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Sample records for generation center essai

  1. Johnson Space Center CFD grid generation requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Fred

    1993-01-01

    Topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: heavy lift launch vehicles, space shuttles, space transportation system, grid generation, computational fluid dynamics, space station, and flow distribution.

  2. 5. Exciter generator (right of center) and its governor stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Exciter generator (right of center) and its governor stand (left of center), oil-pressure tank (left background), and brake stand (right foreground). View to west. - Holter Hydroelectric Facility, Dam & Power House, End of Holter Dam Road, Wolf Creek, Lewis and Clark County, MT

  3. Next-generation optical wireless communications for data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    Data centers collect and process information with a capacity that has been increasing from year to year at an almost exponential pace. Traditional fiber/cable data center network interconnections suffer from bandwidth overload, as well as flexibility and scalability issues. Therefore, a technology-shift from the fiber and cable to wireless has already been initiated in order to meet the required data-rate, flexibility and scalability demands for next-generation data center network interconnects. In addition, the shift to wireless reduces the volume allocated to the cabling/fiber and increases the cooling efficiency. Optical wireless communication (OWC), or free space optics (FSO), is one of the most effective wireless technologies that could be used in future data centers and could provide ultra-high capacity, very high cyber security and minimum latency, due to the low index of refraction of air in comparison to fiber technologies. In this paper we review the main concepts and configurations for next generation OWC for data centers. Two families of technologies are reviewed: the first technology regards interconnects between rack units in the same rack and the second technology regards the data center network that connects the server top of rack (TOR) to the switch. A comparison between different network technologies is presented.

  4. Design of the next generation target at Lujan center, LANSCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferres, Laurent

    2016-07-27

    This is a presentation given at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the design of the next generation target at Lujan center, LANSCE. The motivation for this design is to enable new nuclear physics experiments (defense program applications (DANCE)) that are currently limited by neutron intensity or energy resolution available at LANSCE. The target is being redesigned so that the Flight Paths in the upper tier provide a higher intensity in the epithermal and medium energy ranges.

  5. SWIRLING GALAXY PARENTS GENERATIONS OF STARS IN ITS CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a view of several star generations in the central region of the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51), a spiral region 23 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Canes Venatici (the Hunting Dogs). The galaxy's massive center, the bright ball of light in the center of the photograph, is about 80 light-years across and has a brightness of about 100 million suns. Astronomers estimate that it is about 400 million years old and has a mass 40 million times larger than our Sun. The concentration of stars is about 5,000 times higher than in our solar neighborhood, the Milky Way Galaxy. We would see a continuously bright sky if we lived near the bright center. The dark 'y' across the center is a sign of dust absorption. The bright dot in the middle of the 'y' has a brightness of about one million suns, but a size of less than five light-years. Its power and its tiny size suggest that we have located the elusive central black hole that produces powerful radio jets. Surrounding the center is a much older stellar population that covers a region of about 1,500 light-years in diameter and is at least 8 billion years old, and may be as old as the Universe itself, about 13 billion years. Further away, there is a 'necklace' of very young star-forming regions, clusters of infant stars, younger than 10 million years, which are about 700 light-years away from the center. Normally, young stars are found thousands of light-years away. Astronomers believe that stars in the central region were formed when a dwarf companion galaxy - which is not in the photograph - passed close to it, about 400 million years ago, stirring up dust and material for new star birth. The close encounter has been felt for a long time and is believed to be responsible also for the unusually high star formation activity in the bright necklace of young stars. The color image was assembled from four exposures taken Jan. 15, 1995 with Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 in blue

  6. Photocurrent generation in diamond electrodes modified with reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Roberta; Csiki, Réka; Lyuleeva, Alina; Pfisterer, Jonas; Wiesinger, Markus; Janssens, Stoffel D; Haenen, Ken; Cattani-Scholz, Anna; Stutzmann, Martin; Garrido, Jose A

    2015-04-22

    Photoactive reaction centers (RCs) are protein complexes in bacteria able to convert sunlight into other forms of energy with a high quantum yield. The photostimulation of immobilized RCs on inorganic electrodes result in the generation of photocurrent that is of interest for biosolar cell applications. This paper reports on the use of novel electrodes based on functional conductive nanocrystalline diamond onto which bacterial RCs are immobilized. A three-dimensional conductive polymer scaffold grafted to the diamond electrodes enables efficient entrapment of photoreactive proteins. The electron transfer in these functional diamond electrodes is optimized through the use of a ferrocene-based electron mediator, which provides significant advantages such as a rapid electron transfer as well as high generated photocurrent. A detailed discussion of the generated photocurrent as a function of time, bias voltage, and mediators in solution unveils the mechanisms limiting the electron transfer in these functional electrodes. This work featuring diamond-based electrodes in biophotovoltaics offers general guidelines that can serve to improve the performance of similar devices based on different materials and geometries.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-03-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  9. Enhanced Product Generation at NASA Data Centers Through Grid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Hinke, Thomas H.; Gavali, Shradha; Seufzer, William J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how grid technology can support the ability of NASA data centers to provide customized data products. A combination of grid technology and commodity processors are proposed to provide the bandwidth necessary to perform customized processing of data, with customized data subsetting providing the initial example. This customized subsetting engine can be used to support a new type of subsetting, called phenomena-based subsetting, where data is subsetted based on its association with some phenomena, such as mesoscale convective systems or hurricanes. This concept is expanded to allow the phenomena to be detected in one type of data, with the subsetting requirements transmitted to the subsetting engine to subset a different type of data. The subsetting requirements are generated by a data mining system and transmitted to the subsetter in the form of an XML feature index that describes the spatial and temporal extent of the phenomena. For this work, a grid-based mining system called the Grid Miner is used to identify the phenomena and generate the feature index. This paper discusses the value of grid technology in facilitating the development of a high performance customized product processing and the coupling of a grid mining system to support phenomena-based subsetting.

  10. AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, Stephen

    2012-08-29

    To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTAR’s initial offering combines--for the first time--a “gasification with CO2 capture” process simulator with a “combined-cycle” power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows

  11. Next-generation wideband multimode fibers for data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balemarthy, Kasyapa; Shubochkin, Roman; Sun, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Short-reach optical links such as those used in data centers pre-dominantly employ VCSELs together with laser- optimized OM4 and OM3 multimode fiber (MMF), mainly due to their reliability, energy-efficiency and low end-to-end system cost. The IEEE 802.3bm specification for 100Gbps Ethernet utilizes four parallel MMFs each operating at a serial data rate of 25Gbps. Due to the rapidly increasing internet traffic, the IEEE P802.3bs Task Force is working towards a 400Gbps Ethernet standard requiring a commensurate increase in the number of parallel fibers deployed. Using 16 parallel lanes, while feasible, is not the most efficient use of cabling. One solution to the data rate - cable density problem is the use of shortwave wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM) near 850nm. For example, employing four wavelengths separated by ~30nm (with an operational window of ~840-950nm) results in a four-fold increase in the per-fiber data rate. Furthermore, SWDM can be combined with the parallel solution to support 400Gbps with the same cable density as the current 100Gbps Ethernet solution using OM4 fiber. Conventional laser-optimized OM4 gives diminished performance at the longer wavelengths compared to 850nm. Shifting the OM4 optimization wavelength to longer wavelengths sacrifices the 850nm performance. In this paper, we present next-generation wideband multimode fibers (NG-WBMMF) that are optimized for SWDM operation using a novel design approach employing multiple dopants. We have fabricated and characterized a wideband MMF that is OM4 compliant over the 850-950nm wavelength window. BER measurements demonstrate that this next-generation WB MMF satisfies the pre-FEC requirement of 5 × 10-5 even after transmission over 300m.

  12. Photoredox Catalysis for the Generation of Carbon Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Jean-Philippe; Ollivier, Cyril; Fensterbank, Louis

    2016-09-20

    Radical chemistry has witnessed over the last decades important advances that have positioned it as a methodology of choice in synthetic chemistry. A number of great attributes such as specific reactivities, the knowledge of the kinetics of most elementary processes, the functional group tolerance, and the possibility to operate cascade sequences are clearly responsible for this craze. Nevertheless, at the end of the last century, radical chemistry appeared plagued by several hurdles to overcome such as the use of environmentally problematic mediators or the impossibility of scale up. While the concept of photocatalysis was firmly established in the coordination chemistry community, its diffusion in organic synthetic chemistry remained sporadic for decades until the end of the 2000s with the breakthrough merging of organocatalysis and photocatalysis by the MacMillan group and contemporary reports by the groups of Yoon and Stephenson. Since then, photoredox catalysis has enjoyed particularly active and intense developments. It is now the topic of a still increasing number of publications featuring various applications from asymmetric synthesis, total synthesis of natural products, and polymerization to process (flow) chemistry. In this Account, we survey our own efforts in this domain, focusing on the elaboration of new photocatalytic pathways that could lead to the efficient generation of C-centered functionalized alkyl and aryl radicals. Both reductive and oxidative manifolds are accessible through photoredox catalysis, which has guided us along these lines in our projects. Thus, we studied the photocatalytic reduction of onium salts such as sulfoniums and iodoniums for the production of the elusive aryl radical intermediates. Progressing to more relevant chemistry for synthesis, we examined the cleavage of C-O and the C-Br bonds for the generation of alkyl C-centered radicals. Activated epoxides could serve as valuable substrates of a photocatalyzed variant of

  13. A Vision for the Net Generation Media Center. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Many children today have never lived in a home without a computer. They are the "Net Generation," constantly "connected" by iPod, cell phone, keyboard, digital video camera, or game controller to various technologies. Recent studies have found that Net Genners see technology as "embedded in society," a primary means of connection with friends, and…

  14. Cobalamin Catalytic Centers for Stable Fuels Generation from Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Wesley D.; Jawdat, Benmaan I.; Ennist, Nathan M.; Warncke, Kurt

    2010-03-01

    Our aim is to design and construct protein-based artificial photosynthetic systems that reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) to stable fuel forms within the robust and adaptable (βα)8 TIM-barrel protein structure. The EutB subunit of the adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme, ethanolamine ammonia-lyase, from Salmonella typhimurium, was selected as the protein template. This system was selected because the Co^I forms of the native cobalamin (Cbl) cofactor, and the related cobinamide (Cbi), possess redox properties that are commensurate with reduction of CO2. The kinetics of photo- (excited 5'-deazariboflavin electron donor) and chemical [Ti(III)] reduction, and subsequent reaction, of the Cbl and Cbi with CO2 are measured by time-resolved UV/visible absorption spectroscopy. Products are quantified by NMR spectroscopy. The results address the efficacy of the organocobalt catalytic centers for CO2 reduction to stable fuels, towards protein device integration.

  15. NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER EMPLOYEE ENJOYS CAPTURING NASA'S NEXT GENERATION ASTRONAUT PORTRAITS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER EMPLOYEE ENJOYS CAPTURING NASA'S NEXT GENERATION ASTRONAUT PORTRAITS AT PICTURE YOURSELF IN SPACE BOOTH AT THE WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE OPEN HOUSE - AIR POWER 2003, MAY 10-11, 2003

  16. The Role of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems in Data Centers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report reviews how distributed generation (DG) resources such as fuel cells, reciprocating engines, and gas turbines can offer powerful energy efficiency savings in data centers, particularly when configured in combined heat and power (CHP) mode.

  17. Generation kinetics of color centers in irradiated poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, J. S.; Li, C. L.; Lee, Sanboh; Chou, K. F.

    2011-09-15

    The transient absorbance of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (PMP) irradiated with gamma rays at elevated temperatures has been investigated. The absorbance in the ultraviolet and visible range increases with gamma ray dose. A bathochromic shift in transmission spectra emerges significantly upon irradiation. A first-order generation model is proposed to analyze the kinetics of color centers during annealing. The activation energy of the color center increases with increasing gamma ray dose. The equilibrium behavior of color centers in PMP is similar to that of vacancies in metals, and the formation energy of color centers in PMP decreases with increasing gamma ray dose. However, annealable color centers are not observed in this study.

  18. Serving Generation 1.5 Learners in the University Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thonus, Terese

    2003-01-01

    Explains how a key academic support service--the university writing center, can assist Generation 1.5 students (long-term U.S. residents and English language learners fluent in spoken English) as they develop their writing skills. (Author/VWL)

  19. Thinking beyond Measurement, Description and Judgment: Fourth Generation Evaluation in Family-Centered Pediatric Healthcare Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Katherine Ann; Clarkin, Chantalle Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although pediatric healthcare organizations have widely implemented the philosophy of family-centered care (FCC), evaluators and health professionals have not explored how to preserve the philosophy of FCC in evaluation processes. Purpose: To illustrate how fourth generation evaluation, in theory, could facilitate collaboration between…

  20. Testing of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is a high-efficiency generator being developed for potential use on a Discovery 12 space mission. Lockheed Martin designed and fabricated the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit was delivered to NASA Glenn Research Center in 2008 and has been undergoing extended operation testing to generate long-term performance data for an integrated system. It has also been used for tests to characterize generator operation while varying control parameters and system inputs, both when controlled with an alternating current (AC) bus and with a digital controller. The ASRG EU currently has over 27,000 hours of operation. This paper summarizes all of the tests that have been conducted on the ASRG EU over the past 3 years and provides an overview of the test results and what was learned.

  1. A generation/recombination model assisted with two trap centers in wide band-gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Kuwabara, Takuhito; Uda, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    A generation/recombination (GR) model assisted with two trap centers has been proposed for studying reverse current on pn junctions in wide band-gap semiconductors. A level (Et1) has been assumed to be located near the bottom of the conduction band and the other (Et2) to be near the top of the valence band. The GR model has been developed by assuming (1) a high-electric field; F, (2) a short distance; d, between trap centers, (3) reduction in an energy-difference; Δeff = |Et1 - Et2| - eFd, and (4) hopping or tunneling conductions between trap centers with the same energy-level (Δeff ≈ 0). The GR rate has been modeled by trap levels, capture cross-sections, trap densities, and transition rate between trap centers. The GR rate, about 1010 greater than that estimated from the single-level model, has been predicted on pn junctions in a material with band-gap of 3.1 eV. Device simulations using the proposed GR model have been demonstrated for SiC diodes with and without a guard ring. A reasonable range for reverse current at room temperature has been simulated and stable convergence has been obtained in a numerical scheme for analyzing diodes with an electrically floating region.

  2. Generation X: implications for faculty recruitment and development in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Janet; Brown, Ann J

    2005-03-01

    Differences and tensions between the Baby Boom generation (born 1945-1962) and Generation X (born 1963-1981) have profound implications for the future of academic medicine. By and large, department heads and senior faculty are Boomers; today's residents and junior faculty are Generation X'ers. Looking at these issues in terms of the generations involved offers insights into a number of faculty development challenges, including inadequate and inexpert mentoring, work-life conflicts, and low faculty morale. These insights suggest strategies for strengthening academic medicine's recruitment and retention of Generation X into faculty and leadership roles. These strategies include (1) improving career and academic advising by specific attention to mentoring "across differences"--for instance, broaching the subject of formative differences in background during the initial interaction; adopting a style that incorporates information-sharing with engagement in problem solving; offering frequent, frank feedback; and refraining from comparing today to the glories of yesterday; to support such improvements, medical schools should recognize and evaluate mentoring as a core academic responsibility; (2) retaining both valued women and men in academic careers by having departments add temporal flexibility and create and legitimize less-than-full-time appointments; and (3) providing trainees and junior faculty with ready access to educational sessions designed to turn their "intellectual capital" into "academic career capital."Given the trends discussed in this article, such supports and adaptations are indicated to assure that academic health centers maintain traditions of excellence.

  3. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  4. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division.

  5. Event generator for RHIC spin physics. RIKEN BNL Research Center Proceedings, Volume 18

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, N.; Schaefer, A.

    1999-03-15

    This volume archives the reports from the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on ''Event Generator for RHIC Spin Physics II'' held during the week March 15, 1999 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It was the second meeting on the subject following a first one in last September. This workshop has been initiated to establish a firm collaboration between theorists and experimentalists involved in RHIC spin physics with the aim of developing a reliable, high-precision event generator for RHIC spin physics. Needless to say, adequate event generators are indispensible tools for high energy physics programs in general, especially in the process of: planning the experimental programs, developing algorithms to extract the physics signals of interest, estimating the background in the extracted results, and connecting the final particle kinematics to the fundamental i.e. partonic level processes. Since RHIC is the first polarized collider, dedicated efforts are required to obtain a full-fledged event generator which describes spin dependent reactions in great detail. The RHIC spin project will be in the transition from R&D and construction phase to operation phase in the year 2000. As soon as data will be available, it should be analysed, interpreted and compared with theoretical predictions to extract its physical significance. Without mutual understanding between theorists and experimentalists on the technical details, it is hard to perform detailed comparisons in a consistent framework. The importance of this fact has been recognized especially during the analyses of hadron induced reactions observed at CERN, Fermilab and DESY. Since the use of event generator is indispensible for the analyses, it should be developed in a way that both experimentalists and theorists can agree upon.

  6. Generation and complete nondestructive analysis of hyperentanglement assisted by nitrogen-vacancy centers in resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Mei

    2015-06-01

    We present two efficient schemes for the deterministic generation and the complete nondestructive analysis of hyperentangled Bell states in both the polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom (DOFs) of two-photon systems, assisted by the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamonds coupled to microtoroidal resonators as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. With the input-output process of photons, two-photon polarization-spatial hyperentangled Bell states can be generated in a deterministic way and their complete nondestructive analysis can be achieved. These schemes can be generalized to generate and analyze hyperentangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of multiphoton systems as well. Compared with previous works, these two schemes relax the difficulty of their implementation in experiment as it is not difficult to obtain the π phase shift in single-sided NV-cavity systems, but difficult in single-sided quantum-dot-cavity systems. Moreover, our schemes do not require that the transmission for the uncoupled cavity is balanceable with the reflectance for the coupled cavity and they can be operated at room temperature. Our calculations show that these schemes can reach a high fidelity and efficiency with current technology, which may be a benefit to long-distance high-capacity quantum communication with two DOFs of photon systems.

  7. Central and peripheral pain generators in women with chronic pelvic pain: patient centered assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) often present without obvious cause on imaging studies, laboratory values or physical exam. Dysfunctional sensory processing in the central nervous system (CNS) may explain pain of unclear origin. Central sensitization (CS), a mechanism of centrally mediated pain, describes this abnormal processing of sensory information. Women with CPP often present with several seemingly unrelated symptoms. This can be explained by co-existing chronic pain syndromes occurring in the same patient. Central sensitization occurs in all of these pain syndromes, also described as dysfunctional pain syndromes, and thus may explain why several often occur in the same patient. Six of the most common pain disorders that co-exist in CPP include endometriosis, painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cysitis, vulvodynia, myofascial pain/ pelvic floor hypertonus, irritable bowel syndrome, and primary dysmenorrhea. Central pain generators, (pain originating from CS) and peripheral pain generators, (pain from local tissue damage), can both occur in each of these six conditions. These pain generators will be described. Chronic pain, specifically dysfunctional sensory processing, is recognized as a systemic disease process like diabetes to be managed as opposed to a local problem to be "fixed" or cured. A multi-disciplinary approach to assessment and treatment with a focus on improving emotional, physical and social functioning instead of focusing strictly on pain reduction is more effective in decreasing disability. This is best achieved by determining the patient's needs and perspective through a patient-centered approach. Algorithms for such an approach to assessment and treatment are outlined.

  8. Metal-centered polymers: Using controlled polymerization methodologies for the generation of responsive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert Matthew

    Controlled polymerization methods were used to prepare highly modular polymeric metal complexes via convergent and divergent strategies. In these materials, the metal center provides a versatile hub for preparing diverse architectures through coordinative bonds. Moreover, the metal complex introduces various properties to the polymer such as luminescence, magnetism, or electroactivity. Suitably functionalized metal complexes have been used for the atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylate and methacrylate monomers by metalloinitiation to generate luminescent biocompatible materials through a divergent synthesis. By cleaving the tert-butyl groups from poly(tert -butyl acrylate), water soluble [Ru(bpyPAA2)3] 2+ has been prepared as well as the amphiphilic star block copolymer [Ru{bpy(PLA-PAA)2}3]2+ (PLA = poly(lactic acid), PAA = poly(acrylic acid) Bipyridine-centered polymeric macroligands may be chelated to a variety of metal salts. The polymer size greatly influences the formation of [Fe(bpy) 3]2+ centered polymers. As the molecular weight increases (> ˜25 kDa) tris complex formation decreases. Tris(bpy) synthesis is also impacted by chemical composition. BpyPtBA2 (PtBA = poly(tert-butyl acrylate) generates an iron mono(bpy) complex before giving rise to the bis(bpy) iron complex; no tris complex is observed. In contrast, the combination of bpyPEG2 (3 equiv) (PEG = (poly(ethylene glycol)) results in the formation of some iron tris(bpy) compound; however, complete tris(bpy) product formation is suppressed, presumably because of the chelating ability of the PEG chains. These examples contrast with other polymeric macroligands such as bpyPS2, bpyPMMA2, bpyPCL2 and bpyPLA 2 (PS = polystyrene; PMMA = poly(methyl methacrylate); PCL = poly(epsilon-caprolactone); PLA = poly(DL-lactic acid)) for which chelation reactions are facile for low molecular weight macroligands (<15 kDa), with chelation efficiencies (defined as (epsilonPMC/epsilonbpy) x 100%) only declining

  9. Materials characterization of dusts generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeker, Gregory P.; Sutley, Stephen J.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Lowers, Heather; Bern, Amy M.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Clark, Roger N.; Gent, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    The major inorganic components of the dusts generated from the collapse of the World Trade Center buildings on September 11, 2001 were concrete materials, gypsum, and man-made vitreous fibers. These components were likely derived from lightweight Portland cement concrete floors, gypsum wallboard, and spray-on fireproofing and ceiling tiles, respectively. All of the 36 samples collected by the USGS team had these materials as the three major inorganic components of the dust. Components found at minor and trace levels include chrysotile asbestos, lead, crystalline silica, and particles of iron and zinc oxides. Other heavy metals, such as lead, bismuth, copper, molybdenum, chromium, and nickel, were present at much lower levels occurring in a variety of chemical forms. Several of these materials have health implications based on their chemical composition, morphology, and bioaccessibility.

  10. Design of the Next Generation Target at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ferres, Laurent

    2016-08-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports scientific research in many diverse fields such as biology, chemistry, and nuclear science. The Laboratory was established in 1943 during the Second World War to develop nuclear weapons. Today, LANL is one of the largest laboratories dedicated to nuclear defense and operates an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator for basic and applied research including: production of high- and low-energy neutrons beams, isotope production for medical applications and proton radiography. This accelerator is located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The work performed involved the redesign of the target for the low-energy neutron source at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, which is one of the facilities built around the accelerator. The redesign of the target involves modeling various arrangements of the moderator-reflector-shield for the next generation neutron production target. This is done using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX), and ROOT analysis framework, a C++ based-software, to analyze the results.

  11. Towards protein-crystal centering using second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, David J.; Dettmar, Christopher M.; Becker, Michael; Mulichak, Anne M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Ginell, Stephan L.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Fischetti, Robert F.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-­ray diffraction of protein crystals was explored. These studies included (i) comparison of microcrystal positions in cryoloops as determined by SHG imaging and by X-ray diffraction rastering and (ii) X-ray structure determinations of selected proteins to investigate the potential for laser-induced damage from SHG imaging. In studies using β2 adrenergic receptor membrane-protein crystals prepared in lipidic mesophase, the crystal locations identified by SHG images obtained in transmission mode were found to correlate well with the crystal locations identified by raster scanning using an X-­ray minibeam. SHG imaging was found to provide about 2 µm spatial resolution and shorter image-acquisition times. The general insensitivity of SHG images to optical scatter enabled the reliable identification of microcrystals within opaque cryocooled lipidic mesophases that were not identified by conventional bright-field imaging. The potential impact of extended exposure of protein crystals to five times a typical imaging dose from an ultrafast laser source was also assessed. Measurements of myoglobin and thaumatin crystals resulted in no statistically significant differences between structures obtained from diffraction data acquired from exposed and unexposed regions of single crystals. Practical constraints for integrating SHG imaging into an active beamline for routine automated crystal centering are discussed. PMID:23633594

  12. The NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Next Generation Space Weather Data Warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Chulaki, A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Boblitt, J.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Swindell, M. J., IV; Bakshi, S. S.; Mays, M. L.; Shim, J. S.; Hesse, M.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables, supports, and performs research and development for next generation space science and space weather models. The CCMC currently hosts a large and expanding collection of state-or-the-art, physics-based space weather models that have been developed by the international research community. There are many tools and services provided by the CCMC that are currently available world-wide, along with the ongoing development of new innovative systems and software for research, discovery, validation, visualization, and forecasting. Over the history of the CCMC's existence, there has been one constant engineering challenge - describing, managing, and disseminating data. To address the challenges that accompany an ever-expanding number of models to support, along with a growing catalog of simulation output - the CCMC is currently developing a flexible and extensible space weather data warehouse to support both internal and external systems and applications. This paper intends to chronicle the evolution and future of the CCMC's data infrastructure, and the current infrastructure re-engineering activities that seek to leverage existing community data model standards like SPASE and the IMPEx Simulation Data Model.

  13. Data Basin Climate Center: where to get datasets, manipulate them, and generate practical answers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, D. M.; Strittholt, J.; Ward, B. C.; Sheehan, T.; Comendant, T.; Lenihan, J. M.; Osborne-Gowey, J.

    2009-12-01

    Monitoring datasets are essential to detect changes that are occurring and identify thresholds that cause them, but scientists around the world are now generating large volumes of data that vary in quality, format, supporting documentation, and accessibility. Moreover, diverse models are being run at various spatial and temporal scales to try and understand past climate variability and its impacts, generate future climate and land use scenarios, and project potential future impacts to the planet. Conservation practitioners and land managers are struggling to synthesize this wealth of information, identify relevant and usable datasets, and translate evolving science results into on-the-ground climate adaptation strategies. In partnership with ESRI and Mambo media, the Conservation Biology Institute (CBI) is developing a versatile web-based resource that centralizes usable climate change-relevant datasets and provides analytical tools to visualize, analyze, and communicate findings for practical applications. To illustrate its capability to store, manipulate, and derive relevant conclusions to users, we present a project focusing on California included in the Climate Center of Data Basin (http://www.databasin.org). The project synthesizes several studies at a variety of scales describing climate change impacts on vegetation distribution, carbon sequestration potential, and wildfire risk, for the State of California, as a result of collaboration between PNW Forest Service, Oregon State University, CBI and The Nature Conservancy.

  14. Time-bin-encoding-based remote states generation of nitrogen-vacancy centers through noisy channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shi-Lei; Chen, Li; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-02-01

    We design proposals to generate a remote Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state and a W state of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers coupled to microtoroidal resonators (MTRs) through noisy channels by utilizing time-bin encoding processes and fast-optical-switch-based polarization rotation operations. The polarization and phase noise induced by noisy channels generally affect the time of state generation but not its success probability and fidelity. Besides, the above proposals can be generalized to n-qubit between two or among n remote nodes with success probability unity under ideal conditions. Furthermore, the proposals are robust for regular noise-changeable channels for the n-node case. This method is also useful in other remote quantum information processing tasks through noisy channels. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264042, 61465013, 11465020, and 11165015), the Program for Chun Miao Excellent Talents of Jilin Provincial Department of Education (Grant No. 201316), and the Talent Program of Yanbian University of China (Grant No. 950010001).

  15. Test Program for Stirling Radioisotope Generator Hardware at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Bolotin, Gary S.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2014-01-01

    Stirling-based energy conversion technology has demonstrated the potential of high efficiency and low mass power systems for future space missions. This capability is beneficial, if not essential, to making certain deep space missions possible. Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a 140-watt radioisotope power system. A variety of flight-like hardware, including Stirling convertors, controllers, and housings, was designed and built under the ASRG flight development project. To support future Stirling-based power system development NASA has proposals that, if funded, will allow this hardware to go on test at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). While future flight hardware may not be identical to the hardware developed under the ASRG flight development project, many components will likely be similar, and system architectures may have heritage to ASRG. Thus the importance of testing the ASRG hardware to the development of future Stirling-based power systems cannot be understated. This proposed testing will include performance testing, extended operation to establish an extensive reliability database, and characterization testing to quantify subsystem and system performance and better understand system interfaces. This paper details this proposed test program for Stirling radioisotope generator hardware at NASA GRC. It explains the rationale behind the proposed tests and how these tests will meet the stated objectives.

  16. Test Program for Stirling Radioisotope Generator Hardware at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Bolotin, Gary S.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    Stirling-based energy conversion technology has demonstrated the potential of high efficiency and low mass power systems for future space missions. This capability is beneficial, if not essential, to making certain deep space missions possible. Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a 140-W radioisotope power system. A variety of flight-like hardware, including Stirling convertors, controllers, and housings, was designed and built under the ASRG flight development project. To support future Stirling-based power system development NASA has proposals that, if funded, will allow this hardware to go on test at the NASA Glenn Research Center. While future flight hardware may not be identical to the hardware developed under the ASRG flight development project, many components will likely be similar, and system architectures may have heritage to ASRG. Thus, the importance of testing the ASRG hardware to the development of future Stirling-based power systems cannot be understated. This proposed testing will include performance testing, extended operation to establish an extensive reliability database, and characterization testing to quantify subsystem and system performance and better understand system interfaces. This paper details this proposed test program for Stirling radioisotope generator hardware at NASA Glenn. It explains the rationale behind the proposed tests and how these tests will meet the stated objectives.

  17. J-2X Gas Generator Development Testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Hormonzian, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for upper stage and trans-lunar applications of the Ares vehicles for the Constellation program. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. Development was contracted to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, two phases of testing have been completed on the development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine. The hardware has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations. Several of these configurations have resulted in combustion instability of the gas generator assembly. Development of the final configuration of workhorse hardware (which will ultimately be used to verify critical requirements on a component level) has required a balance between changes in the injector and chamber hardware in order to successfully mitigate the combustion instability without sacrificing other engine system requirements. This paper provides an overview of the two completed test series, performed at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The requirements, facility setup, hardware configurations, and test series progression are detailed. Significant levels of analysis have been performed in order to provide design solutions to mitigate the combustion stability issues, and these are briefly covered. Also discussed are the results of analyses related to either anomalous readings or off-nominal testing throughout the two test series.

  18. Coordination functionalization of graphene oxide with tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of nickel(II): Generation of paramagnetic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Alzate-Carvajal, Natalia; Henao-Holguín, Laura V.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V.; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a novel approach to functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) which allows for a facile generation of paramagnetic centers from two diamagnetic components. Coordination attachment of [Ni(cyclam)]2+ or [Ni(tet b)]2+ tetraazamacrocyclic cations to carboxylic groups of GO takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based reaction medium. The procedure is very straightforward and does not require high temperatures or other harsh conditions. Changing the coordination geometry of Ni(II) from square-planar tetracoordinated to pseudooctahedral hexacoordinated brings about the conversion from low-spin to high-spin state of the metal centers. Even though the content of tetraazamacrocyclic complexes in functionalized GO samples was found to be relatively low (nickel content of ca. 1 wt%, as determined by thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements easily detected the appearance of paramagnetic properties in GO + [Ni(cyclam)] and GO + [Ni(tet b)] nanohybrids, with effective magnetic moments of 1.95 BM and 2.2 BM for, respectively. According to density functional theory calculations, the main spin density is localized at the macrocyclic complexes, without considerable extension to graphene sheet, which suggests insignificant ferromagnetic coupling in the nanohybrids, in agreement with the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements. The coordination attachment of Ni(II) tetraazamacrocycles to GO results in considerable changes in Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra, as well as in GO morphology, as observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  19. NASA Glenn Research Center Support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    A high-efficiency radioisotope power system was being developed for long-duration NASA space science missions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managed a flight contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company to build Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs), with support from NASA Glenn Research Center. DOE initiated termination of that contract in late 2013, primarily due to budget constraints. Sunpower, Inc., held two parallel contracts to produce Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), one with Lockheed Martin to produce ASC-F flight units, and one with Glenn for the production of ASC-E3 engineering unit "pathfinders" that are built to the flight design. In support of those contracts, Glenn provided testing, materials expertise, Government-furnished equipment, inspection capabilities, and related data products to Lockheed Martin and Sunpower. The technical support included material evaluations, component tests, convertor characterization, and technology transfer. Material evaluations and component tests were performed on various ASC components in order to assess potential life-limiting mechanisms and provide data for reliability models. Convertor level tests were conducted to characterize performance under operating conditions that are representative of various mission conditions. Despite termination of the ASRG flight development contract, NASA continues to recognize the importance of high-efficiency ASC power conversion for Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) and continues investment in the technology, including the continuation of the ASC-E3 contract. This paper describes key Government support for the ASRG project and future tests to be used to provide data for ongoing reliability assessments.

  20. Seismic waves generated by aircraft impacts and building collapses at World Trade Center, New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Young; Sykes, L. R.; Armitage, J. H.; Xie, J. K.; Jacob, K. H.; Richards, P. G.; West, M.; Waldhauser, F.; Armbruster, J.; Seeber, L.; Du, W. X.; Lerner-Lam, A.

    Seismologists sometimes do their work of data acquisition and analysis against a tragic background. Usually, the context is fieldwork far from home, in an area subjected to the natural but sometimes devastating effects of an earthquake. But in the present case, we are in our own New York City area; that is, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, in Palisades, N.Y; and the context is inhuman actions against people and the fabric of our society.As the appalling events of September 11 unfolded, we found that we had recorded numerous seismic signals from two plane impacts and building collapses of the two World Trade Center (WTC) towers, often at times different than those being reported elsewhere. Collapses of the two WTC towers generated large seismic waves, observed in five states and up to 428 km away The north tower collapse was the largest seismic source and had local magnitude ML 2.3. From this, we infer that ground shaking of the WTC towers was not a major contributor to the collapse or damage to surrounding buildings. But unfortunately, we also conclude that from the distance at which our own detections were made (the nearest station is 34 km away at Palisades) it is not possible to infer (with detail sufficient to meet the demands of civil engineers in an emergency situation) just what the near-in ground motions must have been.

  1. Hydrogen Generation Through Renewable Energy Sources at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony; Prokopius, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation of the potential for generating high pressure, high purity hydrogen at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was performed. This evaluation was based on producing hydrogen utilizing a prototype Hamilton Standard electrolyzer that is capable of producing hydrogen at 3000 psi. The present state of the electrolyzer system was determined to identify the refurbishment requirements. The power for operating the electrolyzer would be produced through renewable power sources. Both wind and solar were considered in the analysis. The solar power production capability was based on the existing solar array field located at NASA GRC. The refurbishment and upgrade potential of the array field was determined and the array output was analyzed with various levels of upgrades throughout the year. The total available monthly and yearly energy from the array was determined. A wind turbine was also sized for operation. This sizing evaluated the wind potential at the site and produced an operational design point for the wind turbine. Commercially available wind turbines were evaluated to determine their applicability to this site. The system installation and power integration were also addressed. This included items such as housing the electrolyzer, power management, water supply, gas storage, cooling and hydrogen dispensing.

  2. Advanced Aeroservoelastic Testing and Data Analysis (Les Essais Aeroservoelastiques et l’Analyse des Donnees).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    L’arriv6e des syst~mes de contr6le actifs a eu pour effet d󈨁argir le champ couvert par ces essais et de les rendre plus complexes, puisque il faut... capteurs de voilure, moteur servocommande, cette technique n’est g6n6ralernent pas et fuselage avant en vertical pour t’excitation par les retenue par... capteurs ci-dessus pour les deux types d’excitation. Le Par contre, sur avion a CDVE pour lequel les ordres crit6re de qualit6 de lidentification est

  3. Dynamic two-center interference in high-order harmonic generation from molecules with attosecond nuclear motion.

    PubMed

    Baker, S; Robinson, J S; Lein, M; Chirilă, C C; Torres, R; Bandulet, H C; Comtois, D; Kieffer, J C; Villeneuve, D M; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P

    2008-08-01

    We report a new dynamic two-center interference effect in high-harmonic generation from H2, in which the attosecond nuclear motion of H2+ initiated at ionization causes interference to be observed at lower harmonic orders than would be the case for static nuclei. To enable this measurement we utilize a recently developed technique for probing the attosecond nuclear dynamics of small molecules. The experimental results are reproduced by a theoretical analysis based upon the strong-field approximation which incorporates the temporally dependent two-center interference term.

  4. Processes that Intervene in the Generation of the Photoacoustic Effect in Alkali Halides with F-Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Luis F.

    2004-01-01

    The photoacoustic effect, produced by the F-center in alkali halide crystals, is analyzed using the configuration coordinate model. By using the configuration coordinate model it is possible to explain the temperature increase of the sample when the sample is illuminated and the F-centers absorb light. Also this model explains the piston effect upon the atmosphere that surrounds the sample when the sample is illuminated. The temperature increase and the piston effect, produced during the development of the photoacoustic effect, cause the sound wave generation in the atmosphere that surrounds the sample when the F-centers absorb light. Using this model, the temperature increase value for a KCl sample and the displacement of the faces of the crystal during the process for the following crystals: KCl, KBr, KI and NaCl, have been determined.

  5. One-step Entanglement Generation Between Separated Nitrogen-vacancy Centers Embedded in Photonic Crystal Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhengang; Song, Kehui

    2016-12-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for creating entanglement between two distant nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, which are placed in separate single-mode nanocavities in a planar photonic crystal (PC). With a laser-driven, the decoherence from the excited states of the NV centers can be effectively suppressed by virtue of the Raman transition in the dispersive regime. With the assistant of a strong classical field, fast operation can be achieved. The experimental feasibility of the scheme is discussed based on currently available technology.

  6. Generation of a two-center overlap integral over Slater orbitals of higher principal quantum numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.

    1992-01-01

    The expressions for two-center overlap integrals between angular s, p, and d Slater orbitals of arbitrary, higher principal quantum number are explicitly listed. The expressions obtained are extremely compact and independent of the coordinate system. It is further shown that the numerical values of the integrals obtained in this way are free from any numerical instability.

  7. Lewis Research Center studies of multiple large wind turbine generators on a utility network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. J.; Triezenberg, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA-Lewis program to study the anticipated performance of a wind turbine generator farm on an electric utility network is surveyed. The paper describes the approach of the Lewis Wind Energy Project Office to developing analysis capabilities in the area of wind turbine generator-utility network computer simulations. Attention is given to areas such as, the Lewis Purdue hybrid simulation, an independent stability study, DOE multiunit plant study, and the WEST simulator. Also covered are the Lewis mod-2 simulation including analog simulation of a two wind turbine system and comparison with Boeing simulation results, and gust response of a two machine model. Finally future work to be done is noted and it is concluded that the study shows little interaction between the generators and between the generators and the bus.

  8. The validity of the first and second generation Microsoft Kinect™ for identifying joint center locations during static postures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; McGorry, Raymond W

    2015-07-01

    The Kinect™ sensor released by Microsoft is a low-cost, portable, and marker-less motion tracking system for the video game industry. Since the first generation Kinect sensor was released in 2010, many studies have been conducted to examine the validity of this sensor when used to measure body movement in different research areas. In 2014, Microsoft released the computer-used second generation Kinect sensor with a better resolution for the depth sensor. However, very few studies have performed a direct comparison between all the Kinect sensor-identified joint center locations and their corresponding motion tracking system-identified counterparts, the result of which may provide some insight into the error of the Kinect-identified segment length, joint angles, as well as the feasibility of adapting inverse dynamics to Kinect-identified joint centers. The purpose of the current study is to first propose a method to align the coordinate system of the Kinect sensor with respect to the global coordinate system of a motion tracking system, and then to examine the accuracy of the Kinect sensor-identified coordinates of joint locations during 8 standing and 8 sitting postures of daily activities. The results indicate the proposed alignment method can effectively align the Kinect sensor with respect to the motion tracking system. The accuracy level of the Kinect-identified joint center location is posture-dependent and joint-dependent. For upright standing posture, the average error across all the participants and all Kinect-identified joint centers is 76 mm and 87 mm for the first and second generation Kinect sensor, respectively. In general, standing postures can be identified with better accuracy than sitting postures, and the identification accuracy of the joints of the upper extremities is better than for the lower extremities. This result may provide some information regarding the feasibility of using the Kinect sensor in future studies.

  9. Two-center interference in high-order harmonic generation from heteronuclear diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2011-01-17

    Two-center interference for heteronuclear diatomic molecules (HeDM) is investigated. The minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum, as a consequence of the destructive interference, is shifted to lower harmonic orders compared with that in a homonuclear case. This phenomenon is explained by performing phase analysis. It is found that, for an HeDM, the high harmonic spectrum contains information not only on the internuclear separation but also on the properties of the two separate centers, which implies the potential application of estimating the asymmetry of molecules and judging the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) for the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). Moreover, the possibility to monitor the evolution of HOMO itself in molecular dynamics is also promised.

  10. Evolution of reaction center mimics to systems capable of generating solar fuel.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Benjamin D; Vaughn, Michael D; Bergkamp, Jesse J; Gust, Devens; Moore, Ana L; Moore, Thomas A

    2014-05-01

    Capturing and converting solar energy via artificial photosynthesis offers an ideal way to limit society's dependence on fossil fuel and its myriad consequences. The development and study of molecular artificial photosynthetic reactions centers and antenna complexes and the combination of these constructs with catalysts to drive the photochemical production of a fuel helps to build the understanding needed for development of future scalable technologies. This review focuses on the study of molecular complexes, design of which is inspired by the components of natural photosynthesis, and covers research from early triad reaction centers developed by the group of Gust, Moore, and Moore to recent photoelectrochemical systems capable of using light to convert water to oxygen and hydrogen.

  11. DNA breaking activity of the carbon-centered radical generated from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH).

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, K; Johkoh, H; Sako, K; Kikugawa, K

    1993-01-01

    When supercoiled plasmid DNA was incubated with 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane)hydrochloride (AAPH) at pH 7.4 in the presence and absence of oxygen, the DNA single strands were effectively cleaved. The breaking in the presence of oxygen was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase and catalase, but inhibited by mannitol, ethanol, butyl hydroxyanisole, thiol compounds, tertiary amines and spin trapping agents N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). The breaking in the absence of oxygen was inhibited by ethanol, a tertiary amine and PBN. By electron spin resonance spin-trapping with PBN, the carbon-centered radical was detected both in the presence and the absence of oxygen. Hydroxyl radical was detected by use of DMPO only in the presence of oxygen. The DNA breaking activity of AAPH was found to be due primarily to the aliphatic carbon-centered radical. While the reactivity of carbon-centered radicals have received little attention, the aliphatic carbon-centered radical generated from AAPH was found to be highly reactive to break the DNA strands.

  12. Yahoo! Compute Coop (YCC). A Next-Generation Passive Cooling Design for Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, AD; Page, Christina; Lytle, Bob

    2011-07-20

    The purpose of the Yahoo! Compute Coop (YCC) project is to research, design, build and implement a greenfield "efficient data factory" and to specifically demonstrate that the YCC concept is feasible for large facilities housing tens of thousands of heat-producing computing servers. The project scope for the Yahoo! Compute Coop technology includes: - Analyzing and implementing ways in which to drastically decrease energy consumption and waste output. - Analyzing the laws of thermodynamics and implementing naturally occurring environmental effects in order to maximize the "free-cooling" for large data center facilities. "Free cooling" is the direct usage of outside air to cool the servers vs. traditional "mechanical cooling" which is supplied by chillers or other Dx units. - Redesigning and simplifying building materials and methods. - Shortening and simplifying build-to-operate schedules while at the same time reducing initial build and operating costs. Selected for its favorable climate, the greenfield project site is located in Lockport, NY. Construction on the 9.0 MW critical load data center facility began in May 2009, with the fully operational facility deployed in September 2010. The relatively low initial build cost, compatibility with current server and network models, and the efficient use of power and water are all key features that make it a highly compatible and globally implementable design innovation for the data center industry. Yahoo! Compute Coop technology is designed to achieve 99.98% uptime availability. This integrated building design allows for free cooling 99% of the year via the building's unique shape and orientation, as well as server physical configuration.

  13. Iterative user-centered design of a next generation patient monitoring system for emergency medical response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tia; Kim, Matthew I; White, David; Alm, Alexander M

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a system for real-time patient monitoring during large-scale disasters. Our system is designed with scalable algorithms to monitor large numbers of patients, an intuitive interface to support the overwhelmed responders, and ad-hoc mesh networking capabilities to maintain connectivity to patients in the chaotic settings. This paper describes an iterative approach to user-centered design adopted to guide development of our system. This system is a part of the Advanced Health and Disaster Aid Network (AID-N) architecture.

  14. Work or Study: Different Fortunes of U.S. Latino Generations. Pew Hispanic Center Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Richard; Lowell, B. Lindsay

    This study examines how different Latino generations (immigrants and their U.S.-born offspring) perform in the labor market, highlighting the wages and employment of young adults. It is based on tabulations of Current Population Survey data collected monthly by the U.S. Bureau of the Census, with the years 1995 and 2000 as the starting and closing…

  15. Correlation of a generation-recombination center with a deep level trap in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, X. S. E-mail: elecsj@nus.edu.sg; Lin, K.; Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; McSkimming, B.; Speck, J. S.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Chua, S. J. E-mail: elecsj@nus.edu.sg

    2015-03-09

    We report on the identification of a deep level trap centre which contributes to generation-recombination noise. A n-GaN epilayer, grown by MOCVD on sapphire, was measured by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and noise spectroscopy. DLTS found 3 well documented deep levels at E{sub c} − 0.26 eV, E{sub c} − 0.59 eV, and E{sub c} − 0.71 eV. The noise spectroscopy identified a generation recombination centre at E{sub c} − 0.65 ± 0.1 eV with a recombination lifetime of 65 μs at 300 K. This level is considered to be the same as the one at E{sub c} − 0.59 eV measured from DLTS, as they have similar trap densities and capture cross section. This result shows that some deep levels contribute to noise generation in GaN materials.

  16. Lahar hazard zones for eruption-generated lahars in the Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Lahar deposits are found in drainages that head on or near Lassen Peak in northern California, demonstrating that these valleys are susceptible to future lahars. In general, lahars are uncommon in the Lassen region. Lassen Peak's lack of large perennial snowfields and glaciers limits its potential for lahar development, with the winter snowpack being the largest source of water for lahar generation. The most extensive lahar deposits are related to the May 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak, and evidence for pre-1915 lahars is sparse and spatially limited. The May 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak was a small-volume eruption that generated a snow and hot-rock avalanche, a pyroclastic flow, and two large and four smaller lahars. The two large lahars were generated on May 19 and 22 and inundated sections of Lost and Hat Creeks. We use 80 years of snow depth measurements from Lassen Peak to calculate average and maximum liquid water depths, 2.02 meters (m) and 3.90 m respectively, for the month of May as estimates of the 1915 lahars. These depths are multiplied by the areal extents of the eruptive deposits to calculate a water volume range, 7.05-13.6x106 cubic meters (m3). We assume the lahars were a 50/50 mix of water and sediment and double the water volumes to provide an estimate of the 1915 lahars, 13.2-19.8x106 m3. We use a representative volume of 15x106 m3 in the software program LAHARZ to calculate cross-sectional and planimetric areas for the 1915 lahars. The resultant lahar inundation zone reasonably portrays both of the May 1915 lahars. We use this same technique to calculate the potential for future lahars in basins that head on or near Lassen Peak. LAHARZ assumes that the total lahar volume does not change after leaving the potential energy, H/L, cone (the height of the edifice, H, down to the approximate break in slope at its base, L); therefore, all water available to initiate a lahar is contained inside this cone. Because snow is the primary source of water for

  17. Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric α-Carbon-Centered Triglycine Radical Cations in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Minjie; Siu, Shiu On; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2008-05-31

    The mobility of the radical center in three isomeric triglycine radical cationss[G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+shas been investigated theoretically via density functional theory (DFT) and experimentally via tandem mass spectrometry. These radical cations were generated by collision-induced dissociations (CIDs) of Cu(II)-containing ternary complexes that contain the tripeptides YGG, GYG, and GGY, respectively (G and Y are the glycine and tyrosine residues, respectively). Dissociative electron transfer within the complexes led to observation of [Y•GG]+, [GY•G]+, and [GGY•]+; CID resulted in cleavage of the tyrosine side chain as p-quinomethide, yielding [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+, respectively. Interconversions between these isomeric triglycine radical cations have relatively high barriers (g44.7 kcal/mol), in support of the thesis that isomerically pure [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ can be experimentally produced. This is to be contrasted with barriers < 17 kcal/mol that were encountered in the tautomerism of protonated triglycine [Rodriquez C. F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006-3012]. The CID spectra of [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ were substantially different, providing experimental proof that initially these ions have distinct structures. DFT calculations showed that direct dissociations are competitive with interconversions followed by dissociation.

  18. Next-generation sequencing-based genome diagnostics across clinical genetics centers: implementation choices and their effects.

    PubMed

    Vrijenhoek, Terry; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Elferink, Martin; de Ligt, Joep; Kranendonk, Elcke; Santen, Gijs; Nijman, Isaac J; Butler, Derek; Claes, Godelieve; Costessi, Adalberto; Dorlijn, Wim; van Eyndhoven, Winfried; Halley, Dicky J J; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; van Hove, Steven; Johansson, Lennart F; Jongbloed, Jan D H; Kamps, Rick; Kockx, Christel E M; de Koning, Bart; Kriek, Marjolein; Lekanne Dit Deprez, Ronald; Lunstroo, Hans; Mannens, Marcel; Mook, Olaf R; Nelen, Marcel; Ploem, Corrette; Rijnen, Marco; Saris, Jasper J; Sinke, Richard; Sistermans, Erik; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Sleutels, Frank; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Tienhoven, Marianne; Vermaat, Martijn; Vogel, Maartje; Waisfisz, Quinten; Marjan Weiss, Janneke; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; van Workum, Wilbert; Ijntema, Helger; van der Zwaag, Bert; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; den Dunnen, Johan; Veltman, Joris A; Hennekam, Raoul; Cuppen, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    Implementation of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technology into routine diagnostic genome care requires strategic choices. Instead of theoretical discussions on the consequences of such choices, we compared NGS-based diagnostic practices in eight clinical genetic centers in the Netherlands, based on genetic testing of nine pre-selected patients with cardiomyopathy. We highlight critical implementation choices, including the specific contributions of laboratory and medical specialists, bioinformaticians and researchers to diagnostic genome care, and how these affect interpretation and reporting of variants. Reported pathogenic mutations were consistent for all but one patient. Of the two centers that were inconsistent in their diagnosis, one reported to have found 'no causal variant', thereby underdiagnosing this patient. The other provided an alternative diagnosis, identifying another variant as causal than the other centers. Ethical and legal analysis showed that informed consent procedures in all centers were generally adequate for diagnostic NGS applications that target a limited set of genes, but not for exome- and genome-based diagnosis. We propose changes to further improve and align these procedures, taking into account the blurring boundary between diagnostics and research, and specific counseling options for exome- and genome-based diagnostics. We conclude that alternative diagnoses may infer a certain level of 'greediness' to come to a positive diagnosis in interpreting sequencing results. Moreover, there is an increasing interdependence of clinic, diagnostics and research departments for comprehensive diagnostic genome care. Therefore, we invite clinical geneticists, physicians, researchers, bioinformatics experts and patients to reconsider their role and position in future diagnostic genome care.

  19. Control of oscillation periods and phase durations in half-center central pattern generators: a comparative mechanistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Daun, Silvia; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2009-08-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) consisting of interacting groups of neurons drive a variety of repetitive, rhythmic behaviors in invertebrates and vertebrates, such as arise in locomotion, respiration, mastication, scratching, and so on. These CPGs are able to generate rhythmic activity in the absence of afferent feedback or rhythmic inputs. However, functionally relevant CPGs must adaptively respond to changing demands, manifested as changes in oscillation period or in relative phase durations in response to variations in non-patterned inputs or drives. Although many half-center CPG models, composed of symmetric units linked by reciprocal inhibition yet varying in their intrinsic cellular properties, have been proposed, the precise oscillatory mechanisms operating in most biological CPGs remain unknown. Using numerical simulations and phase-plane analysis, we comparatively investigated how the intrinsic cellular features incorporated in different CPG models, such as subthreshold activation based on a slowly inactivating persistent sodium current, adaptation based on slowly activating calcium-dependent potassium current, or post-inhibitory rebound excitation, can contribute to the control of oscillation period and phase durations in response to changes in excitatory external drive to one or both half-centers. Our analysis shows that both the sensitivity of oscillation period to alterations of excitatory drive and the degree to which the duration of each phase can be separately controlled depend strongly on the intrinsic cellular mechanisms involved in rhythm generation and phase transitions. In particular, the CPG formed from units incorporating a slowly inactivating persistent sodium current shows the greatest range of oscillation periods and the greatest degree of independence in phase duration control by asymmetric inputs. These results are explained based on geometric analysis of the phase plane structures corresponding to the dynamics for each CPG type

  20. On the generation of charge-carrier recombination centers in the sapphire substrates of silicon-on-sapphire structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, P. A. Belova, N. E.; Demakov, K. D.; Shemardov, S. G.

    2015-08-15

    A method for the production of high-quality radiation-resistant silicon-on-sapphire structures through the fabrication of a layer of nanopores in sapphire by helium ion implantation, i.e., by creating charge-carrier recombination centers, is proposed. In this case, the quality of the silicon layer is simultaneously improved. The problem of the thermal stability of the pores is discussed with the aim of analyzing the possibility of producing a microcircuit on the resultant modified silicon-on-sapphire sample. The layer of pores possesses a large total surface area and, hence, decreases the lifetime of charge carriers generated during irradiation of the operating microcircuit. This effect reduces the charge at the silicon-sapphire interface and improves radiation resistance.

  1. Design and analysis of vortex generators on reengined Boeing 727-100QF center inlet S-duct by a reduced Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Pao S.; Piccolo, Antonio; Slater, Andy; Anderson, Bernhard H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a three dimensional reduced Navier-Stokes code to perform design and analysis of vortex generators on a reengined Boeing 727-100QF center engine inlet S duct. This computer code with vortex generators modeling is shown to be cost-effective, accurate and easy to use to design the optimal vortex generators installed on a S-duct, predict its aerodynamic performance and provide the detailed flow field information.

  2. When Marcel Mauss's Essai sur le Don becomes The Gift: variations on the theme of solidarity.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Simone

    2016-12-01

    Since the early 1970s, Marcel Mauss's Essai sur le Don (1923), translated into English as The Gift in 1954, has been a standard reference in the social science and bioethical literature on the use of human body parts and substances for medical and research purposes. At that time, three social scientists-political scientist Richard Titmuss in the United Kingdom and sociologist Renée C. Fox working with historian Judith Swazey in the United States-had the idea of using this concept to highlight the fundamental structure of the biomedical practices they were studying, respectively, blood donation, and hemodialysis and organ transplantation. The fact that these first applications of Mauss's essay should emerge in English- rather than in French-speaking countries raises the question of what the translation of the essay, and notably of the word don as gift, may have to do with this fact. Reading Mauss in translation undoubtedly inspired a seminal approach to interpreting medical and research practices based on bodily giving. This article posits that something may have also been lost: a much broader concept of giving with unquestionable links to the Durkheimian concept of solidarity, which Mauss conceptualizes not only as an obligation but also as a liberty to give.

  3. Efficiency of generation of optical centers in KS-4V and KU-1 quartz glasses at neutron and gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, A. Kh.; Salikhbaev, U. S.; Ibragimova, E. M.; Nuritdinov, I.; Fayzullaev, B. S.; Vukolov, K. Yu.; Orlovskiy, I.

    2013-11-01

    Pure quartz glasses of KS-4V and KU-1 types are candidates for optical plasma diagnostic system in ITER. The purpose of experiment was to study the efficiency of defect production in these glasses under irradiation with 60Со γ-quanta (5.7 Gy/s) dose range of 102-107 Gy and the fission reactor neutrons in the fluency range of 1020-1023 n/m2 and gammas simulating the plasma influence. In KU-1 (1000 ppm OH) the accumulation kinetics of E‧-(5.75 eV) and NBO-(1.9 eV) centers at γ-doses⩾5×105 Gy and neutron fluencies <1021 n/m2 is faster, than that in KS-4V glasses (<0.1 ppm OH) that is caused by rupture of hydrogen bonds. At fluencies >1021 n/m2 the NBO accumulation kinetics is slower in KU-1 than in KS-4B, because highly mobile hydrogen atoms access to the generated NBO centers. In KS-4V irradiated to γ-doses102-5 × 103 Gy a new unstable absorption band at 1.8 eV was found, which is caused by the glass synthesis conditions and alkali metal impurities. The transparency at 3.5-6.2 eV at fluencies 1020-5 × 1021 n/m2 is higher in KS-4V than KU-1. However at fluencies >1021 n/m2 in KS-4V the photoluminescence band at 2.7 eV is more intensive and distorts a diagnosed signal. The transparency in 3.5-1.2 eV at fluencies >1021 n/m2 is higher in KU-1 than KS-4V.

  4. Supporting Development for the Stirling Radioisotope Generator and Advanced Stirling Technology Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency, 110-We (watts electric) Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for possible use on future NASA Space Science missions is being developed by the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Potential mission use includes providing spacecraft onboard electric power for deep space missions and power for unmanned Mars rovers. GRC is conducting an in-house supporting technology project to assist in SRG110 development. One-, three-, and six-month heater head structural benchmark tests have been completed in support of a heater head life assessment. Testing is underway to evaluate the key epoxy bond of the permanent magnets to the linear alternator stator lamination stack. GRC has completed over 10,000 hours of extended duration testing of the Stirling convertors for the SRG110, and a three-year test of two Stirling convertors in a thermal vacuum environment will be starting shortly. GRC is also developing advanced technology for Stirling convertors, aimed at substantially improving the specific power and efficiency of the convertor and the overall generator. Sunpower, Inc. has begun the development of a lightweight Stirling convertor, under a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) award, that has the potential to double the system specific power to about 8 We/kg. GRC has performed random vibration testing of a lower-power version of this convertor to evaluate robustness for surviving launch vibrations. STC has also completed the initial design of a lightweight convertor. Status of the development of a multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code and high-temperature materials work on advanced superalloys, refractory metal alloys, and ceramics are also discussed.

  5. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users’ Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    PubMed Central

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  6. Methodologies nouvelles pour la realisation d'essais dans la soufflerie Price-Paidoussis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Salinas, Manuel

    Le present memoire en genie de la production automatisee vise a decrire le travail effectue dans la soufflerie Price-Paidoussis du laboratoire LARCASE pour trouver les methodologies experimentales et les procedures de tests, qui seront utilisees avec les modeles d'ailes actuellement au laboratoire. Les methodologies et procedures presentees ici vont permettre de preparer les tests en soufflerie du projet MDO-505 Architectures et technologies deformables pour l'amelioration des performances des ailes, qui se derouleront durant l'annee 2015. D'abord, un bref historique des souffleries subsoniques sera fait. Les differentes sections de la soufflerie Price-Paidoussis seront decrites en mettant l'emphase sur leur influence dans la qualite de l'ecoulement qui se retrouve dans la chambre d'essai. Ensuite, une introduction a la pression, a sa mesure lors de tests en soufflerie et les instruments utilises pour les tests en soufflerie au laboratoire LARCASE sera presente, en particulier le capteur piezoelectrique XCQ-062. Une attention particuliere sera portee au mode de fonctionnement, a son installation, a la mesure et a la detection des frequences et aux sources d'erreurs lorsqu'on utilise des capteurs de haute precision comme la serie XCQ-062 du fournisseur Kulite. Finalement, les procedures et les methodologies elaborees pour les tests dans la soufflerie Price-Paidoussis seront utilisees sur quatre types d'ailes differentes. L'article New methodology for wind tunnel calibration using neural networks - EGD approch portant sur une nouvelle facon de predire les caracteristiques de l'ecoulement a l'interieur de la soufflerie Price-Paidoussis se trouve dans l'annexe 2 de ce document. Cet article porte sur la creation d'un reseau de neurones multicouche et sur l'entrainement des neurones, Ensuite, une comparaison des resultats du reseau de neurones a ete fait avec des valeurs simules avec le logiciel Fluent.

  7. System Identification for Integrated Aircraft Development and Flight Testing (l’Identification des systemes pour le developpement integre des aeronefs et les essais en vol)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    essais environ. Un outil d’optimisation param6trique IDLATNL a donc 6t6 naturellement d~velopp6 pour aider 5. IDLATNL Fing~nieur A r~soudre ce probl~me...support h de nombreux essais en vol sous contrat des Services Officiel Franqais (SPA6). 3. CAPTEURS Ce dispositif experimental a W utilis6 dans le...proviennent d’une travaillant dans le domaine fr~quentiel, fournit une centrale h inertic et de capteurs sp~cifiques cellule en cc qui estimation des

  8. AMMPHS Trial Report CFB Valcartier, 28 September to 9 October 2009 (Compte Rendu D’Essais pour le AMMPHS BFC Valcartier du 28 Septembre au 9 Octobre 2009)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    le soldat (CIS) qui ont eu lieu à la base des Forces canadiennes (BFC) Valcartier du 28 septembre au 9 octobre 2009. Une batterie d’essais de...casques intégrés pour le soldat (CIS), les prototypes de systèmes de mandibule du SCPMMP ont été évalués à partir d’une quantité de kiosques statiques et...champ de vision, un sous-ensemble de douze (12) soldats a été sélectionné pour participer aux essais des CIS et des SCPMMP (les autres participants

  9. Entanglement generation of nitrogen-vacancy centers via coupling to nanometer-sized resonators and a superconducting interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qiong; Xu Zhenyu; Feng Mang

    2010-07-15

    We present a potential scheme to entangle negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (N-V) centers in distance using nanomechanical resonators (NAMRs) and a common superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). By virtually exciting the vibrational modes of the NAMRs, we show the effective coupling between the N-V centers and the SQUID, which is a promising step toward large-sized quantum-information processing with separate N-V centers.

  10. Total aerobic destruction of azo contaminants with nanoscale zero-valent copper at neutral pH: promotion effect of in-situ generated carbon center radicals.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guohui; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-12-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent copper (nZVC) was synthesized with a facile solvothermal method and used for the aerobic removal of azo contaminants at neutral pH for the first time. We found that both Cu(I) and OH generated during the nZVC induced molecular oxygen activation process accounted for the rapid total destruction of azo contaminants in the nZVC/Air system, where nZVC could activate molecular oxygen to produce H2O2, and also release Cu(I) to break the -NN- bond of azo contaminants via the sandmeyer reaction for the generation of carbon center radicals. The in-situ generated carbon center radicals would then react with OH produced by the Cu(I) catalyzed decomposition of H2O2, resulting in the generation of low molecular weight organic acids and their subsequent mineralization. The indispensible role of Cu(I) catalyzed sandmeyer reaction and the promotion effect of in-situ generated carbon center radicals on the rapid total destruction of azo contaminants in the nZVC/Air system were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. This study can deepen our understanding on the degradation of organic pollutant with molecular oxygen activated by zero valent metal, and also provide a new method to remove azo contaminants at neutral pH.

  11. The Use of Reference Data on Thermal Conductivity Generated by TPRC/CINDAS (Thermophysical Properties Research Center/Center for Information and Numerical Data Analysis and Synthesis).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    160-9, 1973. 19. Touloukian , Y. S. and Buyco, E. H. , "Specific Heat - Metallic Elements and Alloys ," Vol. 4 of Thermophysical Properties of Matter...University has generated recommended reference data on the thermal conductivity of elements, alloys , and compounds, among other physical properties and...Elements and Alloys , ŕ Vol. 1 of Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series, IFI/Plenum Data Corp., New York, 1595 pp., 1970. 5

  12. Fusion 2.0: The Next Generation of Fusion in California: Aligning State and Regional Fusion Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    again and bring their friends.” ( Walt Disney ) Succinctly put, the way fusion centers can maintain support and sustainability in today’s political...success just hours later at the Battle of Lexington. More than 226 years later, millions of Americans and people throughout the world would watch in... World Trade Center and Pentagon, killing thousands in the aftermath. Regrettably, there would be no modern day Paul Revere to warn of these attacks

  13. Computer-generated formulas for three-center nuclear-attraction integrals (electrostatic potential) for Slater-type orbitals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    The computer-assisted C-matrix, Loewdin-alpha-function, single-center expansion method in spherical harmonics has been applied to the three-center nuclear-attraction integral (potential due to the product of separated Slater-type orbitals). Exact formulas are produced for 13 terms of an infinite series that permits evaluation to ten decimal digits of an example using 1s orbitals.

  14. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  15. Tests of constituent-quark generation methods which maintain both the nucleon center of mass and the desired radial distribution in Monte Carlo Glauber models

    DOE PAGES

    Mitchell, J. T.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; ...

    2016-05-23

    Here, several methods of generating three constituent quarks in a nucleon are evaluated which explicitly maintain the nucleon's center of mass and desired radial distribution and can be used within Monte Carlo Glauber frameworks. The geometric models provided by each method are used to generate distributions over the number of constituent quark participants (Nqp) in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions. The results are compared with each other and to a previous result of Nqp calculations, without this explicit constraint, used in measurements of √SNN = 200 GeV p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  16. Tests of constituent-quark generation methods which maintain both the nucleon center of mass and the desired radial distribution in Monte Carlo Glauber models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. T.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Stankus, P. W.

    2016-05-01

    Several methods of generating three constituent quarks in a nucleon are evaluated which explicitly maintain the nucleon's center of mass and desired radial distribution and can be used within Monte Carlo Glauber frameworks. The geometric models provided by each method are used to generate distributions over the number of constituent quark participants (Nqp) in p +p ,d +Au , and Au +Au collisions. The results are compared with each other and to a previous result of Nqp calculations, without this explicit constraint, used in measurements of √{sNN}=200 GeV p +p ,d +Au , and Au +Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  17. Improving Requirements Generation Thoroughness in User-Centered Workshops: The Role of Prompting and Shared User Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The rise of stakeholder centered software development has led to organizations engaging users early in the development process to help define system requirements. To facilitate user involvement in the requirements elicitation process, companies can use Group Support Systems (GSS) to conduct requirements elicitation workshops. The effectiveness of…

  18. Acoustic tests on a new motor generator system for the minuteman launch control centers in Hill engineering test facilities 1 and 2, Hill AFB, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairman, Terry M.

    1989-04-01

    Post critical design review acoustic tests were performed in Hill Engineering Test Facilities 1 and 2 (HETF) on a proposed new motor generator system for the Minuteman Launch Control Centers (LCC). A performance noise criteria equivalent to a preferred noise criterion (PNC-50) curve was established as the standard by which to judge the effectiveness of the new motor generator. Measurements were obtained at both the commander's console and the deputy commander's console. Results indicated the noise from the motor generator as configured in HETF 1 (the small LCC) exceeded the PNC-50 criteria primarily in the 63 hertz (Hz) octave band by 10 decibels (dB) when operated in both the ac and dc modes. The motor generator as configured in HETF 2 (the large LCC) exceeded the PNC-50 criteria by 3 dB in the 125 Hz octave band only at the deputy commander's console when operated in the ac mode. Acoustic intensity measurements were obtained to isolate specific noise sources and determine the transmission loss of the floor panels. Vibration measurements were also made on and near the motor generator to determine paths of structure-borne vibration energy. Specific recommendations for improving the acoustic environment in the LCC's are presented.

  19. Acoustic tests on a new motor generator system for the Minuteman launch control centers at Alpha 01 and Sierra 00, Malmstrom AFB, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairman, Terry M.

    1991-05-01

    Field tests of the acoustic performance of a new motor generator system (MGS) were performed at Minuteman Launch Control Centers (LCC) Alpha 01 and Sierra 00, Malmstrom AFB, MT. This same MGS unit was accepted for use after the Hill Engineering Test Facilities (HETF) acoustic performance studies conducted in 1988. Rivet Mile from the Ogden ALC began installation of the new MGS at Malmstrom in the spring of 1990. Performance tests were requested by 00-ALC/MMGRMM, and SAC, to compare with the HETF data and document the LCC acoustic environment with the new MGS operating in a field setting. This report presents our findings.

  20. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 18. Flight Testing of Radio Navigation Systems. (Les Essais en Vol des Systemes de Radionavigation)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Space Administration SCIENTIFIC & TECHNICAL INFORMATION RTO-AG-300 Vol. 18 AC/323(SCI)TP/26 NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION I- 0 o RESEARCH AND... 18 Flight Testing of Radio Navigation Systems (les Essais en vol des systemes de radionavigation) This AGARDograph has been sponsored by the Systems...TO: Recipients of AG-300 Vol. 18 FROM: Executive, Information Policy and Publications SUBJECT: AG-300, Vol 18 , pages A-1, A-2 and A-3 We regret that

  1. Tests of constituent-quark generation methods which maintain both the nucleon center of mass and the desired radial distribution in Monte Carlo Glauber models

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J. T.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Stankus, P. W.

    2016-05-23

    Here, several methods of generating three constituent quarks in a nucleon are evaluated which explicitly maintain the nucleon's center of mass and desired radial distribution and can be used within Monte Carlo Glauber frameworks. The geometric models provided by each method are used to generate distributions over the number of constituent quark participants (Nqp) in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions. The results are compared with each other and to a previous result of Nqp calculations, without this explicit constraint, used in measurements of √SNN = 200 GeV p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  2. High affinity IgM(+) memory B cells are generated through a germinal center-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yasushi; Tashiro, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Nishimura, Miyuki; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kubo, Masato; Burrows, Peter D; Azuma, Takachika

    2015-12-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, B cells undergo clonal expansion and selection and the induction of isotype switching and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Although somatically mutated IgM(+) memory B cells have been reported, it has not been established whether they are really high affinity B cells. We tracked (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl hapten-specific GC B cells from normal immunized mice based on affinity of their B cell receptor (BCR) and performed BCR sequence analysis. SHM was evident by day 7 postimmunization and increased with time, such that high affinity IgM(+) as well as IgG(+) memory B cells continued to be generated up to day 42. In contrast, class-switch recombination (CSR) was almost completed by day 7 and then the ratio of IgG1(+)/IgM(+) GC B cells remained unchanged. Together these findings suggest that IgM(+) B cells undergo SHM in the GC to generate high affinity IgM(+) memory cells and that this process continues even after CSR is accomplished.

  3. Life history profiles for 27 strepsirrhine primate taxa generated using captive data from the Duke Lemur Center

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, Sarah M; Roach, Richard G; Haring, David; Taylor, Julie; Cameron, Freda H; Yoder, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1966, the Duke Lemur Center (DLC) has accumulated detailed records for nearly 4,200 individuals from over 40 strepsirrhine primate taxa—the lemurs, lorises, and galagos. Here we present verified data for 3,627 individuals of 27 taxa in the form of a life history table containing summarized species values for variables relating to ancestry, reproduction, longevity, and body mass, as well as the two raw data files containing direct and calculated variables from which this summary table is built. Large sample sizes, longitudinal data that in many cases span an animal’s entire life, exact dates of events, and large numbers of individuals from closely related yet biologically diverse primate taxa make these datasets unique. This single source for verified raw data and systematically compiled species values, particularly in combination with the availability of associated biological samples and the current live colony for research, will support future studies from an enormous spectrum of disciplines. PMID:25977776

  4. Inorganic chemical composition and chemical reactivity of settled dust generated by the World Trade Center building collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Ziegler, Thomas L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Adams, Monique G.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Taggart, Joseph E.; Clark, Roger N.; Wilson, S.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of dust deposited around lower Manhattan by the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) collapse have inorganic chemical compositions that result in part from the variable chemical contributions of concrete, gypsum wallboard, glass fibers, window glass, and other materials contained in the buildings. The dust deposits were also modified chemically by variable interactions with rain water or water used in street washing and fire fighting. Chemical leach tests using deionized water as the extraction fluid show the dust samples can be quite alkaline, due primarily to reactions with calcium hydroxide in concrete particles. Calcium and sulfate are the most soluble components in the dust, but many other elements are also readily leached, including metals such as Al, Sb, Mo Cr, Cu, and Zn. Indoor dust samples produce leachates with higher pH, alkalinity, and dissolved solids than outdoor dust samples, suggesting most outdoor dust had reacted with water and atmospheric carbon dioxide prior to sample collection. Leach tests using simulated lung fluids as the extracting fluid suggest that the dust might also be quite reactive in fluids lining the respiratory tract, resulting in dissolution of some particles and possible precipitation of new phases such as phosphates, carbonates, and silicates. Results of these chemical characterization studies can be used by health scientists as they continue to track and interpret health effects resulting from the short-term exposure to the initial dust cloud and the longer-term exposure to dusts resuspended during cleanup.

  5. Molecular footprints of a germinal center derivation of human IgM+(IgD+)CD27+ B cells and the dynamics of memory B cell generation.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Marc; Küppers, Ralf

    2009-11-23

    The origin of IgM(+)CD27(+) B lymphocytes with mutated IgV genes, which account for approximately 20% of human peripheral blood (PB) B cells, is controversially discussed. A generation in a primary diversification pathway, in T cell-independent immune responses, or in T cell-dependent germinal center (GC) reactions has been proposed. We show here that IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) and IgM(+)IgD(-/low)CD27(+) B cell subsets carry, like class-switched memory B cells, mutations in the Bcl6 gene as a genetic trait of a GC experience. Moreover, the identification of PB IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells clonally related to GC-derived IgG(+) memory B cells with shared and distinct IgV gene mutations demonstrates the GC origin also of the former subset. These findings provide genetic evidence for a GC derivation of somatically mutated IgM(+) B cells and indicate that adult humans harbor a large population of IgM(+)IgD(+) post-GC memory B cells. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that a highly diverse and often very large population of memory B cells is generated from a given GC B cell clone, and that (preferentially IgM) memory B cells are generated already early in the GC reaction. This provides novel insights into the dynamics of GC reactions and the generation of a memory B cell repertoire.

  6. IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells promote generation of protective germinal center-derived IgM+ B cell memory against Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Hisaki, Emiliano; Chai, Qian; Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Regen, Tommy; Waisman, Ari; Isibasi, Armando; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2014-06-01

    Abs play a significant role in protection against the intracellular bacterium Salmonella Typhi. In this article, we investigated how long-term protective IgM responses can be elicited by a S. Typhi outer-membrane protein C- and F-based subunit vaccine (porins). We found that repeated Ag exposure promoted a CD4(+) T cell-dependent germinal center reaction that generated mutated IgM-producing B cells and was accompanied by a strong expansion of IFN-γ-secreting T follicular helper cells. Genetic ablation of individual cytokine receptors revealed that both IFN-γ and IL-17 are required for optimal germinal center reactions and production of porin-specific memory IgM(+) B cells. However, more profound reduction of porin-specific IgM B cell responses in the absence of IFN-γR signaling indicated that this cytokine plays a dominant role. Importantly, mutated IgM mAbs against porins exhibited bactericidal capacity and efficiently augmented S. Typhi clearance. In conclusion, repeated vaccination with S. Typhi porins programs type I T follicular helper cell responses that contribute to the diversification of B cell memory and promote the generation of protective IgM Abs.

  7. Treatise of World Trade Center (WTC) Dust generated during the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the WTC towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Steven R.

    The initial devastation created by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) Towers resulting from the September 11, 2001 bombings was followed by the dissemination of newly formed toxic dust throughout Lower Manhattan. The ensuing fires that burned within the six-story high debris pile produced a continuous stream of hazardous combustion products. Emphasis on this research was placed on the characterization, the extent of contamination, remediation procedures, and the potential for recontamination by dusts produced by the events of 9/11/2001. A detailed characterization of the WTC Dust was performed using a wide variety of methods. Through the analyses of known WTC Dust, WTC Dust Markers were identified using the composition and morphology of the particles present. Buildings throughout Lower Manhattan were tested for WTC Dust Markers and the radial extent of the WTC Dust was identified. Case studies of buildings located in close proximity to the WTC Site were undertaken to determine the pervasiveness of the WTC Dust into various building systems and components. Testing was conducted on all major building systems/spaces including: occupied spaces, perimeter induction units, structural steel, interior wall cavities, curtain walls, IT raceways, HVAC, and MEP systems. The analytical results indicated that all systems contained WTC Dust and that reservoirs were present. The feasibility of remediation of the WTC Dust from surfaces was evaluated in order to determine if it is possible for the dusts and contaminants to be eradicated. Utilizing standard remediation methods specific to surface type and contaminate type, surfaces throughout the studied buildings were cleaned. Results of post-remediation analyses indicated that remediation efforts in a building contaminated with WTC Dust were ineffective in returning the building to its state prior to the WTC Event. Recontamination studies were also performed in buildings that had been previously cleaned to determine if

  8. Wireless Microcurrent-Generating Antimicrobial Wound Dressing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Chow, James

    2016-06-27

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria and financial burden of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) further the need for treatments to address pathogenic contamination and expedite healing. This retrospective study was a chart review of a series of 92 patients who underwent 100 total knee arthroplasties performed by the same surgeon and treated with a novel microcurrent-generating antimicrobial dressing (MCD). Mean hospital length of stay was 2.3±0.9 days, while the mean length of treatment with MCD was 8.3±1.2 days. No major complications, PJI or major infectious complications were reported, with two readmissions (2%) within 30 days of surgery. Knee Society Score function showed statistically significant improvements post-operatively, with a mean six-month score of 75.0±20.3 and mean change from baseline of 36.3±21.1 (P<0.0001). These results support previous findings that use of the MCD may result in improved outcomes as an element in post-operative wound management.

  9. Wireless Microcurrent-Generating Antimicrobial Wound Dressing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James

    2016-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria and financial burden of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) further the need for treatments to address pathogenic contamination and expedite healing. This retrospective study was a chart review of a series of 92 patients who underwent 100 total knee arthroplasties performed by the same surgeon and treated with a novel microcurrent-generating antimicrobial dressing (MCD). Mean hospital length of stay was 2.3±0.9 days, while the mean length of treatment with MCD was 8.3±1.2 days. No major complications, PJI or major infectious complications were reported, with two readmissions (2%) within 30 days of surgery. Knee Society Score function showed statistically significant improvements post-operatively, with a mean six-month score of 75.0±20.3 and mean change from baseline of 36.3±21.1 (P<0.0001). These results support previous findings that use of the MCD may result in improved outcomes as an element in post-operative wound management. PMID:27433298

  10. Generation of basic centers in high-silica zeolites and their application in gas-phase upgrading of bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Keller, Tobias C; Rodrigues, Elodie G; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-06-01

    High-silica zeolites have been reported recently as efficient catalysts for liquid- and gas-phase condensation reactions because of the presence of a complementary source of basicity compared to Al-rich basic zeolites. Herein, we describe the controlled generation of these active sites on silica-rich FAU, BEA, and MFI zeolites. Through the application of a mild base treatment in aqueous Na2CO3, alkali-metal-coordinating defects are generated within the zeolite whereas the porous properties are fully preserved. The resulting catalysts were applied in the gas-phase condensation of propanal at 673 K as a model reaction for the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis oil, for which an up to 20-fold increased activity compared to the unmodified zeolites was attained. The moderate basicity of these new sites leads to a coke resistance superior to traditional base catalysts such as CsX and MgO, and comparable activity and excellent selectivity is achieved for the condensation pathways. Through strategic acid and base treatments and the use of magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, the nature of the active sites was investigated, which supports the theory of siloxy sites as basic centers. This contribution represents a key step in the understanding and design of high-silica base catalysts for the intermediate deoxygenation of crude bio-oil prior to the hydrotreating step for the production of second-generation biofuels.

  11. Harnessing person-generated health data to accelerate patient-centered outcomes research: the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America PCORnet Patient Powered Research Network (CCFA Partners).

    PubMed

    Chung, Arlene E; Sandler, Robert S; Long, Millie D; Ahrens, Sean; Burris, Jessica L; Martin, Christopher F; Anton, Kristen; Robb, Amber; Caruso, Thomas P; Jaeger, Elizabeth L; Chen, Wenli; Clark, Marshall; Myers, Kelly; Dobes, Angela; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners Patient-Powered Research Network (PPRN) seeks to advance and accelerate comparative effectiveness and translational research in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Our IBD-focused PCORnet PPRN has been designed to overcome the major obstacles that have limited patient-centered outcomes research in IBD by providing the technical infrastructure, patient governance, and patient-driven functionality needed to: 1) identify, prioritize, and undertake a patient-centered research agenda through sharing person-generated health data; 2) develop and test patient and provider-focused tools that utilize individual patient data to improve health behaviors and inform health care decisions and, ultimately, outcomes; and 3) rapidly disseminate new knowledge to patients, enabling them to improve their health. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners PPRN has fostered the development of a community of citizen scientists in IBD; created a portal that will recruit, retain, and engage members and encourage partnerships with external scientists; and produced an efficient infrastructure for identifying, screening, and contacting network members for participation in research.

  12. Un Essai d'Automatisation de la Documentation en Médecine

    PubMed Central

    Wolff-Terroine, Par Madeleine

    1964-01-01

    Since there is still little mechanization in medical documentation, it seemed interesting to study an attempt at automation in a medical specialty, cancerology. The author explains the difficulties which derive from the multidisciplinary nature of the specialty itself and from the diversity of its users' needs. The system used is Filmorex, which is described in some detail. The author then examines the problems connected with the development of a documentation language and describes an attempt to solve these problems in a documentation center of moderate size (10,000 documents per year). PMID:14119282

  13. Extreme U-Th disequilibrium in rift-related basalts, rhyolites and granophyric granite and the timescale of rhyolite generation, intrusion and crystallization at Alid volcanic center, Eritrea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Charlier, B.L.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Rhyolite pumices and co-erupted granophyric (granite) xenoliths yield evidence for rapid magma generation and crystallization prior to their eruption at 15·2 ± 2·9 ka at the Alid volcanic center in the Danikil Depression, Eritrea. Whole-rock U and Th isotopic analyses show 230Th excesses up to 50% in basalts <10 000 years old from the surrounding Oss lava fields. The 15 ka rhyolites also have 30–40% 230Th excesses. Similarity in U–Th disequilibrium, and in Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic values, implies that the rhyolites are mostly differentiated from the local basaltic magma. Given the (230Th/232Th) ratio of the young basalts, and presumably the underlying mantle, the (230Th/232Th) ratio of the rhyolites upon eruption could be generated by in situ decay in about 50 000 years. Limited (∼5%) assimilation of old crust would hasten the lowering of (230Th/232Th) and allow the process to take place in as little as 30 000 years. Final crystallization of the Alid granophyre occurred rapidly and at shallow depths at ∼20–25 ka, as confirmed by analyses of mineral separates and ion microprobe data on individual zircons. Evidently, 30 000–50 000 years were required for extraction of basalt from its mantle source region, subsequent crystallization and melt extraction to form silicic magmas, and final crystallization of the shallow intrusion. The granophyre was then ejected during eruption of the comagmatic rhyolites.

  14. Spatial fluctuation enhancement and nonradiative-recombination-center generation due to high Si-doping into GaAs/AlAs short-period-superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobori, H.; Shigetani, A.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.

    2006-04-01

    Through the time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurement for excitons, we have studied the enhancement of spatial fluctuation (SF) and the generation of nonradiative-recombination-centers (NRC) due to high Si-doping into GaAs/AlAs short-period-superlattices (SPS's). We have carried out the exciton transport analysis according to Krivorotov et al. [I.N. Krivorotov, T. Chang, G.D. Gilliland, L.P. Fu, K.K. Bajaj, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 10687]. From this analysis, we have obtained the temperature dependence of the exciton diffusivity, the concentration of the NRC and the average distant between adjacent localized states of excitons. The temperature dependence of the exciton diffusivity is found to be given by the sum of the temperature-independent contribution and the activation-type contribution. For the exciton diffusivity in undoped GaAs/AlAs SPS's, only the activation-type contribution has been observed. Therefore, we point out the possibility that the temperature-independent contribution comes from the tunneling through the impurities. In this experiment, the activation energy and the concentration of the NRC are found to be larger than those of undoped GaAs/AlAs SPS's. We infer that high Si-doping into GaAs/AlAs SPS causes the enhancement of the SF and the generation of NRC.

  15. Time-resolved generation of a membrane potential by ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus. Evidence for reduction-induced opening of the binuclear center.

    PubMed

    Siletskiy, S; Soulimane, T; Azarkina, N; Vygodina, T V; Buse, G; Kaulen, A; Konstantinov, A

    1999-08-20

    ba3-type cytochrome c oxidase purified from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus has been reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles and laser flash-induced generation of a membrane potential by the enzyme has been studied in a microsecond/ms time scale with Ru(II)-tris-bipyridyl complex (RuBpy) as a photoreductant. Flash-induced single electron reduction of the aerobically oxidized ba3 by RuBpy results in two phases of membrane potential generation by the enzyme with tau values of about 20 and 300 microseconds at pH 8 and 23 degrees C. Spectrophotometric experiments show that oxidized ba3 reacts very poorly with hydrogen peroxide or any of the other exogenous heme iron ligands studied like cyanide, sulfide and azide. At the same time, photoreduction of the enzyme by RuBpy triggers the electrogenic reaction with H2O2 with a second order rate constant of approximately 2 x 10(3) M-1 s-1. The data indicate that single electron reduction of ba3 oxidase opens the binuclear center of the enzyme for exogenous ligands. The fractional contribution of the protonic electrogenic phases induced by peroxide in cytochrome ba3 is much less than in bovine oxidase, pointing to a possibility of a different electrogenic mechanism of the ba3 oxidase as compared to the oxidases of the aa3-type.

  16. Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2

  17. Helicon plasma generator-assisted surface conversion ion source for the production of H(-) ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, O; Rouleau, G; Keller, R; Geros, E; Stelzer, J; Ferris, J

    2008-02-01

    The converter-type negative ion source currently employed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H(-) ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. In this kind of an ion source the extracted H(-) beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which deposits on the H(-) converter surface and degrades its performance. Therefore, we have started an ion source development project focused on replacing these thermionic cathodes (filaments) of the converter source by a helicon plasma generator capable of producing high-density hydrogen plasmas with low electron energy. In our studies which have so far shown that the plasma density of the surface conversion source can be increased significantly by exciting a helicon wave in the plasma, and we expect to improve the performance of the surface converter H(-) ion source in terms of beam brightness and time between services. The design of this new source and preliminary results are presented, along with a discussion of physical processes relevant for H(-) ion beam production with this novel design. Ultimately, we perceive this approach as an interim step towards our long-term goal, combining a helicon plasma generator with an SNS-type main discharge chamber, which will allow us to individually optimize the plasma properties of the plasma cathode (helicon) and H(-) production (main discharge) in order to further improve the brightness of extracted H(-) ion beams.

  18. Early protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle using an inactivated vaccine formulated with Montanide ESSAI IMS D 12802 VG PR adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Quattrocchi, V; Pappalardo, J S; Langellotti, C; Smitsaart, E; Fondevila, N; Zamorano, P

    2014-04-17

    Foot and mouth disease is an acute disease of cattle with a broad distribution around the world. Due to the fast spread of FMDV infections, control measures must be applied immediately after an outbreak, such as the use of vaccines that induce fast protection. Previously, it was shown that mice vaccinated with FMD inactivated virus (iFMDV) formulated with Montanide™ ESSAI IMS D 12802 VG PR adjuvant (802-iFMDV) were protected when they were challenged 4 and 7 days post-vaccination (dpv) with homologous virus. In this work, we describe the successful use of this formulation in cattle. In addition, adjuvant Montanide™ IMS 1313 VG NPR was also tested. 802-iFMDV vaccine was able to confer 100% protection against viral challenge at 4 and 7 dpv, while eliciting low antibody levels, at 7 dpv. 1313-iFMDV vaccine induced protection in 60% of cattle. At 4 dpv, 1313-iFMDV vaccinated animals presented increased levels of IFNγ but not of macrophages. At 4 and 7 dpv, macrophages, IFNγ, nasal IgA and IgG1 antibodies against FMDV, and opsonophagocytosis were increased in animals vaccinated with 802-iFMDV indicating that these phenomena could be involved in protection.It is the first time that total protection against FMDV at early stages post-vaccination is reported using a single dose of the formulation iFMDV plus Montanide™ ESSAI D IMS 12802 VG PR adjuvant.

  19. Thermal and resonance neutrons generated by various electron and X-ray therapeutic beams from medical linacs installed in polish oncological centers

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Adam; Orlef, Andrzej; Łaciak, Marcin; Ciba, Aleksander; Szewczuk, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Background High-energy photon and electron therapeutic beams generated in medical linear accelerators can cause the electronuclear and photonuclear reactions in which neutrons with a broad energy spectrum are produced. A low-energy component of this neutron radiation induces simple capture reactions from which various radioisotopes originate and in which the radioactivity of a linac head and various objects in the treatment room appear. Aim The aim of this paper is to present the results of the thermal/resonance neutron fluence measurements during therapeutic beam emission and exemplary spectra of gamma radiation emitted by medical linac components activated in neutron reactions for four X-ray beams and for four electron beams generated by various manufacturers’ accelerators installed in typical concrete bunkers in Polish oncological centers. Materials and methods The measurements of neutron fluence were performed with the use of the induced activity method, whereas the spectra of gamma radiation from decays of the resulting radioisotopes were measured by means of a portable high-purity germanium detector set for field spectroscopy. Results The fluence of thermal neutrons as well as resonance neutrons connected with the emission of a 20 MV X-ray beam is ∼106 neutrons/cm2 per 1 Gy of a dose in water at a reference depth. It is about one order of magnitude greater than that for the 15 MV X-ray beams and about two orders of magnitude greater than for the 18–22 MeV electron beams regardless of the type of an accelerator. Conclusion The thermal as well as resonance neutron fluence depends strongly on the type and the nominal potential of a therapeutic beam. It is greater for X-ray beams than for electrons. The accelerator accessories and other large objects should not be stored in a treatment room during high-energy therapeutic beam emission to avoid their activation caused by thermal and resonance neutrons. Half-lives of the radioisotopes originating from

  20. Seismic Waves Generated by Aircraft Impacts and Building Collapses at World Trade Center, New York City and Shanksville, Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.

    2002-12-01

    Seismologists sometimes do their work of data acquisition and analysis against a tragic background. Usually the context is fieldwork far from home, in an area subjected to the natural but sometimes devastating effects of an earthquake. As the appalling events of September 11, 2001 unfolded, we found that we had recorded numerous seismic signals of two plane impacts and building collapses, often at times different than those being reported elsewhere. Collapses of the two World Trade Center (WTC) towers generated the largest seismic waves, observed in five states and up to 428 km away. The North Tower collapse was the largest seismic source and had local magnitude ML 2.3. From this we infer that ground shaking of the WTC towers was not a major contributor to the collapse or damage to surrounding buildings. The time of plane impact at the Pentagon on September 11, 2001 had often been reported with large scatter. We analyzed seismic records from five stations in the northeastern United States, ranging from 63 to 350 km from the Pentagon to examine whether we could obtain an accurate time of the Pentagon attack based upon our seismic network. Despite detailed analysis of the data, we could not find a clear seismic signal. Even the closest station (Δ= 62.8 km) at Soldier's Delight, Baltimore County, Maryland (SDMD) did not record the impact. However, we positively identified seismic signals associated with United Airlines Flight 93 that crashed near Shanksville, Somerset County, Pennsylvania. The time of the plane crash was 10:06:05+/-5 (EDT). We recognized that information on accurate timing of earthquakes and other events is very desirable for emergency management agencies and government authorities handling mitigation efforts as well as for general public, and that the modern seismographic stations with accurate clocks can provide such reference time as long as there are discernable ground motion associate with such sources.

  1. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  2. Superoxide activates uncoupling proteins by generating carbon-centered radicals and initiating lipid peroxidation: studies using a mitochondria-targeted spin trap derived from alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Echtay, Karim S; Blaikie, Frances H; Asin-Cayuela, Jordi; Cocheme, Helena M; Green, Katherine; Buckingham, Julie A; Taylor, Ellen R; Hurrell, Fiona; Hughes, Gillian; Miwa, Satomi; Cooper, Christopher E; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Smith, Robin A J; Brand, Martin D

    2003-12-05

    Although the physiological role of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 3 is uncertain, their activation by superoxide and by lipid peroxidation products suggest that UCPs are central to the mitochondrial response to reactive oxygen species. We examined whether superoxide and lipid peroxidation products such as 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal act independently to activate UCPs, or if they share a common pathway, perhaps by superoxide exposure leading to the formation of lipid peroxidation products. This possibility can be tested by blocking the putative reactive oxygen species cascade with selective antioxidants and then reactivating UCPs with distal cascade components. We synthesized a mitochondria-targeted derivative of the spin trap alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, which reacts rapidly with carbon-centered radicals but is unreactive with superoxide and lipid peroxidation products. [4-[4-[[(1,1-Dimethylethyl)-oxidoimino]methyl]phenoxy]butyl]triphenylphosphonium bromide (MitoPBN) prevented the activation of UCPs by superoxide but did not block activation by hydroxynonenal. This was not due to MitoPBN reacting with superoxide or the hydroxyl radical or by acting as a chain-breaking antioxidant. MitoPBN did react with carbon-centered radicals and also prevented lipid peroxidation by the carbon-centered radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-methyl propionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Furthermore, AAPH activated UCPs, and this was blocked by MitoPBN. These data suggest that superoxide and lipid peroxidation products share a common pathway for the activation of UCPs. Superoxide releases iron from iron-sulfur center proteins, which then generates carbon-centered radicals that initiate lipid peroxidation, yielding breakdown products that activate UCPs.

  3. Information Technology in Science (ITS) Center for Teaching and Learning Environment Design Experiment Study for the Development of New Generation Leaders in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, B. E.; Schroeder, C.; Brody, S.; Cahill, T.; Kenimer, A.; Loving, C.; Schielack, J.

    2003-12-01

    The ITS Center for Teaching and Learning is a five-year NSF-funded collaborative effort to engage scientists and university and school or district-based science educators in the use of information technology to improve science teaching and learning at all levels. One assumption is that science and mathematics teaching and learning will be improved when they become more connected to the authentic science research done in field settings or laboratories. The effective use of information technology in science classrooms has been shown to help achieve this objective. As a design study that is -working toward a greater understanding of a -learning ecology", the research related to the creation and refinement of the ITS Centeres collaborative environment for professional development is contributing information about an important setting not often included in the descriptions of professional development, a setting that incorporates distributed expertise and resulting distributed growth in the various categories of participants: scientists, science graduate students, education researchers, education graduate students, and master teachers. Design-based research is an emerging paradigm for the study of learning in context through the systematic design and study of instructional strategies and tools. This presentation will discuss the results of the formative evaluation process that has moved the ITS Centeres collaborative environment for professional development through the iterative process from Phase I (the planned program designed in-house) to Phase II (the experimental program being tested in-house). In particular, we will focus on the development of the ITS Centeres Project Teams, which create learning experiences over two summers focused on the exploration of science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) topics through the use of modeling, visualization and complex data sets to explore authentic scientific questions that can be integrated within the K-16

  4. Economics of data center optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Traffic to and from data centers is now reaching Zettabytes/year. Even the smallest of businesses now rely on data centers for revenue generation. And, the largest data centers today are orders of magnitude larger than the supercomputing centers of a few years ago. Until quite recently, for most data center managers, optical data centers were nice to dream about, but not really essential. Today, the all-optical data center - perhaps even an all-single mode fiber (SMF) data center is something that even managers of medium-sized data centers should be considering. Economical transceivers are the key to increased adoption of data center optics. An analysis of current and near future data center optics economics will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Resegregation of Public Schools: The Third Generation. A Report on the Condition of Desegregation in America's Public Schools by the Network of Regional Desegregation Assistance Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. Center for National Origin, Race and Sex Equity.

    A third generation of school segregation has evolved, with the following problems: (1) renewed physical segregation; (2) limited teacher expectations for minority students; (3) culturally biased instructional methods; (4) persistence of sex stereotyping and bias; and (5) ability grouping that isolates students on the basis of race, national…

  6. Cartilage-specific β-CATENIN signaling regulates chondrocyte maturation, generation of ossification centers, and perichondrial bone formation during skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Debbie Y.; Jonason, Jennifer H.; Zhang, Yongchun; Hsu, Wei; Chen, Di; Hilton, Matthew J.; O’Keefe, Regis J.

    2012-01-01

    The WNT/β-CATENIN signaling pathway is a critical regulator of chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation during multiple phases of cartilage and bone development. While the importance of β-CATENIN signaling during the process of endochondral bone development has been previously appreciated using a variety of genetic models that manipulate β-CATENIN in skeletal progenitors and osteoblasts, genetic evidence demonstrating a specific role for β-CATENIN in committed growth plate chondrocytes has been less robust. To identify the specific role of cartilage-derived β-CATENIN in regulating cartilage and bone development, we studied chondrocyte-specific gain- and loss-of-function genetic mouse models using the tamoxifen-inducible Col2CreERT2 transgene in combination with β-cateninfx(exon3)/wt or β-cateninfx/fx floxed alleles, respectively. From these genetic models and biochemical data, three significant and novel findings were uncovered. First, cartilage-specific β-CATENIN signaling promotes chondrocyte maturation, possibly involving a BMP2 mediated mechanism. Second, cartilage-specific β–CATENIN facilitates primary and secondary ossification center formation via the induction of chondrocyte hypertrophy, possibly through enhanced MMP expression at sites of cartilage degradation, and potentially by enhancing IHH signaling activity to recruit vascular tissues. Finally, cartilage-specific β-CATENIN signaling promotes perichondrial bone formation possibly via a mechanism in which BMP2 and IHH paracrine signals synergize to accelerate perichondrial osteoblastic differentiation. The work presented here supports the concept that the cartilage-derived β-CATENIN signal is a central mediator for major events during endochondral bone formation, including chondrocyte maturation, primary and secondary ossification center development, vascularization, and perichondrial bone formation. PMID:22508079

  7. 17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view to the northwest. The power center is the cabinet on the right and the load center is the cabinet on the left of the photograph. A door to the generator barrel of Unit 1 is visible in the background. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  8. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  9. Short range forecasting of sea breeze generated thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center: A real-time experiment using a primitive equation mesoscale numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Moon, Dennis; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William; Arritt, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    The operational efficiency of using guidance from a mesoscale numerical model to improve sea breeze thunderstorm forecasts at and around the Shuttle landing strip was assessed. The Prognostic Three-Dimensional Mesoscale (P3DM) model, developed as a sea breeze model, reveals a strong correlation between regions of mesoscale convergence and the triggering of sea breeze convection thunderstorms. The P3DM was modified to generate stability parameters familiar to the operational forecaster. In addition to the mesoscale fields of wind, vertical motion, moisture, temperature, a stability indicator, a combination of model-predicted K and Lifted Indices and the maximum grid cell vertical motion, were proposed and tested. Results of blind tests indicate that a forecaster, provided with guidance derived from model output, could improve local thunderstorm forecasts.

  10. Apports de la simulation numérique pour I'identification du comportement rhéologique des alliages d'aluminium par essai de bipoinçonnement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélin, J. C.; Ghouati, O.; Shahani, R.

    1994-04-01

    The modelling of rheological behaviour of aluminium alloys for hot metal forming is based on experimental tests. The plane strain compression tests under various thermomechanical conditions (effective strain, effective strain rate, temperature, ...) are used for such a procedure. It is shown that numerical modelling combined with classical approaches can advantageously help in testing interpretation. It is shown, for instance, that the friction coefficient or the thermal exchanges between the specimen and the dies can be accurately fitted. Furthermore, a comparison between the numerical results and micrographical observations shows that it is possible to use numerical results with a good confidence. L'identification du comportement rhéologique des alliages d'aluminium en vue de leur mise en forme à chaud par laminage nécessite la réalisation d'essais expérimentaux. Les essais de bipoinçonnement entre poinçons parallélépipédiques, réalisés sous diverses conditions thermomécaniques (déformation effective, vitesse de déformation effective et température) ont été retenus pour une telle identification. On montre que la simulation numérique des essais permet de corriger de manière substantielle les méthodes d'identification classiques basées sur des approches rigides viscoplastiques. On montre par exemple que les simulations numériques permettent d'ajuster le coefficient de frottement ou les conditions d'échange thermiques. Enfin, une comparaison entre résultats numériques et analyses micrographiques montre que l'on peut utiliser les résultats des simulations en vue de la prévision des évolutions microstructurales des alliages considérés.

  11. Collaborative guarded-hot-plate tests between the Laboratoire national de métrologie et d’essais and the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarr, Robert R.; Guthrie, William F.; Hay, Bruno; Koenen, Alain

    2017-02-01

    A collaborative study to compare the long-term measurement performance between guarded-hot-plate facilities at the Laboratoire national de métrologie et d’essais (LNE) in France and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the United States is presented. Thermal conductivity data were compiled from three international comparisons organized from 1997 to 2014. Measurements were conducted in accordance with standardized test methods (ISO 8302 or ASTM C 177) over a temperature range from 280 K to 320 K. Nine thermal insulating materials (either mineral fiber or expanded polystyrene) were examined covering broad ranges of bulk densities (13 kg · m‑3–200 kg · m‑3) and thicknesses (13 mm–70 mm). A different set of specimens was utilized for each comparison. Results of this study indicate that, over a 17 year interval, the majority of test data from LNE and NIST agreed to within  ±1.0%, or less, for mineral fiber materials and to within  ±0.5%, or less, for expanded polystyrene. The long-term variability limit of 1% between the two laboratories is in good agreement with their current measurement uncertainties. Regression coefficients and their standard uncertainties for a straight-line model relating thermal conductivity to temperature from 280 K to 320 K were computed by material and laboratory. Graphical analysis of the data and corresponding fits exhibit consistent behavior by material type between the two laboratories. Sources of measurement variability are addressed.

  12. Southern California Earthquake Center/Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/UseIT): Towards the Next Generation of Internship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S.; Benthien, M.; Jordan, T. H.

    2005-12-01

    The SCEC/UseIT internship program is training the next generation of earthquake scientist, with methods that can be adapted to other disciplines. UseIT interns work collaboratively, in multi-disciplinary teams, conducting computer science research that is needed by earthquake scientists. Since 2002, the UseIT program has welcomed 64 students, in some two dozen majors, at all class levels, from schools around the nation. Each summer''s work is posed as a ``Grand Challenge.'' The students then organize themselves into project teams, decide how to proceed, and pool their diverse talents and backgrounds. They have traditional mentors, who provide advice and encouragement, but they also mentor one another, and this has proved to be a powerful relationship. Most begin with fear that their Grand Challenge is impossible, and end with excitement and pride about what they have accomplished. The 22 UseIT interns in summer, 2005, were primarily computer science and engineering majors, with others in geology, mathematics, English, digital media design, physics, history, and cinema. The 2005 Grand Challenge was to "build an earthquake monitoring system" to aid scientists who must visualize rapidly evolving earthquake sequences and convey information to emergency personnel and the public. Most UseIT interns were engaged in software engineering, bringing new datasets and functionality to SCEC-VDO (Virtual Display of Objects), a 3D visualization software that was prototyped by interns last year, using Java3D and an extensible, plug-in architecture based on the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment. Other UseIT interns used SCEC-VDO to make animated movies, and experimented with imagery in order to communicate concepts and events in earthquake science. One movie-making project included the creation of an assessment to test the effectiveness of the movie''s educational message. Finally, one intern created an interactive, multimedia presentation of the UseIT program.

  13. Metal-mediated controllable creation of secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbon centers: a powerful strategy for the synthesis of iron, cobalt, and copper complexes with in situ generated substituted 1-pyridineimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanmei; Li, Lei; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Yonglu; Hu, Hailiang; Chen, Wenqian; Liu, Wei; Li, Yahong; Lei, Tao; Cao, Yanyuan; Kang, Zhenghui; Lin, Miaoshui; Li, Wu

    2012-09-17

    An efficient strategy for the synthesis of a wide variety of coordination complexes has been developed. The synthetic protocol involves a solvothermal in situ metal-ligand reaction of picolinaldehyde, ammonium acetate, and transition-metal ions, leading to the generation of 12 coordination complexes supported by a novel class of substituted 1-pyridineimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine ligands (L1-L5). The ligands L1-L5 were afforded by metal-mediated controllable conversion of the aldehyde group of picolialdehyde into a ketone and secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbon centers, respectively. Complexes of various nuclearities were obtained: from mono-, di-, and tetranuclear to 1D chain polymers. The structures of the in situ formed complexes could be controlled rationally via the choice of appropriate starting materials and tuning of the ratio of the starting materials. The plausible mechanisms for the formation of the ligands L1-L5 were proposed.

  14. Qualité des eaux de la station de traitement de la ville de Skikda, Algérie Essais d'optimisation de la clarification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghzili, B.; Medjram, M. S.; Achour, S.

    2005-05-01

    A cause de la sécheresse qui a sévit durant une décennie, la station de traitement de l'eau potable de la ville de Skikda Algérie, en vue de combler le déficit en eau, utilise un mélange des eaux de surface (barrage) et des eaux souterraines (forage). Les résultats des analyses physico-chimiques de ces eaux montrent la présence de micropolluants, notamment le mercure, avec une concentration de 0.035 mg/l pour les eaux de surface et une concentration de 0.02 mg/l pour les eaux souterraines. Ces résultats obtenus, montrent également que la concentration en matières organiques dépasse, pour les deux sources, les normes OMS. Afin de réduire les effets de cette pollution, nous avons calculé les doses nécessaires des différents réactifs utilisés sur la base des essais d'optimisation réalisés en laboratoire. Les résultats obtenus nous ont permis de conclure que les doses de 30 à 60 mg/l de sulfate d'aluminium (S.A) sont nécessaires à une bonne élimination de la turbidité et des matières organiques (M.O) et que l'utilisation du charbon active en poudre (C.A.P) permet la réduction de la teneur en mercure au dessous du seuil admissible. L'utilisation d'un adjuvant (chaux vive) permet d'améliorer les résultats surtout pour la turbidité (4 mg/l). Une préchloration au break point semble intéressante pour améliorer la phase de floculation.

  15. Hastings Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... on, and advocacy for, wiser health care and science policy. In addition to her leadership role at The Hastings Center, she is a professor at Harvard Medical School, where she directs the school’s Fellowship in Bioethics, a program that ...

  16. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, L.; Boysel, M. B.; Smith, D. R.

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  17. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    SciTech Connect

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  18. Essais de capillarité et d'évaporation sous tomodensitométrie RX imagerie de la répartition de l'eau. Conséquences sur les flux et la localisation des zones de précipitation des sels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géraud, Y.; Tournier, B.; Surma, F.; Mazerolle, F.

    2002-07-01

    La tomodensitométrie Rx est utilisée pour suivre la saturation et le séchage des pierres utilisées dans la construction de certains monuments. Les mesures d'atténuation des rayons X sont interprétées pour déterminer la répartition des phases minérales qui composent le matériau ainsi que la répartition de la porosité. Les essais de saturation ou de séchage effectués sous tomodensitométrie RX permettent de suivre les variations de saturation du réseau poreux au cours des essais. Les interfaces entre zones saturées en fluides et zones sèches localisent de possibles zones de précipitation de sels, processus important dans le dégradation de pierres d'œuvre.

  19. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  20. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  1. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  2. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  3. Utilisation de l'essai comete et du biomarqueur gamma-H2AX pour detecter les dommages induits a l'ADN cellulaire par le 5-bromodeoxyuridine post-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Madeleine, Carole

    Ce memoire est presente a la Faculte de medecine et des sciences de la sante de l'Universite de Sherbrooke en vue de l'obtention du grade de maitre es sciences (M.Sc.) en radiobiologie (2009). Un jury a revise les informations contenues dans ce memoire. Il etait compose de professeurs de la Faculte de medecine et des sciences de la sante soit : Darel Hunting PhD, directeur de recherche (departement de medecine nucleaire et radiobiologie), Leon Sanche PhD, directeur de recherche (departement de medecine nucleaire et radiobiologie), Richard Wagner PhD, membre du programme (departement de medecine nucleaire et radiobiologie) et Guylain Boissonneault PhD, membre exterieur au programme (departement de biochimie). Le 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), un analogue halogene de la thymidine reconnu depuis les annees 60 comme etant un excellent radiosensibilisateur. L'hypothese la plus repandue au sujet de l'effet radio sensibilisant du BrdU est qu'il augmente le nombre de cassures simple et double brin lorsqu'il est incorpore dans l'ADN de la cellule et expose aux radiations ionisantes. Toutefois, de nouvelles recherches semblent remettre en question les observations precedentes. Ces dernieres etudes ont confirme que le BrdU est un bon radiosensibilisateur, car il augmente les dommages radio-induits dans l'ADN. Mais, c'est en etant incorpore dans une region simple brin que le BrdU radiosensibilise l'ADN. Ces recherches ont egalement revele pour la premiere fois un nouveau type de dommages produits lors de l'irradiation de l'ADN contenant du BrdU : les dimeres interbrins. Le but de ces travaux de recherche est de determiner si la presence de bromodeoxyuridine dans l'ADN augmente l'induction de bris simple et / ou double brin chez les cellules irradiees en utilisant de nouvelles techniques plus sensibles et specifiques que celles utilisees auparavant. Pour ce faire, les essais cometes et la detection des foci H2AX phosphorylee pourraient permettre d'etablir les effets engendres par

  4. Todai Scientific Information Retrieval (TSIR-1) System. II. Generation of a Scientific Literature Data Base in a Center-Oriented Format by a Tape-to-Tape Conversion of CAS SDF Data Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Yammoto, Takeo

    1972-01-01

    Conversion of the Chemical Abstract Service scientific literature data base from Standard Distribution Format to a center-oriented file format, STF, is described. A tape file format is described in which variable length logical records, possibly longer than the blocksize, may be stored safely. (7 references) (Author/NH)

  5. Caractérisation de matériaux a basse température. Dilatation conductivité, essais mécaniques; étalonnage de thermomètres industriels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabert, J. N.

    1991-02-01

    The Low Temperatures Department is equiped with the following testing benchs/stands: thermal dilatation from 4 K to 300 K; thermal conductivity from 2 K to 300 K; mechanical testing at 4 K, 77 K and 300 K; industrial thermometers calibration (Allen-Bradley carbon resistors) from 1.7 K to 80 K; platine resistors thermometers calibration (DEGUSSA) from 20 K to 300 K. These measurements can be carried out in the Laboratory for internal studies or for external demands. Le Service des Basses Températures est équipé des bancs de mesure suivants : dilatation thermique de 4 K à 300 K ; conductivité thermique de 2 K à 300 K ; essais mécaniques à 4 K, 77 K et 300 K ; étalonnage de thermomètres industriels (résistance de carbone AllenBradley) de 1,7 K à 80 K; étalonnage de thermomètres à résistance de platine (DEGUSSA) de 20 K à 300 K. Le laboratoire peut effectuer ces mesures pour ses besoins propres ou pour des clients extérieurs.

  6. Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR)

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) Program at The Johns Hopkins University provides high-quality next generation sequencing and genotyping services to investigators working to discover genes that contribute to common diseases.

  7. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  8. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  9. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  10. Interactive design center.

    SciTech Connect

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  11. RIKEN BNL Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) has been a major force in the realms of Spin Physics, Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics, large scale Computing Physics and the training of a new generation of extremely talented physicists. This has been accomplished through the recruitment of an outstanding non-permanent staff of Fellows and Research associates in theory and experiment. RBRC is now a mature organization that has reached a steady level in the size of scientific and support staff while at the same time retaining its vibrant youth. A brief history of the scientific accomplishments and contributions of the RBRC physicists will be presented as well as a discussion of the unique RBRC management structure.

  12. Interactive DIF Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preheim, Larry E.; Amy, Laraine; Young, Jimmie D.

    1993-01-01

    Interactive DIF Generator (IDG) computer program serves as utility to generate and manipulate directory interchange format (DIF) files. Creates and updates DIF files, sent to NASA's Master Directory, also referred to as International Global Change Directory at Goddard Space Flight Center. Many government and university data systems use Master Directory to advertise availability of research data. IDG is interactive software tool and requires mouse or trackball to operate. Written in C language.

  13. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  14. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  15. Kennedy Space Center exercise program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Cristy

    1993-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  16. Electrostatic generator/motor configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-02-04

    Electrostatic generators/motors designs are provided that generally may include a first cylindrical stator centered about a longitudinal axis; a second cylindrical stator centered about the axis, a first cylindrical rotor centered about the axis and located between the first cylindrical stator and the second cylindrical stator. The first cylindrical stator, the second cylindrical stator and the first cylindrical rotor may be concentrically aligned. A magnetic field having field lines about parallel with the longitudinal axis is provided.

  17. From Teacher Centered to Student Centered Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockemy, M. J.; Summers, Sylvia

    In 1991, staff at the Business Resource Center (BRC) at Tacoma Community College, in Washington, began to reevaluate their approach to serving students. Up to that point, the BRC had been teacher centered, with staff operating under the assumptions that only the students who succeeded were actually "college material," that students would cheat if…

  18. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  19. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    , practical, and cost effective. To properly formulate any future plans, background information and research are required. Before bringing in a consultant to tackle the three year process anticipated to prepare a Center Master Plan, my job was to gather information on different organizations contributions to the NASA mission, their facility needs, consistent trends they observe, etc. I conducted numerous interviews with personnel such as Directorate Representatives, Division Chiefs, Branch Chiefs, System Managers and Building Managers. I documented the information I received from them for future use. I used the information to create various color-coded maps layering the different data. This was done with the ending objective being to collect the information and place it in a database that will be linked with Aperture (a computer program that generates color-coded map layers from database information) and made electronically retrievable to the Planning Consultant, NASA personnel, program stakeholders, and other governmental agencies. My goal this summer was to gather information and ideas appropriate for use in NASA Glenn Research Center s Master Plan and organize them for future application by the Planning Consultant. By the end of the summer, after completion of my goal, I will utilize my knowledge and create an array of preliminary future plans for the facility that can be passed along as a guidance tool.

  20. View of possible sluice gate support structure, north center of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of possible sluice gate support structure, north center of the Merry Generator House, looking south - Arthur Holmes Merry Generator House, Signal Lake North of Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  1. Counter-IED PPE Horizon 0, Phase 1 Human Factors Trial: Performance Evaluation of Soft Armour Personal Protective Equipment (Essai Ergonomique du Projet Horizon 0 d’EPI a l’Epreuve des IED, Phase 1: Evaluation du Rendement d’un Equipement de Protection Individual en Materiel Souple)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-31

    Horizon 0 avaient pour objet de scruter les effets de différentes options de blindage souple sur la mobilité des militaires, en tenant compte de leur...l’ajustement, l’amplitude de mouvement, la liberté de mouvement et la compatibilité ont été mis en œuvre et suivis d’évaluations dynamiques de la mobilité et...différentes options de protection sur la mobilité du soldat. Ces essais ont porté sur l’exécution des tâches par les soldats ainsi que sur leur degré

  2. An accelerated line-by-line option for MODTRAN combining on-the-fly generation of line center absorption within 0.1 cm-1 bins and pre-computed line tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Alexander; Conforti, Patrick; Hawes, Fred

    2015-05-01

    A Line-By-Line (LBL) option is being developed for MODTRAN6. The motivation for this development is two-fold. Firstly, when MODTRAN is validated against an independent LBL model, it is difficult to isolate the source of discrepancies. One must verify consistency between pressure, temperature and density profiles, between column density calculations, between continuum and particulate data, between spectral convolution methods, and more. Introducing a LBL option directly within MODTRAN will insure common elements for all calculations other than those used to compute molecular transmittances. The second motivation for the LBL upgrade is that it will enable users to compute high spectral resolution transmittances and radiances for the full range of current MODTRAN applications. In particular, introducing the LBL feature into MODTRAN will enable first-principle calculations of scattered radiances, an option that is often not readily available with LBL models. MODTRAN will compute LBL transmittances within one 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin at a time, marching through the full requested band pass. The LBL algorithm will use the highly accurate, pressure- and temperature-dependent MODTRAN Padé approximant fits of the contribution from line tails to define the absorption from all molecular transitions centered more than 0.05 cm-1 from each 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin. The beauty of this approach is that the on-the-fly computations for each 0.1 cm-1 bin will only require explicit LBL summing of transitions centered within a 0.2 cm-1 spectral region. That is, the contribution from the more distant lines will be pre-computed via the Padé approximants. The status of the LBL effort will be presented. This will include initial thermal and solar radiance calculations, validation calculations, and self-validations of the MODTRAN band model against its own LBL calculations.

  3. Fastrac Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Dennis, Jay

    2001-01-01

    A rocket engine gas generator component development test was recently conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This gas generator is intended to power a rocket engine turbopump by the combustion of Lox and RP-1. The testing demonstrated design requirements for start sequence, wall compatibility, performance, and stable combustion. During testing the gas generator injector was modified to improve distribution of outer wall coolant and the igniter boss was modified to investigate the use of a pyrotechnic igniter. Expected chamber pressure oscillations at longitudinal acoustic mode were measured for three different chamber lengths tested. High amplitude discrete oscillations resulted in the chamber-alone configurations when chamber acoustic modes coupled with feed-system acoustics modes. For the full gas generator configuration, which included a turbine inlet manifold, high amplitude oscillations occurred only at off-design very low power levels. This testing led to a successful gas generator design for the Fastrac 60,000 lb thrust engine.

  4. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  5. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  6. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  7. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Midwifery Services and Birth Center Accredited 351 N. Water Street Black River Falls, WI 54615 715-284- ... 795-9912 Accredited Since December 1991 42 Del Mar Birth Center Accredited 1416 El Centro Street, Suite ...

  8. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  9. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  10. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  11. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  12. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  13. An osmium(III)/osmium(V) redox couple generating Os(V)(O)(OH) center for cis-1,2-dihydroxylation of alkenes with H2O2: Os complex with a nitrogen-based tetradentate ligand.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Kitayama, Kazuhiro; Mori, Seiji; Itoh, Shinobu

    2012-11-21

    For the synthesis of the 1,2-diols, cis-1,2-dihydroxylation of alkenes catalyzed by osmium(VIII) tetroxide (OsO(4)) is a powerful method. However, OsO(4) is quite toxic due to its highly volatile and sublimable nature. Thus, the development of alternative catalysts for cis-1,2-dihydroxylation of alkenes is highly challenging. Our approach involves the use of a nitrogen-based tetradentate ligand, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (tpa), for an osmium center to develop a new osmium catalyst and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as a cheap and environmentally benign oxidant. The new Os-tpa complex acts as a very efficient turnover catalyst for syn-selective dihydroxylation of various alkenes (turnover number ∼1000) in aqueous media, and H(2)O(2) oxidant is formally incorporated into the products quantitatively (100% atom efficiency). The reaction intermediates involved in the catalytic cycle have been isolated and characterized crystallographically as [Os(III)(OH)(H(2)O)(tpa)](2+) and [Os(V)(O)(OH)(tpa)](2+) complexes. The observed syn-selectivity, structural characteristics of the intermediates, and kinetic studies have suggested a concerted [3 + 2]-cycloaddition mechanism between [Os(V)(O)(OH)(tpa)](2+) and alkenes, which is strongly supported by DFT calculations.

  14. Rationale for Linking the Generations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sally

    This paper provides an overview of the negative aspects of generational isolation and outlines the developmental needs shared by younger and older people. The paper cites intergenerational models, such as community centers, places of worship, colleges and universities, and nursing homes, in which generations interact in a substantive way. It…

  15. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  16. Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Workshop on Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software was conducted for NASA to assess its unstructured grid activities, improve the coordination among NASA centers, and promote technology transfer to industry. The proceedings represent contributions from Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers, and the Johnson and Marshall Space Flight Centers. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the workshop.

  17. The DLESE Community Services Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, E.; Aivazian, B.; Manduca, C.; Mogk, D.

    2003-12-01

    The DLESE Community Services Center (DCSC) is one of several centers recently funded by the National Science Foundation to promote greater and more effective use of Digital Library resources. The primary goals of the DCSC are to: (1) increase the current resource user and contributor base to include greater numbers of K-12, informal, and college educators and students, (2) diversify the DLESE user and contributor base to include rich and robust representation of ethnic, cultural, and differently-abled groups, (3) improve the ability of users and contributors to easily find, adapt, and use high quality digital resources in their classrooms, laboratories, and communities and (4) demonstrate how DLESE can support community activity addressing issues in geoscience education. During the course of the next three years we will: (a) solicit, create, and disseminate "exemplars" that highlight effective digital resource use in a variety of diverse educational settings, (b) continue to support and promote on-line DLESE community services, and (c) work to develop a DLESE ambassadors outreach program involving educators, scientists, and students working across the Earth, space, and environmental sciences. Collaborations with the DLESE Evaluation and Data Centers, collection builders, the DLESE Program Center staff, as well as diverse audience groups will be a key focus of our efforts. We invite you to join us as we work to build and support the next generation of digital services and resources for educators and students at all levels.

  18. Grants Document-Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairell, Terri; Kreymer, Lev; Martin, Greg; Sheridan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The Grants Document-Generation System (GDGS) software allows the generation of official grants documents for distribution to the appropriate parties. The documents are created after the selection and entry of specific data elements and clauses. GDGS is written in Cold Fusion that resides on an SQL2000 database and is housed on-site at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes access security written around GSFC's (Goddard Space Flight Center's) LIST system, and allows for the entry of Procurement Request information necessary for the generation of the resulting Grant Award.

  19. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  20. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tsybychev, Dmitri

    2004-04-01

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb-1 of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-ET jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 ± 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  1. Understanding wellness center loyalty through lifestyle analysis.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Satya; Ravichandran, Swathi; P, Ganesan

    2011-01-01

    Many changes taking place at a macro-level in Indian society along with the popularity of services that are native to India, such as Yoga and Ayurveda, have generated significant interest in wellness services. To assist wellness centers in gaining loyal clients, the goal of this study was to understand the influence of customer lifestyle factors on wellness center loyalty. The activities, interests, and opinions model was used to understand the lifestyles of wellness center clients. Data were collected from clients of five wellness centers. Regression results indicate that overworked individuals and those seeking a balance between work and family life would be the most loyal to wellness centers. Managerial implications of results are discussed.

  2. EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, located in Sioux Falls, SD, is a data management, systems development, and research field center of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Mapping Division. The Center was established in the early 1970's to receive, process, and distribute data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat satellites. The Center holds the world's largest collection of space and aircraft acquired imagery of the Earth. These holdings include over 2 million images acquired from satellites and over 8 million aerial photographs. The Center is also a major focal point for information concerning the holdings of foreign Landsat ground reception stations and data acquired by other countries' Earth observing satellites. The central U.S. location provides the Center with a unique capability to receive real-time electronic signals from Earth orbiting satellites, used for developing data sets of most of the North American continent.

  3. Etude de l'influence du champ magnetique dans une section d'essais thermohydraulique d'un canal de reacteur nucleaire CANDU 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry-Lavoie, Renaud

    This memoir deals with the effects of the magnetic fields present in a thermal hydraulic test section of the Canadian nuclear industry. This test section is used to determine the thermal hydraulic conditions that can lead to critical heat flux in a channel of a CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. To perform their series of experiments the STERN Company used strong electric currents to heat the simulation bundles with a thermal power similar to the one found in a channel of a CANDU reactor. The materials constituting the simulation channel and its supports are of ferromagnetic nature. The strong magnetic field generated by the bundles implies that they are subjected to a magnetostatic force due to the magnetization of the ferromagnetic materials. The nuclear industry wants to know if these efforts, combined with the force of gravity, are sufficient to maintain the bundles in place in the simulation channel. The question also arises whether or not the magnetic field present in the channel can affect the parameters of boiling heat transfer. To determine the magnetic field distribution in the simulation channel, we had recourse to the magnetostatic image method and the integral method of calculation of magnetization. The results of the calculations show that the magnetostatic forces exerted by the ferromagnetic elements of the test section are inferior in magnitude to the one estimated by the STERN laboratorie. We used the mechanistic model of Sullivan et al. (1964) to evaluate the possible influence of the magnetic fields on the departure diameter of the vapor bubbles. The deviation in the frequency of bubble emission was evaluated by using the correlations of Zuber et al. (1959) and Cole (1960). By introducing a magnetostatic force in the boiling model and in the correlations, we demonstrated that the magnetic field present in the STERN test section has a negligible effect on the bubble departure diameter and their emission frequency. We conclude that the conditions in the test

  4. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  5. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  6. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  7. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    ScienceCinema

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2016-07-12

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  8. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-10

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  9. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  10. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  11. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  12. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  13. World Saver Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Theresa; And Others

    Conservation is a concern for all cultures, and children are familiar with this concept because of recycling in their homes and home towns. The World Saver Center, an example of the thematic approach to learning, is designed to allow children to experiment with concepts of conservation in a familiar setting. The center, designed to resemble an…

  14. One Stop Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patricia

    With the aid of a U.S. Department of Labor grant, a number of one-stop career centers are being developed or have been implemented in California. A one-stop career center is a physical and electronic site where comprehensive services to job seekers and employers are available. These services include the following: assessment and eligibility…

  15. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  16. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  17. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  18. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  19. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  20. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  1. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  2. Tribal Business Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdowne, Michele

    The Salish Kootenai College Tribal Business Assistance Center was established in 1994 to provide technical assistance to individuals who are pursuing a small business. The center assists the entrepreneur by way of individual consultation with business advisors, small business workshops, and business administration courses that have been created…

  3. Outfitting Campus Fitness Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Explains how universities and colleges, both private and public, are including fitness centers as ways of increasing their student enrollment levels. Comments are provided on school experiences in fitness-center design, equipment purchasing, and maintenance and operating-costs issues. (GR)

  4. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  5. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  6. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  7. Generation X

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    service or government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT GENERATION X BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL NEIL YAMASHIRO United States Army National Guard CVI...WAR COLLEGE, CARLISLE BARRACKS, PA 17013-5050 ■"""" mimmm n USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT Generation X by LTC Neil Yamashiro COL Paul...is unlimited. 11 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: LTC Neil Yamashiro TITLE: Generation X FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 7 April 1998 PAGES: 26

  8. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case

  9. Generation Y Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Garret; Painting, Kristen; Barrera, Aaron; Skytland, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Are you familiar with the famed Generation Y, or "Gen Yers?" Generation Y is projected to be 47 percent of the workforce by 2014. They were born roughly between 1977 and 2000, but that is definitely not their only defining factor. But who is this group, and what do they have to do with the future of the space program and the Johnson Space Center (JSC)? During 2007, a group of Gen Yers at JSC participated on a committee to address the NASA Headquarters strategic communications plan. Fitzpatrick, along with his co-authors, created a presentation to share the Gen Yers' perspective on their generation in conjunction with the strategic communications strategy released. This knowledge capture (KC) event is that presentation.

  10. Spherical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  11. John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49

  12. Wallowa County Integrated Biomass Energy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Christoffersen, Nils

    2014-05-02

    The Integrated Biomass Energy Center (IBEC) is an approximately 0.1 MW CHP integrated biorefinery in Northeastern Oregon which will demonstrate and validate small-scale combined heat and power from lignin intermediates/residues. IBEC will be co-located with feedstock suppliers and thermal and power customers for distributed generation. The project was developed by Wallowa Resources Community Solutions Inc.

  13. University of Maryland--Educational Opportunity Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jerry L.

    This document describes a program at the University of Maryland-Educational Opportunity Center (UM-EOC) in College Park that fulfills a legislative mandate to provide information on and assistance to 1,500 adults, two-thirds of whom will be low-income, first-generation college participants who reside in 13 targeted communities in Prince George's…

  14. Radionuclide Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, F.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ)

    Radionuclide generator systems continue to play a key role in providing both diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for various applications in nuclear medicine, oncology, and interventional cardiology. Although many parent/daughter pairs have been evaluated as radionuclide generator systems, there are a relatively small number of generators, which are currently in routine clinical and research use. Essentially every conceivable approach has been used for parent/separation strategies, including sublimation, thermochromatographic separation, solvent extraction, and adsorptive column chromatography. The most widely used radionuclide generator for clinical applications is the 99Mo/99mTc generator system, but recent years have seen an enormous increase in the use of generators to provide therapeutic radionuclides, which has paralleled the development of complementary technologies for targeting agents for therapy and in the general increased interest in the use of unsealed therapeutic radioactive sources. More recently, use of the 68Ge/68Ga generator is showing great potential as a source of positron-emitting 68Ga for positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Key advantages for the use of radionuclide generators include reasonable costs, the convenience of obtaining the desired daughter radionuclide on demand, and availability of the daughter radionuclide in high specific activity, no-carrier added form.

  15. Generative Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  16. World Data Center / National Geophysical Data Center's Tsunami Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Brantley, K.; Stroker, K.

    2005-12-01

    The WDC for Solid Earth Geophysics (including tsunamis) is operated by NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). NGDC is one of three environmental data centers within the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS). Operating both World and National Data Centers, WDC/NGDC is now providing the long-term archive, data management, and access to national and global tsunami data for research and mitigation of tsunami hazards. Archive responsibilities include the global historic tsunami event and runup database, the bottom pressure recorder data, and access to event-specific tide-gauge data, as well as other related hazards and bathymetric data and information. The WDC/NGDC Worldwide Tsunami Database includes more than 2,400 events since 2,000 BC and more than 7,200 locations where tsunamis were observed. Times of generating earthquakes, tsunami arrival times, travel times, first motion of the wave, and wave periods are included in the database. The WDC/NGDC Worldwide Significant Earthquake Database includes information for more than 6,600 destructive earthquakes from 2,000 B.C. to the present. In the 1980s, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) developed deep ocean tsunameters for the early detection, measurement, and real-time reporting of tsunamis in the open ocean. The tsunameters were developed by PMEL's Project DART (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis). A DART system consists of a seafloor bottom pressure recording (BPR) system capable of detecting tsunamis as small as 1 cm, and a moored surface buoy for real-time communications. An acoustic link is used to transmit data from the BPR on the seafloor to the surface buoy. The data are then relayed via a GOES satellite link to ground stations for immediate dissemination to NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers and PMEL. These systems were deployed near regions with a history of tsunami generation, to ensure measurement of the waves as they propagate towards

  17. Containment Safety Of Super Phenix : Essai Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgayrettes, M. F.; Fiche, C.; Hamon, P.

    1985-02-01

    The protection of people and property must be assured by every situation around an industrial power plant. That is why the FRENCH Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has defined the size of the confinement of Super Phenix to withstand the worst highly hypothetical accident. The study of the strength of the confinement has been carried out by two complementary means : - Calculation (Display poster # 491 188), - Experiment : reactor mock-up. The latter is presented in the film. The solution which have been adopted for the problems encountered are emphasied ; the work with high speed camera is presented. The film is illustrated with some fast movie sequences.

  18. Essays in Semiotics. Essais de Semiotique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristeva, Julia, Ed.; And Others

    This collection, representing the fruits of recent international work, consists of reprints of articles from the 1967 and 1968 issues of the journal "Social Science Information." It brings together a variety of studies by semioticians of both East and West--treatments of theoretical and methodological issues of modern semiotics, semiotic analysis…

  19. Essais de Stylistique (Essays on Stylistics).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiraud, Pierre

    This French text of selected articles, lectures, and writings from Bally to Jakobson presents a typology of literary styles, complementing an introductory book on the theory and readings in stylistics by dealing with the problems and methods of stylistic analysis. Seeking to arrive at a description of the inner structure of literary texts, it…

  20. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  1. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The EROS Data Center, 16 miles (25 km) northeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated by the EROS Program to provide access to NASA's LANDSAT [formerly Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)] imagery, aerial photography acquired by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and photography and imagery acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from research aircraft and from Skylab, Apollo, and Gemini spacecraft. The primary functions of the Center are data storage and reproduction, and user assistance and training. This publication describes the Data Center operations, data products, services, and procedures for ordering remotely sensed data. The EROS Data Center and its principal facility, the 120,000-square-foot (11,200 m2) Karl E. Mundt Federal Building, were dedicated August 7, 1973.

  2. Test Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  3. Proteome Characterization Centers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The centers, a component of NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, will analyze a subset of TCGA samples to define proteins translated from cancer genomes and their related biological processes.

  4. America's Blood Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spokesperson Biographies Statements Logo & Style Guidelines Every two seconds someone needs blood. It's About Life. Please Donate ... from the Foundation for America’s Blood Centers. 2 SECONDS Every 2 seconds, someone in the United States ...

  5. NMA Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierulf, Halfdan Pascal; Andersen, Per Helge

    2013-01-01

    The Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA) has during the last few years had a close cooperation with Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in the analysis of space geodetic data using the GEOSAT software. In 2012 NMA has taken over the full responsibility for the GEOSAT software. This implies that FFI stopped being an IVS Associate Analysis Center in 2012. NMA has been an IVS Associate Analysis Center since 28 October 2010. NMA's contributions to the IVS as an Analysis Centers focus primarily on routine production of session-by-session unconstrained and consistent normal equations by GEOSAT as input to the IVS combined solution. After the recent improvements, we expect that VLBI results produced with GEOSAT will be consistent with results from the other VLBI Analysis Centers to a satisfactory level.

  6. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  7. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  8. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of the Kennedy Space Center both in terms to the economy of Florida and to spaceflight. It reviews the general NASA direction,the challenges of the coming year and the accomplishments.

  9. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  10. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  11. Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The Tsukuba Analysis Center is funded by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The c5++ analysis software is regularly used for the IVS-INT2 analysis and the ultra-rapid EOP experiments.

  12. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  13. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... disseminate evidence-based findings into communities that can benefit from these findings, but the centers can also, through the experience of working with those patients, help inform national research and ...

  14. Patient-centered Communication

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Sara L; Buell, Stephanie; Zettler, Patti; White, Martha; Ruston, Delaney C; Lo, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate patient preferences for a patient-centered or a biomedical communication style. DESIGN Randomized study. SETTING Urgent care and ambulatory medicine clinics in an academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS We recruited 250 English-speaking adult patients, excluding patients whose medical illnesses prevented evaluation of the study intervention. INTERVENTION Participants watched one of three videotaped scenarios of simulated patient-physician discussions of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Each participant watched two versions of the scenario (biomedical vs. patient-centered communication style) and completed written and oral questionnaires to assess outcome measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Main outcome measures were 1) preferences for a patient-centered versus a biomedical communication style; and 2) predictors of communication style preference. Participants who preferred the patient-centered style (69%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63 to 75) tended to be younger (82%[51/62] for age < 30; 68%[100/148] for ages 30–59; 55%[21/38] for age > 59; P < .03), more educated (76%[54/71] for postcollege education; 73%[94/128] for some college; 49%[23/47] for high school only; P = .003), use CAM (75%[140/188] vs. 55%[33/60] for nonusers; P = .006), and have a patient-centered physician (88%[74/84] vs. 30%[16/54] for those with a biomedical physician; P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with preferring the patient-centered style included younger age, use of herbal CAM, having a patient-centered physician, and rating a “doctor's interest in you as a person” as “very important.” CONCLUSIONS Given that a significant proportion of patients prefer a biomedical communication style, practicing physicians and medical educators should strive for flexible approaches to physician-patient communication. PMID:15566435

  15. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  16. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  17. Patient Safety Center Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Enterectomy Bariatric 7/20/05 4 hours/course (28 hours/year) Surgery R 7 Dr. Karen Horvath R5 Lap Enterectomy & Colectomy 11/30/05 4...areas in the UW Schools of Nursing and Dentistry, at the Harborview Research Center Microvascular Surgery lab, with the Seattle Children’s Hospital and...1 laboratory complex (2500 sq ft) has been designed within the University of Washington Medical Center, in the Surgery Pavilion complex

  18. Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng

    1998-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the Center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The Center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The College has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction represents prominent evidence of this record. The basic concept on which the Center was founded is the in-space construction of large space systems, such as space stations, interplanetary space vehicles, and extraterrestrial space structures. Since 1993, the scope of CSC research has evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. With the broadened scope our research projects seek to impact the technological basis for spacecraft such as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites and other special-purpose spacecraft, as well as large space platforms. A summary of accomplishments, including student participation and degrees awarded, during the contract period is presented.

  19. Energy generator

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a power booster. It comprises: at least one pendulum means suspended at one end to oscillate about the point of suspension; power generating means; mass means connected to one end of the pendulum means; spring means disposed in operative cooperation with the mass means to impart energy into the pendulum means and assist the pendulum means in oscillating about the point of suspension; and energy transfer linkage means between the pendulum means and the power generating means for transferring energy between the pendulum means and the power generating means.

  20. Advanced Material Intelligent Processing Center: Next Generation Scalable Lean Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    machines and have made significant advances to automated tape laying (ATL) and automated fiber placement (AFP) technologies. Companies are moving...beyond standard thermoplastic and thermoset prepregs and are looking at placing 00A prepregs as well as dry fabrics. Today. Automated Tape Laying (ATL...References [1] Michael N. Grimshaw, " Automated Tape Laying ." in ASM Handbook Vol. 21 Composites.. ASM International, 2001. [2] Obaid Younossi. Michael

  1. Reader-Centered Technical Writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Technical writing is an essential part of professional communication and in recent years it has shifted from a genre-based approach. Formerly, technical writing primarily focused on generating templates of documents and sometimes it was creating or reproducing traditional forms with minor modifications and updates. Now, technical writing looks at the situations surrounding the need to write. This involves deep thinking about the goals and objectives of the project on hand. Furthermore, one observes that it is very important for any participatory process to have the full support of management. This support needs to be well understood and believed by employees. Professional writing may be very persuasive in some cases. When presented in the appropriate context, technical writing can persuade a company to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production. However, one must recognize that lot of professional writing still continues to make use of reports and instruction manuals. Normally, technical and professional writing addresses four aspects. Objective: The need for generating a given professionally written technical document and the goals the document is expected to achieve and accomplish. Clientele: The clientele who will utilize the technical document. This may include the people in the organization. This may also include "unintended readers." Customers: The population that may be affected by the content of the technical document generated. This includes the stakeholders who will be influenced. Environment: The background in which the document is created. Also, the nature of the situation that warranted the generation of the document. Swiss Psychologist Jean Piaget's view of Learning focuses on three aspects. The author likes to extend Jean Piaget's ideas to students, who are asked to prepare and submit Reader-Centered Technical Writing reports and exercises. Assimilation: Writers may benefit specifically, by assimilating a new object into

  2. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  3. Generation Wrecked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Noshua

    2002-01-01

    Young adults in Generation X are facing financial problems. Because of their college and credit card debt, many in worse financial shape than anyone since the Depression and have little or no retirement savings. (JOW)

  4. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  5. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  6. Window generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William K.; May, Roger A.

    1989-03-01

    The present invention relates generally to video target recognition systems and more specifically to a window generator which receives a field of video data and applies an identification code to rectangular subregions to identify distinct target areas within a given background area. The present invention comprises a window generator which provides a 6 bit target identification number for up to 63 target areas and one background area in a frame of serially scanned data. The window generator receives a field of video data from an image data source. This video data consists of digitized frames of serially scanned data similar to a conventional television screen image, which is divided horizontally in pixels, and vertically in lines. The window generator permits any given frame to be subdivided into specific rectangular subregions, which may be located anywhere on the video picture. By allowing statistics to be collected on the individual subregions (or target areas) the window generator permits local processing of video data within the specified target areas as opposed to processing of video data over the entire video field. One embodiment of the window generator is composed of: a microprocessor, a random access memory (RAM), a comparator, a line memory, two counters, an OR gate, a frame initialization circuit, and a buffer. These elements function as described below.

  7. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  8. 6. WARHEADING BUILDING, REAR AND LEFT SIDES, CENTER OF BERM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. WARHEADING BUILDING, REAR AND LEFT SIDES, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  9. 2. WARHEADING BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WARHEADING BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING WEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  10. 5. WARHEADING BUILDING, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, CENTER OF BERM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. WARHEADING BUILDING, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  11. 3. WARHEADING BUILDING, REAR SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WARHEADING BUILDING, REAR SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  12. 4. WARHEADING BUILDING, LEFT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. WARHEADING BUILDING, LEFT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING EAST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  13. 1. WARHEADING BUILDING, FRONT, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WARHEADING BUILDING, FRONT, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING NORTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  14. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  15. Spontaneous germinal centers and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Domeier, Phillip P; Schell, Stephanie L; Rahman, Ziaur S M

    2017-02-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are dynamic microenvironments that form in the secondary lymphoid organs and generate somatically mutated high-affinity antibodies necessary to establish an effective humoral immune response. Tight regulation of GC responses is critical for maintaining self-tolerance. GCs can arise in the absence of purposeful immunization or overt infection (called spontaneous GCs, Spt-GCs). In autoimmune-prone mice and patients with autoimmune disease, aberrant regulation of Spt-GCs is thought to promote the development of somatically mutated pathogenic autoantibodies and the subsequent development of autoimmunity. The mechanisms that control the formation of Spt-GCs and promote systemic autoimmune diseases remain an open question and the focus of ongoing studies. Here, we discuss the most current studies on the role of Spt-GCs in autoimmunity.

  16. International Water Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  17. Virtual center arraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.; Lipes, R. G.; Miller, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to increase the amount of data that can be received from outer planet missions are described with emphasis on antenna arraying systems designed to increase the total effective aperture of the receiving system. One such method is virtual center arraying (VCA). In VCA, a combined carrier reference is derived at a point that is, conceptually, the geometric center of the array. This point need not coincide with any of the actual antennas of the array. A noise analysis of the VCA system is given along with formulas for the phase jitter as a function of loop bandwidths and the amount of loop damping. If the ratio of the loop bandwidths of the center loop to the vertex loops is greater than 100, then the jitter is very nearly equal to that expected for ideal combined carrier referencing.

  18. Survey: National Meteorological Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Meteorological Center (NMC) is comprised of three operational divisions (Development, Automation, and Forecast) and an Administrative Division. The Development Division develops and implements mathematical models for forecasting the weather. The Automation Division provides the software and processing services to accommodate the models used in daily forecasts. The Forecasting Division applies a combination of numerical and manual techniques to produce analyses and prognoses up to 120 hr into the future. This guidance material is combined with severe storm information from the National Hurricane Center and the National Severe Storms Forecasting Center to develop locally tailored forecasts by the Weather Service Forecast Offices and, in turn, by the local Weather Service Offices. A very general flow of this information is shown. A more detailed illustration of data flow into, within, and from the NMC is given. The interrelations are depicted between the various meteorological organizations and activities.

  19. MARS Mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center (M2RC) is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in June 1988. It is a cooperative effort between NCSU and A&T in Greensboro. The goal of the Center is to focus on research and educational technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines Mission Analysis and Design, Hypersonic Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structures and Controls, Composite Materials, and Fabrication Methods in a cross-disciplined program directed towards the development of space transportation systems for lunar and planetary travel. The activities of the students and faculty in the M2RC for the period 1 Jul. 1990 to 30 Jun. 1991 are described.

  20. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  1. Best Practices Guide for Energy-Efficient Data Center Design

    SciTech Connect

    O. VanGeet: NREL

    2010-02-24

    This guide provides an overview of best practices for energy-efficient data center design which spans the categories of Information Technology (IT) systems and their environmental conditions, data center air management, cooling and electrical systems, on-site generation, and heat recovery.

  2. The Social Work Research Center at Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winokur, Marc A.; Valentine, Deborah P.; Drendel, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The Social Work Research Center is an innovative university-community partnership within the School of Social Work in the College of Applied Human Sciences at Colorado State University. The center is focused on working with county and state child welfare agencies to generate applied research that translates into evidence-based practice for serving…

  3. Marketing the Products and Services of Information Analysis Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, H. William; Grattidge, Walter

    Information analysis centers must perform the function of evaluation as well as compilation, in order to generate products and services with increased utility and user acceptance. Also, these centers must perform a dual role as wholesaler and retailer. These roles, as well as problems and examples of production and marketing experiences, are…

  4. Microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  5. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  6. F-1 Engine Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The gas generator from an F-1 engine is test-fired at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 24, 2013. Data from the 30 second test will be used in the development of advance...

  7. Emergency Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinea, Anoushka Z.

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Operation Center (EOC) is a site from which NASA LaRC Emergency Preparedness Officials exercise control and direction in an emergency. Research was conducted in order to determine what makes an effective EOC. Specifically information concerning the various types of equipment and communication capability that an efficient EOC should contain (i.e., computers, software, telephone systems, radio systems, etc.) was documented. With this information a requirements document was written stating a brief description of the equipment and required quantity to be used in an EOC and then compared to current capabilities at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  8. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  9. Mars mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. It has the goal of focusing on research and training technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines: (1) composite materials and fabrication, (2) light weight structures and controls, and (3) hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion in a cross disciplined program directed towards the development of the space transportation system for planetary travel.

  10. Minor Planet Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Brian G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the activities of the Minor Planet Center for the year of 1998. The main product of this center is the Minor Planet Circulars, augmented by the Minor Planet Circulars Supplement which is a new series introduced in 1997 to include the actual observations, which are now only summarized MPC. The introduction of the Daily Orbit Update (DOU) lists all the orbits computed and identification found since the previous issue. There has been a fivefold increase in the reported Near Earth Objects, which includes the addition of 55 potentially hazardous asteroids.

  11. Ocean Pollution Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.

  12. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-01-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  13. Lied Transplant Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  14. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  15. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.R.

    1984-06-19

    A hydrogen generator decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, and includes an induction coil which is electrically heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose water passing therethrough. A generator coil is connected in communicating relation to the induction coil, and is positioned in a fire resistant crucible containing ferrous oxide pellets. Oxygen and hydrogen produced by decomposition of water pass through the ferrous oxide pellets where the oxygen reacts with the ferrous oxide and the hydrogen is burned to produce heat for heating a building, such as a conventional home.

  16. Solar Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Vanguard I dish-Stirling module program, initiated in 1982, produced the Vanguard I module, a commercial prototype erected by the Advanco Corporation. The module, which automatically tracks the sun, combines JPL mirrored concentrator technology, an advanced Stirling Solar II engine/generator, a low cost microprocessor-controlled parabolic dish. Vanguard I has a 28% sunlight to electricity conversion efficiency. If tests continue to prove the system effective, Advanco will construct a generating plant to sell electricity to local utilities. An agreement has also been signed with McDonnell Douglas to manufacture a similar module.

  17. Generational mentoring.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Della W

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations struggle with the best way to integrate new staff members, including novice and experienced nurses returning to practice, into the organization. One way of accomplishing this integration is mentoring. Mentoring is a process of guiding the development of another person. The methods used to mentor staff members can be influenced by the generation to which they belong. Each generation typically experiences different events that shape their expectations and responses. Consideration of the influence of these events can improve the effectiveness of the mentoring process.

  18. Plasma Generator Using Spiral Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N. (Inventor); Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Ticatch, Larry A. (Inventor); Smith, Laura J. (Inventor); Koppen, Sandra V. (Inventor); Nguyen, Truong X. (Inventor); Ely, Jay J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A plasma generator includes a pair of identical spiraled electrical conductors separated by dielectric material. Both spiraled conductors have inductance and capacitance wherein, in the presence of a time-varying electromagnetic field, the spiraled conductors resonate to generate a harmonic electromagnetic field response. The spiraled conductors lie in parallel planes and partially overlap one another in a direction perpendicular to the parallel planes. The geometric centers of the spiraled conductors define endpoints of a line that is non-perpendicular with respect to the parallel planes. A voltage source coupled across the spiraled conductors applies a voltage sufficient to generate a plasma in at least a portion of the dielectric material.

  19. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  20. Generative Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyles, Dan Allen

    Educational research has identified how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice and education have underperforming metrics in racial and gender diversity, despite decades of intervention. These disparities are part of the construction of a culture of science that is alienating to these populations. Recent studies in a social science framework described as "Generative Justice" have suggested that the context of social and scientific practice might be modified to bring about more just and equitable relations among the disenfranchised by circulating the value they and their non-human allies create back to them in unalienated forms. What is not known are the underlying principles of social and material space that makes a system more or less generative. I employ an autoethnographic method at four sites: a high school science class; a farm committed to "Black and Brown liberation"; a summer program geared towards youth environmental mapping; and a summer workshop for Harlem middle school students. My findings suggest that by identifying instances where material affinity, participatory voice, and creative solidarity are mutually reinforcing, it is possible to create educational contexts that generate unalienated value, and circulate it back to the producers themselves. This cycle of generation may help explain how to create systems of justice that strengthen and grow themselves through successive iterations. The problem of lack of diversity in STEM may be addressed not merely by recruiting the best and the brightest from underrepresented populations, but by changing the context of STEM education to provide tools for its own systematic restructuring.

  1. Generation Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of accounting professors with Ph.D.s who can prepare the next generation. To help reverse the faculty deficit, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) has created the new Accounting Doctoral Scholars program by pooling more than $17 million and soliciting commitments from more than 70 of the nation's…

  2. Community Learning Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The Community Learning Centers plan provides a systemically changed model for the 21st century. This top-to-bottom transformation of current education addresses all aspects of schools with a detailed framework to guide serious educational reformers. This fresh approach to principles of learning, curriculum, staffing, facilities, student as…

  3. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  4. Johnson Space Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafka, Tammy; Terrier, Doug; Smith, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is a review of the work of Johnson Space Center. It includes a section on technology development areas, (i.e., composite structures, non-destructive evaluation, applied nanotechnology, additive manufacturing, and fracture and fatigue analytical methods), a section on structural analysis capabilities within NASA/JSC and a section on Friction stir welding and laser peening.

  5. Precision Joining Center

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.W.; Westphal, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10--12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of US industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  6. Evidence-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Leong, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student understanding is a critical part of a teacher's routine. Most assessments are reviewed with a quick eye, but the evidence-centered assessment strategy encourages us to slow down and look more carefully at student work samples. In this article, the author proposes guidelines for the close examination of student work. These…

  7. The Pupil Appraisal Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilborn, Bobbie; Gentile, Lance M.

    The primary purpose of the Pupil Appraisal Center (PAC) is to promote teacher education by providing teachers and students direct experience in resolving behavioral disorders and learning problems. PAC provides specialized teacher training in counseling, reading, hearing, speech, and language development and provides service to area schools for…

  8. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  9. Learning Center Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivrette, Lyndon

    Cuesta College's Learning Center is designed to totally support the instructional methods of each instructor, to meet the individual learning and study needs of each student, and to provide cultural and educational resource opportunities to the community. The facility is to be a traditional library, whose total media storage and retrieval capacity…

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  11. Science and Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danilov, Victor J.

    Science and technology centers, which are relative newcomers to the museum field, differ from traditional museums in a number of respects. They are concerned with furthering public understanding and appreciation of the physical and biological sciences, engineering, technology, and health and seek to accomplish this goal by making museums both…

  12. Starting a sleep center.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  13. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  14. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center is the largest astronomical institution in Poland, located in Warsaw and founded in 1956. At present it is a government-funded research institute supervised by the Polish Academy of Sciences and licensed by the government of Poland to award PhD and doctor habilitatus degrees in astronomy and astrophysics. In September 1999 staff included 21 senior scientist...

  15. A Learner Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Florence N.

    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel. It examines: primary level preparation (literacy, numeracy, and basic knowledge; examination and…

  16. Mobile PET Center Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  17. National Response Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NRC is the federal government's national communications center, which is staffed 24 hours a day by U.S. Coast Guard officers and marine science technicians. Sole federal point of contact for reporting all hazardous substance releases and oil spills

  18. Developing a Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Rich, Ed.

    This 12-section handbook, based on information for Colorado but applicable to other states as well, contains resources and lists and explains procedures to establish or expand a career guidance center in a school, government office, or organization. The 12 sections cover the following topics: (1) purpose and philosophy; (2) assessment, advisory…

  19. Vocabulary at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy; Crow, John T.

    2009-01-01

    In "Vocabulary at the Center," Amy Benjamin and John T. Crow identify the most effective methods for extending the use of new words--in every grade level and across all subjects. This book shows teachers how to use context-driven exercises to incorporate new words into other areas of study. This book contains information about the authors, an…

  20. National Farm Medicine Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinic Research Institute Careers Contact Us Patient Rights Privacy Location Our System Marshfield Clinic Marshfield Clinic Division of Education Marshfield Labs Security Health Plan Family Health Center Our Partners ... Website Privacy | Terms of Use | Non-discrimination Statement Copyright © 2012 - ...

  1. Next Generation CTAS Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    2000-01-01

    The FAA's Free Flight Phase 1 Office is in the process of deploying the current generation of CTAS tools, which are the Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) and the passive Final Approach Spacing Tool (pFAST), at selected centers and airports. Research at NASA is now focussed on extending the CTAS software and computer human interfaces to provide more advanced capabilities. The Multi-center TMA (McTMA) is designed to operate at airports where arrival flows originate from two or more centers whose boundaries are in close proximity to the TRACON boundary. McTMA will also include techniques for routing arrival flows away from congested airspace and around airspace reserved for arrivals into other hub airports. NASA is working with FAA and MITRE to build a prototype McTMA for the Philadelphia airport. The active Final Approach Spacing Tool (aFAST) provides speed and heading advisories to help controllers achieve accurate spacing between aircraft on final approach. These advisories will be integrated with those in the existing pFAST to provide a set of comprehensive advisories for controlling arrival traffic from the TRACON boundary to touchdown at complex, high-capacity airports. A research prototype of aFAST, designed for the Dallas-Fort Worth is in an advanced stage of development. The Expedite Departure Path (EDP) and Direct-To tools are designed to help controllers guide departing aircraft out of the TRACON airspace and to climb to cruise altitude along the most efficient routes.

  2. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  3. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    On 8-9 Sep. 1993, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center (PERC) at The Pennsylvania State University held its Fifth Annual Symposium. PERC was initiated in 1988 by a grant from the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology as a part of the University Space Engineering Research Center (USERC) program; the purpose of the USERC program is to replenish and enhance the capabilities of our Nation's engineering community to meet its future space technology needs. The Centers are designed to advance the state-of-the-art in key space-related engineering disciplines and to promote and support engineering education for the next generation of engineers for the national space program and related commercial space endeavors. Research on the following areas was initiated: liquid, solid, and hybrid chemical propulsion, nuclear propulsion, electrical propulsion, and advanced propulsion concepts.

  4. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

    1981-06-08

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  5. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  6. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  7. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  8. Thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Pryslak, N.E.

    1974-02-26

    A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

  9. Electric generator

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  10. The TESS science processing operations center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Twicken, Joseph D.; McCauliff, Sean; Campbell, Jennifer; Sanderfer, Dwight; Lung, David; Mansouri-Samani, Masoud; Girouard, Forrest; Tenenbaum, Peter; Klaus, Todd; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chacon, A. D.; Henze, Christopher; Heiges, Cory; Latham, David W.; Morgan, Edward; Swade, Daryl; Rinehart, Stephen; Vanderspek, Roland

    2016-08-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will conduct a search for Earth's closest cousins starting in early 2018 and is expected to discover 1,000 small planets with Rp < 4 R⊕ and measure the masses of at least 50 of these small worlds. The Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center based on the Kepler science pipeline and will generate calibrated pixels and light curves on the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division's Pleiades supercomputer. The SPOC will also search for periodic transit events and generate validation products for the transit-like features in the light curves. All TESS SPOC data products will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST).

  11. Three dimensional scattering center imaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Burnside, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods to image scattering centers in 3-D are presented. The first method uses 2-D images generated from Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) measurements taken by two vertically offset antennas. This technique is shown to provide accurate 3-D imaging capability which can be added to an existing ISAR measurement system, requiring only the addition of a second antenna. The second technique uses target impulse responses generated from wideband radar measurements from three slightly different offset antennas. This technique is shown to identify the dominant scattering centers on a target in nearly real time. The number of measurements required to image a target using this technique is very small relative to traditional imaging techniques.

  12. Pyramid Resource Center-Green Energy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Flory, Paul, D.

    2011-09-02

    There are currently over 3,500 USA/Canadian landfills listed by the EPA/EC and like numbers in Europe that are producing methane-rich landfill gas (LFG). This gas is typically made up of 50-percent methane (CH4), 35-percent carbon dioxide (CO2), and 2 to 25% nitrogen and oxygen (N2 & O2), plus dozens of dilute contaminants. LFG is classified as a renewable fuel, because it is generated via biological decay of municipal solid waste, a constant byproduct of human activity. To date, most LFG has been allowed to escape into the atmosphere. On account of its high CH4 content, LFG may contribute to climate change, as CH4 is one of the most harmful greenhouse gases with 21 times the global warming potential of CO2. Of the landfills that collect LFG, most simply flare it. In the past decade, some landfills have begun to use LFG for electricity generation or for direct combustion as low Btu gas. Very few landfills upgrade LFG to high Btu gas. A patented CO2 WashTM process developed by Acrion Technologies Inc., and licensed to Firm Green Inc. shows promise as an economically and environmentally sustainable process to recover energy and prevent pollution from landfills. The CO2 WashTM has already been proven at lab-scale. It upgrades LFG, which consists of 50% methane (CH4) + 35% carbon dioxide (CO2) + 2 to 25% nitrogen + oxygen (N2+O2), 1 to 2% water vapor, and dozens of contaminants (which total a few hundred to a few thousand parts per million). CH4, which by itself has an energy content of 1,012 British thermal units (Btu) per standard cubic foot (SCF), is the only component in LFG that contributes to its energy content, which is therefore about 400-550 Btu/SCF. Accordingly, raw LFG is usually referred to as medium-Btu gas. To be salable, it is necessary to remove essentially all the components besides CH4, while keeping the vast majority of the revenue producing CH4. This is high-Btu gas, yielding 850 to 1,000 Btu/SCF. The CO2 WashTM process upgrades LFG to about 930 Btu

  13. The TESS Science Processing Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jon; Twicken, Joseph D.; McCauliff, Sean; Campbell, Jennifer; Sanderfer, Dwight; Lung, David; Mansouri-Samani, Masoud; Girouard, Forrest; Tenenbaum, Peter; Klaus, Todd; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chacon, Aaron; Henze, Christopher; Heiges, Cory A.; Latham, David; Morgan, Edward; Swade, Daryl; Rinehart, Stephen; Vanderspek, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will conduct a search for Earth’s closest cousins starting in late 2017. TESS will discover approx.1,000 small planets and measure the masses of at least 50 of these small worlds. The Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) is being developed based on the Kepler science pipeline and will generate calibrated pixels and light curves on the NAS Pleiades supercomputer. The SPOC will search for periodic transit events and generate validation products for the transit-like features in the light curves. All TESS SPOC data products will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  14. Defect centers in chemical-mechanical polished MOS oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Warren, W.L.; Hetherington, D.L.; Timon, R.P.; Resnick, P.J.; Winokur, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    Defect centers generated in vacuum-ultraviolet irradiated chemical-mechanical polished oxides have been characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance and C-V analysis. Both oxide trap E{sub {gamma}} and interface trap P{sub b0} centers were detected in unpolished and polished oxides. In addition, another interface defect center known as the P{sub b1} center was only identified in the polished oxides, suggesting that the polishing process altered the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  15. Center for Healthcare Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.

    1994-03-01

    In the U.S., we now spend about 13% of the gross domestic product (CDP) on healthcare. This figure represents nearly $3000 per year per man, woman, and child. Moreover, this expenditure is projected to grow to about 20% of the GDP by the year 2000. Medical research and development accounts for only about 3% of national healthcare spending, and technology development represents only a small fraction of that 3%. New technologies that are far more cost-effective than previous ones - such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, advanced automated diagnostics, and better information systems - could save the nation billions of dollars per year to say nothing of the potential reductions in pain and suffering. A center is described that will coordinate ongoing Laboratory research aimed at developing more cost-effective tools for use by the healthcare community. The new Center for Healthcare Technologies will have many long-term benefits for the region and the nation.

  16. Bahrain's offshore banking center

    SciTech Connect

    Gerakis, A.S.; Roncesvalles, O.

    1983-01-01

    The economic effects of Bahrain's schemes for licensing offshore banking units (OBUs) were the immediate response of major international banks and the financial services the banking center has rendered by improving regional money and exchange markets at a time when a Middle East link was needed to service the increasing demand for oil-wealth banking services. Bahrain's leadership also created a favorable climate. Aggressive competition from banks in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia have caused some friction, but informal supervision by the Bahrain Monetary Agency (BMA) should be able to avoid serious difficulty. Bahrain's success required a banking infrastructure, a free-enterprise system, a willingness to maintain banking standards, a country small enough to benefit directly from OBU income, and a gap in nearby competing centers. 39 references, 1 figure, 5 tables. (DCK)

  17. The STEREO Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Thompson, W. T.; Kucera, T. A.

    2007-05-01

    The STEREO Science Center (SSC), at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, is the "one-stop shopping" location for STEREO data, observation plans, analysis software, and links to other mission resources. Along with the other data products, a special "Space Weather Beacon" telemetry stream, relayed through an array of antenna partners coordinated by NOAA, provides near-real-time images, and will soon also provide near-real- time radio and in-situ data. Through interaction with the Solar Software library, the SSC also acts as a focal point for software coordination. The SSC is closely integrated with the Virtual Solar Observatory, making data easily accessible to users. Details on access to the SSC will be given and examples of the various types of data available at the SSC will be shown.

  18. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  19. Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

  20. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  2. National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), part of the National Weather Service, is an agency within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is supported by personnel and ships of the U.S. Coast Guard. NDBC operates automated observing systems that measure environmental conditions from coastal and remote marine areas. These measurements support the requirements of national and international scope and are used for forecasting, public advisories and warning, and in climate and research programs.

  3. Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Christopher Barry

    2007-01-01

    As part of a session at the 2007 Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), an overview of the operations at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was given. Mission support at this site includes the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD); Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), Science - ER-2; Science - G3 UAVSAR; Science - Ikhana and Space Operations. In addition, the presentation describes TFAWS related work at Dryden.

  4. Battle Space Action Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-14

    VREEDE, G. J. D., & KOLFSCHOTEN, G. L . (2008). Extending the contextual and organizational elements of adaptive structurization theory in GSS...Reiter-Palmon, R., & Harland, L . (2009). Computer Assisted Collaboration Engineering and Process Support Systems: The BattleSpace ActionCenters...Collaboration Science, 27 February, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE. 18. BRIGGS, R.O., VREEDE, G.J. DE, REITER-PALMON, R., HARLAND, L

  5. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  7. National Biocontainment Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    contributing to the advancement of this aim. Progress Topics in Biosecurity Symposia Series . Distinguished guest speakers continue to participate in the...for the Fall 2014 seminars is underway, with confirmed speakers Dr. Kavita Berger, Associate Director of the Center for Science , Technology and...and Surveillance (SACIDS), SUA; Dr. Brocard; Professor Meck Mattee of Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences , Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

  8. Swiftly Computing Center Strings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The center string (or closest string) problem is a classic computer science problem with important applications in computational biology. Given k input strings and a distance threshold d, we search for a string within Hamming distance at most d to each input string. This problem is NP complete. Results In this paper, we focus on exact methods for the problem that are also swift in application. We first introduce data reduction techniques that allow us to infer that certain instances have no solution, or that a center string must satisfy certain conditions. We describe how to use this information to speed up two previously published search tree algorithms. Then, we describe a novel iterative search strategy that is effecient in practice, where some of our reduction techniques can also be applied. Finally, we present results of an evaluation study for two different data sets from a biological application. Conclusions We find that the running time for computing the optimal center string is dominated by the subroutine calls for d = dopt -1 and d = dopt. Our data reduction is very effective for both, either rejecting unsolvable instances or solving trivial positions. We find that this speeds up computations considerably. PMID:21504573

  9. Smoke generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A smoke generator is disclosed which is particularly suitable for mounting on the wing tips of an aircraft and for conducting airflow studies. The device includes a network of thermally insulated tubes for carrying a fluid which is used to produce smoke. The fluid, which need not be combustible, is heated above its vaporization temperature by electric current which is passed through the fluid conduit tubes, so that the tubes serve both as fluid conduits and resistance heating elements. Fluid supply and monitoring systems and electrical control systems are also disclosed.

  10. Piezoelectrostatic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piezoelectrostatic generator includes a plurality of elongated piezoelectric elements having first and second ends, with the first ends fixedly mounted in a cylindrical housing and the second extending radially inwardly toward an axis. A shaft movable along the axis is connected to the inner ends of the elements to produce bending forces in piezoelectric strips within the elements. Each element includes a pair of strips mounted in surface contact and in electrical series to produce a potential upon bending. Electrodes spaced from the strips by a solid dielectric material act as capacitor plates to collect the potential charge.

  11. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  12. Tide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Feltenberger, B.D.

    1981-06-16

    A tidewater power system consisting of a high tide reservoir and a low tide reservoir. The high tide reservoir has an inlet adapted to be supported at high tide level and an outlet with a water wheel and generator between the outlet of the high tide reservoir and the low tide reservoir. The low tide reservoir has an outlet at the low tide level. The outlet from the high tide reservoir is adjustable to control the flow rate and the high tide reservoir can be closed at high tide to retain water for use over a period of time.

  13. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, Joseph S.; Wheeler, Paul C.

    1983-01-01

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  14. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Finding the Center of Volume of the Forearm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Stacy S.; Roselli, Robert J.

    2008-04-01

    A typical first-year physics course teaches students about the center of mass using both regular and irregularly shaped objects. Students often suspend an object in each of two dimensions from a string with the intersection determining the center of mass of the object. While these methods can be effective, they are not particularly exciting or motivating. Wouldn't it be more interesting to find the center of mass of a body part, such as the forearm? Through a series of simple measurements and assumptions, students can generate a first-order approximation of the center of volume and center of mass of their forearm. Comparisons can be made between the muscular forearm of the football player in the class with the scrawniest arm in the room, creating a deeper understanding of center of mass and how it relates to the human body.

  16. Effect of Discharge Gap Dispersion on Ozone Generation Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Jiro; Kuzumoto, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Takao

    In this paper, the effect of discharge gap dispersion on ozone generation characteristics of a tube type ozone generator is investigated quantitably by calculation and experiment. It is clarified that off-centered electrode layout seriously affects the ozone generation characteristics. Therefore, it is extremely important for efficient and high concentration ozone generation to shape a uniform discharge space.

  17. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  18. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1972-01-01

    The EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated for the Earth Resources Observation Systems Program of the Department of the Interior by the Topographic Division of the Geological Survey to provide access to Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) imagery, USGS aerial photography, and NASA aircraft data for the general public, domestic government agencies at all levels, and foreign government agencies at all levels, and foreign governments. Facilities are available for data storage, retrieval, reproduction, and dissemination, and for user assistance and training.

  19. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  20. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  1. Computer Center Reference Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-20

    introduction to the operating systems of the Cray X -MP (COS), DEC VAxcluster (VMS), and CDC (NOS) for applications programmers. Some information has been...Cray X -MP / 24 1-1-2 CDC CYBER 180 model 860A 1-1-2 DEC VAXcluster 1-1-3 DEC Remote Mini 1-1-3 The Integrated Supercomputer Network 1-1-4 User Interface...ADP Control Center 1-2-3 ( Software Available 1-3-1 2 The Cray X -MP 2-1-1 COS Version 1.16 2-1-1 Accessing the Cray X -MP 2-1-1 Cray Detasets 2-1-1

  2. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  3. Southeast Ecological Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pawlitz, Rachel J.

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems, from deep sea reefs and coastal marshes to freshwater springs and wetlands, are home to diverse assemblages of life. These commercially and ecologically important systems are part of our national heritage, and are often treasured places or refuges that protect rare or threatened species. In the water-rich Southeastern United States, managers face the challenge of understanding how water and land use affect the region's aquatic life. The Southeast Ecological Science Center (SESC) helps address that challenge by providing objective science that can be used to evaluate proposed actions and develop management strategies.

  4. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  5. Seafloor manifold center installed

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, K.

    1982-07-01

    The Shell/Esso Underwater Manifold Center (UMC), designed and tested as a diverless production facility, is a significant step toward really deep water oil and gas production. In May 1982, the 2100 metric ton unit was towed 645 miles from its Dutch fabrication yard and precisely emplaced in 500 ft water in the Cormorant field in only 6 days. When fully installed with all of its wells drilled and testing completed, the UMC will have cost an estimated $700 million. During its anticipated 25 yr operating life, the UMC is expected to produce ca 110 million bbl from the central Cormorant area. Design and operational criteria are described.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  7. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  8. Triboelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L; Fan, Fengru; Lin, Long; Zhu, Guang; Pan, Caofeng; Zhou, Yusheng

    2015-11-03

    A generator includes a thin first contact charging layer and a thin second contact charging layer. The thin first contact charging layer includes a first material that has a first rating on a triboelectric series. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer includes a second material that has a second rating on a triboelectric series that is more negative than the first rating. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer is disposed adjacent to the first contact charging layer so that the second side of the second contact charging layer is in contact with the second side of the first contact charging layer.

  9. Kennedy Space Center Five Year Sustainability Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Ann T.

    2016-01-01

    The Federal Government is committed to following sustainable principles. At its heart, sustainability integrates environmental, societal and economic solutions for present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Building upon its pledge towards environmental stewardship, the Administration generated a vision of sustainability spanning ten goals mandated within Executive Order (EO) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade. In November 2015, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) responded to this EO by incorporating it into a new release of the NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP). The SSPP recognizes the importance of aligning environmental practices in a manner that preserves, enhances and strengthens NASA's ability to perform its mission indefinitely. The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is following suit with KSC's Sustainability Plan (SP) by promoting, maintaining and pioneering green practices in all aspects of our mission. KSC's SP recognizes that the best sustainable solutions use an interdisciplinary, collaborative approach spanning civil servant and contractor personnel from across the Center. This approach relies on the participation of all employees to develop and implement sustainability endeavors connected with the following ten goals: Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Design, build and maintain sustainable buildings, facilities and infrastructure. Leverage clean and renewable energy. Increase water conservation. Improve fleet and vehicle efficiency and management. Purchase sustainable products and services. Minimize waste and prevent pollution. Implement performance contracts for Federal buildings. Manage electronic equipment and data centers responsibly. Pursue climate change resilience. The KSC SP details the strategies and actions that address the following objectives: Reduce Center costs. center dot Increase energy and water efficiencies. Promote smart

  10. Planning for the Mercy Center for Breast Health.

    PubMed

    Olivares, V Ed

    2002-01-01

    During the last months of 2000, administrators at the Mercy San Juan Medical Center in Carmichael, Calif., convened a steering committee to plan the Mercy Center for Breast Health. The Steering Committee was composed of the director of ancillary and support services, the oncology clinical nurse specialist, the RN manager of the oncology nursing unit, the RN surgery center manager, and me, the manager of imaging services. The committee was responsible for creating a new business with five specific objectives: to position the Center as a comprehensive diagnostic and resource center for women; to generate physician referrals to the Breast Center through various vehicles; to create awareness of the Breast Center's capabilities among area radiologists; to create awareness of the Breast Center among employees of six sister facilities; to create "brand awareness" for the Mercy Center for Breast Health among referring physicians and patients who could use competing centers in the area. The Steering Committee's charter was to design a center with a feminine touch and ambience and to provide a "one-stop shopping" experience for patients. A major component of the Breast Center is the Dianne Haselwood Resource Center, which provides patients with educational support and information. The Steering Committee brought its diverse experience and interests to bear on arranging for equipment acquisition, information and clerical systems, staffing, clinic office design, patient care and marketing. Planning the Mercy Center for Breast Health has been a positive challenge that brought together many elements of the organization and people from different departments and specialties to create a new business venture. Our charge now is to grow and to live up to our vision of offering complete breast diagnostic, education and support services in one location.

  11. 77 FR 46768 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Moapa Solar Energy Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... Solar Energy Center on the Moapa River Indian Reservation, Clark County NV AGENCY: Bureau of Indian... (EIS) that evaluates a solar energy generation center on the Moapa River Indian Reservation. This... Proposed Action consists of constructing and operating a solar generation energy center, consisting of...

  12. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  13. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  14. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  15. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  16. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  17. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  18. School-Based Health Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hall. Staffed by health care workers like nurses and doctors, school-based health centers provide a ... including mental health care. Centers may even have nurse practitioners, medical students, doctors, social workers, drug counselors, ...

  19. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  20. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  1. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events You are here Home National Center on Family Homelessness Center A staggering 2.5 million children ... the impact of homelessness on children, youth, and families. Through research, programs, trainings, and partnerships with the ...

  2. Matera CGS VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanotte, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the VLBI data analysis activities at the Space Geodesy Center (CGS), Matera, from January 2012 through December 2012, and the contributions that the CGS intends to provide for the future as an IVS Analysis Center.

  3. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  4. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  5. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  6. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  7. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  8. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries

  9. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  10. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  11. Concurrent engineering research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The projects undertaken by The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) at West Virginia University are reported and summarized. CERC's participation in the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project relating to technology needed to improve the product development process is described, particularly in the area of advanced weapon systems. The efforts committed to improving collaboration among the diverse and distributed health care providers are reported, along with the research activities for NASA in Independent Software Verification and Validation. CERC also takes part in the electronic respirator certification initiated by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as well as in the efforts to find a solution to the problem of producing environment-friendly end-products for product developers worldwide. The 3M Fiber Metal Matrix Composite Model Factory Program is discussed. CERC technologies, facilities,and personnel-related issues are described, along with its library and technical services and recent publications.

  12. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  13. SPOT4 Operational Control Center (CMP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaouche, G.

    1993-01-01

    CNES(F) is responsible for the development of a new generation of Operational Control Center (CMP) which will operate the new heliosynchronous remote sensing satellite (SPOT4). This Operational Control Center takes large benefit from the experience of the first generation of control center and from the recent advances in computer technology and standards. The CMP is designed for operating two satellites all the same time with a reduced pool of controllers. The architecture of this CMP is simple, robust, and flexible, since it is based on powerful distributed workstations interconnected through an Ethernet LAN. The application software uses modern and formal software engineering methods, in order to improve quality and reliability, and facilitate maintenance. This software is table driven so it can be easily adapted to other operational needs. Operation tasks are automated to the maximum extent, so that it could be possible to operate the CMP automatically with very limited human interference for supervision and decision making. This paper provides an overview of the SPOTS mission and associated ground segment. It also details the CMP, its functions, and its software and hardware architecture.

  14. Regional Warning Center Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, Henrik

    RWC-Sweden is operated by the Lund division of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics located at IDEON, a Science Research Technology Park. The Institute of Technology of Lund and Lund University are just adjacent to IDEON. This creates a lot of synergy effects. Copenhagen, with the Danish National Space Center DNSC), and Atmosphere Space Research Division of Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), is 45 min away via the bridge. The new LOIS Space Centre is located two hours away by car, north of Lund and just outside V¨xj¨. The IRF Lund a o division is aiming at becoming a "Solar and Space Weather Center". We focus on solar magnetic activity, its influence on climate and on space weather effects such the effect of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC). Basic research: A PostDoc position on "Solar Magnetic Activity: Topology and Predictions has recently been created. Research is carried on to improve predictions of solar magnetic activity. Preparations for using upcoming SDO vector magnetic fields are ongoing. Predictions: RWC-Sweden offers real-time forecasts of space weather and space weather effects based on neural networks. We participated in the NASA/NOAA Cycle 24 Prediction Panel. We have also participated in several ESA/EU solar-climate projects New observation facilities: Distributed, wide-area radio facility (LOIS) for solar (and other space physics) observations and a guest prof: Radio facility about 200 km distant, outside V¨xj¨ (Sm˚ a o aland), in Ronneby (Blekinge) and Lund (Sk˚ ane) is planned to be used for tracking of CMEs and basic solar physics studies of the corona. The LOIS station outside V¨xj¨ has a o been up and running for the past three years. Bo Thidé has joined the Lund division e as a guest prof. A new magnetometer at Risinge LOIS station has been installed an calibrated and expected to be operational in March, 2008.

  15. Finding Center: How Learning Centers Evolved in a Secondary Student-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movitz, Allison P.; Holmes, Kerry P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors elaborate on the experience of creating for high school students effective multisensory, hands-on learning centers that address a full range of elements from the English language arts curriculum. Allison P. Movitz and Kerry P. Holmes detail the centers Movitz designed for a Mostly Medieval unit to show how learning centers can help…

  16. Survival strategies for community nursing centers.

    PubMed

    Lundeen, S P

    1989-01-01

    The development of innovations in any area presents a myriad of challenges. The establishment of a community nursing center in a competitive health care market place is not a role for the faint of heart or those with limited motivation or energy to devote to such an endeavor. Even so, many nurses are committed to the goal of establishing CNCs as demonstration sites for experimentation with alternative structures of health care delivery in spite of the challenges and the odds. Until reimbursement mechanisms are modified to allow nurses practicing in CNCs to generate client/service-based revenue, reliance on alternative sources of funding will continue. Several strategies have been presented here that have been identified as useful in the acquisition of financial resources for the support of a community nursing center. The strategies include: focusing on community need rather than the model of delivery when approaching potential donors; securing funds from multiple sources; centralizing the funding strategy and the preparation of grant applications; and adopting a policy of patience and persistence in seeking extramural funding. It is my hope that these strategies will assist those of you engaged in the struggle to develop community nursing centers to significantly improve the level of financial security in your center.

  17. Agricultural origins: centers and noncenters.

    PubMed

    Harlan, J R

    1971-10-29

    I propose the theory that agriculture originated independently in three different areas and that, in each case, there was a system composed of a center of origin and a noncenter, in which activities of domestication were dispersed over a span of 5,000 to 10,000 kilometers. One system includes a definable Near East center and a noncenter in Africa; another system includes a North Chinese center and a noncenter in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific; the third system includes a Mesoamerican center and a South American noncenter. There are suggestions that, in each case, the center and noncenter interact with each other. Crops did not necessarily originate in centers (in any conventional concept of the term), nor did agriculture necessarily develop in a geographical "center."

  18. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  19. Ocean wave electric generators

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.R.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an apparatus for generating electricity from ocean waves. It consists of: 1.) a hollow buoyant duck positioned in the path of waves including a core about the center axis of which the duck rotates, a lower chamber portion having liquid therein and an upper chamber portion having air therein. The air is alternately compressed and expanded by the liquid in the chamber during the rotational motion of the duck caused by waves. A turbine mounted in the upper portion of the duck is driven by the compressed and expanded air. A generator is coupled to the turbine and operated to produce electrical energy and an air bulb; 2.) a spine having a transverse axial shaft anchoring the spine to the ocean floor. The upper portion of the spine engages the duck to maintain the duck in position. The spine has a curved configuration to concentrate and direct wave energy. The spine configuration acts as a scoop to increase the height of wave peaks and as a foil to increase the depth of wave troughs.

  20. Positron program at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2009-09-02

    Positron physics is an important part of the research activities at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). With positron annihilation spectroscopy, maps of nanodefects in materials have been obtained. For this purpose, positrons are generated by radioactive decay, photoactivation, or pair production. Preliminary tests of positron sources in the MeV range based on electron linacs have also been carried out at the IAC, and an expansion of this program is planned. A similar positron beam at Jefferson Lab would greatly improve our knowledge of the inner structure of the proton. In this paper, research with positrons at the IAC is reviewed. After a description of the Center's facilities, results from positron annihilation spectroscopy are discussed, together with future plans for testing a prototype positron source for CEBAF.

  1. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  2. Offshore Space Center (offshore launch site)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Any activity requiring the development of the HLLV can benefit by operations from an offshore space center (OSC) since operating near the equator provides a twenty percent increase in payload in an ecliptic plan orbit. Some OSC concepts considered include a moored floating (semisubmersible) design, a stationary design supported by fixed piles, and a combination of these two. The facility supports: a 15,000 foot long, 300 foot wide runway, designed to accommodate a two staged winged launch vehicle, with a one million pound payload capacity to low earth orbit; an industrial area for HLLV maintenance; an airport terminal, control and operation center, and observation tower; liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen production and storage, and fuel storage platforms; a power generation station, docks with an unloading area; two separate launch sites; and living accommodations for 10,000 people. Potential sites include the Paramount Seamount in the Pacific Ocean off the north coast of South America. Cost estimates are considered.

  3. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education.

  4. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

  5. Space Operations Learning Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  6. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests

  7. Oxygen Generation Assembly Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert; Cloud, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Hamilton Standard Space Systems International (HSSI) is under contract to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to develop an Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) for the International Space Station (ISS). The International Space Station Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) electrolyzes potable water from the Water Recovery System (WRS) to provide gaseous oxygen to the Space Station module atmosphere. The OGA produces oxygen for metabolic consumption by crew and biological specimens. The OGA also replenishes oxygen lost by experiment ingestion, airlock depressurization, CO2 venting, and leakage. As a byproduct, gaseous hydrogen is generated. The hydrogen will be supplied at a specified pressure range above ambient to support future utilization. Initially, the hydrogen will be vented overboard to space vacuum. This paper describes the OGA integration into the ISS Node 3. It details the development history supporting the design and describes the OGA System characteristics and its physical layout.

  8. Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Supply Systems Command,Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound,467 W Street , Bremerton ,WA,98314-5100 8... Bremerton , WA Established: October 1967 Name Changes: Naval Supply Center Puget Sound, Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Puget...or Sasebo) deployed Ships in the Western Pacific (WestPac) Naval Base Kitsap at Bremerton and Bangor (NBK at Bremerton or Bangor) Navy Region

  9. Patient-centered healthcare design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2011-12-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient's and family's experience in the hospital, and the design of the healthcare environment should support the patient-centered care concept. The purpose of this facility design department is to expand nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enable them to take leadership roles in design efforts. This article focuses on healthcare design guiding principles and features to support organizational cultural initiatives such as patient- and family-centered care and Planetree.

  10. Mitigating PQ Problems in Legacy Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinets, Boris; /SLAC

    2011-06-01

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Problems with PQ in legacy data centers still exist and need to be mitigated; (2) Harmonics generated by non-linear IT load can be lowered by passive, active and hybrid cancellation methods; (3) Harmonic study is necessary to find the best way to treat PQ problems; (4) AHF's and harmonic cancellation transformers proved to be very efficient in mitigating PQ problems; and (5) It is important that IT leaders partner with electrical engineering to appropriate ROI statements, justifying many of these expenditures.

  11. Aerothermodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity in the aerothermodynamics branch at the NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed. Advanced concepts and mission studies relating to the next generation aerospace transportation systems are summarized and directions for continued research identified. Theoretical and computational studies directed at determining flow fields and radiative and convective heating loads in real gases are described. Included are Navier-Stokes codes for equilibrium and thermochemical nonequilibrium air. Experimental studies in the 3.5-ft hypersonic wind tunnel, the ballistic ranges, and the electric arc driven shock tube are described. Tested configurations include generic hypersonic aerospace plane configurations, aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle shapes and Galileo probe models.

  12. The AMPTE IRM Science Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, O. H.; Baumjohann, W.; Edwards, J.; Graeter, K.; Hoefner, H.; Klecker, B.; Muehlhaueser, K.-H.; Drexler, M.; Guckenbiehl, F.; Hansen, C.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of artificial ion clouds is a major aspect of the AMPTE program. The IRM Science Data center supports real-time decision for a release with real-time scientific data processing and display including model calculations of ion trajectories. Additionally, survey plots and summary data records are generated in near real time thus allowing to start the data analysis as early as possible. For detailed analyses, interactive programs were developed so that physical parameters of all IRM experiments can be combined to produce common spectra or line plots.

  13. Communications among data and science centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to electronically access and query the contents of remote computer archives is of singular importance in space and earth sciences; the present evaluation of such on-line information networks' development status foresees swift expansion of their data capabilities and complexity, in view of the volumes of data that will continue to be generated by NASA missions. The U.S.'s National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) manages NASA's largest science computer network, the Space Physics Analysis Network; a comprehensive account is given of the structure of NSSDC international access through BITNET, and of connections to the NSSDC available in the Americas via the International X.25 network.

  14. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  15. Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Dillingham, Gavin

    2013-09-30

    The Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center was initiated to significantly improve market and regulatory conditions for the implementation of combined heat and power technologies. The GC CEAC was responsible for the development of CHP in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Through this program we employed a variety of outreach and education techniques, developed and deployed assessment tools and conducted market assessments. These efforts resulted in the growth of the combined heat and power market in the Gulf Coast region with a realization of more efficient energy generation, reduced emissions and a more resilient infrastructure. Specific t research, we did not formally investigate any techniques with any formal research design or methodology.

  16. The Hydrogen Technology Center at Wyle Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelock, H.; Smith, D.; Frazier, J.

    1990-10-01

    A deactivated storable propellant test area with numerous test cells, large open concrete pads of up to 65-ft length, and two enclosed metal storage buildings, has been converted into a Hydrogen Technology Center. The conversion strategy involved extensive use of modified surplus equipment, well established testing technologies, and innovative engineering to obviate long-delivery time items. Simple, high heat flux water-to-cryogen heat exchangers are used to generate ambient temperature H2 and N gas. Hydrogen-fueled combustors were designed and fabricated to power the specialized heat exchangers required to support high-temperature hydrogen experiments. The facility has operated productively and safely since October, 1988.

  17. ROSAT Science Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen; Pisarski, Ryszard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) ROSAT SCIENCE DATA CENTER (RSDC) activities for the recent years of our contract. Details have already been reported in the monthly reports. The SAO was responsible for the High Resolution Imager (HRI) detector on ROSAT. We also provided and supported the HRI standard analysis software used in the pipeline processing (SASS). Working with our colleagues at the Max Planck in Garching Germany (MPE), we fixed bugs and provided enhancements. The last major effort in this area was the port from VMS/VAX to VMS/ALPHA architecture. In 1998, a timing bug was found in the HRI standard processing system which degraded the positional accuracy because events accessed incorrect aspect solutions. The bug was fixed and we developed off-line correction routines and provided them to the community. The Post Reduction Off-line Software (PROS) package was developed by SAO and runs in the IRAF environment. Although in recent years PROS was not a contractual responsibility of the RSDC, we continued to maintain the system and provided new capabilities such as the ability to deal with simulated AXAF data in preparation for the NASA call for proposals for Chandra. Our most recent activities in this area included the debugging necessary for newer versions of IRAF which broke some of our software. At SAO we have an operating version of PROS and hope to release a patch even though almost all functionality that was lost was subsequently recovered via an IRAF patch (i.e. most of our problems were caused by an IRAF bug).

  18. Satellite medical centers project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  19. Optical Measurement Center Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Mulrooney, M.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, an optical measurement center (OMC) was created to measure the photometric signatures of debris pieces. Initially, the OMC was equipped with a 300 W xenon arc lamp, a SBIG 512 x 512 ST8X MEI CCD camera with standard Johnson filters, and a Lynx 6 robotic arm with five degrees of freedom. As research progressed, modifications were made to the equipment. A customized rotary table was built to overcome the robot s limitation of 180 degree wrist rotation and provide complete 360 degree rotation with little human interaction. This change allowed an initial phase angle (source-object-camera angle) of roughly 5 degrees to be adjusted to 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 25, or 28 degrees. Additionally, the Johnson R and I CCD filters were replaced with the standard astronomical filters suite (Bessell R,I). In an effort to reduce object saturation, the two generic aperture stops were replaced with neutral density filters. Initially data were taken with aluminum debris pieces from the European Space Operations Centre ESOC2 ground test and more recently with samples from a thermal multi-layered insulation (MLI) commonly used on rocket bodies and satellites. The ESOC2 data provided light curve analysis for one type of material but many different shapes, including flat, bent, curled, folded, and torn. The MLI samples are roughly the same size and shape, but have different surfaces that give rise to interesting photometric light curves. In addition, filter photometry was conducted on the MLI pieces, a process that also will be used on the ESOC2 samples. While obtaining light curve data an anomalous drop in intensity was observed when the table revolved through the second 180 degree rotation. Investigation revealed that the robot s wrist rotation is not reliable past 80 degrees, thus the object may be at slightly different angles at the 180 degree transition. To limit this effect, the initial rotation position begins with the object s minimal surface area facing the camera.

  20. Liver transplant center risk tolerance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scott R; Karp, Seth J; Curry, Michael P; Barugel, Martin; Rodrigue, James R; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Rogers, Christin P; Hanto, Douglas W

    2012-01-01

    Recent changes in Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) condition for participation, using benchmark volume/outcomes requirements for certification, have been implemented. Consequently, the ability of a transplant center to assess its risk tolerance is important in successful management. An analysis of SRTR data was performed to determine donor/recipient risk factors for graft loss or patient death in the first year. Each transplant performed was then assigned a prospective relative risk (RR) of failure. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation, transplants were selected at random that met the centers' acceptable risk tolerance. Transplant center volume was fixed and its risk tolerance was adjusted to determine the impact on outcomes. The model was run 1000 times on centers with varying volume. The modeling demonstrates that centers with smaller annual volumes must use a more risk taking strategy than larger volume centers to avoid being flagged for CMS volume requirements. The modeling also demonstrates optimal risk taking strategies for centers based upon volume to minimize the probability of being flagged for not meeting volume or outcomes benchmarks. Small volume centers must perform higher risk transplants to meet current CMS requirements and are at risk for adverse action secondary to chance alone.

  1. Center for Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Space Propulsion (CASP) is part of the University of Tennessee-Calspan Center for Aerospace Research (CAR). It was formed in 1985 to take advantage of the extensive research faculty and staff of the University of Tennessee and Calspan Corporation. It is also one of sixteen NASA sponsored Centers established to facilitate the Commercial Development of Space. Based on investigators' qualifications in propulsion system development, and matching industries' strong intent, the Center focused its efforts in the following technical areas: advanced chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, AI/Expert systems, fluids management in microgravity, and propulsion materials processing. This annual report focuses its discussion in these technical areas.

  2. National Center for Farmworker Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data Migrant Health Centers Population Estimates Resources Performance Management & Governance Tool Box > Administrative Governance Human Resources Needs Assessment Service Delivery Emergency Preparedness Call for ...

  3. Model for a patient-centered comparative effectiveness research center.

    PubMed

    Costlow, Monica R; Landsittel, Douglas P; James, A Everette; Kahn, Jeremy M; Morton, Sally C

    2015-04-01

    This special report describes the systematic approach the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) undertook in creating an infrastructure for comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research resources. We specifically highlight the administrative structure, communication and training opportunities, stakeholder engagement resources, and support services offered.

  4. 5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), and wood-frame garage (far right). View to southwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  5. Photography-based image generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Nicholas M.; Deering, Charles S.

    1989-09-01

    A two-channel Photography Based Image Generator system was developed to drive the Helmet Mounted Laser Projector at the Naval Training System Center at Orlando, Florida. This projector is a two-channel system that displays a wide field-of-view color image with a high-resolution inset to efficiently match the pilot's visual capability. The image generator is a derivative of the LTV-developed visual system installed in the A-7E Weapon System Trainer at NAS Cecil Field. The Photography Based Image Generator is based on patented LTV technology for high resolution, multi-channel, real world visual simulation. Special provisions were developed for driving the NTSC-developed and patented Helmet Mounted Laser Projector. These include a special 1023-line raster format, an electronic image blending technique, spherical lens mapping for dome projection, a special computer interface for head/eye tracking and flight parameters, special software, and a number of data bases. Good gaze angle tracking is critical to the use of the NTSC projector in a flight simulation environment. The Photography Based Image Generator provides superior dynamic response by performing a relatively simple perspective transformation on stored, high-detail photography instead of generating this detail by "brute force" computer image generation methods. With this approach, high detail can be displayed and updated at the television field rate (60 Hz).

  6. Plans and status of the NASA-Lewis Research Center wind energy project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R.; Puthoff, R.; Savino, J.; Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Wind energy is investigated as a source of energy. The wind energy program that is managed by the NASA-Lewis Research Center is described. The Lewis Research Center's Wind Power Office, its organization, plans, and status are discussed. Major elements of the wind power project included are: an experimental 100 kW wind-turbine generator; first generation industry-built and user-operated wind turbine generators; and supporting research and technology tasks.

  7. NASA New England Outreach Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  8. Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, Jim

    2013-09-30

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive

  9. Stennis Visitors Center and Administrative Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This aerial view shows the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center and main Administrative complex. The Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing and for commercial remote sensing.

  10. 77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... submit grant applications for the University Transportation Centers (UTCs) program. The Department... national university transportation Centers, regional university transportation Centers, and Tier...

  11. 78 FR 69173 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... opportunity to submit applications for a grant as a Regional Center in the University Transportation Centers... will solicit competitive grant applications for two regional university transportation centers,...

  12. Data center thermal management

    DOEpatents

    Hamann, Hendrik F.; Li, Hongfei

    2016-02-09

    Historical high-spatial-resolution temperature data and dynamic temperature sensor measurement data may be used to predict temperature. A first formulation may be derived based on the historical high-spatial-resolution temperature data for determining a temperature at any point in 3-dimensional space. The dynamic temperature sensor measurement data may be calibrated based on the historical high-spatial-resolution temperature data at a corresponding historical time. Sensor temperature data at a plurality of sensor locations may be predicted for a future time based on the calibrated dynamic temperature sensor measurement data. A three-dimensional temperature spatial distribution associated with the future time may be generated based on the forecasted sensor temperature data and the first formulation. The three-dimensional temperature spatial distribution associated with the future time may be projected to a two-dimensional temperature distribution, and temperature in the future time for a selected space location may be forecasted dynamically based on said two-dimensional temperature distribution.

  13. NREL Center for Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Solar cells, also called photovoltaics (PV) by solar cell scientists, convert sunlight directly into electricity. Solar cells are often used to power calculators and watches. The performance of a solar cell is measured in terms of its efficiency at turning sunlight into electricity. Only sunlight of certain energies will work efficiently to create electricity, and much of it is reflected or absorbed by the material that make up the cell. Because of this, a typical commercial solar cell has an efficiency of 15%—about one-sixth of the sunlight striking the cell generates electricity. Low efficiencies mean that larger arrays are needed, and that means higher cost. Improving solar cell efficiencies while holding down the cost per cell is an important goal of the PV industry, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, and they have made significant progress. The first solar cells, built in the 1950s, had efficiencies of less than 4%. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/re_photovoltaics_video_text.html

  14. NREL Center for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Solar cells, also called photovoltaics (PV) by solar cell scientists, convert sunlight directly into electricity. Solar cells are often used to power calculators and watches. The performance of a solar cell is measured in terms of its efficiency at turning sunlight into electricity. Only sunlight of certain energies will work efficiently to create electricity, and much of it is reflected or absorbed by the material that make up the cell. Because of this, a typical commercial solar cell has an efficiency of 15%—about one-sixth of the sunlight striking the cell generates electricity. Low efficiencies mean that larger arrays are needed, and that means higher cost. Improving solar cell efficiencies while holding down the cost per cell is an important goal of the PV industry, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, and they have made significant progress. The first solar cells, built in the 1950s, had efficiencies of less than 4%. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/re_photovoltaics_video_text.html

  15. Turbocharger with turbine backplate and center housing oil shield

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.; Ho, I.C.

    1991-06-25

    This paper describes a turbocharger. It comprises: a center housing, a compressor housing, and a turbine housing, means for securing the turbine housing and the compressor housing to the center housing, the center housing including a circumferentially extending wall defining a cavity therewithin, means carried by the center housing for rotatably supporting a shaft in the cavity, the shaft including portions extending into the compressor housing and into the turbine housing, a turbine wheel mounted on the portion of the shaft in the turbine housing, a compressor wheel mounted on the portion of the shaft in the compressor housing, the cavity having opposite ends facing the turbine and compressor housings respectively, the end facing the turbine housing being an open end, and an annular backplate member separate from the center housing and from the turbine housing, the annular backplate member circumscribing the shaft for closing the open end of the center housing, the securing means including fastening means extending between the center housing and the turbine housing, the backplate member including a portion clamped between the center housing and the turbine housing by compressive forces generated by the fastening means and transmitted from the turbine housing to the compressor housing through the portion of the backplate member, and a circumferentially extending shroud between the annular backplate member and the turbine wheel.

  16. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 technical report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during 1990. The report lists 130 publications, 226 presentations, and 87 new technology reports and patents.

  17. Saving Energy at Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-12

    Data centers provide mission-critical computing functions essential to the daily operation of top U.S. economic, scientific, and technological organizations. These data centers consume large amounts of energy to run and maintain their computer systems, servers, and associated high-performance components.

  18. Chapin Hall Center for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Univ., IL. Chapin Hall Center for Children.

    This document consists of two separate publications: (1) "The Power of Knowing", a brief 12-page description of the Chapin Hall Center for Children, and (2) "Projects and Publications", a 67-page list of the center's projects and publications as of Autumn 1997. "The Power of Knowing" describes the Chapin Hall Center…

  19. Guidelines for ABE Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sourifman, Vivian M., Ed.

    A federally funded demonstration project in adult basic education is presented. The project's proposal set forth the development of demonstration adult basic education learning centers within the central cities area of the cities of Camden and Newark, New Jersey. During 22 months of operation on a demonstration basis, each center developed…

  20. GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development operates a Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC). The Center provides support on issues regarding subsurface contamination, contaminant fluxes to other media (e.g., surface water or air), and ecosystem restoration. The GWTSC creat...

  1. Student Centers/Service Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a college building judged to be an outstanding student center/service area in a competition, which evaluated outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting unique concepts and ideas. Provides data on the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center,…

  2. MISR Center Block Time Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

      MISR Center Block Time Tool The misr_time tool calculates the block center times for MISR Level 1B2 files. This is ... version of the IDL package or by using the IDL Virtual Machine application. The IDL Virtual Machine is bundled with IDL and is ...

  3. Center for space microelectronics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1992 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during the past year. The report lists 187 publications, 253 presentations, and 111 new technology reports and patents in the areas of solid-state devices, photonics, advanced computing, and custom microcircuits.

  4. Model Learning Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviess County School District, Owensboro, KY.

    This handbook describes the model learning resources center in operation at Daviess County (Kentucky) State Vocational-Technical School and details its objectives, materials, and methods of operation. The manual is organized in six sections. The first section describes the learning resources center, and details its philosophy, purpose, objectives,…

  5. The Communication Center Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medcalf, Ann Wachob

    This program manual describes the Communication Center at Joseph Kerr Junior High School in Sacramento County, California, which was established in 1975 to prevent student high risk behavior and to encourage positive attitudes in the school community. The philosophy of the Center, which is based on the theories of Rudolf Dreikurs, is described,…

  6. Stennis Space Center Virtual Tour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Have you ever wanted to visit Stennis Space Center? Or perhaps you have and you're ready to come back. Either way, you can visit Stennis Space Center from anywhere in world! Click on the video to begin your tour.

  7. Executive Center Makes Rapid Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumarsq, Carolyn C.; Scott, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    In a pilot test, superintendents participated in self-assessment activities in the American Association of School Administrator's Executive Development Center program. Activity stages centered on professional attitudes and skills, personal health, and fitness. Data provided a profile for professional development. Participants felt activities were…

  8. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  9. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  10. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 193 publications, 211 presentations, and 125 new technology reports and patents.

  11. AAFES Shopping Center Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    AFB, Montana. February. _________. 2006c. Malmstrom Air Force Base Runoff Curve Numbers, Time of Concentration, Peak Discharge. Report Prepared...The existing Base Exchange was constructed in 1957 and the building suffers from dated design features that limit retail merchandising...proposes to construct a new Shopping Center at Malmstrom Air Force Base (AFB), Montana. The Shopping Center would feature retail and food

  12. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA);Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. This photo shows the completed center with the additional arnex (right of building) that added an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to the already existent NSSTC, nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At

  13. NASA Johnson Space Center's Energy and Sustainability Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the efforts that NASA is making to assure a sustainable environment and energy savings at the Johnson Space Center. Sustainability is defined as development that meets the needs of present generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The new technologies that are required for sustainable closed loop life support for space exploration have uses on the ground to reduce energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and water use. Some of these uses are reviewed.

  14. Power Minimization techniques for Networked Data Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Steven; Tang, Kevin

    2011-09-28

    Our objective is to develop a mathematical model to optimize energy consumption at multiple levels in networked data centers, and develop abstract algorithms to optimize not only individual servers, but also coordinate the energy consumption of clusters of servers within a data center and across geographically distributed data centers to minimize the overall energy cost and consumption of brown energy of an enterprise. In this project, we have formulated a variety of optimization models, some stochastic others deterministic, and have obtained a variety of qualitative results on the structural properties, robustness, and scalability of the optimal policies. We have also systematically derived from these models decentralized algorithms to optimize energy efficiency, analyzed their optimality and stability properties. Finally, we have conducted preliminary numerical simulations to illustrate the behavior of these algorithms. We draw the following conclusion. First, there is a substantial opportunity to minimize both the amount and the cost of electricity consumption in a network of datacenters, by exploiting the fact that traffic load, electricity cost, and availability of renewable generation fluctuate over time and across geographical locations. Judiciously matching these stochastic processes can optimize the tradeoff between brown energy consumption, electricity cost, and response time. Second, given the stochastic nature of these three processes, real-time dynamic feedback should form the core of any optimization strategy. The key is to develop decentralized algorithms that can be implemented at different parts of the network as simple, local algorithms that coordinate through asynchronous message passing.

  15. 78 FR 30303 - National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Contact Center Services, Federal Citizen Information Center, Office of Citizen Services... requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the...

  16. 78 FR 14549 - National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Contact Center Services, Federal Citizen Information Center, Office of Citizen Services... requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the...

  17. Telescience Support Center Data System Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The Telescience Support Center (TSC) team has developed a databasedriven, increment-specific Data Require - ment Document (DRD) generation tool that automates much of the work required for generating and formatting the DRD. It creates a database to load the required changes to configure the TSC data system, thus eliminating a substantial amount of labor in database entry and formatting. The TSC database contains the TSC systems configuration, along with the experimental data, in which human physiological data must be de-commutated in real time. The data for each experiment also must be cataloged and archived for future retrieval. TSC software provides tools and resources for ground operation and data distribution to remote users consisting of PIs (principal investigators), bio-medical engineers, scientists, engineers, payload specialists, and computer scientists. Operations support is provided for computer systems access, detailed networking, and mathematical and computational problems of the International Space Station telemetry data. User training is provided for on-site staff and biomedical researchers and other remote personnel in the usage of the space-bound services via the Internet, which enables significant resource savings for the physical facility along with the time savings versus traveling to NASA sites. The software used in support of the TSC could easily be adapted to other Control Center applications. This would include not only other NASA payload monitoring facilities, but also other types of control activities, such as monitoring and control of the electric grid, chemical, or nuclear plant processes, air traffic control, and the like.

  18. Automated Discourse Generation Using Discourse Structure Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Language Processing, 1993. This work was partially supported by the Rome Air Development Center under RADC contract FQ7619-89- 03326-0001. I 1 Introduction...result, many discourse generation ideas are shared with work on plan recognition [Kautz 87, Hobbs et al. 88, Charniak & Shimony 90]. Several research...computational systems working with multisentence text simply ignored the issue of text struc- ture per se. Generators followed "guided consumption

  19. A linear magnetic motor and generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    In linear magnetic motor and generator suitable for remote and hostile environments, magnetic forces drive reciprocating shaft along its axis. Actuator shaft is located in center of cylindrical body and may be supported by either contacting or noncontacting bearings. When device operates as bidirectional motor, drive coil selectively adds and subtracts magnetic flux to and from flux paths, producing forces that drive actuator along axis. When actuator is driven by external reciprocating engine, device becomes ac generator.

  20. IDEA Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Robert

    2013-09-30

    /feasibility tool for these types of community energy projects. The Excel based tool incorporates hourly climate based building loads data to arrive at the composite energy demand for the district and compares the Net Present Value (NPV) of the costs of CHP/DE alternatives. This tool has been used to provide assistance to several projects in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Intermountain and Pacific Regions. The tool was disseminated to the CEACs and supplemented by a Training Webinar and a How to Guide IDEA produced a US Community Energy Development Guide to support mayors, planners, community leaders, real estate developers and economic development officials who are interested in planning more sustainable urban energy infrastructure, creating community energy master plans and implementing CHP/ District Energy systems in cities, communities and towns. IDEA has collected industry data and provided a comprehensive data set containing information on District Energy installations in the US. District energy systems are present in 49 states and the District of Columbia. Of the 597 systems 55% were DE alone while the remainder was some combination of CHP, district heating, and district cooling. District energy systems that do not currently involve electric generation are strong near-term candidates for the adoption of CHP due to the magnitude of their aggregated thermal load. This data has helped inform specific and targeted initiatives including technical assistance provided by the CEAC’s for EPA’s Boiler MACT Compliance by large District Heating System boilers. These outcomes have been greatly enabled by the close coordination and collaboration with DOE CEAC leadership and with the eight regional US DOE Clean Energy Application Centers and the award’s incremental funding has allowed IDEA to leverage our resources to be an effective champion for Clean Energy.

  1. Canonical transformation for trapped/passing guiding-center orbits in axisymmetric tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, Alain J.; Duthoit, François-Xavier

    2014-05-15

    The generating function for the canonical transformation from the parallel canonical coordinates (s,p{sub ||}) to the action-angle coordinates (ζ, J) for trapped/passing guiding-center orbits in axisymmetric tokamak geometry is presented. Drawing on the analogy between the phase-space portraits of the librating/rotating pendulum and the trapped/passing guiding-center orbits, the generating function is expressed in terms of the Jacobi zeta function, which can then readily be used to obtain an explicit expression for the bounce-center transformation for trapped/passing-particle guiding-center orbits in axisymmetric tokamak geometry.

  2. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program.

  3. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking east, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top left of the photo. In the foreground is the display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Just above that, left to right, can be seen the Theater Complex, Space Flight Exhibit Building and Spaceport Central. Other buildings clustered at the center are the Cafeteria, Souvenir Sales Building, and Ticket Pavilion. To the left of the Theater Complex are the Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and the Shuttle/Gantry mockup. Not seen in the photo is the Center for Space Education.

  4. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking northwest, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top of the photo (left to right). Just below the roadway, from left, can be seen the Center for Space Education, the Theater Complex, Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and Shuttle/Gantry mockup. In front of the theater complex are a cluster of buildings that include the Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the left of the complex are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Beyond the roadway can be seen the Banana River.

  5. Grasp admittance center. A concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoga, K. B.; Goldenberg, A. A.

    1991-05-01

    The ultimate goal of the research on articulated hands in general is to use them to do tasks in a way similar to that of humans. A systematic analysis reveals that the day-to-day tasks of humans include some common task primitives such as twist, turn, insert, pullout, push, pull, lift, and place. During each of these operations, the grasp dynamic behavior plays an important role and more so in tasks involving manipulation of delicate objects. Introduced in this paper is the concept of the grasp admittance center, a notion that aims to make an articulated grasp exhibit a directionally decoupled dynamic behavior. An admittance center is conceptualized as the superposition of compliance, accommodation, and mobility centers in a desired coordinate frame. A grasp with an admittance center will have three useful features: stability, decoupled force motion relation, and decoupled time-response. These features are also useful to other closed kinematic chain robotic devices such as the cooperating multiarms and multilegged mobile robots engaged in non-quasistatic (dynamic) manipulation tasks. As a preparation to demonstrate the concept experimentally, a method of synthesizing articulated grasps so as to achieve an admittance center has been developed as well as a method of choosing appropriate location and related parameters for the center. The sensitivity of the center to its parameter imprecision has also been analyzed.

  6. Geothermal Power Generation Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196°F resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  7. More Than 50 Ways to Learner-Centered Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Laura; Hubble, Deborah

    Designed for teachers of kindergarten through grade 6, this book contains practical and innovative ideas on fostering literacy generated from discussions with teachers from the United States and Canada, visits to their classrooms, and observations of their interactions with students. The book addresses all levels of learner-centered literacy…

  8. Money-center structures in dynamic banking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic model for banking systems based on the description of balance sheets. It generates some features identified through empirical analysis. Through simulation analysis of the model, we find that banking systems have the feature of money-center structures, that bank asset distributions are power-law distributions, and that contract size distributions are log-normal distributions.

  9. Alternative Developmental Evaluation Paradigm in Centers for Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachor, Ditza A.; Isaacs, Janet; Merrick, Joav

    2006-01-01

    The interdisciplinary evaluation has been a well-established process in centers for neurodevelopmental disabilities, but it is costly and may generate long waiting lists that can delay early diagnosis and treatment. An alternative evaluation paradigm was designed, using a specific screening approach, to improve use of staff time without…

  10. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  11. Emergency Operations Center ribbon cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Center Director Gene Goldman and special guests celebrate the opening of the site's new Emergency Operations Center on June 2. Participants included (l t r): Steven Cooper, deputy director of the National Weather Service Southern Region; Tom Luedtke, NASA associate administrator for institutions and management; Charles Scales, NASA associate deputy administrator; Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour; Gene Goldman, director of Stennis Space Center; Jack Forsythe, NASA assistant administrator for the Office of Security and Program Protection; Dr. Richard Williams, NASA chief health and medical officer; and Weldon Starks, president of Starks Contracting Company Inc. of Biloxi.

  12. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  13. MIT Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at MIT, started in Jul. 1988, has completed two years of research. The Center is approaching the operational phase of its first testbed, is midway through the construction of a second testbed, and is in the design phase of a third. We presently have seven participating faculty, four participating staff members, ten graduate students, and numerous undergraduates. This report reviews the testbed programs, individual graduate research, other SERC activities not funded by the Center, interaction with non-MIT organizations, and SERC milestones. Published papers made possible by SERC funding are included at the end of the report.

  14. Generator configuration for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed are improvements in a solid oxide fuel cell generator 1 having a multiplicity of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells 2, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen-containing gas is passed over the other side of said cells resulting in the generation of heat and electricity. The improvements comprise arranging the cells in the configuration of a circle, a spiral, or folded rows within a cylindrical generator, and modifying the flow rate, oxygen concentration, and/or temperature of the oxygen-containing gases that flow to those cells that are at the periphery of the generator relative to those cells that are at the center of the generator. In these ways, a more uniform temperature is obtained throughout the generator.

  15. Poison Center Data for Public Health Surveillance: Poison Center and Public Health Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Law, Royal K.; Schier, Josh; Schauben, Jay; Wheeler, Katherine; Mulay, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the use of poison center data for public health surveillance from the poison center, local, state, and federal public health perspectives and to generate meaningful discussion on how to address the challenges to collaboration. Introduction Since 2008, poisoning has become the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States (US); since 1980, the poisoning-related fatality rate in the US has almost tripled.1 Many poison-related injuries and deaths are reported to regional poison centers (PCs) which receive about 2.4 million reports of human chemical and poison exposures annually.2 Federal, state, and local public health (PH) agencies often collaborate with poison centers and use PC data for public health surveillance of poisoning-related health issues. Many state and local PH agencies have partnerships with regional PCs for direct access to local PC data which help them perform this function. At the national level, CDC conducts public health surveillance for exposures and illnesses of public health significance using the National Poison Data System (NPDS), the national PC reporting database. Though most PC and PH officials agree that PC data play an important role in PH practice and surveillance, collaboration between PH agencies and PCs has been hindered by numerous challenges. To address these challenges and bolster collaboration, the Poison Center and Public Health Collaborations Community of Practice (CoP) was created in 2010 by CDC as a means to share experiences, identify best practices, and facilitate relationships among federal, state and local public health agencies and PCs. To date, the Poison Center and Public Health Collaborations CoP includes over 200 members from state and local public health, regional PCs, CDC, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A leadership team was created with representatives of the many stakeholders of the community to drive its

  16. Lessons learned: mobile device encryption in the academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kusche, Kristopher P

    2009-01-01

    The academic medical center is faced with the unique challenge of meeting the multi-faceted needs of both a modern healthcare organization and an academic institution, The need for security to protect patient information must be balanced by the academic freedoms expected in the college setting. The Albany Medical Center, consisting of the Albany Medical College and the Albany Medical Center Hospital, was challenged with implementing a solution that would preserve the availability, integrity and confidentiality of business, patient and research data stored on mobile devices. To solve this problem, Albany Medical Center implemented a mobile encryption suite across the enterprise. Such an implementation comes with complexities, from performance across multiple generations of computers and operating systems, to diversity of application use mode and end user adoption, all of which requires thoughtful policy and standards creation, understanding of regulations, and a willingness and ability to work through such diverse needs.

  17. The Hastings Center and the early years of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The Hastings Center was founded in 1969 to study ethical problems in medicine and biology. The Center arose from a confluence of three social currents: the increased public scrutiny of medicine and its practices, the concern about the moral problems being generated by technological developments, and the desire of one of its founders (Callahan) to make use of his philosophical training in a more applied way. The early years of the Center were devoted to raising money, developing an early agenda of issues, and identifying a cadre of people around the country interested in the issues. Various stresses and strains in the Center and the field are identified, and some final reflections are offered on the nature and value of the contributions made by bioethics as an academic field.

  18. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA); Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. An arnex, scheduled for completion by summer 2002, will add an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to NSSTC nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the completed NSSTC will top 200

  19. Sustainability protects resources for future generations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This publication by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses the steps necessary to provide livable urban centers for future generations through sustainable development, or sustainability. To illustrate this concept, nonsustainable cities and sustainable cities are compared. Sustainable city projects for several major US cites are reviewed.

  20. Using Microsoft Excel to Generate Usage Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    At the Libraries Service Center, statistics are generated on a monthly, quarterly, and yearly basis by using four Microsoft Excel workbooks. These statistics provide information about what materials are being requested and by whom. They also give details about why certain requests may not have been filled. Utilizing Excel allows for a shallower…

  1. Leading Generation Y

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    autonomy. 36 Howe and Strauss show readers that this team ethic shows up in Generation Y’s political views.37 When teens from the Millennial ...April 2008 WORD COUNT: 5,582 PAGES: 30 KEY TERMS: Leadership, Millennial Generation , Next Generation , Recruiting, and Retention CLASSIFICATION... Millennial Generation , Generation Y or the Next Generation , the Army needs to consider the gap between Boomers, Generation X and the Soldiers that

  2. Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ETSC is EPA’s technical support and resource centers responsible for providing specialized scientific and engineering support to decision-makers in the Agency’s ten regional offices, states, communities, and local businesses.

  3. Ames Research Center Publications-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.

    1978-01-01

    Bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors, which appeared in formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports. Covers 1976.

  4. World Reference Center for Arboviruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    multiple sclerosis . Lyme disease was associated in distribution with Ixodes ticks but the etiologic agent was not isolated. The reference center distributed 566 ampoules of reference sera, viruses, and antigens during 1977; mosquito and vertebrate cell lines were also distributed.

  5. Kennedy Space Center Payload Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Ronnie; Engler, Tom; Colloredo, Scott; Zide, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the payload processing functions at Kennedy Space Center. It details some of the payloads processed at KSC, the typical processing tasks, the facilities available for processing payloads, and the capabilities and customer services that are available.

  6. Poison control center - emergency number

    MedlinePlus

    For a POISON EMERGENCY call: 1-800-222-1222 ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this ...

  7. Student-Centered Reading Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, James; Wagner, Betty Jane

    1991-01-01

    Offers student-centered reading activities designed to bring students to reading maturity and involvement in literature. Discusses partner reading, dramatizing and performing texts, transforming texts, journal writing, discussion, and writing. (PRA)

  8. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  9. Center for Creative Studies, Detroit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AIA Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    One of the ten buildings chosen to receive 1976 AIA honor awards, the arts center houses the departments of sculpture, painting, graphics, advertising art, photography, and industrial design. (Author/MLF)

  10. Clean Air Technology Center Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  11. Oceans and Human Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ocean and human health science can help prevent disease outbreaks and improve public health through a deeper understanding of the causes ... our Center and the field of oceans and human health science. More Research Learn about the research ...

  12. Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humeniuk, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

  13. Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center is EPA's primary resource for services and expertise in the areas of consensus-building, collaborative problem solving, alternative dispute resolution, and environmental collaboration and conflict resolution.

  14. PSI-Center Validation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Morgan, K. D.; Norgaard, P. C.; Shumlak, U.; Sutherland, D. A.; Victor, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) supports collaborating validation platform experiments with 3D extended MHD simulations using the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-TET codes. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), HBT-EP (Columbia), HIT-SI (U Wash-UW), LTX (PPPL), MAST (Culham), Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCSU (UW), and ZaP/ZaP-HD (UW). The PSI-Center is exploring application of validation metrics between experimental data and simulations results. Biorthogonal decomposition (BOD) is used to compare experiments with simulations. BOD separates data sets into spatial and temporal structures, giving greater weight to dominant structures. Several BOD metrics are being formulated with the goal of quantitive validation. Results from these simulation and validation studies, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  15. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  16. Human-Centered Design Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Howard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For NASA, human-centered design (HCD) seeks opportunities to mitigate the challenges of living and working in space in order to enhance human productivity and well-being. Direct design participation during the development stage is difficult, however, during project formulation, a HCD approach can lead to better more cost-effective products. HCD can also help a program enter the development stage with a clear vision for product acquisition. HCD tools for clarifying design intent are listed. To infuse HCD into the spaceflight lifecycle the Space and Life Sciences Directorate developed the Habitability Design Center. The Center has collaborated successfully with program and project design teams and with JSC's Engineering Directorate. This presentation discusses HCD capabilities and depicts the Center's design examples and capabilities.

  17. Parent and Child Living Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pushaw, David R.

    1978-01-01

    Parent and child living centers offer a program to improve parenting skills with areas of learning including child growth and development, family management, home care and repair, and personal growth and development. (MM)

  18. Ames research center publications, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B. R. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography cites 851 documents by Ames Research Center personnel and contractors which appeared in formal NASA publications, journals, books, patents, and contractor reports in 1975, or not included in previous annual bibliographies. An author index is provided.

  19. Technology Development Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) is developing and testing VLBI technologies and conducts observations with this new equipment. This report gives an overview of the Technology Development Center (TDC) at NICT and summarizes recent activities.

  20. Johnson Space Center 2012 Highlights

    NASA Video Gallery

    The year has seen many highlights at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston in the realm of human spaceflight exploration, international and commercial partnerships, and research and technology dev...

  1. Center Gets Commuters, Residents Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The new student center at Trenton State College is situated on the walkway between the central campus and the commuter parking areas. The location brings resident and commuter students together. (Author/MLF)

  2. Center Spot: Shoe Box Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jan

    1976-01-01

    This is the second "Center Spot" devoted to Jan Hoffman's "Shoe Box Science," a program that organizes manipulative materials so that children can identify, describe, order, construct, name and distinguish on their own.

  3. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  4. 2. VIEW OF GOVERNANCE EQUIPMENT AT UNIT 3 GENERATOR (RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF GOVERNANCE EQUIPMENT AT UNIT 3 GENERATOR (RIGHT BACKGROUND) SHOWING PRESSURE TANK (LEFT BACKGROUND), GOVERNOR STAND (CENTER), AND SUMP PUMP (RIGHT FOREGROUND). VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Black Eagle Hydroelectric Facility, Powerhouse, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  5. OVERHEAD VIEW OF VIVIANNA WORKS ORE BIN LOOKING NORTHEAST. GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERHEAD VIEW OF VIVIANNA WORKS ORE BIN LOOKING NORTHEAST. GENERATOR BUILDING TOP LEFT, OFFICE AND STOREROOM TOP CENTER, ROTARY KILN AND CONDENSER PLATFORM RIGHT. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  6. 2. VIEW NORTHEAST OF CONDENSER WATER INTAKE (LEFT), GENERATING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHEAST OF CONDENSER WATER INTAKE (LEFT), GENERATING PLANT AND STACK (CENTER), AND VIADUCT (EXTREME RIGHT) - Turners Falls Power & Electric Company, Hampden Station, East bank of Connecticut River, Chicopee, Hampden County, MA

  7. 10. DETAIL VIEW NORTH AND WEST OF GENERATOR (LEFT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW NORTH AND WEST OF GENERATOR (LEFT AND CENTER) AND BELT (RIGHT) - Willimantic Linen Company, Mill No. 2, South Main Street opposite Durham Street, North bank Willimantic River, Windham, Windham County, CT

  8. Measurement Of Water Sprays Generated By Airplane Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental investigation conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to measure rate of flow and trajectory of water spray generated by tire operating on flooded runway. Potential application to both aircraft and automotive industries, with particular application to manufacturers of tires.

  9. 6. POWERHOUSE, GENERATOR AND GOVERNOR LOCATED AT GROUND LEVEL LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. POWERHOUSE, GENERATOR AND GOVERNOR LOCATED AT GROUND LEVEL LOOKING NORTHWEST - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Powerhouse, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  10. 4. POWERHOUSE, GROUND LEVEL, GENERATOR AND EXCITER LOCATED IN POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. POWERHOUSE, GROUND LEVEL, GENERATOR AND EXCITER LOCATED IN POWERHOUSE AT GROUND LEVEL LOOKING NORTHEAST - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Powerhouse, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  11. The SIRTF Science Center: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Helou, G.; Armus, L.; Ebert, R.; Latter, W. B.; Moshir, M.; Nichols, J. B.; Potts, S. K.

    1997-12-01

    The SIRTF Science Center (SSC) is charged with designing, planning and developing SIRTF science operations, and with conducting these operations including automated data processing for release to the community once SIRTF is launched. The SSC is also the primary interface between the SIRTF project and its scientific users. This paper will present the charter, scope, organization and development plans for the SSC, and summarize the current status of the Center.

  12. Italy INAF Analysis Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activity of the Italian INAF VLBI Analysis Center. Our Analysis Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics. IRA runs the observatories of Medicina and Noto, where two 32-m VLBI AZ-EL telescopes are situated. This report contains the AC's VLBI data analysis activities and shortly outlines the investigations into the co-locations of space geodetic instruments.

  13. Joint Center for Robotics (JCR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    Unclassified 1 Joint Center for Robotics (JCR) Dr. Jim Overholt 15 April 2008 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is...REPORT DATE APR 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Joint Center for Robotics (JCR) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ANSI Std Z39-18 Unclassified 2 TARDEC JCR Robotics CAST Projects & Cells “White Hat” Organization - Understand the needs of the user and create

  14. Resuscitation center designation: recommendations for emergency medical services practices.

    PubMed

    Mechem, C Crawford; Goodloe, Jeffrey M; Richmond, Neal J; Kaufman, Bradley J; Pepe, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    Regionalization of medical resources by designating specialty receiving centers, such as trauma and stroke centers, within emergency medical services (EMS) systems is intended to ensure the highest-quality patient care in the most efficient and fiscally responsible fashion. Significant advances in the past decade such as induction of therapeutic hypothermia following resuscitation from cardiac arrest and a time-driven, algorithmic approach to management of septic patients have created compelling arguments for similar designation for specialized resuscitative interventions. Resuscitation of critically ill patients is both labor- and resource-intensive. It can significantly interrupt emergency department (ED) patient throughput. In addition, clinical progress in developing resuscitation techniques is often dependent on the presence of a strong research infrastructure to generate and validate new therapies. It is not feasible for many hospitals to make the commitment to care for large numbers of critically ill patients and the accompanying investigational activities, whether in the prehospital, ED, or inpatient arena. Because of this, the question of whether EMS systems should designate specific hospitals as "resuscitation centers" has now come center stage. Just as EMS systems currently delineate criteria and monitor compliance for trauma, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and stroke centers, strong logic now exists to develop similar standards for resuscitation facilities. Accordingly, this discussion reviews the current applicable trends in resuscitation science and presents a rationale for resuscitation center designation within EMS systems. Potential barriers to the establishment of such centers are discussed and strategies to overcome them are proposed.

  15. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF FISK STREET ELECTRIC GENERATING STATION COMPLEX, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF FISK STREET ELECTRIC GENERATING STATION COMPLEX, LOOKING SOUTH; IN THE CENTER, BEHIND THE STACK IS THE GENERATING STATION BUILT IN 1959; THE TALL METAL-CLAD BUILDING CONTAINS A COAL BUNKER, COAL PULVERIZER, FURNACE, BOILER, SUPER-HEATER, STEAM PIPES, AND HOT-AIR DUCTS. TO THE RIGHT OF THIS 1959 GENERATING STATION IS THE ORIGINAL POWERHOUSE. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. Vortex Generator Model Developed for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2002-01-01

    A computational model was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to investigate possible uses of vortex generators (VG's) for improving the performance of turbomachinery. A vortex generator is a small, winglike device that generates vortices at its tip. The vortices mix high-speed core flow with low-speed boundary layer flow and, thus, can be used to delay flow separation. VG's also turn the flow near the walls and, thus, can be used to control flow incidence into a turbomachinery blade row or to control secondary flows.

  17. Correlations between Abelian monopoles and center vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Nejad, Seyed Mohsen; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2017-04-01

    We study the correlations between center vortices and Abelian monopoles for SU(3) gauge group. Combining fractional fluxes of monopoles, center vortex fluxes are constructed in the thick center vortex model. Calculating the potentials induced by fractional fluxes constructing the center vortex flux in a thick center vortex-like model and comparing with the potential induced by center vortices, we observe an attraction between fractional fluxes of monopoles constructing the center vortex flux. We conclude that the center vortex flux is stable, as expected. In addition, we show that adding a contribution of the monopole-antimonopole pairs in the potentials induced by center vortices ruins the Casimir scaling at intermediate regime.

  18. The Research Role of a National Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    The functional role of a national center for vocational education depends on the people doing the work; consequently, the center sets its own agenda when it makes personal decisions. A center's role should include two elements: in setting its own research agenda, a center should take a broad perspective on vocational education; and a center should…

  19. Development and Testing of the Glenn Research Center Visitor's Center Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed, installed, and tested a 12 kW DC grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) power system at the GRC Visitor s Center. This system utilizes a unique ballast type roof mount for installing the photovoltaic panels on the roof of the Visitor s Center with no alterations or penetrations to the roof. The PV system has generated in excess of 15000 kWh since operation commenced in August 2008. The PV system is providing power to the GRC grid for use by all. Operation of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system has been completely trouble free. A grid-tied PV power system is connected directly to the utility distribution grid. Facility power can be obtained from the utility system as normal. The PV system is synchronized with the utility system to provide power for the facility, and excess power is provided to the utility. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners. GRC personnel glean valuable experience with PV power systems that are directly applicable to various space power systems, and provides valuable space program test data. PV power systems help to reduce harmful emissions and reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels. Power generated by the PV system reduces the GRC utility demand, and the surplus power aids the community. Present global energy concerns reinforce the need for the development of alternative energy systems. Modern PV panels are readily available, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Modern electronics has been the enabling technology behind grid-tied power systems, making them safe, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Based upon the success of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system, additional PV power system expansion at GRC is under consideration. The GRC Visitor s Center grid-tied PV power system was successfully designed and developed which served to validate the basic principles

  20. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left, can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup, the Post Show Dome, the Astronaut Memorial, and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right of the site is a display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Parking lots span the width of the complex on the south side.

  1. Category 5: Sound Generation in Viscous Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soogab; Henderson, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    Two problems are considered. Problem 1: Aeolian tones, sound generation by flow over cylinders, are relevant to airframe and power plant noise (heat exchanger, power transmission lines and chimneys). The purpose of this problem is to test the ability of a CFD/CAA code to accurately predict sound generation by viscous flows and sound propagation through interactions between acoustic wave & solid wall and between acoustic waves & shear layers. Problem 2: Sound generation by flow over a cavity.Air flows over the cavity shown below with a mean approach flow velocity of 50 m/s. The boundary layer that develops over the flat plate is turbulent with a thickness of 14 mm at the entrance to the cavity. Calculate the power spectra at the center of each cavit wall and the center of the cavity floor. Experimental data will be available for comparison.

  2. Light saturation response of inactive photosystem II reaction centers in spinach.

    PubMed

    Chylla, R A; Whitmarsh, J

    1990-07-01

    The effective absorption cross section of inactive photosystem II (PS II) centers, which is the product of the effective antenna size and the quantum yield for photochemistry, was investigated by comparing the light saturation curves of inactive PS II and active reaction centers in intact chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Inactive PS II centers are defined as the impaired PS II reaction centers that require greater than 50 ms for the reoxidation of QA (-) subsequent to a single turnover flash. Active reaction centers are defined as the rapidly turning over PS II centers (recovery time less than 50 ms) and all of the PS I centers. The electrochromic shift, measured by the flash-induced absorbance increase at 518 nm, was used to probe the activity of the reaction centers. Light saturation curves were generated for inactive PS II centers and active reaction centers by measuring the extent of the absorbance increase at 518 nm induced by red actinic flashes of variable energy. The light saturation curves show that inactive PS II centers required over twice as many photons as active reaction centers to achieve the same yield. The ratio of the flash energy required for 50% saturation for active reaction centers (PS II active + PS I) compared to inactive PS II centers was 0.45±0.04 in intact chloroplasts, and 0.54±0.11 in thylakoid membranes. Analysis of the light saturation curves using a Poisson statistical model in which the ratio of the antenna size of active PS II centers to that of PS I is considered to range from 1 to 1.5, indicates that the effective absorption cross section of inactive PS II centers was 0.54-0.37 times that of active PS II centers. If the quantum yield for photochemistry is assumed to be one, we estimate that the antenna system serving the inactive PS II centers contains approx. 110 chlorophyll molecules.

  3. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  4. The Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST Center)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The following is a technical report of the progress made under Cooperative Agreement NCC5494, the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST). The period covered by this report is October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001. GEST is a consortium of scientists and engineers, led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to conduct scientific research in Earth and information sciences and related technologies in collaboration with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). GEST was established through a cooperative agreement signed May 11, 2000, following a competitive procurement process initiated by GSFC.

  5. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. we consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength Of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. We shall present simulation results of an oscillating plate at various Reynolds numbers and Strouhal frequencies.

  6. Single-color centers implanted in diamond nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Birgit J. M.; Babinec, Thomas M.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Hodges, Jonathan S.; Hong, Sungkun; Bulu, Irfan; Yacoby, Amir; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Lončar, Marko

    2011-04-01

    The development of material-processing techniques that can be used to generate optical diamond nanostructures containing a single-color center is an important problem in quantum science and technology. In this work, we present the combination of ion implantation and top-down diamond nanofabrication in two scenarios: diamond nanopillars and diamond nanowires. The first device consists of a 'shallow' implant (~20 nm) to generate nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers near the top surface of the diamond crystal prior to device fabrication. Individual NV centers are then mechanically isolated by etching a regular array of nanopillars in the diamond surface. Photon anti-bunching measurements indicate that a high yield (>10%) of the devices contain a single NV center. The second device demonstrates 'deep' (~1 μm) implantation of individual NV centers into diamond nanowires as a post-processing step. The high single-photon flux of the nanowire geometry, combined with the low background fluorescence of the ultrapure diamond, allowed us to observe sustained photon anti-bunching even at high pump powers.

  7. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  8. Finding Communities by Their Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Pei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Detecting communities or clusters in a real-world, networked system is of considerable interest in various fields such as sociology, biology, physics, engineering science, and interdisciplinary subjects, with significant efforts devoted in recent years. Many existing algorithms are only designed to identify the composition of communities, but not the structures. Whereas we believe that the local structures of communities can also shed important light on their detection. In this work, we develop a simple yet effective approach that simultaneously uncovers communities and their centers. The idea is based on the premise that organization of a community generally can be viewed as a high-density node surrounded by neighbors with lower densities, and community centers reside far apart from each other. We propose so-called “community centrality” to quantify likelihood of a node being the community centers in such a landscape, and then propagate multiple, significant center likelihood throughout the network via a diffusion process. Our approach is an efficient linear algorithm, and has demonstrated superior performance on a wide spectrum of synthetic and real world networks especially those with sparse connections amongst the community centers.

  9. Finding Communities by Their Centers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Pei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Detecting communities or clusters in a real-world, networked system is of considerable interest in various fields such as sociology, biology, physics, engineering science, and interdisciplinary subjects, with significant efforts devoted in recent years. Many existing algorithms are only designed to identify the composition of communities, but not the structures. Whereas we believe that the local structures of communities can also shed important light on their detection. In this work, we develop a simple yet effective approach that simultaneously uncovers communities and their centers. The idea is based on the premise that organization of a community generally can be viewed as a high-density node surrounded by neighbors with lower densities, and community centers reside far apart from each other. We propose so-called “community centrality” to quantify likelihood of a node being the community centers in such a landscape, and then propagate multiple, significant center likelihood throughout the network via a diffusion process. Our approach is an efficient linear algorithm, and has demonstrated superior performance on a wide spectrum of synthetic and real world networks especially those with sparse connections amongst the community centers. PMID:27053090

  10. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, Eduard; Wright, Alan; Gevorgian, Vahan; Donegan, James; Marnagh, Cian; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-06-01

    Renewable energy sources are the second largest contributor to global electricity production, after fossil fuels. The integration of renewable energy continued to grow in 2014 against a backdrop of increasing global energy consumption and a dramatic decline in oil prices during the second half of the year. As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded from primarily wind and solar to include new types with promising future applications, such as hydropower generation, including river and tidal generation. Today, hydropower is considered one of the most important renewable energy sources. In river and tidal generation, the input resource flow is slower but also steadier than it is in wind or solar generation, yet the level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another. This report focuses on hydrokinetic power conversion.

  11. Angelman syndrome imprinting center encodes a transcriptional promoter.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael W; Brant, Jason O; Kramer, Joseph M; Moss, James I; Yang, Thomas P; Hansen, Peter J; Williams, R Stan; Resnick, James L

    2015-06-02

    Clusters of imprinted genes are often controlled by an imprinting center that is necessary for allele-specific gene expression and to reprogram parent-of-origin information between generations. An imprinted domain at 15q11-q13 is responsible for both Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), two clinically distinct neurodevelopmental disorders. Angelman syndrome arises from the lack of maternal contribution from the locus, whereas Prader-Willi syndrome results from the absence of paternally expressed genes. In some rare cases of PWS and AS, small deletions may lead to incorrect parent-of-origin allele identity. DNA sequences common to these deletions define a bipartite imprinting center for the AS-PWS locus. The PWS-smallest region of deletion overlap (SRO) element of the imprinting center activates expression of genes from the paternal allele. The AS-SRO element generates maternal allele identity by epigenetically inactivating the PWS-SRO in oocytes so that paternal genes are silenced on the future maternal allele. Here we have investigated functional activities of the AS-SRO, the element necessary for maternal allele identity. We find that, in humans, the AS-SRO is an oocyte-specific promoter that generates transcripts that transit the PWS-SRO. Similar upstream promoters were detected in bovine oocytes. This result is consistent with a model in which imprinting centers become DNA methylated and acquire maternal allele identity in oocytes in response to transiting transcription.

  12. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC GOVERNORS, CIRCUITS, VACUUM SEALS, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, VACUUM, ELECTRODES, FINISHES, SURFACE...FINISHING, SURFACE PROPERTIES, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, FIELD EMISSION.

  13. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, FIELD EMISSION, ELECTRODES, VACUUM, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ANODES, CATHODES, POLISHES...DIELECTRICS, COATINGS, PRESSURE, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, VACUUM SEALS, EQUATIONS.

  14. Suborbital Science Program: Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelFrate, John

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the suborbital science program at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Program Objectives are given in various areas: (1) Satellite Calibration and Validation (Cal/val)--Provide methods to perform the cal/val requirements for Earth Observing System satellites; (2) New Sensor Development -- Provide methods to reduce risk for new sensor concepts and algorithm development prior to committing sensors to operations; (3) Process Studies -- Facilitate the acquisition of high spatial/temporal resolution focused measurements that are required to understand small atmospheric and surface structures which generate powerful Earth system effects; and (4) Airborne Networking -- Develop disruption-tolerant networking to enable integrated multiple scale measurements of critical environmental features. Dryden supports the NASA Airborne Science Program and the nation in several elements: ER-2, G-3, DC-8, Ikhana (Predator B) & Global Hawk and Reveal. These are reviewed in detail in the presentation.

  15. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  16. The Arecibo Remote Command Center Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Jenet, Fredrick; Siemens, Xavier; Dolch, Timothy; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    The Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) is a multi-institution research and education program that introduces undergraduates to the field of pulsar research. Specifically, the program trains students to work in small teams to operate several of the world's largest radio telescopes (both Arecibo and the Green Bank Telescope). Students conduct survey observations for the PALFA Galactic plane pulsar survey and conduct timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) for the NANOGrav search for gravitational waves using these telescopes. In addition, ARCC students search pulsar candidates generated from processed survey data in order to find both new radio MSPs and non-recycled pulsars. The ARCC program currently operates at four U.S. institutions and involves more than 50 undergraduate students each year. To date, ARCC students have discovered 64 new pulsars in this program.

  17. The New Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Bond; K. Kostelnik; R.A. Wharton; A. Kadak

    2006-06-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundation to enable future economic growth. The next generation energy workforce in the U.S. is a critical element in meeting both national and global energy needs. The Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) was established in 2005 in response to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. CAES, located at the new Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will address critical energy education, research, policy study and training needs. CAES is a unique joint partnership between the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), the State of Idaho, an Idaho University Consortium (IUC), and a National University Consortium (NUC). CAES will be based in a new facility that will foster collaborative academic and research efforts among participating institutions.

  18. Reuse research plans at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Susan J.; Walker, Carrie

    1989-01-01

    The reuse activities at Langley have centered on the development of the Eli System by SPS. The development of a computer systems design environment at Langley was described as a target application for the future Eli system. This environment combines software development tools with an architecture design and analysis tool. Specifically, a Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) system, under development at Charles Stark Draper Laboratory for Langley, is being used to generate Ada code for use in architecture functional simulations using the Architecture Design and Assessment System (ADAS). The Eli system will be included in this tool set and will be used to organize and promote reuse of the functional simulation code modules.

  19. Center for Computational Structures Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST) is intended to serve as a focal point for the diverse CST research activities. The CST activities include the use of numerical simulation and artificial intelligence methods in modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, and optimization of flight-vehicle structures. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The key elements of the Center are: (1) conducting innovative research on advanced topics of CST; (2) acting as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); (3) strong collaboration with NASA scientists and researchers from universities and other government laboratories; and (4) rapid dissemination of CST to industry, through integration of industrial personnel into the ongoing research efforts.

  20. Ontogenesis of the thermogenic center in hornets.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Natalya Y; Plotkin, Marian; Volynchik, Stanislav; Bergman, David J; Ishay, Jacob S

    2007-09-01

    In the Oriental hornet, a thermogenic center is located in its prothorax. The present study attempted to elucidate the development of this organ with age, that is, by following the development of the thermogenic center in the hornet from its pupal stage until several days after eclosion of the imago. To this end, use was made of an infrared camera, with which pictures were taken of the prothorax in hornets at various ages, i.e., several days prior eclosion, 24 h after eclosion, and 48-h posteclosion. The photographic findings established that prior to 48-h posteclosion there was no thermally distinct region or spot in the prothorax, but at about 48 h, such a "hot spot," namely, a point whose temperature is greater than that of the rest of the prothorax, does appear, and its appearance coincides with certain specific nest activities like warming of the pupae. Next, an attempt was made to transplant by allograft the region in the prothorax housing the hot spot. Accordingly, several pupae at 2 days prior to eclosion were subjected to the following procedure; their future prothoracic thermogenic center was excised and so also an equally sized piece of cuticle from the dorsal region of their abdomen, and the two now allografted in exchange, i.e., the piece from the prothorax replacing the abdominal piece and vice versa. The result of this exchange-transplant was studied 48 h after eclosion of the operated hornets and showed disruption of heat formation in the prothoracic site coupled with nonappearance of a hot spot in the abdominal site. As for the functional, intact hot spot in the adult hornet, it is characterized by a high concentration of tracheae, with numerous mitochondria in between them that probably contribute to the heat generation.