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Sample records for generation electrothermal vaporization

  1. Determination of plutonium in urine: evaluation of electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrzak, R.; Kaplan, E.

    1996-11-01

    Mass spectroscopy has the distinct advantage of detecting atoms rather than radioactive decay products for nuclides of low specific activity. Electrothermal vaporization (ETV) is an efficient means of introducing small volumes of prepared samples into an inductively coupled mass spectrometer to achieve the lowest absolute detection limits. The operational characteristics and capabilities of electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled mass spectrometer mass spectroscopy were evaluated. We describe its application as a detection method for determining Pu in urine, in conjunction with a preliminary separation technique to avoid matrix suppression of the signal.

  2. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  3. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  4. High-Speed Cinematic Studies of Water Vaporization Phenomena in Electrothermal Hydrazine Thruster Simulations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    HIGH-SPEED CINEMATIC STUDIES OF WATER VAPORIZATION PHENOMENA I7 IN ELECTROTHERMAL HYDRAZINE THRUSTER SIMULATIONS by W. G. Grenham SUMMARY - Tests of...hydrazine to flow through the small bore injector tube (typically 0.125 to 0.15 mm diameter), and into the thruster body . On switching off the...solenoid current the valve closes under the action of a return spring. In these prototype thrusters which were used for ground level testing only, the body

  5. Determination of mercury in fish samples by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Ming-Jyh; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Li, Yi-Ching

    1997-06-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to the determination of mercury in several fish samples. The effects of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals are reported. Palladium was used as modifier to delay the vaporization of mercury in this study. As the vaporization behavior of mercury in fish slurry and aqueous solution is quite different, the standard addition method was used for the determination of mercury in reference materials. The detection limit of mercury estimated from the standard addition curve was in the range 0.002-0.004 μg g -1 for different samples. This method has been applied to the determination of mercury in dogfish muscle reference material (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and dogfish liver reference material (DOLT-1). Accuracy was better than 4% and precision was better than 7% with the USS-ETV-ICP-MS method.

  6. Stratified vapor generator

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, Vahab

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  7. Concomitant adsorption and desorption of organic vapor in dry and humid air streams using microwave and direct electrothermal swing adsorption.

    PubMed

    Hashisho, Zaher; Emamipour, Hamidreza; Rood, Mark J; Hay, K James; Kim, Byung J; Thurston, Deborah

    2008-12-15

    Industrial gas streams can contain highly variable organic vapor concentrations that need to be processed before they are emitted to the atmosphere. Fluctuations in organic vapor concentrations make it more difficult to operate a biofilter when compared to a constant vapor concentration. Hence, there is a need to stabilize the concentration of rapidly fluctuating gas streams for optimum operation of biofilters. This paper describes new concomitant adsorption desorption (CAD) systems used with variable organic vapor concentration gas streams to provide the same gas stream, but at a user-selected constant vapor concentration that can then be more readily processed by a secondary air pollution control device such as a biofilter. The systems adsorb organic vapor from gas streams and simultaneously heat the adsorbent using microwave or direct electrothermal energy to desorb the organic vapor at a user-selected set-point concentration. Both systems depicted a high degree of concentration stabilization with a mean relative deviation between set-point and stabilized concentration of 0.3-0.4%. The direct electrothermal CAD system was also evaluated to treat a humid gas stream (relative humidity = 85%) that contained a variable organic vapor concentration. The high humidity did not interfere with CAD operation as water vapor did not adsorb but penetrated through the adsorbent These results are important because they demonstrate the ability of CAD to effectively dampen concentration fluctuation in gas streams.

  8. Vapor generator wand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device for producing a stream of vapor for wind tunnel airflow visualization is described. An electrically conductive heating tube is used to resistively heat a vapor producing liquid. The heating and delivery systems are integrated to allow the device to present a small cross section to the air flow, thereby reducing disturbances due to the device. The simplicity of the design allows for inexpensive implementation and construction. The design is readily scaled for use in various wind tunnel applications. The device may also find uses in manufacturing, producing a vapor for deposition on a substrate.

  9. Copper Vapor Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    percent measured during this program in a static copper vapor apparatus developed at PIB . This efficiency has been calculated by dividing the energy of a... laser medium. A measure of beam quality may be defined in terms ot the energy delivered in the tar field in relatum to the energy delivered by a...phase of the work the homogeneity requirements for the medium of a high -power laser was reviewed. These requirements were translated into measurable

  10. Electrothermal Vaporization Sample Introduction for Spaceflight Water Quality Monitoring via Gas Chromatography-Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, William T; Gazda, Daniel B; Limero, Thomas F; Minton, John M; Macatangay, Ariel V; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-06-16

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension in mission duration up to one year, an enhanced, real-time method for environmental monitoring is necessary. The station air is currently monitored for trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) via the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), while water is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. As mission scenarios extend beyond low Earth orbit, a convergence in analytical instrumentation to analyze both air and water samples is highly desirable. Since the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for air samples and many of the targets in air are also common to water, this platform is a logical starting point for developing a multimatrix monitor. Here, we report on the interfacing of an electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction unit with a ground-based AQM for monitoring target analytes in water. The results show that each of the compounds tested from water have similar GC-DMS parameters as the compounds tested in air. Moreover, the ETV enabled AQM detection of dimethlsilanediol (DMSD), a compound whose analysis had proven challenging using other sample introduction methods. Analysis of authentic ISS water samples using the ETV-AQM showed that DMSD could be successfully quantified, while the concentrations obtained for the other compounds also agreed well with laboratory results.

  11. Determination of aluminum and silicon in biological materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with electrothermal vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Barnes, Ramon M.

    An atomic emission spectrometric method is described for the determination of trace elements in microvolume samples especially of biological materials. Based upon the arrangement of a commercial electrothermal vaporizer and a 40-MHz inductively coupled plasma, the direct determination of aluminum and silicon in human body fluids such as urine and serum and aluminum in hemodialysis solution is performed. The instrumental system involves vaporizing the sample from a modified graphite electrode followed by atomization and excitation of the vapors in the ICP discharge. Compromise experimental conditions are reported and calibration functions compared. Limits of detection in 5-μl samples were 8 pg Al and 2.5 ng Si, and after preconcentration of Al with a poly(acrylamidoxime) resin, the detection limit was 1 pg Al. Recovery of 5 μg Si/ml and 10 ng Al/ml from aqueous and synthetic standards was 80-85% and 96-103%, respectively.

  12. Direct determination of sulfur species in coals from the Argonne premium sample program by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniela; Vogt, Thomas; Klinger, Mathias; Masset, Patrick Joseph; Otto, Matthias

    2014-10-21

    A new direct solid sampling method for speciation of sulfur in coals by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ETV-ICP OES) is presented. On the basis of the controlled thermal decomposition of coal in an argon atmosphere, it is possible to determine the different sulfur species in addition to elemental sulfur in coals. For the assignment of the obtained peaks from the sulfur transient emission signal, several analytical techniques (reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction) were used. The developed direct solid sampling method enables a good accuracy (relative standard deviation ≤ 6%), precision and was applied to determine the sulfur forms in the Argonne premium coals, varying in rank. The generated method is time- and cost-effective and well suited for the fast characterization of sulfur species in coal. It can be automated to a large extent and is applicable for process-accompanying analyses.

  13. Determination of selenium in biological samples by slurry sampling-electrothermal vaporization-in situ fusion-isotope dilution-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Takafumi; Nishide, Akifumi; Okutsu, Kentaro; Minami, Hirotsugu; Zhang, Qiangbin; Inoue, Sadanobu; Atsuya, Ikuo

    2005-03-01

    Determination of selenium in certified reference biological materials by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization (ETV)-isotope dilution (ID)-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) was performed. Several parameters such as the heating conditions were studied in order to obtain optimal conditions. A special heating stage called the in situ fusion stage was applied just before the pyrolysis stage in the electrothermal vaporization process in order to fuse the biological sample and to achieve selenium isotope-equilibration between selenium in the sample and the 78Se spike solution. The slurry sample containing an appropriate amount of biological sample, 78Se spike solution, and sodium hydroxide as an alkaline flux was injected into the electrothermal vaporization unit. The slurry sample was in situ fused, pyrolyzed, and then vaporized. The ion counts at m/ z=78 and 80, the spike and reference isotopes, respectively, could be measured accurately without interference caused by argon since nitrogen plasma was used. The analytical utility of the proposed slurry sampling-electrothermal vaporization-in situ fusion-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry was evaluated by determining the selenium concentration in certified reference biological materials, and the analytical results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. The limit of detection for selenium was 90 ng g -1. The relative standard deviation of the determination of selenium was 8-15% with a high sample throughput (less than 30 min per sample including a slurry preparation.)

  14. Potential of Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization for solving spectral interference in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2009-05-01

    Spectral interference is one of the main causes of erroneous results in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This paper describes some cases of spectral interferences with conventional nebulization ICP-OES and the potential of solving them utilizing electrothermal vaporization for volatility-based separation. The cases studied were, the well-known spectral overlap between the As and Cd lines at 228.8 nm that are only 10 pm apart, and the interference of Fe on the main emission lines of As, Cd and Pb. The spectral interferences were studied by monitoring the typical signals of solutions that contain the analytes and the potential interferent, by studying the spectra and calculating Background Equivalent Concentration (BEC)-values. A three step temperature program was developed to be used for direct analysis of solid soil samples by Electrothermal Vaporization (ETV)-ICP-OES: step 1 (760 °C, 40 s), step 2 (1620 °C, 20 s) and a cleaning step (2250 °C, 10 s) where Cd vaporizes in step 1, As, Pb and part of Fe in step 2 and the major part of Fe in the cleaning step. Because As and Cd were time-separated using this program, their prominent lines at 228.8 nm, could be used for determination of each element by ETV-ICP-OES, in spite of the serious wavelength overlap. Selective vaporization was also shown to reduce or eliminate the Fe background emission on As, Cd and Pb lines. To confirm the applicability of the method, a solid soil certified reference materials was analyzed directly without any sample treatment. Good or reasonable accuracy was obtained for the three elements.

  15. Adsorption and Electrothermal Desorption of Organic Vapors Using Activated Carbon Adsorbents With Novel Morphologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Principles of adsorption and adsorption processes. New York: Wiley; 1984. [5] Guerin P, Domine D. Process for separating a binary gas mixture by contact with...and ACFC electrothermal– swing adsorption systems are pro- vided below. The properties used to describe these systems include their pressure drop...Carbon 1996;34(7):851–6. [8] Petkovska M, Tondeur D, Grevillot G, Granger J, Mitrovic M. Temperature swing gas separation with electrothermal

  16. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  17. Analysis of trace impurities in organometallic semiconductor grade reagent materials using electrothermal vaporization - inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Argentine, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    Trace impurity determinations in volatile, pyrophoric organometallic materials is complicated owing to its chemical nature. Furthermore, trends toward high semiconductor circuit density demand that impurity determinations are performed at increasingly low levels. Volatility of the impurities is also desired as it plays a significant role in impurity incorporation in semiconductor products. Determination of both volatile and nonvolatile impurities in semiconductor-grade organometallic reagent materials has been accomplished using electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. Solid or liquid materials can be dispensed directly onto a graphite microboat, and application of an appropriate time-temperature ramp allows separation of impurities based on volatility. Temporal separation allows quantitative capabilities on both volatile and nonvolatile signals in a single ETV run. Calibration efforts for volatile impurities have been compared with results from exponential dilution and direct vapor sampling techniques. Nonvolatile impurity determinations can be reasonably performed with aqueous external standard calibration. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry provides an alternate and more sensitive, multielement detection method. Several spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic difficulties with volatile impurity detection remain. Nonetheless, qualitative and semiquantitative (<50% RSD) determination of most impurities may be performed in a single ETV run.

  18. Control of flow through a vapor generator

    DOEpatents

    Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2005-11-08

    In a Rankine cycle system wherein a vapor generator receives heat from exhaust gases, provision is made to avoid overheating of the refrigerant during ORC system shut down while at the same time preventing condensation of those gases within the vapor generator when its temperature drops below a threshold temperature by diverting the flow of hot gases to ambient and to thereby draw ambient air through the vapor generator in the process. In one embodiment, a bistable ejector is adjustable between one position, in which the hot gases flow through the vapor generator, to another position wherein the gases are diverted away from the vapor generator. Another embodiment provides for a fixed valve ejector with a bias towards discharging to ambient, but with a fan on the downstream side of said vapor generator for overcoming this bias.

  19. Determination of trace elements in medicinal activated charcoal using slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with low vaporization temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chou; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2015-01-01

    The determination of Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb in medicinal activated charcoal by ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) was described. EDTA was used as the modifier to enhance the volatility of elements studied. The influences of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were studied. A relatively low vaporization temperature of 1000°C was used, which separated the analyte from the major matrix components that improved ion signals. The method has been applied to determine Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb in an NIST SRM 1633b Coal Fly Ash reference material and three brands of medicinal activated charcoal capsules using isotope dilution and standard addition calibration methods. The concentrations that are in ng g(-1) levels were in good agreement between different calibration methods. The precision between sample replicates was better than 7% with USS-ETV-ICP-MS technique. The method detection limit estimated from standard addition curves was 0.4, 0.3, 0.3, 0.3, 0.04 and 0.9 ng g(-1) for Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb, respectively, in original medicinal activated charcoal.

  20. Next Generation Electrocaloric and Pyroelectric Materials for Solid State Electrothermal Interconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpay, S. Pamir; Mantese, Joseph V.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Zhang, Qiming; Whatmore, Roger W.

    2015-03-01

    Thin film electrocaloric (EC) and pyroelectric (PE) electrothermal interconversion energy sources have recently emerged as viable means for primary and auxiliary solid state cooling and power generation. This emergence is a result of two significant developments: (1) advancements in the formation of high quality polymeric and ceramic thin films with figures of merit that project system level performance as a large percentage of Carnot efficiency, and (2) the ability of these newer materials to support larger electric fields which permit operation at higher voltage; thus making the power electronic architectures more favorable for thermal to electric interconversion. Current research targets to adequately address commercial device needs, include reduction of parasitic losses, increases in mechanical robustness, and the ability to form nearly free-standing element in the range of 1 - 10 microns in thickness. This article will describe the current state-of-the-art materials, thermodynamic cycles and device losses; pointing to potential lines of research that would lead to substantially better figures of merit for electrothermal interconversion.

  1. Solid-Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry for Direct Determination of Total Oxygen in Coal.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Thomas; Bauer, Daniela; Nennstiel, David; Otto, Matthias

    2015-10-20

    A new analytical method for direct determination of total oxygen contents in eight coal samples of the Argonne Premium Coal (APC) series and in the NIST SRM 1632d is presented. The development of a suitable calibration procedure, optimization of measurement conditions, and the application of a tailored data processing for handling of plasma effects and high blanks enable the quantification of oxygen simultaneously with other trace, minor, or major elements in whole coal samples by means of electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ETV-ICP OES). For comparison, the oxygen contents were determined by a direct oxygen analyzer. The obtained oxygen values of the APC and the reference material NIST SRM 1632d were compared to data in the literature. The precision of the ETV-ICP OES was within ±3.5%, and the recovery better than 92%. With this good accuracy, the developed direct solid sampling method ETV-ICP OES is well suited for the fast determination of oxygen in coals, varying in rank from lignite to semianthracite, in a content range of about 100 ppm up to 27% using 1.5 mg sample weight. This direct analysis method represents an accurate, advantageous alternative to currently used methods for estimation of total oxygen contents in coals.

  2. Slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of As and Se in soil and sludge.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yen-Jia; Liu, Chung-Chang; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2007-04-11

    Slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization (ETV) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been applied to determine As and Se in soil and sludge samples. The influences of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were reported. Pd and ascorbic acid were used as mixed modifiers to enhance the ion signals. The effectiveness of ETV sample introduction technique for alleviating various spectral interferences in ICP-MS analysis has been demonstrated. This method has been applied to determine As and Se in NIST SRM 2709 San Joaquin soil reference material and NIST SRM 2781 domestic sludge reference material and a farmland soil sample collected locally. Since the sensitivities of As and Se in slurry solution and aqueous solution were different, analyte addition technique was used to determine As and Se in these samples. The As and Se analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision between sample replicates was better than 5% for all determinations. The method detection limit estimated from analyte addition curves was about 0.03 and 0.02 microg g(-1) for As and Se, respectively, in original soil and sludge samples.

  3. Determination of cadmium, mercury and lead in coal fly ash by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hsien-Chung; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    1999-08-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ID-ICP-MS) has been applied to the determination of Cd, Hg and Pb in coal fly ash samples. Thioacetamide (TAC) was used as the modifier. Since the sensitivities of the elements studied in coal fly ash slurry and aqueous solution were quite different, isotope dilution method was used for the determination of Cd, Hg and Pb in these coal fly ash samples. The isotope ratios of each element were calculated from the peak areas of each injection peak. This method has been applied to the determination of Cd, Hg and Pb in NIST SRM 1633a coal fly ash reference material and a coal fly ash sample collected from Kaohsiung area. Analysis results of reference sample NIST SRM 1633a coal fly ash agreed satisfactorily with the certified values. The other sample determined by isotope dilution and method of standard additions was agreed satisfactorily. Precision was better than 6% for most of the determinations and accuracy was better than 4% with the USS-ETV-ID-ICP-MS method. Detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were in the range of 24-58, 6-28 and 108-110 ng g-1 for Cd, Hg and Pb, respectively.

  4. Immersed single-drop microextraction-electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy for the trace determination of mercury in water samples.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Habib; Naderi, Mehrnoush

    2009-06-15

    A new method based on single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETV-AAS) was developed for the trace determination of mercury in water samples. A microdrop of m-xylene was applied as the extraction solvent. After extraction, the microdrop was introduced, directly, into a graphite furnace of AAS. Some important extraction parameters such as type of solvent, volume of solvent, sample stirring, ionic strength, sample pH, chelating agent concentration, sample temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The highest possible microdrop volume of 10 microL, a sampling temperature of 27 degrees C, and use of m-xylene containing dithizone, as complexing agent, are major parameters led to achieve a high enrichment factor of 970. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 0.01 microg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 6.1% (n=7). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of Hg in two river water samples. The effects of interfering species such as Pt, Pd, Cu, Au, and Bi, having the tendency to form complexes with dithizone, at two concentration levels of 100 and 1000 microg L(-1) were also studied.

  5. Direct determination of arsenic in fresh and saline waters by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad Grégoire, D.; de Lourdes Ballinas, Maria

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for the direct determination of arsenic in fresh and saline waters by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Arsenic could be determined directly in waters containing up to 10 000 μg ml -1 NaCl without interference from the formation of 75ArCl +. For non-saline waters, arsenic was determined directly with the addition to both aqueous calibration standards and samples of 0.1 μg each of Pd and Mg to act as physical carriers. For the analysis of highly saline waters, the use of Pd and Mg chemical modifier served to thermally stabilize arsenic up to a temperature of 1000°C, while the separate addition of 8 mg of ammonium nitrate was used to remove chloride from the sample. This eliminated serious spectral interference on 75As + from 75ArCl +. Although the ArCl + spectral interference was completely eliminated, residual Na co-volatilized with As caused signal suppression, requiring the use of the method of standard additions for calibration. An absolute limit of detection limit for As of 0.069 pg was obtained corresponding to 6.9 pg ml -1 in a 10 μl sample.

  6. A vapor generator for transonic flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert A.; Hess, Robert W.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A vapor generator was developed for use in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). Propylene glycol was used as the vapor material. The vapor generator system was evaluated in a laboratory setting and then used in the TDT as part of a laser light sheet flow visualization system. The vapor generator provided satisfactory seeding of the air flow with visible condensate particles, smoke, for tests ranging from low subsonic through transonic speeds for tunnel total pressures from atmospheric pressure down to less than 0.1 atmospheric pressure.

  7. A miniaturized capacitively coupled plasma microtorch optical emission spectrometer and a Rh coiled-filament as small-sized electrothermal vaporization device for simultaneous determination of volatile elements from liquid microsamples: spectral and analytical characterization.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Darvasi, Eugen; Butaciu, Sinziana; Ponta, Michaela; Petreus, Dorin; Mihaltan, Alin I; Frentiu, Maria

    2014-11-01

    A low power and low argon consumption (13.56 MHz, 15 W, 150 ml min(-1)) capacitively coupled plasma microtorch interfaced with a low-resolution microspectrometer and a small-sized electrothermal vaporization Rh coiled-filament as liquid microsample introduction device into the plasma was investigated for the simultaneous determination of several volatile elements of interest for environment. Constructive details, spectral and analytical characteristics, and optimum operating conditions of the laboratory equipment for the simultaneous determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn requiring low vaporization power are provided. The method involves drying of 10 μl sample at 100°C, vaporization at 1500°C and emission measurement by capture of 20 successive spectral episodes each at an integration time of 500 ms. Experiments showed that emission of elements and plasma background were disturbed by the presence of complex matrix and hot Ar flow transporting the microsample into plasma. The emission spectrum of elements is simple, dominated by the resonance lines. The analytical system provided detection limits in the ng ml(-1) range: 0.5(Ag); 1.5(Cd); 5.6(Cu); 20(Pb) and 3(Zn) and absolute detection limits of the order of pg: 5(Ag); 15(Cd); 56(Cu); 200(Pb) and 30(Zn). It was demonstrated the utility and capability of the miniaturized analytical system in the simultaneous determination of elements in soil and water sediment using the standard addition method to compensate for the non-spectral effects of alkali and earth alkaline elements. The analysis of eight certified reference materials exhibited reliable results with recovery in the range of 95-108% and precision of 0.5-9.0% for the five examined elements. The proposed miniaturized analytical system is attractive due to the simple construction of the electrothermal vaporization device and microtorch, low costs associated to plasma generation, high analytical sensitivity and easy-to-run for simultaneous multielemental

  8. Direct determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in biological materials by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gelaude, I; Dams, R; Resano, M; Vanhaecke, F; Moens, L

    2002-08-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SS-EIV-ICPMS) for the direct and simultaneous determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in biological materials. The main advantage of this fast and sensitive method is that no sample preparation is required. In this way, the sample throughput can be considerably increased, problems of contamination and analyte losses are kept to a minimum and, even more important, the original chemical form of the different analyte species in the solid samples is preserved. To achieve this goal, a solid sample is inserted into a graphite furnace of the boat-in-tube type and is subsequently submitted to an appropriate temperature program, leading to the separate vaporization of methylmercury and inorganic mercury, which are transported into the ICP by means of an argon carrier gas. The separation was accomplished within 75 s. For the quantification of the two peaks, species-unspecific isotope dilution was used. For this purpose, a stable flow of argon loaded with gaseous Hg isotopically enriched in 200Hg was generated using a permeation tube that was constructed in-house. Its emission rate was determined by collecting the mercury released during a given time interval on a gold-coated silica absorber, after which the amount collected was released by heating of the absorber and determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). A reference material from the Canadian National Research Council (NRC) (TORT-2) was used to assess the accuracy of the method. For the application of the method to samples with diverse mercury contents, the spike/sample ratio can be optimized by varying the emission rate of the permeation tube simply by adapting its temperature. To prove the feasibility of this approach, two reference materials (BCR 463 and DORM-2) with a methylmercury content more than 10

  9. Sample transport efficiency with electrothermal vaporization and electrostatic deposition technique in multielement solid sample analysis of plant and cereal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Jens; Buchkamp, Thomas; Hermann, Gerd; Lasnitschka, Georg

    2000-05-01

    A graphite furnace of the boat-in-tube type as electrothermal vaporizer (ETV) and an electrostatic precipitator were used for determining analyte transport efficiencies and dependencies on plant and cereal matrices, and on carrier elements. All analytical measurements were carried out with coherent forward scattering (CFS) using simultaneous multielement determinations. Transport efficiencies of up to 19% for Cu, 21% for Fe and Mn, and 36% for Pb from the ETV boat to the L'vov platform were obtained for the standard reference materials BCR CRM 281 rye grass, BCR CRM 189 wholemeal flour and NIST SRM 1567 wheat flour and multielement standard solutions containing approximately the same element ratios as certified for the solid samples. The analytical accuracy of the procedure including the ETV process and the electrostatic deposition was tested with Cu, Fe and Pb in BCR CRM 281, Cu, Fe and Mn in BCR CRM 189, and Fe and Mn in NIST SRM 1567 by weighing the solid sample onto the ETV-boat and calibrating against multielement standard solutions dosed into the ETV-boat as well. The analyte addition technique was tested with Cu, Fe and Mn in wholemeal flour. The deviations of the results were below 10% and the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) values were typically 3-10%. The influence of added potassium and palladium nitrates as physical carriers on the transport efficiencies of Ag, Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn standard solutions was investigated with simultaneous multielement determination. Using K and Pd as carriers increased transport efficiencies by factors up to 1.74 in comparison to measurements without an added carrier.

  10. A radiotracer study on the volatilization and transport effects of thermochemical reagents used in the analysis of alumina powders by slurry electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, Birgit U.; Herdering, Wilhelm; Broekaert, José A. C.

    2007-02-01

    A neutron-activated Al 2O 3 powder SRM 699 (NIST) containing the γ-radiation emitting radionuclides 51Cr, 59Fe, 60Co and 65Zn has been used to study the influence of thermochemical reagents on the volatilization and transport efficiency for these trace elements in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) of Al 2O 3 powders. From the signals in the γ-spectra for the radiotracers it has been found that less than 2% of the elements Cr, Fe, Co and Zn is left back in a graphite furnace from Al 2O 3 powders at 2200 °C even without addition of a thermochemical reagent and the latter even was found to decrease the volatilization efficiencies. The recovery for the radiotracers on filters at the end of the transport tube as measured from the signals in the γ-spectra, however, was found to increase in most cases (i.e. from about 10% to more than 20%) when Pd(NO 3) 2, Pd(NO 3) 2 + Mg(NO 3) 2, PdCl 2, IrCl 3, SnCl 2, AgCl, NaF, NH 4Cl and NH 4F were added at amounts generally used in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. However, when adding higher amounts as stoichiometrically required for a complete halogenation of the sample matrix in the case of AgCl, C 8F 15O 2Na, IrCl 3 or PdCl 2 the transport efficiencies considerably decrease again. As shown in the case of NH 4Cl the amount of thermochemical reagent used has to be optimized so as to obtain maximum analyte transport efficiencies. A comparison of the influence of NH 4Cl on the transport efficiencies with its influence on the ETV-ICP-MS signals for Fe demonstrates the importance of transport efficiency changes for the effects of thermochemical reagents in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  11. Evaluation of pyrolysis curves for volatile elements in aqueous standards and carbon-containing matrices in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. F.; Welz, B.; de Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    2008-07-01

    Pyrolysis curves in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) and electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) have been compared for As, Se and Pb in lobster hepatopancreas certified reference material using Pd/Mg as the modifier. The ET AAS pyrolysis curves confirm that the analytes are not lost from the graphite furnace up to a pyrolysis temperature of 800 °C. Nevertheless, a downward slope of the pyrolysis curve was observed for these elements in the biological material using ETV-ICP-MS. This could be related to a gain of sensitivity at low pyrolysis temperatures due to the matrix, which can act as carrier and/or promote changes in the plasma ionization equilibrium. Experiments with the addition of ascorbic acid to the aqueous standards confirmed that the higher intensities obtained in ETV-ICP-MS are related to the presence of organic compounds in the slurry. Pyrolysis curves for As, Se and Pb in coal and coal fly ash were also investigated using the same Pd/Mg modifier. Carbon intensities were measured in all samples using different pyrolysis temperatures. It was observed that pyrolysis curves for the three analytes in all slurry samples were similar to the corresponding graphs that show the carbon intensity for the same slurries for pyrolysis temperatures from 200 °C up to 1000 °C.

  12. Development of MEMS based safe electro-thermal pyrotechnic igniter for a new generation of microfuze (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennarun, Pierre; Rossi, Carole; Esteve, Daniel; Conedera, Veronique

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a safe MEMS based micro electro-thermal igniter for a safe microfuze for military purpose. The proposed device"s architecture is made of: (1) one pyrotechnical micro igniter, (2) one arming function, (3) one disarming function and (3) one sterilization function. The pyrotechnical electro-thermal igniter consists in a resistive element that converts electrical energy into heat to initiate an energetic material. The arming function permits the igniter to be armed, ready to fire, only if the ignition conditions are respected. For that, a short-circuit to the electrical ground is cut and the igniter is connected to the power supply. The igniter can be reset to the safe mode (disarmed state) thanks to the disarming function that reconnects the igniter's electrical pads to the electrical ground. If necessary the igniter can be sterilized meaning that the system's ignition capability is definitively removed. All these functions are based on the use of two electro-thermal micro switches : one ON-OFF and one OFF-ON. Due to the application requirements (the fuze is used once but after a long storage, all components must have a high level of safety and reliability and the power consumption must be minimized), we opted for a new generation of one shot, safe and reliable micro switches. They are based on electro thermal mechanisms and consist in breaking one electrical connection (ON-OFF switch) or micro soldering locally two electrical connections (OFF-ON switch). Both switches have been developed in MEMS technology, characterized and are presented in this paper. A prototype of safe micro igniter with ON-OFF and OFF-ON switches has been also realized and is presented.

  13. Simultaneous determination of bromine and chlorine in coal using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Pereira, Éderson R; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L G

    2014-12-10

    A new method for the direct analysis of coal using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis was developed, aiming at the determination of Br and Cl. The procedure does not require any significant sample pretreatment and allows simultaneous determination of both elements to be carried out, requiring small mass aliquots of sample (about 0.5 mg). All operating parameters, including carrier gas flow-rate and RF power, were optimized for maximum sensitivity. The use of modifiers/aerosol carriers (Pd, Pd+Al and Pd+Ca) was evaluated, and the mixture of Pd and Ca was chosen, allowing pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures of 700°C and 1900°C, respectively. Chlorine was accurately determined using calibration against solid standards, whereas Br could also be determined using calibration against aqueous standard solutions. The limits of quantification were 0.03 μg g(-1) for Br and 7 μg g(-1) for Cl, and no spectral interferences were observed.

  14. Sensitive determination of bromine and iodine in aqueous and biological samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a chemical modifier.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Konishi, Chie; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi; Ito, Kazuaki

    2008-06-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of bromine and iodine by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry was investigated. In order to prevent the decrease in the ionization efficiencies of bromine and iodine atoms caused by the introduction of water mist, electrothermal vaporization was used for sample introduction into the ICP mass spectrometer. To prevent loss of analytes during the drying process, a small amount of tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution was placed as a chemical modifier into the tungsten boat furnace. After evaporation of the solvent, the analytes instantly vaporized and were then introduced into the ICP ion source to detect the (79)Br(+), (81)Br(+), and (127)I(+) ions. By using this system, detection limits of 0.77 pg and 0.086 pg were achieved for bromine and iodine, respectively. These values correspond to 8.1 pg mL(-1) and 0.91 pg mL(-1) of the aqueous bromide and iodide ion concentrations, respectively, for a sampling volume of 95 microL. The relative standard deviations for eight replicate measurements were 2.2% and 2.8% for 20 pg of bromine and 2 pg of iodine, respectively. Approximately 25 batches were vaporizable per hour. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of various certified reference materials and practical situations as biological and aqueous samples. There is further potential for the simultaneous determination of fluorine and chlorine.

  15. Optimization of the operating conditions of solid sampling electrothermal vaporization coupled to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the sensitive direct analysis of powdered rice.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Nausheen; Beauchemin, Diane

    2014-12-03

    Two different approaches were used to improve the capabilities of solid sampling (SS) electrothermal vaporization (ETV) coupled to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) for the direct analysis of powdered rice. Firstly, a cooling step immediately before and after the vaporization step in the ETV temperature program resulted in a much sharper analyte signal peak. Secondly, point-by-point internal standardization with an Ar emission line significantly improved the linearity of calibration curves obtained with an increasing amount of rice flour certified reference material (CRM). Under the optimized conditions, detection limits ranged from 0.01 to 6ngg(-1) in the solid, depending on the element and wavelength selected. The method was validated through the quantitative analysis of corn bran and wheat flour CRMs. Application of the method to the multi-elemental analysis of 4-mg aliquots of real organic long grain rice (white and brown) also gave results for Al, As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Se, Pb and Zn in agreement with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following acid digestion of 0.2-g aliquots. As the analysis takes roughly 5min per sample (2.5min for grinding, 0.5-1min for weighing a 4-mg aliquot and 87s for the ETV program), this approach shows great promise for fast screening of food samples.

  16. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  17. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity.

  18. Assessment of the Halogen Content of Brazilian Inhalable Particulate Matter (PM10) Using High Resolution Molecular Absorption Spectrometry and Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, with Direct Solid Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Almeida, Tarcisio S; Alves, Jeferson C; Araujo, Rennan G O; Borges, Daniel L G

    2016-03-15

    Halogens in the atmosphere play an important role in climate change and also represent a potential health hazard. However, quantification of halogens is not a trivial task, and methods that require minimum sample preparation are interesting alternatives. Hence, the aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of direct solid sample analysis using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS) for F determination and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for simultaneous Cl, Br, and I determination in airborne inhalable particulate matter (PM10) collected in the metropolitan area of Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Analysis using HR-CS MAS was accomplished by monitoring the CaF molecule, which was generated at high temperatures in the graphite furnace after the addition of Ca. Analysis using ETV-ICP-MS was carried out using Ca as chemical modifier/aerosol carrier in order to avoid losses of Cl, Br, and I during the pyrolysis step, with concomitant use of Pd as a permanent modifier. The direct analysis approach resulted in LODs that were proven adequate for halogen determination in PM10, using either standard addition calibration or calibration against a certified reference material. The method allowed the quantification of the halogens in 14 PM10 samples collected in a northeastern coastal city in Brazil. The results demonstrated variations of halogen content according to meteorological conditions, particularly related to rainfall, humidity, and sunlight irradiation.

  19. Imaging of elements in leaves of tobacco by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Plants take up and store elements according to the environment in which they are growing. Because plants are at the base of the food chain, the determination of essential elements or toxic elements in plant materials is of importance. However, it is assumed that the element content determined on selected tissues may provide more specific information than that derived from the whole plant analysis. In this work, we assessed the feasibility of solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry analyses for quantitative imaging of Cd and Mg in plant leaves. Leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were selected to be used as samples. To produce a two dimensional image, sections cut from leaf samples were analyzed. Cellulose doped with multi-element solution standards was used as calibration samples. Two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato leaves) were used to verify the accuracy of measurements with good agreement between the measured concentrations and the certified values. Quantitative imaging revealed the inhomogeneous distribution of the selected elements. Excess of Cd and Mg tended to be focused on peripheral regions and the tip of the leaf.

  20. Determination of trace rare earth elements in coal fly ash and atmospheric particulates by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with slurry sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuefei; Jiang, Zucheng; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2007-07-01

    A method of fluorination assisted electrothermal vaporization (FETV)-ICP-MS with polytetrafluoroethylene as fluorinating reagent was developed for the direct determination of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in coal fly ash and atmospheric particulates. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limits for REEs were 0.1 pg m(-3)(Eu) to 6.7 pg m(-3)(Nd) with the precisions of 4.1%(Yb) to 10%(La) (c=1 microg L(-1), n=9). The proposed method was applied to determine trace REEs in coal fly ash, airborne particulates and NIES SRM No. 8 Vehicle Exhaust Particulates. It was found that the determined values for Y, La, Pr and Nd obtained by slurry sampling FETV-ICP-MS with external calibration coincided with that obtained by pneumatic nebulization (PN)-ICP-MS and slurry sampling FETV-ICP-MS with standard addition. However, the determined values for Ce and Sm obtained by slurry sampling FETV-ICP-MS with external calibration were lower than that obtained by PN-ICP-MS and slurry sampling FETV-ICP-MS with standard addition.

  1. Assessment of homogeneity and minimum sample mass for cadmium analysis in powdered certified reference materials and real rice samples by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuefei; Liu, Jixin; Huang, Yatao; Feng, Li; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Yongzhong; Wang, Min

    2013-01-30

    To optimize analytical quality controls of solid sampling electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SS-ETV-AFS), the homogeneity (H(E)) of rice samples and their minimum sample mass (M) for cadmium analysis were evaluated using three certified reference materials (CRMs) and real rice samples. The effects of different grinding degrees (particle sizes <0.85, <0.25, <0.15, and >1 mm) on H(E) and M of real rice samples were also investigated. The calculated M values of three CRMs by the Pauwels equation were 2.19, 19.76, and 3.79 mg. The well-ground real rice samples (particle size <0.25 mm) demonstrated good homogeneity, and the M values were 3.48-4.27 mg. On the basis of these results, the Cd concentrations measured by the proposed method were compared with the results by microwave digestion graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a 0.5 g sample mass. There was no significant difference between these two methods, which meant that SS-ETV-AFS could be used to accurately detect Cd in rice with several milligrams of samples instead of the certified value (200 mg) or the recommended mass (200-500 mg) of the methods of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  2. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  3. Nonclassical photon pair generation in atomic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhya, S. N.

    2007-07-15

    A scheme for the generation of nonclassical pairs of photons in atomic vapors is proposed. The scheme exploits the fact that the cross correlation of the emission of photons from the extreme transitions of a four-level cascade system shows antibunching, unlike the case of the three-level cascade emission, which shows bunching. The Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, which is the ratio of the cross-correlation to the autocorrelation function, in this case is estimated to be 10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} for controllable time delay, and is one to four orders of magnitude larger compared to previous experiments. The choice of Doppler-free geometry, in addition to the fact that at three-photon resonance the excitation and deexcitation processes occur in a very narrow frequency band, ensures cleaner signa0008.

  4. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, L.W.

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid - starting as feedwater heating where no vapors are present, progressing to nucleate heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with film heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10 to 30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  5. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  6. Generation and characterization of aerosols and vapors for inhalation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, M I; Wood, G O; Ettinger, H J

    1976-01-01

    Control of aerosol and vapor characteristics that affect the toxicity of inhaled contaminants often determines the methods of generating exposure atmospheres. Generation methods for aerosols and vapors are presented. The characteristics of the resulting exposure atmosphere and the limitations of the various generation methods are discussed. Methods and instruments for measuring the airborne contaminant with respect to various charcteristics are also described. PMID:797565

  7. Nanoparticle labelling-based magnetic immunoassay on chip combined with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Ping; He, Man; Peng, Hanyong; Zhang, Xing

    2011-10-07

    A sensitive and selective on chip magnetic immunoassay method, based on a sandwich-type immunoreaction with PbS nanoparticle (NPs) labels in combination with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS), was proposed for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We designed and fabricated a microfluidic chip for magnetic immunoassay, and the prepared iminodiacetic acid modified silica coated magnetic nanoparticles (IDA-SCMNPs) were packed into the central microchannel to form a solid phase column by self-assembly under the magnetic field. After completion of the immunoreaction involving a primary antibody, CEA and a secondary antibody labeled with PbS NPs on a magnetic solid phase packed-column, ETV-ICP-MS was used to determine the concentration of Pb that was released from the captured PbS NPs using an acid-dissolution step. The concentrations of CEA can be correlated with that of Pb. The established method demonstrated a limit of detection of 0.058 μg L(-1) for CEA, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.7% (c = 10 μg L(-1), n = 7). A linearity ranging from 0.2 μg L(-1) to 50 μg L(-1) and a 2-fold enrichment factor (from 60 μL sample solution to 30 μL eluent) were achieved. The proposed method was further validated by analyzing CEA in human serum. The results were in good agreement with those obtained by chemiluminescent immunoassay, which is currently used as a clinical method. Overall, this method offers the advantages of high speed, high sensitivity, high selectivity, low sample/reagents consumption, high integrity and versatility. Moreover, it can be easily applied to other biological and medical assays.

  8. Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to determine Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in several cereal samples. Thioacetamide was used as the modifier to enhance the ion signals. The background ions at the masses of interest were reduced in intensity significantly by using 1.0 mL min- 1 methane (CH4) as reaction cell gas in the dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Since the sensitivities of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in different matrices were quite different, standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in these cereal samples. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 1, 10, 4, 12 and 2 ng g- 1 for Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se, respectively, in original cereal samples. This procedure has been applied to the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se whose concentrations are in μg g- 1 (except Cr and Se) in standard reference materials (SRM) of National institute of standards and technology (NIST), NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and two cereal samples purchased from a local market. The analysis results of reference materials agreed with certified values at 95% confidence level according to Student's T-test. The results for the real world cereal samples were also found to be in good agreement with the pneumatic nebulization DRC ICP-MS results of the sample solutions.

  9. Ultra-trace determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental water by surfactant assisted dispersive liquid liquid microextraction coupled with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2016-08-01

    A new method by coupling surfactant assisted dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (SA-DLLME) with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) was proposed for the analysis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in environmental water samples. Effective separation of AuNPs from ionic gold species was achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. Various experimental parameters affecting SA-DLLME of AuNPs, such as the organic solvent, organic solvent volume, pH of the sample, the kind of surfactant, surfactant concentration, vortex time, speed of centrifugation, centrifugation time, and different coating as well as sizes of AuNPs were investigated carefully. Furthermore, the interference of coexisting ions, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other metal nanoparticles (NPs) were studied. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 2.2 ng L- 1 and an enrichment factor of 152-fold was achieved for AuNPs, and the original morphology of the AuNPs could be maintained during the extraction process. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of AuNPs in environmental water samples, including tap water, the East Lake water, and the Yangtze River water, with recoveries in the range of 89.6-102%. Compared with the established methods for metal NPs analysis, the proposed method has the merits of simple and fast operation, low detection limit, high selectivity, good tolerance to the sample matrix and no digestion or dilution required. It provides an efficient quantification methodology for monitoring AuNPs' pollution in the environmental water and evaluating its toxicity.

  10. Capillary microextraction combined with fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the determination of trace lanthanum, europium, dysprosium and yttrium in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Hu, Chengguo; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2013-10-15

    In this work, a congo red modified single wall carbon nanotubes (CR-SWCNTs) coated fused-silica capillary was prepared and used for capillary microextraction (CME) of trace amounts of lanthanum (La), europium (Eu), dysprosium (Dy) and yttrium (Y) in human hair followed by fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (FETV-ICP-OES) determination. The adsorption properties and stability of the prepared CR-SWCNTs coated capillary along with the various factors affecting the separation/preconcentration of La, Eu, Dy and Y by CME were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, with a consumption of 2 mL sample solution, a theoretical enrichment factor of 50 and a detection limit (3σ) of 0.12 ng mL(-1) for La, 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Eu, 0.11 ng mL(-1) for Dy and 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Y were obtained, respectively. The preparation reproducibility of the CR-SWCNTs coated capillary was investigated and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were ranging from 4.1% (Eu) to 4.4% (La) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=7) in one batch, and from 5.7% (Eu) to 6.1% (Y) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=5) among different batches. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of real-world human hair sample and the recoveries for the spiked sample were in the range of 93-105%. The method was also applied to the determination of La, Eu, Dy and Y in Certified Reference Material of GBW07601 human hair, and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values.

  11. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  12. Simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic, selenium and tellurium in environmental water samples by dispersive liquid liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    A new method based on dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) was developed for the simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and tellurium (Te) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as both chelating reagent and chemical modifier. As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) were transformed into DDTC-chelates at pH 7 and extracted into the fine droplets formed by injecting the binary solution of bromobenzene (extraction solvent) and methanol (dispersive solvent) into the sample solution. After phase separation by centrifugation, As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) preconcentrated in the organic phase were determined by ETV-ICP-MS. Total inorganic As, Se and Te were obtained by reducing As(V), Se(VI) and Te(VI) to As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) with L-cysteine, which were then subjected to the same DLLME-ETV-ICP-MS process. The concentration of As(V), Se(VI), Te(VI) were calculated by subtracting the concentration of As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) from the total inorganic As, Se and Te, respectively. The main factors affecting the microextraction efficiency and the vaporization behavior of target species were investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection were 2.5, 8.6 and 0.56 ng L(-1) for As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV), respectively, with the relative standard deviations (n=7) of 8.5-9.7%. The developed method was applied to the speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ50004-88, GBW(E)080395 and GBW(E)080548 environmental waters, and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also successfully applied to the simultaneous speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in different environmental water samples with the recoveries in the range of 86.3-107% for the spiked samples.

  13. Dynamic headspace generation and quantitation of triacetone triperoxide vapor.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Braden C; Lubrano, Adam L; Field, Christopher R; Collins, Greg E

    2014-02-28

    Two methods for quantitation of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor using a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet coupled to a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) have been demonstrated. The dynamic headspace of bulk TATP was mixed with clean humid air to produce a TATP vapor stream. Sampling via a heated transfer line to a PTV inlet with a Tenax-TA™ filled liner allowed for direct injection of the vapor stream to a GC/MS for vapor quantitation. TATP was extracted from the vapor stream and subsequently desorbed from the PTV liner for splitless injection on the GC column. Calibration curves were prepared using solution standards with a standard split/splitless GC inlet for quantitation of the TATP vapor. Alternatively, vapor was sampled onto a Tenax-TA™ sample tube and placed into a thermal desorption system. In this instance, vapor was desorbed from the tube and subsequently trapped on a liquid nitrogen cooled PTV inlet. Calibration curves for this method were prepared from direct liquid injection of standards onto samples tube with the caveat that a vacuum is applied to the tube during deposition to ensure that the volatile TATP penetrates into the tube. Vapor concentration measurements, as determined by either GC/MS analysis or mass gravimetry of the bulk TATP, were statistically indistinguishable. Different approaches to broaden the TATP vapor dynamic range, including diluent air flow, sample chamber temperature, sample vial orifice size, and sample size are discussed. Vapor concentrations between 50 and 5400ngL(-1) are reported, with stable vapor generation observed for as long as 60 consecutive hours.

  14. Continuous flow, explosives vapor generator and sensor chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Greg E.; Giordano, Braden C.; Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Ananth, Ramagopal; Hammond, Mark; Merritt, Charles D.; Tucker, John E.; Malito, Michael; Eversole, Jay D.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A novel liquid injection vapor generator (LIVG) is demonstrated that is amenable to low vapor pressure explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine. The LIVG operates in a continuous manner, providing a constant and stable vapor output over a period of days and whose concentration can be extended over as much as three orders of magnitude. In addition, a large test atmosphere chamber attached to the LIVG is described, which enables the generation of a stable test atmosphere with controllable humidity and temperature. The size of the chamber allows for the complete insertion of testing instruments or arrays of materials into a uniform test atmosphere, and various electrical feedthroughs, insertion ports, and sealed doors permit simple and effective access to the sample chamber and its vapor.

  15. Spectral probing of impact-generated vapor in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Eberhardy, Clara A.

    2015-03-01

    High-speed spectra of hypervelocity impacts at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) captured the rapidly evolving conditions of impact-generated vapor as a function of impact angle, viewpoint, and time (within the first 50 μs). Impact speeds possible at the AVGR (<7 km/s) are insufficient to induce significant vaporization in silicates, other than the high-temperature (but low-mass) jetting component created at first contact. Consequently, this study used powdered dolomite as a proxy for surveying the evolution and distribution of chemical constituents within much longer lasting vapor. Seven separate telescopes focused on different portions of the impact vapor plume and were connected through quartz fibers to two 0.35 cm monochromaters. Quarter-space experiments reduced the thermal background and opaque phases due to condensing particles and heated projectile fragments while different exposure times isolated components passing through different the fields of view, both above and below the surface within the growing transient cavity. At early times (<5 μs), atomic emission lines dominate the spectra. At later times, molecular emission lines dominate the composition of the vapor plume along a given direction. Layered targets and target mixtures isolated the source and reveal that much of the vaporization comes from the uppermost surface. Collisions by projectile fragments downrange also make significant contributions for impacts below 60° (from the horizontal). Further, impacts into mixtures of silicates with powdered dolomite reveal that frictional heating must play a role in vapor production. Such results have implications for processes controlling vaporization on planetary surfaces including volatile release, atmospheric evolution (formation and erosion), vapor generated by the Deep Impact collision, and the possible consequences of the Chicxulub impact.

  16. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  17. Techniques for the generation and monitoring of vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.O.

    1981-02-06

    Controlled test atmospheres can be produced using a variety of techniques. Gases are usually generated by using flow dilution methods while vapors are produced by using solvent injection and vaporization, saturation, permeation and diffusion techniques. The resulting gas mixtures can be monitored and measured using flame ionization, photoionization, electrochemical and infrared analytical systems. An ideal system for the production of controlled test atmospheres would not only be able to generate controlled test atmospheres, but also monitor all pertinent environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and air flow.

  18. Vapor-Generator Wand Helps To Reveal Airflow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B.

    1993-01-01

    In vapor-generator wand, liquid propylene glycol flows into electrically heated stainless-steel tube. Liquid boils in heated tube, and emerging vapor forms dense, smoke-like fog used to make airflow patterns visible. Built in variety of sizes, suitable for uses ranging from tabletop demonstrations to research in wind tunnels. For best viewing, plume illuminated by bright, focused incandescent spotlight at right angle to viewing direction. Viewing further enhanced by coating walls of test chamber with flat, dark color to minimize reflections and increase contrast.

  19. Novel bimodal porous N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane-silica monolithic capillary microextraction and its application to the fractionation of aluminum in rainwater and fruit juice by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Hu, Bin

    2008-01-01

    A novel bimodal porous N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AAPTS)-silica monolithic capillary was prepared by sol-gel technology, and used as capillary microextraction (CME) column for aluminum fractionation by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV)-ICP-MS with the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) slurry as fluorinating agent. The extraction behaviors of different Al species were studied and it was found that in the pH range of 4-7, labile monomeric Al (free Al 3+, Al-OH and Al-F) could be retained quantitatively on the monolithic capillary, while non-labile monomeric Al (Al-Cit and Al-EDTA) passed through the capillary directly. The labile monomeric Al retained on monolithic capillary was eluted with 10 μL 1 mol L - 1 HCl and the elution was introduced into the ETV for fluorination assisted ETV-ICP-MS determination. The total monomeric Al fraction was also determined by AAPTS-silica monolithic CME-fluorination-assisted electrothermal vaporization (FETV)-ICP-MS after the sample solution was adjusted to pH 8.8. Non-labile monomeric Al was obtained by subtracting labile monomeric Al from the total monomeric Al. Under the optimized conditions, the relative standard deviation (R.S.D) was 6.2% ( C = 1 μg L - 1 , n = 7; sample volume, 5 mL), and the limit of detection was 1.6 ng L - 1 for Al with an enrichment factor of 436 fold and a sampling frequency of 9 h - 1 . The prepared AAPTS-silica monolithic capillary showed an excellent pH tolerance and solvent stability and could be used for more than 250 times without decreasing adsorption efficiency. The developed method was applied to the fraction of Al in rainwater and fruit juice, and the results demonstrated that the established system had advantages over the existing 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) chelating system for Al fractionation such as wider pH range, higher tolerance of interference and better regeneration.

  20. Studies of interfaces and vapors with Optical Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, Christopher Shane

    1993-12-01

    Optical Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) has been applied to the study of soap-like molecules adsorbed to the water-air interface. By calibrating the signal from a soluble monolayer with that of an insoluble homolog, absolute measurements of the surface density could be obtained and related to the bulk concentration and surface tension. We could then demonstrate that the soluble surfactant forms a single monolayer at the interface. Furthermore, it deviates significantly from the ideal case in that its activity coefficients are far from 1, yet those coefficients remain constant over a broad range of surface pressures. We present evidence of a first-order phase transition taking place during the adsorption of this soluble monolayer. We consider the effects of the non-ideal behavior and the phase transition on the microscopic model of adsorption, and formulate an alternative to the Langmuir picture of adsorption which is just as simple, yet it can more easily allow for non-ideal behavior. The second half of this thesis considers the problem of SHG in bulk metal vapors. The symmetry of the vapor forbids SHG, yet it has been observed. We consider several models whereby the symmetry of the vapor is broken by the presence of the laser and compare their predictions to new observations we have made using a few-picosecond laser pulse. The two-lobed output beam profile shows that it is the vapor-plus-beam combination whose symmetry is important. The dependence on vapor pressure demonstrates the coherent nature of the radiation, while the dependence on buffer gas pressure hints at a change of the symmetry in time. The time-dependence is measured directly with a preliminary pump-probe measurement. The magnitude and intensity dependence of the signal are also measured. All but one of the models are eliminated by this comparison.

  1. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12). (a) Organic fluid vaporizer generators and parts thereof shall meet...

  2. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12). (a) Organic fluid vaporizer generators and parts thereof shall meet...

  3. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12). (a) Organic fluid vaporizer generators and parts thereof shall meet...

  4. Direct atomic absorption determination of cadmium and lead in strongly interfering matrices by double vaporization with a two-step electrothermal atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinshtein, Ilia L.; Vilpan, Yuri A.; Saraev, Alexei V.; Vasilieva, Lubov A.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal pretreatment of a sample using double vaporization in a two-step atomizer with a purged vaporizer makes possible the direct analysis of samples with strongly interfering matrices including solids. A porous-graphite capsule or a filter inserted into the vaporizer is used for solid sample analysis. The technique was used for the direct determination of Cd and Pb in human urine, potatoes, wheat, bovine liver, milk powder, grass-cereal mixtures, caprolactam, bituminous-shale and polyvinyl chloride plastic without chemical modification or any other sample pretreatment.

  5. Photoacoustic-pulse generation and propagation in a metal vapor.

    PubMed

    Tam, A C; Zapka, W; Chiang, K; Imaino, W

    1982-01-01

    Photoacoustic-pulse generation by breakdown is achieved in dense cesium metal vapors of vapor pressures ranging from 2 to 130 Torr by using a dye laser pulse of energy variable from 10(-6) to 10(-3) J, tuned to the Cs transition at 6010 A. The acoustic-pulse propagation is detected by the transient photorefractive deflection of a cw probe laser beam that is displaced from but parallel to the pulsed laser beam. The temperature-dependent velocity of infinitesimal ultrasonic waves in a corrosive metal vapor is measured for the first time. The supersonic propagation of finite amplitude acoustic pulses (blast waves) obtained with a higher pulse energy is also studied. Our data, with Mach numbers ranging from 2.1 down to below 1.01, agree surprisingly well with the prediction of Vlases and Jones for cylindrical blast waves. This provides a new experimental support for their theoretical trajectory formula for blast waves in the extremely weak amplitude limit.

  6. Dual extraction based on solid phase extraction and solidified floating organic drop microextraction for speciation of arsenic and its distribution in tea leaves and tea infusion by electrothermal vaporization ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhong; Li, Jianfen; Lu, Dengbo; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-15

    A dual extraction based on solid phase extraction (SPE) and solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) was developed for As species in tea leaves and tea infusion by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, including total, suspended, soluble, organic and inorganic As as well as As(III) and As(V). In SPE step, titanium dioxide nanotubes were used for preconcentration of analytes and removal of sample matrix. Elution solution from SPE was employed for further preconcentration and separation of analytes with SFODME. Under optimal conditions, detection limits of this method were 0.046 and 0.072pgmL(-1) with relative standard deviations of 6.3% and 5.8% for As(III) and As(V) (n=9, c=1.0ngmL(-1)), respectively. A preconcentration factor of 500-fold was achieved for As(III) and As(V). This method was successfully applied for analysis of speciation of arsenic and its distribution in tea leaves, tea infusion and certified reference material of tea leaves.

  7. Selective separation of La3+ and lanthanum organic complexes with nanometer-sized titanium dioxide and their detection by using fluorination-assisted electrothermal vaporization ICP-AES with in-situ matrix removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengqing; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Zucheng; Liang, Pei; Li, Xuan; Xia, Linbo

    2004-04-01

    A new method for the determination of free La3+ and La organic complexes in solution using a nanometer-sized titanium dioxide as solid-phase extractant and fluorination-assisted electrothermal vaporization (FETV)-ICP-AES as sensitive detector has been developed. The effect of pH on the adsorption characteristics of La3+ and La complexes of citric acid, 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA), and humic acid on nanometer-sized TiO2 was investigated and optimized. On the basis of the difference in volatility between fluoride of analyte (lanthanum) and the fluoride of matrix (titanium), an in-situ removal of the adsorbent matrix (TiO2) from a graphite furnace was realized. Therefore, the free La3+ and adsorbed La complexes on nanometer-sized titanium dioxide could be determined respectively by FETV-ICP-AES without any other chemical pretreatment. The proposed method was applied for the determination of free ion (La3+) and La complexes in synthetic solutions and soil extracts with satisfactory results.

  8. Versatile thin-film reactor for photochemical vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chengbin; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Brophy, Christine; Hou, Xiandeng

    2010-04-01

    A novel thin-film reactor is described and evaluated for its analytical performance with photochemical vapor generation (TF-PVG). The device, comprising both the generator and a gas-liquid separator, utilizes a vertical central quartz rod onto which the sample is pumped to yield a thin liquid film conducive to the rapid escape of generated hydrophobic species. The rod is housed within a concentric quartz tube through which a flow of argon carrier/stripping gas is passed to remove and transport the generated species to a detector, which in this study is an inductively coupled argon plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). The concentric quartz tube is itself surrounded by a 78-turn 0.5 m long quartz coil low-pressure mercury discharge lamp operating at 20 W. The performance of this thin-film photoreactor was evaluated through comparison of analytical figures of merit for detection of a number of elements undergoing PVG in the presence of formic or acetic acid with those arising from conventional solution nebulization under optimized conditions. The TF-PVG reactor provided sensitivity enhancements, of 110-, 120-, 130-, 250-, 120-, 230-, 78-, 1.3-, 16-, and 32-fold for As, Sb, Bi, Se, Te, Hg, Ni, Co, Fe, and I, respectively, and detection limit enhancements of 110-, 140-, 170-, 270-, 200-, 300-, 160-, 2.7-, 50-, and 44-fold for these same elements. Vapor generation efficiencies ranged from 20-100% for this suite of analytes. The utility of this technique was demonstrated by the determination of Fe and Ni in Certified Reference Materials DORM-3 (fish protein) and DOLT-4 (dogfish liver tissue).

  9. Micro- and nano-volume samples by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction using removable, interchangeable and portable rhenium coiled-filament assemblies and axially-viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; Lai, Bryant; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-11-01

    An electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction for micro- or nano-volume samples is described. Samples were pipetted onto coiled-filament assemblies that were purposely developed to be removable and interchangeable and were dried and vaporized into a small-volume vaporization chamber that clips onto any ICP torch with a ball joint. Interchangeable assemblies were also constructed to be small-size (e.g., less than 3 cm long with max diameter of 0.65 cm) and light-weight (1.4 g) so that they can be portable. Interchangeable assemblies with volume-capacities in three ranges (i.e., < 1 μL, 1-10 μL and 10-100 μL) were fabricated and used. The horizontally-operated NTV sample introduction was interfaced to an axially-viewed ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry) system and NTV was optimized using ICP-AES and 8 elements (Pb, Cd, Zn, V, Ba, Mg, Be and Ca). Precision was 1.0-2.3% (peak height) and 1.1-2.4% (peak area). Detection limits (obtained using 5 μL volumes) expressed in absolute-amounts ranged between 4 pg for Pb to 0.3 fg (~ 5 million atoms) for Ca. Detection limits expressed in concentration units (obtained using 100 μL volumes of diluted, single-element standard solutions) were: 50 pg/mL for Pb; 10 pg/mL for Cd; 9 pg/mL for Zn; 1 pg/mL for V; 0.9 pg/mL for Ba; 0.5 pg/mL for Mg; 50 fg/mL for Be; and 3 fg/mL for Ca. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Pb in pg/mL levels of diluted natural water Certified Reference Material (CRM) and the determination of Zn in 80 nL volumes of the liquid extracted from an individual vesicle. It is shown that portable and interchangeable assemblies with dried sample residues on them can be transported without analyte loss (for the concentrations tested), thus opening up the possibility for "taking part of the lab to the sample" applications, such as testing for Cu concentration-compliance with the lead-copper rule of the Environmental

  10. The electrothermal ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.; Mitchell, C. E.; Shaw, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    An electrothermal ramjet configuration is examined as a possible alternative to rail guns and mass drivers for high acceleration launch missions. For a specific mission (earth escape) the idealized performance of the electrothermal ramjet, the electrothermal rocket and the electromagnetic acceleration system are compared. This comparison indicates that the gross performance of the ramjet compares favorably with that of the ideal electromagnetic acceleration system. A specific configuration for the ramjet is chosen and models for the dynamics, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics are presented. Results of calculations for a typical supersonic launch cycle suggest that pressure, temperature and power demand profiles associated with ramjet operation should be reasonable. A light gas gun is proposed to accelerate the vehicle to the critical velocity where efficient ramjet operation can begin. The theoretical performance of the ramjet is also shown to be substantially better than that of the light gas gun at high velocities.

  11. Direct determination of cadmium in foods by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a tungsten coil trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Mao, Xuefei; Liu, Jixin; Wang, Min; Qian, Yongzhong; Gao, Chengling; Qi, Yuehan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a solid sampling device consisting of a tungsten coil trap, porous carbon vaporizer and on-line ashing furnace of a Ni-Cr coil was interfaced with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A modified double gas circuit system was employed that was composed of carrier and supplemental gas lines controlled by separate gas mass flow controllers. For Cd determination in food samples using the assembled solid sampling ICP-MS, the optimal ashing and vaporization conditions, flow rate of the argon-hydrogen (Ar/H2) (v:v = 24:1) carrier gas and supplemental gas, and minimum sampling mass were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of quantification was 0.5 pg and the relative standard deviation was within a 10.0% error range (n = 10). Furthermore, the mean spiked recoveries for various food samples were 99.4%-105.9% (n = 6). The Cd concentrations measured by the proposed method were all within the certified values of the reference materials or were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from those of the microwave digestion ICP-MS method, demonstrating the good accuracy and precision of the solid sampling ICP-MS method for Cd determination in food samples.

  12. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  13. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter A.; London, Richard A.; Strauss, Moshe; Glinsky, Michael E.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Celliers, Peter M.; Visuri, Steven R.; Bailey, David S.; Young, David A.; Ho, Darwin; Lin, Charles P.; Kelly, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks [Lin and Kelly, SPIE 2391, 294 (1995)].

  14. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    DOEpatents

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  15. Electromagnetic Properties of Impact-Generated Plasma, Vapor and Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.A.; Schultz, P.H.

    1998-11-02

    Plasma, vapor and debris associated with an impact or explosive event have been demonstrated in the laboratory to produce radiofrequency and optical electromagnetic emissions that can be diagnostic of the event. Such effects could potentially interfere with communications or remote sensing equipment if an impact occurred, for example, on a satellite. More seriously, impact generated plasma could end the life of a satellite by mechanisms that are not well understood and not normally taken into account in satellite design. For example, arc/discharge phenomena resulting from highly conductive plasma acting as a current path across normally shielded circuits may have contributed to the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite on August 11, 1993. The possibility of significant storm activity during the Leonid meteor showers of November 1998, 1999 and 2000 (impact velocity, 72 km/s) has heightened awareness of potential vulnerabilities from hypervelocity electromagnetic effects to orbital assets. The concern is justified. The amount of plasma, electrostatic charge and the magnitude of the resulting currents and electric fields scale nearly as the cube of the impact velocity. Even for microscopic Leonid impacts, the amount of plasma approaches levels that could be dangerous to spacecraft electronics. The degree of charge separation that occurs during hypervelocity impacts scales linearly with impactor mass. The resulting magnetic fields increase linearly with impactor radius and could play a significant role in our understanding of the paleomagnetism of planetary surfaces. The electromagnetic properties of plasma produced by hypervelocity impact have been exploited by researchers as a diagnostic tool, invoked to potentially explain the magnetically jumbled state of the lunar surface and blamed for the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite. The production of plasma in and around an impact event can lead to several effects: (1) the

  16. Electrothermal oscillations and the quasilinear theory of electron enthalpy fluctuations in magnetohydrodynamic generators and magnetoplasmadynamic arc thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Flucturations in electron density and temperature coupled through OHM's Law are studied for MHD power generator and MPD arc thruster applications. The dispersion relation based on linear theory is derived, and the two limiting cases of infinite ionization rate and frozen flow are examined. The nonlinear effects of the frozen flow case are then studied in the quasilinear limit. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation and its effect upon Ohm's Law and the electron temperature equation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined, and effective transport properties are determined.

  17. Tellurium speciation analysis using hydride generation in situ trapping electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and ruthenium or palladium modified graphite tubes.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Emrah; Akay, Pınar; Arslan, Yasin; Bakirdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2012-12-15

    Speciation of tellurium can be achieved by making use of different kinetic behaviors of Te(IV) and Te(VI) upon their reaction with sodium borohydride using hydride generation. While Te(IV) can form H(2)Te, Te(VI) will not form any volatile species during the course of hydride formation and measurement by atomic absorption spectrometry. Quantitative reduction of Te(VI) was achieved through application of a microwave assisted prereduction of Te(VI) in 6.0 mol/L HCl solution. Enhanced sensitivity was achieved by in situ trapping of the generated H(2)Te species in a previously heated graphite furnace whose surface was modified using Pd or Ru. Overall efficiency for in situ trapping in pyrolytically coated graphite tube surface was found to be 15% when volatile analyte species are trapped for 60s at 300°C. LOD and LOQ values were calculated as 0.086 ng/mL and 0.29 ng/mL, respectively. Efficiency was increased to 46% and 36% when Pd and Ru surface modifiers were used, respectively. With Ru modified graphite tube 173-fold enhancement was obtained over 180 s trapping period with respect to ETAAS; the tubes could be used for 250 cycles. LOD values were 0.0064 and 0.0022 ng/mL for Pd and Ru treated ETAAS systems, respectively, for 180 s collection of 9.6 mL sample solution.

  18. Vapor bubble generation around gold nano-particles and its application to damaging of cells.

    PubMed

    Kitz, M; Preisser, S; Wetterwald, A; Jaeger, M; Thalmann, G N; Frenz, M

    2011-01-11

    We investigated vapor bubbles generated upon irradiation of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses. Bubble formation was studied both with optical and acoustic means on supported single gold nanoparticles and single nanoparticles in suspension. Formation thresholds determined at different wavelengths indicate a bubble formation efficiency increasing with the irradiation wavelength. Vapor bubble generation in Bac-1 cells containing accumulations of the same particles was also investigated at different wavelengths. Similarly, they showed an increasing cell damage efficiency for longer wavelengths. Vapor bubbles generated by single laser pulses were about half the cell size when inducing acute damage.

  19. Vaporization and compatibility of SiGe radioisotope thermoelectric generators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staley, H. G.; Rovner, L. H.; Snowden, D.; Elsner, N. B.

    1972-01-01

    The limiting operating temperatures of SiGe thermoelectrics designed for extended operation are set by sublimation process of the elements and by considerations of their compatibility with the surrounding insulating elements. Mass spectrometric Knudsen cell and Langmuir vaporization modes of operation have been utilized in the study of the equilibrium vapor species and in the time evaluation of the sublimation process. Isothermal high-vacuum (1 ntorr) anneals of samples have extended observations to long-time spans. The time variations follow the formation of surface depletion layers due to disproportional rates of sublimation of the various species.

  20. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer generators... requirements of PVG-1 through PVG-12 of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated...

  1. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer generators... requirements of PVG-1 through PVG-12 of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated...

  2. Laboratory experiments and thermal calculations for the development of a next-generation glacier-ice exploration system: Development of an electro-thermal drilling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Yuko; Saito, Sosuke; Osada, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Motoyama, Hideaki; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yoichi

    A next-generation drilling system, equipped with a thermal drilling device, is proposed for glacier ice. The system is designed to penetrate glacier ice via melting of the ice and continuously analyze melt-water in a contamination-free sonde. This new type of drilling system is expected to provide analysis data in less time and at less cost than existing systems. Because of the limited number of parameters that can be measured, the proposed system will not take the place of conventional drilling systems that are used to obtain ice cores; however, it will provide a useful method for quickly and simply investigating glacier ice. An electro-thermal drilling device is one of the most important elements needed to develop the proposed system. To estimate the thermal supply required to reach a target depth in a reasonable time, laboratory experiments were conducted using ice blocks and a small sonde equipped solely with heaters. Thermal calculations were then performed under a limited range of conditions. The experiments were undertaken to investigate the effects of the shape and material of the drill head and heater temperature on the rate of penetration into the ice. Additional thermal calculations were then performed based on the experimental results. According to the simple thermal calculations, if the thermal loss that occurs while heat is transferred from the heater to ice (in melting the ice) is assumed to be 50%, the total thermal supply required for heaters in the sonde and cable is as follows: (i) 4.8 kW (sonde) plus 0 W (cable) to penetrate to 300 m depth over 10 days into temperate glacier ice for which the temperature is 0 °C at all depths and to maintain a water layer along 300 m of cable; (ii) 10 kW (sonde) plus 19-32 kW (cable) to penetrate to 1000 m depth over 1 month into cold glacier ice for which the temperature is -25 °C at the surface and 0 °C at 1000 m depth and to maintain a water layer along 1000 m of cable; and (iii) 19 kW (sonde) plus 140

  3. Electrothermal pumping with interdigitated electrodes and resistive heaters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stuart J; Green, Nicolas G

    2015-08-01

    Interdigitated electrodes are used in electrokinetic lab-on-a-chip devices for dielectrophoretic trapping and characterization of suspended particles, as well as the production of field-induced fluid flow via AC electroosomosis and electrothermal mechanisms. However, the optimum design for dielectrophoresis, that if symmetrical electrodes, cannot induce bulk electrohydrodynamic pumping. In addition, the mechanism of intrinsic electrothermal pumping is affected by the properties of the fluid, with thermal fields being generated by Joule Heating. This work demonstrates the incorporation of an underlying thin film heater, electrically isolated from the interdigitated electrodes by an insulator layer, to enhance bulk electrothermal pumping. The use of integrated heaters allows the thermal field generation to be controlled independently of the electric field. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the importance of geometrical arrangement of the heater with respect to the interdigitated electrodes, as well as electrode size, spacing, and arrangement. The optimization of such a system is a careful balance between electrokinetics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics. The heater location and electrode spacing influence the rate of electrothermal pumping significantly more than electrode width and insulator layer thickness. This demonstration will aid in the development of microfluidic electrokinetic systems that want to utilize the advantages associated with electrothermal pumping while simultaneously applying other lab-on-a-chip electrokinetics like dielectrophoresis.

  4. A bibliography of electrothermal thruster technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Hardy, T. L.; Englehart, M.

    1986-01-01

    Electrothermal propulsion concepts are briefly discussed as an introduction to a bibliography and author index. Nearly 700 citations are given for resistojets, thermal arcjets, pulsed electrothermal thrusters, microwave heated devices, solar thermal thrusters, and laser thermal thrusters.

  5. Laboratory and field measurements of vapors generated by organic materials in drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Candler, J.; Churan, M.; Conn, L.

    1996-11-01

    In an era of increasing awareness of worker health issues one of the key concerns in exploration activities is the exposure of wellsite personnel to vapors generated by organic materials in drilling fluids. Areas on the drilling location with the highest exposure potentials are the shale shakers and mud pits. These areas are often enclosed in rooms and ventilated to prevent unhealthy levels of vapors from accumulating. In continuing efforts to minimize health risks, new products are evaluated to minimize the volatility of organic materials used in drilling fluids. This study presents a laboratory technique for measuring vapors generated from organic materials in drilling fluids. Using this technique, data will be presented comparing the volume of vapors generated from diesel oils, mineral oils, synthetic fluids and a water-miscible glycol. Field data collected from the shaker and mud pit areas of drilling operations will be used to validate the laboratory study to field conditions. The potential health effects of the collected vapors will be reviewed.

  6. Generation of Shock-Wave Disturbances at Plasma-Vapor Bubble Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N. S.; Yudin, A. S.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    The complex physical and mathematical model describing all steps of plasma-vapor bubble evolution in the system of the water-ground condensed media is presented. Discharge circuit operation, discharge plasma channel expansion, its transformation into the vapor-plasma bubble and its pulsation, pressure wave generation and propagation of the mechanical stress waves in the ground are self-consistently considered in the model. The model allows investigation of the basic laws of stored energy transformation into the discharge plasma channel, next to the plasma-vapor bubble and transformation of this energy to the energy of pressure wave compressing the surrounding ground. Power characteristics of wave disturbances generated by gas-vapor bubble oscillation in liquid depending on the circuit parameters are analyzed for the prediction of the ground boundary displacement. The dynamics of the shock-wave propagation in water-ground condensed media depending on the rate of the plasma channel energy release is investigated. Simulation of the shock-wave phenomena at a plasma-vapor bubble oscillation in condensed media consecutively describes the physical processes underlying technology for producing piles by electro-discharge stuffing. The quantitative model verified by physical experimental tests will allow optimization of pulse generator parameters and electrode system construction of high-voltage equipment.

  7. Microwave-enhanced cold vapor generation for speciation analysis of mercury by atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Long, Zhou; Liu, Liwei; Zhou, Qin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Zheng, Chengbin

    2012-05-30

    A new and simple cold vapor generation technique utilizing microwave irradiation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry is developed for the speciation analysis of mercury in biological and geological samples. In the presence of formic acid, inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) and total mercury (both Hg(2+) and methylmercury (MeHg)) can be converted to mercury cold vapor (Hg(0)) by microwave irradiation without and with H(2)O(2), respectively. The cold vapor was subsequently released from the liquid phase and rapidly transported to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for the mercury detection. Optimum conditions for vapor generation as well as interferences from concomitant ions were carefully investigated. The conventionally required evaporation of the remnants of acid or oxidants was avoided because no significant interferences from these substances were observed, and thus analyte loss and potential contamination were minimized. A limit of detection of 0.005 ng mL(-1) for total mercury or inorganic mercury was obtained. A precision of less than 3% (RSD) at 2 μg L(-1) of mercury species was typical. The accuracy of the method was validated by determination of mercury in geological and biological certified reference materials. The speciation analysis of Hg(2+) and MeHg was achieved by controlling the conditions of microwave-enhanced cold vapor generation and validated via determination of Certified Reference Materials DORM-2, DORM-3 and a real river water sample.

  8. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  9. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  10. Testing and Results of Human Metabolic Simulation Utilizing Ultrasonic Nebulizer Technology for Water Vapor Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbe, Matthew; Curley, Su

    2010-01-01

    Life support technology must be evaluated thoroughly before ever being implemented into a functioning design. A major concern during that evaluation is safety. The ability to mimic human metabolic loads allows test engineers to evaluate the effectiveness of new technologies without risking injury to any actual humans. The main function of most life support technologies is the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) vapor. As such any good human metabolic simulator (HMS) will mimic the human body s ability to produce these items. Introducing CO2 into a test chamber is a very straightforward process with few unknowns so the focus of this particular new HMS design was on the much more complicated process of introducing known quantities of H2O vapor on command. Past iterations of the HMS have utilized steam which is very hard to keep in vapor phase while transporting and injecting into a test chamber. Also steam adds large quantities of heat to any test chamber, well beyond what an actual human does. For the new HMS an alternative approach to water vapor generation was designed utilizing ultrasonic nebulizers as a method for creating water vapor. Ultrasonic technology allows water to be vibrated into extremely tiny pieces (2-5 microns) and evaporate without requiring additional heating. Doing this process inside the test chamber itself allows H2O vapor generation without the unwanted heat and the challenging process of transporting water vapor. This paper presents the design details as well as results of all initial and final acceptance system testing. Testing of the system was performed at a range of known human metabolic rates in both sea-level and reduced pressure environments. This multitude of test points fully defines the systems capabilities as they relate to actual environmental systems testing.

  11. Removal of Water Vapor in a Mist Singlet Oxygen Generator for Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Shigeki; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2004-02-01

    The mist singlet oxygen generator (Mist-SOG) for a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) has been developed in order to increase basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) utilization. It was clarified that the Mist-SOG generated much more water vapor than conventional SOGs because the heat capacity of BHP is small. The water vapor deactivates the excited iodine and depresses the laser power. Therefore, a jet-cold trap was developed in order to remove the water vapor while maintaining a minimum deactivation of singlet oxygen. In this method, a nozzle was used to spray chilled H2O2 at 238 K as a thin layer directly to the gas flow to achieve a large specific surface area for water vapor. As a result, the water vapor mole fraction was reduced to 7% from 18% with the BHP utilization of 21% at the Cl2 consumption rate of 3.5 mmol/s (Cl2 input flow rate of 8.0 mmol/s) for 65-μm-diameter BHP droplets.

  12. Advancements in oxygen generation and humidity control by water vapor electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Sudar, M.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of manned spacecraft atmospheres or other manned habitats are essential for realization of long-term space missions. These processes include oxygen generation through water electrolysis. One promising technique of water electrolysis is the direct conversion of the water vapor contained in the cabin air to oxygen. This technique is the subject of the present program on water vapor electrolysis development. The objectives were to incorporate technology improvements developed under other similar electrochemical programs and add new ones; design and fabricate a mutli-cell electrochemical module and a testing facility; and demonstrate through testing the improvements. Each aspect of the water vapor electrolysis cell was reviewed. The materials of construction and sizing of each element were investigated analytically and sometime experimentally. In addition, operational considerations such as temperature control in response to inlet conditions were investigated. Three specific quantitative goals were established.

  13. Optimized design for an electrothermal microactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎlimǎnescu, Ioan; Stan, Liviu-Constantin; Popa, Viorica

    2015-02-01

    In micromechanical structures, electrothermal actuators are known to be capable of providing larger force and reasonable tip deflection compared to electrostatic ones. Many studies have been devoted to the analysis of the flexure actuators. One of the most popular electrothermal actuators is called `U-shaped' actuator. The device is composed of two suspended beams with variable cross sections joined at the free end, which constrains the tip to move in an arcing motion while current is passed through the actuator. The goal of this research is to determine via FEA the best fitted geometry of the microactuator (optimization input parameters) in order to render some of the of the output parameters such as thermal strain or total deformations to their maximum values. The software to generate the CAD geometry was SolidWorks 2010 and all the FEA analysis was conducted with Ansys 13 TM. The optimized model has smaller geometric values of the input parameters that is a more compact geometry; The maximum temperature reached a smaller value for the optimized model; The calculated heat flux is with 13% bigger for the optimized model; the same for Joule Heat (26%), Total deformation (1.2%) and Thermal Strain (8%). By simple optimizing the design the dimensions and the performance of the micro actuator resulted more compact and more efficient.

  14. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    PubMed

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. CHEMISTRY OF IMPACT-GENERATED SILICATE MELT-VAPOR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Channon; Fegley, Bruce Jr.

    2013-04-10

    In the giant impact theory for lunar origin, the Moon forms from material ejected by the impact into an Earth-orbiting disk. Here we report the initial results from a silicate melt-vapor equilibrium chemistry model for such impact-generated planetary debris disks. In order to simulate the chemical behavior of a two-phase (melt+vapor) disk, we calculate the temperature-dependent pressure and chemical composition of vapor in equilibrium with molten silicate from 2000 to 4000 K. We consider the elements O, Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti, and Zn for a range of bulk silicate compositions (Earth, Moon, Mars, eucrite parent body, angrites, and ureilites). In general, the disk atmosphere is dominated by Na, Zn, and O{sub 2} at lower temperatures (<3000 K) and SiO, O{sub 2}, and O at higher temperatures. The high-temperature chemistry is consistent for any silicate melt composition, and we thus expect abundant SiO, O{sub 2}, and O to be a common feature of hot, impact-generated debris disks. In addition, the saturated silicate vapor is highly oxidizing, with oxygen fugacity (f{sub O{sub 2}}) values (and hence H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO ratios) several orders of magnitude higher than those in a solar-composition gas. High f{sub O{sub 2}} values in the disk atmosphere are found for any silicate composition because oxygen is the most abundant element in rock. We thus expect high oxygen fugacity to be a ubiquitous feature of any silicate melt-vapor disk produced via collisions between rocky planets.

  16. Chemical vapor generation for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy: vaporization of antimony(III) with bromide.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Molinero, A; Mendoza, O; Callizo, A; Chamorro, P; Castillo, J R

    2002-10-01

    A new method for antimony determination in soils is proposed. It is based on the chemical vapor generation of Sb(III) with bromide, after a reaction in sulfuric acid media and transport of the gaseous phase into an inductively coupled plasma for atomic emission spectrometry. The experimental variables influencing the method were delimited by experimental design and the most important were finally optimized by the modified Simplex method. In optimized conditions the method involves the reaction of 579 microl concentrated sulfuric acid with 120 microl 5% w/v KBr and 250 microl antimony solution. Measurement of antimony emission intensity at 217.581 nm provides a method with an absolute detection limit of 3.5 ng and a precision (RSD) of 5.8% for the injection of five replicates of 175 ng Sb(III) (250 microl of 0.7 microg ml(-1) solution). The interference of common anions and cations on the antimony signal was evaluated. A 21% Sb(III) volatilization efficiency was calculated from the mean of six experiments at optimum conditions. The accuracy of the methodology was checked by the analysis of one standard reference soil after acid decomposition heating in a microwave oven.

  17. Generation of real-time mode high-resolution water vapor fields from GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chen; Penna, Nigel T.; Li, Zhenhong

    2017-02-01

    Pointwise GPS measurements of tropospheric zenith total delay can be interpolated to provide high-resolution water vapor maps which may be used for correcting synthetic aperture radar images, for numeral weather prediction, and for correcting Network Real-time Kinematic GPS observations. Several previous studies have addressed the importance of the elevation dependency of water vapor, but it is often a challenge to separate elevation-dependent tropospheric delays from turbulent components. In this paper, we present an iterative tropospheric decomposition interpolation model that decouples the elevation and turbulent tropospheric delay components. For a 150 km × 150 km California study region, we estimate real-time mode zenith total delays at 41 GPS stations over 1 year by using the precise point positioning technique and demonstrate that the decoupled interpolation model generates improved high-resolution tropospheric delay maps compared with previous tropospheric turbulence- and elevation-dependent models. Cross validation of the GPS zenith total delays yields an RMS error of 4.6 mm with the decoupled interpolation model, compared with 8.4 mm with the previous model. On converting the GPS zenith wet delays to precipitable water vapor and interpolating to 1 km grid cells across the region, validations with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer near-IR water vapor product show 1.7 mm RMS differences by using the decoupled model, compared with 2.0 mm for the previous interpolation model. Such results are obtained without differencing the tropospheric delays or water vapor estimates in time or space, while the errors are similar over flat and mountainous terrains, as well as for both inland and coastal areas.

  18. Electrothermal branding for embryo labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Beebe, D J; Williams, A R; Easley, K D

    1997-11-01

    A novel embryo labeling technique based on electrothermal branding is developed. Two types of micro branding irons are fabricated and tested. One utilizes 25 microns tungsten wire as the heating element. The other utilizes surface micromachining techniques to fabricate polysilicon branding irons. The thermal behavior of the branding irons and the heat distributions in the embryos are analytically modeled. Micron-scale labels on unfertilized bovine embryos are achieved.

  19. Water vapor concentration measurement in singlet oxygen generator by using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weili; Wang, Zengqiang; Fang, Benjie; Li, Qingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2005-12-01

    By using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm, partial water pressure at the exit of a square pipe-array jet-type singlet oxygen generator (SPJSOG) for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was measured. The water vapor fraction was calculated from the partial water pressure in the diagnostic cell when we assumed the water vapor fraction in the diagnostic cell is the same as that in the generator. The results from the two methods showed that the water vapor concentration is less than 0.08 in this SPJSOG during normal operation. The water vapor fraction decreases with the increasing of the pressure in the generator and rises with the increasing of buffer gas flow rate and the basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) temperature in the case of constant chlorine flow rate. Measurements showed that the change of water vapor fraction due to BHP temperature could be ignored during normal operation. It is indicated that the gas flow velocity is the main reason that affects on the water vapor fraction in COIL. It is proved that the emission spectroscopy method is one of the simple and convenient ways to measure the water vapor concentration in singlet oxygen generator (SOG), especially in real time measurements. But absorption spectroscopy method, as a direct measurement, can give the more factual results of the water concentration.

  20. Investigation of a repetitive pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster with 1000:1 ratio nozzle is tested in a repetitive mode on water propellant. The thruster is driven by a 60J pulse forming network at repetition rates up to 10 Hz (600W). The pulse forming network has a .31 ohm impedance, well matched to the capillary discharge resistance of .40 ohm, and is directly coupled to the thruster electrodes without a switch. The discharge is initiated by high voltage breakdown, typically at 2500V, through the water vapor in the interelectrode gap. Water is injected as a jet through a .37 mm orifice on the thruster axis. Thruster voltage, current and impulse bit are recorded for several seconds at various power supply currents. Thruster to power ratio is typically T/P = .07 N/kW. Tank background pressure precludes direct measurement of exhaust velocity which is inferred from calculated pressure and temperature in the discharge to be about 14 km/sec. Efficiency, based on this velocity and measured T/P is .54 + or - .07. Thruster ablation is zero at the throat and becomes measurable further upstream, indicating that radiative ablation is occurring late in the pulse.

  1. Determination of mercury(II) ion by electrochemical cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, M Hosein; Rounaghi, G Hosein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Masrournia, Mahboube

    2003-05-01

    A technique for determination of mercury is described; it is based on electrolytic reduction of Hg(II) ion on a graphite cathode, the trapping of mercury vapor and its volatilization into a quartz tube aligned in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The electrochemical cell consisted of a graphite cathode and an anode operating with constant direct current for the production of mercury atoms. A pre-activated graphite rod was used as the cathode material. The optimum conditions for electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor (the electrolysis time and current, the flow rate, the type of electrode and electrolyte) were investigated. The characteristic electrochemical data with chemical cold vapor using NaBH4-acid were compared. The presence of cadmium(II), arsenic(III), antimony(III), selenium(IV), bismuth(III), silver(I), lead(II), lithium(I), sodium(I) and potassium(I) showed interference effects which were eliminated by suitable separation techniques. The calibration curve is linear over the range of 5-90 ng ml(-1) mercury(II). The detection limit is 2 ng ml(-1) of Hg(II) and the RSD is 2.5% (n = 10) for 40 ng ml(-1). The accuracy and recovery of the method were investigated by analyzing spiked tap water and river water.

  2. Studies on Aspirin Crystals Generated by a Modified Vapor Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit; Malhotra, Deepak; Jain, Preeti; Kalia, Anupama; Shunmugaperumal, Tamilvanan

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of the current investigation were (1) to study the influence of selected two different non-solvents (diethylether and dichloromethane) on the drug crystal formation of a model drug, aspirin (ASP-I) by the modified vapor diffusion method and (2) to characterize and compare the generated crystals (ASP-II and ASP-III) using different analytical techniques with that of unprocessed ASP-I. When compared to the classical vapor diffusion method which consumes about 15 days to generate drug crystals, the modified method needs only 12 h to get the same. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that the internal structures of ASP-II and ASP-III crystals were identical when compared with ASP-I. Although the drug crystals showed a close similarity in X-ray diffraction patterns, the difference in the relative intensities of some of the diffraction peaks (especially at 2θ values of around 7.7 and 15.5) could be attributed to the crystal habit or crystal size modification. Similarly, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study speculates that only the crystal habit modifications might occur but without involving any change in internal structure of the generated drug polymorphic form I. This is further substantiated from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures that indicated the formation of platy shape for the ASP-II crystals and needle shape for the ASP-III crystals. In addition, the observed slow dissolution of ASP crystals should indicate polymorph form I formation. Thus, the modified vapor diffusion method could routinely be used to screen and legally secure all possible forms of other drug entities too.

  3. On line vapor generation of osmium based on solution cathode glow discharge for the determination by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenli; Huang, Chunying; He, Qian; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Zhifu; Zhang, Suicheng; Hu, Shenghong

    2013-03-15

    A novel plasma induced vapor generation method is proposed to determine osmium in solutions. Without any chemical oxidizing agents, osmium ion can be readily converted to volatile osmium tetraoxide vapor in the solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) system. The generated osmium vapor is then transported to inductively coupled plasma for determination by optical emission spectrometry. The influences of background electrolyte, carrier gas flow rate, sample flow rate, ICP power and discharge current were investigated. The analytical performances of this proposed technique were evaluated under optimized conditions. The detection limit of Os was calculated to be 0.51 ng mL(-1). The reproducibility, expressed as the relative standard deviation (n=11) of a 2.0 μg mL(-1) standard solution, was 1.9%. This SCGD induced vapor generation is sensitive and simple, oxidation reagents free, providing an alternative analytical method for measuring Os in geological or environmental water samples.

  4. Plasma-material interaction in electrothermal and electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourham, M. A.; Gilligan, J. G.; Hankins, O. E.

    1993-07-01

    Various material surfaces have been exposed to high heat fluxes from 2 to 80 GW/sq m over 100 microsec duration using the electrothermal launcher, SIRENS. The vapor shield is effective in reducing the heat to the ablating surface, and the energy transmission factor through the vapor shield decreases as the incident heat flux increases. Results show good agreement with code predictions. Visible light emission spectra have been observed both in-bore and from the muzzle flash of the barrel, and from the flash of the source. Measurements of visible emission from the source indicate time averaged temperatures of 1 to 3 eV, and about 1 to 2 eV along the axis of the device, which agree with the theory and experimental measurements of the average heat flux and plasma conductivity.

  5. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV).

  6. Demonstration of a vapor density monitoring system using UV radiation generated from quasi-phasematched SHG waveguide devices

    SciTech Connect

    Galanti, S.A.; Berzins, L.V.; Brown, J.B.; Tamosaitis, R.S.; Bortz, M.L.; Day, T.; Fejer, M.M.; Wang, W.

    1996-01-29

    Many industrial applications require non-intrusive diagnostics for process monitoring and control. One example is the physical vapor deposition of titanium alloys. In this paper we present a system based on laser absorption spectroscopy for monitoring titanium vapor. Appropriate transitions for monitoring high rate vaporization of titanium require extension of available IR diode technology to the UV. The heart of this vapor density monitoring system is the 390nm radiation generated from quasi-phase matched interactions within periodically poled waveguides. In this paper, key system components of a UV laser absorption spectroscopy based system specific for titanium density monitoring are described. Analysis is presented showing the minimum power levels necessary from the ultraviolet laser source. Performance data for prototype systems using second harmonic generation (SHG) waveguide technology is presented. Application of this technology to other alloy density monitoring systems is discussed.

  7. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-06

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration.

  8. Determination of total mercury in biological tissue by isotope dilution ICPMS after UV photochemical vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xu, Mo; Shi, Zeming; Zhang, Jiayun; Gao, Ying; Yang, Lu

    2013-12-15

    A method is developed for the determination of trace mercury in biological samples using photo chemical vapor generation (PVG) and isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID ICPMS) detection. Biological tissues were solubilized in formic acid. Subsequently, the sample solutions were exposed to an ultraviolet (UV) source for the reduction of mercury into vapor species prior to ICPMS measurements. The formic acid served not only as a tissue solubilizer in the sample preparation procedure, but also as a photochemical reductant for mercury in the PVG process. The problem arising from the opaque formic acid digested solution was efficiently solved by using ID method. The optimum conditions for sample treatment and PVG were investigated. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 pg g(-1), based on an external calibration, provided 350-fold improvement over that obtained by utilizing conventional pneumatic nebulization sample introduction. Method validation was demonstrated by the determination of total mercury in several biological tissue certified reference materials (CRMs). The results were in good agreement with the certified values.

  9. Electrothermally driven flows in ac electrowetting.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Pablo; Ramos, Antonio; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-01-01

    Mixing within sessile drops can be enhanced by generating internal flow patterns using ac electrowetting. While for low ac frequencies, the flow patterns have been attributed to oscillations of the drop surface, we provide here the driving mechanism of the hitherto unexplained high-frequency flows. We show that: (1) the electric field in the liquid bulk becomes important, leading to energy dissipation due to Joule heating and a temperature increase of several degrees Celsius, and (2) the fluid flow at these frequencies is generated by electrothermal effect, i.e., gradients in temperature give rise to gradients in conductivity and permittivity, the electric field acting on these inhomogeneities induces an electrical body force that generates the flow. We solved numerically the equations for the electric, temperature and flow fields. The temperature is obtained from a convection-diffusion equation where Joule heating is introduced as a source term. From the solution of the electric field and the temperature, we compute the electrical force that acts as a body force in Stokes equations. Our numerical results agree with previous experimental observations.

  10. Electrothermal blinking vortices for chaotic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loire, Sophie; Kauffmann, Paul; Gimenez, Paul; Meinhart, Carl; Mezic, Igor

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of electrothermal chaotic mixing using blinking of asymmetric 2D electrothermal vortices. Electrothermal flows are modelled with 2D finite element method using COMSOL software based on an enhanced electrothermal model. Velocities in top-view and side-view devices are measured by micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV). The experimentally reconstructed velocity profile shows a dramatic asymmetry between the two vortices, in good agreement with the FEM model. The separation line between the two vortices is shifted and tilted making the blinking vortices overlap. We use the mix-variance coefficient (MVC) on experimental particle detection data and numerical trajectory simulations to evaluate mixing at different scales including the layering of fluid interfaces by the flow, a keypoint for efficient mixing. The blinking vortices method greatly improve mixing efficiency. Theoretical, experimental and simulation results of the mixing process will be presented.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra at vapor/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectra at vapor/water interface were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with a classical flexible and nonpolarizable model. The present model well describes the spectral diffusion of 2D infrared spectrum of bulk water as well as 2D HD-VSFG at the interface. The effect of isotopic dilution on the 2D HD-VSFG was elucidated by comparing the normal (H{sub 2}O) water and HOD water. We further performed decomposition analysis of 2D HD-VSFG into the hydrogen-bonding and the dangling (or free) OH vibrations, and thereby disentangled the different spectral responses and spectral diffusion in the 2D HD-VSFG. The present MD simulation demonstrated the role of anharmonic coupling between these modes on the cross peak in the 2D HD-VSFG spectrum.

  12. Net vapor generation point in boiling flow of trichlorotrifluoroethane at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions at which the void in subcooled boiling starts to undergo a rapid increase were studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in a 12.7 x 9.5 mm rectangular channel. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in one wall. The pressure ranged from 9.45 to 20.7 bar, mass velocity from 600 to 7000 kg/sq m sec, and subcooling from 16 to 67 C. Photographs were used to determine when detached bubbles first appeared in the bulk flow. Measurements of bubble layer thickness along the wall were also made. Results showed that the point of net vapor generation is close to the occurrence of fully-developed boiling.

  13. The use of electrothermal vaporizer coupled to the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of arsenic, selenium and transition metals in biological samples treated with formic acid.

    PubMed

    Tormen, Luciano; Gil, Raul A; Frescura, Vera L A; Martinez, Luis Dante; Curtius, Adilson J

    2012-03-02

    A fast method for the determination of As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se and V in biological samples by ETV-ICP-MS, after a simple sample treatment with formic acid, is proposed. Approximately 75 mg of each sample is mixed with 5 mL of formic acid, kept at 90°C for 1 h and then diluted with nitric acid aqueous solution to a 5% (v/v) formic acid and 1% (v/v) nitric acid final concentrations. A palladium solution was used as a chemical modifier. The instrumental conditions, such as carrier gas flow rate, RF power, pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures and argon internal flow rate during vaporization were optimized. The formic acid causes a slight decrease of the analytes signal intensities, but does not increase the signal of the mainly polyatomic ions ((14)N(35)Cl(+), (14)N(12)C(+), (40)Ar(12)C(+), (13)C(37)Cl(+), (40)Ar(36)Ar(+), (40)Ar(35)Cl(+), (35)Cl(16)O(+), (40)Ar(18)O(+)) that affect the analytes signals. The effect of charge transfer reactions, that could increase the ionization efficiency of some elements with high ionization potentials was not observed due to the elimination of most of the organic compounds during the pyrolysis step. External calibration with aqueous standard solutions containing 5% (v/v) formic acid allows the simultaneous determination of all analytes with high accuracy. The detection limits in the samples were between 0.01 (Co) and 850 μg kg(-1) (Fe and Se) and the precision expressed by the relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 0.1% (Mn) and 10% (Ni). Accuracy was validated by the analysis of four certified reference biological materials of animal tissues (lobster hepatopancreas, dogfish muscle, oyster tissue and bovine liver). The recommended procedure avoids plasma instability, carbon deposit on the cones and does not require sample digestion.

  14. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    DOEpatents

    Kunnmann, Walter; Larese, John Z.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  15. A mechanistic model for mercury capture with in situ-generated titania particles: role of water vapor.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sylian; Almquist, Catherine; Lee, Tai Gyu; Furuuchi, Masami; Hedrick, Elizabeth; Biswas, Pratim

    2004-02-01

    A mechanistic model to predict the capture of gas-phase mercury (Hg) species using in situ-generated titania nanosize particles activated by UV irradiation is developed. The model is an extension of a recently reported model for photochemical reactions by Almquist and Biswas that accounts for the rates of electron-hole pair generation, the adsorption of the compound to be oxidized, and the adsorption of water vapor. The role of water vapor in the removal efficiency of Hg was investigated to evaluate the rates of Hg oxidation at different water vapor concentrations. As the water vapor concentration is increased, more hydroxy radical species are generated on the surface of the titania particle, increasing the number of active sites for the photooxidation and capture of Hg. At very high water vapor concentrations, competitive adsorption is expected to be important and reduce the number of sites available for photooxidation of Hg. The predictions of the developed phenomenological model agreed well with the measured Hg oxidation rates in this study and with the data on oxidation of organic compounds reported in the literature.

  16. A Parylene MEMS Electrothermal Valve

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Givrad, Tina K.; Holschneider, Daniel P.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    The first microelectromechanical-system normally closed electrothermal valve constructed using Parylene C is described, which enables both low power (in milliwatts) and rapid operation (in milliseconds). This low-power valve is well suited for applications in wirelessly controlled implantable drug-delivery systems. The simple design was analyzed using both theory and modeling and then characterized in benchtop experiments. Operation in air (constant current) and water (current ramping) was demonstrated. Valve-opening powers of 22 mW in air and 33 mW in water were obtained. Following integration of the valve with catheters, our valve was applied in a wirelessly operated microbolus infusion pump, and the in vivo functionality for the appropriateness of use of this pump for future brain mapping applications in small animals was demonstrated. PMID:21350679

  17. Refrigerant Charge Management and Control for Next-Generation Aircraft Vapor Compression Systems (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    feet below the evaporator EXVs. It had to travel vertically up, either through the riser containing valve V2 or the riser at the far right-hand...levels (without subcooling), the two-phase fluid passed from the condenser down the low line to the first riser , at which point the vapor...preferentially went up the vertical riser , which effectively separated the vapor from the liquid. This vapor was fed to EXV 4, allowing the liquid to continue

  18. Microfluidic pumping optimization in microgrooved channels with ac electrothermal actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, E.; Manoochehri, Souran

    2010-01-01

    An optimization methodology is developed and applied to an ac electrothermal pump design with patterned microgrooved features. The microgrooved configuration can overcome the restrictions of the conventional planar configuration on pumping performance by diminishing fast backward flows and suppressing prolonged streamlines. At all frequency excitations (0.2-1000 MHz) and ion concentration conditions (5×10-3-0.1 M), the optimum microgrooved configuration generates much faster flow rate than planar configuration. This happens without additional increases in the maximum temperature values. The effects of elevated temperature on ac ET flow behavior is investigated and analyzed.

  19. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-12-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at - 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at - 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  20. Determination of As, Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb in biological samples by modern electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardans, Jordi; Montes, Fernando; Peñuelas, Josep

    2010-02-01

    Pollution from heavy metals has increased in recent decades and has become an important concern for environmental agencies. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, mercury and lead are among the trace elements that have the greatest impact and carry the highest risk to human health. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has long been used for trace element analyses and over the past few years, the main constraints of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) methods, namely matrix interferences that provoked high background absorption and interferences, have been reduced. The use of new, more efficient modifiers and in situ trapping methods for stabilization and pre-concentration of these analytes, progress in control of atomization temperatures, new designs of atomizers and advances in methods to correct background spectral interferences have permitted an improvement in sensitivity, an increase in detection power, reduction in sample manipulation, and increase in the reproducibility of the results. These advances have enhanced the utility of Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) for trace element determination at μg L -1 levels, especially in difficult matrices, giving rise to greater reproducibility, lower economic cost and ease of sample pre-treatment compared to other methods. Moreover, the recent introduction of high resolution continuum source Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-ETAAS) has facilitated direct solid sampling, reducing background noise and opening the possibility of achieving even more rapid quantitation of some elements. The incorporation of flow injection analysis (FIA) systems for automation of sample pre-treatment, as well as chemical vapor generation renders (ETAAS) into a feasible option for detection of As and Hg in environmental and food control studies wherein large numbers of samples can be rapidly analyzed. A relatively inexpensive approach with low sample consumption provide additional advantages of

  1. Studies to reduce material erosion in electrothermal launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, J.; Bourham, M.; Hankins, O.; Auciello, O.; Tallavarjula, S.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma erosion processes on insulators and conductors, using the SIRENS electrothermal launcher, have verified the vapor shield concept. The energy transmission factor through the vapor shield was found to vary from 20 percent to 5 percent as the heat flux increases. Metals have strong axial erosion dependence, with an average erosion depth of 15-45 micron/kJ for aluminum and 5-10 micron/kJ for pure copper. Insulators have uniform ablation along the axial direction, with an average ablation depth of 10-14 micron/kJ for Lexan. Aluminum has a higher erosion rate with an increase of energy input, while Lexan and pure copper have approximately equal erosion rates which are considerably less than that of aluminum. High-density graphite does not ablate at lower energies, and ablates only slightly at energies above 3 kJ (1-2 micron/kJ), while molded dense electrographite ablates at a higher rate (1-3 micron/kJ). Both types of graphite have considerably less ablation than other materials. Lexan and graphites showed greater evidence of the vapor shield effect than aluminum and copper, although there is tendency toward less erosion at higher values of heat fluxes. Multiple exposure of material surfaces demonstrated that insulators have better performance than metallic surfaces.

  2. Studies on photochemical vapor generation of selenium with germicidal low power ultraviolet mercury lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, B.; Menciassi, A.; Onor, M.; Ferrari, C.; Bramanti, E.; D'Ulivo, A.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical vapor generation (photo-CVG) with flow injection - atomic fluorescence spectrometry was investigated for the determination of selenium, using formic and acetic acids as photochemical reagents. Using a germicidal low power ultraviolet mercury-based lamp, emitting both the 185 and 254 nm Hg lines, mild reaction conditions can be achieved in formic acid medium, where optimal sensitivity was obtained at 0.3-0.5% w/w acid concentrations, whereas the optimal sensitivity could be attained with acetic acid in the range from 12 to 35% w/w. The only volatile Se product identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry from formic acid-based photo-CVG was selenium carbonyl. A series of dedicated experiments were performed using photo-CVG and pure dimethylselenide in order to identify reaction pathways contributing to the formation of non-volatile selenium species or to the degradation of volatile selenium species. Under the optimized conditions in formic acid, using 250 μL sample volume, the limits of detection and quantification were 0.10 and 0.35 μg L- 1, respectively. The effect of several interfering species was investigated and the method was tested in the analysis of certified reference materials.

  3. Photochemical vapor generation of lead for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hualing; Zhang, Ningning; Gong, Zhenbin; Li, Weifeng; Hang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Photochemical vapor generation (PCVG) of lead was successfully achieved with a simplified and convenient system, in which only low molecular weight organic acid and a high-efficiency photochemical reactor were needed. The reactor was used to generate lead volatile species when a solution of lead containing a small amount of low molecular weight organic acid was pumped through. Several factors, including the concentration of acetic acid, the concentration of hydrochloride acid, and the irradiation time of UV light were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, including the addition of 0.90% (v/v) acetic acid and 0.03% (v/v) hydrochloride acid, and irradiation time of 28 s, intense and repeatable signal of lead volatile species was successfully obtained and identified with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). In addition, the effects from inorganic anions and transition metal ions, including Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -, Cu2 +, Fe3 +, Co2 + and Ni2 +, were investigated, which suggests that their suppression to the PCVG of lead was in the order of Cl- < SO42 - < NO3- for anions and Ni2 +, Co2 + < Fe3 + < Cu2 + for transition metal ions. Under optimized conditions, relative standard derivation (RSD) of 4.4% was achieved from replicate measurements (n = 5) of a standard solution of 0.1 μg L- 1 lead. And, the limit of quantitation (LOQ, 10σ) of 0.012 μg L- 1 lead was obtained using this method and the method blank could be easily controlled down to 0.023 μg L- 1. To validate applicability of this method, it was also employed for the determination of lead in tap water, rain water and lake water.

  4. Comment on "Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds in the vapor phase at trace levels: A tool for testing and developing sensitive and selective substrates for explosive detection"

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-02-13

    The evaluation of developed technologies and research on new detection approaches require the ability to generate explosive vapors in the gas phase. In this correspondence, the authors comment on a technical note describing a vaopr generator, discuss safety issues associated with explosives for vapor generators, and provide a concise review of vapor generators for explosive compounds. Approaches to measuring or monitoring the output of a vapor generators are also discussed.

  5. Electrothermal plasma gun as a pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.

    1994-11-01

    The NCSU electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS has been used to accelerate plastic (Lexan polycarbonate) pellets, to determine the feasibility of the use of electrothermal guns as pellet injectors. The use of an electrothermal gun to inject frozen hydrogenic pellets requires a mechanism to provide protective shells (sabots) for shielding the pellet from ablation during acceleration into and through the barrel of the gun. The gun has been modified to accommodate acceleration of the plastic pellets using special acceleration barrels equipped with diagnostics for velocity and position of the pellet, and targets to absorb the pellet`s energy on impact. The length of the acceleration path could be varied between 15 and 45 cm. The discharge energy of the electrothermal gun ranged from 2 to 6 kJ. The pellet velocities have been measured via a set of break wires. Pellet masses were varied between 0.5 and 1.0 grams. Preliminary results on 0.5 and 1.0 g pellets show that the exit velocity reaches 0.9 km/s at 6 kJ input energy to the source. Higher velocities of 1.5 and 2.7 km/s have been achieved using 0.5 and 1.0 gm pellets in 30 cm long barrel, without cleaning the barrel between the shots.

  6. Comparative study of component erosion for electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourham, M. A.; Hankins, O. E.; Gilligan, J. G.; Hurley, J. D.; Earnhart, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The electrothermal launcher SIRENS has been used to study the erosion of critical components (rails and insulators) of plasma-driven launchers. SIRENS can produce high-density (above 10 exp 25/cu m) low-temperature (1-3 eV) plasma, formed by the ablation of the insulator (Lexan), with currents up to 100 kA. The incident heat flux varies between 2 to 90 GW/sq m over 100 microsec duration, for input energies 1-10 kJ. Erosion studies have been performed on several insulators, pure and coated metals, alloys and several graphite grades. The fraction of the total incident energy that is transmitted to the eroded surface varies from 12 to 30 percent for the materials tested and decreases to 5-7 percent as the incident energy fluence increases. Such reduction in erosion for a given incident fluence is due to the vapor shield effect. The scaling law for the energy transmission factor through the vapor shield layer was obtained for the exposed materials.

  7. Studies to reduce material erosion in electrothermal launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Gilligan, J.; Bourham, M.; Hankins, O.; Auciello, O.; Tallavarjula, S.; Mobanti, R. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that during the exposure of launcher components of high heat fluxes a vapor shield (plasma boundary layer) is formed which absorbs a fraction of the incoming energy, and thus naturally reduces the surface erosion. Computer simulation has shown that a strong externally applied magnetic field parallel to the surface may reduce the surface erosion, since the energy transport though the vapor shield will be reduced due to decreased turbulence. The experimental electrothermal launcher device SIRENS has been operated to measure the erosion of material surfaces subjected to high heat flux from a high density low temperature plasma (1-3 eV) with a strong applied magnetic field. The plasma is produced by the ablation of the insulator (Lexan), with currents up to 100 kA over a pulse length of 100{mu}s, and flows through a cylindrical barrel which serves as the material sample. Ablation and erosion for both the insulator and sample surfaces are caused by convection and radiation emitted from the plasma. The ablated thickness of the Lexan insulator compares favorably with predicted values. The key parameter is f, the fraction of total incident energy that is transmitted to the eroding surface which is flux and material dependent but in the range 5-20%.

  8. Hg speciation by differential photochemical vapor generation at UV-B and UV-C wavelengths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mercury speciation was accomplished by differential photochemical reduction at two UV wavelengths; the resulting Hg(O) vapor was quantified by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. After microwave digestion and centrifugation, analyte solutions were mixed with 20% (v/v) formic acid in a reactor coil, an...

  9. Highly vibrationally excited CO generated in a low-temperature chemical reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jans, E.; Frederickson, K.; Yurkovich, M.; Musci, B.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A chemical flow reactor is used to study the vibrational population distribution of CO produced by a reaction between carbon vapor generated in an arc discharge and molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate formation of highly vibrationally excited CO, up to vibrational level v = 14, at low temperatures, T = 400-450 K, with population inversion at v = 4-7, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of reaction enthalpy. The results show feasibility of development of a new CO chemical laser using carbon vapor and oxygen as reactants.

  10. Electrothermal energy conversion using electron gas volumetric change inside semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyze an electrothermal energy converter using volumetric changes in non-equilibrium electron gas inside semiconductors. The geometric concentration of electron gas under an electric field increases the effective pressure of the electrons, and then a barrier filters out cold electrons, acting like a valve. Nano- and micro-scale features enable hot electrons to arrive at the contact in a short enough time to avoid thermalization with the lattice. Key length and time scales, preliminary device geometry, and anticipated efficiency are estimated for electronic analogs of Otto and Brayton power generators and Joule-Thomson micro refrigerators on a chip. The power generators convert the energy of incident photons from the heat source to electrical current, and the refrigerator can reduce the temperature of electrons in a semiconductor device. The analytic calculations show that a large energy conversion efficiency or coefficient of performance may be possible.

  11. Enhanced electrothermal pumping with thin film resistive heaters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stuart J

    2013-05-01

    This work demonstrates the use of thin film heaters to enhance electrothermal pumping in microfluidic systems. Thin film heating electrothermal pumping is more efficient than Joule heating alone. Numerical simulations of an asymmetric electrode array are performed to demonstrate the advantages of incorporating thin film heaters. This specific simulation shows that thin film heater electrothermal pumping provides approximately two and one-half times more volumetric flow than Joule heating alone for the same input power to both systems. In addition, external heating allows for electrothermal pumping to be applicable to low conductivity media.

  12. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg-1), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg-1, respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (~0.4 MPa).Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid

  13. Vapor Jet Ejector Used to Generate Free Waste Heat Driven Cooling in Military Environmental Cooling Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    vap erant vapor is or by a J-tub essure side of using similar pressure incre ump in order o the diesel-e per heat excha recovered at to the exhaus...top of the a tering the com at exchanger. g of the conve id flow. A nit essure pulsati tor where the ed in the cool erature level. ger where wa

  14. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-06-21

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg(-1)), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg(-1), respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (∼ 0.4 MPa).

  15. Electrothermal micromixing in 96 well plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Loire, Sophie; Mezic, Igor

    2011-11-01

    Diagnostic and pharmacology processes could be greatly accelerated by appropriate mixing. Here electrothermal flows are explored to provide mixing of conductive physiological solutions (=1.6 S/m) in a 96 well plate. Three interdigitated electrodes provide an electric field (< 15Vpp, 1MHz) beneath each well. Polarization and conduction phenomenon of the fluid in a well will be first modeled numerically and compared to an electrical circuit model. Due to high conductivity and permittivity of the fluid, the impedance of the array of filled wells collapse dramatically (96 wells: R = 1Ohm, C=250nF). The power supply challenges accordingly raised by arrays of electrothermal micromixers will be then analyzed. The efficiency of different methods of mixing in those wells will be also compared: the addition of low frequency signal leading to AC electro-osmotic perturbations, a blinking vortices method. The experimental results will be compared to simulations.

  16. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Valeria; Biagi, Simona; Ghimenti, Silvia; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2011-11-01

    Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg 0, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H 2 microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10 - 5 mol L - 1 ), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L - 1 (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 μmol L - 1 were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were never less than 91%. Flow injection

  17. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, H.; Kato, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Sekiguchi, H.; Wakahara, A.; Furukawa, M.

    2014-02-20

    Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma is investigated. Feasibility of precursors of triethylsilane (TES) and bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) is discussed based on a calculation of bond energies by computer simulation. Refractive indices of 1.81 and 1.71 are obtained for deposited films with TES and BDMADMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the deposited film revealed that TES-based film coincides with the stoichiometric thermal silicon nitride.

  18. An Analysis of Bore Surface Temperatures in Electrothermal-Chemical Guns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    conductivity of liquids is dependent upon other properties, notably temperature and pressure . However, in the case of liquids no adequate theories...BLANK. viii 1. INTRODUCTION In the electrothermal-chemical (ETC) gun, an electrically generated high- pressure , high- temperature plasma interacts with a...of the gas resulting from the plasma/propellant interaction is dependent on the interaction rate between the propellant and plasma as well as material

  19. A Fundamental Study of Vapor Generation from Nonaqeuous Phase Liquid Sources as a Function of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, B. G.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Sauck, C.; Sakaki, T.; Christ, J.

    2011-12-01

    The intrusion of vapor phase contaminants from subsurface sources into occupied buildings represents a possible exposure pathway and threat to human health. To make informed risk-management decisions regarding this pathway, it is important to build a conceptual model of the physical and chemical processes that govern vapor intrusion, and specifically to understand the source of the contaminant vapors. One vapor source includes nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) entrapped within the vadose zone. The generation of vapors in the vadose zone from these sources under transient conditions imparted by the heat and water flux boundary conditions at the land surface involves complex mass-transfer processes; partitioning occurs simultaneously between NAPL, air, water and soil phases. Advection and diffusion within the air and water phases also play a critical role. It is our contention that the mass transfer to the air phase is a strong function of the soil moisture conditions in the direct vicinity of the NAPL source. We hypothesize that NAPL sources located in zones of high water saturation will have lower effective mass transfer rates than NAPLs located in low saturation regions, due to the higher diffusion resistance in the aqueous phase. Several studies have investigated NAPL mass transfer under unsaturated conditions and variable soil moisture (Ho and Udell 1992; Wilkins et al. 1995; Yoon et al. 2002); however, to build on this knowledge base, laboratory experimentation is needed under controlled conditions that considers spatially and temporally variable airflow fields and soil moisture saturations that occur in source zones in response to rain events and other climatic phenomena. The fundamental knowledge needed to address field problems cannot be generated in field systems due to lack of control and geologic complexities that are hard to characterize, leading to the need to use intermediate scale test systems. To investigate this problem, experiments were first

  20. Three-dimensional time-dependent computer modeling of the electrothermal atomizers for analytical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivilskiy, I. V.; Nagulin, K. Yu.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    A full three-dimensional nonstationary numerical model of graphite electrothermal atomizers of various types is developed. The model is based on solution of a heat equation within solid walls of the atomizer with a radiative heat transfer and numerical solution of a full set of Navier-Stokes equations with an energy equation for a gas. Governing equations for the behavior of a discrete phase, i.e., atomic particles suspended in a gas (including gas-phase processes of evaporation and condensation), are derived from the formal equations molecular kinetics by numerical solution of the Hertz-Langmuir equation. The following atomizers test the model: a Varian standard heated electrothermal vaporizer (ETV), a Perkin Elmer standard THGA transversely heated graphite tube with integrated platform (THGA), and the original double-stage tube-helix atomizer (DSTHA). The experimental verification of computer calculations is carried out by a method of shadow spectral visualization of the spatial distributions of atomic and molecular vapors in an analytical space of an atomizer.

  1. Visible light emission measurements from a dense electrothermal launcher plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, O. E.; Bourham, M. A.; Earnhart, J.; Gilligan, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the visible light emission from dense, weakly non-ideal plasmas have been performed on the experimental electrothermal launcher device 'SIRENS'. The plasma is created by the ablation or a Lexan insulator in the source, which then flows through a cylindrical barrel which serves as the material sample. Visible light emission spectra have been observed both in-bore and from the muzzle flash or the barrel, and from the flash or the source. Due to high plasma opacity (the plasma emits as a near blackbody) and absorption by the molecular components of the vapor shield, the hotter core or the arc has been difficult to observe. Recent measurements along the axis or the device indicate time-averaged plasma temperatures in the barrel or about 1 eV for lower energy shots, which agree with experimental measurements of the average heat flux and plasma conductivity along the barrel. Measurements or visible emission from the source indicate time averaged temperatures of 1 to 2 eV which agree with the theoretical estimates derived from ablated mass measurements and calculated estimates derived from plasma conductivity measurements.

  2. Electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven pulsed power liners

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Yu, Edmund P.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Nakhleh, Charles

    2012-09-15

    This paper explores the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. Comparatively little is known about these types of instabilities compared to the well known Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. We present simulations that show electrothermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent MRT instability growth. We also present the results of several experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These experiments show excellent agreement with electrothermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone.

  3. Demonstration of a vapor-density monitoring system using UV radiation generated from waveguide quasi-phase-matched SHG waveguide devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Shirley A.; Berzins, Leon V.; Brown, J. B.; Tamosaitis, Robert S.; Bortz, Michael L.; Day, Timothy; Fejer, Martin M.; Wang, Weizhi

    1996-05-01

    Many industrial application require non-intrusive diagnostics for process monitoring and control. One example is the physical vapor deposition of titanium alloys. In this paper we present a system based on laser absorption spectroscopy for monitoring titanium vapor. Appropriate transitions for monitoring high rate vaporization of titanium require extension of available IR diode technology to the UV. The heart of this vapor density monitoring system is the 390 nm radiation generated from quasi-phase matched interactions within periodically poled waveguides. In this paper, key system components of a UV laser absorption spectroscopy based system specific for titanium density monitoring are described. Analysis is presented showing the minimum power levels necessary from the ultraviolet laser source. Performance data for prototype systems using second harmonic generation waveguide technology is presented. Application of this technology to other alloy density monitoring systems is discussed.

  4. The use of emulsions for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish-eggs oil by cold vapor generation in a flow injection system with atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Burguera, J L; Quintana, I A; Salager, J L; Burguera, M; Rondón, C; Carrero, P; Anton de Salager, R; Petit de Peña, Y

    1999-04-01

    An on-line time based injection system used in conjunction with cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry and microwave-aided oxidation with potassium persulfate has been developed for the determination of the different mercury species in fish-eggs oil samples. A three-phase surfactant-oil-water emulsion produced an advantageous flow when a peristaltic pump was used to introduce the highly viscous sample into the system. The optimum proportion of the oil-water mixture ratio was 2:3 v/v with a Tween 20 surfactant concentration in the emulsion of 0.008% v/v. Inorganic mercury was determined after reduction with sodium borohydride while total mercury was determined after an oxidation step with persulfate prior to the reduction step to elemental mercury with the same reducing agent. The difference between total and inorganic mercury determined the organomercury content in samples. A linear calibration graph was obtained in the range 0.1-20 micrograms l-1 of Hg2+ by injecting 0.7 ml of samples. The detection limits based on 3 sigma of the blank signals were 0.11 and 0.12 microgram l-1 for total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The relative standard deviation of ten independent measurements were 2.8 and 2.2% for 10 micrograms l-1 and 8.8 and 9.0% for 0.1 microgram l-1 amounts of total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The recoveries of 0.3, 0.6 and 8 micrograms l-1 of inorganic and organic mercury added to fish-eggs oil samples ranged from 93.0 to 94.8% and from 100 to 106%, respectively. Good agreement with those values obtained for total mercury content in real samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was also obtained, differences between mean values were < 7%. With the proposed procedure, 22 proteropterous catfish-eggs oil samples from the northwestern coast of Venezuela were measured; while the organic mercury lay in the range 2.0 and 3.3 micrograms l-1, inorganic mercury was not detected.

  5. Separation of analyte and matrix for the direct analysis of high-purity molybdenum-based materials by electrothermal atomic spectrometry methods—I. Radiotracer investigation of thermal extraction of impurities in a graphite cup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Krivan, Viliam; Franek, Martin

    1994-06-01

    By means of radiotracers, thermal vaporization of a number of detrimental trace elements (alkali, alkali earth and heavy metals) from metallic molybdenum powder has been studied. For this purpose, molybdenum samples labelled with appropriate radiotracers of the trace elements were prepared from a slurry of molybdenum oxide, ammonium molybdate solution and a radiotracer solution. Vaporization yields were measured after electrothermal treatment of the samples at temperatures between 1900 and 3000°C. Alkali and alkali earth elements, copper and zinc were vaporized with yields higher than 98%. Possible application of the electrothermal vaporization technique to the direct analysis of high-purity molybdenumbased materials by atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry is discussed.

  6. Determination of inorganic and total mercury by vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry using different temperatures of the measurement cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Luiz Eduardo; Goldschmidt, Fabiane; Paniz, José Neri Gottfried; de Moraes Flores, Érico Marlon; Dressler, Valderi Luiz

    2005-06-01

    A simple and inexpensive laboratory-built flow injection vapor generation system coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-VG AAS) for inorganic and total mercury determination has been developed. It is based on the vapor generation of total mercury and a selective detection of Hg 2 + or total mercury by varying the temperature of the measurement cell. Only the inorganic mercury is measured when the quartz cell is at room temperature, and when the cell is heated to 650 °C or higher the total Hg concentration is measured. The organic Hg concentration in the sample is calculated from the difference between the total Hg and Hg 2 + concentrations. Parameters such as the type of acid (HCl or HNO 3) and its concentration, reductant (NaBH 4) concentration, carrier solution (HCl) flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, sample volume and quartz cell temperature, which influence FI-VG AAS system performance, were systematically investigated. The optimized conditions for Hg 2 + and total Hg determinations were: 1.0 mol l - 1 HCl as carrier solution, carrier flow rate of 3.5 ml min - 1 , 0.1% (m/v) NaBH 4, reductant flow rate of 1.0 ml min - 1 and carrier gas flow rate of 200 ml min - 1 . The relative standard deviation (RSD) is lower than 5.0% for a 1.0 μg l - 1 Hg solution and the limit of quantification (LOQ, 10 s) is 55 ng g - 1 . Certified samples of dogfish muscle (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and non-certified fish samples were analyzed, using a 6.0 mol l - 1 HCl solution for analyte extraction. The Hg 2 + and CH 3Hg + concentrations found were in agreement with certified ones.

  7. Simple field device for measurement of dimethyl sulfide and dimethylsulfoniopropionate in natural waters, based on vapor generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Takanori; Kajiwara, Hidetaka; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2013-05-07

    A small, simple device was developed for trace analysis of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in natural waters. These compounds are known to be the major sources of cloud condensation nuclei in the oceanic atmosphere and ideally should be measured onsite because of their volatility and instability. First, chemical and physical vapor generations were examined, and simple pressurizing by injection of 30 mL of air using a syringe was adopted. Pressurized headspace air above a 10 mL water sample was introduced to a detection cell as a result of the pressure differential and mixed with ozone to induce chemiluminescence. Although the measurement procedure was simple, the method was very sensitive: sharp peaks appeared within seconds for nanomolar levels of DMS, and the limit of detection was 0.02 nmol L(-1) (1 ng L(-1)). Although interference from methanethiol was significant, this was successfully addressed by adding a small amount of Cd(2+) before DMS vapor generation. DMSP was also measured after hydrolysis to DMS, as previously reported. Pond water and seawater samples were analyzed, and DMS was found in both types of sample, whereas DMSP was observed only in seawater. The DMS/DMSP data obtained using the developed method were compared with data obtained by purge/trap and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data from the two methods agreed, with good correlation (R(2) = 0.9956). The developed device is inexpensive, light (5 kg), simple to use, can be applied in the field, and is sensitive enough for fresh- and seawater analysis.

  8. Predicted dynamic electrothermal performance of thermistor bolometer radiometers for Earth radiation budget applications.

    PubMed

    Haeffelin, M P; Mahan, J R; Priestley, K J

    1997-10-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) rely on scanning thermistor bolometer radiometers of a similar design for accomplishing their mission. High-level dynamic electrothermal models of these instruments have been developed on the basis of the Monte Carlo ray-trace, finite-difference, and finite-element methods. The models are capable of simulating the end-to-end response of the ERBE and the CERES instruments to simulated sequences of Earth scenes. Such models will prove useful in the design of future generations of similar instruments, in defining ground-based and in-flight calibration and data-reduction strategies, in the interpretation of flight data, and in understanding data anomalies that might arise after the instruments have been placed in orbit. Two modules that make up the end-to-end model are presented: the optical-thermal radiative module and the thermistor bolometer dynamic electrothermal module. The optics module is used to determine the point-spread function of the optics, which establishes that the instrument has sharply defined footprints on the Earth. Results obtained with the thermistor bolometer dynamic electrothermal module provide valuable insights into the details of channel operation and establish its high level of equivalence. The combination of the two modules allows the point-spread function of the instrument to be determined and reveals the potential of this tool for scanning realistic Earth scenes.

  9. Metal carbonyl vapor generation coupled with dielectric barrier discharge to avoid plasma quench for optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Li, Shao-Hua; Dou, Shuai; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-20

    The scope of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) microplasma as a radiation source for optical emission spectrometry (OES) is extended by nickel carbonyl vapor generation. We proved that metal carbonyl completely avoids the extinguishing of plasma, and it is much more suitable for matching the DBD excitation and OES detection with respect to significant DBD quenching by concomitant hydrogen when hydride generation is used. A concentric quartz UV reactor allows sample solution to flow through the central channel wherein to efficiently receive the uniformly distributed UV irradiation in the confined cylindrical space between the concentric tubes, which facilitates effective carbonyl generation in a nickel solution. The carbonyl is transferred into the DBD excitation chamber by an argon stream for nickel excitation, and the characteristic emission of nickel at 232.0 nm is detected by a charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. A 1.0 mL sample solution results in a linear range of 5-100 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.3 μg L(-1) and a precision of 2.4% RSD at 50 μg L(-1). The present DBD-OES system is validated by nickel in certified reference materials.

  10. Electrothermal ring burn from a car battery.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Paul A; Godwin, Kenneth A

    2013-08-01

    Despite prevention efforts, burn injuries among auto mechanics are described in the literature. Electrothermal ring burns from car batteries occur by short-circuiting through the ring when it touches the open terminal or metal housing. This article describes a 34-year-old male auto mechanic who was holding a wrench when his gold ring touched the positive terminal of a 12-volt car battery and the wrench touched both his ring and the negative terminal. He felt instant pain and had a deep partial-thickness circumferential burn at the base of his ring finger. No other soft tissues were injured. He was initially managed conservatively, but after minimal healing at 3 weeks, he underwent a full-thickness skin graft. The graft incorporated well and healed by 4 weeks postoperatively. He had full range of motion. The cause of ring burns has been controversial, but based on reports similar to the current patient's mechanism, they are most likely electrothermal burns. Gold, a metal with high thermal conductivity, can heat up to its melting point in a matter of seconds. Many treatments have been described, including local wound care to split- and full-thickness skin grafts. Because most burns are preventable, staff should be warned and trained about the potential risks of contact burns. All jewelry should be removed, and the live battery terminal should be covered while working in the vicinity of the battery.

  11. Benefits of Low-Power Electrothermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Sankovic, John M.

    1997-01-01

    Mission analyses were completed to show the benefits of low-power electrothermal propulsion systems for three classes'of LEO smallsat missions. Three different electrothermal systems were considered: (1) a 40 W ammonia resistojet system, (2) a 600 W hydrazine arcjet system, and (3) a 300 W ammonia resistojet. The benefits of using two 40 W ammonia resistojet systems were analyzed for three months of drag makeup of a Shuttle-launched 100 kg spacecraft in a 297 km orbit. The two 46 W resistojets decreased the propulsion system wet mass by 50% when compared to state-of-art hydrazine monopropellant thrusters. The 600 W arcjet system was used for a 300 km sun synchronous makeup mission of a 1000 kg satellite and was found to decrease the wet propulsion mass by 30%. Finally, the 300 W arcjet system was used on a 200 kg Earth-orbiting spacecraft for both orbit transfer from 300 to 400 km, two years of drag makeup, and a final orbit rise to 700 km. The arcjet system was determined to halve the propulsion system wet mass required for that scenario as compared to hydrazine monopropellant thrusters.

  12. Microwave-assisted arbitrary optical-pulse generation in a thermal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajitha K., V.; Dey, Tarak N.

    2016-11-01

    The propagation of a weak optical field through an atomic system in closed Λ configuration is investigated in which the hyperfine levels are coupled by a microwave pulse. Under the three-photon resonance condition, it is observed that a new pulse of the shape of a microwave field is generated at the probe transition while the input probe is absorbed. The generated probe pulse follows the temporal position of the microwave pulse and maintains shape through the propagation. A simple propagation equation for the probe field in the Fourier domain has been employed to study this effect. This shape preservation of the probe pulse is due to the ground state coherence of the hyperfine transitions induced by the weaker intensity of the microwave field. The generation of an arbitrary shaped probe pulse is also possible at comparable strength of control and microwave fields. The intensity and detuning of the microwave field can play an important role to control probe pulse properties such as gain, broadening, and preservation of shape. The mechanism of efficient generation and manipulation of an optical pulse may have important applications in information science and optical communications.

  13. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of SiOx Films Using Electron Beam Generated Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-28

    special relation to the substrate or e-beam. A total flow of 100 sccm was used in all cases . For the gas flows mentioned above, the individual flows...beam generated plasmas. In this case , molecular hydrogen, formed primarily by recombination of atomic hydrogen on system walls, will not be...the films was large (> 130 nm/min), which implied a high porosity for all cases except for low TEOS flow (≤ 2 sccm) at the higher (300 °C) temperature

  14. UV-photochemical vapor generation of selenium for atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization and 75Se radiotracer efficiency study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybínová, Marcela; Musil, Stanislav; Červený, Václav; Vobecký, Miloslav; Rychlovský, Petr

    2016-09-01

    Volatile selenium compounds were generated UV-photochemically in the continuous flow mode using four UV-photoreactors differing in the material of the reaction coil; Teflon tubing and quartz tubes with various inner diameters and wall thicknesses were tested. Atomic absorption spectrometry with an externally heated quartz furnace atomizer was employed as the detector. The relevant experimental generation parameters were optimized and the basic analytical characteristics were determined. Using formic acid as the photochemical agent, limits of detection achieved for selenium were in the range 46-102 ng L- 1 in dependence on the type of UV-photoreactor employed. When nitric acid was also added to the photochemical agent, the limits of detection were reduced to 27-44 ng L- 1. The repeatability did not exceed 2.4% (5 μg L- 1 Se(IV), n = 10). Experiments with 75Se radiotracer have been performed for the first time to quantify the efficiency of UV-photochemical vapor generation (UV-PVG) of selenium. The highest efficiency of 67 ± 1% was obtained for a UV-photoreactor containing a quartz reaction coil (2.0 mm i.d., 4.0 mm o.d.). The generation efficiency of 61 ± 1% was obtained for a Teflon reaction coil (1.0 mm i.d., 1.4 mm o.d.). Mapping of the radiotracer distribution in the individual parts of the apparatus did not reveal substantial transport losses of the analyte in the UV-PVG system.

  15. Mechanisms of chemical vapor generation by aqueous tetrahydridoborate. Recent developments toward the definition of a more general reaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    A reaction model describing the reactivity of metal and semimetal species with aqueous tetrahydridoborate (THB) has been drawn taking into account the mechanism of chemical vapor generation (CVG) of hydrides, recent evidences on the mechanism of interference and formation of byproducts in arsane generation, and other evidences in the field of the synthesis of nanoparticles and catalytic hydrolysis of THB by metal nanoparticles. The new "non-analytical" reaction model is of more general validity than the previously described "analytical" reaction model for CVG. The non-analytical model is valid for reaction of a single analyte with THB and for conditions approaching those typically encountered in the synthesis of nanoparticles and macroprecipitates. It reduces to the previously proposed analytical model under conditions typically employed in CVG for trace analysis (analyte below the μM level, borane/analyte ≫ 103 mol/mol, no interference). The non-analytical reaction model is not able to explain all the interference effects observed in CVG, which can be achieved only by assuming the interaction among the species of reaction pathways of different analytical substrates. The reunification of CVG, the synthesis of nanoparticles by aqueous THB and the catalytic hydrolysis of THB inside a common frame contribute to rationalization of the complex reactivity of aqueous THB with metal and semimetal species.

  16. Large scale generation of micro-droplet array by vapor condensation on mesh screen piece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian; Xu, Jinliang; He, Xiaotian; Liu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a novel micro-droplet array system, which is based on the distinct three dimensional mesh screen structure and sintering and oxidation induced thermal-fluid performance. Mesh screen was sintered on a copper substrate by bonding the two components. Non-uniform residue stress is generated along weft wires, with larger stress on weft wire top location than elsewhere. Oxidation of the sintered package forms micro pits with few nanograsses on weft wire top location, due to the stress corrosion mechanism. Nanograsses grow elsewhere to show hydrophobic behavior. Thus, surface-energy-gradient weft wires are formed. Cooling the structure in a wet air environment nucleates water droplets on weft wire top location, which is more “hydrophilic” than elsewhere. Droplet size is well controlled by substrate temperature, air humidity and cooling time. Because warp wires do not contact copper substrate and there is a larger conductive thermal resistance between warp wire and weft wire, warp wires contribute less to condensation but function as supporting structure. The surface energy analysis of drops along weft wires explains why droplet array can be generated on the mesh screen piece. Because the commercial material is used, the droplet system is cost effective and can be used for large scale utilization.

  17. Large scale generation of micro-droplet array by vapor condensation on mesh screen piece.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian; Xu, Jinliang; He, Xiaotian; Liu, Qi

    2017-01-05

    We developed a novel micro-droplet array system, which is based on the distinct three dimensional mesh screen structure and sintering and oxidation induced thermal-fluid performance. Mesh screen was sintered on a copper substrate by bonding the two components. Non-uniform residue stress is generated along weft wires, with larger stress on weft wire top location than elsewhere. Oxidation of the sintered package forms micro pits with few nanograsses on weft wire top location, due to the stress corrosion mechanism. Nanograsses grow elsewhere to show hydrophobic behavior. Thus, surface-energy-gradient weft wires are formed. Cooling the structure in a wet air environment nucleates water droplets on weft wire top location, which is more "hydrophilic" than elsewhere. Droplet size is well controlled by substrate temperature, air humidity and cooling time. Because warp wires do not contact copper substrate and there is a larger conductive thermal resistance between warp wire and weft wire, warp wires contribute less to condensation but function as supporting structure. The surface energy analysis of drops along weft wires explains why droplet array can be generated on the mesh screen piece. Because the commercial material is used, the droplet system is cost effective and can be used for large scale utilization.

  18. Large scale generation of micro-droplet array by vapor condensation on mesh screen piece

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Xu, Jinliang; He, Xiaotian; Liu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a novel micro-droplet array system, which is based on the distinct three dimensional mesh screen structure and sintering and oxidation induced thermal-fluid performance. Mesh screen was sintered on a copper substrate by bonding the two components. Non-uniform residue stress is generated along weft wires, with larger stress on weft wire top location than elsewhere. Oxidation of the sintered package forms micro pits with few nanograsses on weft wire top location, due to the stress corrosion mechanism. Nanograsses grow elsewhere to show hydrophobic behavior. Thus, surface-energy-gradient weft wires are formed. Cooling the structure in a wet air environment nucleates water droplets on weft wire top location, which is more “hydrophilic” than elsewhere. Droplet size is well controlled by substrate temperature, air humidity and cooling time. Because warp wires do not contact copper substrate and there is a larger conductive thermal resistance between warp wire and weft wire, warp wires contribute less to condensation but function as supporting structure. The surface energy analysis of drops along weft wires explains why droplet array can be generated on the mesh screen piece. Because the commercial material is used, the droplet system is cost effective and can be used for large scale utilization. PMID:28054635

  19. Detection of bromine by ICP-oa-ToF-MS following photochemical vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Ralph E

    2015-03-03

    A unique flow-through photochemical reactor is utilized for the generation of volatile methyl bromide from aqueous solutions of bromide and bromate ions in a medium of 2% acetic acid containing 3000 μg/mL NH4Cl. The volatile product is transported to a thin-film gas-liquid phase separator and directed to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tine-of-flight mass spectrometer for detection and quantitation using either of the (79)Br or (81)Br isotopes. Utilizing a sample flow rate of 3.3 mL/min and a 13 s irradiation time, a detection limit of 0.14 ng/mL is achieved, yielding a 17-fold enhancement over conventional solution nebulization. The estimated generation efficiency of 95% provides for a significant increase in analyte transport efficiency to the ICP. Precision of replicate measurement is 2.5% (RSD) at 20 ng/mL. The methodology was validated by successful determination of bromine in reference materials, including IRMM (BCR-611) low level bromide in groundwater, NIST SRM 1568b Rice Flour, and SRM 1632 bituminous coal.

  20. Pellet acceleration using an ablation-controlled electrothermal launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    The NCSU ablation-controlled electrothermal launcher SIRENS has been used to accelerate plastic (Lexan polycarbonate) pellets to investigate the possibility of using electrothermal launchers as frozen pellet injectors for tokamak fueling. Successful installation of such a device would include a protective shell (sabot) to shield the hydrogenic pellet from ablation and allow it to maintain its integrity throughout the acceleration. The SIRENS device has been modified to include specially designed barrel sections equipped with diagnostic ports.

  1. The generation of HCl in the system CaCl2-H2O: Vapor-liquid relations from 380-500°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fournier, Robert O.

    1996-01-01

    We determined vapor-liquid relations (P-T-x) and derived critical parameters for the system CaCl2-H2O from 380-500??C. Results show that the two-phase region of this system is extremely large and occupies a significant portion of the P-T space to which circulation of fluids in the Earth's crust is constrained. Results also show the system generates significant amounts of HCl (as much as 0.1 mol/kg) in the vapor phase buffered by the liquid at surprisingly high pressures (???230 bars at 380??C, <580 bars at 500??C), presumably by hydrolysis of CaCl2: CaCl2 + 2H2O = Ca(OH)2 + 2HCl. We interpret the abundance of HCl in the vapor as due to its preference for the vapor phase, and by the preference of Ca(OH)2 for either the liquid phase or solid. The recent recognition of the abundance of CaCl2 in deep brines of the Earth's crust and their hydrothermal mobilization makes the hydrolysis of CaCl2 geologically important. The boiling of Ca-rich brines produces abundant HCl buffered by the presence of the liquid at moderate pressures. The resultant Ca(OH)2 generated by this process reacts with silicates to form a variety of alteration products, such as epidote, whereas the vapor produces acid-alteration of rocks through which it ascends.

  2. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-08-13

    Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the core

  3. Second-Harmonic Generation and Relaxation in Polyurea Thin Films Prepared by Vapor Deposition Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikita, Masayuki; Yamada, Sinichi; Mizutani, Teruyosi

    1993-06-01

    Aromatic polyurea thin (PU) films were fabricated by means of coevaporation of 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and either 4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (DDM) or 4,4'-diamino diphenyl ether (DDE). For the two PU films, second-harmonic generation (SHG) caused by corona poling and the subsequent isothermal decay were investigated. The second-order nonlinear coefficient d33 was estimated to be 5.3 and 6.3 pm/V for PU(DDM) and PU(DDE), respectively, and proved to exhibit almost no decay with time up to 2000 h. It was also found that annealing prior to the poling process caused no additional increase of SHG. This result was interpreted in terms of increase in the packing density of molecules, leading to suppression of the molecular orientation. PU films containing excess residual isocyanate groups showed a large SHG decay to about 60% of the initial value within 10 min. It was concluded that the residual isocyanate groups in as-deposited PU films greatly affects the behavior of SHG relaxation.

  4. Experiments on a repetitively pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results from an investigation of a pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster using water propellant. The PET thruster is operated on a calibrated thrust stand, and produces a thrust to power ratio of T/P = 0.07 + or - 0.01 N/kW. The discharge conditions are inferred from a numerical model which predicts pressure and temperature levels of 300-500 atm and 20,000 K, respectively. These values in turn correctly predict the measured values of impulse bit and discharge resistance. The inferred ideal exhaust velocity from these conditions is 17 km/sec, but the injection of water propellant produces a test tank background pressure of 10-20 Torr, which reduces the exhaust velocity to 14 km/sec. This value corresponds to a thrust efficiency of 54 + or - 7 percent when all experimental errors are taken into account.

  5. Soft electrothermal actuators using silver nanowire heaters.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shanshan; Cui, Jianxun; Cui, Zheng; Zhu, Yong

    2017-03-17

    Low-voltage and extremely flexible electrothermal bimorph actuators were fabricated in a simple, efficient and scalable process. The bimorph actuators were made of flexible silver nanowire (AgNW) based heaters, which exhibited a fast heating rate of 18 °C s(-1) and stable heating performance with large bending. The actuators offered the largest bending angle (720°) or curvature (2.6 cm(-1)) at a very low actuation voltage (0.2 V sq(-1) or 4.5 V) among all types of bimorph actuators that have been reported to date. The actuators can be designed and fabricated in different configurations that can achieve complex patterns and shapes upon actuation. Two applications of this type of soft actuators were demonstrated towards biomimetic robotics - a crawling robot that can walk spontaneously on ratchet surfaces and a soft gripper that is capable of manipulating lightweight and delicate objects.

  6. Electrothermal MEMS fiber scanner for optical endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Hwang, Kyungmin; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-02-22

    We report a novel MEMS fiber scanner with an electrothermal silicon microactuator and a directly mounted optical fiber. The microactuator comprises double hot arm and cold arm structures with a linking bridge and an optical fiber is aligned along a silicon fiber groove. The unique feature induces separation of resonant scanning frequencies of a single optical fiber in lateral and vertical directions, which realizes Lissajous scanning during the resonant motion. The footprint dimension of microactuator is 1.28 x 7 x 0.44 mm3. The resonant scanning frequencies of a 20 mm long optical fiber are 239.4 Hz and 218.4 Hz in lateral and vertical directions, respectively. The full scanned area indicates 451 μm x 558 μm under a 16 Vpp pulse train. This novel laser scanner can provide many opportunities for laser scanning endomicroscopic applications.

  7. Bi-directional electrothermal electromagnetic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Andrew; Kim, Jongbaeg; Lin, Liwei

    2007-05-01

    A new breed of in-plane bi-directional MEMS actuators based on controlled electrothermal buckling and electromagnetic Lorentz force has been demonstrated under both dc and ac operations. Experimentally, bi-directional actuators made by the standard surface-micromachining process have a lateral actuation range of several microns and can exert forces over 100 µN, while those made by SOI and MetalMUMPs processes have an operation range up to several tens of microns and can exert more than 20 mN of force. Reliability tests show that SOI/MetalMUMPs and surface-micromachined actuators can operate for more than 1 and 100 million cycles, respectively, with no signs of degradation. As such, these micro-actuators could be used for MEMS devices that require a bi-directional movement with a large force output such as bi-directional micro-relays.

  8. Study of monopropellants for electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzly, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A 333 mN electrothermal thruster designed to use MIL-grade hydrazine was demonstrated to be suitable for operation with low freezing point monopropellants containing hydrazine azide, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical-dimethylhydrazine and ammonia. The steady-state specific impulse was greater than 200 sec for all propellants. The pulsed-mode specific impulse for an azide blend exceeded 175 sec for pulse widths greater than 50 msec; propellants containing carbonaceous species delivered 175 sec pulsed-mode specific impulses for pulse widths greater than 100 msec. Longer thrust chamber residence times were required for the carbonaceous propellants; the original thruster design was modified by increasing the characteristic chamber length and screen packing density. Specific recommendations were made for the work required to design and develop flight worthy thrusters, including methods to increase propellant dispersal at injection, thruster geometry changes to reduce holding power levels and methods to initiate the rapid decomposition of the carbonaceous propellants.

  9. Analysis of metals in marine sediments by microwave extraction and flame, hydride generation and cold vapor atomic-absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, M.L.; Zubieta, A.C.; Lorenzo, S.M.; Lopez-Mahia, P.; Rodriguez, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast metal extraction method that combines closed vessels and microwave heating for the simultaneous extraction of ten selected heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) from marine sediments is proposed. Digestion conditions, i.e., power and times microwave irradiation, reagent extractant, sample amount, were optimized to recover the potentially available metallic fraction not bound in silicates. A nitric acid and two step microwave program was established. The resulting solutions were analyzed by flame (FAAS), hydride generation (HG-AAS) and cold vapor (CV-AAS) atomic absorption spectrometry. Quantifications were made using direct calibration with aqueous standards. The recoveries of the spiked samples investigated ranged from 89 to 113%. The results obtained from analyzing the BCR certified reference sediment CRM 277 Estuarine Sediment were in good agreement with the certified values (93--105%), except for low values for chromium (79%). The relative standard deviations for the determination of metals were less than 4%. Finally, the technique designed herein was applied to sediment samples from La Coruna estuary, NW Spain.

  10. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyang

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg 0, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL -1 for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury ( n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  11. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  12. Design, Modeling, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators with Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposited Polysilicon as Thermoelement Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Maria Theresa; Tarazona, Antulio; Chong, Harold; Kraft, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, fabrication, and evaluation of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) with p-type polysilicon deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) as thermoelement material. A thermal model is developed based on energy balance and heat transfer equations using lumped thermal conductances. Several test structures were fabricated to allow characterization of the boron-doped polysilicon material deposited by HWCVD. The film was found to be electrically active without any post-deposition annealing. Based on the tests performed on the test structures, it is determined that the Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and electrical resistivity of the HWCVD polysilicon are 113 μV/K, 126 W/mK, and 3.58 × 10-5 Ω m, respectively. Results from laser tests performed on the fabricated TEG are in good agreement with the thermal model. The temperature values derived from the thermal model are within 2.8% of the measured temperature values. For a 1-W laser input, an open-circuit voltage and output power of 247 mV and 347 nW, respectively, were generated. This translates to a temperature difference of 63°C across the thermoelements. This paper demonstrates that HWCVD, which is a cost-effective way of producing solar cells, can also be applied in the production of TEGs. By establishing that HWCVD polysilicon can be an effective thermoelectric material, further work on developing photovoltaic-thermoelectric (PV-TE) hybrid microsystems that are cost-effective and better performing can be explored.

  13. Transition-edge sensor with enhanced electrothermal feedback for cryogenic particle detection

    DOEpatents

    Nam, Sae Woo; Cabrera, Blas

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting transition-edge sensor with an electrothermal-feedback circuit, a heat sink thermally coupled thereto, a bias-feedback circuit electrically coupled with the electrothermal feedback circuit, and a current sensor electrically coupled with the bias-feedback circuit and inductively coupled with the electrothermal-feedback circuit.

  14. Modeling the capillary discharge of an electrothermal (ET) launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Least, Travis

    Over the past few decades, different branches of the US Department of Defense (DoD) have invested at improving the field ability of electromagnetic launchers. One such focus has been on achieving hypervelocity launch velocities in excess of 7 km/s for direct launch to space applications [1]. It has been shown that pre-injection is required for this to be achieved. One method of pre-injection which has promise involves using an electro-thermal (ET) due to its ability to achieve the desired velocities with a minimal amount of hot plasma injected into the launcher behind the projectile. Despite the demonstration of pre-injection using this method, polymer ablation is not very well known and this makes it challenging to predict how the system will behave for a given input of electrical power. In this work, the rate of ablation has been studied and predicted using different models to generate the best possible characteristic curve. [1] - Wetz, David A., Francis Stefani, Jerald V. Parker, and Ian R. McNab. "Advancements in the Development of a Plasma-Driven Electromagnetic Launcher." IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS 45.1 (2009): 495--500. IEEE Xplore. Web. 18 Aug. 2012.

  15. Experimental Observations of the Electrothermal Instability on Thin Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Adam; Campbell, Paul; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Jordan, Nicholas; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2016-10-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) arises whenever a current-carrying material has a resistivity that depends on temperature. When resistivity increases with increasing temperature, ETI causes striations to form perpendicular to the direction of current. On pulsed-power-driven, ablating metallic loads, this process can cause sections of the target to ablate earlier than the bulk material, creating a macroscopic surface perturbation on the plasma surface that can seed hydrodynamic instabilities, such as the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. Experiments have been performed to observe the self-emission of ablating planar aluminum and tantalum foils using a 12-frame ultrafast ICCD camera with 2 μm spatial resolution and 5 ns time resolution. Other diagnostics include voltage, current, and optical spectroscopy. Ablations of foils ranging from 0.4 to 2 μm in thickness are driven with a 4 kA, 600 ns risetime pulse generator. Striations of hotter, brighter material forming perpendicular to current are consistently observed. These measurements provide experimental evidence of the growth of ETI as a temperature perturbation on initially solid metal loads. This research was supported by the Department of Energy through Award DE-SC0012328, AFOSR Grant #FA9550-15-1-0419, and Sandia National Laboratories.

  16. Statics and dynamics of electrothermal micromirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Jessica A.

    Adaptive and smart systems are growing in popularity as we shift toward personalization as a culture. With progressive demands on energy efficiency, it is increasingly important to focus on the utilization of energy in a novel way. This thesis investigates a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror with the express intent to provide flexibility in solid state lighting (SSL). By coupling the micromirror to an optical source, the reflected light may be reshaped and directed so as to optimize the overall illumination profile. In addition, the light may be redirected in order to provide improved signal strength in visible light communications (VLC) with negligible impact on energy demands. With flexibility and full analog control in mind, the design of a fully integrated tip-tilt-piston micromirror with an additional variable focus degree of freedom is outlined. Electrothermal actuators are used to both steer the light and tune the focal length. A detailed discussion of the underlying physics behind composite beams and thermal actuators is addressed. This leads directly into an overview of the two main mirror components, namely the segmented mirror and the deflection actuators. An in-depth characterization of the dynamics of the mirror is discussed including the linearity of the thermal response. Frequency domain analysis of such a system provides insight into tunable mechanical properties such as the resonant frequency and quality factor. The degenerate resonant modes can be separated significantly. It is shown that the frequency response may be tuned by straining specific actuators and that it follows a predictable pattern. As a result, the system can be scanned at increasingly large angles. In other words, coupled mechanical modes allow variable damping and amplification. A means to determine the level of coupling is examined and the mode shape variations are tracked as a function of the tuning parameters. Finally, the applications of such a device are explored

  17. SOI-CMOS-MEMS electrothermal micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgunn, Peter J.

    A fabrication technology called SOI-CMOS-MEMS is developed to realize arrays of electrothermally actuated micromirror arrays with fill factors up to 90% and mechanical scan ranges up to +/-45°. SOI-CMOS-MEMS features bonding of a CMOS-MEMS folded electrothermal actuator chip with a SOI mirror chip. Actuators and micromirrors are separately released using Bosch-type and isotropic Si etch processes. A 1-D, 3 x 3 SOI-CMOS-MEMS mirror array is characterized at a 1 mm scale that meets fill factor and scan range targets with a power sensitivity of 1.9 deg·m W-1 and -0.9 deg·m W-1 on inner and outer actuator legs, respectively. Issues preventing fabrication of SOI-CMOS-MEMS micromirror arrays designed for 1-D and 3-D motion at scales from 500 microm to 50 microm are discussed. Electrothermomechanical analytic models of power response of a generic folded actuator topology are developed that provide insight into the trends in actuator behavior for actuator design elements such as beam geometry and heater type, among others. Adverse power and scan range scaling and favorable speed scaling are demonstrated. Mechanical constraints on device geometry are derived. Detailed material, process, test structure and device characterization is presented that demonstrates the consistency of measured device behavior with analytic models. A unified model for aspect ratio dependent etch modulation is developed that achieves depth prediction accuracy of better than 10% up to 160 microm depth over a range of feature shapes and dimensions. The technique is applied extensively in the SOI-CMOS-MEMS process to produce deep multi-level structures in Si with a single etch mask and to control uniformity and feature profiles. TiW attack during release etch is shown to be the driving factor in mirror coplanarity loss. The effect is due to thermally accelerated etching caused by heating of released structures by the exothermic reaction of Si and F. The effect is quantified using in situ infrared

  18. Design and characterization of a microelectromechanical system electro-thermal linear motor with interlock mechanism for micro manipulators.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tengjiang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Xiuyuan; Zhao, You; Bai, Yingwei

    2016-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a novel electro-thermal linear motor for micro manipulators is presented in this paper. The V-shape electro-thermal actuator arrays, micro lever, micro spring, and slider are introduced. In moving operation, the linear motor can move nearly 1 mm displacement with 100 μm each step while keeping the applied voltage as low as 17 V. In holding operation, the motor can stay in one particular position without consuming energy and no creep deformation is found. Actuation force of 12.7 mN indicates the high force generation capability of the device. Experiments of lifetime show that the device can wear over two million cycles of operation. A silicon-on-insulator wafer is introduced to fabricate a high aspect ratio structure and the chip size is 8.5 mm × 8.5 mm × 0.5 mm.

  19. Erosion of plasma-facing components under simulated disruption-like conditions using an electrothermal plasma gun

    SciTech Connect

    Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1994-11-01

    The NCSU electrothermal plasma gun, SIRENS, has been used to evaluate the erosion behavior of plasma-facing components under conditions simulating plasma disruption in tokamaks. The device is capable of producing conditions with heat fluence up to 10 MJ/m{sup 2} over 0.1 and 0.25 ms pulse duration. In future large tokamaks, plasma-facing components are expected to receive heat fluxes during a plasma disruption, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over 0.01-5 ms. The vapor, which is developed at the ablating surface, absorbs a fraction of the incoming plasma energy. Candidate plasma-facing materials have been exposed to heat fluxes in the SIRENS facility (primarily from a blackbody spectrum photons), up to 100 GW/m{sup 2} over 0.1-0.25 ms. The vapor shielding effect has been demonstrated and analyzed for the divertor candidate materials.

  20. Investigation of a pulsed electrothermal thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hilko, B. K.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of an ablative wall Pulsed Electrothermal (PET) thruster is accurately characterized on a calibrated thrust stand, using polyethylene propellant. The thruster is tested for four configurations of capillary length and pulse length. The exhaust velocity is determined with twin time-of-flight photodiode stagnation probes, and the ablated mass is measured from the loss over ten shots. Based on the measured thrust impulse and the ablated mass, the specific impulse varies from 1000 to 1750 seconds. The thrust to power varies from .05 N/kW (quasi-steady mode) to .10 N/kW (unsteady mode). The thruster efficiency varies from .56 at 1000 seconds to .42 at 1750 seconds. A conceptual design is presented for a 40 kW PET propulsion system. The point design system performance is .62 system efficiency at 1000 seconds specific impulse. The system's reliability is enhanced by incorporating 20, 20 kW thruster modules which are fired in pairs. The thruster design is non-ablative, and uses water propellant, from a central storage tank, injected through the cathode.

  1. Investigation of a pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hilko, B. K.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1983-01-01

    Exhaust velocity and thrust measurements are performed on a pulsed electrothermal thruster using polyethylene and Teflon propellants. The results verify theoretical predictions of equilibrium flow in the nozzle, resulting in substantial recovery of the energy of dissociation and ionization. The thruster is tested in an unsteady mode (15 micro sec current pulse and 15 cm discharge length) and in a quasi-steady mode (48 micro sec current pulse and 5 cm discharge length). All tests are run at 2 kJ. The exhaust velocity of the propellant mass exiting during the current pulse is measured with two types of time of flight probes, and the impulse bit is measured on a thrust stand. It is inferred from both theory and experiment that an additional amount of mass is exhausted after the pulse. The measured thrust to power ratio for polyethylene is T/P = 0.10 NkW at 21 km/sec in the unsteady mode, and T/P = .053 N/kW at 27 km/sec in the quasi-steady mode, where the velocities are measured by the time-of-flight probes. For Teflon propellant, T/P = .20 N/kW at 15 km/sec (unsteady mode) and 0.090 N/kW at 20 km/sec (quasi-steady mode). The discharge pressure and temperature predicted by a computational model for polyethylene are consistent with the measured thrust and discharge resistance.

  2. Experimental investigation and characterization of micro resistance welding with an electro-thermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Wei; Yeh, Cheng-Chi; Hsu, Wensyang

    2009-02-01

    Resistance welding is a common scheme of assembly on the macro scale by pressing together two workpieces with current passing through them to generate joule heating at the contact region due to high contact resistance. However, micro assembly by resistance welding is seldom reported. Here, resistance welding with an electro-thermal microactuator to assemble micro Ni structures is experimentally investigated and characterized. The bent-beam electro-thermal microactuator is designed to provide the necessary displacements and pressing forces. The two-mask metal-based surface micromachining process is adopted to fabricate the micro Ni structures. The calibrated initial contact resistance is shown to decrease with increasing contact pressure. Furthermore, stronger welding strength is achieved at a smaller initial contact resistance, which indicates that a larger clamping force would enhance the welding strength as large as 3.09 MPa (74.4 µN) at a contact resistance of 2.7 Ω here. The input welding energy is also found to be a critical factor. In our tests, when welding energy is below the threshold limit of 0.05 J, the welding trials all fail. For the energy between 0.05 J and 1 J, there is a transition from a lower yield of 33.3% to a higher yield of 58.3%. At high welding energy, between 1 and 10 J, 100% yield is achieved. With the demonstration and characterization of micro resistance welding by the electro-thermal microactuator, the scheme proposed here would be helpful in the automation of micro assembly.

  3. Study of monopropellants for electrothermal thrusters: Analytical task summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzly, J. D.; Grabbi, R.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of operating small thrust level electrothermal thrusters is determined with monopropellants other than MIL-grade hydrazine. The work scope includes analytical study, design and fabrication of demonstration thrusters, and an evaluation test program where monopropellants with freezing points lower than MIL-grade hydrazine are evaluated and characterized to determine their applicability to electrothermal thrusters for spacecraft attitude control. Results of propellant chemistry studies and performance analyses indicated that the most promising candidate monopropellants to be investigated are monomethylhydrazine, Aerozine-50, 77% hydrazine-23% hydrazine azide blend, and TRW formulated mixed hydrazine monopropellant (MHM) consisting of 35% hydrazine-50% monomethylhydrazine-15% ammonia.

  4. Ultrathin phase-change coatings on metals for electrothermally tunable colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Ayas, Sencer; Saidzoda, Tohir; Celebi, Kemal; Dana, Aykutlu

    2016-08-01

    Metal surfaces coated with ultrathin lossy dielectrics enable color generation through strong interferences in the visible spectrum. Using a phase-change thin film as the coating layer offers tuning the generated color by crystallization or re-amorphization. Here, we study the optical response of surfaces consisting of thin (5-40 nm) phase-changing Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) films on metal, primarily Al, layers. A color scale ranging from yellow to red to blue that is obtained using different thicknesses of as-deposited amorphous GST layers turns dim gray upon annealing-induced crystallization of the GST. Moreover, when a relatively thick (>100 nm) and lossless dielectric film is introduced between the GST and Al layers, optical cavity modes are observed, offering a rich color gamut at the expense of the angle independent optical response. Finally, a color pixel structure is proposed for ultrahigh resolution (pixel size: 5 × 5 μm2), non-volatile displays, where the metal layer acting like a mirror is used as a heater element. The electrothermal simulations of such a pixel structure suggest that crystallization and re-amorphization of the GST layer using electrical pulses are possible for electrothermal color tuning.

  5. Determination of mercury in fish otoliths by cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS)†

    PubMed Central

    Kenduzler, Erdal; Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; McHenry, Melanie; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    A method based on cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS) has been developed for determination of inorganic mercury, Hg(II), and total mercury in fish otoliths. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was used as the only reducing agent and its concentration was optimized across an acidity gradient to selectively reduce Hg(II) without affecting methylmercury, CH3Hg(I). Inorganic Hg was quantitatively reduced to elemental mercury (Hg0) with 1×10−4% (m/v) NaBH4. CH3Hg(I) required a minimum of 0.5% (m/v) NaBH4 for complete reduction. Increasing the HCl concentration of solution to 5% (v/v) improved the selectivity toward Hg(II) as it decreased the signals from CH3Hg(I) to baseline levels. Potassium ferricyanide solution was the most effective in eliminating the memory effects of Hg compared with a number of chelating and oxidizing agents, including EDTA, gold chloride, thiourea, cerium ammonium nitrate and 2-mercaptoethylamine chloride. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5% for 1.0 μg L−1 Hg(II) solution. The detection limits were 4.2 and 6.4 ng L−1 (ppt) for Hg(II) and total Hg, respectively. Sample dissolution conditions and recoveries were examined with ultra-pure CaCO3 (99.99%) spiked with Hg(II) and CH3HgCl. Methylmercury was stable when dissolution was performed with up to 20% (v/v) HCl at 100 oC. Recoveries from spiked solutions were higher than 95% for both Hg(II) and CH3Hg(I). The method was applied to the determination of Hg(II) and total Hg concentrations in the otoliths of red emperor (CRM 22) and Pacific halibut. Total Hg concentration in the otoliths was 0.038 ± 0.004 μg g−1 for the red emperor and 0.021 ± 0.003 μg g−1 for the Pacific halibut. Inorganic Hg accounted for about 25% of total Hg indicating that Hg in the otoliths was predominantly organic mercury (e.g., methylmercury). However, as opposed to the bioaccumulation in tissues, methylmercury levels in otoliths was very low suggesting a

  6. A theoretical description of the polarization dependence of the sum frequency generation spectroscopy of the water/vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Angela; Neipert, Christine; Kasprzyk, Christina Ridley; Green, Tony; Space, Brian; Moore, Preston B.

    2005-10-01

    An improved time correlation function (TCF) description of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy was developed and applied to theoretically describing the spectroscopy of the ambient water/vapor interface. A more general TCF expression than was published previously is presented—it is valid over the entire vibrational spectrum for both the real and imaginary parts of the signal. Computationally, earlier time correlation function approaches were limited to short correlation times that made signal processing challenging. Here, this limitation is overcome, and well-averaged spectra are presented for the three independent polarization conditions that are possible for electronically nonresonant SFG. The theoretical spectra compare quite favorably in shape and relative magnitude to extant experimental results in the O H stretching region of water for all polarization geometries. The methodological improvements also allow the calculation of intermolecular SFG spectra. While the intermolecular spectrum of bulk water shows relatively little structure, the interfacial spectra (for polarizations that are sensitive to dipole derivatives normal to the interface—SSP and PPP) show a well-defined intermolecular mode at 875cm-1 that is comparable in intensity to the rest of the intermolecular structure, and has an intensity that is approximately one-sixth of the magnitude of the intense free OH stretching peak. Using instantaneous normal mode methods, the resonance is shown to be due to a wagging mode localized on a single water molecule, almost parallel to the interface, with two hydrogens displaced normal to the interface, and the oxygen anchored in the interface. We have also uncovered the origin of another intermolecular mode at 95cm-1 for the SSP and PPP spectra, and at 220cm-1 for the SPS spectra. These resonances are due to hindered translations perpendicular to the interface for the SSP and PPP spectra, and translations parallel to the interface for the SPS

  7. On-line continuous generation of zinc chelates in the vapor phase by reaction with sodium dithiocarbamates and determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Sun, Rui; Fang, Jinliang

    2017-02-01

    The present study shows for the first time that a volatile zinc chelate species can be generated by the on-line continuous merging of an acidified sample solution with an aqueous sodium diethyldithiocarbamate solution followed by rapid separation using a frit-based bubble gas-liquid separator at room temperature. The operating conditions for the generation of the vaporous zinc chelate were preliminarily investigated by non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The possible mechanism of zinc vapor generation is discussed. The study shows that the volatile species is an intermediate species with very similar properties to diethyldithiocarbamic acid and a very short half-life in the acidic solution. Moreover, this species can only be generated by on-line mixing and rapid separation. The efficiency of generation was 33-85% depending on acidity. Under optimal conditions, the flow rates of the sample and Na-DDTC solution were 1.3 ml min- 1, the carrier argon flow rate was 225 ml min- 1, the acid concentration of the sample solution and the concentration of Na-DDTC were 0.05 M and 0.4% (m/v), respectively, the detection limit of zinc was 0.33 (3σ) ng ml- 1, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.3%. The accuracy of the method was verified by the determination of zinc in the plant reference materials GBW10015 (spinach) and GBW10045 (rice). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  8. The annular flow electrothermal ramjet. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    The annular flow, electrothermal, plug ramjet is examined as a possible means of achieving rapid projectile acceleration to velocities for such applications as direct launch of spacebound payloads. The performance of this ramjet operating with hydrogen propellant is examined for cases where this working fluid is treated: (1) as a perfect gas, and (2) as a gas that is allowed to dissociate and ionize and then recombine with finite reaction rates in the nozzle. Performance results for these cases are compared to the performance of a conventional ramjet operating with perfect gas hydrogen propellant. The performance of the conventional ramjet is superior to that of the annular flow, electrothermal ramjet. However, it is argued that the mechanical complexities associated with conventional ramjet operation are difficult to attain, and for this reason the annular flow, electrothermal ramjet is more desirable as a launch system. Models are presented which describe both electrothermal plug ramjet and conventional ramjet operation, and it is shown that for a given flight velocity there is a rate of heat addition per unit propellant mass for which ramjet operation is optimized.

  9. Enhanced Performance of Electrothermal Plasma Sources as Fusion Pellet Injection Drivers and Space Based Mini-Thrusters via Extension of a Flattop Discharge Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh Winfrey, A.; Abd Al-Halim, Mohamed A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Gilligan, John G.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2013-06-01

    Electrothermal plasma sources have been introduced as a method to propel frozen hydrogenic pellets for fueling of future magnetic fusion reactors. These sources are also useful as mini-thrusters in space shuttles, pre-injectors in hypervelocity launchers and igniters in electrothermal-chemical Guns. The source is a capillary discharge that generates the plasma from the ablation of a liner in an ablation-dominated regime, or from the flow of gas into the capillary in an ablation-free regime. Most electrothermal plasma sources uses pulse power delivery system with a pulse length in the range of 100 μs with FWHM of 50 μs. This research is a computational study on the effect of extending the top of the discharge current pulse to the range of 1,000 μs on the source exit parameter to achieve higher pressures and better exit velocities. Calculations using 0.4 cm diameter, 9.0 cm length Lexan polycarbonate capillary source, using ideal and nonideal plasma models, show that extended flattop pulses at fixed amplitude produce more ablated mass which scales linearly with increased pulse length, however, other plasma parameters remain almost constant. Results suggest that quasi-steady state operation of an electrothermal plasma source may provide constant exit pressure and velocity for pellet injectors for future magnetic fusion reactors deep fueling.

  10. Vapor shielding effects on energy transfer from plasma-gun generated ELM-like transient loads to material surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Isono, W.; Nakazono, T.; Nakane, M.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer processes from ELM-like pulsed helium (He) plasmas with a pulse duration of ˜0.1 ms to aluminum (Al) and tungsten (W) surfaces were experimentally investigated by the use of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device. The surface absorbed energy density of the He pulsed plasma on the W surface measured with a calorimeter was ˜0.44 MJ m-2, whereas it was ˜0.15 MJ m-2 on the Al surface. A vapor layer in front of the Al surface exposed to the He pulsed plasma was clearly identified by Al neutral emission line (Al i) measured with a high time resolution spectrometer, and fast imaging with a high-speed visible camera filtered around the Al i emission line. On the other hand, no clear evaporation in front of the W surface exposed to the He pulsed plasma was observed in the present condition. Discussions on the reduction in the surface absorbed energy density on the Al surface are provided by considering the latent heat of vaporization and radiation cooling due to the Al vapor cloud.

  11. Monitoring variations of dimethyl sulfide and dimethylsulfoniopropionate in seawater and the atmosphere based on sequential vapor generation and ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iyadomi, Satoshi; Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-04-01

    To monitor the fluctuations of dimethyl sulfur compounds at the seawater/atmosphere interface, an automated system was developed based on sequential injection analysis coupled with vapor generation-ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry (SIA-VG-IMRMS). Using this analytical system, dissolved dimethyl sulfide (DMS(aq)) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a precursor to DMS in seawater, were monitored together sequentially with atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS(g)). A shift from the equilibrium point between DMS(aq) and DMS(g) results in the emission of DMS to the atmosphere. Atmospheric DMS emitted from seawater plays an important role as a source of cloud condensation nuclei, which influences the oceanic climate. Water samples were taken periodically and dissolved DMS(aq) was vaporized for analysis by IMRMS. After that, DMSP was hydrolyzed to DMS and acrylic acid, and analyzed in the same manner as DMS(aq). The vaporization behavior and hydrolysis of DMSP to DMS were investigated to optimize these conditions. Frequent (every 30 min) determination of the three components, DMS(aq)/DMSP (nanomolar) and DMS(g) (ppbv), was carried out by SIA-VG-IMRMS. Field analysis of the dimethyl sulfur compounds was undertaken at a coastal station, which succeeded in showing detailed variations of the compounds in a natural setting. Observed concentrations of the dimethyl sulfur compounds both in the atmosphere and seawater largely changed with time and similar variations were repeatedly observed over several days, suggesting diurnal variations in the DMS flux at the seawater/atmosphere interface.

  12. Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  13. Direct measurement of axial momentum imparted by an electrothermal radiofrequency plasma micro-thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick; Bish, Andrew; Khayms, Vadim; Scholz, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    Gas flow heating using radio frequency plasmas offers the possibility of depositing power in the centre of the flow rather than on the outside, as is the case with electro-thermal systems where thermal wall losses lower efficiency. Improved systems for space propulsion are one possible application and we have tested a prototype micro-thruster on a thrust balance in vacuum. For these initial tests, a fixed component radio frequency matching network weighing 90 grams was closely attached to the thruster in vacuum with the frequency agile radio frequency generator power being delivered via a 50 Ohm cable. Without accounting for system losses (estimated at around 50%), for a few 10s of Watts from the radio frequency generator the specific impulse was tripled to ˜48 seconds and the thrust tripled from 0.8 to 2.4 milli-Newtons.

  14. Determination of mercury compounds in fish by microwave-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography-vapor generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chwei-Sheng; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Kumar Danadurai, K. Suresh

    2001-07-01

    A method employing a vapor generation system and LC combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) is presented for the determination of mercury in biological tissues. An open vessel microwave digestion system was used to extract the mercury compounds from the sample matrix. The efficiency of the mobile phase, a mixture of L-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol, was evaluated for LC separation of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)], methylmercury (methyl-Hg) and ethylmercury (ethyl-Hg). The sensitivity, detection limits and repeatability of the liquid chromatography (LC) ICP-MS system with a vapor generator were comparable to, or better than, that of an LC-ICP-MS system with conventional pneumatic nebulization, or other sample introduction techniques. The experimental detection limits for various mercury species were in the range of 0.05-0.09 ng ml -1 Hg, based on peak height. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury compounds in a swordfish sample purchased from the local market. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analyzing a marine biological certified reference material (DORM-2, NRCC).

  15. Determination of Se in biological samples by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after digestion with aqua regia and on-line chemical vapor generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Éder José; Herrmann, Amanda Beatriz; de Caires, Suzete Kulik; Frescura, Vera Lúcia Azzolin; Curtius, Adilson José

    2009-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the determination of Se in biological samples, including food, by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using on-line chemical vapor generation (CVG-ICP OES) is proposed. The concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4, used in the chemical vapor generation were optimized by factorial analysis. Six certified materials (non-fat milk powder, lobster hepatopancreas, human hair, whole egg powder, oyster tissue, and lyophilised pig kidney) were treated with 10 mL of aqua regia in a microwave system under reflux for 15 min followed by additional 15 min in an ultrasonic bath. The solutions were transferred to a 100 mL volumetric flask and the final volume was made up with water. The Se was determined directly in these solutions by CVG-ICP OES, using the analytical line at 196.026 nm. Calibration against aqueous standards in 10% v/v aqua regia in the concentration range of 0.5-10.0 µg L - 1 Se(IV) was used for the analysis. The quantification limit, considering a 0.5 g sample weight in a final volume of 100 mL - 1 was 0.10 µg g - 1. The obtained concentration values were in agreement with the total certified concentrations, according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level.

  16. Enhancing vapor generation at a liquid-solid interface using micro/nanoscale surface structures fabricated by femtosecond laser surface processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Troy P.; Wilson, Chris; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Kruse, Corey; Gogos, George; Ndao, Sidy; Alexander, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond Laser Surface Processing (FLSP) is a versatile technique for the fabrication of a wide variety of micro/nanostructured surfaces with tailored physical and chemical properties. Through control over processing conditions such as laser fluence, incident pulse count, polarization, and incident angle, the size and density of both micrometer and nanometer-scale surface features can be tailored. Furthermore, the composition and pressure of the environment both during and after laser processing have a substantial impact on the final surface chemistry of the target material. FLSP is therefore a powerful tool for optimizing interfacial phenomena such as wetting, wicking, and phasetransitions associated with a vapor/liquid/solid interface. In the present study, we utilize a series of multiscale FLSPgenerated surfaces to improve the efficiency of vapor generation on a structured surface. Specifically, we demonstrate that FLSP of stainless steel 316 electrode surfaces in an alkaline electrolysis cell results in increased efficiency of the water-splitting reaction used to generate hydrogen. The electrodes are fabricated to be superhydrophilic (the contact angle of a water droplet on the surface is less than 5 degrees). The overpotential of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is measured using a 3-electrode configuration with a structured electrode as the working electrode. The enhancement is attributed to several factors including increased surface area, increased wettability, and the impact of micro/nanostructures on the bubble formation and release. Special emphasis is placed on identifying and isolating the relative impacts of the various contributions.

  17. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri

    2015-03-01

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D2 and Xe lamps within 200-400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3-5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground water

  18. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  19. Role of plant-generated water vapor and VOC fluxes in shoot chamber measurements of O3 and NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joensuu, J.; Altimir, N.; Raivonen, M.; Kolari, P.; Keronen, P.; Vesala, T.; Bäck, J.; Hari, P.; Järvinen, E.; Nikinmaa, E.

    2012-04-01

    One of the processes underlying the atmospheric balance of O3 and NOx is their interaction with vegetation. Both are removed, absorbed, and NOx potentially also emitted by foliage. Uncertainties remain on relevant factors controlling O3 and NOx interactions with foliage as well as on including them in large-scale models. One reason for the uncertainty is that chamber measurements of O3 and NOx fluxes are complicated. These reactive gases are adsorbed and desorbed on the chamber walls, depending on the conditions (i.e. humidity). These artefact gas fluxes (chamber blank) must also be quantified and taken into account in the data analysis. Their importance increases when measuring in clean air, where the fluxes are generally small. At near-zero concentrations, the fluxes may not pass the detection limit of the instrumentation, which usually means it is not possible to separate the plant-related fluxes from the chamber blank. The long-term field measurements at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, have provided valuable insights into O3 and NOx exchange (i.e. Raivonen & al. 2009, Altimir & al. 2006). This project builds up on the expertise and conclusions from these works. The aim of this study was to improve the reliability of the measuring system by checking the role of potential measuring artefact(s). A live shoot, enclosed in a chamber, creates a water vapor in the chamber flux by transpiring. There are also biogenic VOC emissions from the shoot. In principle, these may affect the reactions of O3 and possibly NOx in the chamber. The potential interference of these fluxes created naturally during chamber closure is a main concern. Their effect on the O3 and NOx flux measurements has been tested with field calibrations in 2010-2011. In these calibrations, a controlled water vapor /VOC flux was fed into an empty shoot measurement chamber, and the H2O, CO2, O3 and NOx fluxes created in the chamber were measured. The created water vapor flux pattern

  20. Pattern Generation below 0.1 micron by Localized Chemical Vapor Deposition with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozanne, Alex

    1994-12-01

    Nowadays there are many techniques for nanofabrication, some of which are well established. The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is the newest tool for making nanostructures, even down to the atomic scale, but it is not yet clear which applications will benefit from it. We have developed a technique that combines STM and chemical vapor deposition (CVD): the idea is to break CVD precursor gases with the electrons from the STM. This has the attractive feature of obtaining the highest resolution possible together with minimal damage to the substrate or existing structures. The gases that have been used with this technique include trimethylaluminum, dimethylcadmium, tungsten hexafluoride, nickel tetracarbonyl, and iron pentacarbonyl. Thus far this technique has produced metallic lines that are only 35 nm wide and dots that are 8 nm in diameter.

  1. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  2. Electro-thermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Marsili, F.; Najafi, F.; Herder, C.; Berggren, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Determination of mercury in coal by isotope dilution cold-vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Long, Stephen E; Kelly, W Robert

    2002-04-01

    A method based on isotope dilution cold-vapor inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-CV-ICPMS) has been developed for high-accuracy determinations of mercury in bituminous and sub-bituminous coals. A closed-system digestion process employing a Carius tube is used to completely oxidize the coal matrix and chemically equilibrate the mercury in the sample with a 201Hg isotopic spike. The digestates are diluted with high-purity quartz-distilled water, and the mercury is released as a vapor by reduction with tin(II) chloride. Measurements of 201Hg/202Hg isotope ratios are made using a quadrupole ICPMS system in time-resolved analysis mode. The new method has some significant advantages over existing methods. The instrument detection limit is less than 1 pg/mL. The average blank (n = 17) is 30 pg, which is roughly 1 order of magnitude lower than the equivalent microwave digestion procedure. The detection limit in coal is blank limited and is approximately 40 pg/g. Memory effects are very low. The relative reproducibility of the analytical measurements is approximately 0.5% for mercury concentrations in the range 10-150 ng/g. The method has been used to measure mercury concentrations in six coal reference materials, SRM 1632b (77.4 ng/g), SRM 1632c (94.3 ng/g), BCR 40 (433.2 ng/g), BCR 180 (125.0 ng/g), BCR 181 (135.8 ng/g), and SARM 20 (252.6 ng/g), as well as a coal fly ash, SRM 1633b (143.1 ng/g). The method is equally applicable to other types of fossil fuels including both crude and refined oils.

  4. The design and analysis of a MEMS electrothermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suocheng, Wang; Yongping, Hao; Shuangjie, Liu

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces a type of out-of-plane microelectrothermal actuator, which is based on the principle of bimetal film thermal expansion in the fuse. A polymer SU-8 material and nickel are used as the functional and structural materials of the actuator. Through heating the resistance wire using electricity, the actuator produces out-of-plane motion in the perpendicular axial direction of the device and the bias layer contact with the substrate, completing signal output. Using Coventorware software to establish the three-dimensional model, the geometric structure is optimized and the electrothermal capabilities are determined theoretically. From electrothermal analysis, the actuator's displacement is 18 μm and the temperature rises from 300 to 440 K under a voltage of 5 V and the response time is 5 ms. The actuator's displacement is 20 μm under a 100000 m/s2 acceleration in the accelerating field. In the coupled field, applying a 3 V voltage, the initial temperature is 300 K, while the acceleration is 50000 m/s2, the driving displacement of the actuator is 23 μm, and temperature rises to 400 K. Finally, through checking the stress in different field sources, the maximum stress of the actuator is smaller than the allowable stress of nickel. The results show that the electrothermal actuator has high reliability.

  5. Voltage-biased high-{Tc} superconducting infrared bolometers with strong electrothermal feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.T.; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Shih-Fu; Richards, P.L.

    1996-08-01

    In the current generation of high-{Tc} bolometers the thermal conductance is often chosen for a short time-constant rather than for optimal sensitivity. We describe a novel bolometer bias and readout scheme that promises to relax this constraint. Voltage bias of the superconductor results in strong negative electrothermal feedback that greatly reduces the time-constant of the bolometer. We estimate that a decrease of more than one order of magnitude in time-constant should be possible with existing high-Tc thermometers. We give theoretical estimates of the performance gain with voltage bias for several bolometers that have been reported in the literature. We find cases where the sensitivity can be greatly improved (by changing the thermal conductance) while holding the time constant fixed and others where the bolometer can be made much faster while maintaining the sensitivity.

  6. The effect of tailored voltage waveforms on neutral gas heating in a radio-frequency driven electrothermal microthruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Scott; Gibson, Andrew; Boswell, Roderick; Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James

    2016-09-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a growing interest in the development compact sources of electric propulsion. In this study the effect of driving the `Pocket Rocket' radio-frequency electrothermal microthruster with non-sinusoidal voltage waveforms, consisting of multiple harmonics of 13.56 MHz, is investigated using the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). The results are compared to previous experiments and simulation results using CFD-ACE+ to investigate the potential to generate an increased neutral gas temperature and density in the source. The authors gratefully acknowledge M. Kushner of the University of Michigan for the use of the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM).

  7. Advanced oxidation using Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles and its application in mercury speciation analysis by high performance liquid chromatography-cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xi; Wang, Yu; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Lu; Zheng, Chengbin; Wu, Li

    2013-06-21

    A novel, green and efficient post-column oxidation method using Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was developed to on-line convert hydride generation/cold vapor generation (HG/CV) inactive species to their active species without microwave/UV irradiation. It was applied to high performance liquid chromatography HG/CV atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-HG/CV-AFS) to enable sensitive speciation analysis of both HG/CV inactive and active species. Inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), methylmercury (MeHg), ethylmercury (EtHg) and phenylmercury (PhHg) were selected as model compounds to validate the methodology. Separation of these mercury species was accomplished on a RP-C18 column with a mixture of acetonitrile and water (10 : 90) at pH 6.8 containing 0.12% (m/v) L-cysteine as the mobile phase. In the presence of 0.6% (v/v) H(2)O(2), on-line conversion of the organomercury species eluted from the HPLC column to Hg(2+) was obtained using the advanced oxidation method at pH 2.0. Optimum conditions for the separation, oxidation and cold vapor generation were carefully investigated. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.7, 1.1, 0.8 and 0.9 μg L(-1) (as Hg) for Hg(2+), MeHg, EtHg and PhHg, respectively, corresponding to 14, 22, 16 and 18 pg absolute detection limits for Hg(2+), MeHg, EtHg and PhHg by using a 20 μL sample loop, which are comparable to or better than those previously reported. National Research Council Canada DORM-2 fish muscle tissue and several real water samples were analyzed to validate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  8. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition – A facile method for encapsulation of diverse cell types in silica matrices

    DOE PAGES

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason C.; ...

    2014-12-12

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex vivo environments necessitates development of bio–nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cellsmore » are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters, thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. Furthermore, the ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell–silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications.« less

  9. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) Deposition- A Facile Method for Encapsulation of Diverse Cell Types in Silica Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason C.; Tartis, Michaelann

    2014-01-01

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex-vivo environments necessitates development of bio-nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cells are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. The ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell-silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications. PMID:25688296

  10. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition – A facile method for encapsulation of diverse cell types in silica matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason C.; Tartis, Michaelann

    2014-12-12

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex vivo environments necessitates development of bio–nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cells are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters, thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. Furthermore, the ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell–silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications.

  11. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) Deposition- A Facile Method for Encapsulation of Diverse Cell Types in Silica Matrices.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason C; Tartis, Michaelann

    2015-02-14

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex-vivo environments necessitates development of bio-nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cells are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. The ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell-silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications.

  12. MEMS-based silicon cantilevers with integrated electrothermal heaters for airborne ultrafine particle sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    The development of low-cost and low-power MEMS-based cantilever sensors for possible application in hand-held airborne ultrafine particle monitors is described in this work. The proposed resonant sensors are realized by silicon bulk micromachining technology with electrothermal excitation, piezoresistive frequency readout, and electrostatic particle collection elements integrated and constructed in the same sensor fabrication process step of boron diffusion. Built-in heating resistor and full Wheatstone bridge are set close to the cantilever clamp end for effective excitation and sensing, respectively, of beam deflection. Meanwhile, the particle collection electrode is located at the cantilever free end. A 300 μm-thick, phosphorus-doped silicon bulk wafer is used instead of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) as the starting material for the sensors to reduce the fabrication costs. To etch and release the cantilevers from the substrate, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching is utilized. By controlling the etching parameters (e.g., temperature, oxygen content, and duration), cantilever structures with thicknesses down to 10 - 20 μm are yielded. In the sensor characterization, the heating resistor is heated and generating thermal waves which induce thermal expansion and further cause mechanical bending strain in the out-of-plane direction. A resonant frequency of 114.08 +/- 0.04 kHz and a quality factor of 1302 +/- 267 are measured in air for a fabricated rectangular cantilever (500x100x13.5 μm3). Owing to its low power consumption of a few milliwatts, this electrothermal cantilever is suitable for replacing the current external piezoelectric stack actuator in the next generation of the miniaturized cantilever-based nanoparticle detector (CANTOR).

  13. Effects of an Early-Time Impact Generated Vapor Blast in the Martian Atmosphere: Formation of High-Latitude Pedestal Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrobel, K. E.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Following impact, vapor expansion creates an intense airblast that interacts with the ambient atmosphere. The resulting hemi-spherical shock wave leaves a signature on the surface that is dependent on initial atmospheric and surface conditions. Here we propose that the formation of pedestal craters (craters surrounded by an erosion-resistant pedestal) may be a direct consequence of extreme winds and elevated temperatures generated by such an impact-induced atmospheric blast. Pedestal craters, first recognized in Mariner 9 data, are a unique feature on Mars and likely a signature of near-surface volatiles. They are found at high latitudes (small pedestals, Amazonian to Late Hesperian in age) and in thick equatorial mantling deposits (larger pedestals, early Hesperian to Noachian in age). Previously suggested mechanisms for pedestal crater formation (e.g., wind: ejecta curtain vortices or vapor blast; and ejecta dust: armoring) do not provide a complete picture. The clear evidence for near-surface volatiles at high latitudes requires a re-evaluation of these alternative models. The results presented here suggest that a combined atmospheric blast/thermal model provides a plausible formation hypothesis.

  14. Experimental generation of quadruple quantum-correlated beams from hot rubidium vapor by cascaded four-wave mixing using spatial multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Leiming; Qi, Jian; Du, Jinjian; Jing, Jietai

    2017-02-01

    Multimode quantum states, such as multipartite quantum entanglement or quantum correlations, are important for both fundamental science and the future development of quantum technologies. Here we theoretically propose and experimentally realize a scheme that can fully exploit the multi-spatial-mode nature of the four-wave-mixing (FWM) process, i.e., spatial multiplexing, and thus integrates multiple FWM processes into a single cell at each stage of the cascaded process. The number of generated quantum-correlated beams 2n is exponentially dependent on the number of vapor cells n . In addition, the quantum correlations between the multiple beams also increase as the number of vapor cell increases. For the case of n =2 , we experimentally show that the degree of intensity-difference squeezing between the four quantum-correlated beams in our scheme is enhanced to -8.2 ±0.2 dB from -5.6 ±0.3 and -6.5 ±0.2 dB of squeezing obtained with a single FWM process. Our system may find applications in quantum information and precision measurement.

  15. The use of an electrothermal plasma gun to simulate the extremely high heat flux conditions of a tokamak disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, John; Bourham, Mohamed

    1993-09-01

    Disruption damage conditions for future large tokamaks like ITER are nearly impossible to simulate on current tokamaks. The electrothermal plasma source SIRENS has been designed, constructed, and operated to produce high density (> 1025/m3), low temperature (1-3 eV) plasma formed by the ablation of the insulator with currents of up to 100 kA (100 μs pulse length) and energies up to 15 kJ. The source heat fluence (variable from 0.2 to 7 MJ/m2) is adequate for simulation of the thermal quench phase of plasma disruption in future fusion tokamaks. Different materials have been exposed to the high heat flux in SIRENS, where comparative erosion behavior was obtained. Vapor shield phenomena has been characterized for different materials, and the energy transmission factor through the shielding layer is obtained. The device is also equipped with a magnet capable of producing a parallel magnetic field (up to 16 T) over a 8 msec pulse length. The magnetic field is produced to decrease the turbulent energy transport through the vapor shield, which provides further reduction of surface erosion (magnetic vapor shield effect).

  16. The use of an electrothermal plasma gun to simulate the extremely high heat flux conditions of a tokamak disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Gilligan, J.; Bourham, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Disruption damage conditions for future large tokamaks like ITER are nearly impossible to simulate on current tokamaks. The electrothermal plasma source SIRENS has been designed, constructed, and operated to produce high density (> 10[sup 25]/m[sup 3]), low temperature (1-3 eV) plasma formed by the ablation of the insulator with currents of up to 100 kA (100 [mu]s pulse length) and energies up to 15 kJ. The source heat fluence (variable from 0.2 to 7 MJ/m[sup 2]) is adequate for simulation of the thermal quench phase of plasma disruption in future fusion tokamaks. Different materials have been exposed to the high heat flux in SIRENS, where comparative erosion behavior was obtained. Vapor shield phenomena has been characterized for different materials, and the energy transmission factor through the shielding layer is obtained. The device is also equipped with a magnet capable of producing a parallel magnetic field (up to 16 T) over a 8 msec pulse length. The magnetic field is produced to decrease the turbulent energy transport through the vapor shield, which provides further reduction of surface erosion (magnetic vapor shield effect).

  17. A MECHANISTIC MODEL FOR MERCURY CAPTURE WITH IN-SITU GENERATED TITANIA PARTICLES: ROLE OF WATER VAPOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mechanistic model to predict the capture of gas phase mercury species using in-situ generated titania nanosize particles activated by UV irradiation is developed. The model is an extension of a recently reported model1 for photochemical reactions that accounts for the rates of...

  18. Chemical vapor generation of arsane in the presence of L-cysteine. Mechanistic studies and their analytical feedback.

    PubMed

    Pitzalis, Emanuela; Ajala, Delè; Onor, Massimo; Zamboni, Roberto; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2007-08-15

    The complex reactivity of the system As-AH-RSH-THB (As=As(III), As(V); AH=HCl, HClO4, CH3COOH; RSH=L-cysteine (Cys); THB=NaBH4) was investigated using continuous flow (CF) hydride generation (HG) coupled either with atomic absorption (AAS) or atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). AsH3 generation was examined in the presence of Cys by varying acidity and the type of acid, the mixing sequence, and the reaction time of reagents. The strong depression of arsane generation, which is typically observed in the range of acidity of 0.2-2 M HCl, can be addressed to the low reaction rate of thiol-borane, hydroboron complexes, or both toward those As(III) substrates that are formed in the same reaction environment. The simultaneous presence of Cys-borane and As(III)-Cys species is at the origin of the gap of the arsane generation efficiency in the 0.2-2 M HCl acidity range. The selective formation of Cys-borane complexes, which are formed faster than As(III)-thiol complexes, can be achieved by a careful choice of the mixing sequence of the reagents. The simultaneous mixing of sample, Cys, and THB is able to reduce substantially the gap of the arsane generation efficiency in the 0.2-2 M HCl acidity range. These properties were employed to implement a simple method for selective determination of As(III) in samples containing inorganic arsenic: (i) Total inorganic arsenic is determined by sample treatment with 0.2 M Cys for 30 min, acidity 0.1 M HCl, followed by CF-HG-AFS; (ii) As(III) is selectively determined in 0.005 M CH3COOH in the presence of Cys using a chemifold setup allowing the simultaneous mixing of sample, 0.2 M Cys and 0.1 M THB. The selectivity, measured from the ratio between the slopes of calibration graphs As(III)/As(V), is 220. The interference effects of Cu(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Co(II), Ag(I), Pd(II), and Pt(IV) can be kept under control using the simultaneous mixing of all the reagents. The tolerance toward the interferences was almost the same as that

  19. Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  20. Numerical simulation of electrothermal de-icing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Witt, K. J.; Keith, T. G.; Chao, D. F.; Masiulaniec, K. C.

    1983-01-01

    Transient simulations of de-icing of composite aircraft components by electrothermal heating have been computed for both one and two-dimensional rectangular geometries. The implicit Crank-Nicolson formulation is used to insure stability of the finite-differenced heat conduction equations and the phase change in the ice layer is simulated using the Enthalpy method. Numerical solutions illustrating de-icer performance for various composite aircraft blades and environmental conditions are presented. Comparisons are made with previous studies and with available experimental data. Initial results using a coordinate mapping technique to describe the actual blade geometry are discussed.

  1. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis - chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min- 1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values.

  2. Novel chemical vapor deposition process of ZnO films using nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small amount of O2 below 1%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Yukinori; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Ashida, Atsushi; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Norifumi

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process of ZnO films involving a nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small O2 concentration (O2%) below 1%. In the optical emission (OE) spectra of the plasma, OE lines corresponding to the NO-γ system ( A 2 Σ + → X 2 Πγ + ) were observed, despite the only introduced gases being N2 and O2; these vanish at an O2% of more than 1%. ZnO films were grown on a glass substrate placed in the plasma at a growth temperature of as low as 200 °C and at an O2% of below 1% in the presence of the NO-γ system. This plasma yielded almost the same growth rate for ZnO films as O2 plasma including atomic O radicals that are often observed in low-pressure O2 plasma, suggesting that some highly reactive oxidant was sufficiently generated in such a small O2%. ZnO films synthesized using this plasma exhibited excellent ( 0001 ) preferred orientation without other diffractions such as 10 1 ¯ 1 diffraction, and with an optical bandgap of 3.30 eV. Based on the analyses of the plasma and the exhaust gases, the coexistence state of NO-γ and O3 should be essential and useful for the decomposition and oxidation of Zn source material in the proposed CVD process.

  3. Ultraviolet vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of mercury in natural water with enrichment by on-line solid phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Deyuan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Liqian; Liu, Jixin; Ye, Jianping; Li, Junwei; Zheng, Fengxi

    2013-10-01

    A novel method, which coupled an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) enrichment with ultraviolet vapor generation (UVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), was developed to improve the sensitivity of mercury determination and to remove the interference of some anion and organics to UVG of mercury. A high mercury retention efficiency and maximum exclusion of inorganic and organic matrix in water samples were achieved by using C18 SPE mini cartridge modified with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). Fast and efficient elution from the cartridge was found by using L-cysteine mixing solution. Furthermore, through the investigation of different UV reactor designs, the most important factor was the structure of the reactor (which corresponded roughly to the photon flux) wherein the tubing was sintered into the UV lamp to give the highest UV generation efficiency. The second factor was the materials of the tubing (which roughly corresponded to the working wavelength). Synthetic quartz, characterized by the highest transparency at 185 nm, attained the highest UVG efficiency, suggesting that the most favorable wavelength for UVG was 185 nm. Under optimum conditions, the achievable detection limit (3σ) with sample loadings of 10.0 mL was 0.03 ng L- 1 and 0.08 ng L- 1 with different manifolds, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in tap water, river water and lake water samples.

  4. An electro-thermally activated rotary micro-positioner for slider-level dual-stage positioning in hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keong Lau, Gih; Yang, Jiaping; Tan, Cheng Peng; Boon Chong, Nyok

    2016-03-01

    Slider-level micro-positioners are useful to assist a voice coil motor to perform fine head positioning over a Tb/in2 magnetic disk. Recently, a new kind of slider-level micro-positioner was developed using the thermal unimorph of the Si/SU8 composite. It has the advantages of a very small footprint and high mechanical resonant frequency, but its stroke generation is inadequate, with a 50 nm dynamic stroke at 1 kHz. There is a need for a larger thermally induced stroke. This paper presents a rotary design of an electrothermal micro-positioner to address the stroke requirements without consuming more power or decreasing the mechanical resonant frequency. Experimental studies show the present rotary design can produce a six-fold larger displacement, as compared to the previous lateral design, while possessing a 35 kHz resonant frequency. In addition, simple analytical models were developed to estimate: (i) the rotational stiffness and system’s natural frequency, (ii) thermal unimorph bending and stage rotation, and (iii) the system’s thermal time constant for this rotary electro-thermal micro-positioner. This study found that this rotary electro-thermal micro-positioner can meet the basic stroke requirement and high mechanical resonant frequency for a moving slider, but its thermal cut-off frequency needs to be increased further.

  5. Flow speed of the ablation vapors generated during laser drilling of CFRP with a continuous-wave laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faas, S.; Freitag, C.; Boley, S.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2017-03-01

    The hot plume of ablation products generated during the laser drilling process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with a continuous-wave laser beam was analyzed by means of high-speed imaging. The formation of compression shocks was observed within the flow of the evaporated material, which is an indication of flow speeds well above the local speed of sound. The flow speed of the hot ablation products can be estimated by analyzing the position of these compression shocks. We investigated the temporal evolution of the flow speed during the drilling process and the influence of the average laser power on the flow speed. The flow speed increases with increasing average laser powers. The moment of drilling through the material changes the conditions for the drilling process and was confirmed to influence the flow speed of the ablated material. Compression shocks can also be observed during laser cutting of CFRP with a moving laser beam.

  6. vapor phase lubrication of SiO2 surfaces via adsorption of short chain linear alcohols & a sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy study of crystalline cellulose in biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnette, Anna Lorraine

    The use of silicon oxide with its native oxide layer for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting sliding parts requires the need for innovative lubrication methods to extend device lifetimes. The most promising method to date involves the equilibrium vapor phase lubrication (VPL) of MEMS using short chain linear alcohols in ambient conditions. Still, some questions remain regarding the effectiveness of this lubrication method, these include (1) whether or not the adsorbed n-alcohol molecules are the primary lubricant and (2) is this lubrication method effective in humid environments. This study investigates the vapor phase lubrication of SiO2 surfaces using short chain linear alcohols, more specifically n-propanol and n-pentanol. Macro-scale ball-on-flat tribometer tests are used to evaluate the lubriciousness of n-pentanol vapor under a series of contact loads/ pressures. Wear reduction of the SiO2 surfaces is achieved when there is complete coverage of the SiO2 surfaces with the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules. This occurs when the partial pressure relative to the saturation pressure (P/Psat) of n-pentanol was kept above 20% P/Psat which corresponds to approximately monolayer coverage of the SiO2 surface. In contrast to the lubricious effect of n-pentanol vapor, water vapor proves to enhance wear of the SiO2 surfaces when compared to dry (low moisture) conditions. This study also demonstrates that the primary lubrication method of the SiO 2 surfaces is most likely the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules and not the tribochemical reaction species produced during the sliding contact. Although this reaction species is always present within the wear tested regions, the production of the tribochemical reaction species is enhanced when more severe wear is observed. So, the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules are the primary method of lubrication. The effectiveness of the lubrication method in environments containing water vapor is also investigated

  7. Self-consistent electrothermal analysis of nanotube network transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Pimparkar, N.; Murthy, J. Y.; Alam, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We develop an electrothermal transport model for nanocomposite thin films based on self-consistent solution of drift-diffusion and Poisson equations for electrons coupled with diffusive transport of heat. This model is used to analyze the performance of an electronic display the pixels of which are controlled by carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs). The effect of electrothermal coupling on device performance and steady state temperature rise is analyzed as a function of key device parameters such as channel length, network density, tube-to-substrate thermal conductance, and tube-to-substrate thermal conductivity ratio. Our analysis suggests that device on-current Ion may reduce by 30% for a 1 μm channel length devices due to self-heating. The temperature rise in such devices can be as high as 500 K in extreme cases due to the thermally insulating substrate and the low tube-to-substrate thermal conductance. These results suggest that an appropriate combination of network density, channel length and width should be selected for CNT-TFTs to avoid device temperature rise above acceptable limits. We analyze the effectiveness of active cooling in reducing the temperature and enhancing the performance of the device. We find that the high thermal spreading resistance between the CNT device and the electronic display reduces the effectiveness of forced convective cooling, necessitating the exploration of alternative designs for viable CNT-FET based display technology.

  8. Plasma formation and expansion in an electrothermal plasma injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental device SIRENS has been used to conduct studies on plasma formation and expansion in electrothermal launchers. The 1-D, time-dependent fluid dynamics code, ODIN, models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and the equation-of-state of the source and barrel of the SIRENS experiment. Because electrothermal plasmas are highly collisional (high-density, low-temperature), the plasma is modeled as a viscous fluid, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium for each cell. The viscous drag forces were varied according to the Reynolds number of each cell. As the Reynolds number increases the modeled drag forces change accordingly, going from laminar to smooth turbulent to rough turbulent. The measured mass loss of the ablating liner (Lexan) in the source section is in good agreement with that predicted by the code. Comparisons between the measured and predicted pressures inside the barrel are in good agreement. The pressure reaches its maximum inside the source at approximately 45 {mu}s, then decreases steadily due to the drop in temperature and density. The plasma flows into the barrel and the pressure profile begins to flatten out and drop as the plasma exits the barrel. The variation of the plasma parameters as a function of the energy input to the source have also been calculated and will be discussed.

  9. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  10. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  11. Electrothermal Microactuators With Peg Drive Improve Performance for Brain Implant Applications

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sindhu; Sutanto, Jemmy; Baker, Michael S.; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new actuation scheme for in-plane bidirectional translation of polysilicon microelectrodes. The new Chevron-peg actuation scheme uses microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electrothermal microactuators to move microelectrodes for brain implant applications. The design changes were motivated by specific needs identified by the in vivo testing of an earlier generation of MEMS microelectrodes that were actuated by the Chevron-latch type of mechanism. The microelectrodes actuated by the Chevron-peg mechanism discussed here show improved performance in the following key areas: higher force generation capability (111 μN per heat strip compared to 50 μN), reduced power consumption (91 mW compared to 360 mW), and reliable performance with consistent forward and backward movements of microelectrodes. Failure analysis of the Chevron-latch and the Chevron-peg type of actuation schemes showed that the latter is more robust to wear over four million cycles of operation. The parameters for the activation waveforms for Chevron-peg actuators were optimized using statistical analysis. Waveforms with a 1-ms time period and a 1-Hz frequency of operation showed minimal error between the expected and the actual movement of the microelectrodes. The new generation of Chevron-peg actuators and microelectrodes are therefore expected to enhance the longevity and performance of implanted microelectrodes in the brain.  [2011-0341] PMID:24431926

  12. Steady-State and Dynamic Desorption of Organic Vapor From Activated Carbon With Electrothermal Swing Adsorption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    41, 5063-5069 10.1021/es0703022 CCC: $37.00  2007 American Chemical Society VOL. 41, NO. 14, 2007 / ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 9 5063...system. 5064 9 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY / VOL. 41, NO. 14, 2007 occurred with variable pre-defined set-points ranging from 250 to 5000 ppmv...and (d) power and cumulative energy deposited to the ACFC. 5066 9 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY / VOL. 41, NO. 14, 2007 (Figure 4). Maximum

  13. Microwave photochemical reactor for the online oxidative decomposition of p-hydroxymercurybenzoate (pHMB)-tagged proteins and their determination by cold vapor generation-atomic fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Beatrice; Rivera, Jose González; Ferrari, Carlo; Biagi, Simona; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2013-12-17

    A novel method is presented for the characterization and determination of thiolic proteins. After the labeling with p-hydroxymercurybenzoate, the pHMB-labeled proteins underwent on-line oxidation with a novel microwave (MW)/UV photochemical reactor, followed by cold vapor generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. The MW/UV process led to the conversion of pHMB to Hg(II) with a yield of 89.0 ± 0.5% without using chemical oxidizing reagents and avoiding the use of toxic carcinogenic compounds. Hg(II) was reduced to Hg(0) in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH4 solution, stripped from the solution by an argon flow and detected. The chromatographic method for labeled thiolic peptides was linear in the 0.2-100 μmol L(-1) range, with a LOD as mercury of 57 nmol L(-1). This system has proven to be a useful interface for liquid chromatography coupled with CVG-AFS in the determination and characterization of thiolic proteins. This method has been applied to the determination of thiolic peptides after tryptic digestion of serum albumins from different species (human, bovine, rat, horse, and sheep).

  14. Determination of thimerosal in pharmaceutical industry effluents and river waters by HPLC coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry through post-column UV-assisted vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Gimena; Spisso, Adrián; Fernández, Liliana P; Martinez, Luis D; Pacheco, Pablo H; Gil, Raúl A

    2015-03-15

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry method for the determination of thimerosal (sodium ethylmercury thiosalicylate, C9H9HgNaO2S), ethylmercury, and inorganic mercury is proposed. Mercury vapor is generated by the post-column reduction of mercury species in formic acid media using UV-radiation. Thimerosal is quantitatively converted to Hg(II) followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). This method is applied to the determination of thimerosal (THM), ethylmercury (EtHg) and inorganic Hg in samples of a pharmaceutical industry effluent, and in waters of the San Luis River situated in the west side of San Luis city (Middle West, Argentine) where the effluents are dumped. The limit of detections, calculated on the basis of the 3σ criterion, where 0.09, 0.09 and 0.07 μg L(-1) for THM, EtHg(II) and for Hg(II), respectively. Linearity was attained from levels close to the detection limit up to at least 100 μg L(-1).

  15. Recyclable decoration of amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with Ni(2+) for determination of histidine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Chengbin; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2014-01-07

    It is critically important to accurately determine histidine since it is an indicator for many diseases when at an abnormal level. Here, an inexpensive and simple method using an amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle-based Ni(2+)-histidine affinity pair system was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of histidine in human urine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry. Ni(2+) was first bound to the amine groups of the amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and then liberated to solution via the highly specific interaction between the histidine and Ni(2+) in the presence of histidine. The liberated histidine-Ni(2+) complex was exposed to UV irradiation in the presence of formic acid to form gaseous nickel tetracarbonyl, which was separated from the sample matrix and determined by atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry. Compared to other methods, this approach promises high sensitivity, simplicity in design, and convenient operation. The need for organic solvents, enzymatic reactions, separation processes, chemical modification, expensive instrumentations, and sophisticated and complicated pretreatment is minimized with this strategy. A limit of detection of 1 nM was obtained and provided tens-to-hundreds of fold improvements over that achieved with conventional methods. The protocol was evaluated by analysis of several urine samples with good recoveries and showed great potential for practical application.

  16. Determination of As, Hg and Pb in herbs using slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chia-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of herbs for As, Hg and Pb has been carried out using slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with flow injection vapor generation. Slurry containing 0.5% m/v herbal powder, 0.1% m/v citric acid and 2% v/v HCl was injected into the VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Hg and Pb that obviate dissolution and mineralization. Standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for quantifications in selected herbal powders. This method has been validated by the determination of As, Hg and Pb in NIST standard reference materials SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The As, Hg and Pb analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision obtained by the reported procedure was better than 7% for all determinations. The detection limit estimated from standard addition curve was 0.008, 0.003, and 0.007 ng mL(-1) for As, Hg and Pb, respectively.

  17. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Mark L. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Nakamura, Barbara J. (Inventor); Oconnor, Dennis E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  18. An in-depth evaluation of accuracy and precision in Hg isotopic analysis via pneumatic nebulization and cold vapor generation multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rua-Ibarz, Ana; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) isotopic analysis via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can provide relevant biogeochemical information by revealing sources, pathways, and sinks of this highly toxic metal. In this work, the capabilities and limitations of two different sample introduction systems, based on pneumatic nebulization (PN) and cold vapor generation (CVG), respectively, were evaluated in the context of Hg isotopic analysis via MC-ICP-MS. The effect of (i) instrument settings and acquisition parameters, (ii) concentration of analyte element (Hg), and internal standard (Tl)-used for mass discrimination correction purposes-and (iii) different mass bias correction approaches on the accuracy and precision of Hg isotope ratio results was evaluated. The extent and stability of mass bias were assessed in a long-term study (18 months, n = 250), demonstrating a precision ≤0.006% relative standard deviation (RSD). CVG-MC-ICP-MS showed an approximately 20-fold enhancement in Hg signal intensity compared with PN-MC-ICP-MS. For CVG-MC-ICP-MS, the mass bias induced by instrumental mass discrimination was accurately corrected for by using either external correction in a sample-standard bracketing approach (SSB) or double correction, consisting of the use of Tl as internal standard in a revised version of the Russell law (Baxter approach), followed by SSB. Concomitant matrix elements did not affect CVG-ICP-MS results. Neither with PN, nor with CVG, any evidence for mass-independent discrimination effects in the instrument was observed within the experimental precision obtained. CVG-MC-ICP-MS was finally used for Hg isotopic analysis of reference materials (RMs) of relevant environmental origin. The isotopic composition of Hg in RMs of marine biological origin testified of mass-independent fractionation that affected the odd-numbered Hg isotopes. While older RMs were used for validation purposes, novel Hg isotopic data are provided for the

  19. Pulsed Power, Plasma, and Interior Ballistic Simulations for Application to Electrothermal-Chemical Guns.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY ........ Pulsed Power, Plasma, and Interior Ballistic Simulations for Application to Electrothermal- Chemical Guns Gary L...ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED March 1996 Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Pulsed Power, Plasma, and...simulation code called the pulsed power plasma interior ballistics (PPIB). PPIB is a time-dependent, lumped parameter, electrothermal-chemical gun ballistic

  20. 3D electro-thermal Monte Carlo study of transport in confined silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Y.

    The simultaneous explosion of portable microelectronics devices and the rapid shrinking of microprocessor size have provided a tremendous motivation to scientists and engineers to continue the down-scaling of these devices. For several decades, innovations have allowed components such as transistors to be physically reduced in size, allowing the famous Moore's law to hold true. As these transistors approach the atomic scale, however, further reduction becomes less probable and practical. As new technologies overcome these limitations, they face new, unexpected problems, including the ability to accurately simulate and predict the behavior of these devices, and to manage the heat they generate. This work uses a 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulator to investigate the electro-thermal behavior of quasi-one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) multigate MOSFETs. In order to study these highly confined architectures, the inclusion of quantum correction becomes essential. To better capture the influence of carrier confinement, the electrostatically quantum-corrected full-band MC model has the added feature of being able to incorporate subband scattering. The scattering rate selection introduces quantum correction into carrier movement. In addition to the quantum effects, scaling introduces thermal management issues due to the surge in power dissipation. Solving these problems will continue to bring improvements in battery life, performance, and size constraints of future devices. We have coupled our electron transport Monte Carlo simulation to Aksamija's phonon transport so that we may accurately and efficiently study carrier transport, heat generation, and other effects at the transistor level. This coupling utilizes anharmonic phonon decay and temperature dependent scattering rates. One immediate advantage of our coupled electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulator is its ability to provide an accurate description of the spatial variation of self-heating and its effect on non

  1. Performance of an electrothermal swing adsorption system with postdesorption liquefaction for organic gas capture and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Rood, Mark J

    2013-07-02

    The use of adsorption on activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) and postdesorption pressure and temperature control allows organic gases with boiling points below 0 °C to be captured from air streams and recovered as liquids. This technology has the potential to be a more sustainable abatement technique when compared to thermal oxidation. In this paper, we determine the process performance and energy requirements of a gas recovery system (GRS) using ACFC-ESA for three adsorbates with relative pressures between 8.3 × 10(-5) and 3.4 × 10(-3) and boiling points as low as -26.3 °C. The GRS is able to capture > 99% of the organic gas from the feed air stream, which is comparable to destruction efficiencies for thermal oxidizers. The energy used per liquid mole recovered ranges from 920 to 52,000 kJ/mol and is a function of relative pressure of the adsorbate in the feed gas. Quantifying the performance of the bench-scale gas recovery system in terms of its ability to remove organic gases from the adsorption stream and the energy required to liquefy the recovered organic gases is a critical step in developing new technologies to allow manufacturing to occur in a more sustainable manner. To our knowledge, this is the first time an ACFC-ESA system has been used to capture, recover, and liquefy organic compounds with vapor pressures as low as 8.3 × 10(-5) and the first time such a system has been analyzed for process performance and energy consumption.

  2. Coaxial microwave electrothermal thruster performance in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M.

    1994-01-01

    The microwave electro thermal thruster (MET) is an electric propulsion concept that offers the promise of high performance combined with a long lifetime. A unique feature of this electric propulsion concept is its ability to create a microwave plasma discharge separated or floating away from any electrodes or enclosing walls. This allows propellant temperatures that are higher than those in resistojets and reduces electrode and wall erosion. It has been demonstrated that microwave energy is coupled into discharges very efficiently at high input power levels. As a result of these advantages, the MET concept has been identified as a future high power electric propulsion possibility. Recently, two additional improvements have been made to the coaxial MET. The first was concerned with improving the microwave matching. Previous experiments were conducted with 10-30 percent reflected power when incident power was in excess of 600 W(exp 6). Power was reflected back to the generator because the impedance of the MET did not match the 50 ohm impedance of the microwave circuit. To solve this problem, a double stub tuning system has been inserted between the MET and the microwave power supply. The addition of the double stub tuners reduces the reflected power below 1 percent. The other improvement has prepared the coaxial MET for hydrogen experiments. To operate with hydrogen, the vacuum window which separates the coaxial line from the discharge chamber has been changed from teflon to boron nitride. All the microwave energy delivered to the plasma discharge passes through this vacuum window. This material change had caused problems in the past because of the increased microwave reflection coefficients associated with the electrical properties of boron nitride. However, by making the boron nitride window electrically one-half of a wavelength long, power reflection in the window has been eliminated. This technical note summarizes the experimental performance of the improved

  3. Coaxial microwave electrothermal thruster performance in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, W.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M.

    1994-09-01

    The microwave electro thermal thruster (MET) is an electric propulsion concept that offers the promise of high performance combined with a long lifetime. A unique feature of this electric propulsion concept is its ability to create a microwave plasma discharge separated or floating away from any electrodes or enclosing walls. This allows propellant temperatures that are higher than those in resistojets and reduces electrode and wall erosion. It has been demonstrated that microwave energy is coupled into discharges very efficiently at high input power levels. As a result of these advantages, the MET concept has been identified as a future high power electric propulsion possibility. Recently, two additional improvements have been made to the coaxial MET. The first was concerned with improving the microwave matching. Previous experiments were conducted with 10-30 percent reflected power when incident power was in excess of 600 W(exp 6). Power was reflected back to the generator because the impedance of the MET did not match the 50 ohm impedance of the microwave circuit. To solve this problem, a double stub tuning system has been inserted between the MET and the microwave power supply. The addition of the double stub tuners reduces the reflected power below 1 percent. The other improvement has prepared the coaxial MET for hydrogen experiments. To operate with hydrogen, the vacuum window which separates the coaxial line from the discharge chamber has been changed from teflon to boron nitride. All the microwave energy delivered to the plasma discharge passes through this vacuum window. This material change had caused problems in the past because of the increased microwave reflection coefficients associated with the electrical properties of boron nitride. However, by making the boron nitride window electrically one-half of a wavelength long, power reflection in the window has been eliminated. This technical note summarizes the experimental performance of the improved

  4. A novel AC electrothermal micropump for biofluid transport using circular interdigitated microelectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Electrokinetic micropumps have been widely used in lab-on-a-chip devices. The AC electrothermal (ACET) effect is highly efficient for biofluidic micropumping, but is unable to generate high flow rates. Attempts to increase ACET flows, such as applying a wide range of actuation voltages, using asymmetric microelectrode arrays and using 3D microelectrodes have been reported. In this paper a novel idea of employing circular coplanar asymmetric microelectrodes placed on the perimeter of a microchannel is explored. An array of microelectrodes is simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The micropump output shows relatively high flow rates compared to other ACET micropumps which have the same electrode dimensions. Moreover, the idea of using different micropumps with scaled dimensions is investigated. The results show that a highly efficient ACET micropump can be achieved if an appropriate electrode size-to-channel dimension ratio is selected. The results also show that a micropump with a scale of 0.2 can show negligible flow rate, but if the electrodes are used in a micropump with the scale of 1, a flow rate of 15 ×106 μm3/s can be generated. This new ACET pump design can be utilized for lab-on-a-chip applications, specifically in biofluid delivery systems.

  5. Deposition of Fluorinated Diamond-Like-Carbon Films by Exposure of Electrothermal Pulsed Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Iida, Masayasu

    2011-08-01

    Thin amorphous carbon films are deposited on silicon substrates by exposure to pulsed plasmas where the feed gas is mainly generated from the ablation of an insulator. An electrothermal pulsed plasma thruster with a discharge room in an insulator rod is used as the pulsed plasma for the ablation of the insulator, and the material of the insulator rod is poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE). The pulsed plasma, in which the estimated electron density is on the order of 1022-1023 m-3, is generated by the stored energy in the capacitor. The deposition rate, which depends on the stored energy, is lower than 1 nm per pulse in our experiment. The maximum hardness measured using a nanoindenter is about 7 GPa at a stored energy of about 2.7 J, beyond which the hardness of the films decreases with the increase in stored energy. Raman spectroscopy is also carried out to examine the formation of fluorinated diamond-like carbon films. In addition, the influence of dilution gas on the properties of the deposited films is also investigated.

  6. Efficient generation of volatile cadmium species using Ti(III) and Ti(IV) and application to determination of cadmium by cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zikri; Yilmaz, Vedat; Rose, LaKeysha

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a highly efficient chemical vapor generation (CVG) approach is reported for determination of cadmium (Cd). Titanium (III) and titanium (IV) were investigated for the first time as catalytic additives along with thiourea, L-cysteine and potassium cyanide (KCN) for generation of volatile Cd species. Both Ti(III) and Ti(IV) provided the highest enhancement with KCN. The improvement with thiourea was marginal (ca. 2-fold), while L-cysteine enhanced signal slightly only with Ti(III) in H2SO4. Optimum CVG conditions were 4% (v/v) HCl + 0.03 M Ti(III) + 0.16 M KCN and 2% (v/v) HNO3 + 0.03 M Ti(IV) + 0.16 M KCN with a 3% (m/v) NaBH4 solution. The sensitivity was improved about 40-fold with Ti(III) and 35-fold with Ti(IV). A limit of detection (LOD) of 3.2 ng L(-1) was achieved with Ti(III) by CVG-ICP-MS. The LOD with Ti(IV) was 6.4 ng L(-1) which was limited by the blank signals in Ti(IV) solution. Experimental evidence indicated that Ti(III) and Ti(IV) enhanced Cd vapor generation catalytically; for best efficiency mixing prior to reaction with NaBH4 was critical. The method was highly robust against the effects of transition metal ions. No significant suppression was observed in the presence of Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) up to 1.0 μg mL(-1). Among the hydride forming elements, no interference was observed from As(III) and Se(IV) at 0.5 μg mL(-1) level. The depressive effects from Pb(II) and Sb(III) were not significant at 0.1 μg mL(-1) while those from Bi(III) and Sn(II) were marginal. The procedures were validated with determination of Cd by CVG-ICP-MS in a number certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), Dogfish liver (DOLT-4), Mussel tissue (SRM 2976) and Domestic Sludge (SRM 2781).

  7. Operating principles of an electrothermal vibrometer for optical switching applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Min-fan; Tien, Norman C.

    1999-09-01

    A compact polysilicon surface-micromachined microactuator designed for optical switching applications is described. This actuator is fabricated using the foundry MUMPs process provided by Cronos Integrated Microsystems Inc. Actuated electrothermally, the microactuator allows fast switching speeds and can be operated with a low voltage square-wave signal. The design, operation mechanisms for this long-range and high frequency thermal actuation are described. A vertical micromirror integrated with this actuator can be operated with a 10.5 V, 20 kHz 15% duty-cycle pulse signal, achieving a lateral moving speed higher than 15.6 mm/sec. The optical switch has been operated to frequencies as high as 30 kHz.

  8. Experimental investigation of the pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hiko, B. K.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Burton et al. (1982) have discussed the theory of the Pulsed Electrothermal (PET) thruster, a device which in principle can operate with 70 percent efficiency at a specific impulse of 1000 seconds and higher. It is pointed out that this level of performance would be particularly attractive for orbit raising of large satellites and other near-earth missions, which cannot be easily accomplished by chemical propulsion. The present investigation is concerned with two PET thruster operating modes. A PET thruster was built and tested on a thrust stand. Exhaust velocities for polyethylene propellant vary from 20 to 27 km/sec. Single pulse specific impulse and efficiency measurements based on ablated mass show a thruster efficiency of 37-56 percent in the time range from 1000 to 1750 seconds. It is believed that an improved design with a thruster efficiency in the range from 70 to 80 percent might be possible.

  9. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A C

    2015-02-20

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL(-1) Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample.

  10. On the prospects of using runaway electron beams generated in an open discharge for the pumping of metal-vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Arlantsev, S.V.; Borovich, B.L.; Yurchenko, N.I.

    1995-03-01

    The excitation of gas lasers with the help of electron beams (e-beams) is, at the present time, one of the most promising methods of pumping. In most of the conventional methods, an electron beam is produced as a result of a collisionless acceleration of electrons due to the low gas density in a diode of an accelerator. Because of this, an accelerative gap should be hermetically isolated from a laser cell, which makes the technique of e-beam injection into the active region quite complicated. A radical solution to the problem would be the production of an e-beam in the gas whose density in the accelerative gap corresponds to the working pressure of the laser. This would allow one to place an accelerator in one chamber with the laser. The generation of a beam in a high-density gas would become possible when one provides the conditions for an effective transition of electrons into the runaway regime. Such a motion of electrons can be achieved in a strong electric field as a result of the decreasing cross section of the electron-atom interaction as sufficiently high energy. The runaway effect is manifested in the case where the electrons moving under the action of a strong external field obtain kinetic energy comparable with the potential difference. The kinetic energy is many times greater than that spent in one collision. Despite the considerable number of collisions, the electrons are transmitted into the steady acceleration regime, and their motion becomes almost directed, thus forming a beam. The present paper is devoted to the development of a physical-mathematical model of an open discharge, the calculation of its characteristics, and the estimation of the potentialities of e-beam pumping of metal-vapor lasers.

  11. Water vaporization on Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A search is presently conducted for OH generated by the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor in long-exposure IUE spectra of the region around Ceres. A statistically significant detection of OH is noted in an exposure off the northern limb of Ceres after perihelion. The amount of OH is consistent with a polar cap that might be replenished during winter by subsurface percolation, but which dissipates in summer.

  12. Electrochemical vapor generation of selenium species after online photolysis and reduction by UV-irradiation under nano TiO2 photocatalysis and its application to selenium speciation by HPLC coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Wang, Qiuquan; Huang, Benli

    2005-01-01

    An online UV photolysis and UV/TiO2 photocatalysis reduction device (UV-UV/TiO2 PCRD) and an electrochemical vapor generation (ECVG) cell have been used for the first time as an interface between high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) for selenium speciation. The newly designed ECVG cell of approximately 115 microL dead volume consists of a carbon fiber cathode and a platinum loop anode; the atomic hydrogen generated on the cathode was used to reduce selenium to vapor species for AFS determination. The noise was greatly reduced compared with that obtained by use of the UV-UV/TiO2 PCRD-KBH4-acid interface. The detection limits obtained for seleno-DL: -cystine (SeCys), selenite (Se(IV)), seleno-DL: -methionine (SeMet), and selenate (Se(VI)) were 2.1, 2.9, 4.3, and 3.5 ng mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the speciation of selenium in water-soluble extracts of garlic shoots cultured with different selenium species. The results obtained suggested that UV-UV/TiO2 PCRD-ECVG should be an effective interface between HPLC and AFS for the speciation of elements amenable to vapor generation, and is superior to methods involving KBH4.

  13. Dynamic Electrothermal Model of a Sputtered Thermopile Thermal Radiation Detector for Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weckmann, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aimed at evaluating the global energy balance. Current scanning radiometers used for CERES consist of thin-film thermistor bolometers viewing the Earth through a Cassegrain telescope. The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently studying a new sensor concept to replace the current bolometer: a thermopile thermal radiation detector. This next-generation detector would consist of a thermal sensor array made of thermocouple junction pairs, or thermopiles. The objective of the current research is to perform a thermal analysis of the thermopile. Numerical thermal models are particularly suited to solve problems for which temperature is the dominant mechanism of the operation of the device (through the thermoelectric effect), as well as for complex geometries composed of numerous different materials. Feasibility and design specifications are studied by developing a dynamic electrothermal model of the thermopile using the finite element method. A commercial finite element-modeling package, ALGOR, is used.

  14. Electrothermal piezoresistive cantilever resonators for personal measurements of nanoparticles in workplace exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Wu, Wenze; Uhde, Erik; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Low-cost and low-power piezoresistive cantilever resonators with integrated electrothermal heaters are developed to support the sensing module enhancement of the second generation of handheld cantilever-based airborne nanoparticle (NP) detector (CANTOR-2). These sensors are used for direct-reading of exposure to carbon engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) at indoor workplaces. The cantilever structures having various shapes of free ends are created using silicon bulk micromachining technologies (i.e, rectangular, hammer-head, triangular, and U-shaped cantilevers). For a complete wearable CANTOR-2, all components of the proposed detector can be grouped into two main units depending on their packaging placements (i.e., the NP sampler head and the electronics mounted in a handy-format housing). In the NP sampler head, a miniaturized electrophoretic aerosol sampler and a resonant silicon cantilever mass sensor are employed to collect the ENPs from the air stream to the cantilever surfaces and measuring their mass concentration, respectively. After calibration, the detected ENP mass concentrations of CANTOR-2 show a standard deviation from fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS, TSI 3091) of 8-14%.

  15. Study on an alternating current electrothermal micropump for microneedle-based fluid delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rumi; Jullien, Graham A.; Dalton, Colin

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a modeling study of an AC electrothermal (ACET) micropump with high operating pressures as well as fast flow rates. One specific application area is for fluid delivery using microneedle arrays which require higher pressures and faster flow rates than have been previously reported with ACET devices. ACET is very suitable for accurate actuation and control of fluid flow, since the technique has been shown to be very effective in high conductivity fluids and has the ability to create a pulsation free flow. However, AC electrokinetic pumps usually can only generate low operating pressures of 1 to 100 Pa, where flow reversal is likely to occur with an external load. In order to realize a high performance ACET micropump for continuous fluid delivery, applying relatively high AC operating voltages (20 to 36 Vrms) to silicon substrate ACET actuators and using long serpentine channel allows the boosting of operating pressure as well as increasing the flow rates. Fast pumping flow rates (102-103 nl/s) and high operating pressures (1-12 kPa) can be achieved by applying both methods, making them of significant importance for continuous fluid delivery applications using microneedle arrays and other such biomedical devices.

  16. Experimental Studies of the Electrothermal and Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities on Thin Metal Foil Ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Adam; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Patel, Sonal; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) and magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability (MRT) are important in the implosion of metallic liners, such as magnetized liner implosion fusion (MagLIF). The MAIZE linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan generates 200 ns risetime-current pulses of 500 to 600 kA into Al foil liners to study plasma instabilities and implosion dynamics, most recently MRT growth on imploding cylindrical liners. A full circuit model of MAIZE, along with I-V measurements, yields time-resolved load inductance. This has enabled measurements of an effective current-carrying radius to determine implosion velocity and plasma-vacuum interface acceleration. Measurements are also compared to implosion data from 4-time-frame laser shadowgraphy. Improved resolution measurements on the laser shadowgraph system have been used to examine the liner interface early in the shot to examine surface perturbations resulting from ETI for various seeding conditions. Fourier analysis examines the growth rates of wavelength bands of these structures to examine the transition from ETI to MRT. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE through award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel is supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager is supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  17. A Fourier Transform Spectrometer Based on an Electrothermal MEMS Mirror with Improved Linear Scan Range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Jiapin; Zivkovic, Aleksandar. S.; Xie, Huikai

    2016-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) that incorporates a closed-loop controlled, electrothermally actuated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micromirror is proposed and experimentally verified. The scan range and the tilting angle of the mirror plate are the two critical parameters for MEMS-based FTS. In this work, the MEMS mirror with a footprint of 4.3 mm × 3.1 mm is based on a modified lateral-shift-free (LSF) bimorph actuator design with large piston and reduced tilting. Combined with a position-sensitive device (PSD) for tilt angle sensing, the feedback controlled MEMS mirror generates a 430 µm stable linear piston scan with the mirror plate tilting angle less than ±0.002°. The usable piston scan range is increased to 78% of the MEMS mirror’s full scan capability, and a spectral resolution of 0.55 nm at 531.9 nm wavelength, has been achieved. It is a significant improvement compared to the prior work. PMID:27690047

  18. A review of research and development on the microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Martin C.; Asmussen, Jes; Filpus, John W.; Frasch, Lydell L.; Whitehair, Stanley; Morin, T. J.; Chapman, R.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket (MWPETR) shows promise for spacecraft propulsion and maneuvering, without some of the drawbacks of competitive electric propulsion systems. In the MWPETR, the electric power is first converted to microwave-frequency radiation. In a specially-designed microwave cavity system, the electromagnetic energy of the radiation is transferred to the electrons in a plasma sustained in the working fluid. The resulting high-energy electrons transfer their energy to the atoms and molecules of the working fluid by collisions. The working fluid, thus heated, expands through a nozzle to generate thrust. In the MWPETR, no electrodes are in contact with the working fluid, the energy is transferred into the working fluid by nonthermal mechanisms, and the main requirement for the materials of construction is that the walls of the plasma chamber be insulating and transparent to microwave radiation at operating conditions. In this survey of work on the MWPETR, several experimental configurations are described and compared. Diagnostic methods used in the study are described and compared, including titration, spectroscopy, calorimetry, electric field measurements, gas-dynamic methods, and thrust measurements. Measured and estimated performance efficiencies are reported. Results of computer modeling of the plasma and of the gas flowing from the plasma are summarized.

  19. Development of a System to Generate Near Real Time Tropospheric Delay and Precipitable Water Vapor in situ at Geodetic GPS Stations, to Improve Forecasting of Severe Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. W.; Bock, Y.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Laber, J. L.; Morris, T.; Offield, D. G.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    We describe a system under development for generating ultra-low latency tropospheric delay and precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates in situ at a prototype network of geodetic GPS sites in southern California, and demonstrating their utility in forecasting severe storms commonly associated with flooding and debris flow events along the west coast of North America through infusion of this meteorological data at NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices and the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL). The first continuous geodetic GPS network was established in southern California in the early 1990s and much of it was converted to real-time (latency <1s) high-rate (1Hz) mode over the following decades. GPS stations are multi-purpose and can also provide estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy PWV using collocated pressure and temperature measurements, the basis for GPS meteorology (Bevis et al. 1992, 1994; Duan et al. 1996) as implemented by NOAA with a nationwide distribution of about 300 GPS-Met stations providing PW estimates at subhourly resolution currently used in operational weather forecasting in the U.S. We improve upon the current paradigm of transmitting large quantities of raw data back to a central facility for processing into higher-order products. By operating semi-autonomously, each station will provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of the narrow communications bandwidth that often occurs in the aftermath of natural disasters. The onsite ambiguity-resolved precise point positioning solutions are enabled by a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS and a low-cost MEMS meteorological sensor package. The decreased latency (~5 minutes) PW estimates will provide the detailed knowledge of the distribution and magnitude of PW that NWS forecasters require to monitor and predict severe winter

  20. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-05-18

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  1. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    DOE PAGES

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R.; ...

    2015-05-18

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivitymore » of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.« less

  2. A review of production methods of carbon nanotube and graphene thin films for electrothermal applications.

    PubMed

    Janas, D; Koziol, K K

    2014-03-21

    Electrothermal materials transform electric energy into heat due to the Joule effect. To date, resistive wires made of heavy metal alloys have primarily been used as the heat source in many appliances surrounding us. Recent discoveries in the field of carbon nanostructures revealed that they can offer a spectrum of advantages over the traditional materials. We review the production methods of thin films composed of carbon nanotubes or graphene and depict how they can be used as conductive coatings for electrothermal applications. We screen all reports from the field up to now and highlight the features of designed nanoheaters. A particular focus is placed on the analysis of general findings of how to tune their electrothermal properties, why carbon nanostructure devices operate the way they do and in what aspects they are superior to the currently available materials on the market.

  3. A review of production methods of carbon nanotube and graphene thin films for electrothermal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janas, D.; Koziol, K. K.

    2014-02-01

    Electrothermal materials transform electric energy into heat due to the Joule effect. To date, resistive wires made of heavy metal alloys have primarily been used as the heat source in many appliances surrounding us. Recent discoveries in the field of carbon nanostructures revealed that they can offer a spectrum of advantages over the traditional materials. We review the production methods of thin films composed of carbon nanotubes or graphene and depict how they can be used as conductive coatings for electrothermal applications. We screen all reports from the field up to now and highlight the features of designed nanoheaters. A particular focus is placed on the analysis of general findings of how to tune their electrothermal properties, why carbon nanostructure devices operate the way they do and in what aspects they are superior to the currently available materials on the market.

  4. Fluid flow study of an AC electrothermal micropump consisting of multiple arrays of microelectrodes for biofluidic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Electrokinetics has many applications in a wide range of areas, such as lab-on-a-chip and biomedical microdevices. The electrothermal effect has been used for biofluid delivery systems since it has high pumping efficiency for high conductive liquids (>0.1 S/m) compared to other electrokinetic techniques such as electroosmosis. AC electrothermal (ACET) micropumps are based on the temperature gradient caused by Joule heating or an external heat source, which generates permittivity and conductivity gradients in the bulk of the liquid. When the liquid is subjected to an electric field, the ACET force is created. Electrode geometry significantly affects the electric field distribution, which can yield stronger ACET forces. Previously electrode dimension optimization has been performed for a single-array coplanar asymmetric configuration in order to obtain maximum ACET velocities. In this paper we expand the study to other governing parameters in a multiple-row microelectrode array configuration consisting of microelectrodes placed on top, bottom, and/or side walls of a microchannel. The studied parameters are the substrate material and thickness, ambient temperature, fluid viscosity, and actuation frequency. Electrode dimensions remain constant during the study (120 μm wide and 20 μm thin electrodes, 20 μm gap). The study is performed using finite element analysis software for one pair of microelectrodes on each array with periodic boundary conditions. The simulation data is then compared with experimental data for a single combination of the aforementioned parameters. The results show that the effect of these parameters on ACET flow can be significant.

  5. Design and Simulation of an Electrothermal Actuator Based Rotational Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, Sterling; Dallas, Tim

    2008-10-01

    As a participant in the Micro and Nano Device Engineering (MANDE) Research Experience for Undergraduates program at Texas Tech University, I learned how MEMS devices operate and the limits of their operation. Using specialized AutoCAD-based design software and the ANSYS simulation program, I learned the MEMS fabrication process used at Sandia National Labs, the design limitations of this process, the abilities and drawbacks of micro devices, and finally, I redesigned a MEMS device called the Chevron Torsional Ratcheting Actuator (CTRA). Motion is achieved through electrothermal actuation. The chevron (bent-beam) actuators cause a ratcheting motion on top of a hub-less gear so that as voltage is applied the CTRA spins. The voltage applied needs to be pulsed and the frequency of the pulses determine the angular frequency of the device. The main objective was to design electromechanical structures capable of transforming the electrical signals into mechanical motion without overheating. The design was optimized using finite element analysis in ANSYS allowing multi-physics simulations of our model system.

  6. Electro-thermal modelling of a supercapacitor and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrueta, Alberto; San Martín, Idoia; Hernández, Andoni; Ursúa, Alfredo; Sanchis, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports on the electro-thermal modelling of a Maxwell supercapacitor (SC), model BMOD0083 with a rated capacitance of 83 F and rated voltage of 48 V. One electrical equivalent circuit was used to model the electrical behaviour whilst another served to simulate the thermal behaviour. The models were designed to predict the SC operating voltage and temperature, by taking the electric current and ambient temperature as input variables. A five-stage iterative method, applied to three experiments, served to obtain the parameter values for each model. The models were implemented in MATLAB-Simulink®, where they interacted to reciprocally provide information. These models were then validated through a number of tests, subjecting the SC to different current and frequency profiles. These tests included the validation of a bank of supercapacitors integrated into an electric microgrid, in a real operating environment. Satisfactory results were obtained from the electric and thermal models, with RMSE values of less than 0.65 V in all validations.

  7. Operation of electrothermal and electrostatic MUMPs microactuators underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameoto, Dan; Hubbard, Ted; Kujath, Marek

    2004-10-01

    Surface-micromachined actuators made in multi-user MEMS processes (MUMPs) have been operated underwater without modifying the manufacturing process. Such actuators have generally been either electro-thermally or electro-statically actuated and both actuator styles are tested here for suitability underwater. This is believed to be the first time that thermal and electrostatic actuators have been compared for deflection underwater relative to air performance. A high-frequency ac square wave is used to replicate a dc-driven actuator output without the associated problem of electrolysis in water. This method of ac activation, with frequencies far above the mechanical resonance frequencies of the MEMS actuators, has been termed root mean square (RMS) operation. Both thermal and electrostatic actuators have been tested and proved to work using RMS control. Underwater performance has been evaluated by using in-air operation of these actuators as a benchmark. When comparing deflection per volt applied, thermal actuators operate between 5 and 9% of in-air deflection and electrostatic actuators show an improvement in force per volt applied of upwards of 6000%. These results agree with predictions based on the physical properties of the surrounding medium.

  8. Compatibility experiments of facilities, materials, and propellants for electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, M. V.; Grisnik, S. P.; Sovey, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the compatibility of materials and propellants for electro-thermal thrusters. Candidate propellants for resistojet propulsion include carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, and hydrazine. The materials being examined are grain stabilized platinum for resistojets for Space station and rhenium for high performance resistojets for satellites. Heater mass loss and deterioration of materials were evaluated. A coiled tube of platinum, with yttria dispersed throughout the base material to inhibit grain growth, was tested in carbon dioxide at 1300 C for 2000 hr. Post-test examination indicated the platinum-yttria heater would last over 100 000 hr with less than 10 percent mass loss. Short-term compatibility tests were conducted to test the integrity of the platinum-yttria in hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide/methane mixtures and ammonia environments. In each of these 100 hr tests, the platinum-yttria mass change indicated a minimum coil life of 100 000 hr. Facility related effects were investigated in materials tests using rhenium heated to high tempertures. Vacuum facility water reduction was monitored using a mass spectrometer. In vacuum environments obtained using only diffusion pumping and those obtained with the assistance of cryogenic equipment there were mass gains in the rhenium heaters. These mass gains were the result of the high amount of oxygen and water contained in the gas. Propellant purity and preferred test facility environments are discussed.

  9. Recent developments in atomizers for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frech, W

    1996-06-01

    This review first describes general requirements to be met for suitable base materials used to produce electrothermal atomizers (ETAs). In this connection the physical and chemical properties of adequate types of graphite and metals are discussed. Further, various atomizer designs, their temperature dynamics during atomization and general performance characteristics are critically reviewed. For end-heated Massmann-type atomizers, discussions are focused on recent developments of, e.g., contoured tubes to achieve improved temperature homogeneity over the tube length, second surface atomizers to realize temporally isothermal atomization and tubes with graphite filters to reduce interference effects. The state-of-the-art of platform equipped, side-heated atomizers with integrated contacting bridges are characterized mainly with respect to heating dynamics, as well as susceptibility to interference- and memory effects. In contrast to end-heated ETAs, the tube ends of side-heated ETAs are freely located in the furnace compartment and, as a consequence of this configuration, convective gas flows can easily appear. The magnitude and effect of these flows on analytical performance are discussed and measures are suggested, permitting operation under diffusion controlled conditions. A critical comparison of classical constant temperature atomizers with state-of-the-art platform equipped ETAs is made and from this it is concluded that future ETA developments are likely to involve only minor modifications aiming at, e.g., the reduction of cycling times or the improvement of tube surface properties.

  10. Optimization of energy transfer in microwave electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. J.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from preliminary tests conducted to evaluate the performance of a prototype microwave electrothermal thruster. The primary component of the device is a microwave resonant cavity. The device produces stable axial plasmas within a pressurized section of the cavity with the plasma positioned in the inlet region of the nozzle. Plasma stability is enhanced by axial power coupling, an optimal distribution of electric power density within the cavity, and a propellant gas flow which has a large vortical velocity component. The thruster has been operated with a number of propellant gases: helium, nitrogen, ammonia, and hydrogen. Plasmas can be formed in a reliable manner at cavity pressures of 1 kPa and incident power levels ranging from 50 W to 350 W, depending on the gas used, and can be operated at pressures up to 300 kPa at power levels up to 2200 W. Ideal performance results of vacuum Isp and thermal efficiency vs. specific power are presented for each gas. Representative results of this preliminary work are: He - Isp = 625 s, eta-thermal = 90 percent; N2 - Isp = 270 s, eta-thermal = 41 percent; NH3 - Isp = 475 s, eta-thermal= 55 percent; H2 - Isp = 1040 s, eta-thermal = 53 percent.

  11. Electro-thermal modeling of a microbridge gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J.; Huber, R.J.

    1997-08-01

    Fully CMOS-compatible, surface-micromachined polysilicon microbridges have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in catalytic, calorimetric gas sensing. To improve sensor behavior, extensive electro-thermal modeling efforts were undertaken using SPICE. The validity of the SPICE model was verified comparing its simulated behavior with experiment. Temperature distribution of an electrically heated microbridges was measured using an infrared microscope. Comparisons among the measured distribution, the SPICE simulation, and distributions obtained by analytical methods show that heating at the ends of a microbridges has important implications for device response. Additional comparisons between measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics, as well as transient response, further support the accuracy of the model. A major benefit of electro- thermal modeling with SPICE is the ability to simultaneously simulate the behavior of a device and its control/sensing electronics. Results for the combination of a unique constant-resistance control circuit and microbridges gas sensor are given. Models of in situ techniques for monitoring catalyst deposition are shown to be in agreement with experiment. Finally, simulated chemical response of the detector is compared with the data, and methods of improving response through modifications in bridge geometry are predicted.

  12. Optimization of energy transfer in microwave electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, D. J.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-11-01

    Results are presented from preliminary tests conducted to evaluate the performance of a prototype microwave electrothermal thruster. The primary component of the device is a microwave resonant cavity. The device produces stable axial plasmas within a pressurized section of the cavity with the plasma positioned in the inlet region of the nozzle. Plasma stability is enhanced by axial power coupling, an optimal distribution of electric power density within the cavity, and a propellant gas flow which has a large vortical velocity component. The thruster has been operated with a number of propellant gases: helium, nitrogen, ammonia, and hydrogen. Plasmas can be formed in a reliable manner at cavity pressures of 1 kPa and incident power levels ranging from 50 W to 350 W, depending on the gas used, and can be operated at pressures up to 300 kPa at power levels up to 2200 W. Ideal performance results of vacuum Isp and thermal efficiency vs. specific power are presented for each gas. Representative results of this preliminary work are: He - Isp = 625 s, eta-thermal = 90 percent; N2 - Isp = 270 s, eta-thermal = 41 percent; NH3 - Isp = 475 s, eta-thermal= 55 percent; H2 - Isp = 1040 s, eta-thermal = 53 percent.

  13. Development of the electrothermal instability from resistive inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Awe, T. J.; Bauer, B. S.; Yates, K. C.; Yelton, W. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Fuelling, S.; McKenzie, B. B.; Peterson, K. J.

    2016-10-01

    The magneto Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability limits the performance of all magnetically imploded systems. In the case of compressing metal liners, as in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept, a dominant seed for MRT is believed to be the electrothermal instability (ETI). Here, linear theory predicts the most unstable mode manifests as horizontal (i.e. perpendicular to current flow) bands of heated and expanded metal. However, how do such bands, known as striations, actually develop from a smooth metal surface? Recent experiments on ETI evolution, performed at the University of Nevada, Reno, provide a possible answer: pre-shot characterization of aluminum rods show numerous resistive inclusions, several microns in diameter and distributed throughout the rod. In this work, we use 3D MHD simulation and analytic theory to explore how current redistribution around these isolated inclusions, combined with ETI, can lead to rapid formation of the global striation structures. Later in time, striations expand and form density perturbations much larger than the initial inclusion size. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. High Temperature Electrothermal Processing--Zinc from Zinc Oxide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-17

    1111M Due Nm_______________ REORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE in3"Ś COMPL3TEEO FORM 1. 1111POT NomBeRp GOVT AC IO rMEPOREN S CATALG MUNDER TR- Ib.~l-*c8 14...producing liquid Zn rather than Zn vapor in the electrolysis cell, because Zn vapor causes a bad mismatch in the counter- current heat exchanger and a

  15. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  16. Electrothermally-Actuated Micromirrors with Bimorph Actuators--Bending-Type and Torsion-Type.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hua; Tsai, Chun-Wei; Chang, Hsu-Tang; Liu, Shih-Hsiang; Tsai, Jui-Che

    2015-06-22

    Three different electrothermally-actuated MEMS micromirrors with Cr/Au-Si bimorph actuators are proposed. The devices are fabricated with the SOIMUMPs process developed by MEMSCAP, Inc. (Durham, NC, USA). A silicon-on-insulator MEMS process has been employed for the fabrication of these micromirrors. Electrothermal actuation has achieved a large angular movement in the micromirrors. Application of an external electric current 0.04 A to the bending-type, restricted-torsion-type, and free-torsion-type mirrors achieved rotation angles of 1.69°, 3.28°, and 3.64°, respectively.

  17. Electrothermally-Actuated Micromirrors with Bimorph Actuators—Bending-Type and Torsion-Type

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Hua; Tsai, Chun-Wei; Chang, Hsu-Tang; Liu, Shih-Hsiang; Tsai, Jui-Che

    2015-01-01

    Three different electrothermally-actuated MEMS micromirrors with Cr/Au-Si bimorph actuators are proposed. The devices are fabricated with the SOIMUMPs process developed by MEMSCAP, Inc. (Durham, NC, USA). A silicon-on-insulator MEMS process has been employed for the fabrication of these micromirrors. Electrothermal actuation has achieved a large angular movement in the micromirrors. Application of an external electric current 0.04 A to the bending-type, restricted-torsion-type, and free-torsion-type mirrors achieved rotation angles of 1.69°, 3.28°, and 3.64°, respectively. PMID:26110409

  18. The energetics of hydrogen atom recombination - Analysis, experiments, and modeling. [in electrothermal propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filpus, J. W.; Hawley, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the effect of the microscopic energetics of the recombination reaction on the performance of a microwave-plasma electrothermal propulsion system is described, and the results of the analysis are presented. A series of experiments to test the concept is described and analyzed by comparison with a computer model of the recombination reaction. It is concluded that internal energy considerations are not likely to significantly affect the design of a microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket. The experimental results indicate that the microwave power is far higher than the capacity of the gas to absorb it; the cooling needed to control the energy dominates the experimental results.

  19. Superfund Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In addition to basic information about vapor intrusion, the site contains technical and policy documents, tools and other resources to support vapor intrusion environmental investigations and mitigation activities.

  20. Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

    2007-12-31

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b

  1. Infrared spectral evaluation of methanol/ammonia vapor mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Paul E.; Combs, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The vapor analytes of methanol and ammonia are quantitatively generated separately and as mixtures in the presence of water vapor. Generation of these analytes relies on the vapor liquid equilibria properties of the associated aqueous solutions for delivering targeted vapor amounts into an equilibrium vapor cell. The amount delivered to the equilibrium vapor cell is controlled by use of gravimetrically prepared solutions and maintaining a constant solution temperature. The cell vapor contents are examined with a laboratory Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Vapor phase spectra are acquired for the analyte mixtures in the Beer's Law concentration range using a fixed path length optical cell. Comparison to literature vapor liquid equilibrium measurements indicates the assumption of ideal solution behavior for methanollammonia interactions in the ternary solutions to be valid.

  2. Analysis of the optimal dimension on the electrothermal microactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Kung, C.; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2002-05-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of an electrothermal microactuator (so-called 'hot-cold-beam actuator') is developed using the ANSYSTM finite element analysis (FEA) simulation program (ANSYS 1992 User's Manual for Revision 5.5.1 (Houston, PA: Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc.)). The actuator is geometrically scaled (except the thickness) to explore the effect of dimension variation on the performance of the actuator. The model is then used to optimize the actuator for robust design. Two types of actuator are also studied here: one with a suspended polysilicon structure and the other with additional gold-layer deposition. The results reveal that a greater deflection can be obtained for gold-plated actuators. An L18 Taguchi matrix is developed to investigate the effects of dimensional variation on the performance of the actuator. It is found that total actuator length contributes the major influence to the performance of the actuator. A maximum deflection is realized as the cold-beam length reaches about 86% of the hot-beam length of the actuator. Experiments are also conducted to verify numerical data. The results are in good agreement with analytical simulations to a certain electrical current regime. Finally, our robust design concludes that a gold-plated actuator with a 250 μm long, 3.5 μm thick, 2 μm wide hot beam and a 215 μm long, 3.5 μm thick, 15 μm wide cold beam can deflect up to 20.2 μm at a driving current of 6.2 mA.

  3. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Marzouk, A.; Crisostomo, M.C.; Weatherby, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use by a Stomacher blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15%, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8% (mean +/-SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung > heart > bone > kidney > brain > testis > fat > liver > spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 ..mu..g per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 ..mu..g per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl/sub 2/-treated rats rank as follows: kidney >> lung > spleen > testis > heart > fat > liver > bone > brain. The present method fills the need for an accurate, sensitive, and practical technique to determine tissue Ni concentrations, with stringent precautions to minimize Ni contamination during tissue sampling and processing. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  4. Antimony quantification in Leishmania by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W L; Rainey, P M

    1993-05-15

    Tri- and pentavalent antimony were quantified in Leishmania mexicana pifanoi amastigotes and promastigotes by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization. Leishmania grown in axenic culture were treated with either potassium antimony tartrate [Sb(III)] or sodium stibogluconate [Sb(V)]. The parasites were collected, digested with nitric acid, and subjected to atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method was linear from 0 to 7 ng of antimony. The interassay coefficients of variation were 9.6 and 5.7% (N = 5) for 0.52 and 3.7-ng samples of leishmanial antimony, respectively. The limit of detection was 95 pg of antimony. The assay was used to characterize Sb(III) and Sb(V) influx and efflux kinetics. Influx rates were determined at antimony concentrations that produced a 50% inhibition of growth (IC50). The influx rates of Sb(V) into amastigotes and promastigotes were 4.8 and 12 pg/million cells/h, respectively, at 200 micrograms antimony/ml. The influx rate of Sb(III) into amastigotes was 41 pg/million cells/h at 20 micrograms antimony/ml. Influx of Sb(III) into promastigotes at 1 microgram antimony/ml was rapid and reached a plateau of 175 pg/million cells in 2 h. Efflux of Sb(III) and Sb(V) from amastigotes and promastigotes exhibited biphasic kinetics. The initial (alpha) half-life of Sb(V) efflux was less than 4 min and that of Sb(III) was 1-2 h. The apparent terminal (beta) half-lives ranged from 7 to 14 h.

  5. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  6. Insights in the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal generation underwater using dual pulse excitation — Part I: Vapor bubble, shockwaves and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazic, V.; Laserna, J. J.; Jovicevic, S.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma and vapor bubble formation and evolution after a nanosecond laser pulse delivered to aluminum targets inside water were studied by fast photography. This technique was also applied to monitor the plasma produced by a second laser pulse and for different interpulse delays. The bubble growth was evident only after 3 μs from the first laser pulse and the bubble shape changed during expansion and collapse cycles. The evolution and propagation of the initial shockwave and its reflections both from the back sample surface and cell walls were detected by Schlieren photography. The primary plasma develops in two phases: violent particle expulsion and ionization during the first μs, followed by slow plasma growth from the ablation crater into the evolving vapor bubble. The shape of the secondary plasma strongly depends on the inner bubble pressure whereas the particle expulsion into the expanded bubble is much less evident. Both the primary and secondary plasma have similar duration of about 30 μs. Detection efficiency of the secondary plasma is much reduced by light refraction at the curved bubble-water interface, which behaves as a negative lens; this leads to an apparent reduction of the plasma dimensions. Defocusing power of the bubble lens increases with its expansion due to the lowering of the vapor's refraction index with respect to that of the surrounding liquid (Lazic et al., 2012 [1]). Smell's reflections of secondary plasma radiation at the expanded bubble wall redistribute the detected intensity on a wavelength-dependent way and allow gathering of the emission also from the external plasma layer that otherwise, would not enter into the optical system.

  7. The use of an electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system in the management of lung hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Mario; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Milione, Roberta; Vicidomini, Giovanni; Accardo, Marina

    2014-10-01

    Surgery is the treatment of choice for management of pulmonary hydatid cysts. Total pericystectomy provided the best results concerning the recurrence of the disease, but haemorrhagia and air leak during dissection of the pericystic space are the main disadvantages of such a method. To avoid these complications, we proposed the use of an electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. After the extraction of the hydatid cyst, a small space is created between the pericyst and normal lung, and the separation between the two zones is joined using the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. This procedure reduces the risk of bleeding and of air leaks because the bronchi and the vessels encountered during dissection are sealed by the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. When the pericystic membrane (inflammatory host reaction) is intimately adherent to the lung, total pericystectomy demands greater technical training because the bronchovascular axes of the healthy segments are situated in the pericyst. In such cases, the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system allowed creation of an appropriate plane through the parenchyma close to the pericyst, minimizing the normal lung exposed to resection as much as possible and reducing the resulting bleeding and air leak. This procedure was successfully applied in 4 consecutive patients each with a giant hydatid cyst.

  8. Electrode Arrangement As Substitute Bottom For An Electrothermic Slag Smelting Furnace.

    DOEpatents

    Aune, Jan Arthur; Brinch, Jon Christian; Johansen, Kai

    2005-12-27

    The electrode arrangement uses vertically oriented electrodes with side wall contacts for an electrothermic smelting furnace for aluminum production. The side wall contacts are radially moveable into the furnace to compensate for wear on the contacts. The side wall contacts can be hollow to allow a slag forming charge to be fed to the furnace.

  9. Closed-form modelling and design analysis of V- and Z-shaped electrothermal microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Weize; Wu, Qiyang; Yu, Yueqing; Liu, Xinyu; Zhang, Xuping

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the modelling and design analysis of V- and Z-shaped electrothermal microactuators. First, a comprehensive but concise closed-form multiphysical analytical model is developed to predict the output displacement and force of both V- and Z-shaped electrothermal microactuators operating either in vacuum or in air conditions. The analytical model is verified by finite element analysis and experimental testing. Then, a novel comparison benchmark is proposed for the design and analysis of the V- and Z-shaped microactuators. With the multiphysical model and comparison benchmark, comprehensive performance comparison and analysis of the V- and Z-shaped beams are performed with the aim of providing insight and guidance on selection and design of the two typical types of electrothermal microactuators. Finally, the application of the comparison model into the design analysis is demonstrated using a design example of an electrothermal microactuator, and the detailed investigation is conducted to examine the effects of the material properties and structural parameters on the microactuator outputs.

  10. Development of Electrothermal Pulsed Plasma Thrusters for Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yushuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Minetsugu; Tahara, Hirokazu

    2008-12-01

    The Project of Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship (PROITERES) was started at Osaka Institute of Technology. In PROITERES, a 10-kg small satellite with electrothermal pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs), named JOSHO, will be launched in 2010. The main mission is powered flight of small satellite by electric thruster itself. Electrothermal PPTs were studied with both experiments and numerical simulations. An electrothermal PPT with a side-fed propellant feeding mechanism achieved a total impulse of 3.6 Ns with a repetitive 10000-shot operation. An unsteady numerical simulation showed the existence of considerable amount of ablation delaying to the discharge. However, it was also shown that this phenomenon should not be regarded as the ``late time ablation'' for electrothermal PPTs.

  11. Development of Electrothermal Pulsed Plasma Thrusters for Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Yushuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Minetsugu; Tahara, Hirokazu

    2008-12-31

    The Project of Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship (PROITERES) was started at Osaka Institute of Technology. In PROITERES, a 10-kg small satellite with electrothermal pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs), named JOSHO, will be launched in 2010. The main mission is powered flight of small satellite by electric thruster itself. Electrothermal PPTs were studied with both experiments and numerical simulations. An electrothermal PPT with a side-fed propellant feeding mechanism achieved a total impulse of 3.6 Ns with a repetitive 10000-shot operation. An unsteady numerical simulation showed the existence of considerable amount of ablation delaying to the discharge. However, it was also shown that this phenomenon should not be regarded as the 'late time ablation' for electrothermal PPTs.

  12. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully.

  13. Vapor-phase deposition of polymers as a simple and versatile technique to generate paper-based microfluidic platforms for bioassay applications.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Gokhan; Babur, Esra

    2014-05-21

    Given their simplicity and functionality, paper-based microfluidic systems are considered to be ideal and promising bioassay platforms for use in less developed countries or in point-of-care services. Although a series of innovative techniques have recently been demonstrated for the fabrication of such platforms, development of simple, inexpensive and versatile new strategies are still needed in order to reach their full potential. In this communication, we describe a simple yet facile approach to fabricate paper-based sensor platforms with a desired design through a vapor-phase polymer deposition technique. We also show that the fabricated platforms could be readily employed for the detection of various biological target molecules including glucose, protein, ALP, ALT, and uric acid. The limit of detection for each target molecule was calculated to be 25 mg dL(-1) for glucose, 1.04 g L(-1) for protein, 7.81 unit per L for ALP, 1.6 nmol L(-1) for ALT, and 0.13 mmol L(-1) for uric acid.

  14. Evaluation of Mercury in Environmental Samples by a Supramolecular SolventBased Dispersive LiquidLiquid Microextraction Method Before Analysis by a Cold Vapor Generation Technique.

    PubMed

    Ali, Jamshed; Tuzen, Mustafa; Kazi, Tasneem G

    2017-02-01

    Supramolecular solvent–based dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction was used as a preconcentration method for the determination of trace levels of Hg. This simple method accurately measured oxidized HgII content in claystone and sandstone samples obtained from the Thar Coalfield in Pakistan. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry was used as the detection technique because it is reliable and accurate. The HgII in acidic media forms a complex with dithizone (DTz) in the presence of supramolecular solvent (tetrahydrofuran and 1-undecanol), forming reverse micelles. Formation of the Hg-DTz complex was achieved to increase the interactions with the supramolecular solvent phase at pH 2.5 under the optimized experimental conditions. After addition of the supramolecular solvent to the aqueous solution, the micelles were uniformly mixed using a vortex mixer. The cloudy solution was centrifuged, and the Hg-DTz complex was extracted into the supramolecular solvent phase. Under optimized experimental conditions, the LOD and enrichment factor were found to be 5.61 ng/L and 77.8, respectively. Accuracy of the developed method was checked with Certified Reference Materials. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of HgII in claystone and sandstone samples from the Block VII and Block VIII areas of the Thar Coalfield on the basis of depth.

  15. Low defect InGaAs quantum well selectively grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on Si(100) 300 mm wafers for next generation non planar devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M.; Moeyaert, J.; David, S.; Gorbenko, V.; Bassani, F.; Bogumilowicz, Y.; Barnes, J. P.; Rochat, N.; Loup, V.; Vizioz, C.; Allouti, N.; Chauvin, N.; Bao, X. Y.; Ye, Z.; Pin, J. B.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs, InGaAs, and AlGaAs on nominal 300 mm Si(100) at temperatures below 550 °C was studied using the selective aspect ratio trapping method. We clearly show that growing directly GaAs on a flat Si surface in a SiO2 cavity with an aspect ratio as low as 1.3 is efficient to completely annihilate the anti-phase boundary domains. InGaAs quantum wells were grown on a GaAs buffer and exhibit room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Cathodoluminescence reveals the presence of dark spots which could be associated with the presence of emerging dislocation in a direction parallel to the cavity. The InGaAs layers obtained with no antiphase boundaries are perfect candidates for being integrated as channels in n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET), while the low temperatures used allow the co-integration of p-type MOSFET.

  16. Iron bromide vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  17. Arthroscopic electrothermal capsulorrhaphy for the treatment of recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Daniel E; McCain, Joseph P

    2012-06-01

    Acute temporomandibular joint dislocation is a common occurrence that is generally treated by conservative therapy. In some patients, this can become a chronic recurrent condition. This recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation (RTD) can significantly decrease the patient's quality of life and require some form of surgical intervention for correction. The purpose of this study is to present a minimally invasive alternative treatment for RTD using operative arthroscopy. 11 patients treated for recurrent temporomandibular dislocation between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Electrothermal capsulorrhaphy was performed using a standard double puncture operative arthroscopy with a Hol:YAG laser and/or electrocautery. Postoperatively the patients were monitored for 6 months to 6 years. Of the 11 subjects, 2 suffered a recurrence of temporomandibular dislocation and required open arthrotomy for correction. The other 9 patients had no signs of recurrence or any significant postoperative loss of function. Electrothermal capsulorrhaphy is an effective and minimally invasive method for the treatment of RTD.

  18. Literature study of microwave-assisted digestion using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, R; Das, A K; Cervera, M L; De La Guardia, M

    1996-05-01

    The literature on the use of microwave-assisted digestion procedures for subsequent sample analysis by means of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is reviewed. The literature survey reveals that this digestion technique has been applied mainly for biological materials. The elements most extensively determined by this method are cadmium and lead followed by copper, chromium, nickel and iron. The microwave digestion conditions, ETAAS furnace programmes and analytical details of the developed methodologies have been carefully revised.

  19. Vapor phase pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    The vapor phase pyrolysis process is designed exclusively for the lunar production of oxygen. In this concept, granulated raw material (soil) that consists almost entirely of metal oxides is vaporized and the vapor is raised to a temperature where it dissociates into suboxides and free oxygen. Rapid cooling of the dissociated vapor to a discrete temperature causes condensation of the suboxides, while the oxygen remains essentially intact and can be collected downstream. The gas flow path and flow rate are maintained at an optimum level by control of the pressure differential between the vaporization region and the oxygen collection system with the aid of the environmental vacuum.

  20. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-05

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause.

  1. A novel alternating current multiple array electrothermal micropump for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Salari, A; Navi, M; Dalton, C

    2015-01-01

    The AC electrothermal technique is very promising for biofluid micropumping, due to its ability to pump high conductivity fluids. However, compared to electroosmotic micropumps, a lack of high fluid flow is a disadvantage. In this paper, a novel AC multiple array electrothermal (MAET) micropump, utilizing multiple microelectrode arrays placed on the side-walls of the fluidic channel of the micropump, is introduced. Asymmetric coplanar microelectrodes are placed on all sides of the microfluidic channel, and are actuated in different phases: one, two opposing, two adjacent, three, or all sides at the same time. Micropumps with different combinations of side electrodes and cross sections are numerically investigated in this paper. The effect of the governing parameters with respect to thermal, fluidic, and electrical properties are studied and discussed. To verify the simulations, the AC MAET concept was then fabricated and experimentally tested. The resulted fluid flow achieved by the experiments showed good agreement with the corresponding simulations. The number of side electrode arrays and the actuation patterns were also found to greatly influence the micropump performance. This study shows that the new multiple array electrothermal micropump design can be used in a wide range of applications such as drug delivery and lab-on-a-chip, where high flow rate and high precision micropumping devices for high conductivity fluids are needed.

  2. Optoelectric patterning: Effect of electrode material and thickness on laser-induced AC electrothermal flow.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Avanish; Khor, Jian-Wei; Clayton, Katherine N; Williams, Stuart J; Pan, Xudong; Kinzer-Ursem, Tamara; Wereley, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP) is an emerging optoelectric technique that takes advantage of laser-induced AC electrothermal flow and particle-electrode interactions to trap and translate particles. The electrothermal flow in REP is driven by the temperature rise induced by the laser absorption in the thin electrode layer. In previous REP applications 350-700 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layers have been used as electrodes. In this study, we show that ITO is an inefficient electrode choice as more than 92% of the irradiated laser on the ITO electrodes is transmitted without absorption. Using theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches, we demonstrate that for a given laser power the temperature rise is controlled by both the electrode material and its thickness. A 25-nm thick Ti electrode creates an electrothermal flow of the same speed as a 700-nm thick ITO electrode while requiring only 14% of the laser power used by ITO. These results represent an important step in the design of low-cost portable REP systems by lowering the material cost and power consumption of the system.

  3. Evaluation of candidate working fluid formulations for the electrothermal-chemical wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyurtlu, Jale F.; Akyurtlu, Ates

    1993-01-01

    A new hypersonic test facility which can simulate conditions typical of atmospheric flight at Mach numbers up to 20 is currently under study at the NASA/LaRC Hypersonic Propulsion Branch. In the proposed research, it was suggested that a combustion augmented electrothermal wind tunnel concept may be applied to the planned hypersonic testing facility. The purpose of the current investigation is to evaluate some candidate working fluid formulations which may be used in the chemical-electrothermal wind. The efforts in the initial phase of this research were concentrated on acquiring the code used by GASL to model the electrothermal wind tunnel and testing it using the conditions of GASL simulation. The early version of the general chemical kinetics code (GCKP84) was obtained from NASA and the latest updated version of the code (LSENS) was obtained from the author Dr. Bittker. Both codes are installed on a personal computer with a 486 25 MHz processor and 16 Mbyte RAM. Since the available memory was not sufficient to debug LSENS, for the current work GCKP84 was used.

  4. Electrothermally Driven Fluorescence Switching by Liquid Crystal Elastomers Based One Dimensional Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changxu; Jiang, Yin; Tao, Cheng-An; Yin, Xianpeng; Lan, Yue; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shiqiang; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Li, Guangtao

    2017-03-15

    In this article, an active organic-inorganic one-dimensional photonic crystals structure is fabricated to offer electrothermal fluorescence switching. The film is obtained by spin-coating of liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) and TiO2 nanoparticles alternatively. By utilizing the property of LCEs that can change their size and shape reversibly under external thermal stimulations, the λmax of photonic band-gap of these films is tuned by voltage through electrothermal conversion. The shifted photonic band-gap further changes the matching degree between the photonic band-gap of the film and the emission spectrum of organic dye mounting on the film. With rhodamine B as an example, the enhancement factor of its fluorescence emission is controlled by variating the matching degree. Thus, the fluorescence intensity is actively switched by voltage applied on the system, in a fast, adjustable and reversible manner. The control chain of using the electrothermal stimulus to adjust fluorescence intensity via controlling the photonic band-gap is proved by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the UV-Vis reflectance. This mechanism is also corresponded to the results from the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation. The comprehensive usage of photonic crystals and liquid crystal elastomers opened a new possibility for active optical devices.

  5. A non-resonant fiber scanner based on an electrothermally-actuated MEMS stage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Duan, Can; Liu, Lin; Li, Xingde; Xie, Huikai

    2015-01-01

    Scanning fiber tips provides the most convenient way for forward-viewing fiber-optic microendoscopy. In this paper, a distal fiber scanning method based on a large-displacement MEMS actuator is presented. A single-mode fiber is glued on the micro-platform of an electrothermal MEMS stage to realize large range non-resonantscanning. The micro-platform has a large piston scan range of up to 800 µm at only 6V. The tip deflection of the fiber can be further amplified by placing the MEMS stage at a proper location along the fiber. A quasi-static model of the fiber-MEMS assembly has been developed and validated experimentally. The frequency response has also been studied and measured. A fiber tip deflection of up to 1650 µm for the 45 mm-long movable fiber portion has been achieved when the MEMS electrothermal stage was placed 25 mm away from the free end. The electrothermally-actuated MEMS stage shows a great potential for forward viewing fiber scanning and optical applications. PMID:26347583

  6. A non-resonant fiber scanner based on an electrothermally-actuated MEMS stage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Duan, Can; Liu, Lin; Li, Xingde; Xie, Huikai

    2015-09-01

    Scanning fiber tips provides the most convenient way for forward-viewing fiber-optic microendoscopy. In this paper, a distal fiber scanning method based on a large-displacement MEMS actuator is presented. A single-mode fiber is glued on the micro-platform of an electrothermal MEMS stage to realize large range non-resonantscanning. The micro-platform has a large piston scan range of up to 800 µm at only 6V. The tip deflection of the fiber can be further amplified by placing the MEMS stage at a proper location along the fiber. A quasi-static model of the fiber-MEMS assembly has been developed and validated experimentally. The frequency response has also been studied and measured. A fiber tip deflection of up to 1650 µm for the 45 mm-long movable fiber portion has been achieved when the MEMS electrothermal stage was placed 25 mm away from the free end. The electrothermally-actuated MEMS stage shows a great potential for forward viewing fiber scanning and optical applications.

  7. Mechanisms of the micro-crack generation in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. Q. Takahashi, T.; Ide, T.; Shimizu, M.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate the generation mechanisms of micro-cracks (MCs) in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice (SL) structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The SL is intended to be used as an interlayer (IL) for relaxing tensile stress and obtaining high-quality crack-free GaN grown on Si substrates. It is found that the MCs can be generated by two different mechanisms, where large mismatches of the lattice constant (LC) and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) play key roles in the issue. Different MC configurations (low-density and high-density MCs) are observed, which are considered to be formed during the different growth stages (SL growth and cooling down processes) due to the LC and the CTE effects. In-situ and ex-situ experimental results support the mechanism interpretations of the MCs generation. The mechanism understanding makes it possible to optimize the SL IL structure for growing high-quality crack-free GaN films on Si substrates for optical and electronic device applications.

  8. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  9. 100 WATT THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GENERATORS , *ENERGY CONVERSION, HEAT EXCHANGERS, THERMOELECTRICITY, THERMOCOUPLES, BLOWERS, MODULES(ELECTRONICS), SILICON ALLOYS, GERMANIUM ALLOYS, COMBUSTION, GASOLINE, VAPORIZATION, FUELS, LEAD COMPOUNDS.

  10. Study of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference in the selenium determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela

    2002-02-01

    The use of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference when measuring selenium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with deuterium background correction was evaluated. Ammonium molybdate did not produce a selenium thermal stabilization; however, the presence of ammonium molybdate decreased the phosphate interference. The study was carried out with mussel acid digests and mussel slurries. Pd-Mg(NO 3) 2 was used as a chemical modifier at optimum concentrations of 300 and 250 mg l -1, respectively, yielding optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 and 2100 °C, respectively. A yellow solid (ammonium molybdophosphate) was obtained when adding ammonium molybdate to mussel acid digest solutions. This precipitate can be removed after centrifugation prior to ETAAS determination. Additionally, studies on the sampling of the solid ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) together with the liquid phase, as a slurry, were also developed. The volatilization of the solid AMP was not reached at temperatures lower than 2500 °C. By this way, phosphate, as AMP, is not present in the vapor phase at the atomization temperature (2100 °C), yielding a reduction of the spectral interference by phosphate. The proposed method was validated analyzing three reference materials of marine origin (DORM-1, DOLT-1 and TORT-1). Good agreement with the certified selenium contents was reached for all cases.

  11. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/temperature/humidity (FIFH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the Kennedy

  12. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, Gregory M.; McRae, Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  13. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David; Fabiilli, Mario; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Gas embolotherapy is a proposed cancer therapy where gas bubbles acting as embolic agents are selectively generated near the tumor site to block blood supply, resulting to tumor necrosis. The gas bubbles are generated by using focused ultrasound to selective vaporize intravenously injected microdroplets. In this study, albumin encapsulated dodecafluorocarbon microdroplets were isolated in 25 to 100 micron diameter polydimethylsiloxane microchannels. The droplets were vaporized at 37 °C using a single pulse from a 7.5 MHz single element focused transducer with 8-32 cycles at 2.2 to 5.6 MPa peak negative pressure. The vaporization process was recorded using an ultra-high speed camera attached to an inverted microscope. A theoretical Rayleigh-Plesset like model was derived to describe the both the expansion of small spherical bubbles as well as cylindrical bubbles in a long microchannel. The gas phase was described as an ideal gas and the liquid DDFP and bulk fluid were viscous Newtonian fluids. Additionally, surface tension, viscous losses from the channel, and the phase change process were included in the model. The theoretical model matched very well to experiments with channel diameters or 50 micron or less. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  14. Water Vapor Effects on Silica-Forming Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Silica-forming ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 are proposed for applications in combustion environments. These environments contain water vapor as a product of combustion. Oxidation of silica-formers is more rapid in water vapor than in oxygen. Parabolic oxidation rates increase with the water vapor partial pressure with a power law exponent value close to one. Molecular water vapor is therefore the mobile species in silica. Rapid oxidation rates and large amounts of gases generated during the oxidation reaction in high water vapor pressures may result in bubble formation in the silica and nonprotective scale formation. It is also shown that silica reacts with water vapor to form Si(OH)4(g). Silica volatility has been modeled using a laminar flow boundary layer controlled reaction equation. Silica volatility depends on the partial pressure of water vapor, the total pressure, and the gas velocity. Simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions have been modeled with paralinear kinetics.

  15. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    EPA Science Inventory

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  16. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  17. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1989--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes research to reduce the intrinsic bonding defects in amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloys by controlling the bonding chemistry and the microstructure via the deposition process reactions. The specific approach was to use remote plasma-enhanced, chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) and reactive magnetron sputtering to limit the multiplicity of deposition inaction pathways, and thereby gain increased control over the thin-film chemistry and microstrucre. The research included (1) the deposition of amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloy materials by the PECVD process and by reactive magnetron sputtering, and (2) the evaluation of the material properties of these films for potential applications in PV devices. The focus of the research was on pining a fundamental understanding of the relationships between deposition reaction pathways, the bonding of dopant and alloy atoms, and the electrical provides of importance for PV applications. This involved studying the factors that contribute to defect generation and to defect removal and/or neutralization. In addition to the experimental studies, the research also included theoretical and modeling studies aimed at understanding the relationships between local atomic arrangements of Si and alloy atoms, and the electrical, optical, vibrational, and defect properties.

  18. A low power, on demand electrothermal valve for wireless drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Givrad, Tina K.; Sheybani, Roya; Holschneider, Daniel P.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a low power, on demand Parylene MEMS electrothermal valve. A novel Ω-shaped thermal resistive element requires low power (~mW) and enables rapid valve opening (~ms). Using both finite element analysis and valve opening experiments, a robust resistive element design for improved valve opening performance in water was obtained. In addition, a thermistor, as an inrush current limiter, was added into the valve circuit to provide variable current ramping. Wireless activation of the valve using RF inductive power transfer was demonstrated. PMID:20024057

  19. Numerical analysis of mixing by electrothermal induced flow in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Feng, J. J.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Sundaram, S.

    2007-01-01

    An electrothermal flow induced chaotic mixing in microfluidic systems is studied analytically and numerically. The flow is induced due to the Coulombic and dielectric forces arising from the variation of the dielectric properties with respect to the temperature in the presence of an electric field. The numerical model is validated using an analytical solution derived for basic flow patterns in a simplified geometry. The computational model has been used to illustrate the mixing in microcavity and T-sensor constructs. The simulations predict the chaotic nature of the mixing process, where the material interface evolution shows exponential growth. PMID:19693379

  20. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using electrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  1. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion, and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S.-Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using eiectrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  2. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  3. Parameterization and Validation of an Integrated Electro-Thermal LFP Battery Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    integrated electro- thermal model for an A123 26650 LiFePO4 battery is presented. The electrical dynamics of the cell are described by an equivalent...the parameterization of an integrated electro-thermal model for an A123 26650 LiFePO4 battery is presented. The electrical dynamics of the cell are...the average of the charge and discharge curves taken at very low current (C/20), since the LiFePO4 cell chemistry is known to yield a hysteresis effect

  4. A low power, on demand electrothermal valve for wireless drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Po-Ying; Givrad, Tina K; Sheybani, Roya; Holschneider, Daniel P; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Meng, Ellis

    2010-01-07

    We present a low power, on demand Parylene MEMS electrothermal valve. A novel Omega-shaped thermal resistive element requires low power (approximately mW) and enables rapid valve opening (approximately ms). Using both finite element analysis and valve opening experiments, a robust resistive element design for improved valve opening performance in water was obtained. In addition, a thermistor, as an inrush current limiter, was added into the valve circuit to provide variable current ramping. Wireless activation of the valve using RF inductive power transfer was demonstrated.

  5. [Electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants and plant products].

    PubMed

    Karpova, E A; Malysheva, A G; Ermakov, A A; Sidorenkova, N K

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed the optimal temperature-time parameters of electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants after their acid predigestion. The matrix modifier is 1% nickel nitrate or palladium nitrate solution. Cuvettes (ovens) are simple, made of porous or pyrolytic graphite. The analytical program is suitable for both spectrometers with Zeeman and deuterium background correction. The correctness of the procedure has been estimated from the results of analysis of state reference samples certified for their arsenic content. The coefficient of variation was 20-35% for the concentration range of 0.02-0.2 mg/kg.

  6. Inhibiting electro-thermal breakdown of acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators by dielectric gel coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is very localized; a spark and a pinhole (puncture) in dielectric ends up with short-circuit. This letter shows that prevention of electrothermal breakdown helps defer failure of DEAs even with conductive-grease electrodes. Dielectric gel encapsulation or coating (Dow Corning 3-4170) helps protect acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905), making it thermally more stable and delaying its thermal oxidation (burn) from 218 °C to 300 °C. Dielectric-gel-coated acrylic DEAs can withstand higher local leak-induced heating and thus achieve higher dielectric strengths than non-coated DEAs do.

  7. Condensation on a noncollapsing vapor bubble in a subcooled liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure is presented by which an estimate can be made of the condensation coefficient on a noncollapsing stationary vapor bubble in subcooled liquid nitrogen. Film boiling from a thin wire was used to generate vapor bubbles which remain fixed to the wire at their base. A balance was established between the evaporation in the thin annular region along the wire and the condensation in the vapor bubbles.

  8. Comparative study of the vapor analytes of trinitrotoluene (TNT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, Cindy C.; Gibb, Julie; Dugan, Regina E.

    1998-12-01

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a high explosive used in most antipersonnel and antitank landmines. The Institute for Biological Detection Systems (IBDS) has developed a quantitative vapor delivery system, termed olfactometer, for conducting canine olfactory research. The research is conducted utilizing dynamic conditions, therefore, it is imperative to evaluate the headspace of TNT to ensure consistency with the dynamic generation of vapor. This study quantified the vapor headspace of military- grade TNT utilizing two different vapor generated methodologies, static and dynamic, reflecting differences between field and laboratory environments. Static vapor collection, which closely mimics conditions found during field detection, is defined as vapor collected in an open-air environment at ambient temperature. Dynamic vapor collection incorporates trapping of gases from a high flow vapor generation cell used during olfactometer operation. Analysis of samples collected by the two methodologies was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the results provided information with regard to the constituents detected. However, constituent concentration did vary between the sampling methods. This study provides essential information regarding the vapor constituents associated with the TNT sampled using different sampling methods. These differences may be important in determining the detection signature dogs use to recognize TNT.

  9. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  10. Improved electrothermal performance of custom-shaped micro heater based on anisotropic laser-reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tian-Yu; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Qian; Wang, Dan-Yang; Deng, Ning-Qin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a flexible heater based on anisotropic laser-reduced graphene oxide (LRGO) is established. Attributing to precision and shape design of laser processing and excellent adhesion of graphene oxide, the LRGO-based heater can be microminiaturized with custom patterns and integrated on various substrates, which is what the existing film heaters cannot do and can be widely used for wearable heating devices, flexural warming systems in medical science, and light deicing equipment and heaters for aero vehicles. The electrothermal performance of the anisotropic LRGO is investigated systematically through a series of experiments including Raman spectra, SEM, white-light interferograms, IV testing, and infrared thermography. The electrothermal performance of the LRGO with the parallel aligned direction is better than the LRGO with the vertical aligned direction. The electrothermal performance can be improved greatly through radiating repeatedly. The saturated temperature and heating rate of the LRGO radiated twice are almost double that of the LRGO radiated once. Radiating thrice damages the material and structure, reducing electrothermal performance.

  11. Determination of chromium in treated crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by electrothermal ASS: study of chromium accumulation in different tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, F.; Diaz, J.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.

    1986-06-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of chromium in muscle, hepatopancreas, antennal glands, and gills of Procambarus clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following Cr(VI)-exposure. Determinations of chromium were made by using Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and the standard additions method.

  12. Evaluation of GaAs Schottky gate bipolar transistor (SGBT) by electrothermal simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossin, M.; Johnson, C. M.; Wright, N. G.; O'Neill, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    A GaAs alternative to the Si IGBT, employing an implanted lateral channel in place of the usual MOSFET inversion channel, is proposed. A simplified analytical model shows that the relatively high ratio of electron to hole mobility in GaAs allows much lower anode emitter injection efficiencies to be used without compromising conductivity modulation of the base region. This, in turn, means that a higher proportion of the total device current is carried by electrons. Design strategies for the GaAs SGBT are investigated and applied in the design of an optimised unit cell. The optimised structure is compared with an equivalent Si IGBT structure by means of electrothermal and transient simulation. Electrothermal simulation shows the GaAs device to have useable performance at junction temperatures in excess of 300°C, a feature which is consistent with the wide band-gap of GaAs. Transient simulations show reduced minority carrier tailing effects at both turn-on and turn-off, with initial turn-off tail currents being reduced by a factor of 5 compared to the Si IGBT. The resulting reduction in turn-off loss allows switching frequencies to be increased by a factor of 4 for the same total losses. The excellent switching performance derives from the relatively low proportion of hole current needed to ensure effective conductivity modulation of the structure.

  13. Determination of total magnesium in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulanicki, Adam; Godlewska, Beata; Brzóska, Malgorzata

    1995-11-01

    Magnesium content is an important diagnostic parameter in medicine. It is recognized that its determination in one compartment is not sufficient for reliable information about the magnesium status in the body. In addition to the common procedures of magnesium determination in blood by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, the procedure of electrothermal atomization has also been developed and applied to the analysis of blood fractions, mononuclear cells and isolated nuclei of liver cells. Electrothermal atomization is preferred in cases where the sample size is limited and the magnesium content low. The total errors are in the order of 3-4%. Various techniques of sample pretreatment have been tested and direct dilution with 0.05 mol l -1 nitric acid was optimal when the samples were not mineralized. The calibration graph based on standards containing albumin was found to give the best results, as the form of magnesium in the samples may influence the ashing and atomization processes. Good agreement was obtained for determination of magnesium in standard serum. The results are compared with those obtained by the standard flame atomization technique.

  14. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  15. Ultra-High Temperature ContinuousReactors based on Electro-thermal FluidizedBed Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Sergiy S.; Rohatgi, Upendra Singh; Barsukov, Igor V.; Gubynskyi, Mykhailo V.; Barsukov, Michelle G.; Wells, Brain S.; Livitan, Mykola V.; Gogotsi, Oleksiy G.

    2015-12-08

    This paper presents the results of research and development in high-temperature (i.e. 2,000- 3,000ºС) continuous furnaces operating on the principle of electro-thermal fluidized bed for the purification of recycled, finely sized carbon materials. The basis of this fluidized bed furnace is specific electrical resistance and a new correlation has been developed to predict specific electrical resistance for the natural graphite-based precursors entering the fluidized bed reactor This correlation has been validated with the data from a fully functional pilot furnace whose throughput capacity is 10 kg per hour built as part of this work. Data collected in the course of graphite refining experiments demonstrated that difference between the calculated and measured values of specific electrical resistance of fluidized bed does not exceed 25%. It was concluded that due to chaotic nature of electro-thermal fluidized bed reactors this discrepancy is acceptable. The fluid mechanics of the three types of operating regimes, have been described. The numerical relationships obtained as part of this work allowed proposing an algorithm for selection of technological operational modes with large- scale high-temperature furnaces rated for throughputs of several tons of product per hour. Optimizations proposed now allow producing natural graphite-based end product with the purity level of 99.98+ wt%C which is the key passing criteria for applications in the advanced battery markets.

  16. Ultra-High Temperature ContinuousReactors based on Electro-thermal FluidizedBed Concept

    DOE PAGES

    Fedorov, Sergiy S.; Rohatgi, Upendra Singh; Barsukov, Igor V.; ...

    2015-12-08

    This paper presents the results of research and development in high-temperature (i.e. 2,000- 3,000ºС) continuous furnaces operating on the principle of electro-thermal fluidized bed for the purification of recycled, finely sized carbon materials. The basis of this fluidized bed furnace is specific electrical resistance and a new correlation has been developed to predict specific electrical resistance for the natural graphite-based precursors entering the fluidized bed reactor This correlation has been validated with the data from a fully functional pilot furnace whose throughput capacity is 10 kg per hour built as part of this work. Data collected in the course ofmore » graphite refining experiments demonstrated that difference between the calculated and measured values of specific electrical resistance of fluidized bed does not exceed 25%. It was concluded that due to chaotic nature of electro-thermal fluidized bed reactors this discrepancy is acceptable. The fluid mechanics of the three types of operating regimes, have been described. The numerical relationships obtained as part of this work allowed proposing an algorithm for selection of technological operational modes with large- scale high-temperature furnaces rated for throughputs of several tons of product per hour. Optimizations proposed now allow producing natural graphite-based end product with the purity level of 99.98+ wt%C which is the key passing criteria for applications in the advanced battery markets.« less

  17. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Son, H K; Sivakumar, S; Rood, M J; Kim, B J

    2016-01-15

    Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40-900 ppm(v)) and superficial gas velocity (6.3-9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system.

  18. Water vapor retrieval from OMI visible spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Miller, C. Chan

    2014-01-01

    There are distinct spectral features of water vapor in the wavelength range covered by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) visible channel. Although these features are much weaker than those at longer wavelengths, they can be exploited to retrieve useful information about water vapor. They have an advantage in that their small optical depth leads to fairly simple interpretation as measurements of the total water vapor column density. We have used the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO)'s OMI operational retrieval algorithm to derive the Slant Column Density (SCD) of water vapor from OMI measurements using the 430-480 nm spectral region after extensive optimization of retrieval windows and parameters. The Air Mass Factor (AMF) is calculated using look-up tables of scattering weights and monthly mean water vapor profiles from the GEOS-5 assimilation products. We convert from SCD to Vertical Column Density (VCD) using the AMF and generate associated retrieval averaging kernels and shape factors. Our standard water vapor product has a median SCD of ~ 1.3 × 1023 molecule cm-2 and a median relative uncertainty of ~ 11% in the tropics, about a factor of 2 better than that from a similar OMI algorithm but using narrower retrieval window. The corresponding median VCD is ~ 1.2 × 1023 molecule cm-2. We have also explored the sensitivities to various parameters and compared our results with those from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET).

  19. Vapor generator steam drum spray head

    DOEpatents

    Fasnacht, Jr., Floyd A.

    1978-07-18

    A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and "cooldown" water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure.

  20. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  1. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  2. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  3. In-situ separation of the matrix for the direct determination of traces of chromium, cobalt, and nickel in titanium dioxide powder by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Hu, B; Wang, L; Li, S; Jiang, Z

    2001-10-01

    A novel method has been developed for the direct determination of traces of chromium, cobalt, and nickel in TiO2 powder; it entails slurry sampling and electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) slurry (6% m/v) as fluorinating reagent. The factors which could affect the vaporization of the matrix and analytes were studied in detail; the fluorinating vaporization behavior of the analyte both in the slurry and in solution were also investigated. Owing to the in-situ separation of the matrix, the matrix influences were reduced significantly. The proposed method has been applied to the direct determination of traces of chromium, cobalt, and nickel in high-purity TiO2 powder without chemical pretreatment. Under the optimum experimental conditions the detection limits of the analytes (Cr, Co, and Ni) were 1.9 ng g(-1), 2.4 ng g(-1) and 5.4 ng g(-1), respectively, the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 3.4% (n=6, c=7.0 ng mL(-1)), 2.9% (n=6, c=0.70 ng mL(-1)), and 7.6% (n=6, c=4.0 ng mL(-1)), again respectively, and the characteristic masses for Cr, Co, and Ni were 8.4 pg/ 0.0044A, 9.3 pg/0.0044A, and 40.0 pg/0.0044A, respectively.

  4. Single-Drop Solution Electrode Discharge-Induced Cold Vapor Generation Coupling to Matrix Solid-Phase Dispersion: A Robust Approach for Sensitive Quantification of Total Mercury Distribution in Fish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Lin, Yao; Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Li; Yang, Lu; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2017-02-07

    Sensitive quantification of mercury distribution in fish is challenging because of insufficient sensitivities of conventional analytical methods, the limited mass of organs (tens of micrograms to several milligrams), and dilution of analyte concentration from sample digestion. In this work, a simple and robust approach coupling multiwall carbon nanotubes assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion (MWCNTs-MSPD) to single-drop solution electrode glow discharge-induced cold vapor generation (SD-SEGD-CVG) was developed for the sensitive determination of mercury in limited amount of sample. Mercury species contained in a limited amount of sample can be efficiently extracted into a 100 μL of eluent by MWCNTs-MSPD, which are conveniently converted to Hg(0) by SD-SEGD-CVG and further transported to atomic fluorescence spectrometry for their determination. Therefore, analyte dilution resulted from sample preparation is avoided and sensitivity is significantly improved. On the basis of consumption of 1 mg of sample, a limit of detection of 0.01 μg L(-1) (0.2 pg) was obtained with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 5.2% and 4.6% for 2 and 20 μg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated by analysis of three Certified Reference Materials with satisfying results. To confirm that SD-SEGD-CVG-AFS coupling to MWCNTs-MSPD is a promising method to quantify mercury distribution in fish, this method was successfully applied for the sensitive determination of mercury in seven organs of common carps (muscle, gill, intestine, liver, gallbladder, brain, and eye) after dietary of mercury species. The proposed method provides advantages of minimum sample dilution, low blank, high sample introduction efficiency, high sensitivity, and minimum toxic chemicals and sample consumption.

  5. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  6. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  8. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  9. Vapor core propulsion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Nils J.

    1991-01-01

    Many research issues were addressed. For example, it became obvious that uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is a most preferred fuel over uranium hexafluoride (UF6). UF4 has a very attractive vaporization point (1 atm at 1800 K). Materials compatible with UF4 were looked at, like tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, carbon. It was found that in the molten state, UF4 and uranium attacked most everything, but in the vapor state they are not that bad. Compatible materials were identified for both the liquid and vapor states. A series of analyses were established to determine how the cavity should be designed. A series of experiments were performed to determine the properties of the fluid, including enhancement of the electrical conductivity of the system. CFD's and experimental programs are available that deal with most of the major issues.

  10. Fuel Vaporization Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosque, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effects of fuel-air preparation characteristics on combustor performance and emissions at temperature and pressure ranges representative of actual gas turbine combustors is discussed. The effect of flameholding devices on the vaporization process and NOx formation is discussed. Flameholder blockage and geometry are some of the elements that affect the recirculation zone characteristics and subsequently alter combustion stability, emissions and performance. A water cooled combustor is used as the test rig. Preheated air and Jet A fuel are mixed at the entrance of the apparatus. A vaporization probe is used to determine percentage of vaporization and a gas sample probe to determine concentration of emissions in the exhaust gases. The experimental design is presented and experimental expected results are discussed.

  11. Vapor concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  12. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  13. Vapor transport mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The Raman scattering furnace for investigating vapor transport mechanisms was completed and checked out. Preliminary experiments demonstate that a temperature resolution of plus and minus 5 C is possible with this system operating in a backscatter mode. In the experiments presented with the GeI 4 plus excess Ge system at temperatures up to 600 C, only the GeI4 band at 150 cm superscript minus 1 was observed. Further experiments are in progress to determine if GeI2 does become the major vapor species above 440 C.

  14. Transient Shock Formation of Pulsed Electrothermal Plasma Discharge Confined in an Extended Bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungjin; Kwak, Ho Sang; Park, Joong-Youn

    An electrothermal gun possesses a great potential to be an efficient source of pulsed plasma discharge for nanomaterials production or thermal plasma spray coatings. A plasma discharge by intense pulsed power is numerically studied utilizing time-dependent gas dynamics equations which are solved by FCT (flux-corrected transport) algorithm in two-dimensional domain of the interior capillary bore region and the external region of extended bore. Plasma conditions at the bore exit, mass ablation of polycarbonate bore wall, and degree of ionization are determined at different levels of transient arc current profile. As a way to controlling the plasma discharge, the extended bore at the capillary exit is considered and the flow pattern of pulsed plasma discharge in the extended bore exhibit complex shock structure from slightly to highly underexpanded jet depending on the level of arc current profiles. Flow instability of oscillating Mach disk is found at higher level of arc current profile cases.

  15. A computer model for the recombination zone of a microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filpus, John W.; Hawley, Martin C.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a study of the microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket, a computer model of the flow regime below the plasma has been developed. A second-order model, including axial dispersion of energy and material and boundary conditions at infinite length, was developed to partially reproduce the absence of mass-flow rate dependence that was seen in experimental temperature profiles. To solve the equations of the model, a search technique was developed to find the initial derivatives. On integrating with a trial set of initial derivatives, the values and their derivatives were checked to judge whether the values were likely to attain values outside the practical regime, and hence, the boundary conditions at infinity were likely to be violated. Results are presented and directions for further development are suggested.

  16. Determination of thallium in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after extraction preconcentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetković, Julijana; Arpadjan, Sonja; Karadjova, Irina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2002-06-01

    A simple method for extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) determination of Tl in wine is described. The wine sample is decomposed with a mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and both thallium species Tl(I) and Tl(III) are extracted from 0.5 mol l -1 KI solution into iso-butyl methyl ketone (IBMK). Optimal parameters for ETAAS measurement of the iodide complexes extracted were defined for two different instruments: Perkin Elmer Zeeman 3030 (HGA 600) and Varian SpectrAA-880 (GTA-100). Modifiers of tartaric acid, Pd [ammoniumtetrachloropaladate (II)] or Ag (silver nitrate) were investigated for thermal stabilization of such extremely volatile species as iodide complexes of Tl. The analytical procedure developed permits 50-fold preconcentration and determination of 0.05 μg l -1 Tl in wine. The relative standard deviation ranges from 6 to 12% for the concentration range 0.2-1 μg l -1 Tl in wine.

  17. Depth profiles and bulk analysis of semiconductor materials using ICP mass spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, William; Henderson, William; Rogers, Michael

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of the contract was to build the equipment necessary to show technical feasibility of a Demand Modulated Electrothermal Atomization System. This system was thought to have advantages over current technology as follows: (1) Prevents excessive analyte concentrations in the plasma giving the analyst control over matrix suppression effects. (2) Allows the analyst to control atomization rates and avoid buildup of deposits in the throat of the sample cone opening. (3) Allows the analyst to work in the optimum counting range for isotropic ratio work regardless of concentration variations. (4) Allows the data to be taken over the temperature dimension, thus resolving isobaric interferences as well as improving the signal to noise ratio resulting in improved detection limits across the entire mass range.

  18. Research and Development of Electrothermal Pulsed Plasma Thrusters onboard PROITERES Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Hirokazu; Naka, Masamichi; Takagi, Hiroki; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke

    2010-10-01

    The Project of Osaka Institute of Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship (PROITERES) was started at Osaka Institute of Technology. In PROITERES, a small satellite with electrothermal pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs) will be launched in 2010. The main mission is powered flight of small satellite by electric thruster. This study aims at improvement in performance by changing configuration of PPTs. The total impulse of about 5 Ns was achieved with a Teflon® (poly-tetrafluoroethylene: PTFE) cylindrical discharge room of 9.0 mm in length and 1.0 mm in diameter in 53,000-shot operation with 2.43 J/shot. Finally, the engineering model of the PPT system was developed, and it is under operation as final test.

  19. Elimination of matrix effects in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometric determinations of bismuth in serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Dean, S; Tscherwonyi, P J; Riley, W J

    1992-01-01

    A sensitive and precise electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometric method for determining bismuth concentration is described. Protein precipitation and the use of a palladium modifier reduce the problems of foaming and permit the use of a higher ashing temperature. The detection limit of the assay is 0.9 nmol/L. Total CVs (intra- and interassay) for serum ranged from 3.5% to 15.1% and for urine from 4.8% to 14.5% at concentrations of 60.0 and 6.0 nmol/L, respectively. Analytical recoveries of bismuth added to serum and urine were 102% and 103% over the same range. The method is robust and reproducible and can be accurately calibrated with aqueous standards.

  20. Numerical simulation of an electrothermal deicer pad. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marano, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical simulation is developed to investigate the removal of ice from composite aircraft blades by means of electrothermal deicing. The model considers one dimensional, unsteady state heat transfer in the composite blade-ice body. The heat conduction equations are approximated by using the Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme, and the phase change in the ice layer is handled using the Enthalpy method. To solve the system of equations which result, Gauss-Seidel iteration is used. The simulation computes the temperature profile in the composite blade-ice body, as well as the movement of the ice-water interface, as a function of time. This information can be used to evaluate deicer performance. The simulation can also be used to solve a variety of other heat conduction problems involving composite bodies.

  1. An atomic-absorption spectrometer with an electrothermal atomizer in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Eristavi, V.D; Ivanov, V.K.; Sadagov, Y.M.; Sharashidze, P.A.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes a system for correcting unselective interference. The system enables one to amplify the preparation of specimens of complicated composition, and it increases the accuracy at the expense of only a very slight sensitivity loss. The Zeeman AA spectrometer with electrothermal atomizer is shown and is based on the optical system of an S-302 AA spectrometer. The resonant-radiation sources were VSB-2 electrodeless high-frequency lamps or 1SP-1 hollow-cathode ones supplied with dc. The system for correcting for unselective interference enables one to simplify the preparation of specimens of complicated composition and it increases the accuracy at the expense of only a very slight sensitivity loss.

  2. Slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry as screening method for chromium in compost.

    PubMed

    Laborda, F; Górriz, M P; Castillo, J R

    2004-10-20

    Ultrasonic slurry sample introduction was applied to the determination of total chromium in composted materials by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The effect of grinding on the heterogeneity of the test samples and on the attainable precision was studied. The repeatability was influenced by the heterogeneity of the test samples at the mug-level, the R.S.D. of the measurements being 15%. The reproducibility depended on the heterogeneity of the test sample at the mg level, and it could be improved from 11 to 7% by increasing the grinding time. The characteristic mass was 2.6pg and the detection limit for the optimised procedure at the 0.04% (w/v) slurry concentration, 370ngg(-1). Good agreement with a certified reference material and with the conventional microwave assisted digestion method was found by using external calibration with aqueous standards. The performance of the method for screening purposes was evaluated.

  3. Determination of lead in fish samples by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, S J; Jiang, S J

    2000-08-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (USS-ETAAS) was been applied to the determination of lead in several fish samples. The influences of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the signal were examined. Palladium and ammonium nitrate were used as the modifier to improve the signal. Since the sensitivity to lead in various fish slurries and aqueous solutions was different, the standard additions method was used for the determination of lead in these fish samples. The method was applied to the determination of lead in dogfish muscle reference material (DORM-2) and a swordfish muscle sample purchased from the local market. The analysis results agreed with the reference value. The accuracy was better than 6%. The precision between sample replicates was better than 16% with the USS-ETAAS method. The detection limit of lead estimated from standard additions curve was about 0.053-0.058 microgram g-1 in different samples.

  4. Acceleration of mini-projectiles using a small-caliber electrothermal gun for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    The small-caliber electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS has been used to accelerate mini-projectiles to demonstrate the feasibility of using such guns as a pellet injector for fueling of future fusion reactors. The gun has been modified to accommodate acceleration of plastic projectiles to simulate frozen hydrogenic pellets required to fuel fusion reactors. Barrel sections are equipped with diagnostics for velocity and position of the projectile. The length of the acceleration path could be varied between 15 and 45 cm. The pulse forming network (PFN) can provide up to 100 kJ discharge energy over 0.1 to 1.0 ms pulse duration. The projectile velocities have been measured via a set of break wires. The ODIN code has been modified to account for the projectile mass, acceleration and friction. Plasma parameters compared to code results are discussed in detail.

  5. Technical Transfer Report on a TNT Enzyluminescent Vapor Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Cab NoI@w, Sm 1204. * irpa . VA W041=uOt v bO9th aeard Wed ARe-1a bmA?41" 4li. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE j.REPORT TYPE AND DAME...11 Detector Module .................................................................................... 15 Vapor Generator...Luciferase, Oxidoreductase, and Nitroreductase Assays ............... 1- 15 Appendix J Sample Train Drawings .. Appendix K Vapor Generator Draings

  6. Localized electro-thermal processing: a new route to the patterning of magnetic recording media.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M M; Newman, D M; Sidwell, A; Wears, M L; Wright, C D

    2010-12-17

    Previous reports have detailed the fabrication of media able to support high density magnetic recording in both longitudinal and perpendicular formats by the global rapid thermal processing of sputtered non-magnetic precursor films. During processing in this manner a magnetic element is released from its nitride and agglomerates to form a random near mono-dispersion of magnetic nano-particles. Here we explore, primarily through modelling and simulation, the feasibility of processing similarly formulated precursor media not globally but locally. We investigate the potential of using conducting nano-probe tips to produce, via electro-thermal (Joule) heating, a nano-patterned recording medium in the form of regular arrays of magnetic islands in a non-magnetic host. In the first instance we concentrate on the simplest cobalt based precursor medium for which both initial simulation and experimental studies indicate the formation of magnetic islands with dimensions of the order of the tip diameter; this is relatively straightforward. The results signify that if practical production scenarios can be devised to produce technologically significant areas of recording media by the rapid multi-probe repetition of this technique, then processing in this manner offers a promising route to areal recording densities of perhaps 5 Terabit/in(2) even with the simplest cobalt media. We also note that the electro-thermal processing method is potentially extendable to the production of a wide variety of magnetic materials (e.g. PtCo, FeCo, NiFe alloys) and, applied via electrical nano-imprinting type techniques, to the production of a wide variety of patterned structures.

  7. Lumped-Element Dynamic Electro-Thermal model of a superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaioli, E.; Auchmann, B.; Maciejewski, M.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Verweij, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling accurately electro-thermal transients occurring in a superconducting magnet is challenging. The behavior of the magnet is the result of complex phenomena occurring in distinct physical domains (electrical, magnetic and thermal) at very different spatial and time scales. Combined multi-domain effects significantly affect the dynamic behavior of the system and are to be taken into account in a coherent and consistent model. A new methodology for developing a Lumped-Element Dynamic Electro-Thermal (LEDET) model of a superconducting magnet is presented. This model includes non-linear dynamic effects such as the dependence of the magnet's differential self-inductance on the presence of inter-filament and inter-strand coupling currents in the conductor. These effects are usually not taken into account because superconducting magnets are primarily operated in stationary conditions. However, they often have significant impact on magnet performance, particularly when the magnet is subject to high ramp rates. Following the LEDET method, the complex interdependence between the electro-magnetic and thermal domains can be modeled with three sub-networks of lumped-elements, reproducing the electrical transient in the main magnet circuit, the thermal transient in the coil cross-section, and the electro-magnetic transient of the inter-filament and inter-strand coupling currents in the superconductor. The same simulation environment can simultaneously model macroscopic electrical transients and phenomena at the level of superconducting strands. The model developed is a very useful tool for reproducing and predicting the performance of conventional quench protection systems based on energy extraction and quench heaters, and of the innovative CLIQ protection system as well.

  8. In-bore diagnostic and modeling of an electrothermal plasma launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A diagnostic method has been developed to measure the high heat flux produced in the electrothermal plasma launcher SIRENS. The method involves attaching a thermocouple to the back surface of a target to obtain the temperature history of the back surface, which is a direct indication of the heat flux incident on the front surface. The measured temperature history is an input to a developed one dimensional (1-D), time dependent heat conduction code which uses the temperature history of the back surface to determine the incident heat flux on the front surface of the target. A one dimensional time dependent code, ODIN, was developed to model the plasma formation and flow in electrothermal launchers. ODIN models the plasma formation and flow into the source section and the plasma expansion into and through the barrel section. ODIN models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and equation-of-state. The source and barrel sections were broken into a specific number of cells and each cell was considered to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), with the plasma modeled as a viscous fluid. The primary objective of the numerical simulation was to predict the time and axial variation of the plasma flow and to predict the magnitude of the drag forces acting on the plasma. SIRENS has been operated at atmospheric conditions using a fuse placed between the two electrodes in the source section to initiate the discharge. Three different types of fuses were tested, with the best results obtaining using a thin triangular shaped aluminum fuse. SIRENS has also be used to launch projectiles, with projectile masses ranging from 400 mg to 1500 mg. The maximum velocity obtained was 1.74 km/sec at an input energy of 2.5 kJ, using a 540 mg Lexan projectile with an efficiency of 33%.

  9. In-Bore Diagnostic and Modeling of AN Electrothermal Plasma Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jeffery Dale

    A diagnostic method has been developed to measure the high heat flux produced in the electrothermal plasma launcher SIRENS. The method involves attaching a thermocouple to the back surface of a target to obtain the temperature history of the back surface, which is a direct indication of the heat flux incident on the front surface. The measured temperature history is an input to a developed one dimensional (1-D), time dependent heat conduction code which uses the temperature history of the back surface to determine the incident heat flux on the front surface of the target. A one dimensional time dependent code, ODIN, was developed to model the plasma formation and flow in electrothermal launchers. ODIN models the plasma formation and flow in the source section and the plasma expansion into and through the barrel section. ODIN models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and equation-of-state. The source and barrel sections were broken into a specific number of cells and each cell was considered to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), with the plasma modeled as a viscous fluid. The primary objective of the numerical simulation was to predict the time and axial variation of the plasma flow and to predict the magnitude of the drag forces acting on the plasma. SIRENS has been operated at atmospheric conditions using a fuse placed between the two electrodes in the source section to initiate the discharge. Three different types of fuses were tested, with the best results obtained using a thin triangular shaped aluminum fuse. SIRENS has also been used to launch projectiles, with projectile masses ranging from 400 mg to 1500 mg. The maximum velocity obtained was 1.74 km/sec at an input energy of 2.5 kJ, using a 540 mg Lexan projectile with an efficiency of 33%.

  10. BTSC VAPOR INSTRUSION PRIMER "VAPOR INTRUSION CONSIDERATION FOR REDEVELOPMENT"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This primer is designed for brownfields stakeholders concerned about vapor intrusion, including property owners, real estate developers, and contractors performing environmental site investigations. It provides an overview of the vapor intrusion issue and how it can impact the ap...

  11. Effect of Increased Water Vapor Levels on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Garner, George Walter; Lowe, Tracie M; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased water vapor levels on thermal barrier coating (TBC) lifetime, furnace cycle tests were performed at 1150 C in air with 10 vol.% water vapor (similar to natural gas combustion) and 90 vol.%. Either Pt diffusion or Pt-modified aluminide bond coatings were applied to specimens from the same batch of a commercial second-generation single-crystal superalloy and commercial vapor-deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats were applied. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure to compare the average lifetimes obtained in dry O{sub 2}, using the same superalloy batch and coating types. Average lifetimes with Pt diffusion coatings were unaffected by the addition of water vapor. In contrast, the average lifetime of Pt-modified aluminide coatings was reduced by more than 50% with 10% water vapor but only slightly reduced by 90% water vapor. Based on roughness measurements from similar specimens without a YSZ coating, the addition of 10% water vapor increased the rate of coating roughening more than 90% water vapor. Qualitatively, the amount of {beta}-phase depletion in the coatings exposed in 10% water vapor did not appear to be accelerated.

  12. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  13. Water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, R.; Mcilrath, T.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of measuring atmospheric water vapor by means of a tunable lidar operated from the space shuttle. The specific method evaluated was differential absorption, a two-color method in which the atmospheric path of interest is traversed by two laser pulses. Results are reported.

  14. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  15. Sorption and modeling of mass transfer of toxic chemical vapors in activated-carbon fiber-cloth adsorbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Sagen, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorber coupled with an electrothermal regenerator and a cryogenic condenser was designed and developed to efficiently capture and recover toxic chemical vapors (TCVs) from simulated industrial gas streams. The system was characterized for adsorption by ACFC, electrothermal desorption, and cryogenic condensation to separate acetone and methyl ethyl ketone from gas streams. Adsorption dynamics are numerically modeled to predict system characteristics during scale-up and optimization of the process in the future. The model requires diffusivities of TCVs into an activated-carbon fiber (ACF) as an input. Effective diffusivities of TCVs into ACFs were modeled as a function of temperature, concentration, and pore size distribution. Effective diffusivities for acetone at 65 ??C and 30-60 ppmv were measured using a chromatography method. The energy factor for surface diffusion was determined from comparison between the experimental and modeled effective diffusivities. The modeled effective diffusivities were used in a dispersive computational model to predict mass transfer zones of TCVs in fixed beds of ACFC under realistic conditions for industrial applications.

  16. Electro-thermally polarized bulk and coated hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics---Understanding the role of surface charge, wettability and dopants on physical, mechanical and biological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodhak, Subhadip

    2010-11-01

    on cell-materials interactions. Protein study results confirmed that higher adsorption and better structural stability of fibronectin protein led to superior cell-materials interactions on negatively charged binary doped HAp surfaces over undoped HAp. Overall, the present research findings demonstrated the potency of developing electro-thermally polarized HAp ceramics which can provide a new basis for the development of a new generation of HAp based implants that can promote faster healing.

  17. Competition between Induced-Charge Electro-Osmosis and Electrothermal Effects at Low Frequencies around a Weakly Polarizable Microchannel Corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehavi, Matan; Boymelgreen, Alicia; Yossifon, Gilad

    2016-04-01

    Sharp corners are an inherent component of most planar microfluidic systems, and thus their influence on flow within the microchannel is of significant interest. Here, we demonstrate that in electrokinetically driven devices, the presence of a sharp corner may result in localized vortices due to nonlinear induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) and/or electrothermal forces. Application of an alternating-current electric field enables quantification of the nonlinear ICEO ejection-flow effect by isolating it from linear electro-osmotic background flow which is present under dc forcing. The hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of a sharp channel corner is analyzed using experimental micro-particle-image-velocimetry and numerical simulations for different buffer concentrations, frequencies, and applied voltages. Divergence from the purely ICEO flow with increasing buffer conductivity is shown to be a result of increasing electrothermal effects due to Joule heating.

  18. BioVapor Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    General background on modeling and specifics of modeling vapor intrusion are given. Three classical model applications are described and related to the problem of petroleum vapor intrusion. These indicate the need for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. Evaluation of Bi...

  19. Performance of a Hydrogen Pulsed Electrothermal Thruster. Strategic Defense Initiative Organization Innovative Science and Technology. SBIR. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-28

    chemically and stay within the shuttle payload limit . In this case a high Isp electric system can be used to achieve orbit transfer and minimize propellant...electrothermal thruster consists of three major elements: A. Calculation of discharge parameters and pulse forming network. B. Calculation of exhaust conditions...and Ideal Performance Calculation of discharge parameters and pulse forming network follows a zero-D model used successfully at GT-Devices [4-6

  20. Metal vapor lasers with increased reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Sabotinov, N. V.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Shumeiko, A. S.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    Results of investigation and development of an excitation pulse generator with magnetic pulse compression by saturation chokes for pumping of active media of CuBr, Sr, and Ca vapor lasers are presented. A high-power IGBT transistor is used as a commutator. The generator can operate at excitation pulse repetition frequencies up to 20 kHz. The total average power for all laser lines of the CuBr laser pumped by this generator is ~6.0 W; it is ~1.3-1.7 W for the Sr and Ca lasers.

  1. Vapor-liquid equilibria from the triple point up to the critical point for the new generation of TIP4P-like models: TIP4P/Ew, TIP4P/2005, and TIP4P/ice.

    PubMed

    Vega, C; Abascal, J L F; Nezbeda, I

    2006-07-21

    The vapor-liquid equilibria of three recently proposed water models have been computed using Gibbs-Duhem simulations. These models are TIP4P/Ew, TIP4P/2005, and TIP4P/ice and can be considered as modified versions of the TIP4P model. By design TIP4P reproduces the vaporization enthalpy of water at room temperature, whereas TIP4P/Ew and TIP4P/2005 match the temperature of maximum density and TIP4P/ice the melting temperature of water. Recently, the melting point for each of these models has been computed, making it possible for the first time to compute the complete vapor-liquid equilibria curve from the triple point to the critical point. From the coexistence results at high temperature, it is possible to estimate the critical properties of these models. None of them is capable of reproducing accurately the critical pressure or the vapor pressures and densities. Additionally, in the cases of TIP4P and TIP4P/ice the critical temperatures are too low and too high, respectively, compared to the experimental value. However, models accounting for the density maximum of water, such as TIP4P/Ew and TIP4P/2005 provide a better estimate of the critical temperature. In particular, TIP4P/2005 provides a critical temperature just 7 K below the experimental result as well as an extraordinarily good description of the liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. All TIP4P-like models present a ratio of the triple point temperature to the critical point temperature of about 0.39, compared with the experimental value of 0.42. As is the case for any effective potential neglecting many body forces, TIP4P/2005 fails in describing simultaneously the vapor and the liquid phases of water. However, it can be considered as one of the best effective potentials of water for describing condensed phases, both liquid and solid. In fact, it provides a completely coherent view of the phase diagram of water including fluid-solid, solid-solid, and vapor-liquid equilibria.

  2. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  3. Characterization of Bioeffects on Endothelial Cells under Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    PubMed

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2015-12-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization, which results in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events, resulting in cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was subjected to acoustic droplet vaporization using a 3.5-MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional) and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The bubble cloud generated was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application.

  4. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study.

  5. Effects of capillarity and vapor adsorption in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs in natural (undisturbed) conditions contain water as both vapor and liquid phases. The most compelling evidence for the presence of distributed liquid water is the observation that vapor pressures in these systems are close to saturated vapor pressure for measured reservoir temperatures (White et al., 1971; Truesdell and White, 1973). Analysis of natural heat flow conditions provides additional, indirect evidence for the ubiquitous presence of liquid. From an analysis of the heat pipe process (vapor-liquid counterflow) Preuss (1985) inferred that effective vertical permeability to liquid phase in vapor-dominated reservoirs is approximately 10{sup 17} m{sup 2}, for a heat flux of 1 W/m{sup 2}. This value appears to be at the high end of matrix permeabilities of unfractured rocks at The Geysers, suggesting that at least the smaller fractures contribute to liquid permeability. For liquid to be mobile in fractures, the rock matrix must be essentially completely liquid-saturated, because otherwise liquid phase would be sucked from the fractures into the matrix by capillary force. Large water saturation in the matrix, well above the irreducible saturation of perhaps 30%, has been shown to be compatible with production of superheated steam (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1982). In response to fluid production the liquid phase will boil, with heat of vaporization supplied by the reservoir rocks. As reservoir temperatures decline reservoir pressures will decline also. For depletion of ''bulk'' liquid, the pressure would decline along the saturated vapor pressure curve, while for liquid held by capillary and adsorptive forces inside porous media, an additional decline will arise from ''vapor pressure lowering''. Capillary pressure and vapor adsorption effects, and associated vapor pressure lowering phenomena, have received considerable attention in the geothermal literature, and also in studies related to geologic disposal of heat generating

  6. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  7. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  8. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  9. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  10. Passive vapor transport solar heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In the systems under consideration, refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed in thermal storage for space or water heating located within the building at a level below that of the collector. Condensed liquid is lifted to an accumulator above the collector by the vapor pressure generated in the collector. Tests of two systems are described, and it is concluded that one of these systems offers distinct advantages.

  11. An investigation of vapor concentration during boiling of liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Utaka, Yoshio; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Tsuboi, Takao

    1999-07-01

    The objective of the study is to clarify experimentally the variation of the vapor concentration of binary mixture generated during nucleate boiling in a saturated pool under various boiling conditions. The generated vapor concentrations in the bulk vapor layer were measured for the binary mixtures of water-ethanol and ethanol-acetone under various liquid concentrations, the heat fluxes and the liquid layer heights from the heated thin wires at the atmospheric pressure. The main experimental apparatus for measuring concentration of bulk vapor in the boiling and condensation system is shown. Two methods of measuring concentration, i.e., the dew point method and the laser absorption method were adopted. The dew point measurement was carried out by utilizing the copper heat transfer block installed in the central part of the vapor layer in the vessel. The commencement of the condensation was observed directly for determining the dew point by controlling its temperature. The laser light having wavelength of 3.39 micron meters was used for the laser light absorption method utilizing its absorptive property against ethanol vapor. The measured results by using both methods coincided well with each other. The measured concentrations of the bulk vapor for various superheatings of heated wires, the depth of liquid mixture layer and liquid concentrations were almost independent of those parameters and were almost in equilibrium with bulk liquid conditions even under the higher surface superheating and the lower liquid heights.

  12. Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles

    DOEpatents

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2005-04-19

    An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

  13. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  14. Effect of Salt Additives to Water on the Severity of Vapor Explosions and on the Collapse of Vapor Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takahiro; Furuya, Masahiro

    We proposed ultra rapid solidification and atomization technique, CANOPUS (Cooling and Atomizing based on NOble Process Utilizing Steam explosion), using small-scale vapor explosions to make an amorphous metal. The CANOPUS method is suitable for rapid cooling and atomization process, which utilizing sustainable small-scale vapor explosions. In order to apply the CANOPUS method to a high melting point metal, it is necessary to make a small-scale vapor explosion occur at a high temperature of the molten metal. Small-scale experiment is conducted to develop the vapor explosion promotor in which spontaneous vapor explosion can occur at a high temperature of a molten metal. Spontaneous vapor explosion do not occur when water at 80°C is used as a coolant. However, spontaneous vapor explosion occurs when water at 80°C with salt additives is used as a coolant. Specifically, lithium chloride solution generates spontaneous vapor explosions at the highest temperature of the molten tin in the experiment. In order to clarify the triggering mechanism of the spontaneous vapor explosion when the promotor is used as a coolant, a high-temperature solid stainless steel sphere is immersed into a coolant. The interfacial temperature of the stainless steel sphere is measured, and the behavior of a vapor film around the stainless steel sphere is observed with a digital video camera. As a result, salt additives resulted in an increase of quench temperature in all salt solutions. The quenching curves of each coolant indicate that the salt additives improve the film boiling heat transfer. The improvement of the film boiling heat transfer causes an unstable formation of the vapor film and a rise of the quench temperature. It is clarified that the salt additives to water promotes a vapor film collapse. Comparing two experiments, the quench temperature of each solution is in close agreement with the upper limit of the molten tin temperature that causes spontaneous vapor explosion. This

  15. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  16. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-13

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  17. Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    surface roughness. 0.9 0.8 p0.7 0.6 0.5 C0.4 0.3 0.2- 0.1- 0-. 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 frequency (cm-1) Figure 10. Transmission spectrum of CVD...significantly less than one micrometer. The resultant films show root-mean- squared surface roughnesses -0.02 pm as long as the film thickness is not much... Derjaguin , B.V., Vapor Growth of Diamond on Diamond and Other Surfaces , J. Cryst. Growth 52:219-226 (1981); Spitsyn, B.V., The State of the Art in

  18. Vapor Pressure of GB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    EDGEWOOD CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL CENTER U.S. ARMY RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING COMMAND ECBC-TR-686 VAPOR PRESSURE OF GB James H. Buchanan...275 °C under a flow rate of 20 seem UHP -grade helium for 5 min and transferred to the ACEM 900 tenax focusing trap maintained at 40 °C. Transfer...a flow rate of 8.0 seem UHP grade helium for 5 min to affect sample transfer to the gas chromatographic column. The 15 m x 0.53 mm i.d. fused silica

  19. Hydrazine-Vapor Samplers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca; Mcbrearty, Charles; Curran, Dan; Leavitt, Nilgun

    1994-01-01

    Active sampling unit capable of detecting hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine vapors at levels as low as 10 ppb in air developed. Includes detachable badge holder and pump which draws air through badge holder at selectable rate of 1 or 2 L/min. Coated strip in each badge designed to align with air passage in badge holder. Two types of badge holders constructed: one has open-face design for general monitoring of air in open spaces, while other has closed-face design with viewing window and intended for sampling through small openings to detect leaks.

  20. Sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vapor generation device coupled with anion exchange chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for speciation analysis of selenium species in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-ni; Lin, Cheng-hsing; Hsu, I-hsiang; Sun, Yuh-chang

    2014-01-02

    We have developed an on-line sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vaporization device (SPADVD), which operates through the nano-TiO2-catalyzed photo-oxidation and reduction of selenium (Se) species, for coupling between anion exchange chromatography (LC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) systems to provide a simple and sensitive hyphenated method for the speciation analysis of Se species without the need for conventional chemical digestion and vaporization techniques. Because our proposed on-line SPADVD allows both organic and inorganic Se species in the column effluent to be converted on-line into volatile Se products, which are then measured directly through ICP-MS, the complexity of the procedure and the probability of contamination arising from the use of additional chemicals are both low. Under the optimized conditions for SPADVD - using 1g of nano-TiO2 per liter, at pH 3, and illuminating for 80 s - we found that Se(IV), Se(VI), and selenomethionine (SeMet) were all converted quantitatively into volatile Se products. In addition, because the digestion and vaporization efficiencies of all the tested selenicals were improved when using our proposed on-line LC/SPADVD/ICP-MS system, the detection limits for Se(IV), Se(VI), and SeMet were all in the nanogram-per-liter range (based on 3σ). A series of validation experiments - analysis of neat and spiked extracted samples - indicated that our proposed methods could be applied satisfactorily to the speciation analysis of organic and inorganic Se species in the extracts of Se-enriched supplements.

  1. Experimental Investigation of the Electrothermal Instability on Planar Foil Ablation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Adam; Patel, Sonal; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2014-10-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) is an important early-time physical effect on pulsed power foil ablation experiments due to its ability to seed the destructive magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. ETI occurs whenever electrical resistivity has temperature dependence; when resistivity increases with temperature, as with solid metal liners or foils, ETI forms striation structures perpendicular to current flow. These striations provide an initial perturbation for the MRT instability, which is the dominant late-time instability in planar foil ablations. The MAIZE linear transformer driver was used to drive current pulses of approximately 600 kA into 400 nm-thick aluminum foils in order to study ETI in planar geometry. Shadowgraph images of the aluminum plasmas were taken for multiple shots at various times within approximately 50 ns of current start. Fourier analysis extracted the approximate wavelengths of the instability structures on the plasma-vacuum interface. Surface metrology of pre-shot foils was performed to provide a comparison between surface roughness features and resulting plasma structure. This work was supported by US DoE. S.G. Patel and A.M. Steiner supported by NPSC funded by Sandia. D.A. Yager supported by NSF fellowship Grant # DGE 1256260.

  2. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huang Mao; Krivan, Viliam; Welz, Bernhard; Schlemmer, Gerhard

    1997-10-01

    A slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for the determination of Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl and Zn in powdered titanium dioxide is described. The behaviour of the titanium matrix in the atomizer and its interferences with the determination of Al, Fe, Co, Ni and Mn were studied. A tungsten carbide modified graphite tube was used to improve the signal shape and the repeatability for the determination of Fe. For all elements, except for Cd and Pb, quantification by a calibration curve established with aqueous standards was possible. No chemical modifier was used throughout in order to minimize contamination. For the contamination risk elements such as Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na and Zn, the slurry sampling technique allows to achieve limits of detection (3 σ of the blank) 5-20 times lower than the solution technique, resulting for these elements in values of 1, 3, 0.5, 0.5, 0.9 and 2 ng g -1, respectively, and, generally being in the range of 0.2 ng g -1 (Cd) to 10 ng g -1 (Al and Tl). The results obtained by the slurry sampling technique are compared with those of other independent methods including four solution methods and neutron activation analysis.

  3. A Novel MUMPs-compatible single-layer out-of-plane electrothermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Weider; Wu, Mingching; Ho, Yi-Ping; Yeh, Mau-Shium; Fang, Weileun

    2002-11-01

    Microactuator is one of the key components for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and it can be categorized as out-of-plane and in-plane according to the motion types. Most of the existing out-of-plane thermal actuators are multi-layer structures. In this paper, a novel electrothermal single-layer out-of-plane actuator is provided and it characteristics and advantages of this device are stated as follows: (1) This actuator is consisted of only a single thin film material, therefore, it can prevent from delaminating after a long-term operation. Besides, owing to its symmetric geometric design, the inner-beams of this structure don"t have any current passed through them and the inner-beams also provide a geometric constraint to allow the two free ends of the structure to bend upwards symmetrically. (2) This device can be operated at a relative low voltage (<5 volt), and deflected upwards about 4 μm in the experiment test. Besides, the fabrication process is very simple and it is MUMPs(Multi-User MEMS Processes)-compatible. Presently, a prototype structure has been successfully fabricated and tested. This structure offers the potential applications in the adaptive optics systems, and Fabry-Perot filters, etc. Besides, it also provides an interface to cooperate with integrated circuits (IC) and various optical elements to construct an embedded-control optical system.

  4. Determination of selenium in human spermatozoa and prostasomes using base digestion and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Suistomaa, U; Saaranen, M; Vanha-Perttula, T

    1987-10-15

    A method for the determination of selenium in human spermatozoa and prostasomes is described. The samples were digested with 25% (w/v) tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in methanol and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization and Zeeman background correction (ET-AAS). Nickel was used as a matrix modifier. Calibration was performed using the matrix-based calibration curve. The TMAH-digestion method agreed well with a conventional digestion procedure using concentrated nitric acid. The TMAH-digestion does not require heating or strong acids and it was suitable for small biological samples. The average recovery of added selenium in spermatozoan digests was 95.1 +/- 5.2% (n = 5). The coefficient of variation was 9.1% (n = 21). The accuracy of the method tested with the NBS standard 1577 (bovine liver, certified at 1.1 +/- 0.1 micrograms Se/g) resulted in a value of 0.98 +/- 0.10 micrograms Se/g (n = 16). The method was further tested in an interlaboratory comparison study.

  5. Model-Based Angular Scan Error Correction of an Electrothermally-Actuated MEMS Mirror.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Dacheng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Qiao; Xie, Huikai; Li, Suiqiong

    2015-12-10

    In this paper, the actuation behavior of a two-axis electrothermal MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) mirror typically used in miniature optical scanning probes and optical switches is investigated. The MEMS mirror consists of four thermal bimorph actuators symmetrically located at the four sides of a central mirror plate. Experiments show that an actuation characteristics difference of as much as 4.0% exists among the four actuators due to process variations, which leads to an average angular scan error of 0.03°. A mathematical model between the actuator input voltage and the mirror-plate position has been developed to predict the actuation behavior of the mirror. It is a four-input, four-output model that takes into account the thermal-mechanical coupling and the differences among the four actuators; the vertical positions of the ends of the four actuators are also monitored. Based on this model, an open-loop control method is established to achieve accurate angular scanning. This model-based open loop control has been experimentally verified and is useful for the accurate control of the mirror. With this control method, the precise actuation of the mirror solely depends on the model prediction and does not need the real-time mirror position monitoring and feedback, greatly simplifying the MEMS control system.

  6. Nonlinear effects in transient electrothermal characterization of anatase TiO2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuhui; Huang, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-04-01

    As an effective transient thermal characterization technique, the transient electrothermal (TET) technique features a capability of measuring micro/nanoscale samples of diverse electrical conducting natures. In this work, single anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanowires fabricated using the electrospinning method are characterized using the TET technique. Time-dependent nonlinear effect is observed for both rise and fall stages in the voltage-time (U-t) response profile. The coated iridium film and soldered platinum pads possibly compromise the linear Ohmic effect and introduce undesired effects into the whole system. Two quantitative methods: generalized function analysis and direct capacitance derivation, are developed to suppress the nonlinear effect based on U-t profiles. Data processing is performed to determine the thermal diffusivity using global fitting under non-constant electrical heating. The effective thermal diffusivities from modified analysis processes stay in the range from 2 to 6 × 10-6 m2/s. The results from both methods agree well with each other. The general function analysis method is also applicable for samples of short time thermal transport or for an experimental instrument that has relatively long rise time.

  7. Proposed system design for a 20 kW pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hilko, B. K.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a Pulsed Electrothermal (PET) propulsion system for the Air Force Space Based Radar satellite, which has a mass of 7000 kg. The proposed system boosts the SBR satellite from 150 n.m. to 600 n.m. with a 4 deg plane change, for a total mission Delta v of 1 km/sec. Satellite power available is 50 kW, and 45 kW are used to drive two water-injected 20 kW PET thrusters, delivering 5.6 N thrust to the SBR at 1000 seconds specific impulse. The predicted mission trip time is 15 days. The proposed system consumes 850 kg of water propellant, stored in a central tank and injected with pressurized helium. Component mass estimates based on space-qualified hardware are presented for the propellant handling, power conditioning and thruster subsystems. The estimated total mass is 400 kg and the propulsion system specific mass is alpha = 10 kg/kW. The proposed system efficiency of 0.62 at 1000 seconds specific impulse is supported by experimental performance measurements.

  8. Determination of Mo and V in multiphase gasoline emulsions by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana Sodré dos Santos, Denilson; Paixão Teixeira, Alete; das Graças Andrade Korn, Maria; Sena Gomes Teixeira, Leonardo

    2006-05-01

    This paper proposes an alternative analytical method using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry to determine Mo and V in multiphase gasoline emulsions. Samples were prepared by mixing gasoline with a nitric acid solution (0.1% v/v) and two cationic surfactants. The mixture was sonicated, resulting in an emulsive system. Calibration was done by using the aforementioned solutions with added analyte. The detection limits (3 σ) of Mo and V were 0.9 μg l - 1 and 4.7 μg l - 1 , respectively. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method were evaluated by the analysis of samples spiked with metallo-organic standard and the relative standard deviation obtained ranged from 1.2% to 4.4% in samples spiked with 2 μg l - 1 of each metal. The recovery rates varied from 91.2% to 101.6%. The proposed method was applied to determine Mo and V in samples of gasoline from different gas stations.

  9. Electro-Thermal Model of Threshold Switching in TaOx-Based Devices.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Jonathan M; Sharma, Abhishek A; Li, Dasheng; Bain, James A; Skowronski, Marek

    2017-04-05

    Pulsed and quasi-static current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of threshold switching in TiN/TaOx/TiN crossbar devices were measured as a function of stage temperature (200-495 K) and oxygen flow during the deposition of TaOx. A comparison of the pulsed and quasi-static characteristics in the high resistance part of the I-V revealed that Joule self-heating significantly affected the current and was a likely source of negative differential resistance (NDR) and thermal runaway. The experimental quasi-static I-V's were simulated using a finite element electro-thermal model that coupled current and heat flow and incorporated an external circuit with an appropriate load resistor. The simulation reproduced the experimental I-V including the OFF-state at low currents and the volatile NDR region. In the NDR region, the simulation predicted spontaneous current constriction forming a small-diameter hot conducting filament with a radius of 250 nm in a 6 μm diameter device.

  10. Preliminary investigation of high power microwave plasmas for electrothermal thruster use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, John L.; Sullivan, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported from preliminary tests to evaluate the high power microwave electrothermal thruster (MET) concept, which employs a free-floating plasma discharge maintained by applied CW microwave power to heat a propellant gas flow. Stable plasmas have been created and maintained in helium (He), nitrogen (N2), and hydrogen (H2) as propellants in both the TM(sub 011) and TM(sub 012) modes at discharge pressures from 10 Pa to 69 kPa. Reproducible starting conditions of pressure and power have been documented for all the plasmas. Vortical inflow of the propellant gas was observed to cause the formation of on-axis 'spike' plasmas. The formation and unformation conditions of these plasmas were studied. Operation in the spike plasma condition enables maximum power absorption with minimum wall heating and offers maximum efficiency in heating the propellant gas. In the spike condition, plasmas of the three propellant gases were investigated in an open channel configuration to a maximum applied power level of 11.2 kW (in N2). Microwave power coupling efficiencies of over 90 percent were routinely obtained at absorbed power levels up to 2 kW. Magnetic nozzle effects were investigated with a superconducting solenoid Al magnet applying a high magnetic field to the plasmas in and exiting from the discharge tube.

  11. An analytical model for nanoscale electrothermal probe recording on phase-change media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Mustafa M.; Wright, C. David

    2006-02-01

    Scanning probe memories are now emerging as a means of achieving nanoscale resolution data storage. The use of microscopic conductive tips in contact with a phase-change material to record data as amorphous and crystalline marks is one such approach, making use of the large difference in electrical conductivity between the two phases to distinguish between two binary states on replay and hence provide a memory function. The writing process is complex and involves electronic, thermal, and phase-change processes that are difficult to model and study except using numerical techniques. A simplified analytical model of electrothermal writing by probe on a basic two-layer phase-change structure is developed here, and used to predict the required voltage levels for recording and the expected diameters of recorded crystalline and amorphous marks. A simplified model of cooling and solidification was also developed to study the cooling rates during amorphization. The predictions are shown to be in agreement with published experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The developed analytical models were extended to investigate the effects of introducing coating layers on recording voltage levels, to study the depth profiles of recorded marks, and to derive expressions for the capacitance and resistance of the phase-change layer that contribute to the transient behavior of the recording system.

  12. Atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials by use of electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, E.Y.; Simon, F.O.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials, that utilizes electrothermal atomization after a separation by solvent extraction. Samples are decomposed with hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid in Teflon-lined pressure decomposition vessels. Beryllium is isolated by its extraction as beryllium acetylacetonate at pH 8 into xylene and back-extraction in 3M hydrochloric acid. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. Four subsamples from four bottles of each standard sample were analysed in random order. The mean beryllium contents (ppm) are: AGV-1, 1.98; PCC-1, 0.024; MAG-1, 2.84; BHVO-1, 0.90; DTS-1, 0.026; SCo-1, 1.74; SDC-1, 2.52; BCR-1, 1.44; GSP-1, 1.22; SGR-1, 0.86; QLO-1, 1.83; RGM-1, 2.21; STM-1, 8.75; G-2, 2.29. An analysis of variance shows that all the samples may be considered homogeneous at F0.95 except AGV-1 and DTS-1 which may be considered homogeneous at F0.99. ?? 1978.

  13. Determination of silicon in serum and urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhuo-er

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and accurate method for the routine determination of trace silicon in serum and urine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The samples are directly determined after 20-fold dilution of serum and 100-fold dilution of urine. No L'vov platform is used. The signal enhancement of silicon atomization in pyrolytic graphite coated graphite tubes is achieved by using a mixture of calcium chloride and lanthanum nitrate as chemical modifier. The interferences arising from the biological matrices have been eliminated by the addition of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate in the sample solutions. The aqueous calibration curve is linear to at least 300 μg l -1, the characteristic mass is 37 pg (integrated absorbance signal), whereas the detection limit (3SD) is 1.5 μg l -1 for silicon in both diluted serum and urine samples. The recoveries of silicon added to the diluted samples are 101 ± 1.8% for sera and 98.2 ± 3.5% for the urine specimens, independent of the dilution ratio. The silicon measurement results for the serum and urine from healthy adults and for the serum from the patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis are presented.

  14. An Electrothermal Plasma Source Developed for Simulation of Transient Heat Loads in Future Large Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhart, Trey; Baylor, Larry; Winfrey, Leigh

    2016-10-01

    The realization of fusion energy requires materials that can withstand high heat and particle fluxes at the plasma material interface. In this work, an electrothermal (ET) plasma source has been designed as a possible transient heat flux source for a linear plasma material interaction device. An ET plasma source operates in the ablative arc regime, which is driven by a DC capacitive discharge. The current travels through the 4mm bore of a boron nitride liner and subsequently ablates and ionizes the liner material. This results in a high density plasma with a large unidirectional bulk flow out of the source exit. The pulse length for the ET source has been optimized using a pulse forming network to have a duration of 1ms at full-width half maximum. The peak currents and maximum source energies seen in this system are 2kA and 5kJ. The goal of this work is to show that the ET source produces electron densities and heat fluxes that are comparable to transient events in future large magnetic confinement fusion devices. Heat flux, plasma temperature, and plasma density were determined for each test shot using infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy techniques. This work will compare the ET source output (heat flux, temperature, and density) with and without an applied magnetic field. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  15. Gold in natural water: A method of determination by solvent extraction and electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed using electrothermal atomization to effectively determine the amount of gold in natural water within the nanogram range. The method has four basic steps: (1) evaporating a 1-L sample; (2) putting it in hydrobromic acid-bromine solution; (3) extracting the sample with methyl-isobutyl-ketone; and (4) determining the amount of gold using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The limit of detection is 0.001 ??g gold per liter. Results from three studies indicate, respectively, that the method is precise, effective, and free of interference. Specifically, a precision study indicates that the method has a relative standard deviation of 16-18%; a recovery study indicates that the method recovers gold at an average of 93%; and an interference study indicates that the interference effects are eliminated with solvent extraction and background correction techniques. Application of the method to water samples collected from 41 sites throughout the Western United States and Alaska shows a gold concentration range of < 0.001 to 0.036 ??g gold per liter, with an average of 0.005 ??g/L. ?? 1984.

  16. Experimentation in the low-density plume of a simulated electrothermal thruster for computer code validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Dana L.

    1993-01-01

    Pressures and flow angles are measured in the plume of a 20 deg half-angle, conical nozzle in vacuum with Pitot tubes and conical probes. The area of measurement in the plume ranges from the nozzle exit plane to 480 mm axially downstream and from the plume centerline to 60 mm radially. The nozzle has an exit-to-throat area ratio of 100:1 and a throat diameter of 3.2 mm. The nozzle flow exhausts to a vacuum of order 10(exp -2) Pa to simulate a resistojet (an electrothermal rocket of less than 1 N of thrust) operating in space. Experimental data are given for flows of nitrogen at 55 and 68 mg/s, stagnation temperatures between 695 and 921 K, and stagnation pressures ranging from 5600 to 7100 Pa. Data are also given for argon at a rate of 68 mg/s, a stagnation temperature of 648 K, and stagnation pressures of 4500, 4750, and 4770 Pa. Measurements in the nitrogen plume are compared with computational results from a direct-simulation Monte Carlo method.

  17. Electrothermal atomic-absorption determination of silver in zinc and cadmium selenides

    SciTech Connect

    Khozhainov, Yu.M.; Dolova, N.K.

    1987-10-01

    An atomic-absorption signal is dependent on the chemical forms of the test element and matrix in the solution as well as on the processes during electrothermal atomization. The authors have examined the absorption due to silver with a Saturn-2 spectrophotometer with such atomization; the authors used the 328.1 nm line (i = 10 mA, slit width 0.15, time-constant 0.6 sec). The presence of cadmium and zinc was monitored from the 326.1 and 213.8 nm lines respectively. The measurements were made in argon. The internal gas flow was turned off during the atomization. The graphite was used until there were sharp changes in the silver absorption due to change in the structure of the graphite and occurrence of the memory effect. The results from over 100 specimens of cadmium selenide films analyzed for silver showed that the results were in full agreement with the conditions for silver activation (time, temperature, and activator mass).

  18. Flow sensing by buckling monitoring of electrothermally actuated double-clamped micro beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Y.; Krylov, S.; Liberzon, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a flow sensing approach based on deflection monitoring of a micro beam buckled by the compressive thermal stress due to electrothermal Joule's heating. The air stream, convectively cooling the device, affects both the critical buckling values of the electric current and the postbuckling deflections of the structure. After calibration, the flow velocity can be obtained from the deflection measurements. The quasi-static responses of 1000 μm and 2000 μm long, 10 μm wide, and 30 μm high single crystal silicon beams were consistent with the prediction of the model, which couples thermoelectric, thermofluidic, and structural domains. The deflection sensitivity of up to 1.5 μm/(m/s) and the critical current sensitivity of up to 0.43 mA/(m/s) were registered in the experiments. Our model and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the sensing approach and further suggest that simple, robust, and potentially downscalable beam-type devices may have use in flow velocity and wall shear stress sensors.

  19. Column preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of rhodium in some food and standard samples.

    PubMed

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Pourmohammad, Fatemeh; Fazelirad, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium after adsorption of its 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol/tetraphenylborate ion associated complex at the surface of alumina. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the pH, type of eluent, sample and eluent flow rates, sorption capacity of alumina and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The relative standard deviation for eight measurements of 0.1 ng/mL of rhodium was ±6.3%. In this method, the detection limit was 0.003 ng/mL in the original solution. The sorption capacity of alumina and the linear range for Rh(III) were evaluated as 0.8 mg/g and 0.015-0.45 ng/mL in the original solution, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of rhodium content in some food and standard samples with high recovery values.

  20. Determination of total gaseous lead in the atmosphere by honeycomb denuder/electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bicheng; Wu, Tao; Yu, Jimmy C

    2005-09-01

    A technique is described for the determination of total gaseous lead in the atmosphere by honeycomb denuder collection, followed by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) measurement. The collection efficiency of the honeycomb denuder in which a solution containing 2% HNO3/2% glycerine/1% ammonium dihydrogenphosphate was coated for trapping the gaseous lead in the atmosphere was 98.8%. The linear absorbance response was obtained for a concentration range of 0-1.39 microg m(-3) of lead in the atmosphere. A precision of 4.8% RSD (peak-height absorbance, n = 11) for an aqueous solution of 1 ng of lead standard, characteristic masses (CM) of 23 pg and detection limit (3sigma) of 54 pg for an aqueous solution of 0.01 ng lead standard was achieved with 100 microg ammonium dihydrogenphosphate as a chemical modifier. The average recovery of lead in three standard samples prepared by the independent digestion of NIST SRM 1648 (Urban Particulate Matter) using our analytical system was 97.8%. The total content of the gaseous lead in the atmosphere of our laboratories was 0.35-0.38 microg m(-3).

  1. Model-Based Angular Scan Error Correction of an Electrothermally-Actuated MEMS Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Dacheng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Qiao; Xie, Huikai; Li, Suiqiong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the actuation behavior of a two-axis electrothermal MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) mirror typically used in miniature optical scanning probes and optical switches is investigated. The MEMS mirror consists of four thermal bimorph actuators symmetrically located at the four sides of a central mirror plate. Experiments show that an actuation characteristics difference of as much as 4.0% exists among the four actuators due to process variations, which leads to an average angular scan error of 0.03°. A mathematical model between the actuator input voltage and the mirror-plate position has been developed to predict the actuation behavior of the mirror. It is a four-input, four-output model that takes into account the thermal-mechanical coupling and the differences among the four actuators; the vertical positions of the ends of the four actuators are also monitored. Based on this model, an open-loop control method is established to achieve accurate angular scanning. This model-based open loop control has been experimentally verified and is useful for the accurate control of the mirror. With this control method, the precise actuation of the mirror solely depends on the model prediction and does not need the real-time mirror position monitoring and feedback, greatly simplifying the MEMS control system. PMID:26690432

  2. Stabilizing Agents for Calibration in the Determination of Mercury Using Solid Sampling Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L−1 TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants. PMID:22654606

  3. Determination of lead in fine particulates by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, J C; Ho, K F; Lee, S C

    2001-01-02

    A simple method for determining lead in fine particulates (PM2.5) by using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has been developed. Particulates collected on Nuclepore filter by using a dichotomous sampler were suspended in diluted nitric acid after ultrasonic agitation. The dislodging efficiency is nearly 100% after agitation for 5 min. In order to study the suspension behavior of PM2.5 in solvents, a Brookhaven ZetaPlus Particle Size Analyzer was used to determine the particle size distribution and suspension behavior of air particulates in the solvent. The pre-digestion and modification effect of nitric acid would be discussed. Palladium was added as a chemical modifier and the temperature program of ETAAS was changed in order to improve the recovery. The slurry was introduced directly into a graphite tube for atomization. The metal content in the sample was determined by the standard addition method. In addition, a conventional acid digestion procedure was applied to verify the efficiency of the slurry sampling method. It offers a quick and efficient alternative method for heavy metal characterization in fine particulates.

  4. Determination of tellurium in indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shiue, M Y; Sun, Y C; Yang, M H

    2001-08-01

    A method for the determination of the dopant concentration of tellurium in dissolved indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Efforts were made to investigate the optimal conditions of the furnace heating program and the effect of palladium modifier on the variation of tellurium and the background absorbance. According to the results obtained, the presence of palladium chemical modifier in the analysis of indium antimonide allowed the successful retention of tellurium in the graphite tube, and the optimum mass of palladium modifier was found to be dependent on the sample matrix concentration. The absorbance profile of tellurium and the background level were significantly improved when a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 degrees C and an atomization temperature of 2200 degrees C were employed in the optimized heating program. With the use of this method, a detection limit of 0.8 microg g(-1) tellurium in indium antimonide could be achieved. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by comparison with two independent methods, i.e. slurry sampling-ETAAS and ICP-MS. From the good agreement between the results, it was demonstrated that the proposed method is suitable for the determination of typical dopant concentrations of tellurium in indium antimonide.

  5. Determination of nickel, chromium and cobalt in wheat flour using slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González, M; Gallego, M; Valcárcel, M

    1999-05-01

    The slurry technique was applied to the determination of Ni, Cr and Co in wheat flour by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The influence of the graphite furnace temperature programme was optimized. Optimum sensitivity was obtained by using a mixture of 15% HNO(3)-10% H(2)O(2) as suspended medium for a 3% w/v slurry in the determination of Ni; lower concentrations of HNO(3) were necessary for the determination of Co and Cr (viz. 5 and 10%). The precision of direct analyses of the slurries was improved by using mechanical agitation between measurements; thus, the RSD of the measurements was ca. 5% for repeatability. The direct slurry sampling (SS) technique is suitable for the determination of Ni and Cr in wheat flour samples at levels of 150-450 and 30-72 ng g(-1), respectively, as it provides results similar to those obtained by ashing the sample. However, the typically low level of Co in these samples precluded its determination by the proposed method (the study was made in an SRM spiked wholemeal flour), at least in those samples that were contaminated with elevated concentrations of the metal (viz. more than 90 ng of Co per g of flour). The method provides a relative standard deviation of 6, 8, and 4% for Ni, Cr, and Co, respectively.

  6. Handling complex effects in slurry-sampling-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry by multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Cal-Prieto, M J; Gómez-Carracedo, M P; Andrade, J M; Carlosena, A; Prada, D

    2006-07-07

    Analysis of solid samples by slurry-sampling-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS) can imply spectral and chemical interferences caused by the large amount of concomitants introduced into the graphite furnace. Sometimes they cannot be solved using stabilized temperature platform furnace (STPF) conditions or typical approaches (previous sample ashing, use of chemical modifiers, etc.), which are time consuming and quite expensive. A new approach to handle interferences using multivariate calibrations (partial least squares, PLS, and artificial neural networks, ANN) is presented and exemplified with a real problem consisting on determining Sb in several solid matrices (soils, sediments and coal fly ash) as slurries by ETAAS. Experimental designs were implemented at different levels of Sb to develop the calibration matrix and assess which concomitants (seven ions were considered) modified the atomic signal mostly. They were Na+ and Ca2+ and they induced simultaneous displacement, depletion (enhancement) and broadening of the atomic peak. Here it is shown that these complex effects can be handled in a reliable, fast and cost-effective way to predict the concentration of Sb in slurry samples of several solid matrices. The method was validated predicting the concentrations of five certified reference materials (CRMs) and studying its robustness to current ETAAS problems. It is also shown that linear PLS can handle eventual non-linearities and that its results are comparable to more complex (non-linear) models, as those from ANNs.

  7. Solution and slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the analysis of high purity quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptkorn, Susanne; Krivan, Viliam

    1996-07-01

    A slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) method for the determination of Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn and Na at trace and ultratrace level in high purity quartz samples has been developed. The influence of atomization temperature, internal gas flow during atomization and carbide modification of the graphite tube on the background absorption has been studied. Simple quantification via calibration curves, recorded with aqueous standards, is possible for all elements except Al. The performance and the accuracy of the slurry sampling technique are compared to those of the analysis of hydrofluoric acid digests. With both methods, the blanks could be substantially reduced by minimization of sample handling. Because of essentially higher applicable sample portions, the solution technique provides lower limits of detection for all elements excluding Al, Na and K. For the slurry sampling technique, the achievable limits of detection are in the range of 2 (Mg) to 500 (Fe) ng g -1 and for the solution technique, they are between 0.4 (Mg) and 500 (Al) ng g -1. Thus, both developed methods are well suited for ultratrace analysis of high purity quartz for microelectronic applications. The results obtained by these two ETAAS techniques are compared with those of independent methods including neutron activation analysis.

  8. Thermal-Induced Osteonecrosis of Adjacent Vertebra after Intradiscal Electrothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soonjoon; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with complaints of low back pain and intermittent right thigh pain. Twelve weeks before admission, the patient received intradiscal electrothermal therapy (IDET) at a local hospital. The patient still reported low back pain after the procedure that was managed with narcotic analgesics. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and his referring physician thought the likely diagnosis was spondylodiscitis at the L4–5 spinal segment with a small epidural abscess. At admission to our department, the patient reported aggravated low back pain. Blood test results, including the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels, were slightly elevated. Biopsy samples of the L4, L5 vertebral bodies and disk were obtained. The material underwent aerobic, anaerobic, fungal, mycobacterial cultures and histologic examination. Results of all cultures were negative. Histologically, necrosis of the bone was evident from the number of empty osteocyte lacunae. In addition, there was no evidence of infection based on biopsy results. No antibiotic treatment was administered on discharge. Repeat computed tomography and MRI performed 12 months after IDET showed a bony defect in the L4 and L5 vertebral bodies, and a decrease in the size of the L4–5 intervertebral disc lesion. We report a case of lumbar vertebral osteonecrosis induced by IDET and discuss etiology and radiologic features. PMID:28061487

  9. Determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bubnič, Zoran; Urleb, Uroš; Kreft, Katjuša; Veber, Marjan

    2010-03-01

    An electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients was developed. Since the recoveries of nickel by the direct dissolution of samples in diluted nitric acid were low and caused errors in the determination of Ni in pharmaceutical samples, different approaches for sample pre-treatment were examined. It was found that the microwave digestion was the most suitable way for sample preparation. Various combinations of digestion agents and different microwave conditions were tested. The combination of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be the most appropriate. The validity of the method was evaluated by recovery studies of spiked samples and by the comparison of the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recovery ranged from 87.5 to 104.0% and a good agreement was achieved between both methods. The detection limit and the limit of quantification were 0.6 and 2.1 µg g-1 respectively. The precision of the method was confirmed by the determination of Ni in the spiked samples and was below 4%, expressed in terms of a relative standard deviation. The method was applied to the determination of nickel in production samples of active pharmaceutical ingredients and intermediates.

  10. Assessment of toxic metals in raw and processed milk samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Shah, Abdul Qadir

    2009-09-01

    Milk and dairy products have been recognized all over the world for their beneficial influence on human health. The levels of toxic metals (TMs) are an important component of safety and quality of milk. A simple and efficient microwave assisted extraction (MAE) method has been developed for the determination of TMs (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb), in raw and processed milk samples. A Plackett-Burman experimental design and 2(3)+star central composite design, were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for MAE. Concentrations of TMs were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by standard addition method and conventional wet acid digestion method (CDM), for comparative purpose. No significant differences were observed (P>0.05), when comparing the values obtained by the proposed MAE method and CDM (paired t-test). The average relative standard deviation of the MAE method varied between 4.3% and 7.6% based on analyte (n=6). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of understudy TMs in milk samples. The results of raw and processed milk indicated that environmental conditions and manufacturing processes play a key role in the distribution of toxic metals in raw and processed milk.

  11. High pressure hypervelocity electrothermal wind tunnel performance study and subscale tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizkalla, Oussama F.; Chinitz, Wallace; Witherspoon, F. D.; Burton, Rodney L.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a Mach 10 to 20, high pressure electrothermal wind tunnel was assessed. A heater based on a continuous high power electric arc discharge capable of heating air to temperatures above 10,000 K and pressures of 15,000 atm is the key element of this wind tunnel. Results of analytical study indicate that the facility is capable of simulation conditions suitable for hypervelocity airbreathing propulsion testing up to Mach 16. In this case simulation was limited by pressure containment, high nozzle throat heat flux rates, and chemical freezing in the nozzle. The high total pressure capability improved the recombination chemistry in the facility nozzle as chemical equilibrium prevailed to the freezing point. Steady arc discharges were observed with liquid nitrogen flowing into the arc chamber during tests based on the two millisecond test facility. The measured steady pressure in the arc chamber was 4559 psi, which is two times greater than maximum total pressure obtainable in conventional arc heaters.

  12. Determination of sulphur in various vegetables by solid sampling high-resolution electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2015-04-01

    Sulphur was determined in various vegetables via molecular absorption of carbon monosulphide (CS) at 258.056 nm using a solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (SS HR-CS ETAAS). Samples were dried, ground and directly introduced into the ruthenium coated graphite furnace as 0.05 to 0.50mg. All determinations were performed using palladium+citric acid modifier and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000 °C and a volatilisation temperature of 2400 °C. The results were in good agreement with certified sulphur concentrations of various vegetal CRM samples applying linear calibration technique prepared from thioacetamide. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 7.5 and 8.7 ng of S, respectively. The concentrations of S in various spinach, leek, lettuce, radish, Brussels sprouts, zucchini and chard samples were determined. It was showed that distribution of sulphur in CRM and grinded food samples were homogeneous even in micro-scale.

  13. Measurement of alkali vapors in PFBC exhaust. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1994-01-01

    Under the auspices of the US Department of Energy through Morgantown Energy Technology Center, laboratory-scale studies were conducted to develop a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA) for use in an in situ regenerable activated-bauxite sorber alkali monitor (RABSAM). The RABSAM is a sampling probe that does not require a high-temperature/high-pressure sampling line for reliable measurement of alkali vapor in the exhaust of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The RABA can be generated from the commercial grade activated bauxite by deactivating (or reacting) clay impurities in activated bauxite with NaCl or LiCl vapor. Under the atmospheric deactivation process, however, only a partial deactivation of clay impurities is achieved, probably due to limited access of NaCl or LiCl vapor into micropores of activated bauxite. Because LiCl vapor chemically reacts with alumina substrate of activated bauxite, resulting in pore enlargement, loss of pore surface area, and a decrease in the subsequent NaCl-vapor sorption capacity of the RABA, NaCl is a more suitable deactivation agent than LiCl vapor. In a simulated PFBC exhaust environment, the RABA behaves similarly to fresh activated bauxite in capturing NaCl vapor from the simulated PFBC exhaust. Based on results of this work, we recommend generating chemically and thermally stable RABA by deactivating clay impurities of commercial grade activated bauxite with NaCl or KCl vapor under simulated PFBC exhaust environment, that is, high-temperature, high-pressure, and high concentrations of NaCl or KCl vapor in simulated PFBC exhaust compositions.

  14. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of <150 m. Static gas accumulation and dynamic bubble coalescence are both manifestations of vapor segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  16. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.; Nauss, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.117 references.

  17. Determination of cadmium and lead in edible oils by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after reverse dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of edible oils with a low volume of an acidic solution in the presence of isopropyl alcohol allows cadmium and lead to be completely separated into the aqueous phase. After centrifugation, the metals are determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry using a palladium salt for chemical modification in the heating cycle. Using a 10 g oil sample, the enrichment factor is 140, which permits detection limits of 0.6 and 10 ng kg(-1) for cadmium and lead, respectively. The results agree with those obtained after sample mineralization. Data for the cadmium and lead levels for 15 samples of different characteristics are given.

  18. Optical evidence of an electrothermal degradation of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes during electrical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavesi, M.; Manfredi, M.; Salviati, G.; Armani, N.; Rossi, F.; Meneghesso, G.; Levada, S.; Zanoni, E.; Du, S.; Eliashevich, I.

    2004-04-01

    The optical properties of blue InGaN-based light-emitting diodes aged at high current levels have been studied by electroluminescence and cathodoluminescence. The onset of a broad optical band peaked at about 3.1 eV in devices aged without a heat sink (junction temperature higher than 300 °C) has been correlated to an electrothermal threshold effect. The band is attributed to the dissociation of Mg-H complexes inside the p-type layers and to the consequent formation of Mg-related metastable complexes acting as acceptors. Subsequent electron-beam irradiation determines the almost complete quenching of the band.

  19. An analytical model for pulse shape and electrothermal stability in two-body transition-edge sensor microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. A.; Horansky, R. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Hoover, A. S.; Hoteling, N. J.; Rabin, M. W.

    2010-09-06

    High-resolution superconducting gamma-ray sensors show potential for the more accurate analysis of nuclear material. These devices are part of a larger class of microcalorimeters and bolometers based on transition edge sensors (TESs) that have two distinct thermal bodies. We derive the time domain behavior of the current and temperature for compound TES devices in the small signal limit and demonstrate the utility of these equations for device design and characterization. In particular, we use the model to fit pulses from our gamma-ray microcalorimeters and demonstrate how critical damping and electrothermal stability can be predicted.

  20. Revisiting an idea of G D Botto: a solar thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, R.; Ganci, S.; Zozzaro, P.

    2008-11-01

    In an experiment performed by G D Botto in 1833 it was shown that it was possible to produce hydrogen gas by hydrolysis by means of an electromotive force obtained by connecting in series more than 100 thermocouples heated by a flame of burning alcohol. In the system we study, we adopt the same basic idea for an electro-thermal converter, by assuming that concentrated solar radiation heats N thermocouples in series to generate an electromotive force f0.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  2. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  3. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  4. Solvents and vapor intrusion pathways.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Scott D; Krieger, Gary R; Palmer, Robert B; Waksman, Javier C

    2004-08-01

    Vapor intrusion must be recognized appropriately as a separate pathway of contamination. Although many issues resemble those of other forms of contamination (particularly its entryway, which is similar to that of radon seepage), vapor intrusion stands apart as a unique risk requiring case-specific action. This article addresses these issues and the current understanding of the most appropriate and successful remedial actions.

  5. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  6. Modeling and Validation of Microwave Ablations with Internal Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this work, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10 and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intra-procedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard Index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard Index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67 and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  7. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  8. Ion-beam assisted, electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.

    1996-12-01

    Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) is a relatively new technology that has overcome some of the difficulties associated with chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and thermal spray processes. In the EB-PVD process, focused high-energy electron beams generated from electron guns are directed to melt and evaporate ingots, as well as preheat the substrate inside a vacuum chamber. By adding the assistance of ion beams to the process, coating density and adhesion are improved, while costs are reduced. This article describes physical vapor deposition and ion-beam processes, explains the advantages of EB-PVD, shows how ion beams optimize the benefits of EB-PVD, and enumerates a variety of applications.

  9. Characterization of bioeffects on endothelial cells under acoustic droplet vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bul, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), which result in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events leading to cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was exposed to ADV using a 3.5 MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional), and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The generated bubble cloud was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application. PMID:26403698

  10. Vapor phase heat transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.; Neeper, D. A.

    1985-09-01

    Progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of various forms of a vapor transport system for solar space heating is described, which could also be applied to service water heating. The refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector, which may be located on the external wall or roof of a building. The vapor is condensed in a passively discharged thermal storage unit located within the building. The condensed liquid can be returned to the collector either by a motor-driven pump or by a completely passive self-pumping mechanism in which the vapor pressure lifts the liquid from the condenser to the collector. The theoretical investigation analyzes this self-pumping scheme. Experiments in solar test cells compared the operation of both passive and active forms of the vapor system with the operation of a passive water wall. The vapor system operates as expected, with potential advantages over other passive systems in design flexibility and energy yield.

  11. SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R.; Roellig, T. L.; Yuen, L.; Shiroyama, B.; Meyer, A.; Devincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor (WVM) is a heterodyne radiometer designed to determine the integrated amount of water vapor along the telescope line of sight and directly to the zenith. The basic technique that was chosen for the WVM uses radiometric measurements of the center and wings of the 183.3 GHz rotational line of water to measure the water vapor. The WVM reports its measured water vapor levels to the aircraft Mission Controls and Communication System (MCCS) while the SOFIA observatory is in normal operation at flight altitude. The water vapor measurements are also available to other scientific instruments aboard the observatory. The electrical, mechanical and software design of the WVM are discussed.

  12. A Lithium Vapor Box similarity experiment employing water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ja; Jagoe, C.; Goldston, Rj; Jaworski, Ma

    2016-10-01

    Handling high power loads and heat flux in the divertor is a major challenge for fusion power plants. A detached plasma will likely be required. However, hydrogenic and impurity puffing experiments show that detached operation leads easily to X-point MARFEs, impure plasmas, degradation in confinement, and lower helium pressure at the exhaust. The concept of the Lithium Vapor Box Divertor is to use local evaporation and strong differential pumping through condensation to localize the gas-phase material that absorbs the plasma heat flux, and so avoid those difficulties. In order to design such a box first the vapor without plasma must be simulated. The density of vapor required can be estimated using the SOL power, major radius, poloidal box length, and cooling energy per lithium atom. For an NSTX-U-sized machine, the Knudsen number Kn spans 0.01 to 1, the transitional flow regime. This regime cannot handled by fluid codes or collisionless Monte Carlo codes, but can be handled by Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes. To validate a DSMC model, we plan to build a vapor box test stand employing more-convenient water vapor instead of lithium vapor as the working fluid. Transport of vapor between the chambers at -50C will be measured and compared to the model. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Electro-thermal FEM simulations of the 13 kA LHC joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, D.; Verweij, A. P.; Bielert, E. R.

    2013-01-01

    The interconnections between the superconducting main dipole and main quadrupole magnets are made of soldered joints of two superconducting Nb-Ti cables embedded in a copper busbar stabilizer. The primary cause of the September 2008 incident in the LHC was a defect in an interconnection between two dipole magnets. Analyses of the incident show that possibly more defects might be present in the 13 kA circuits, which can lead to unprotected resistive transitions. To avoid the reoccurrence of such an event, thorough experimental and numerical investigations have taken place to determine the safe operating conditions of the LHC. However to show measured curves is beyond the scope of this article. Furthermore, improvements in the design have been proposed in the form of additional parallel copper pieces, or shunts, which bridge the possible voids in the soldering and offer a bypass for the current in case of a quench. The purpose of this work is to support the design choices and to indicate the sensitivity to some of the free parameters in the design. Electro-thermal Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations are performed, making use of COMSOL Multiphysics. The use of FEM allows for a profound three-dimensional analysis and some interesting features of the shunted busbar can only be revealed this way. Especially current redistribution in the shunted area of the interconnect gives important insights in the problem. The results obtained using the model are very sensitive to the exact geometrical properties as well as to the material properties, which drive the Joule heating inside the interconnection. Differences as compared to a one-dimensional model, QP3, are presented. QP3 is also used for simulations of non-shunted busbar joints as well as shunted busbars. Furthermore, margins are given for the soldering process and the quality control of the shunted interconnections, since the contact area between the stabilizer pieces and the shunt is an important quality aspect

  14. Direct analysis of reference biofluids by coupled in situ electrodeposition-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, Jaroslav P.; Powell, Kipton J.

    1999-12-01

    The application of coupled in situ electrodeposition-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ED-ETAAS) to the determination of Pb in biological standard reference materials is described. In situ electrodeposition at a cell voltage of 3.0 V from 25-μl samples onto electrodeposited Pd is used to quantitatively separate the analyte from blood and urine matrices. With subsequent withdrawal of spent electrolyte, this overcomes the atomisation problems inherent with high salt and organic contents. ED-ETAAS is applied with minimal sample pre-treatment (acidification). The electrolysis process aids decomposition of the organic matrix, and the release of trace elements. Evolution of H 2 at the cathode counters fouling of the Pd modifier surface. The palladium deposit is renewed in situ for each determination. For AMI certified lyophilised blood, diluted 1+3 with 0.1 M HCl (18.1 μg/l Pb), the R.S.D. was 3.0% (peak height; n=5) and the detection limit (3 σ blank; n=5) was 1.5 μg/l. Results for certified blood samples were AMI 72.3±4.3 μg/l (certified 76.2±7.6 μg/l) and Seronorm 34.2±2.0 μg/l (36±4 μg/l). The result for NIST SRM 2670 normal urine acidified to 1% HNO 3 was 8.1±0.6 μg/l (recommended value 10 μg/l).

  15. Intradiscal Electrothermal Treatment for Chronic Lower Back Pain Patients with Internal Disc Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Young; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Park, Moon Soo; Kim, Hak-Sun; Choi, Youn-Jin

    2005-01-01

    Chronic lower back pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal problems; it is also the most expensive industrial injury. Not surprisingly, many treatments have been developed to combat this expensive and debilitating condition. One of these, intradiscal electrothermal treatment (IDET), was developed for patients with chronic discogenic lower back pain who failed to improve with any of the wide variety of non-surgical treatments. The present study sought to evaluate the efficacy of IDET for patients with chronic lower back pain. Twenty-five patients were enrolled in this prospective study; the patients received IDET between June 2001 and June 2003. MRI was used to confirm the diagnosis of internal disc disruption in all patients. The patients then underwent a pre-operative provocative test and discography. The follow-up duration was at least 1 year in all cases, and the visual analogue scale, recovery rate, and satisfaction of each patient were evaluated. The average age of the patients was 32 years (age range 18 to 49 years), and the patient group was 33% male and 67% female. Of the 25 patients, 5 underwent lumbar fusion surgery within 1 year of IDET. After IDET, 8 patients (32%) reported more pain than before, 14 patients (56%) reported less pain, and 3 patients (12%) experienced no change. Twelve patients (48%) were satisfied with IDET, 11 (44%) were dissatisfied, and 2 (8%) were undecided about the treatment. At least 1 year after IDET, nearly half the study patients were dissatisfied with their medical outcome. Consequently, 5 patients (20%) underwent fusion surgery at 1 year after IDET. Although other studies have shown good results with IDET for at least 2 years, this investigation suggests the IDET may be somewhat less effective. In order to firmly establish the efficacy of IDET for treating chronic discogenic lower back pain, additional studies with larger numbers of patients evaluated over longer time periods are recommended. PMID:16127780

  16. High efficient biofluid micromixing using ultra-fast AC electrothermal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Electrokinetics have been widely used in lab-on-a-chip devices for fluid manipulation applications. The AC electrothermal (ACET) effect is a highly efficient technique for biofluids (σ>0.1 S/m) active micromixing, which can be used in chemical, biological, and medical analysis systems. In this paper, a novel idea of employing microelectrode arrays placed on sidewalls of a fluidic microchannel for increasing the mixing efficiency of biofluids is numerically investigated. It was reported that coplanar asymmetric microelectrode arrays are capable of creating ACET vortices in the bulk of a high conductive electrolyte solution. Two electrode arrays can be placed on the sidewalls of a microchannel, each of which has a different role, one pumps the biofluid while the other mixes it. Two different actuation patterns were applied to the electrodes. One pair of microelectrodes was simulated and the simulation procedure was then verified by conducting experiments for ACET flow measurement in a similar geometry. Microelectrode arrays were fabricated on 1mm thick glass substrates using photolithography. A 800 μm thick fluidic microchannel was fabricated by soft lithography of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The results showed that such a technique can dramatically increase the mixing of the solution while pumping is taking place. The mechanism was capable of efficiently mixing biofluid solutions (resultant concentration ratio of up to 80%) in a short time (<3 min) and short distance (<600 μm) for a 300×300 μm2 fluidic microchannel cross section area. Medical analysis such as heterogeneous immunoassays can be potential applications of such micromixing technique.

  17. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  18. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  19. Tested Demonstrations. Gasoline Vapor: An Invisible Pollutant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Edgar R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a demonstration concerning the air pollution aspects of gasoline vapor which provides an estimation of the vapor pressure of test fuel, the molecular weight of the vapor, and illustrates a method of controlling the pollution. (SL)

  20. A first-order estimate of shock heating and vaporization in oceanic impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The vaporization of water in oceanic impacts of asteroids or comets of multikilometer dimensions is estimated by a semianalytical modeling of impact heating and shock isobar geometry that is based on computer code calculations. The mass of water vaporized in an infinitely deep ocean by the impact of a 10 km diameter asteroid at 25 km/sec (these values have been proposed for the Cretaceous/Tertiary extinction bolide) is approximately equal to the total mass of water vapor present in the earth's atmosphere, and 3-4 orders of magnitude larger than the mass of water vapor in the stratosphere. For projectiles of this size, however, the finite depth of the ocean becomes significant and may considerably reduce the amount of water vapor initially generated by the impact. Climatological models and extinction scenarios invoking the effects of impact-generated water vapor may critically depend on the a priori ambiguous details of the hypothesized impact.

  1. Vapor Pressure, Vapor Composition and Fractional Vaporization of High Temperature Lavas on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Schaefer, L.; Kargel, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    Observations show that Io's atmosphere is dominated by SO2 and other sulfur and sulfur oxide species, with minor amounts of Na, K, and Cl gases. Theoretical modeling and recent observations show that NaCl, which is produced volcanically, is a constituent of the atmosphere. Recent Galileo, HST and ground-based observations show that some volcanic hot spots on Io have extremely high temperatures, in the range 1400-1900 K. At similar temperatures in laboratory experiments, molten silicates and oxides have significant vapor pressures of Na, K, SiO, Fe, Mg, and other gases. Thus vaporization of these species from high temperature lavas on Io seems likely. We therefore modeled the vaporization of silicate and oxide lavas suggested for Io. Our results for vapor chemistry are reported here. The effects of fractional vaporization on lava chemistry are given in a companion abstract by Kargel et al.

  2. The effect of electro-thermal and electro-choric instabilities and material strength on MagLIF liner stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecover, James; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is a promising route to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The concept involves magnetically imploding a metal liner containing fuel with an azimuthal magnetic field (Bz) ; a key limitation of such systems is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. MagLIF relevant liner implosions with Bz = 0 carried out at SNL showed high amplitude MRT growth; we present a quantitative comparison between experimental results and 3D results from our MHD code Gorgon, demonstrating closer agreement for the MRT properties with the inclusion of electro-thermal and electro-choric instabilities (ETI and ECI) and material strength. The ETI and ECI result in early time azimuthally correlated structures which provide a seed for the MRT. Material strength increases the ETI amplitude due to positive feedback during the solid phase of the liner. Similar liner implosions with Bz exhibited a re-orientation of the MRT into helical structures, which are yet to be reproduced by simulations without an artificial helical initialisation. Our 3D Gorgon results with Bz show helices prior to vapourisation; these occur at initially positive angles before changing sign, tending to zero later in time. This angle does not follow the relative magnitudes of Bz and Bθ as would be expected for the MRT. The angle instead follows the ratio of axial and azimuthal currents (induced by compression or rarefaction of the initial Bz) , indicating an electro-thermal origin.

  3. [Determination of trace silver in water samples by solid phase extraction portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Fan, Guang-yu; Jiang, Xiao-ming; Zheng, Cheng-bin; Hou, Xian-deng; Xu, Kai-lai

    2011-07-01

    A simple method has been developed for the determination of silver in environmental water samples using solid phase extraction with tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Silica gel was used as an adsorbent and packed into a syringe barrel for solid phase extraction of silver prior to its determination by using a portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. Optimum conditions for adsorption and desorption of silver ion, as well as interferences from co-existing ions, were investigated. A sample pH value of 6.0, a sample loading flow rate of 4.0 mL x min(-1), and the mixture of 4% (m/v) thiourea and 2% (phi) nitrate acid with the eluent flow rate of 0.5 mL x min(-1) for desorption were selected for further studies. Under optimal conditions, a linear range of 0.20-4.00 ng x mL(-1), a limit of detection (3sigma) of 0.03 ng x mL(-1) and a preconcentration factor of 94 were achieved. The proposed method was validated by testing three environmental water samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Voltage-biased superconducting transition-edge bolometer with strong electrothermal feedback operated at 370 mK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Gildemeister, J.M.; Holmes, W.; Lee, A.T.; Richards, P.L.

    1998-06-01

    We present an experimental study of a composite voltage-biased superconducting bolometer (VSB). The tested VSB consists of a Ti-film superconducting thermometer ( T{sub c}{approximately}375 mK) on a Si substrate suspended by NbTi superconducting leads. A resistor attached to the substrate provides calibrated heat input into the bolometer. The current through the bolometer is measured with a superconducting quantum interference device ammeter. Strong negative electrothermal feedback fixes the bolometer temperature at T{sub c} and reduces the measured response time from 2.6 s to 13 ms. As predicted, the measured current responsivity of the bolometer is equal to the inverse of the bias voltage. A noise equivalent power of 5{times}10{sup {minus}17} W/{radical}()Hz was measured for a thermal conductance G{approximately}4.7{times}10{sup {minus}10} W/K, which is consistent with the expected thermal noise. Excess noise was observed for bias conditions for which the electrothermal feedback strength was close to maximum. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  5. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-06-30

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

  6. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  7. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  8. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  10. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  11. Multiwavelength Strontium Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Yudin, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of experimental and theoretical works, modern notion on conditions of forming of population density inversion on self-terminating IR transitions of alkali-earth metals is given. It is demonstrated that there is a significant difference in the inversion formation in lasers on self-terminating transitions in the visible and near-IR ranges and lasers on self-terminating transitions of alkali-earth metals lasing IR lines in the mid-IR range. It is shown that in the discharge circuit of lasers on self-terminating metal atom transitions (LSMT) there are processes strengthening the influence of the known mechanism limiting the frequency and energy characteristics (FEC) of radiation caused by the presence of prepulse electron concentration. The mechanism of influence of these processes on FEC of the LSMT and technical methods of their neutralization are considered. The possibility of obtaining average lasing power of ~200 W from one liter volume of the active medium of the strontium vapor laser is demonstrated under conditions of neutralization of these processes.

  12. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  13. Low defect InGaAs quantum well selectively grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on Si(100) 300 mm wafers for next generation non planar devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cipro, R.; Gorbenko, V.; Baron, T. Martin, M.; Moeyaert, J.; David, S.; Bassani, F.; Bogumilowicz, Y.; Barnes, J. P.; Rochat, N.; Loup, V.; Vizioz, C.; Allouti, N.; Chauvin, N.; Bao, X. Y.; Ye, Z.; Pin, J. B.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-06-30

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs, InGaAs, and AlGaAs on nominal 300 mm Si(100) at temperatures below 550 °C was studied using the selective aspect ratio trapping method. We clearly show that growing directly GaAs on a flat Si surface in a SiO{sub 2} cavity with an aspect ratio as low as 1.3 is efficient to completely annihilate the anti-phase boundary domains. InGaAs quantum wells were grown on a GaAs buffer and exhibit room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Cathodoluminescence reveals the presence of dark spots which could be associated with the presence of emerging dislocation in a direction parallel to the cavity. The InGaAs layers obtained with no antiphase boundaries are perfect candidates for being integrated as channels in n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET), while the low temperatures used allow the co-integration of p-type MOSFET.

  14. Smoke generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A smoke generator is disclosed which is particularly suitable for mounting on the wing tips of an aircraft and for conducting airflow studies. The device includes a network of thermally insulated tubes for carrying a fluid which is used to produce smoke. The fluid, which need not be combustible, is heated above its vaporization temperature by electric current which is passed through the fluid conduit tubes, so that the tubes serve both as fluid conduits and resistance heating elements. Fluid supply and monitoring systems and electrical control systems are also disclosed.

  15. Vapor layer evolution during drop impact on a heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyeon; Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Jisan; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid drop impacts on a sufficiently hot surface above the boiling point, a vapor layer is formed between the drop and the surface, preventing direct contact between them and as a result levitating the drop, known as the Leidenfrost effect. Understanding the evolution of the vapor layer is largely unexplored despite its importance in estimating heat transfer in cooling systems of thermal or nuclear power plants. The side-profile visualization of the vapor layer, as absolutely required for investigating its evolution, has been however unavailable by conventional optical microscopy. In this study, by employing ultrafast X-ray phase contrast imaging, we directly visualize the profiles of the vapor layers during liquid drop impact on a hot surface and elucidate the evolution of the vapor layers during spreading and retraction of the drop as functions of impact height and surface temperature. We reveal that the evolution is governed by the propagation of capillary waves generated in retraction and the wavelength of capillary waves λ is inversely proportional to the impact height h with a relation ~σ/ρh ~We-1 where We is weber number. Capillary waves that converge at the center of the vapor layers are linked to the bouncing behavior of the drop.

  16. Soil Vapor Extraction Implementation Experiences

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper identifies issues and summarizes experiences with soil vapor extraction (SVE) as a remedy for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soils. The issues presented here reflect discussions with over 30 Remedial Project Managers (RPMs)...

  17. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  18. Tubing For Sampling Hydrazine Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, Josh; Taffe, Patricia S.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    Report evaluates flexible tubing used for transporting such hypergolic vapors as those of hydrazines for quantitative analysis. Describes experiments in which variety of tubing materials, chosen for their known compatibility with hydrazine, flexibility, and resistance to heat.

  19. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  20. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  1. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOEpatents

    Blocher, Jr., John M.; Veigel, Neil D.; Landrigan, Richard B.

    1983-04-19

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  2. Collapse of large vapor bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J.; Dominick, S.

    1982-01-01

    The refilling of propellant tanks while in a low-gravity environment requires that entrapped vapor bubbles be collapsed by increasing the system pressure. Tests were performed to verify the mechanism of collapse for these large vapor bubbles with the thermodynamic conditions, geometry, and boundary conditions being those applicable to propellant storage systems. For these conditions it was found that conduction heat transfer determined the collapse rate, with the specific bubble geometry having a significant influence.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  6. 46 CFR 39.2011 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.2011... Equipment and Installation § 39.2011 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo tank... per square inch gauge (psig); (3) Prevent a vacuum, which generates in any tank connected to the...

  7. 46 CFR 39.2011 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.2011... Equipment and Installation § 39.2011 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo tank... per square inch gauge (psig); (3) Prevent a vacuum, which generates in any tank connected to the...

  8. Simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freschi, Gian P. G.; Dakuzaku, Carolina S.; de Moraes, Mercedes; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Gomes Neto, José A.

    2001-10-01

    A method has been developed for the direct simultaneous determination of Cd and Pb in white and red wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) using a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction. The thermal behavior of both analytes during pyrolysis and atomization stages were investigated in 0.028 mol l -1 HNO 3 and in 1+1 v/v diluted wine using mixtures of Pd(NO 3) 2+Mg(NO 3) 2 and NH 4H 2PO 4+Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifiers. With 5 μg Pd+3 μg Mg as the modifiers and a two-step pyrolysis (10 s at 400°C and 10 s at 600°C), the formation of carbonaceous residues inside the atomizer was avoided. For 20 μl of sample (wine+0.056 mol l -1 HNO 3, 1+1, v/v) dispensed into the graphite tube, analytical curves in the 0.10-1.0 μg l -1 Cd and 5.0-50 μg l -1 Pb ranges were established. The characteristic mass was approximately 0.6 pg for Cd and 33 pg for Pb, and the lifetime of the tube was approximately 400 firings. The limits of detection (LOD) based on integrated absorbance (0.03 μg l -1 for Cd, 0.8 μg l -1 for Pb) exceeded the requirements of Brazilian Food Regulations (decree #55871 from Health Department), which establish the maximum permissible level for Cd at 200 μg l -1 and for Pb at 500 μg l -1. The relative standard deviations ( n=12) were typically <8% for Cd and <6% for Pb. The recoveries of Cd and Pb added to wine samples varied from 88 to 107% and 93 to 103%, respectively. The accuracy of the direct determination of Cd and Pb was checked for 10 table wines by comparing the results with those obtained for digested wine using single-element ET-AAS, which were in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  9. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  14. Performance characteristics of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshio; Tsuruyama, Toru; Uchiyama, Taro

    1988-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the operation of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap is described. The maximum CW laser power of 87 W was obtained without the water vapor trap at a Cl2 flow rate of 740 mmol/min. An alkaline H2O2 solution (90 wt pct H2O2, 50 wt pct KOH) was cooled down to about -30 C in order to control the saturated H2O2-H2O vapor pressure to less than 100 mTorr. Two porous pipes made of carbon were utilized as a singlet oxygen generator.

  15. Determination of fluorine in tea using high-resolution molecular absorption spectrometry with electrothermal vaporization of the calcium mono-fluoride CaF.

    PubMed

    Morés, Silvane; Monteiro, Gustavo C; Santos, Flaviane da Silva; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard

    2011-10-15

    High-resolution continuum source molecular absorption of the calcium mono-fluoride molecule CaF in a graphite furnace has been used to determine fluorine in tea after acid digestion, alkaline solubilization and preparation of a conventional aqueous infusion. The strongest absorption 'line' of the CaF molecule is at 606.440 nm, which is part of the rotational fine structure of the X(2)Σ(+)-A(2)Π electronic transition; it has a bond dissociation energy of 529 kJ mol(-1), which is comparable with other molecules used for fluorine determination. One advantage of using Ca as the molecule-forming reagent is that spectral interferences are extremely unlikely in the spectral range of its strongest absorption. Another advantage is that Ca acts both as molecule forming reagent and chemical modifier, so that no other reagent has to be added, making the method very simple. The only disadvantage is that Ca has a somewhat negative influence on the graphite tube lifetime. The limit of detection was found to be 0.16 mg L(-1) F, corresponding to 1.6 ng F absolute, and the calibration curve was linear in the range between 0.5 and 25 mg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of R=0.9994. The results obtained for a certified tea reference material were in agreement with the certified value on a 95% confidence level. There was also no difference between the results obtained after an acid digestion and an alkaline solubilization for 10 tea samples, based on a paired t-test. The values found in the 10 samples ranged between 42 μg g(-1) and 87 μg g(-1) F; the tea infusions contained between 21 μg g(-1) and 56 μg g(-1) F, with an extraction rate between 48% and 74%.

  16. Condensing process of a single vapor bubble ejected in subcooled pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Arima, Masayuki; Hattori, Yasusuke

    Behavior of growing/collapsing vapor bubble ejected to subcooled liquid bath was focused. Vapor bubble was produced by vapor generate system. With this system, heated container was carried out temperature control with a thermostat. This system enabled the authors to observe interaction between the vapor and the liquid in the condensing process extracted from the boiling phenomenon consisting of liquid-gas-solid interactions. The bubble behavior was detected by employing a high-speed camera with up to 100,000 fps. The instability emerged over the surface of the growing and collapsing vapor are discussed as functions of the degree of subcooling, and the temperature and ejection speed of vapor. The present study aims to understand and control the micro-bubble emission boiling known as MEB.

  17. Recent advances in vapor intrusion site investigations.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas; Loll, Per; Eklund, Bart

    2017-02-22

    Our understanding of vapor intrusion has evolved rapidly since the discovery of the first high profile vapor intrusion sites in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research efforts and field investigations have improved our understanding of vapor intrusion processes including the role of preferential pathways and natural barriers to vapor intrusion. This review paper addresses recent developments in the regulatory framework and conceptual model for vapor intrusion. In addition, a number of innovative investigation methods are discussed.

  18. The atmospheric water vapor line.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, M.; Sharp, Z. D.; Gutzler, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    We have measured the hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition of atmospheric water vapor periodically across the American Southwest through most of 2007. Samples were primarily collected over Albuquerque, NM on the roof of the 3-story UNM geology building on a near-daily basis with occasional sampling in southern Arizona and southern Texas. Water vapor was captured by pumping ~60 to ~600 liters of air (amount depending on dew point) through a cold trap, producing ~1mL of water. Precipitation samples were also collected in Albuquerque throughout the year and analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition. Isotopic compositions of both vapor and precipitation were determined by CO2 equilibration for oxygen and chromium reduction for hydrogen, with resulting gasses analyzed on a mass spectrometer. Nearly all water vapor samples lie parallel to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) but with a deuterium excess of ~17 (δD = 8δO + 17). This is true regardless of relative humidity, dew point, location, time of day, or season. Precipitation samples fall to the right of the GMWL with a slope of ~5. Within our dataset we have identified 10 pairs of vapor and precipitation samples that were collected within 24 hours. Half of these sample pairs have values consistent with equilibrium conditions at ground temperature, while the other half are not in equilibrium at any temperature. Simple modeling of nonequilibrium fractionation processes suggests that the array of precipitation samples can be derived from the array of vapor samples by equilibrium condensation followed by partial evaporation of falling raindrops. Our data suggests that atmospheric water vapor has a relatively constant deuterium excess value regardless of moisture source, degree of rainout, and/or evapotranspiration contributions.

  19. The lithium vapor box divertor

    DOE PAGES

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-01-13

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Our recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al asmore » well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. Furthermore, at the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required in order to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.« less

  20. The lithium vapor box divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-01-13

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Our recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. Furthermore, at the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required in order to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.