.) are the latest ever reported. We found a SJL of around 2 h in average, which correlated positively with MSFsc, confirming that late chronotypes generate a higher sleep debt during weekdays. Midsleep point and sleep duration significantly decreased between pre-Antarctic and Antarctic phases, and sleep duration rebounded to significant higher values in the post-Antarctic phase. Waking time, but not sleep onset time, significantly varied among phases. This evidence suggests that sleep schedules more likely depended on the social agenda than on the environmental light–dark shifts. High motivation of students towards Antarctic activities likely induced a subjective perception of welfare non-dependent on sleep duration. PMID:27226819

  10. Extreme late chronotypes and social jetlag challenged by Antarctic conditions in a population of university students from Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Tassino, Bettina; Horta, Stefany; Santana, Noelia; Levandovski, Rosa; Silva, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In humans, a person's chronotype depends on environmental cues and on individual characteristics, with late chronotypes prevailing in youth. Social jetlag (SJL), the misalignment between an individual׳s biological clock and social time, is higher in late chronotypes. Strong SJL is expected in Uruguayan university students with morning class schedules and very late entertainment activities. Sleep disorders have been reported in Antarctic inhabitants, that might be a response to the extreme environment or to the strictness of Antarctic life. We evaluated, for the first time in Uruguay, the chronotypes and SJL of 17 undergraduate students of the First Uruguayan Summer School on Antarctic Research, using Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ) and sleep logs (SL) recorded during 3 phases: pre-Antarctic, Antarctic, and post-Antarctic. The midsleep point of free days corrected for sleep debt on work days (MSFsc,) was used as proxy of individuals' chronotype, whose values (around 6 a.m.) are the latest ever reported. We found a SJL of around 2 h in average, which correlated positively with MSFsc, confirming that late chronotypes generate a higher sleep debt during weekdays. Midsleep point and sleep duration significantly decreased between pre-Antarctic and Antarctic phases, and sleep duration rebounded to significant higher values in the post-Antarctic phase. Waking time, but not sleep onset time, significantly varied among phases. This evidence suggests that sleep schedules more likely depended on the social agenda than on the environmental light-dark shifts. High motivation of students towards Antarctic activities likely induced a subjective perception of welfare non-dependent on sleep duration.

  11. Anthropogenic changes to seawater buffer capacity combined with natural reef metabolism induce extreme future coral reef CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Emily C; McNeil, Ben I; Tilbrook, Bronte; Matear, Richard; Bates, Michael L

    2013-05-01

    Ocean acidification, via an anthropogenic increase in seawater carbon dioxide (CO2 ), is potentially a major threat to coral reefs and other marine ecosystems. However, our understanding of how natural short-term diurnal CO2 variability in coral reefs influences longer term anthropogenic ocean acidification remains unclear. Here, we combine observed natural carbonate chemistry variability with future carbonate chemistry predictions for a coral reef flat in the Great Barrier Reef based on the RCP8.5 CO2 emissions scenario. Rather than observing a linear increase in reef flat partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 ) in concert with rising atmospheric concentrations, the inclusion of in situ diurnal variability results in a highly nonlinear threefold amplification of the pCO2 signal by the end of the century. This significant nonlinear amplification of diurnal pCO2 variability occurs as a result of combining natural diurnal biological CO2 metabolism with long-term decreases in seawater buffer capacity, which occurs via increasing anthropogenic CO2 absorption by the ocean. Under the same benthic community composition, the amplification in the variability in pCO2 is likely to lead to exposure to mean maximum daily pCO2 levels of ca. 2100 μatm, with corrosive conditions with respect to aragonite by end-century at our study site. Minimum pCO2 levels will become lower relative to the mean offshore value (ca. threefold increase in the difference between offshore and minimum reef flat pCO2 ) by end-century, leading to a further increase in the pCO2 range that organisms are exposed to. The biological consequences of short-term exposure to these extreme CO2 conditions, coupled with elevated long-term mean CO2 conditions are currently unknown and future laboratory experiments will need to incorporate natural variability to test this. The amplification of pCO2 that we describe here is not unique to our study location, but will occur in all shallow coastal environments where high

  12. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.; Anderson, S.

    2007-05-01

    This paper quantifies the mobile air-conditioning fuel consumption of the typical Indian vehicle, exploring potential fuel savings and emissions reductions these systems for the next generation of vehicles.

  13. Assessment of hydrological extremes in the basins of Shilka and Argun rivers (Far East of Russia) in changing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Daria; Semenova, Olga; Vinogradova, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Transbaikal region of Russia is formed by the basins of the Argun and Shilka Rivers (the upreaches of the Amur River). This region is simultaneously under the flood and drought hazard threat due to the combination of dry continental climate and monsoon impacts. Observed intensification of extreme hazard events in the region requires the scientific base of development of adaptation and mitigation measures. The aim of the study is the analysis of long-term variability of hydrological characteristics of the region by the means of mathematical statistics and projection of hydrological extremes in changing conditions of climate and landscapes based on hydrological modelling. Our research consisted of two stages. Firstly, we developed the database of observed daily hydrographs for about 50 runoff gauges of the region with average continuous period of observations 50 years (up to 2013) and areas from 12.3 to 200000 km2. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted and the trends of changes were assessed and analyzed. At the second stage we selected four river watersheds as the objects of modelling, namely, the gauging stations at the rivers Zun-Cooka, Gazipur, Borzya and Mogoytuy, ranging in size from 100 to 4000 km2. The basins are characterized by the variety of runoff conditions. Average elevation is about 650 m, hilly plateaus dominate the relief. The landscapes are taiga and forest-steppe with discontinuous permafrost. The climate is continental, annual precipitation varies within the range 200-450 mm, runoff - from 30 to 100 mm. The objectives of modelling stage were 1) the estimation of the hydrological model's parameters and its validation at historical data, 2) development of conceptual scenarios of changes of climate and landscapes, 3) running the model in projection mode to assess the implications of possible changes in hydrological regime. High variability of climate and hydrological regime do not allow for conventional modelling procedures to be

  14. Single-crystal diffraction at the Extreme Conditions beamline P02.2: procedure for collecting and analyzing high-pressure single-crystal data.

    PubMed

    Rothkirch, André; Gatta, G Diego; Meyer, Mathias; Merkel, Sébastien; Merlini, Marco; Liermann, Hanns Peter

    2013-09-01

    Fast detectors employed at third-generation synchrotrons have reduced collection times significantly and require the optimization of commercial as well as customized software packages for data reduction and analysis. In this paper a procedure to collect, process and analyze single-crystal data sets collected at high pressure at the Extreme Conditions beamline (P02.2) at PETRA III, DESY, is presented. A new data image format called `Esperanto' is introduced that is supported by the commercial software package CrysAlis(Pro) (Agilent Technologies UK Ltd). The new format acts as a vehicle to transform the most common area-detector data formats via a translator software. Such a conversion tool has been developed and converts tiff data collected on a Perkin Elmer detector, as well as data collected on a MAR345/555, to be imported into the CrysAlis(Pro) software. In order to demonstrate the validity of the new approach, a complete structure refinement of boron-mullite (Al5BO9) collected at a pressure of 19.4 (2) GPa is presented. Details pertaining to the data collections and refinements of B-mullite are presented. PMID:23955034

  15. Long-term monitoring reveals cold-water corals in extreme conditions off the southeast US coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.; Davies, A. J.; Ross, S. W.; Lavaleye, M.; Van Weering, T.

    2011-12-01

    Cold-water corals are common on the SE slope of the US (SEUS) from Florida to Cape Hatteras between depths of 400-600 m. Near Cape Hatteras cold-water corals have formed mound structures that are up to 60 m high, which are mainly covered by living colonies of the coral species Lophelia pertusa. Past explorations of major reef sites of N Carolina using remote and manned submersibles have shown living Lophelia pertusa colonies on the current facing side of the mound structures and a high biodiversity of associated fauna, especially fish. The coral areas lie in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream characterized by strong currents transporting relatively warm water northwards along the SEUS slope. Thus far little is known about the environmental conditions inside the SEUS coral communities and particularly the effects of the nearby Gulf Stream. In December 2009 two autonomous benthic landers were deployed amidst Lophelia reefs off Cape Lookout (NC) for a period of 6 months to define oceanographic patterns that are relevant for the development and persistence of cold-water coral ecosystems. Landers recorded temperature, fluorescence, turbidity, and current speed and direction. Furthermore, a sediment trap was mounted on the landers that collected material at a 16-days interval. A first analysis of the lander data shows that instability of the Gulf Stream causes rapid rises in temperature, current speed and turbidity lasting for days to more than a week. Peak temperature and turbidity levels are the highest measured in coral habitats studied so far. We did not see clear cut effects of Gulf Stream instabilities on the near bed flux of phytodetritus as opposed to reports of meanders inducing upwelling and enhanced production in the photic zone. Data analyzed so far suggest that cwc habitats of Cape Lookout experience extreme and adverse conditions for prolonged periods. The findings of this study are compared with methodologically similar studies that have been conducted in

  16. Perturbing a Stochastic Weather Generator with Different Climate Change Signals to Assess Extreme Precipitation under Influence of Climate Change at Urban Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørup, H. J.; Christensen, O. B.; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, K.; Mikkelsen, P. S.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, urban flooding has occurred in Denmark due to very short lived local extreme precipitation events. Several of these floods have been among the most severe experienced to date. Climate change is expected to alter the frequency of extreme precipitation events causing floods, but in general climate models are poor in representing extreme precipitation events. The current study demonstrates how the Spatio-Temporal Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses weather generator can be applied at urban scale and how it can be used for statistical downscaling by perturbation with a climate change signal. The weather generator is fitted to data from a dense network of high resolution tipping bucket rain gauges in and around Copenhagen. The weather generator is validated by its ability to reproduce realistic extreme precipitation statistics. The model reproduces intensity-duration-frequency statistics down to the one-hour time scale satisfactorily. It furthermore reproduces realistic spatial correlation patterns at the extreme rain event level when output is sampled on a 2-km grid. For downscaling, perturbation with a climate change signal obtained from four different regional climate model simulations has been analyzed. The analyzed data sets originates from two regional climate model (RCM) runs from the European ENSEMBLES project (RACMO/ECHAM and HIRHAM/ECHAM, A1B scenario and 25 km spatial scale) and two RCM runs just for southern Scandinavia performed by the Danish Meteorological Institute (both HIRHAM/EC-EARTH, rcp 4.5 and rcp 8.5 scenarios and 8 km spatial scale). The data sets are all at one-hour time resolution. All data sets result in markedly different perturbation schemes for the weather generator. The downscaled time series are analyzed in accordance to the validation procedure and change factors for the extremes are derived as a function of return period. Despite different perturbation schemes both A1B scenario model runs and the rcp 4.5 scenario model run

  17. Unique Nature of the Quality of Life in the Context of Extreme Climatic, Geographical and Specific Socio-Cultural Living Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Anastasia; Neyaskina, Yuliya; Frizen, Marina; Shiryaeva, Olga; Surikova, Yana

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of a detailed empirical research, aimed at studying the quality of life in the context of extreme climatic, geographical and specific sociocultural living conditions. Our research is based on the methodological approach including social, economical, ecological and psychological characteristics and reflecting…

  18. The influence of initial and surface boundary conditions on a model-generated January climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. F.; Spar, J.

    1981-01-01

    The influence on a model-generated January climate of various surface boundary conditions, as well as initial conditions, was studied by using the GISS coarse-mesh climate model. Four experiments - two with water planets, one with flat continents, and one with mountains - were used to investigate the effects of initial conditions, and the thermal and dynamical effects of the surface on the model generated-climate. However, climatological mean zonal-symmetric sea surface temperature is used in all four runs over the model oceans. Moreover, zero ground wetness and uniform ground albedo except for snow are used in the last experiments.

  19. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling

    PubMed Central

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  20. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling.

    PubMed

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  1. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  2. Frictional behavior and microstructures of calcite fault gouges deformed under extreme conditions of normal stress and sliding velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A.; Billi, A.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Violay, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years several experimental studies have been performed using rotary-shear apparatus to investigate the frictional behavior of gouge materials at seismic slip rates. However, because of technical difficulties confining gouge layers, a majority of these experiments were conducted at normal stresses <2-3MPa, making extrapolation to natural conditions challenging. Here, we present results from an experimental study on calcite gouges (<250μm grain size) deformed in a purpose-built sample holder and using a rotary-shear apparatus at INGV, Rome. Ring-shaped (25/45mm int./ext. diameter), 2.8mm-thick layers of gouge were deformed up to 34MPa normal stress, at slip rates of 10μm/s - 3m/s, in both room-dry and water-present conditions. A peak slip rate of 3m/s was achieved after 0.5s, and total displacements were 1-3m. CO2 emissions were monitored using a mass spectrometer connected to a capillary tube positioned approximately 1cm from the gouge sample holder. Samples were preserved in ultra-low viscosity resin for optical and Field-Emission SEM observations. At slip rates >0.3m/s frictional strength, μ, increases to a peak value of 0.6-1.0 followed by a rapid decay to a lower steady-state value, μss, before finally undergoing dynamic strength recovery during decelerating slip. CO2 starts to be liberated almost instantaneously (within 500μm of slip) during acceleration and reaches a peak value during steady-state sliding of up to 10,000ppm, before decreasing to 380-420ppm within a few seconds following the experiment. μss decreases with increasing slip rate, but in contrast to previous experiments we find that extremely low values of μss<0.2 are only achieved at a slip rate of 1m/s for normal stresses >22MPa. An unexpected result is that steady-state shear stress at slip rates >1m/s does not increase monotonically (either linearly or not, e.g. in the presence of lubrication) with normal stress, but begins to decrease above a normal stress of 15-20MPa, a

  3. Verification of Effect of Damper Windings on the Transient Condition of Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Junya; Taoka, Hisao; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Iwamoto, Shigeru; Daikoku, Akihiro

    This paper describes the results of experimental investigation on the effects of damper winding of a 4-pole synchronous generator at the synchronous generator transient. It is known in the simulation that the damper winding acts effectively at the synchronous generator transient condition. However, experimental proof has not been performed yet. Then, experiments on damper effects were conducted in this paper using a laboratory-scale power system. The damper winding of tested generator consists of 5 damper bars each pole and the number of working damper bars can be changed manually. Damper currents at each bar were measured by a Rogowski coil. FFT analysis was applied to both damper currents and armature currents under different operating conditions. Relationships between damper currents in the rotor and armature currents in the stator were made clearer than before.

  4. Identification of Extreme Events Under Climate Change Conditions Over Europe and The Northwest-atlantic Region: Spatial Patterns and Time Series Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckebusch, G.; Ulbrich, U.; Speth, P.

    In the context of climate change and the resulting possible impacts on socio-economic conditions for human activities it seems that due to a changed occurrence of extreme events more severe consequences have to be expected than from changes in the mean climate. These extreme events like floods, excessive heats and droughts or windstorms possess impacts on human social and economic life in different categories such as forestry, agriculture, energy use, tourism and the reinsurance business. Reinsurances are affected by nearly 70% of all insured damages over Europe in the case of wind- storms. Especially the December 1999 French windstorms caused damages about 10 billion. A new EU-founded project (MICE = Modelling the Impact of Climate Ex- tremes) will focus on these impacts caused by changed occurrences of extreme events over Europe. Based upon the output of general circulation models as well as regional climate models, investigations are carried out with regard to time series characteristics as well as the spatial patterns of extremes under climate changed conditions. After the definition of specific thresholds for climate extremes, in this talk we will focus on the results of the analysis for the different data sets (HadCM3 and CGCMII GCM's and RCM's, re-analyses, observations) with regard to windstorm events. At first the results of model outputs are validated against re-analyses and observations. Especially a comparison of the stormtrack (2.5 to 8 day bandpass filtered 500 hPa geopotential height), cyclone track, cyclone frequency and intensity is presented. Highly relevant to damages is the extreme wind near the ground level, so the 10 m wind speed will be investigated additionally. of special interest to possible impacts is the changed spatial occurrence of windspeed maxima under 2xCO2-induced climate change.

  5. Ambient-condition growth of high-pressure phase centrosymmetric crystalline KDP microstructures for optical second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yan; Zhao, Xian; Hagley, Edward W; Deng, Lu

    2016-08-01

    Noncentrosymmetric potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4 or KDP) in the tetragonal crystal phase is arguably the most extensively studied nonlinear optical crystal in history. It has prolific applications ranging from simple laser pointers to laser inertial confinement fusion systems. Recently, type IV high-pressure KDP crystal sheets with a monoclinic crystal phase having centrosymmetric properties have been observed. However, it was found that this new crystal phase is highly unstable under ambient conditions. We report ambient-condition growth of one-dimensional, self-assembled, single-crystalline KDP hexagonal hollow/solid-core microstructures that have a molecular structure and symmetry identical to the type IV KDP monoclinic crystal that was previously found to exist only at extremely high pressures (>1.6 GPa). Furthermore, we report highly efficient bulk optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from these ambient condition-grown single-crystalline microstructures, even though they have a highly centrosymmetric crystal phase. However, fundamental physics dictates that a bulk optical medium with a significant second-order nonlinear susceptibility supporting SHG must have noncentrosymmetric properties. Laue diffraction analysis reveals a weak symmetry-breaking twin-crystal lattice that, in conjunction with tight confinement of the light field by the tubular structure, is attributed to the significant SHG even with sample volumes <0.001 mm(3). A robust polarization-preserving effect is also observed, raising the possibility of advanced optical technological applications. PMID:27574703

  6. A Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rotor Behavior Under Extreme Operating Conditions with a Description of Blade Oscillations Attributed to Pitch-Lag Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKee, John W.; Naeseth, Rodger L.

    1959-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to study the behavior of a model helicopter rotor under extreme operating conditions. A 1/8-scale model of the front rotor of a tandem helicopter was built and tested to obtaining blade motion and rotor aerodynamic characteristics for conditions that could be encountered in high-speed pullout maneuvers. The data are presented without analysis. A description is given in an appendix of blade oscillations that were experienced during the course of the investigation and of the part that blade pitch-lag coupling played in contributing to the oscillatory condition.

  7. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Generation of Continuum Extreme-Ultraviolet Radiation by Carrier-Envelope-Phase-Stabilized 5-fs Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Hao; Yun, Chen-Xia; Zhu, Jiang-Feng; Han, Hai-Nian; Zhong, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Hou, Xun; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2009-11-01

    Coherent extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is studied by interaction of carrier-envelope (CE) phase stabilized high energy 5-fs infrared (800 nm) laser pulses with neon gas at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. A broadband continuum XUV spectrum in the cut-off region is demonstrated when the CE phase is shifted to about zero, rather than modulated spectral harmonics when setting of CE phase is nonzero. The results show the generation of isolated attosecond XUV pulses.

  8. Participation and performance trends in ultra-endurance running races under extreme conditions - ‘Spartathlon’ versus ‘Badwater’

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    approximately 40 to 45 years, and (c) the sex difference was at approximately 20%. Women will not outrun men in both Badwater and Spartathlon races. Master ultramarathoners can achieve a high level of performance in ultramarathons greater than 200 km under extreme conditions. PMID:23848985

  9. Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

    2012-08-01

    To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

  10. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today. PMID:26573709

  11. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  12. Ambient-condition growth of high-pressure phase centrosymmetric crystalline KDP microstructures for optical second harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yan; Zhao, Xian; Hagley, Edward W.; Deng, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Noncentrosymmetric potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4 or KDP) in the tetragonal crystal phase is arguably the most extensively studied nonlinear optical crystal in history. It has prolific applications ranging from simple laser pointers to laser inertial confinement fusion systems. Recently, type IV high-pressure KDP crystal sheets with a monoclinic crystal phase having centrosymmetric properties have been observed. However, it was found that this new crystal phase is highly unstable under ambient conditions. We report ambient-condition growth of one-dimensional, self-assembled, single-crystalline KDP hexagonal hollow/solid-core microstructures that have a molecular structure and symmetry identical to the type IV KDP monoclinic crystal that was previously found to exist only at extremely high pressures (>1.6 GPa). Furthermore, we report highly efficient bulk optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from these ambient condition–grown single-crystalline microstructures, even though they have a highly centrosymmetric crystal phase. However, fundamental physics dictates that a bulk optical medium with a significant second-order nonlinear susceptibility supporting SHG must have noncentrosymmetric properties. Laue diffraction analysis reveals a weak symmetry-breaking twin-crystal lattice that, in conjunction with tight confinement of the light field by the tubular structure, is attributed to the significant SHG even with sample volumes <0.001 mm3. A robust polarization-preserving effect is also observed, raising the possibility of advanced optical technological applications. PMID:27574703

  13. The Impact of Boreal Summer Intra-Seasonal Oscillation on the development of extremely wet and dry condition in South Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamide, M.; Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.

    2014-12-01

    Boreal Summer Intra-seasonal Oscillation (BSISO) is known to have a strong impact on the development of drought in South Asian Summer Monsoon (SASM). Our research found that in 6 of 8 past extremely wet / dry SASM years, monsoonal precipitation tendency dynamically reversed during May to July, associated with BSISO (figure). Since the predictability of BSISO is greatly limited, the perturbation associated with BSISO could be the main causality of the difficulty in seasonal prediction. Careful analysis on the atmospheric condition in 2002 and 2003, which are extremely dry / wet year with seasonal dynamical change of precipitation tendency, revealed that BSISO influenced on the development of both extremely dry and wet rainy season. The key factor of the influence of BSISO on the development of wet/dry atmospheric condition is the difference in the northward propagating activity of BSISO. Though it is already known that northward propagation of BSISO active (phase 1-4) phase depends on the environmental atmospheric condition [Jiang et al., 2004; Wheeler and Hendon, 2004], break (phase 5-8) phase northward propagating activity is also revealed to be different between various environment. In 2002, both of active and break convection of BSISO contributed to the development of dry condition. Both of those phases created convergence over Pakistan and north India (SASM region) in the upper troposphere. On the other hand, the opposite effect was caused by the BSISO of 2003. In order to show the generality of this impact of BSISO, theoretical analysis and carefully designed numerical experiment with Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) were conducted. We created a convection which shares common characteristics with BSISO by the forcing of sea surface temperature (SST). Further analysis revealed that northward propagation of BSISO differs depending on strong (weak) vertical shear of wind and with plenty (meagerness) of specific humidity in planetary boundary layer

  14. Simultaneous generation of fra-2 conditional and fra-2 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Eferl, Robert; Zenz, Rainer; Theussl, Hans-Christian; Wagner, Erwin F

    2007-07-01

    Loss of function mouse models comprise knock-out mice, where a gene is deleted in the germline, and conditional knock-out mice with somatic deletion of a floxed allele in defined tissues. Both types of mice are used for comprehensive studies of gene functions in vivo. Here, we describe a simple method for simultaneous generation of mice with conditional or knock-out alleles for the transcription factor fra-2 (Fos-related antigen 2) using a single embryonic stem (ES) cell clone. ES cells with a floxed fra-2 allele were transiently transfected with a Cre-recombinase expression plasmid and plated at low density. Most of the resulting ES cell colonies consisted of a mixture of cells that have either retained or lost the conditional allele. We demonstrate that these mixed ES cell clones can be directly used for generation of chimeras that give rise to offspring with conditional or knock-out alleles simultaneously. This strategy shortens the time and reduces the number of germline transmission events to generate genetically modified mice.

  15. A Discussion on Prediction of Wind Conditions and Power Generation with the Weibull Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Sumio; Sato, Kenichi; Sekizuka, Satoshi

    Assessment of profitability, based on the accurate measurement of the frequency distribution of wind speed over a certain period and the prediction of power generation under measured conditions, is normally a centrally important consideration for the installation of wind turbines. The frequency distribution of wind speed is evaluated, in general, using the Weibull distribution. In order to predict the frequency distribution from the average wind speed, a formula based on the Rayleigh distribution is often used, in which a shape parameter equal to 2 is assumed. The shape parameter is also used with the Weibull distribution; however, its effect on calculation of wind conditions and wind power has not been sufficiently clarified. This study reports on the evaluation of wind conditions and wind power generation as they are affected by the change of the shape parameter in the Weibull distribution with regard to two wind turbine generator systems that have the same nominal rated power, but different control methods. It further discusses the effect of the shape parameter of prototype wind turbines at a site with the measured wind condition data.

  16. A generalized sine condition and performance comparison of Wolter type II and Wolter-Schwarzschild extreme ultraviolet telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. T.

    1984-01-01

    An equation similar to the Abbe sine condition is derived for a Wolter type II telescope. This equation and the sine condition are then combined to produce a so called generalized sine condition. Using the law of reflection, Fermat's principle, the generalized sine condition, and simple geometry the surface equations for a Wolter type II telescope and an equivalent Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope are calculated. The performances of the telescopes are compared in terms of rms blur circle radius at the gaussian focal plane and at best focus.

  17. Fully Electrical Modeling of Thermoelectric Generators with Contact Thermal Resistance Under Different Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siouane, Saima; Jovanović, Slaviša; Poure, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The Seebeck effect is used in thermoelectric generators (TEGs) to supply electronic circuits by converting the waste thermal into electrical energy. This generated electrical power is directly proportional to the temperature difference between the TEG module's hot and cold sides. Depending on the applications, TEGs can be used either under constant temperature gradient between heat reservoirs or constant heat flow conditions. Moreover, the generated electrical power of a TEG depends not only on these operating conditions, but also on the contact thermal resistance. The influence of the contact thermal resistance on the generated electrical power have already been extensively reported in the literature. However, as reported in Park et al. (Energy Convers Manag 86:233, 2014) and Montecucco and Knox (IEEE Trans Power Electron 30:828, 2015), while designing TEG-powered circuit and systems, a TEG module is mostly modeled with a Thévenin equivalent circuit whose resistance is constant and voltage proportional to the temperature gradient applied to the TEG's terminals. This widely used simplified electrical TEG model is inaccurate and not suitable under constant heat flow conditions or when the contact thermal resistance is considered. Moreover, it does not provide realistic behaviour corresponding to the physical phenomena taking place in a TEG. Therefore, from the circuit designer's point of view, faithful and fully electrical TEG models under different operating conditions are needed. Such models are mainly necessary to design and evaluate the power conditioning electronic stages and the maximum power point tracking algorithms of a TEG power supply. In this study, these fully electrical models with the contact thermal resistance taken into account are presented and the analytical expressions of the Thévenin equivalent circuit parameters are provided.

  18. Application and development of technologies for engine-condition-based maintenance of emergency diesel generators

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K. H.; Sang, G.; Choi, L. Y. S.; Lee, B. O.

    2012-07-01

    The emergency diesel generator (EDG) of a nuclear power plant has the role of supplying emergency electric power to protect the reactor core system in the event of the loss of offsite power supply. Therefore, EDGs should be subject to periodic surveillance testing to verify their ability to supply specified frequencies and voltages at design power levels within a limited time. To maintain optimal reliability of EDGs, condition monitoring/diagnosis technologies must be developed. Changing from periodic disassemble maintenance to condition-based maintenance (CBM) according to predictions of equipment condition is recommended. In this paper, the development of diagnosis technology for CBM and the application of a diesel engine condition-analysis system are described. (authors)

  19. Near-extremal Black Holes as Initial Conditions of Long GRB Supernovae and Probes of Their Gravitational Wave Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2015-09-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae and short GRBs with extended emission (SGRBEE) from mergers are probably powered by black holes as a common inner engine, as their prompt GRB emission satisfies the same Amati correlation in the Ep,i-Eiso plane. We introduce modified Bardeen equations to identify hyper-accretion driving newly formed black holes in core-collapse supernovae to near-extremal spin as a precursor to prompt GRB emission. Subsequent spin-down is observed in the BATSE catalog of long GRBs. Spin-down provides a natural unification of long durations associated with the lifetime of black hole spin for normal long GRBs and SGRBEEs, given the absence of major fallback matter in mergers. The results point to major emissions unseen in high frequency gravitational waves. A novel matched filtering method is described for LIGO-Virgo and KAGRA broadband probes of nearby core-collapse supernovae at essentially maximal sensitivity.

  20. Heterotrophic bacteria from an extremely phosphate-poor lake have conditionally reduced phosphorus demand and utilize diverse sources of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mengyin; Elling, Felix J; Jones, CarriAyne; Nomosatryo, Sulung; Long, Christopher P; Crowe, Sean A; Antoniewicz, Maciek R; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Maresca, Julia A

    2016-02-01

    Heterotrophic Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were isolated from Lake Matano, Indonesia, a stratified, ferruginous (iron-rich), ultra-oligotrophic lake with phosphate concentrations below 50 nM. Here, we describe the growth of eight strains of heterotrophic bacteria on a variety of soluble and insoluble sources of phosphorus. When transferred to medium without added phosphorus (P), the isolates grow slowly, their RNA content falls to as low as 1% of cellular dry weight, and 86-100% of the membrane lipids are replaced with amino- or glycolipids. Similar changes in lipid composition have been observed in marine photoautotrophs and soil heterotrophs, and similar flexibility in phosphorus sources has been demonstrated in marine and soil-dwelling heterotrophs. Our results demonstrate that heterotrophs isolated from this unusual environment alter their macromolecular composition, which allows the organisms to grow efficiently even in their extremely phosphorus-limited environment. PMID:26415900

  1. Generation of multi-spectral scene images under different weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changbo; Wang, Zhangye; Wu, Yiqi; Peng, Qunsheng

    2005-10-01

    Different kinds of atmospheric media and variation of weather conditions make the generation of multi-spectral out-door scene image quite complex. In this paper, we propose a new approach to realistically generate the multi-spectral scene images under different weather conditions. We first establish the geometrical models of several special weather phenomena. The method of three-dimension cellular automata is adopted to construct the cloud, and particle system is used to model the rain. After that we calculate the radiance of different wavebands for cloud, fog, rain under different weather conditions. The radiance components, such as self-emitted radiance, reflected radiation, transmitted radiance, are calculated separately and the total radiance is thus acquired. Then, based on the spectral radiance values of cloud, rain and fog calculated by above models, we construct the scene under different weather conditions. Finally multi-spectral scene images under different weather conditions are rendered realistically. Simulation results show the potential of our approach.

  2. Remote ischaemic conditioning in the context of type 2 diabetes and neuropathy: the case for repeat application as a novel therapy for lower extremity ulceration.

    PubMed

    Epps, J A; Smart, N A

    2016-01-01

    An emerging treatment modality for reducing damage caused by ischaemia-reperfusion injury is ischaemic conditioning. This technique induces short periods of ischaemia that have been found to protect against a more significant ischaemic insult. Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) can be administered more conveniently and safely, by inflation of a pneumatic blood pressure cuff to a suprasystolic pressure on a limb. Protection is then transferred to a remote organ via humoral and neural pathways. The diabetic state is particularly vulnerable to ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and ischaemia is a significant cause of many diabetic complications, including the diabetic foot. Despite this, studies utilising ischaemic conditioning and RIC in type 2 diabetes have often been disappointing. A newer strategy, repeat RIC, involves the repeated application of short periods of limb ischaemia over days or weeks. It has been demonstrated that this improves endothelial function, skin microcirculation, and modulates the systemic inflammatory response. Repeat RIC was recently shown to be beneficial for healing in lower extremity diabetic ulcers. This article summarises the mechanisms of RIC, and the impact that type 2 diabetes may have upon these, with the role of neural mechanisms in the context of diabetic neuropathy a focus. Repeat RIC may show more promise than RIC in type 2 diabetes, and its potential mechanisms and applications will also be explored. Considering the high costs, rates of chronicity and serious complications resulting from diabetic lower extremity ulceration, repeat RIC has the potential to be an effective novel advanced therapy for this condition. PMID:27613524

  3. Remote ischaemic conditioning in the context of type 2 diabetes and neuropathy: the case for repeat application as a novel therapy for lower extremity ulceration.

    PubMed

    Epps, J A; Smart, N A

    2016-01-01

    An emerging treatment modality for reducing damage caused by ischaemia-reperfusion injury is ischaemic conditioning. This technique induces short periods of ischaemia that have been found to protect against a more significant ischaemic insult. Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) can be administered more conveniently and safely, by inflation of a pneumatic blood pressure cuff to a suprasystolic pressure on a limb. Protection is then transferred to a remote organ via humoral and neural pathways. The diabetic state is particularly vulnerable to ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and ischaemia is a significant cause of many diabetic complications, including the diabetic foot. Despite this, studies utilising ischaemic conditioning and RIC in type 2 diabetes have often been disappointing. A newer strategy, repeat RIC, involves the repeated application of short periods of limb ischaemia over days or weeks. It has been demonstrated that this improves endothelial function, skin microcirculation, and modulates the systemic inflammatory response. Repeat RIC was recently shown to be beneficial for healing in lower extremity diabetic ulcers. This article summarises the mechanisms of RIC, and the impact that type 2 diabetes may have upon these, with the role of neural mechanisms in the context of diabetic neuropathy a focus. Repeat RIC may show more promise than RIC in type 2 diabetes, and its potential mechanisms and applications will also be explored. Considering the high costs, rates of chronicity and serious complications resulting from diabetic lower extremity ulceration, repeat RIC has the potential to be an effective novel advanced therapy for this condition.

  4. Inhibition of sulfide generation by dosing formaldehyde and its derivatives in sewage under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Mendoza, L; Marzorati, M; Verstraete, W

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide emission in sewers is associated with toxicity, corrosion, odor nuisance and a lot of costs. The possibility to inhibit sulfide generation by formaldehyde and its derivatives (paraformaldehyde and urea formaldehyde) has been evaluated under anaerobic conditions. The impact of formaldehyde on an activated sludge system and an appraisal of the economic aspects are also presented. The optimum dosage to inhibit sulfide generation in sewage was 12-19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde. The dosages of 32 mg L(-1) paraformaldehyde or 100 mg L(-1) urea formaldehyde were not capable of inhibiting sulfide generation in sewage. The impact of 19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde on activated sludge system was negligible in terms of COD removal, nitrification rate and oxygen uptake rate.

  5. An assessment of the geotemperature conditions of Bazhenov oil generation (Koltogor mezodepression and its framing structures)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotskiy, V. V.; Isaev, V. I.; Fomin, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal history of oil source rocks of Bazhenov deposits was reconstructed in 8 cross-sections of representative wells of Koltogor mezodepression and the structures framing it. The tectonic history and geotemperature were reconstructed for well profiles, some located in the depression zone and others in the positive structures. A comparative analysis of the geotemperature conditions accompanying the generation of Bazhenov oils was performed.

  6. Analyses of an air conditioning system with entropy generation minimization and entransy theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Qiu, Wu; Li, Cai; Hong-Juan, Wu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, based on the generalized heat transfer law, an air conditioning system is analyzed with the entropy generation minimization and the entransy theory. Taking the coefficient of performance (denoted as COP) and heat flow rate Q out which is released into the room as the optimization objectives, we discuss the applicabilities of the entropy generation minimization and entransy theory to the optimizations. Five numerical cases are presented. Combining the numerical results and theoretical analyses, we can conclude that the optimization applicabilities of the two theories are conditional. If Q out is the optimization objective, larger entransy increase rate always leads to larger Q out, while smaller entropy generation rate does not. If we take COP as the optimization objective, neither the entropy generation minimization nor the concept of entransy increase is always applicable. Furthermore, we find that the concept of entransy dissipation is not applicable for the discussed cases. Project supported by the Youth Programs of Chongqing Three Gorges University, China (Grant No. 13QN18).

  7. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems. PMID:6774707

  8. Analyses of an air conditioning system with entropy generation minimization and entransy theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Qiu, Wu; Li, Cai; Hong-Juan, Wu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, based on the generalized heat transfer law, an air conditioning system is analyzed with the entropy generation minimization and the entransy theory. Taking the coefficient of performance (denoted as COP) and heat flow rate Q out which is released into the room as the optimization objectives, we discuss the applicabilities of the entropy generation minimization and entransy theory to the optimizations. Five numerical cases are presented. Combining the numerical results and theoretical analyses, we can conclude that the optimization applicabilities of the two theories are conditional. If Q out is the optimization objective, larger entransy increase rate always leads to larger Q out, while smaller entropy generation rate does not. If we take COP as the optimization objective, neither the entropy generation minimization nor the concept of entransy increase is always applicable. Furthermore, we find that the concept of entransy dissipation is not applicable for the discussed cases. Project supported by the Youth Programs of Chongqing Three Gorges University, China (Grant No. 13QN18).

  9. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems.

  10. Conditions for Multi-functionality in a Rhythm Generating Network Inspired by Turtle Scratching.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Abigail C; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic behaviors such as breathing, walking, and scratching are vital to many species. Such behaviors can emerge from groups of neurons, called central pattern generators, in the absence of rhythmic inputs. In vertebrates, the identification of the cells that constitute the central pattern generator for particular rhythmic behaviors is difficult, and often, its existence has only been inferred. For example, under experimental conditions, intact turtles generate several rhythmic scratch motor patterns corresponding to non-rhythmic stimulation of different body regions. These patterns feature alternating phases of motoneuron activation that occur repeatedly, with different patterns distinguished by the relative timing and duration of activity of hip extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor motoneurons. While the central pattern generator network responsible for these outputs has not been located, there is hope to use motoneuron recordings to deduce its properties. To this end, this work presents a model of a previously proposed central pattern generator network and analyzes its capability to produce two distinct scratch rhythms from a single neuron pool, selected by different combinations of tonic drive parameters but with fixed strengths of connections within the network. We show through simulation that the proposed network can achieve the desired multi-functionality, even though it relies on hip unit generators to recruit appropriately timed knee extensor motoneuron activity, including a delay relative to hip activation in rostral scratch. Furthermore, we develop a phase space representation, focusing on the inputs to and the intrinsic slow variable of the knee extensor motoneuron, which we use to derive sufficient conditions for the network to realize each rhythm and which illustrates the role of a saddle-node bifurcation in achieving the knee extensor delay. This framework is harnessed to consider bistability and to make predictions about the responses of the

  11. Conditions for Multi-functionality in a Rhythm Generating Network Inspired by Turtle Scratching.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Abigail C; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic behaviors such as breathing, walking, and scratching are vital to many species. Such behaviors can emerge from groups of neurons, called central pattern generators, in the absence of rhythmic inputs. In vertebrates, the identification of the cells that constitute the central pattern generator for particular rhythmic behaviors is difficult, and often, its existence has only been inferred. For example, under experimental conditions, intact turtles generate several rhythmic scratch motor patterns corresponding to non-rhythmic stimulation of different body regions. These patterns feature alternating phases of motoneuron activation that occur repeatedly, with different patterns distinguished by the relative timing and duration of activity of hip extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor motoneurons. While the central pattern generator network responsible for these outputs has not been located, there is hope to use motoneuron recordings to deduce its properties. To this end, this work presents a model of a previously proposed central pattern generator network and analyzes its capability to produce two distinct scratch rhythms from a single neuron pool, selected by different combinations of tonic drive parameters but with fixed strengths of connections within the network. We show through simulation that the proposed network can achieve the desired multi-functionality, even though it relies on hip unit generators to recruit appropriately timed knee extensor motoneuron activity, including a delay relative to hip activation in rostral scratch. Furthermore, we develop a phase space representation, focusing on the inputs to and the intrinsic slow variable of the knee extensor motoneuron, which we use to derive sufficient conditions for the network to realize each rhythm and which illustrates the role of a saddle-node bifurcation in achieving the knee extensor delay. This framework is harnessed to consider bistability and to make predictions about the responses of the

  12. Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

  13. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-02-01

    The structural properties of spent nuclear fuel shipping containers vary as a function of the cask wall temperature. An analysis is performed to determine the effect of a realistic, though bounding, hot day environment on the thermal behavior of spent fuel shipping casks. These results are compared to those which develop under a steady-state application of the prescribed normal thermal conditions of 10CFR71. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by using the steady-state application of the regulatory boundary conditions. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the regulatory condition. This is due to the conservative assumptions present in the ambient conditions used. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations which penetrate the cask wall have maxima substantially less than the corresponding temperatures obtained when applying the steady-state regulatory boundary conditions. Therefore, it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the steady-state interpretation of the 10CFR71 normal conditions.

  14. Integrating K-means Clustering with Kernel Density Estimation for the Development of a Conditional Weather Generation Downscaling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Ho, C.; Chang, L.

    2011-12-01

    In previous decades, the climate change caused by global warming increases the occurrence frequency of extreme hydrological events. Water supply shortages caused by extreme events create great challenges for water resource management. To evaluate future climate variations, general circulation models (GCMs) are the most wildly known tools which shows possible weather conditions under pre-defined CO2 emission scenarios announced by IPCC. Because the study area of GCMs is the entire earth, the grid sizes of GCMs are much larger than the basin scale. To overcome the gap, a statistic downscaling technique can transform the regional scale weather factors into basin scale precipitations. The statistic downscaling technique can be divided into three categories include transfer function, weather generator and weather type. The first two categories describe the relationships between the weather factors and precipitations respectively based on deterministic algorithms, such as linear or nonlinear regression and ANN, and stochastic approaches, such as Markov chain theory and statistical distributions. In the weather type, the method has ability to cluster weather factors, which are high dimensional and continuous variables, into weather types, which are limited number of discrete states. In this study, the proposed downscaling model integrates the weather type, using the K-means clustering algorithm, and the weather generator, using the kernel density estimation. The study area is Shihmen basin in northern of Taiwan. In this study, the research process contains two steps, a calibration step and a synthesis step. Three sub-steps were used in the calibration step. First, weather factors, such as pressures, humidities and wind speeds, obtained from NCEP and the precipitations observed from rainfall stations were collected for downscaling. Second, the K-means clustering grouped the weather factors into four weather types. Third, the Markov chain transition matrixes and the

  15. Precipitation of Oriented Rutile and Ilmenite Needles in Garnet, Northeastern Connecticut, USA: Evidence for Extreme Metamorphic Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ague, J. J.; Eckert, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of oriented needles of rutile and, less commonly, ilmenite in the cores of garnets from northeastern CT, USA. The rocks preserve granulite facies mineral assemblages, form part of the Merrimack Synclinorium, and underwent metamorphism and deformation during the Acadian orogeny. The needles appear identical to those reported from a number of extreme P-T environments worldwide, including UHP metamorphic rocks, high-P granulites, and garnet peridotites. The needles are predominantly oriented along <111> directions in garnet. The long axes of the rutile needles commonly do not go extinct parallel to the cross hairs under cross-polarized light (e.g., Griffin et al., 1971). This anomalous extinction indicates that the needles do not preserve a specific crystallographic relationship with their garnet hosts (e.g., Hwang et al., 2007). The needles range from a few hundred nm to a few um in diameter, and can be mm-scale in length. Micrometer-scale plates of rutile, srilankite and crichtonite have also been observed in some garnets together with the Fe-Ti oxide needles. Several origins for the needles have been proposed in the literature; we investigate the hypothesis that they precipitated in situ from originally Ti-rich garnet. Chemical profiles across garnets indicate that some retain Ti zoning, with elevated-Ti concentrations in the cores dropping to low values in the rims. For these zoned garnets, high-resolution, 2-D chemical mapping using the JEOL JXA-8530F field emission gun electron microprobe at Yale University reveals that the needles are surrounded by well-defined Ti-depletion halos. Chemical profiles also document strong depletions of Cr (which is present in both rutile and ilmenite) directly adjacent to needles. The observed Ti-depletions demonstrate that the needles precipitated from Ti-bearing garnet, probably during cooling and/or decompression associated with exhumation. The rutile precipitates must be largely incoherent with respect

  16. Au-C allotrope nano-composite films at extreme conditions generated by intense ultra-short laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saif A.; Saravanan, K.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2016-07-01

    Structural evolution of gold-carbon allotrope nano-composite films under relativistically intense, ultra-short laser pulse irradiation is studied in this work. Au-C nano-composite films, having 4 and 10 at.% of Au, were deposited by co-sputtering technique on silicon substrates. Au-C60 NC films with 2.5 at.% Au were deposited on 12 μm thick Al foil using co-evaporation technique. These samples were radiated with single pulse from 45 fs, 10 TW Ti:Sapphire Laser at RRCAT at an intensity of 3 × 1018 W cm-2. The morphological and compositional changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry (RBS) techniques. Laser pulse created three morphologically distinct zones around the point of impact on samples with silicon substrates. The gold content in 600 μm circular region around a point of impact is found to reduce by a factor of five. Annular rings of ∼70 nm in diameter were observed in case of Au-C NC film after irradiation. Laser pulse created a hole of about 400 μm in the sample with Al foil as substrate and wavy structures of 6 μm wavelength are found to be created around this hole. The study shows radial variation in nano-structure formation with varying local intensity of laser pulse.

  17. Mechanism of adaptability for the nano-structured TiAlCrSiYN-based hard physical vapor deposition coatings under extreme frictional conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Rabinovich, G. S.; Endrino, J. L.; Aguirre, M. H.; Beake, B. D.; Veldhuis, S. C.; Kovalev, A. I.; Gershman, I. S.; Yamamoto, K.; Losset, Y.; Wainstein, D. L.; Rashkovskiy, A.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, a family of hard mono- and multilayer TiAlCrSiYN-based coatings have been introduced that exhibit adaptive behavior under extreme tribological conditions (in particular during dry ultrahigh speed machining of hardened tool steels). The major feature of these coatings is the formation of the tribo-films on the friction surface which possess high protective ability under operating temperatures of 1000 °C and above. These tribo-films are generated as a result of a self-organization process during friction. But the mechanism how these films affect adaptability of the hard coating is still an open question. The major mechanism proposed in this paper is associated with a strong gradient of temperatures within the layer of nano-scaled tribo-films. This trend was outlined by the performed thermodynamic analysis of friction phenomena combined with the developing of a numerical model of heat transfer within cutting zone based on the finite element method. The results of the theoretical studies show that the major physical-chemical processes during cutting are mostly concentrated within a layer of the tribo-films. This nano-tribological phenomenon produces beneficial heat distribution at the chip/tool interface which controls the tool life and wear behavior.Results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate enhanced formation of protective sapphire- and mullite-like tribo-films on the friction surface of the multilayer TiAlCrSiYN/TiAlCrN coating. Comprehensive investigations of the structure and phase transformation within the coating layer under operation have been performed, using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron radiation technique: x-ray absorption near-edge structure and XRD methods.The data obtained show that the tribo-films efficiently perform their thermal barrier functions preventing heat to penetrate into the body of coated cutting tool. Due to this the surface damaging process as well as non-beneficial phase

  18. Biohydrogen production from glucose in upflow biofilm reactors with plastic carriers under extreme thermophilic conditions (70 degrees C).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hang; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-08-01

    Biohydrogen could efficiently be produced in glucose-fed biofilm reactors filled with plastic carriers and operated at 70 degrees C. Batch experiments were, in addition, conducted to enrich and cultivate glucose-fed extreme-thermophilic hydrogen producing microorganisms from a biohydrogen CSTR reactor fed with household solid waste. Kinetic analysis of the biohydrogen enrichment cultures show that substrate (glucose) likely inhibited hydrogen production when its concentration was higher than 1 g/L. Different start up strategies were applied for biohydrogen production in biofilm reactors operated at 70 degrees C, and fed with synthetic medium with glucose as the only carbon and energy source. A biofilm reactor, started up with plastic carriers, that were previously inoculated with the enrichment cultures, resulted in higher hydrogen yield (2.21 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed) but required longer start up time (1 month), while a biofilm reactor directly inoculated with the enrichment cultures reached stable state much faster (8 days) but with very low hydrogen yield (0.69 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed). These results indicate that hydraulic pressure is necessary for successful immobilization of bacteria on carriers, while there is the risk of washing out specific high yielding bacteria.

  19. Predicting crystal structures and properties of matter under extreme conditions via quantum mechanics: the pressure is on.

    PubMed

    Zurek, Eva; Grochala, Wojciech

    2015-02-01

    Experimental studies of compressed matter are now routinely conducted at pressures exceeding 1 mln atm (100 GPa) and occasionally at pressures greater than 10 mln atm (1 TPa). The structure and properties of solids that have been so significantly squeezed differ considerably from those of solids at ambient pressure (1 atm), often leading to new and unexpected physics. Chemical reactivity is also substantially altered in the extreme pressure regime. In this feature paper we describe how synergy between theory and experiment can pave the road towards new experimental discoveries. Because chemical rules-of-thumb established at 1 atm often fail to predict the structures of solids under high pressure, automated crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods are increasingly employed. After outlining the most important CSP techniques, we showcase a few examples from the recent literature that exemplify just how useful theory can be as an aid in the interpretation of experimental data, describe exciting theoretical predictions that are guiding experiment, and discuss when the computational methods that are currently routinely employed fail. Finally, we forecast important problems that will be targeted by theory as theoretical methods undergo rapid development, along with the simultaneous increase of computational power.

  20. NEAR-EXTREMAL BLACK HOLES AS INITIAL CONDITIONS OF LONG GRB SUPERNOVAE AND PROBES OF THEIR GRAVITATIONAL WAVE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2015-09-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae and short GRBs with extended emission (SGRBEE) from mergers are probably powered by black holes as a common inner engine, as their prompt GRB emission satisfies the same Amati correlation in the E{sub p,i}–E{sub iso} plane. We introduce modified Bardeen equations to identify hyper-accretion driving newly formed black holes in core-collapse supernovae to near-extremal spin as a precursor to prompt GRB emission. Subsequent spin-down is observed in the BATSE catalog of long GRBs. Spin-down provides a natural unification of long durations associated with the lifetime of black hole spin for normal long GRBs and SGRBEEs, given the absence of major fallback matter in mergers. The results point to major emissions unseen in high frequency gravitational waves. A novel matched filtering method is described for LIGO–Virgo and KAGRA broadband probes of nearby core-collapse supernovae at essentially maximal sensitivity.

  1. [Process strategy for ethanol production from lignocellulose feedstock under extremely low water usage and high solids loading conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Chu, Deqiang; Yu, Zhanchun; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Deng, Hongbo; Wang, Xiusheng; Zhu, Zhinan; Zhang, Huaiqing; Dai, Gance; Bao, Jie

    2010-07-01

    The massive water and steam are consumed in the production of cellulose ethanol, which correspondingly results in the significant increase of energy cost, waster water discharge and production cost as well. In this study, the process strategy under extremely low water usage and high solids loading of corn stover was investigated experimentally and computationally. The novel pretreatment technology with zero waste water discharge was developed; in which a unique biodetoxification method using a kerosene fungus strain Amorphotheca resinae ZN1 to degrade the lignocellulose derived inhibitors was applied. With high solids loading of pretreated corn stover, high ethanol titer was achieved in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process, and the scale-up principles were studied. Furthermore, the flowsheet simulation of the whole process was carried out with the Aspen plus based physical database, and the integrated process developed was tested in the biorefinery mini-plant. Finally, the core technologies were applied in the cellulose ethanol demonstration plant, which paved a way for the establishment of an energy saving and environment friendly technology of lignocellulose biotransformation with industry application potential.

  2. Computer-aided generation of stimulation data and model identification for functional electrical stimulation (FES) control of lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Eom, G M; Watanabe, T; Futami, R; Hoshimiy, N; Handa, Y

    2000-01-01

    Standard stimulation data for unassisted standing up of paraplegic patients was generated by dynamic optimization linked with model simulation, to overcome the difficulties in the present electromyogram (EMG)-based method. The generated stimulation data were roughly in agreement with the normal subjects' EMG. From these, it is suggested that the 'model-based' method is useful as an alternative of the 'EMG-based method'. The same technique can be applied to generation of patient-specific stimulation data once the musculoskeletal system of a patient is properly identified. The musculoskeletal system must be identified from data taken from simple and noninvasive experiments for the identification method to be practically acceptable. We developed a musculoskeletal model and systematic identification protocols for this purpose. They were validated for the vastus lateralis muscle at the knee joint. The identification was successful and the predicted joint angle trajectories closely matched the experimental data. This implies that the model-based generation of patient-specific stimulation data is possible.

  3. Impact of Boundary Conditions on Extreme Climate Simulation over South-Korea in the CORDEX-East Asia Domain Using RegCM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. G.; Suh, M. S.; Cha, D. H.; Kang, H. S.

    2012-04-01

    The COordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) is a framework devoted to coordinate international efforts on regional climate simulations. National Institute of Meteorological Research of KMA organizes a domestic collaborative research project for contributing to the CORDEX East Asia. Within the evaluation framework of CORDEX, the goal of this study is to produce 20-year regional climate and also to assess the performance skills of different regional climate models (RCMs; e.g., RegCM4, RSM, WRF, and SNURCM). In this work, we will present the two sets of extreme climate simulation results of RegCM4 over South-Korea in the CORDEX-East Asia Domain driven by the two different lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) data, ERA-Interim (ERA) and NCEP/DOE reanalysis (R-2) during the 20 years (1989-2008). For the validation of RegCM4 extreme climate simulations, the climate stations daily data (precipitation, maximum/minimum temperature) from KMA were used. We consider two types definition of extremes based on the intensity and frequency, as the number of days with extreme events (four categories: frost, hot, wet, and dry days) exceeding absolute threshold values and the average of the highest/lowest 5% (percentile thresholds) values at the each station for each year. Although the RegCM4 underestimated the frequency and intensity of daily extreme climate events compared to the observation regardless of the LBC, the RegCM4 successfully simulates the inter-annual variations of the four categories and the highest (lowest) 5% mean maximum (minimum) temperature and precipitation. The highest/lowest 5% maximum/minimum temperature (precipitation) simulated by RegCM4 using ERA was systematically higher (stronger) than those by using R-2 over South-Korea during simulation period. And maximum temperature and heavy precipitation is better simulated when driven by ERA than R-2, on the other hand, minimum temperature is better simulated when driven by R-2. As a result, the

  4. Adaptive Coping under Conditions of Extreme Stress: Multilevel Influences on the Determinants of Resilience in Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of resilience in maltreated children reveals the possibility of coping processes and resources on multiple levels of analysis as children strive to adapt under conditions of severe stress. In a maltreating context, aspects of self-organization, including self-esteem, self-reliance, emotion regulation, and adaptable yet reserved…

  5. Evaluation of stochastic weather generators for capturing the statistics of extreme precipitation events in the Catskill Mountain watersheds, New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, N.; Frei, A.; Owens, E. M.; Chen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Watersheds located in the Catskill Mountains area, part of the eastern plateau climate region of New York, contributes about 90% of New York City's municipal water supply, serving 9 million New Yorkers with about 1.2 billion gallons of clean drinking water each day. The New York City Department of Environmental Protection has an ongoing series of studies to assess the potential impacts of climate change on the availability of high quality water in this water supply system. Recent studies identify increasing trends in total precipitation and in the frequency of extreme precipitation events in this region. The objectives of the present study are: to analyze the proba­bilistic structure of extreme precipitation based on historical observations: and to evaluate the abilities of stochastic weather generators (WG), statistical models that produce synthetic weather time series based on observed statistical properties at a particular location, to simulate the statistical properties of extreme precipitation events over this region. The generalized extreme value distribution (GEV) has been applied to the annual block maxima of precipitation for 60 years (1950 to 2009) observed data in order to estimate the events with return periods of 50, 75, and 100 years. These results were then used to evaluate a total of 13 WGs were : 12 parametric WGs including all combinations of three different orders of Markov chain (MC) models (1st , 2nd and 3rd) and four different probability distributions (exponential, gamma, skewed normal and mixed exponential); and one semi parametric WG based on k-nearest neighbor bootstrapping. Preliminary results suggest that three-parameter (skewed normal and mixed exponential distribution) and semi-parametric (k-nearest neighbor bootstrapping) WGs are more consistent with observations. It is also found that first order MC models perform as well as second or third order MC models.

  6. Far-infrared-light shadowgraphy for high extraction efficiency of extreme ultraviolet light from a CO2-laser-generated tin plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Hiraku; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yosuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Kodama, Takeshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    The two-color, double-pulse method is an efficient scheme to generate extreme ultraviolet light for fabricating the next generation semiconductor microchips. In this method, a Nd:YAG laser pulse is used to expand a several-tens-of-micrometers-scale tin droplet, and a CO2 laser pulse is subsequently directed at the expanded tin vapor after an appropriate delay time. We propose the use of shadowgraphy with a CO2 laser probe-pulse scheme to optimize the CO2 main-drive laser. The distribution of absorption coefficients is derived from the experiment, and the results are converted to a practical absorption rate for the CO2 main-drive laser.

  7. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71.

  8. Generation of a cre recombinase-conditional Nos1ap over-expression transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Dallas R.; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Bedja, Djahida; Simmers, Jessica L.; Pak, Evgenia; Dutra, Amalia; Cohn, Ronald; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphic non-coding variants at the NOS1AP locus have been associated with the common cardiac, metabolic and neurological traits and diseases. Although, in vitro gene targeting-based cellular and biochemical studies have shed some light on NOS1AP function in cardiac and neuronal tissue, to enhance our understanding of NOS1AP function in mammalian physiology and disease, we report the generation of cre recombinase-conditional Nos1ap over-expression transgenic mice (Nos1apTg). Conditional transgenic mice were generated by the pronuclear injection method and three independent, single-site, multiple copies integration event-based founder lines were selected. For heart-restricted over-expression, Nos1apTg mice were crossed with Mlc2v-cre and Nos1ap transcript over-expression was observed in left ventricles from Nos1apTg; Mlc2v-cre F1 mice. We believe that with the potential of conditional over-expression, Nos1apTg mice will be a useful resource in studying NOS1AP function in various tissues under physiological and disease states. PMID:24563304

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of the meandering of a wind turbine wake with stochastically generated boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Yann-Aël; Masson, Christian; Aubrun, Sandrine

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine wakes are known to be affected by the large atmospheric turbulent scales, which can cause trajectory variations within a wide frequency band. This phenomenon, called meandering, is suspected to be a cause of premature wear on turbines located inside wind farms. This work proposes a method to generate and apply synthetic turbulent velocity series as boundary conditions in a Large Eddy Simulation of an actuator disk in a flow with realistic turbulence characteristics. The stochastic generation method relies on the inverse Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) of a random vector field correlated in Fourier space according to the covariance tensor calculated from the homogeneous isotropic spectral tensor. In contrast with a single Fourier transform, the STFT allows the generation of arbitrarily large velocity fields. The generated series are used as boundary values on the inlet as well as on the lateral boundaries of the domain. This allows for sustained turbulent forcing on the whole length of the domain which is especially useful for a small computational domain relative to the size of the dominant turbulent scales.

  10. Conditions for Debris-Background Ion Interactions and Collisionless Shock Wave Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, Dan; Cowee, Misa

    2012-07-10

    We use hybrid simulations and simple theoretical arguments to determine when debris ions streaming relative to background ions in a collisionless, magnetized plasma couple strongly enough to generate a magnetosonic shock wave. We consider three types of configurations: one-dimensional, the two-dimensional extension of the 1-D case, and a more complex 2-D geometry that contains some effects that would be found in a laser-produced, laboratory plasma. We show that the simulation results as well as previous Russian and LLNL results reduce to a simple condition (R{sub m}/{rho}{sub d} = equal mass radius/debris ion gyroradius {ge} 0.7) for the generation of a shock wave. Strong debris interaction with the background is characterized by the formation of a magnetic pulse that steepens and speeds up as it encounters the debris ions deflected by the magnetic field. The pulse further evolves into a shock. As the earlier work has indicated, the process also involves the generation of a transverse electric field perpendicular to the flow and the magnetic field that accelerates the background ions radially outward, which in turn causes the speedup of the pulse. With electric and magnetic field probes, the UCLA laser experiments should be able to detect these signatures of coupling as well as the generation of the shock wave.

  11. Base Oil-Extreme Pressure Additive Synergy in Lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme pressure (EP) additives are those containing reactive elements such as sulfur, phosphorus, and chlorine. In lubrication processes that occur under extremely severe conditions (e.g., high pressure and/or slow speed), these elements undergo chemical reactions generating new materials (tribofi...

  12. Seasonal Prediction of Hydro-Climatic Extremes in the Greater Horn of Africa Under Evolving Climate Conditions to Support Adaptation Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, T.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Habib, S.; Funk, C. C.; Senay, G. B.; Dinku, T.; Policelli, F. S.; Block, P.; Baigorria, G. A.; Beyene, S.; Wardlow, B.; Hayes, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The development of effective strategies to adapt to changes in the character of droughts and floods in Africa will rely on improved seasonal prediction systems that are robust to an evolving climate baseline and can be integrated into disaster preparedness and response. Many efforts have been made to build models to improve seasonal forecasts in the Greater Horn of Africa region (GHA) using satellite and climate data, but these efforts and models must be improved and translated into future conditions under evolving climate conditions. This has considerable social significance, but is challenged by the nature of climate predictability and the adaptability of coupled natural and human systems facing exposure to climate extremes. To address these issues, work is in progress under a project funded by NASA. The objectives of the project include: 1) Characterize and explain large-scale drivers in the ocean-atmosphere-land system associated with years of extreme flood or drought in the GHA. 2) Evaluate the performance of state-of-the-art seasonal forecast methods for prediction of decision-relevant metrics of hydrologic extremes. 3) Apply seasonal forecast systems to prediction of socially relevant impacts on crops, flood risk, and economic outcomes, and assess the value of these predictions to decision makers. 4) Evaluate the robustness of seasonal prediction systems to evolving climate conditions. The National Drought Mitigation Center (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA) is leading this project in collaboration with the USGS, Johns Hopkins University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, NASA, and GHA local experts. The project is also designed to have active engagement of end users in various sectors, university researchers, and extension agents in GHA through workshops and/or webinars. This project is expected improve and implement new and existing climate- and remote sensing-based agricultural

  13. Condition for short pulse generation in ultrahigh frequency mode-locking of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. Y.; Paslaski, J.

    1991-11-01

    It is shown that although it is possible to obtain mode-locking without self-pulsation when certain criteria are satisfied, the shortest pulses are almost always generated at or close to the onset of self-pulsation. Thus, the amplitude of the optical pulse train is modulated by the (relatively) low-frequency envelop of a few gigahertz under this condition. This observation was obtained by simultaneously measuring the pulsewidth using an autocorrelator and monitoring the optical intensity using a high-speed photodiode and a microwave spectrum analyzer. It is concluded that while it is possible to generate picosecond optical pulses in ultrahigh-frequency mode-locking of quantum-well lasers, very short pulses (approaching 1 ps) are almost always accompanied by self-pulsation which is manifested as low-frequency (gigahertz) envelope modulation of the optical pulse train.

  14. Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

    2011-07-01

    Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

  15. Predictions of structural integrity of steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.

    1996-09-01

    Available models for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions are reviewed. Tests conducted in the past, though limited, tended to show that the earlier flow-stress model for part-through-wall axial cracks overestimated the damaging influence of deep cracks. This observation is confirmed by further tests at high temperatures as well as by finite element analysis. A modified correlation for deep cracks can correct this shortcoming of the model. Recent tests have shown that lateral restraint can significantly increase the failure pressure of tubes with unsymmetrical circumferential cracks. This observation is confirmed by finite element analysis. The rate-independent flow stress models that are successful at low temperatures cannot predict the rate sensitive failure behavior of steam generator tubes at high temperatures. Therefore, a creep rupture model for predicting failure is developed and validated by tests under varying temperature and pressure loading expected during severe accidents.

  16. A method of generating initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Levesque, D.; Marcos, B.

    2005-11-15

    We investigate the possibility of generating initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations by simulating a system whose correlations at thermal equilibrium approximate well those of cosmological density perturbations. The system is an appropriately modified version of the standard 'one component plasma' (OCP). We show first how a well-known semianalytic method can be used to determine the potential required to produce the desired correlations, and then verify our results for some cosmological type spectra with simulations of the full molecular dynamics. The advantage of the method, compared to the standard one, is that it gives by construction an accurate representation of both the real and reciprocal space correlation properties of the theoretical model. Furthermore the distributions are also statistically homogeneous and isotropic. We discuss briefly the modifications needed to implement the method to produce configurations appropriate for large N-body simulations in cosmology, and also the generation of initial velocities in this context.

  17. Generation of plaintext-independent private key based on conditional decomposition strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chao; Shen, Xueju; Lei, Ming

    2016-11-01

    We propose to generate the plaintext-independent private keys in optical asymmetric cryptosystem (OACS) based on the strategy of conditional decomposition (CD). Following this strategy, an OACS is designed with the principle of superposition of two vectorial beams. The proposed cryptosystem can remove the silhouette which is discovered in the two beams interference-based cryptosystem. To relieve the difficulty of key distribution, a structured spiral phase key (SSPK) is utilized instead of the random phase key (RPK). And a comparison on the performance of two kinds of keys in both the encryption and decryption process is made to show the advantage of SSPK over RPK.

  18. Condition for generating the same scattered spectral density by random and deterministic media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Ding, Yi; Ji, Xiaoling; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-02-01

    We present a condition for generating the same scattered spectral density by random and deterministic media. Examples of light waves on scattering from a Gaussian-centered deterministic medium and a Gaussian-correlated quasi-homogeneous random medium are discussed. It is shown that the normalized far-zone scattered spectral density produced by a Gaussian-centered deterministic medium and by a Gaussian-correlated quasi-homogeneous random medium will be identical provided that the square of the effective width of normalized correlation coefficient of the quasi-homogeneous random medium is twice the square of the effective width of scattering potential of the determinate medium.

  19. Bubble Generation in a Continuous Liquid Flow Under Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pais, Salvatore Cezar

    1999-01-01

    The present work reports a study of bubble generation under reduced gravity conditions for both co-flow and cross-flow configurations. Experiments were performed aboard the DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft at NASA Glenn Research Center, using an air-water system. Three different flow tube diameters were used: 1.27, 1.9, and 2.54 cm. Two different ratios of air injection nozzle to tube diameters were considered: 0.1 and 0.2. Gas and liquid volumetric flow rates were varied from 10 to 200 ml/s. It was experimentally observed that with increasing superficial liquid velocity, the bubbles generated decreased in size. The bubble diameter was shown to increase with increasing air injection nozzle diameters. As the tube diameter was increased, the size of the detached bubbles increased. Likewise, as the superficial liquid velocity was increased, the frequency of bubble formation increased and thus the time to detach forming bubbles decreased. Independent of the flow configuration (for either single nozzle or multiple nozzle gas injection), void fraction and hence flow regime transition can be controlled in a somewhat precise manner by solely varying the gas and liquid volumetric flow rates. On the other hand, it is observed that uniformity of bubble size can be controlled more accurately by using single nozzle gas injection than by using multiple port injection, since this latter system gives rise to unpredictable coalescence of adjacent bubbles. A theoretical model, based on an overall force balance, is employed to study single bubble generation in the dynamic and bubbly flow regime. Under conditions of reduced gravity, the gas momentum flux enhances bubble detachment; however, the surface tension forces at the nozzle tip inhibits bubble detachment. Liquid drag and inertia can act either as attaching or detaching force, depending on the relative velocity of the bubble with respect to the surrounding liquid. Predictions of the theoretical model compare well with performed

  20. Consortium for Health and Military Performance and American College of Sports Medicine consensus paper on extreme conditioning programs in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F; Nindl, Bradley C; Deuster, Patricia A; Baumgartner, Neal; Kane, Shawn F; Kraemer, William J; Sexauer, Lisa R; Thompson, Walter R; O'Connor, Francis G

    2011-01-01

    A potential emerging problem associated with increasingly popularized extreme conditioning programs (ECPs) has been identified by the military and civilian communities. That is, there is an apparent disproportionate musculoskeletal injury risk from these demanding programs, particularly for novice participants, resulting in lost duty time, medical treatment, and extensive rehabilitation. This is a significant and costly concern for the military with regard to effectively maintaining operational readiness of the Force. While there are certain recognized positive aspects of ECPs that address a perceived and/or actual unfulfilled conditioning need for many individuals and military units, these programs have limitations and should be considered carefully. Moreover, certain distinctive characteristics of ECPs appear to violate recognized accepted standards for safely and appropriately developing muscular fitness and are not uniformly aligned with established and accepted training doctrine. Accordingly, practical solutions to improve ECP prescription and implementation and reduce injury risk are of paramount importance.

  1. Spectroscopy of low and intermediate Z elements at extreme conditions: in situ studies of Earth materials at pressure and temperature via X-ray Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternemann, C.; Wilke, M.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy is an emerging method in the study of low and intermediate Z elements' core-electron excitations at extreme conditions in order to reveal information on local structure and electronic state of matter in situ. We discuss the capabilities of this method to address questions in Earth materials' science and demonstrate its sensitivity to detect changes in the oxidation state, electronic structure, coordination, and spin state. Examples are presented for the study of the oxygen K-, silicon L- and iron M-edges. We assess the application of both temperature and pressure in such investigations exploiting diamond anvil cells in combination with resistive or laser heating which is required to achieve realistic conditions of the Earth's crust, mantle, and core.

  2. Effects of extreme habitat conditions on otolith morphology: a case study on extremophile live bearing fishes (Poecilia mexicana, P. sulphuraria).

    PubMed

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Riesch, Rüdiger; García de León, Francisco J; Plath, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Our study was designed to evaluate if, and to what extent, restrictive environmental conditions affect otolith morphology. As a model, we chose two extremophile livebearing fishes: (i) Poecilia mexicana, a widespread species in various Mexican freshwater habitats, with locally adapted populations thriving in habitats characterized by the presence of one (or both) of the natural stressors hydrogen sulphide and darkness, and (ii) the closely related Poecilia sulphuraria living in a highly sulphidic habitat (Baños del Azufre). All three otolith types (lapilli, sagittae, and asterisci) of P. mexicana showed a decrease in size ranging from the non-sulphidic cave habitat (Cueva Luna Azufre), to non-sulphidic surface habitats, to the sulphidic cave (Cueva del Azufre), to sulphidic surface habitats (El Azufre), to P. sulphuraria. Although we found a distinct differentiation between ecotypes with respect to their otolith morphology, no clear-cut pattern of trait evolution along the two ecological gradients was discernible. Otoliths from extremophiles captured in the wild revealed only slight similarities to aberrant otoliths found in captive-bred fish. We therefore hypothesize that extremophile fishes have developed coping mechanisms enabling them to avoid aberrant otolith growth - an otherwise common phenomenon in fishes reared under stressful conditions.

  3. Divertor conditions relevant for fusion reactors achieved with linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Lof, A.; Meiden, H. J. van der; Rooij, G. J. van; Scholten, J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2012-11-26

    Intense magnetized hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have been produced with electron densities up to 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} and electron temperatures up to 3.7 eV with a linear plasma generator. Exposure of a W target has led to average heat and particle flux densities well in excess of 4 MW m{sup -2} and 10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. We have shown that the plasma surface interactions are dominated by the incoming ions. The achieved conditions correspond very well to the projected conditions at the divertor strike zones of fusion reactors such as ITER. In addition, the machine has an unprecedented high gas efficiency.

  4. Recent results from extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask inspection for 11 nm half-pitch generation using projection electron microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a promising technique for 1X nm half-pitch (hp) generation lithography. The inspection of patterned EUVL masks is one of the main issues that must be addressed during mask fabrication for manufacture of devices with 11 nm hp feature sizes. We have already designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics that have been integrated into a new inspection system called Model EBEYE-V30 (where "Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) and this system seems quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL patterned mask inspection. The defect inspection sensitivity of this system was evaluated via capture of an electron image that was generated at the mask by focusing the image through the projection optics onto a time-delay integration (TDI) image sensor. For increased throughput and higher defect detection sensitivity, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and a simultaneous deflector for the image capture area that follows the mask scanning motion have been developed. Using a combination of synchronous deflection and mask scanning, the image can be integrated into both the fixed area image sensor and the TDI image sensor. We describe our experimental results for EUV patterned mask inspection using the above system. Elements have been developed for inspection tool integration and the designed specification has been verified. The system performance demonstrates the defect detectability required for 11 nm hp generation EUVL masks.

  5. Harvesting materials formed under extreme conditions: Synthesis and isolation of nanocarbons derived from detonation of high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Millicent; Ringstrand, Bryan; Huber, Rachel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gustavson, Richard; Podlesak, David

    High explosive detonation products are primarily composed of molecular gases and solid carbon products. Recent studies have shown that the solid carbon condensate morphologies can vary depending on the high explosive and / or the pressure, temperature, or environment of the detonation. These studies have revealed, for example, unique carbon nanoparticles possessing novel morphologies, such as ones composed of hollow cores surrounded by lamellar structured graphitic shells. Despite these observations little work has been done to isolate these particles from the recovered post-detonation soot. This lack of effort to isolate and purify these products limits our understanding of their materials properties and, ultimately our ability to adapt them for useful materials. Herein, we report our recent studies directed at the production of nano-carbons through the detonation of a high explosive (e.g., composition B) under a range of experimental conditions. We further describe work directed at isolation and purification of the carbon nanoparticles.

  6. Apparatus for measuring the emittance of materials from far infrared to visible wavelengths in extreme conditions of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sousa Meneses, D.; Melin, P.; del Campo, L.; Cosson, L.; Echegut, P.

    2015-03-01

    A computer controlled circular turntable equipped with a blackbody reference and an integrated axisymmetric heating system based on a CO2 laser is at the heart of the reported device. It allows performing emittance measurements in the spectral domain ranging from far infrared up to visible light and in a wide range of temperature. The apparatus includes two spectrometers and was built to achieve optimal experimental conditions of measurement, i.e. environmental stability and single optical path for the acquisition of the thermal fluxes. The specific design of the apparatus is firstly described; applied procedures for the characterization of the blackbody reference, laser heating and the retrieval of the emittance spectra are given after. Finally measurements obtained for ruby, NdGaO3 and platinum are presented to illustrate the capacities of the apparatus.

  7. Surgery under extreme conditions in the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake: the importance of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Missair, Andres; Gebhard, Ralf; Pierre, Edgar; Cooper, Lebron; Lubarsky, David; Frohock, Jeffery; Pretto, Ernesto A

    2010-01-01

    The 12 January 2010 earthquake that struck Port-au-Prince, Haiti caused >200,000 deaths, thousands of injuries requiring immediate surgical interventions, and 1.5 million internally displaced survivors. The earthquake destroyed or disabled most medical facilities in the city, seriously hampering the ability to deliver immediate life- and limb-saving surgical care. A Project Medishare/University of Miami Miller School of Medicine trauma team deployed to Haiti from Miami within 24 hours of the earthquake. The team began work at a pre-existing tent facility in the United Nations (UN) compound based at the airport, where they encountered 225 critically injured patients. However, non-sterile conditions, no means to administer oxygen, the lack of surgical equipment and supplies, and no anesthetics precluded the immediate delivery of general anesthesia. Despite these limitations, resuscitative care was administered, and during the first 72 hours following the event, some amputations were performed with local anesthesia. Because of these austere conditions, an anesthesiologist, experienced and equipped to administer regional block anesthesia, was dispatched three days later to perform anesthesia for limb amputations, debridements, and wound care using single shot block anesthesia until a better equipped tent facility was established. After four weeks, the relief effort evolved into a 250-bed, multi-specialty trauma/intensive care center staffed with >200 medical, nursing, and administrative staff. Within that timeframe, the facility and its staff completed 1,000 surgeries, including spine and pediatric neurological procedures, without major complications. This experience suggests that when local emergency medical resources are completely destroyed or seriously disabled, a surgical team staffed and equipped to provide regional nerve block anesthesia and acute pain management can be dispatched rapidly to serve as a bridge to more advanced field surgical and intensive care

  8. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect.

  9. Surgery under extreme conditions in the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake: the importance of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Missair, Andres; Gebhard, Ralf; Pierre, Edgar; Cooper, Lebron; Lubarsky, David; Frohock, Jeffery; Pretto, Ernesto A

    2010-01-01

    The 12 January 2010 earthquake that struck Port-au-Prince, Haiti caused >200,000 deaths, thousands of injuries requiring immediate surgical interventions, and 1.5 million internally displaced survivors. The earthquake destroyed or disabled most medical facilities in the city, seriously hampering the ability to deliver immediate life- and limb-saving surgical care. A Project Medishare/University of Miami Miller School of Medicine trauma team deployed to Haiti from Miami within 24 hours of the earthquake. The team began work at a pre-existing tent facility in the United Nations (UN) compound based at the airport, where they encountered 225 critically injured patients. However, non-sterile conditions, no means to administer oxygen, the lack of surgical equipment and supplies, and no anesthetics precluded the immediate delivery of general anesthesia. Despite these limitations, resuscitative care was administered, and during the first 72 hours following the event, some amputations were performed with local anesthesia. Because of these austere conditions, an anesthesiologist, experienced and equipped to administer regional block anesthesia, was dispatched three days later to perform anesthesia for limb amputations, debridements, and wound care using single shot block anesthesia until a better equipped tent facility was established. After four weeks, the relief effort evolved into a 250-bed, multi-specialty trauma/intensive care center staffed with >200 medical, nursing, and administrative staff. Within that timeframe, the facility and its staff completed 1,000 surgeries, including spine and pediatric neurological procedures, without major complications. This experience suggests that when local emergency medical resources are completely destroyed or seriously disabled, a surgical team staffed and equipped to provide regional nerve block anesthesia and acute pain management can be dispatched rapidly to serve as a bridge to more advanced field surgical and intensive care

  10. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect. PMID:26933678

  11. Assessing crop-specific impacts of extremely wet (2007) and dry (2003) conditions in France on regional maize and wheat yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Marijn

    2010-05-01

    Extreme weather conditions can strongly affect agricultural production. In France, crop yields were greatly influenced by drought and heat stress in 2003 and by extremely wet conditions in 2007. Both maize and wheat yield where historically low in 2003, in contrast to 2007 when wheat yields were lower and maize yields were higher than long-term averages. Even though maize yield loss was lower in regions with higher maize irrigation percentages; yield loss was still very considerable. Remotely sensed (AMSR-E) JJA soil moisture related significantly to reported regional crop yield for 2002-2007. The spatial correlation between JJA soil moisture and wheat yield anomalies was positive in dry 2003 and negative in wet 2007. Biweekly soil moisture correlated positively from the first half of June until the second half of July in 2003. In 2007, the relation was negative the first half of June until the second half of August. An analysis with a spatial version (10 by 10 km) of the EPIC crop growth model was used to infer causal relations between rainfall, soil moisture and rainfed wheat and rainfed and irrigated maize yield. The negative impacts of the 2003 heat wave and drought on wheat yield were captured by the model, while negative damages to yield due to excessive wetness in 2007 were not. Modelling suggests that regional drought mitigation increased with increasing maize irrigation percentages from 0 to 40%. At higher irrigation percentages the compensating effect of irrigation was small. The above average maize yields in 2007 were reproduced by the model, but the below average wheat yields were not. The model overestimation of wheat yield in 2007 may be due to a misrepresentation of the impact of wet conditions on plant physiological processes, or due to the incapacity of the model to represent determining factors such as lodging and unfavourable harvesting conditions. Strenghts and limitations of this regional assessment will be discussed. Extreme events affect

  12. Field monitoring of condition of large electric generators. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning monitoring techniques to determine the condition of large electric generators. Electric generators are limited to turbine generators, variously called hydroturbines, turbogenerators and turbosets. Wind turbines and magnetohydrodynamics are not included in this bibliography. Techniques for condition monitoring include noise analysis and acoustic monitoring, vibration and misalignment measurements, bearing oil analyses, and transient torsional changes affecting shafts and rotors. (Contains a minimum of 178 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Extreme variation in basal thermal conditions of the central Greenland Ice Sheet due to anomalous lithosphere structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Petrunin, Alexey; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Koulakov, Ivan; Thomas, Maik

    2013-04-01

    At the Earth's surface, heat fluxes from the interior are generally insignificant when compared with fluxes from the sun and atmosphere; however, in areas permanently blanketed by ice these become very important. Modelling studies show that they are key to understanding the internal thermal structure of ice sheets and the distribution of melt water at their bases, information which is crucial for planning deep ice drilling campaigns and climate reconstructions. Unfortunately, the challenging conditions in ice-covered regions make measurement difficult in exactly the places where it is needed most. Until now, proxy methodologies have been considered best for determining geothermal heat flux (GHF) beneath ice sheets. Our method is to use a novel interdisciplinary approach, integrating a time-evolved climate-ice-lithosphere coupled model with a wide range of data such as direct ice-core measurements, past climate reconstructions and indirect estimates of the lithospheric thermal state. Here we show that the oldest (and thickest) part of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) is strongly thermally influenced by both GHF increasing from west to east and glaciation-induced perturbations of the thermal structure of the upper crust. A pronounced lateral gradient in GHF across the Summit region of the GIS is due to anomalously thin lithosphere, which has only about 25 to 66% of the thickness typical for Archaean to early Proterozoic areas. Our findings suggest that the thermal basal conditions of the present-day central GIS are characterized by surprising rapid lateral variations in ice temperatures of up to 12°C along relatively small distances of 100 to 150 km. We reveal two areas of rapid basal melt in central Greenland, only one of which was previously predicted by ice-penetrating radar measurements and age-depth relations from internal layering (Fahnestock et al. [2001]). The endothermic phase transition associated with rapid basal ice melt is found to increase subglacial heat

  14. Increased power generation from primary sludge by a submersible microbial fuel cell and optimum operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Vologni, Valentina; Kakarla, Ramesh; Angelidaki, Irini; Min, Booki

    2013-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have received attention as a promising renewable energy technology for waste treatment and energy recovery. We tested a submersible MFC with an innovative design capable of generating a stable voltage of 0.250 ± 0.008 V (with a fixed 470 Ω resistor) directly from primary sludge. In a polarization test, the maximum power density was 0.18 W/m(2) at a current density of 0.8 A/m(2) with an external resistor of 300 Ω. The anodic solution of the primary sludge needs to be adjusted to a pH 7 for high power generation. The modified primary sludge with an added phosphate buffer prolonged the current generation and increased the power density by 7 and 1.5 times, respectively, in comparison with raw primary sludge. These findings suggest that energy recovery from primary sludge can be maximized using an advanced MFC system with optimum conditions.

  15. Influence of impact conditions on plasma generation during hypervelocity impact by aluminum projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weidong; Lv, Yangtao; Li, Jianqiao; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    For describing hypervelocity impact (relative low-speed as related to space debris and much lower than travelling speed of meteoroids) phenomenon associated with plasma generation, a self-developed 3D code was advanced to numerically simulate projectiles impacting on a rigid wall. The numerical results were combined with a new ionization model which was developed in an early study to calculate the ionized materials during the impact. The calculated results of ionization were compared with the empirical formulas concluded by experiments in references and a good agreement was obtained. Then based on the reliable 3D numerical code, a series of impacts with different projectile configurations were simulated to investigate the influence of impact conditions on hypervelocity impact generated plasma. It was found that the form of empirical formula needed to be modified. A new empirical formula with a critical impact velocity was advanced to describe the velocity dependence of plasma generation and the parameters of the modified formula were ensured by the comparison between the numerical predictions and the empirical formulas. For different projectile configurations, the changes of plasma charges with time are different but the integrals of charges on time almost stayed in the same level.

  16. Increased power generation from primary sludge by a submersible microbial fuel cell and optimum operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Vologni, Valentina; Kakarla, Ramesh; Angelidaki, Irini; Min, Booki

    2013-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have received attention as a promising renewable energy technology for waste treatment and energy recovery. We tested a submersible MFC with an innovative design capable of generating a stable voltage of 0.250 ± 0.008 V (with a fixed 470 Ω resistor) directly from primary sludge. In a polarization test, the maximum power density was 0.18 W/m(2) at a current density of 0.8 A/m(2) with an external resistor of 300 Ω. The anodic solution of the primary sludge needs to be adjusted to a pH 7 for high power generation. The modified primary sludge with an added phosphate buffer prolonged the current generation and increased the power density by 7 and 1.5 times, respectively, in comparison with raw primary sludge. These findings suggest that energy recovery from primary sludge can be maximized using an advanced MFC system with optimum conditions. PMID:23420478

  17. X-ray diffraction experiments on the Materials in Extreme Conditions (MEC) LCLS x-ray FEL beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond; Fratanduono, Dayne; Wicks, June; Duffy, Tom; Lee, Hae Ja; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Philip; Gleason, Arianna; Bolme, Cynthia; Swift, Damian; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon; Collins, Rip

    2015-06-01

    The experiments described here were conducted on the MEC beamline hutch at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source. A 10 ns 527 nm laser pulse was used to shock compress 60-100 μm thick NaCl and Graphite samples. LCLS x-rays (40 fs, 8 keV), scattered off the shocked sample, were recorded on several pixel array detectors positioned downstream. The diffracted x-ray pattern allows us to determine changes in crystal structure at Mbar pressures and over nanosecond timescales. In this talk we detail the experimental setup, the current capabilities of the MEC laser and the considerations for optimizing the target design. We will describe the wave interactions within the shock-compressed target and the use of a 1D hydrocode to describe the pressure, temperature and density conditions within the target assembly as a function of time and Lagrangian position. We present observations of the B1-B2 phase transition in NaCl and subsequent back transformation during release to ambient pressure, and compare these findings to gas gun and static data. We also present results from a preliminary study of the shock-induced graphite to diamond transformation.

  18. A theoretical study of the stability of anionic defects in cubic ZrO2 at extreme conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samanta, Amit

    2016-02-19

    Using first principles density functional theory calculations, we present a study of the structure, mobility, and the thermodynamic stability of anionic defects in the high-temperature cubic phase of ZrO2. Our results suggest that the local structure of an oxygen interstitial depends on the charge state and the cubic symmetry of the anionic sublattice is unstable at 0 K. In addition, the oxygen interstitials and the vacancies exhibit symmetry breaking transitions to low-energy structures with tetragonal distortion of the oxygen sublattice at 0 K. However, the vibrational entropy stabilizes the defect structures with cubic symmetry at 2600–2980 K. The formation freemore » energies of the anionic defects and Gibbs free energy changes associated with different defect reactions are calculated by including the vibrational free energy contributions and the effect of pressure on these defect structures. By analyzing the defect chemistry, we obtain the defect concentrations at finite temperature and pressure conditions using the zero temperature ab initio results as input and find that at low oxygen partial pressures, neutral oxygen vacancies are most dominant and at high oxygen partial pressures, doubly charged anionic defects are dominant. As a result, the relevance of the results to the thermal protective coating capabilities of zirconium-based ceramic composites is elucidated.« less

  19. Iron-silica interaction at extreme conditions and the electrically conducting layer at the base of Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Langenhorst, F; Dobson, D; Rubie, D; Gessmann, C; Abrikosov, I A; Johansson, B; Baykov, V I; Vitos, L; Le Bihan, T; Crichton, W A; Dmitriev, V; Weber, H-P

    2003-03-01

    The boundary between the Earth's metallic core and its silicate mantle is characterized by strong lateral heterogeneity and sharp changes in density, seismic wave velocities, electrical conductivity and chemical composition. To investigate the composition and properties of the lowermost mantle, an understanding of the chemical reactions that take place between liquid iron and the complex Mg-Fe-Si-Al-oxides of the Earth's lower mantle is first required. Here we present a study of the interaction between iron and silica (SiO2) in electrically and laser-heated diamond anvil cells. In a multianvil apparatus at pressures up to 140 GPa and temperatures over 3,800 K we simulate conditions down to the core-mantle boundary. At high temperature and pressures below 40 GPa, iron and silica react to form iron oxide and an iron-silicon alloy, with up to 5 wt% silicon. At pressures of 85-140 GPa, however, iron and SiO2 do not react and iron-silicon alloys dissociate into almost pure iron and a CsCl-structured (B2) FeSi compound. Our experiments suggest that a metallic silicon-rich B2 phase, produced at the core-mantle boundary (owing to reactions between iron and silicate), could accumulate at the boundary between the mantle and core and explain the anomalously high electrical conductivity of this region.

  20. Thermostatic and rheological responses of DPD fluid to extreme shear under modified Lees-Edwards boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Moshfegh, Abouzar; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Jabbarzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and rheological interactions between velocity-dependent thermostats of Lowe-Andersen (LA) and Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen (NHLA), and modified Lees-Edwards (M-LEC) boundary condition were studied in the context of Dissipative Particle Dynamics method. Comparisons were made with original Lees-Edwards method to characterise the improvements that M-LEC offers in conserving the induced shear momentum. Different imposed shear velocities, heat bath collision/exchange frequencies and thermostating probabilities were considered. The presented analyses addressed an unusual discontinuity in momentum transfer that appeared in form of nonphysical jumps in velocity and temperature profiles. The usefulness of M-LEC was then quantified by evaluating the enhancements in obtained effective shear velocity, effective shear rate, Péclet number, and dynamic viscosity. System exchange frequency (Γ) with Maxwellian heat bath was found to play an important role, in that its larger values facilitated achieving higher shear rates with proper temperature control at the cost of deviation from an ideal momentum transfer. Similar dynamic viscosities were obtained under both shearing modes between LA and NHLA thermostats up to Γ = 10, whilst about twice the range of viscosity (1 < η < 20) was calculated for M-LEC at larger probabilities (ΓΔt > %). The main benefits of this modification were to facilitate momentum flow from shear boundaries to the system bulk. In addition, it was found that there exist upper thresholds for imposing shear on the system beyond which temperature cannot be controlled properly and nonphysical jumps reappear. PMID:26701709

  1. Generation of a conditional knockout allele for the NFAT5 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The osmosensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5), also known as tonicity enhancer element binding protein (TonEBP) plays a crucial role in protection of renal medullary cells against hyperosmotic stress, urinary concentration, the adaptive immune response, and other physiological systems. Since it is also important for development, conventional homozygous-null mutations result in perinatal death, which hinders the analysis of NFAT5 function in specific tissues in vivo. Here we describe the generation of mice with a conditional-null allele, in which loxP sites are inserted around exon 4. Mice harboring the floxed allele (NFAT5(flx) ) were mated to a strain expressing a tamoxifen-inducible derivative of the Cre-recombinase (Cre (+)) under the control of the ubiqitinC promoter. The resultant homozygous conditional knockout mice (Cre (+) NFAT5 (flx/flx) ) are viable, fertile, and show normal expression of NFAT5 and NFAT5 target genes, indicating that the conditional alleles retain their wild-type function. Induction of Cre-mediated recombination by administration of tamoxifen in 8-week-old mice resulted in a decrease in NFAT5 expression of about 70-90% in all tested tissues (renal cortex, renal outer medulla, renal inner medulla, heart, lung, spleen, skeletal muscle). Accordingly, the expression of the NFAT5 target genes aldose reductase and heat shock protein 70 in the renal medulla was also significantly decreased. Mice harboring this conditional knockout allele should be useful in future studies for gaining a better understanding of tissue and cell-type specific functions of NFAT5 in adult animals under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25601839

  2. LILE-Enriched fluids generated at UHP Conditions in Dora-Maira Whiteschists (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, S.; Frezzotti, M.; Petrelli, M.; Compagnoni, R.

    2008-12-01

    We report SEM-EDS, WDS, micro-Raman, IR-synchrotron-radiation imaging, and LA-ICP-MS data on minerals and multiphase solid inclusions (MSI) in equilibrium at UHP peak in Dora-Maira whiteschists. These rocks consist of pyrope-rich garnet, quartz/coesite, phengite, kyanite, talc, chlorite, and minor Mg-rich minerals. Three generations of pyrope occur: 1) prograde reddish megablasts (10-20 cm across); 2) zoned porphyroblasts (2-10 cm across) with prograde core and peak rim; and 3) peak smaller crystals (<2 cm across). Peak assemblage consists of pyrope (Prp82-98Alm1-16), coesite, phengite (Si=3.55-3.58 a.p.f.u.), kyanite, talc, and accessory rutile, zircon and monazite. P-T conditions of UHP peak have been estimated to be 4.3 GPa and 730°C. The fluid phase present at UHP conditions may be inferred from primary MSI (10-30 microns across) within peak pyrope, which contain Mg-Chl, Na-K-Phl, Cl-rich Ap, Zn-rich Py, and chlorides as daughter minerals, Tlc and Mgs as step-daughter minerals, and Rt, Zrn and Mnz as incidentally-trapped minerals. IR-synchrotron- radiation reveals the presence of an aqueous fluid in the inclusions and a significant water diffusion from MSI to host pyrope. Trace elements and REE patterns collected by LA-ICP-MS show substantial enrichment in LILE and depletion in HFSE in these fluids. Possible mechanisms for LILE-enriched fluid generation during the growth of pyrope at UHP conditions in the Dora Maira whiteschists are discussed.

  3. Threshold conditions, energy spectrum and bands generated by locally periodic Dirac comb potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharani, M.; Shastry, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    We derive expressions for polynomials governing the threshold conditions for different types of locally periodic Dirac comb potentials comprising of attractive and combination of attractive and repulsive delta potential terms confined symmetrically inside a one dimensional box of fixed length. The roots of these polynomials specify the conditions on the potential parameters in order to generate threshold energy bound states. The mathematical and numerical methods used by us were first formulated in our earlier works and it is also very briefly summarized in this paper. We report a number of mathematical results pertaining to the threshold conditions and these are useful in controlling the number of negative energy states as desired. We further demonstrate the correlation between the distribution of roots of these polynomials and negative energy eigenvalues. Using these results as basis, we investigate the energy bands in the positive energy spectrum for the above specified Dirac comb potentials and also for the corresponding repulsive case. In the case of attractive Dirac comb the base energy of the each band excluding the first band coincides with specific eigenvalue of the confining box whereas in the repulsive case it coincides with the band top. We deduce systematic correlation between band gaps, band spreads and box eigenvalues and explain the physical reason for the vanishing of band pattern at higher energies. In the case of Dirac comb comprising of orderly arranged attractive and repulsive delta potentials, specific box eigenvalues occur in the middle of each band excluding the first band. From our study we find that by controlling the number and strength parameters of delta terms in the Dirac comb and the size of confining box it is possible to generate desired types of band formations. We believe the results from our systematic analysis are useful and relevant in the study of various one dimensional systems of physical interest in areas like nanoscience.

  4. Temperature and moisture conditions for life in the extreme arid region of the Atacama desert: four years of observations including the El Nino of 1997-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Gomez-Silva, Benito; Caceres-Villanueva, Luis; Andersen, Dale T.; Landheim, Ragnhild

    2003-01-01

    The Atacama along the Pacific Coast of Chile and Peru is one of the driest and possibly oldest deserts in the world. It represents an extreme habitat for life on Earth and is an analog for life in dry conditions on Mars. We report on four years (September 1994-October 1998) of climate and moisture data from the extreme arid region of the Atacama. Our data are focused on understanding moisture sources and their role in creating suitable environments for photosynthetic microorganisms in the desert surface. The average air temperature was 16.5 degrees C and 16.6 degrees C in 1995 and 1996, respectively. The maximum air temperature recorded was 37.9 degrees C, and the minimum was -5.7 degrees C. Annual average sunlight was 336 and 335 W m(-2) in 1995 and 1996, respectively. Winds averaged a few meters per second, with strong fohn winds coming from the west exceeding 12 m s(-1). During our 4 years of observation there was only one significant rain event of 2.3 mm, which occurred near midnight local time. We suggest that this event was a rainout of a heavy fog. It is of interest that the strong El Nino of 1997-1998 brought heavy rainfall to the deserts of Peru, but did not bring significant rain to the central Atacama in Chile. Dew occurred at our station frequently following high nighttime relative humidity, but is not a significant source of moisture in the soil or under stones. Groundwater also does not contribute to surface moisture. Only the one rain event of 2.3 mm resulted in liquid water in the soil and beneath stones for a total of only 65-85 h over 4 years. The paucity of liquid water under stones is consistent with the apparent absence of hypolithic (under-stone) cyanobacteria, the only known primary producers in such extreme deserts.

  5. Effects of extreme thermal conditions on plasticity in breeding phenology and double-broodedness of Great Tits and Blue Tits in central Poland in 2013 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glądalski, Michał; Bańbura, Mirosława; Kaliński, Adam; Markowski, Marcin; Skwarska, Joanna; Wawrzyniak, Jarosław; Zieliński, Piotr; Bańbura, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    Many avian species in Europe breed earlier as a result of higher temperatures caused by global climate changes. Climate change means not only higher temperatures but also more frequent extreme weather events, sometimes contrasting with the long-term trends. It was suggested that we should look closely at every extreme phenomenon and its consequences for the phenology of organisms. Examining the limits of phenotypic plasticity may be an important goal for future research. Extremely low spring temperatures in 2013 (coldest spring in 40 years) resulted in birds laying unusually late, and it was followed in 2014 by the earliest breeding season on record (warmest spring in 40 years). Here, we present results concerning breeding phenology and double-broodedness in the Great Tit (Parus major) and the Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) in 2013 and 2014 in an urban parkland and a deciduous forest in central Poland. Great Tits started laying eggs 18.2 days later in 2013 than in 2014 in the parkland, whereas the analogous difference was 21.1 days in the forest. Blue Tits started laying eggs in the parkland 18.5 days later in 2013 than in 2014, while the analogous difference was 21.6 days in the forest. The difference in the proportion of second clutches in Great Tits between 2013 (fewer second clutches) and 2014 (more second clutches) was highly significant in the parkland and in the forest. This rather large extent of breeding plasticity has developed in reaction to challenges of irregular inter-annual variability of climatic conditions. Such a buffer of plasticity may be sufficient for Blue Tits and Great Tits to adjust the timing of breeding to the upcoming climate changes.

  6. Constrained approximation of effective generators for multiscale stochastic reaction networks and application to conditioned path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, Simon L.

    2016-10-01

    Efficient analysis and simulation of multiscale stochastic systems of chemical kinetics is an ongoing area for research, and is the source of many theoretical and computational challenges. In this paper, we present a significant improvement to the constrained approach, which is a method for computing effective dynamics of slowly changing quantities in these systems, but which does not rely on the quasi-steady-state assumption (QSSA). The QSSA can cause errors in the estimation of effective dynamics for systems where the difference in timescales between the "fast" and "slow" variables is not so pronounced. This new application of the constrained approach allows us to compute the effective generator of the slow variables, without the need for expensive stochastic simulations. This is achieved by finding the null space of the generator of the constrained system. For complex systems where this is not possible, or where the constrained subsystem is itself multiscale, the constrained approach can then be applied iteratively. This results in breaking the problem down into finding the solutions to many small eigenvalue problems, which can be efficiently solved using standard methods. Since this methodology does not rely on the quasi steady-state assumption, the effective dynamics that are approximated are highly accurate, and in the case of systems with only monomolecular reactions, are exact. We will demonstrate this with some numerics, and also use the effective generators to sample paths of the slow variables which are conditioned on their endpoints, a task which would be computationally intractable for the generator of the full system.

  7. Flowing versus Static Conditions for Measuring Multiple Exciton Generation in PbSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Midgett, Aaron G.; Hillhouse, Hugh W.; Hughes, Barbara K.; Nozik, Arthur J.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2010-09-22

    Recent reports question the validity of pulsed fs-laser experiments for measuring the photon-to-exciton quantum yields (QYs) that result from multiple exciton generation (MEG). The repetitive nature of these experiments opens up an alternative relaxation pathway that may produce artificially high results. We present transient-absorption (TA) data for 4.6 and 6.6 nm diameter PbSe quantum dots (QDs) at a variety of pump photon energies. The data are collected under laminar flow conditions with volumetric flow rates ranging from 0 to 150 mL/min (resulting in Reynolds numbers up to 460). The results are modeled with a spatially resolved population balance of generation, recombination, convective replacement, and accumulation of long-lived excited QDs. By comparing the simulations and experiments, the steady-state population of the long-lived QD-excited states and their kinetics are determined for different experimental conditions. We also improve upon reported photon-to-exciton QYs for PbSe QDs. We find differences in the observed TA dynamics between flowing and static conditions that depend upon photon fluence, pump photon energy, and quality of the QD surfaces. For excitation energies below 2 Eg, independent of QD size or photon fluence, we observe no flow rate dependence in the TA dynamics. At excitation energies of hν > 3 Eg, we observe differences between static and flowing conditions that are most pronounced for high photon fluences. At 3.7 Eg and for 4.6 nm PbSe QDs we find a QY of 1.2 ± 0.1 and at 4.5 Eg the QY is 1.55 ± 0.05. With 6.6 nm QDs excited at 4.7 Eg we observe no difference between static and flowing conditions and find a QY of 1.61 ± 0.05. We also find that by treating the surface of QDs, we can decrease the charging probability (Pg ≈ 5 × 10-5) by a factor of 3-4. The observed variations suggest that different QD samples vary regarding their susceptibility to the

  8. Reduced mass absorption cross section of black carbon under an extremely polluted condition in southern suburb of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Hua, Y.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, B.; Xing, J.; Jiang, S.; Cai, R.; Hao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), as one of the most important climate-warming agent, has been the focus of extensive studies in recent years. Mass absorption cross section (MAC) is a key parameter to assess the radiative forcing by linking the mass concentration with the radiation effect. In this study, we conducted a two-month field campaign in Beijing, the capital city of China, in a October and November, a period that severe PM2.5 pollution occurred. PM2.5 offline samples were collected daily onto quartz fiber filters by a Partisol 2300 Speciation Sampler. Size-segregated aerosol samples of the size ranged from 0.056 - 10 µm with 11 bins were collected onto quartz fiber filters by a cascade impactor developed by National Chiao Tung University (NCTU). A DRI Model 2001 thermal/optical carbon analyzer were used to analyze the samples. The MAC of BC is measured by a thermal-optical carbon analyzer. In contrast to previous studies, we found that after "shadow effect" has been corrected, the MAC is reduced from 14 m2/g to 5 m2/g with the increase of BC concentrations. There was no significant correlation between MAC with secondary inorganic aerosols. Such unexpected reduction in MAC of BC is possibly associated with the microphysical property of BC modulated under serious pollution condition. The study of size-segregated species concentrations shows that the size distribution of BC is unimodal, with the peak around 0.56-1.8 µm. The results also show the proportion of BC larger than 0.56 µm is significant increased. Additionally, "soot superaggregate", as distinct from conventional sub-micron aggregates, was found in the bins of BC with size ranged from 1 to1.8 µm. Such high carbon aerosol proportion and large BC size distribution suggests that emissions from residential biomass burning is dominant during this episode. This study suggests that the optical property for BC from different emission sectors should be considered in the estimation of radiative forcing.

  9. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis; Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert; Danylyuk, Serhiy; Bergmann, Klaus; Grützmacher, Detlev; Schneider, Claus M; Juschkin, Larissa

    2014-10-01

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV-250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains. PMID:25362374

  10. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis Juschkin, Larissa; Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M.; Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert; Danylyuk, Serhiy; Bergmann, Klaus; Grützmacher, Detlev

    2014-10-15

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV–250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains.

  11. Laboratory investigation of spray generation mechanism in wind-wave interaction under strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the reduction of sea surface aerodynamic drag coefficient at hurricane conditions [1]. In this paper the mechanism of generation of spray in the near-surface layer of the atmosphere in a strong wind through the mechanism of «bag-breakup instability» was investigated in laboratory conditions with the help of high-speed video shooting. The laboratory experiments were performed on the Thermostratified Wind-Wave Channel of the IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) [2]. Experiments were carried out for the wind speeds from 14 to 22 m/s. In this range spray generation characteristics change dramatically from almost no spray generation to so called catastrophic regime with multiple cascade breakups on each crest. Shooting was performed with High-speed digital camera NAC Memrecam HX-3 in two different setups to obtain both statistical data and detailed spray generation mechanism overview. In first setup bright LED spotlight with mate screen the side of a channel was used for horizontal shadow-method shooting. Camera was placed in semi-submerged box on the opposite side of the channel. Shooting was performed at the distance of 7.5 m from the beginning of the working section. Series of short records of the surface evolution were made at 10 000 fps with 55 to 119 µm/px scale revealed the dominant mechanism of spray generation - bag-breakup instability. Sequences of high resolution images allowed investigating the details of this "bags" evolution. Shadow method provided better image quality for such conditions than side illumination and fluorescence methods. To obtain statistical data on "bags" sizes and densities vertical shadow method was used. Submerged light box was created with two 300 W underwater lamps and mate screen places at the fetch of 6.5 m. Long records (up to 8 seconds) were made with 4500 fps at 124-256 µm/px scales. Specially developed software

  12. Temporal characterization of a time-compensated monochromator for high-efficiency selection of extreme-ultraviolet pulses generated by high-order harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Poletto, L.; Villoresi, P.; Benedetti, E.; Ferrari, F.; Stagira, S.; Sansone, G.; Nisoli, M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast extreme-ultraviolet pulses are spectrally selected by a time-delay-compensated grating monochromator. The intrinsic very short duration of the pulses is obtained by exploiting the high-order harmonic generation process. The temporal characterization of the harmonic pulses is obtained using a cross-correlation method: pulses as short as 8 fs are measured at the output of the monochromator in the case of the 23rd harmonic. This value is in agreement with the expected duration of such pulses, indicating that the influence of the monochromator is negligible. The photon flux has been measured with a calibrated photodiode, pointing out the good efficiency of the monochromator, derived by the exploitation for the two gratings of the conical diffraction mounting.

  13. Synthesis of super-dense phase of aluminum under extreme pressure and temperature conditions created by femtosecond laser pulses in sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Mizeikis, Vygantas; Vailionis, Arturas; Gamaly, Eugene G.; Yang, Wenge; Rode, Andrei V.; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2012-06-26

    We describe synthesis of a new super-dense phase of aluminum under extreme pressure and temperature conditions created by laser-induced microexplosions in sapphire. Micro explosions in sub-micrometer sized regions of sapphire were induced by tightly-focused femtosecond laser pulses with a temporal length of {approx} 100 fs and an energy of {approx} 100 nJ. Fast, explosive expansion of photogenerated high-density plasma created strong heating and pressure transients with peak temperature and pressure of {approx} 105 K and 10 TPa, respectively. Partial decomposition of sapphire in the shock-compressed sapphire led to formation of nanocrystalline bcc-Al phase, which is different from ambient fcc-Al phase, and was permanently preserved by fast quenching. The existence of super-dense bcc-Al phase was confirmed using X-ray diffraction technique. This is the first observation of bcc-Al phase, which so far has been only predicted theoretically, and a demonstration that laser-induced micro explosions technique enables simple, safe and cost-efficient access to extreme pressures and temperatures without the tediousness typical to traditional techniques that use diamond anvil cells, gas guns, explosives, or megajoule-class lasers.

  14. Variable and Extreme Irradiation Conditions in the Early Solar System Inferred from the Initial Abundance of 10Be in Isheyevo CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc; Rollion-Bard, Claire

    2013-02-01

    A search for short-lived 10Be in 21 calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from Isheyevo, a rare CB/CH chondrite, showed that only 5 CAIs had 10B/11B ratios higher than chondritic correlating with the elemental ratio 9Be/11B, suggestive of in situ decay of this key short-lived radionuclide. The initial (10Be/9Be)0 ratios vary between ~10-3 and ~10-2 for CAI 411. The initial ratio of CAI 411 is one order of magnitude higher than the highest ratio found in CV3 CAIs, suggesting that the more likely origin of CAI 411 10Be is early solar system irradiation. The low (26Al/27Al)0 [<= 8.9 × 10-7] with which CAI 411 formed indicates that it was exposed to gradual flares with a proton fluence of a few 1019 protons cm-2, during the earliest phases of the solar system, possibly the infrared class 0. The irradiation conditions for other CAIs are less well constrained, with calculated fluences ranging between a few 1019 and 1020 protons cm-2. The variable and extreme value of the initial 10Be/9Be ratios in carbonaceous chondrite CAIs is the reflection of the variable and extreme magnetic activity in young stars observed in the X-ray domain.

  15. Galaxy Transformation Under Extreme Conditions: The Evolution of Galaxies in the Largest Structures in the High Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaux, Brian Clark

    This dissertation describes research performed in the field of observational astrophysics as part of the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environment (ORELSE) survey. The general motivation of the research presented in this dissertation is to investigate the processes responsible for the evolution of galaxies in a wide range of physical conditions over cosmic time. Throughout this dissertation, galaxy populations will be considered in the very nearby universe (i.e., within one billion light years from Earth), the middle-aged universe (i.e., eight billion years ago), and in the very early universe (i.e., just one billion years after the beginning of the universe). In each chapter I present unique data from observations taken and analyzed specifically for the ORELSE survey. In the first part of this dissertation I describe the context, aims, and current state of the ORELSE survey. The studies presented in this dissertation span a large range of galaxy samples and investigate a variety of different astrophysical phenomena. As all of these studies fall under the context of galaxy evolution, these initial sections will set the framework for the variety of studies presented in this thesis. In the second part of this dissertation I present four studies undertaken to investigate various aspects of galaxy evolution. The first of these studies is an investigation of a large population of very distant galaxies detected in one of the ORELSE fields. The survey in this field represents the deepest survey of a particular kind of very distant galaxy population known as Lymanalpha Emitter (LAEs). The number of LAEs found in this survey far exceeded expectations for such galaxies and are shown to be in excess of every other survey of similar galaxies at similar distances. This result has important consequences for galaxy evolution studies, as it suggests that faint LAEs may be much more numerous than previously thought. This work also has important consequences for

  16. Six-member stimulus classes generated by conditional-discrimination procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, M; Kirk, B; Willson-Morris, M

    1985-01-01

    In conditional-discrimination procedures with three sets of stimuli, A, B, and C, three stimuli per set (A1A2A3, B1B2B3, and C1C2C3), subjects (children and adults) learned to select Set-B and Set-C comparisons conditionally upon Set-A samples (A1B1, A1C1, A2B2, A2C2, A3B3, A3C3). If the conditional-discrimination procedures also generated equivalence relations, three 3-member stimulus classes would be demonstrable, A1B1C1, A2B2C2, and A3B3C3. In addition to these three sets, the present experiments used three other sets of stimuli--D, E, and F. The subjects learned to select Set-E and Set-F comparisons conditionally upon Set-D samples (D1E1, D1F1, D2E2, D2F2, D3E3, D3F3). This established a second group of three 3-member stimulus classes, D1E1F1, D2E2F2, and D3E3F3. In all, two groups of three 3-member classes were established by teaching subjects 12 conditional discriminations. The two groups of 3-member classes were then combined (successfully for 5 of 8 subjects) into a single group of three 6-member classes by teaching the subjects three more conditional relations (E1C1, E2C2, and E3C3). With three other children, enlarging the classes one member at a time also produced 6-member classes. As a consequence of class formation, 60 untrained conditional relations emerged from 15 that had been explicitly taught. Six of the subjects also proved capable of naming the stimuli consistently in accord with their class membership, but two subjects demonstrated class formation even in the absence of consistent naming. PMID:3156941

  17. Large-scale processes relevant to extreme hot and dry summer conditions in the South Central U.S.: Comparing observations with CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J. H.; Hayhoe, K.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, record high temperatures combined with extreme precipitation deficits have led to record-breaking droughts that have affected the Southern Plains. The 2011 drought and heat wave caused over $12B in damages across the SP region. Here, we combine station data with reanalysis to identify the hottest summers in the last 30 years. Consistent with previous analysis, we find that very hot temperatures over the region are highly correlated both precipitation as well as soil moisture deficits. Atmospheric circulation in the SP region during summer is generally dominated by the North Atlantic Subtropical High (NASH), which extends westward from its winter position over the Atlantic. The anticyclonic circulation could play a role in reducing convective precipitation as well as preventing disturbances from moving into the SP region. Examining the NARR reanalysis for the hottest summers of record, we find that the anticyclonic circulation associated with the NASH extends over the SP region relatively earlier in the summer and results in a comparatively stronger anticyclonic circulation, which in turn seems to be influenced by the large-scale climate variability. Specifically, the negative phase of the Pacific/North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern is characterized by high pressure anomalies across the southeastern and south central U.S. during summer. The two hottest years in the last three decades (1980 and 2011) also correlate with the two strongest negative PNA phases over that time. One of the anticipated impacts of human-induced climate change is the increased risk of hot and potentially dry summers across the SP region. For that reason, we also assess to what extent CMIP5 models are able simulate the large-scale processes that, according to reanalysis, are closely related to extreme hot and dry summer conditions over the Southern Plains. Composite maps of extreme heat years simulated in the models do display a stronger-than-average anticyclonic

  18. Hexavalent chromium removal and bioelectricity generation by Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 under different oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Chen, Ching-Kuo; Hsieh, Min-Chi; Lin, Ssu-Ting; Ho, Kuo-Ying; Li, Jo-Wei; Lin, Chia-Pei; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Bioremediation is an environmentally friendly method of reducing heavy metal concentration and toxicity. A chromium-reducing bacterial strain, isolated from the vicinity of an electroplate factory, was identified as Ochrobactrum sp. YC211. The efficiency and capacity per time of Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal under anaerobic conditions were superior to those under aerobic conditions. An acceptable removal efficiency (96.5 ± 0.6%) corresponding to 30.2 ± 0.8 mg-Cr (g-dry cell weight-h)(-1) was achieved by Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 at 300 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). A temperature of 30°C and pH 7 were the optimal parameters for Cr(VI) removal. By examining reactivated cells, permeabilized cells, and cell-free extract, we determined that Cr(VI) removal by Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 under anaerobic conditions mainly occurred in the soluble fraction of the cell and can be regarded as an enzymatic reaction. The results also indicated that an Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an anaerobic anode was considerably superior to that with an aerobic anode in bioelectricity generation and Cr(VI) removal. The maximum power density and Cr(VI) removal efficiency of the MFC were 445 ± 3.2 mW m(-2) and 97.2 ± 0.3%, respectively. Additionally, the effects of coexisting ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), SO4(2-), and Cl(-)) in the anolyte on the MFC performance and Cr(VI) removal were nonsignificant (P > 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report to compare Cr(VI) removal by different cells and MFC types under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  19. Oxygen Generating Biomaterials Preserve Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis under Hypoxic and Ischemic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Catherine L.; Corona, Benjamin T.; Yoo, James J.; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Christ, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Provision of supplemental oxygen to maintain soft tissue viability acutely following trauma in which vascularization has been compromised would be beneficial for limb and tissue salvage. For this application, an oxygen generating biomaterial that may be injected directly into the soft tissue could provide an unprecedented treatment in the acute trauma setting. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine if sodium percarbonate (SPO), an oxygen generating biomaterial, is capable of maintaining resting skeletal muscle homeostasis under otherwise hypoxic conditions. In the current studies, a biologically and physiologically compatible range of SPO (1–2 mg/mL) was shown to: 1) improve the maintenance of contractility and attenuate the accumulation of HIF1α, depletion of intramuscular glycogen, and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) that occurred following ∼30 minutes of hypoxia in primarily resting (duty cycle = 0.2 s train/120 s contraction interval <0.002) rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles in vitro (95% N2–5% CO2, 37°C); 2) attenuate elevations of rat EDL muscle resting tension that occurred during contractile fatigue testing (3 bouts of 25 100 Hz tetanic contractions; duty cycle = 0.2 s/2 s = 0.1) under oxygenated conditions in vitro (95% O2–5% CO2, 37°C); and 3) improve the maintenance of contractility (in vivo) and prevent glycogen depletion in rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in a hindlimb ischemia model (i.e., ligation of the iliac artery). Additionally, injection of a commercially available lipid oxygen-carrying compound or the components (sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide) of 1 mg/mL SPO did not improve EDL muscle contractility under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that a biological and physiological concentration of SPO (1–2 mg/mL) injected directly into rat skeletal muscle (EDL or TA muscles) can partially preserve resting skeletal muscle homeostasis under

  20. Gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharova, Nadezhda; Lebed-Sharlevich, Iana; Kulachkova, Svetlana

    2014-05-01

    Rapid urbanization and expansion of city borders lead to development of new areas, often following with relief changes, covering of gully-ravine systems and river beds with technogenic grounds containing construction and municipal waste. Decomposition of organic matter in these grounds is a source of methane and carbon dioxide. Intensive generation and accumulation of CO2 and CH4 into grounds may cause a fire and explosion risk for constructed objects. Gases emission to the atmosphere changes the global balance of GHGs and negatively influences on human health. The aim of this investigation is to study gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds. Studied areas are the gully-ravine systems or river beds, covered with technogenic grounds during land development. Stratigraphic columns of these grounds are 5-17 meters of man-made loamy material with inclusion of construction waste. Gas generating layer with increased content of organic matter, reductive conditions and high methanogenic activity (up to 1.0 ng*g-1*h-1) is situated at the certain depth. Maximum CH4 and CO2 concentrations in this layer reach dangerous values (2-10% and 11%, respectively) in the current standards. In case of disturbance of ground layer (e.g. well-drilling) methane is rapidly transferred by convective flux to atmosphere. The rate of CH4 emission reaches 100 mg*m-2*h-1 resulting in its atmospheric concentration growth by an order of magnitude compared with background. In normal occurrence of grounds methane gradually diffuses into the upper layers by pore space, consuming on different processes (e.g. formation of organic matter, nitrogen compounds or specific particles of magnetite), and emits to atmosphere. CH4 emission rate varies from 1 to 40 mg*m-2*h-1 increasing with depth of grounds. Carbon dioxide emission is about 100 mg*m-2*h-1. During soil formation on gas generating grounds bacterial oxidation of methane, one of the most

  1. Conditions for generation of fire-related debris flows, Capulin Canyon, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, S.H.; Reneau, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of the responses of three drainage basins burned by the Dome fire of 1996 in New Mexico is used to identify the hillslope, channel and fire characteristics that indicate a susceptibility specifically to wildfire-related debris flow. Summer thunderstorms generated three distinct erosive responses from each of three basins. The Capulin Canyon basin showed widespread erosive sheetwash and rilling from hillslopes, and severe flooding occurred in the channel; the North Tributary basin exhibited extensive erosion of the mineral soil to a depth of 5 cm and downslope movement of up to boulder-sized material, and at least one debris flow occurred in the channel; negligible surface runoff was observed in the South Tributary basin. The negligible surface runoff observed in the South Tributary basin is attributed to the limited extent and severity of the fire in that basin. The factors that best distinguish between debris-flow producing and flood-producing drainages are drainage basin morphology and lithology. A rugged drainage basin morphology, an average 12 per cent channel gradient, and steep, rough hillslopes coupled with colluvium and soil weathered from volcaniclastic and volcanic rocks promoted the generation of debris flows. A less rugged basin morphology, an average gradient of 5 per cent, and long, smooth slopes mantled with pumice promoted flooding. Flood and debris-flow responses were produced without the presence of water-repellent soils. The continuity and severity of the burn mosaic, the condition of the riparian vegetation, the condition of the fibrous root mat, accumulations of dry ravel and colluvial material in