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Sample records for generation electrothermal vaporization

  1. A highly sensitive method for the determination of mercury using vapor generation gold wire microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Payman; Rahimi, Akram

    2007-04-01

    The study introduces a new simple and highly sensitive method for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mercury. In the proposed method, a gold wire, mounted in the headspace of a sample solution in a sealed bottle, is used for collection of mercury vapor generated by addition of sodium tetrahydroborate. The gold wire is then simply inserted in the sample introduction hole of a graphite furnace of an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry instrument. By applying an atomization temperature of 600 °C, mercury is rapidly desorbed from the wire and determined with high sensitivity. Factorial design and response surface analysis methods were used for optimization of the effect of five different variables in order to maximize the mercury signal. By using a 0.75 mm diameter gold wire, a sample volume of about 8 ml and an extraction time of 11 min, the sensitivity of mercury determination was enhanced up to 10 4 times in comparison to its ordinary ETAAS determination with direct injection of 10 μl sample solutions. A detection limit of 0.006 ng ml - 1 and a precision better than 4.6% (relative standard deviation) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in industrial wastewaters and tuna fish samples.

  2. Optimization of a single-drop microextraction method for multielemental determination by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following in situ vapor generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    A headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) method has been developed in combination with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the simultaneous determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in aqueous solutions. Vapor generation is carried out in a 40 mL volume closed-vial containing a solution with the target analytes in hydrochloric acid and potassium ferricyanide medium. Hydrides (As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn) and Hg vapor are trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3 µL volume) containing Pd(II), followed by the subsequent injection in the ETV. Experimental variables such as medium composition, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) volume and concentration, stirring rate, extraction time, sample volume, ascorbic acid concentration and palladium amount in the drop were fully optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) (3 σ criterion) of the proposed method for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg were 0.2, 0.04, 0.01, 0.07, 0.09 and 0.8 µg/L, respectively. Enrichment factors of 9, 85, 138, 130, 37 and 72 for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg, respectively, were achieved in 210 s. The relative standard deviations ( N = 5) ranged from 4 to 8%. The proposed HS-SDME-ETV-ICP-MS method has been applied for the determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in NWRI TM-28.3 certified reference material.

  3. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  4. Determination of plutonium in urine: evaluation of electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrzak, R.; Kaplan, E.

    1996-11-01

    Mass spectroscopy has the distinct advantage of detecting atoms rather than radioactive decay products for nuclides of low specific activity. Electrothermal vaporization (ETV) is an efficient means of introducing small volumes of prepared samples into an inductively coupled mass spectrometer to achieve the lowest absolute detection limits. The operational characteristics and capabilities of electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled mass spectrometer mass spectroscopy were evaluated. We describe its application as a detection method for determining Pu in urine, in conjunction with a preliminary separation technique to avoid matrix suppression of the signal.

  5. Direct Determination of Lead in Foods by Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shang, Derong; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhai, Yuxiu; Ning, Jinsong; Duan, Delin; Zhou, Yongdong

    2016-01-01

    A solid sampling method for the determination of lead in foods (including grains, vegetables and seafoods) using electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry was established. The method introduced samples using electrothermal vaporization by quartz furnace and used on-line ashing and vaporization to remove matrix interferences for the specific trap of lead. It was proven by the certified reference material (CRM) and the recovery rate of the standards that the electrothermal vaporization was stable and there was no effect for sampling difference. The best operating program and parameters for the new method included ashing (850°C, 160 s), vaporization and trap (1050°C, 80 s; 800°C, 10 s), release (800°C, 10 s), and mixed Ar + H2 (85:15%, v/v) as carrier gas with flow rate of 500 mL/min. The relative standard deviations of repeated Pb measurements in CRMs were all below 5.0%, and the recovery rate ranged from 90.0 - 110.0%. The limit of detection (LOD) for the new method was 3.0 pg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 10.0 pg. The total time of analysis was less than 6 min. No significant differences existed between the results measured by the new method and microwave ICP-MS. PMID:27682408

  6. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  7. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  8. Electrothermal vaporization for sample introduction into a three-electrode direct current argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, W.G.; Matusiewicz, H.; Barnes, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    The direct current plasma (DCP) configuration developed by Elliott has been shown to be an excellent source for analytical atomic emission spectrometry. The application of DCP excitation for atomic emission (AES) measurements of trace metals has, during the past 10 years, enhanced the versatility of AES as an analytical technique. In normal use, sample is pumped continuously into a ceramic cross-flow nebulizer, and the resulting aerosol is transported to the excitation region of the plasma. This approach is satisfactory for routine analyses, but under special circumstances benefits may be obtained from the use of electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction. In this study the adaptation of the commercial electrothermal vaporization system is explored for sample introduction into the three-electrode DCP. The ETV technique reduces the sample volume required for analysis and is especially convenient for volumes in the 5-20 ..mu..L range. Recent studies of aerosol approaching the plasma indicate that elimination of the solvent by ETV may permit more efficient introduction of the sample directly into the excitation region of the DCP than with conventional nebulization. Three elements chosen for this feasibility investigation (aluminum, copper, and manganese) cover a range of vaporization and excitation conditions and illustrate problems expected in analytical applications. For each element the effects of carrier gas flow rate and observation region were investigated using 1 ..mu..g/mL solutions. The conditions providing the best signal-to-background ratio were employed to measure the calibration function and estimate the detection limit. 8 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  9. Linearization of calibration curves by aerosol carrier effect of CCl 4 vapor in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2005-03-01

    Carbon tetrachloride vapor as gaseous phase modifier in a graphite furnace electrothermal vaporizer (GFETV) converts heavy volatile analyte forms to volatile and medium volatile chlorides and produces aerosol carrier effect, the latter being a less generally recognized benefit. However, the possible increase of polyatomic interferences in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GFETV-ICP-MS) by chlorine and carbon containing species due to CCl 4 vapor introduction has been discouraging with the use of low resolution, quadrupole type MS equipment. Being aware of this possible handicap, it was aimed at to investigate the feasibility of the use of this halogenating agent in ICP-MS with regard of possible hazards to the instrument, and also to explore the advantages under these specific conditions. With sample gas flow (inner gas flow) rate not higher than 900 ml min -1 Ar in the torch and 3 ml min -1 CCl 4 vapor flow rate in the furnace, the long-term stability of the instrument was ensured and the following benefits by the halocarbon were observed. The non-linearity error (defined in the text) of the calibration curves (signal versus mass functions) with matrix-free solution standards was 30-70% without, and 1-5% with CCl 4 vapor introduction, respectively, at 1 ng mass of Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb analytes. The sensitivity for these elements increased by 2-4-fold with chlorination, while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was essentially the same (2-5%) for the two cases in comparison. A vaporization temperature of 2650 °C was required for Cr in Ar atmosphere, while 2200 °C was sufficient in Ar + CCl 4 atmosphere to attain complete vaporization. Improvements in linear response and sensitivity were the highest for this least volatile element. The pyrolytic graphite layer inside the graphite tube was protected by the halocarbon, and tube life time was further increased by using traces of hydrocarbon vapor in the external sheath gas of the graphite furnace. Details

  10. Slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for steelmaking flue dust analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coedo, A. G.; Dorado, T.; Padilla, I.; Maibusch, R.; Kuss, H.-M.

    2000-02-01

    A commercial atomic absorption graphite furnace (AAGF), with a self-made adapter and valve system, was used as a slurry sampling cell for electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS). The system was applied to the determination of As, Sn, Sb, Se, Te, Bi, Cd, V, Ti and Mo in steelmaking flue dusts. Experimental conditions with respect to ETV and ICP-MS operating parameters were optimized. Compared to aqueous solutions, slurry samples were found to present better analyte transport. Microgram amounts of Rh were used to reduce the difference in analyte response in sensitivity for aqueous solutions of the tested analytes. No such increasing effect was observed for slurry samples and aqueous standards. An added quantity of Rh acting as modifier/carrier resulted in an increase for the same analytes in matrix-slurry solutions, even the addition of an extra Rh quantity has resulted in a decrease in the signals. The effect of Triton X-100 (used as a dispersant agent) on analyte intensity and precision was also studied. External calibration from aqueous standards spiked with 100 μg ml -1 Rh was performed to quantified 0.010 g/100 ml slurry samples. Results are presented for a certified reference electrical arc furnace flue dust (EAF): CRM-876-1 (Bureau of Analysis Samples Ltd., Cleveland, UK), a reference sample of coke ashes X-3705 (from AG der Dillinger Hüttenwerke, Germany), and a representative sample of EAF flue dust from a Spanish steelmaking company (CENIM-1). For the two reference materials an acceptable agreement with certificate values was achieved, and the results for the CENIM sample matched with those obtained from conventional nebulization solution.

  11. Electrothermal Vaporization Sample Introduction for Spaceflight Water Quality Monitoring via Gas Chromatography-Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, William T; Gazda, Daniel B; Limero, Thomas F; Minton, John M; Macatangay, Ariel V; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-06-16

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension in mission duration up to one year, an enhanced, real-time method for environmental monitoring is necessary. The station air is currently monitored for trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) via the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), while water is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. As mission scenarios extend beyond low Earth orbit, a convergence in analytical instrumentation to analyze both air and water samples is highly desirable. Since the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for air samples and many of the targets in air are also common to water, this platform is a logical starting point for developing a multimatrix monitor. Here, we report on the interfacing of an electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction unit with a ground-based AQM for monitoring target analytes in water. The results show that each of the compounds tested from water have similar GC-DMS parameters as the compounds tested in air. Moreover, the ETV enabled AQM detection of dimethlsilanediol (DMSD), a compound whose analysis had proven challenging using other sample introduction methods. Analysis of authentic ISS water samples using the ETV-AQM showed that DMSD could be successfully quantified, while the concentrations obtained for the other compounds also agreed well with laboratory results.

  12. Determination of aluminum and silicon in biological materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with electrothermal vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Barnes, Ramon M.

    An atomic emission spectrometric method is described for the determination of trace elements in microvolume samples especially of biological materials. Based upon the arrangement of a commercial electrothermal vaporizer and a 40-MHz inductively coupled plasma, the direct determination of aluminum and silicon in human body fluids such as urine and serum and aluminum in hemodialysis solution is performed. The instrumental system involves vaporizing the sample from a modified graphite electrode followed by atomization and excitation of the vapors in the ICP discharge. Compromise experimental conditions are reported and calibration functions compared. Limits of detection in 5-μl samples were 8 pg Al and 2.5 ng Si, and after preconcentration of Al with a poly(acrylamidoxime) resin, the detection limit was 1 pg Al. Recovery of 5 μg Si/ml and 10 ng Al/ml from aqueous and synthetic standards was 80-85% and 96-103%, respectively.

  13. Vapor generator wand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device for producing a stream of vapor for wind tunnel airflow visualization is described. An electrically conductive heating tube is used to resistively heat a vapor producing liquid. The heating and delivery systems are integrated to allow the device to present a small cross section to the air flow, thereby reducing disturbances due to the device. The simplicity of the design allows for inexpensive implementation and construction. The design is readily scaled for use in various wind tunnel applications. The device may also find uses in manufacturing, producing a vapor for deposition on a substrate.

  14. Tungsten isotope analysis of meteorite samples using electrothermal vaporization (ETV)-MC-ICPMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, S.; Sakata, S.; Hirata, T.

    2013-05-01

    Hf-W chronometer is based on the decay of 182Hf to 182W with a half-life of 8.9 ± 0.1 Myr. Hf is strongly lithophile elements, whereas W is moderately siderophile elements. Thus, the Hf-W age can provide critical information about the timing of metal-silicate differentiation (core formation) processes at the early stage of the planetary formation. Moreover, both the Hf and W is strongly refractory elements, the Hf-W age can reflect the timing of condensation or segregation of the metallic nuggets from chondritic reservoir at the early sequence of the solar system. The thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is widely used for W isotope analysis. However, a micro-gram amount of W is desired for Hf-W chronological studies in this technique. The ICP-MS technique coupled with the conventional nebulization technique is also used for W isotope measurement. With this technique, total amount of W required for the isotopic ratio measurements could be 50 - 100 ng. On the other hand, typical ion transmission efficiency from sample to ion collector would be <0.1% under the sample introduction using the nebulizer. This suggests that the sample introduction efficiency (i.e., high transmission efficiency) can be dramatically improved when the loss of sample mist could be minimized. To achieve this, we have developed a sample introduction technique using the electrothermal vaporization (ETV) technique for W isotope analysis. In this study, W sample in 2% HNO3 solution is loaded on the Re filament located in a small volume ETV chamber to achieve minimum loss of W vapor and also to reduce the memory of W within the chamber. Temperature of the Re filament is controlled by the incident current (0 - 4 A). The W evaporation is carried out under the two different ambient gasses, Ar or He. We found that W signal intensity profile obtained under the Ar carrier gas is spiky and unstable, and this is not suitable for the precise isotopic analysis. In strike contrast, the signal

  15. Determination of platinum and rhodium in environmental matrixes by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, F; Resano, M; Pruneda-Lopez, M; Moens, L

    2002-12-01

    Electrothermal vaporization from a graphite furnace was used in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for the determination of Pt and Rh in environmental matrixes. Solid samples of tunnel dust, grass, and atmospheric aerosol collected on a cellulose filter could be analyzed directly, such that sample dissolution-which is not self-evident for the determination of platinum group metals-could be avoided. By heating the graphite furnace according to a multistep temperature program, spectral interferences were avoided, since a "dry" plasma was obtained, while "parent" ions such as Cu, Zn, and Pb, giving origin to interfering molecular ions, were vaporized during the thermal pretreatment step. For tunnel dust, the most demanding sample matrix, a mixture of HCl and HF was used as a modifier to stimulate the vaporization of matrix components during the thermal pretreatment step and, hence, to alleviate matrix-induced analyte signal suppression during the actual vaporization step. Calibration was accomplished by means of single standard addition with an aqueous standard solution. The results obtained agreed within the experimental uncertainty with the corresponding reference values (certified values or results obtained using pneumatic nebulization ICPMS), while relative standard deviations of < or = 15% were typical for both Pt and Rh. In all samples, a Pt/Rh ratio of approximately 6-8 was established. For a typical sample mass of 2 mg, limits of detection were 0.35 ng/g for Pt and 0.05 ng/g for Rh.

  16. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  17. Cesium vapor thermionic current generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, H.H.; Israel, A.D.

    1981-11-03

    An electron current generator is disclosed which includes a nonelectrical heat source, a heat pipe having its first end in thermal relationship with the heat source, and a second end projecting upwardly therefrom and constituting a thermionic emitter enclosed within a chamber containing an alkali metal vapor at a substantially reduced atmospheric pressure. A substantial portion of the chamber wall constitutes a thermionic collector which is cooled by an appropriate cooling means to enhance current generation. A body of liquid metal is disposed between the heat source and heat pipe as a thermal stabilizing agent while a solid state diode is arranged in a forward bias situation in the electrical output of the generator to stabilize the voltage thereby forming a constant voltage current generator.

  18. Determination of trace elements in medicinal activated charcoal using slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with low vaporization temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chou; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2015-01-01

    The determination of Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb in medicinal activated charcoal by ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) was described. EDTA was used as the modifier to enhance the volatility of elements studied. The influences of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were studied. A relatively low vaporization temperature of 1000°C was used, which separated the analyte from the major matrix components that improved ion signals. The method has been applied to determine Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb in an NIST SRM 1633b Coal Fly Ash reference material and three brands of medicinal activated charcoal capsules using isotope dilution and standard addition calibration methods. The concentrations that are in ng g(-1) levels were in good agreement between different calibration methods. The precision between sample replicates was better than 7% with USS-ETV-ICP-MS technique. The method detection limit estimated from standard addition curves was 0.4, 0.3, 0.3, 0.3, 0.04 and 0.9 ng g(-1) for Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb, respectively, in original medicinal activated charcoal.

  19. Influence of sample matrix components on the selection of calibration strategies in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. W.; Miller-Ihli, N. J.

    1996-11-01

    Quantification of both digested and slurry samples were studied using ultrasonic slurry electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS). The results of external calibration using aqueous standards, method of additions, and In as an internal standard were compared. The elements studied include: Mn, Ni and Cu and the materials analyzed include: NIST SRM 1548 total diet and SRM 1549 milk powder. Palladium was used as a physical carrier and oxygen ashing was used to remove the organic part of the slurry matrix. Different degrees of matrix suppression effects were observed when different skimmer cones were employed. Aging of the skimmer cone and consequent loss of its original circular symmetry and decrease in orifice size resulted in differences in sampling of the ion beam and changes in the degree of matrix effects were observed as the skimmer cone was rotated. The presence of matrix suppression effects is evidenced by strong suppressions in the Ar 2, C and analyte signals. When matrix suppression effects were present, the method of external calibration provided low recoveries (average accuracy 73 ± 12%), therefore it was necessary to use the method of additions to compensate for these problems, providing an average accuracy of 108 ± 13%. When matrix effects were absent, the external calibration method resulted in an average accuracy of 101 ± 16%.

  20. Determination of noble metals in biological samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, following cloud point extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreia Mesquita da Silva, Márcia; Lúcia Azzolin Frescura, Vera; José Curtius, Adilson

    2001-10-01

    A simple separation procedure for noble metals based on cloud point extraction is proposed. The analyte ions in aqueous acidic solution, obtained by the acid digestion of the samples, were complexed with O, O-diethyl-dithiophosphate and Triton X-114 was added as a non-ionic surfactant. By increasing the temperature up to the cloud point, a phase separation occurs, resulting in an aqueous phase and a surfactant-rich phase containing most of the analytes that were complexed. The metals in the surfactant-rich phase were determined by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The extraction conditions as well as the instrumental parameters were optimized. Enrichment factors ranging from 7 (Rh) to 60 (Pt) and limits of detection from 0.6 (Pt) to 3.0 ng l -1 (Rh) were obtained in the digested samples. The extraction was not efficient for Ir. Among the reference materials analyzed in this work, only one (SRM 2670, urine) presented recommended values for Au and Pt. Due to the non-availability of adequate CRMs, accuracy was assessed by spiking known analyte amounts to the acid digests. Recoveries close to 100% were observed for all the studied elements but Ru. Poor agreement between found and recommended values was observed for non-digested urine sample, probably due to the carrier effect of co-extracted residual matrix components. However, good agreement was reached after urine acid mineralization.

  1. Electrothermal linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derr, L. J.; Tobias, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Converting electric power into powerful linear thrust without generation of magnetic fields is accomplished with an electrothermal linear actuator. When treated by an energized filament, a stack of bimetallic washers expands and drives the end of the shaft upward.

  2. A miniaturized capacitively coupled plasma microtorch optical emission spectrometer and a Rh coiled-filament as small-sized electrothermal vaporization device for simultaneous determination of volatile elements from liquid microsamples: spectral and analytical characterization.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Darvasi, Eugen; Butaciu, Sinziana; Ponta, Michaela; Petreus, Dorin; Mihaltan, Alin I; Frentiu, Maria

    2014-11-01

    A low power and low argon consumption (13.56 MHz, 15 W, 150 ml min(-1)) capacitively coupled plasma microtorch interfaced with a low-resolution microspectrometer and a small-sized electrothermal vaporization Rh coiled-filament as liquid microsample introduction device into the plasma was investigated for the simultaneous determination of several volatile elements of interest for environment. Constructive details, spectral and analytical characteristics, and optimum operating conditions of the laboratory equipment for the simultaneous determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn requiring low vaporization power are provided. The method involves drying of 10 μl sample at 100°C, vaporization at 1500°C and emission measurement by capture of 20 successive spectral episodes each at an integration time of 500 ms. Experiments showed that emission of elements and plasma background were disturbed by the presence of complex matrix and hot Ar flow transporting the microsample into plasma. The emission spectrum of elements is simple, dominated by the resonance lines. The analytical system provided detection limits in the ng ml(-1) range: 0.5(Ag); 1.5(Cd); 5.6(Cu); 20(Pb) and 3(Zn) and absolute detection limits of the order of pg: 5(Ag); 15(Cd); 56(Cu); 200(Pb) and 30(Zn). It was demonstrated the utility and capability of the miniaturized analytical system in the simultaneous determination of elements in soil and water sediment using the standard addition method to compensate for the non-spectral effects of alkali and earth alkaline elements. The analysis of eight certified reference materials exhibited reliable results with recovery in the range of 95-108% and precision of 0.5-9.0% for the five examined elements. The proposed miniaturized analytical system is attractive due to the simple construction of the electrothermal vaporization device and microtorch, low costs associated to plasma generation, high analytical sensitivity and easy-to-run for simultaneous multielemental

  3. Control of flow through a vapor generator

    DOEpatents

    Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2005-11-08

    In a Rankine cycle system wherein a vapor generator receives heat from exhaust gases, provision is made to avoid overheating of the refrigerant during ORC system shut down while at the same time preventing condensation of those gases within the vapor generator when its temperature drops below a threshold temperature by diverting the flow of hot gases to ambient and to thereby draw ambient air through the vapor generator in the process. In one embodiment, a bistable ejector is adjustable between one position, in which the hot gases flow through the vapor generator, to another position wherein the gases are diverted away from the vapor generator. Another embodiment provides for a fixed valve ejector with a bias towards discharging to ambient, but with a fan on the downstream side of said vapor generator for overcoming this bias.

  4. Sample transport efficiency with electrothermal vaporization and electrostatic deposition technique in multielement solid sample analysis of plant and cereal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Jens; Buchkamp, Thomas; Hermann, Gerd; Lasnitschka, Georg

    2000-05-01

    A graphite furnace of the boat-in-tube type as electrothermal vaporizer (ETV) and an electrostatic precipitator were used for determining analyte transport efficiencies and dependencies on plant and cereal matrices, and on carrier elements. All analytical measurements were carried out with coherent forward scattering (CFS) using simultaneous multielement determinations. Transport efficiencies of up to 19% for Cu, 21% for Fe and Mn, and 36% for Pb from the ETV boat to the L'vov platform were obtained for the standard reference materials BCR CRM 281 rye grass, BCR CRM 189 wholemeal flour and NIST SRM 1567 wheat flour and multielement standard solutions containing approximately the same element ratios as certified for the solid samples. The analytical accuracy of the procedure including the ETV process and the electrostatic deposition was tested with Cu, Fe and Pb in BCR CRM 281, Cu, Fe and Mn in BCR CRM 189, and Fe and Mn in NIST SRM 1567 by weighing the solid sample onto the ETV-boat and calibrating against multielement standard solutions dosed into the ETV-boat as well. The analyte addition technique was tested with Cu, Fe and Mn in wholemeal flour. The deviations of the results were below 10% and the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) values were typically 3-10%. The influence of added potassium and palladium nitrates as physical carriers on the transport efficiencies of Ag, Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn standard solutions was investigated with simultaneous multielement determination. Using K and Pd as carriers increased transport efficiencies by factors up to 1.74 in comparison to measurements without an added carrier.

  5. A vapor generator for transonic flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert A.; Hess, Robert W.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A vapor generator was developed for use in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). Propylene glycol was used as the vapor material. The vapor generator system was evaluated in a laboratory setting and then used in the TDT as part of a laser light sheet flow visualization system. The vapor generator provided satisfactory seeding of the air flow with visible condensate particles, smoke, for tests ranging from low subsonic through transonic speeds for tunnel total pressures from atmospheric pressure down to less than 0.1 atmospheric pressure.

  6. Direct solid sampling system for electrothermal vaporization and its application to the determination of chlorine in nanopowder samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Bunji; Uchihara, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Ishizaka, Syoji; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2015-06-01

    An electrothermal vaporization (ETV) system using a tungsten boat furnace (TBF) sample cuvette was designed for the direct determination of chlorine in metallic nanopowders and fine powder samples with detection by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). A portion of a powder or particle sample was placed into a small tungsten sample cuvette and weighed accurately. A modifier solution of aqueous or alcoholic potassium hydroxide was added to it. Then, the cuvette was positioned on the TBF incorporated into the ETV apparatus. The analyte was vaporized and introduced into the ICP optical emission spectrometer with a carrier gas stream of argon and hydrogen. The metal samples were analyzed by using an external calibration curve prepared from aqueous standard solutions. Few chemical species including analyte and some chlorine-free species were introduced into the ICP, because the analyte has been separated from the matrix before introduction. Under such dry plasma conditions, the energy of plasma discharge was focused on the excitation of chlorine atoms, and as a result, lower detection limits were achieved. A detection limit of 170 ng g(-1) of chlorine in solid metal samples was established when 60 mg sample was used. The relative standard deviation for 16 replicate measurements obtained with 100 ng chlorine was 8.7%. Approximately 30 batches could be vaporized per hour. The analytical results for various nanopowders (iron (III) oxide, copper, silver, and gold) and metallic fine powder samples (silver and gold) are described. PMID:25863402

  7. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  8. Simultaneous determination of bromine and chlorine in coal using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Pereira, Éderson R; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L G

    2014-12-10

    A new method for the direct analysis of coal using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis was developed, aiming at the determination of Br and Cl. The procedure does not require any significant sample pretreatment and allows simultaneous determination of both elements to be carried out, requiring small mass aliquots of sample (about 0.5 mg). All operating parameters, including carrier gas flow-rate and RF power, were optimized for maximum sensitivity. The use of modifiers/aerosol carriers (Pd, Pd+Al and Pd+Ca) was evaluated, and the mixture of Pd and Ca was chosen, allowing pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures of 700°C and 1900°C, respectively. Chlorine was accurately determined using calibration against solid standards, whereas Br could also be determined using calibration against aqueous standard solutions. The limits of quantification were 0.03 μg g(-1) for Br and 7 μg g(-1) for Cl, and no spectral interferences were observed.

  9. Assessment of the Halogen Content of Brazilian Inhalable Particulate Matter (PM10) Using High Resolution Molecular Absorption Spectrometry and Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, with Direct Solid Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Almeida, Tarcisio S; Alves, Jeferson C; Araujo, Rennan G O; Borges, Daniel L G

    2016-03-15

    Halogens in the atmosphere play an important role in climate change and also represent a potential health hazard. However, quantification of halogens is not a trivial task, and methods that require minimum sample preparation are interesting alternatives. Hence, the aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of direct solid sample analysis using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS) for F determination and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for simultaneous Cl, Br, and I determination in airborne inhalable particulate matter (PM10) collected in the metropolitan area of Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Analysis using HR-CS MAS was accomplished by monitoring the CaF molecule, which was generated at high temperatures in the graphite furnace after the addition of Ca. Analysis using ETV-ICP-MS was carried out using Ca as chemical modifier/aerosol carrier in order to avoid losses of Cl, Br, and I during the pyrolysis step, with concomitant use of Pd as a permanent modifier. The direct analysis approach resulted in LODs that were proven adequate for halogen determination in PM10, using either standard addition calibration or calibration against a certified reference material. The method allowed the quantification of the halogens in 14 PM10 samples collected in a northeastern coastal city in Brazil. The results demonstrated variations of halogen content according to meteorological conditions, particularly related to rainfall, humidity, and sunlight irradiation.

  10. Assessment of homogeneity and minimum sample mass for cadmium analysis in powdered certified reference materials and real rice samples by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuefei; Liu, Jixin; Huang, Yatao; Feng, Li; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Yongzhong; Wang, Min

    2013-01-30

    To optimize analytical quality controls of solid sampling electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SS-ETV-AFS), the homogeneity (H(E)) of rice samples and their minimum sample mass (M) for cadmium analysis were evaluated using three certified reference materials (CRMs) and real rice samples. The effects of different grinding degrees (particle sizes <0.85, <0.25, <0.15, and >1 mm) on H(E) and M of real rice samples were also investigated. The calculated M values of three CRMs by the Pauwels equation were 2.19, 19.76, and 3.79 mg. The well-ground real rice samples (particle size <0.25 mm) demonstrated good homogeneity, and the M values were 3.48-4.27 mg. On the basis of these results, the Cd concentrations measured by the proposed method were compared with the results by microwave digestion graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a 0.5 g sample mass. There was no significant difference between these two methods, which meant that SS-ETV-AFS could be used to accurately detect Cd in rice with several milligrams of samples instead of the certified value (200 mg) or the recommended mass (200-500 mg) of the methods of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  11. Electrothermal vaporization coupled with inductively coupled plasma array-detector mass spectrometry for the multielement analysis of Al2O3 ceramic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Peschel, Birgit U.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Wetzel, William C.; Schilling, G D.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Broekaert, Jose AC; Sperline, Roger; Denton, M BONNER.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.

    2006-01-01

    An electrothermal vaporization (ETV) system useful for the analysis of solutions and slurries has been coupled with a sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) equipped with an array detector. The ability of this instrument to record the transient signals produced in ETV-ICP-MS is demonstrated. Detection limits for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ga are in the range of 4-60 pg ?L-1 for aqueous solutions and in the low ?g g-1 range for the analysis of 10 mg mL-1 slurries of Al2O3 powders. The dynamic ranges measured for Fe, Cu and Ga spanned 3-5 orders of magnitude when the detector was operated in the low-gain mode and appear to be limited by the ETV system. Trace amounts of Fe, Cu and Ga could be directly determined in Al2O3 powders at the 2-270 ?g g-1 level without the use of thermochemical reagents. The results well agree with literature values for Fe, whereas deviations of 30-50% at the 2-90 ?g g-1 level for Cu and Ga were found.

  12. Imaging of elements in leaves of tobacco by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Plants take up and store elements according to the environment in which they are growing. Because plants are at the base of the food chain, the determination of essential elements or toxic elements in plant materials is of importance. However, it is assumed that the element content determined on selected tissues may provide more specific information than that derived from the whole plant analysis. In this work, we assessed the feasibility of solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry analyses for quantitative imaging of Cd and Mg in plant leaves. Leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were selected to be used as samples. To produce a two dimensional image, sections cut from leaf samples were analyzed. Cellulose doped with multi-element solution standards was used as calibration samples. Two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato leaves) were used to verify the accuracy of measurements with good agreement between the measured concentrations and the certified values. Quantitative imaging revealed the inhomogeneous distribution of the selected elements. Excess of Cd and Mg tended to be focused on peripheral regions and the tip of the leaf.

  13. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity.

  14. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  15. Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to determine Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in several cereal samples. Thioacetamide was used as the modifier to enhance the ion signals. The background ions at the masses of interest were reduced in intensity significantly by using 1.0 mL min- 1 methane (CH4) as reaction cell gas in the dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Since the sensitivities of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in different matrices were quite different, standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in these cereal samples. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 1, 10, 4, 12 and 2 ng g- 1 for Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se, respectively, in original cereal samples. This procedure has been applied to the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se whose concentrations are in μg g- 1 (except Cr and Se) in standard reference materials (SRM) of National institute of standards and technology (NIST), NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and two cereal samples purchased from a local market. The analysis results of reference materials agreed with certified values at 95% confidence level according to Student's T-test. The results for the real world cereal samples were also found to be in good agreement with the pneumatic nebulization DRC ICP-MS results of the sample solutions.

  16. Capillary microextraction combined with fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the determination of trace lanthanum, europium, dysprosium and yttrium in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Hu, Chengguo; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2013-10-15

    In this work, a congo red modified single wall carbon nanotubes (CR-SWCNTs) coated fused-silica capillary was prepared and used for capillary microextraction (CME) of trace amounts of lanthanum (La), europium (Eu), dysprosium (Dy) and yttrium (Y) in human hair followed by fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (FETV-ICP-OES) determination. The adsorption properties and stability of the prepared CR-SWCNTs coated capillary along with the various factors affecting the separation/preconcentration of La, Eu, Dy and Y by CME were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, with a consumption of 2 mL sample solution, a theoretical enrichment factor of 50 and a detection limit (3σ) of 0.12 ng mL(-1) for La, 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Eu, 0.11 ng mL(-1) for Dy and 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Y were obtained, respectively. The preparation reproducibility of the CR-SWCNTs coated capillary was investigated and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were ranging from 4.1% (Eu) to 4.4% (La) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=7) in one batch, and from 5.7% (Eu) to 6.1% (Y) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=5) among different batches. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of real-world human hair sample and the recoveries for the spiked sample were in the range of 93-105%. The method was also applied to the determination of La, Eu, Dy and Y in Certified Reference Material of GBW07601 human hair, and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values.

  17. Ultra-trace determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental water by surfactant assisted dispersive liquid liquid microextraction coupled with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2016-08-01

    A new method by coupling surfactant assisted dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (SA-DLLME) with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) was proposed for the analysis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in environmental water samples. Effective separation of AuNPs from ionic gold species was achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. Various experimental parameters affecting SA-DLLME of AuNPs, such as the organic solvent, organic solvent volume, pH of the sample, the kind of surfactant, surfactant concentration, vortex time, speed of centrifugation, centrifugation time, and different coating as well as sizes of AuNPs were investigated carefully. Furthermore, the interference of coexisting ions, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other metal nanoparticles (NPs) were studied. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 2.2 ng L- 1 and an enrichment factor of 152-fold was achieved for AuNPs, and the original morphology of the AuNPs could be maintained during the extraction process. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of AuNPs in environmental water samples, including tap water, the East Lake water, and the Yangtze River water, with recoveries in the range of 89.6-102%. Compared with the established methods for metal NPs analysis, the proposed method has the merits of simple and fast operation, low detection limit, high selectivity, good tolerance to the sample matrix and no digestion or dilution required. It provides an efficient quantification methodology for monitoring AuNPs' pollution in the environmental water and evaluating its toxicity.

  18. Capillary microextraction combined with fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the determination of trace lanthanum, europium, dysprosium and yttrium in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Hu, Chengguo; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2013-10-15

    In this work, a congo red modified single wall carbon nanotubes (CR-SWCNTs) coated fused-silica capillary was prepared and used for capillary microextraction (CME) of trace amounts of lanthanum (La), europium (Eu), dysprosium (Dy) and yttrium (Y) in human hair followed by fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (FETV-ICP-OES) determination. The adsorption properties and stability of the prepared CR-SWCNTs coated capillary along with the various factors affecting the separation/preconcentration of La, Eu, Dy and Y by CME were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, with a consumption of 2 mL sample solution, a theoretical enrichment factor of 50 and a detection limit (3σ) of 0.12 ng mL(-1) for La, 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Eu, 0.11 ng mL(-1) for Dy and 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Y were obtained, respectively. The preparation reproducibility of the CR-SWCNTs coated capillary was investigated and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were ranging from 4.1% (Eu) to 4.4% (La) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=7) in one batch, and from 5.7% (Eu) to 6.1% (Y) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=5) among different batches. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of real-world human hair sample and the recoveries for the spiked sample were in the range of 93-105%. The method was also applied to the determination of La, Eu, Dy and Y in Certified Reference Material of GBW07601 human hair, and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. PMID:24054601

  19. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  20. Dispersive liquid liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the speciation of inorganic selenium in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Duan, Jiankun; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2013-10-15

    A novel method based on dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) determination was proposed for the speciation of inorganic selenium by using 5-mercapto-3-phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thione potassium salt (Bismuthiol II) as both chelating reagent and chemical modifier. In this method, 500 μL ethanol (as disperser solvent) containing 70 μL chloroform (as extraction solvent) and 0.2 g L(-1) Bismuthiol II (as chelating reagent) was rapidly injected into a sample solution to form cloudy solution. The complex of Se(IV) with Bismuthiol II was rapidly extracted into the extraction solvent at pH 2.0, while Se(VI) was remained in the aqueous solutions. Thus, the separation of Se(IV) and Se(VI) could be realized. After centrifugation, the complex of Se(IV) and Bismuthiol II concentrated in the extraction solvent was introduced into the ETV-ICP-MS for determination of Se(IV). Se(VI) was reduced to Se(IV) prior to determination of total selenium, and its assay was based on subtracting Se(IV) from total selenium. The main factors influencing the DLLME and the vaporization behavior of selenium in ETV were investigated systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for Se(IV) was 0.047 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 7.2% (CSe(IV)=1.0 ng mL(-1), n=8) with an enhancement factor of 64.8-fold from only 5 mL of water sample. The proposed method was successfully applied to the speciation of inorganic selenium in different environmental water samples with recoveries ranging from 94.8 to 108% for the spiking samples. In order to validate the proposed method, a Certified Reference Material of Environment Water (GBW(E)080395) was analyzed, and the determined value obtained was in good agreement with the certified value.

  1. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, L.W.

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid - starting as feedwater heating where no vapors are present, progressing to nucleate heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with film heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10 to 30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  2. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  3. Generation and characterization of aerosols and vapors for inhalation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, M I; Wood, G O; Ettinger, H J

    1976-01-01

    Control of aerosol and vapor characteristics that affect the toxicity of inhaled contaminants often determines the methods of generating exposure atmospheres. Generation methods for aerosols and vapors are presented. The characteristics of the resulting exposure atmosphere and the limitations of the various generation methods are discussed. Methods and instruments for measuring the airborne contaminant with respect to various charcteristics are also described. PMID:797565

  4. Vapor-fed microfluidic hydrogen generator.

    PubMed

    Modestino, M A; Dumortier, M; Hosseini Hashemi, S M; Haussener, S; Moser, C; Psaltis, D

    2015-05-21

    Water-splitting devices that operate with humid air feeds are an attractive alternative for hydrogen production as the required water input can be obtained directly from ambient air. This article presents a novel proof-of-concept microfluidic platform that makes use of polymeric ion conductor (Nafion®) thin films to absorb water from air and performs the electrochemical water-splitting process. Modelling and experimental tools are used to demonstrate that these microstructured devices can achieve the delicate balance between water, gas, and ionic transport processes required for vapor-fed devices to operate continuously and at steady state, at current densities above 3 mA cm(-2). The results presented here show that factors such as the thickness of the Nafion films covering the electrodes, convection of air streams, and water content of the ionomer can significantly affect the device performance. The insights presented in this work provide important guidelines for the material requirements and device designs that can be used to create practical electrochemical hydrogen generators that work directly under ambient air.

  5. Solar vapor generation enabled by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Oara; Urban, Alexander S; Day, Jared; Lal, Surbhi; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-01-22

    Solar illumination of broadly absorbing metal or carbon nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid produces vapor without the requirement of heating the fluid volume. When particles are dispersed in water at ambient temperature, energy is directed primarily to vaporization of water into steam, with a much smaller fraction resulting in heating of the fluid. Sunlight-illuminated particles can also drive H(2)O-ethanol distillation, yielding fractions significantly richer in ethanol content than simple thermal distillation. These phenomena can also enable important compact solar applications such as sterilization of waste and surgical instruments in resource-poor locations.

  6. Solar vapor generation enabled by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Oara; Urban, Alexander S; Day, Jared; Lal, Surbhi; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-01-22

    Solar illumination of broadly absorbing metal or carbon nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid produces vapor without the requirement of heating the fluid volume. When particles are dispersed in water at ambient temperature, energy is directed primarily to vaporization of water into steam, with a much smaller fraction resulting in heating of the fluid. Sunlight-illuminated particles can also drive H(2)O-ethanol distillation, yielding fractions significantly richer in ethanol content than simple thermal distillation. These phenomena can also enable important compact solar applications such as sterilization of waste and surgical instruments in resource-poor locations. PMID:23157159

  7. Determination of arsenic in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometry after hydride generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.; Welsch, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Rock and soil samples are decomposed with HClO4-HNO3; after further treatment, arsine is generated and absorbed in a dilute silver nitrate solution. Aliquots of this solution are injected into a carbon rod atomizer. Down to 1 ppm As in samples can be determined and there are no significant interferences, even from chromium in soils. Good results were obtained for geochemical reference samples. ?? 1979.

  8. Dynamic headspace generation and quantitation of triacetone triperoxide vapor.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Braden C; Lubrano, Adam L; Field, Christopher R; Collins, Greg E

    2014-02-28

    Two methods for quantitation of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor using a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet coupled to a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) have been demonstrated. The dynamic headspace of bulk TATP was mixed with clean humid air to produce a TATP vapor stream. Sampling via a heated transfer line to a PTV inlet with a Tenax-TA™ filled liner allowed for direct injection of the vapor stream to a GC/MS for vapor quantitation. TATP was extracted from the vapor stream and subsequently desorbed from the PTV liner for splitless injection on the GC column. Calibration curves were prepared using solution standards with a standard split/splitless GC inlet for quantitation of the TATP vapor. Alternatively, vapor was sampled onto a Tenax-TA™ sample tube and placed into a thermal desorption system. In this instance, vapor was desorbed from the tube and subsequently trapped on a liquid nitrogen cooled PTV inlet. Calibration curves for this method were prepared from direct liquid injection of standards onto samples tube with the caveat that a vacuum is applied to the tube during deposition to ensure that the volatile TATP penetrates into the tube. Vapor concentration measurements, as determined by either GC/MS analysis or mass gravimetry of the bulk TATP, were statistically indistinguishable. Different approaches to broaden the TATP vapor dynamic range, including diluent air flow, sample chamber temperature, sample vial orifice size, and sample size are discussed. Vapor concentrations between 50 and 5400ngL(-1) are reported, with stable vapor generation observed for as long as 60 consecutive hours. PMID:24508355

  9. Continuous flow, explosives vapor generator and sensor chamber.

    PubMed

    Collins, Greg E; Giordano, Braden C; Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Ananth, Ramagopal; Hammond, Mark; Merritt, Charles D; Tucker, John E; Malito, Michael; Eversole, Jay D; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A novel liquid injection vapor generator (LIVG) is demonstrated that is amenable to low vapor pressure explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine. The LIVG operates in a continuous manner, providing a constant and stable vapor output over a period of days and whose concentration can be extended over as much as three orders of magnitude. In addition, a large test atmosphere chamber attached to the LIVG is described, which enables the generation of a stable test atmosphere with controllable humidity and temperature. The size of the chamber allows for the complete insertion of testing instruments or arrays of materials into a uniform test atmosphere, and various electrical feedthroughs, insertion ports, and sealed doors permit simple and effective access to the sample chamber and its vapor.

  10. Continuous flow, explosives vapor generator and sensor chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Greg E.; Giordano, Braden C.; Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Ananth, Ramagopal; Hammond, Mark; Merritt, Charles D.; Tucker, John E.; Malito, Michael; Eversole, Jay D.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A novel liquid injection vapor generator (LIVG) is demonstrated that is amenable to low vapor pressure explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine. The LIVG operates in a continuous manner, providing a constant and stable vapor output over a period of days and whose concentration can be extended over as much as three orders of magnitude. In addition, a large test atmosphere chamber attached to the LIVG is described, which enables the generation of a stable test atmosphere with controllable humidity and temperature. The size of the chamber allows for the complete insertion of testing instruments or arrays of materials into a uniform test atmosphere, and various electrical feedthroughs, insertion ports, and sealed doors permit simple and effective access to the sample chamber and its vapor.

  11. Spectral probing of impact-generated vapor in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Eberhardy, Clara A.

    2015-03-01

    High-speed spectra of hypervelocity impacts at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) captured the rapidly evolving conditions of impact-generated vapor as a function of impact angle, viewpoint, and time (within the first 50 μs). Impact speeds possible at the AVGR (<7 km/s) are insufficient to induce significant vaporization in silicates, other than the high-temperature (but low-mass) jetting component created at first contact. Consequently, this study used powdered dolomite as a proxy for surveying the evolution and distribution of chemical constituents within much longer lasting vapor. Seven separate telescopes focused on different portions of the impact vapor plume and were connected through quartz fibers to two 0.35 cm monochromaters. Quarter-space experiments reduced the thermal background and opaque phases due to condensing particles and heated projectile fragments while different exposure times isolated components passing through different the fields of view, both above and below the surface within the growing transient cavity. At early times (<5 μs), atomic emission lines dominate the spectra. At later times, molecular emission lines dominate the composition of the vapor plume along a given direction. Layered targets and target mixtures isolated the source and reveal that much of the vaporization comes from the uppermost surface. Collisions by projectile fragments downrange also make significant contributions for impacts below 60° (from the horizontal). Further, impacts into mixtures of silicates with powdered dolomite reveal that frictional heating must play a role in vapor production. Such results have implications for processes controlling vaporization on planetary surfaces including volatile release, atmospheric evolution (formation and erosion), vapor generated by the Deep Impact collision, and the possible consequences of the Chicxulub impact.

  12. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  13. Porous graphitized carbon for adsorptive removal of benzene and the electrothermal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjun; Lu, Renjie; Dou, Baojuan; Ma, Chunyan; Hu, Qiuhong; Liang, Yan; Wu, Feng; Qiao, Shizhang; Hao, Zhengping

    2012-11-20

    Graphitized carbons with mesoporous and macroporous structures were synthesized by a facile template-catalysis procedure using resorcinol and formaldehyde as carbon precursors and particulate hydrated metal oxides as both template and catalyst precursors. The materials were used as novel adsorbents for low-concentration benzene vapor. Furthermore, on the basis of the good electrical conductivities associated with the graphitized structures, an electrothermal desorption technique, which involved passing electric currents through the adsorbents to generate Joule heat, was employed to regenerate the saturated adsorbents and produce enriched benzene vapors. In comparison to microporous activated carbon, the porous graphitized carbons could afford a much quicker and more efficient regeneration by electrothermal desorption technique due to their enhanced conductivity and larger pore sizes. In addition, the concentration of the desorbed organics could be controlled by adjusting the applied voltages, which might be interesting for practical secondary treatment. It is promising that the joint utilization of porous graphitized carbon adsorbents and electrothermal desorption technique might develop effective and energy-saving processes for VOCs removal. PMID:23092151

  14. Hollow Mesoporous Plasmonic Nanoshells for Enhanced Solar Vapor Generation.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Marcin S; Choi, Jae-Woo; La Grange, Thomas; Modestino, Miguel; Hashemi, Seyyed Mohammad Hosseini; Pu, Ye; Birkhold, Susanne; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-04-13

    In the past decade, nanomaterials have made their way into a variety of technologies in solar energy, enhancing the performance by taking advantage of the phenomena inherent to the nanoscale. Recent examples exploit plasmonic core/shell nanoparticles to achieve efficient direct steam generation, showing great promise of such nanoparticles as a useful material for solar applications. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel technique for fabricating bimetallic hollow mesoporous plasmonic nanoshells that yield a higher solar vapor generation rate compared with their solid-core counterparts. On the basis of a combination of nanomasking and incomplete galvanic replacement, the hollow plasmonic nanoshells can be fabricated with tunable absorption and minimized scattering. When exposed to sun light, each hollow nanoshell generates vapor bubbles simultaneously from the interior and exterior. The vapor nucleating from the interior expands and diffuses through the pores and combines with the bubbles formed on the outer wall. The lack of a solid core significantly accelerates the initial vapor nucleation and the overall steam generation dynamics. More importantly, because the density of the hollow porous nanoshells is essentially equal to the surrounding host medium these particles are much less prone to sedimentation, a problem that greatly limits the performance and implementation of standard nanoparticle dispersions.

  15. The fourth-generation Water Vapor Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, R. Michael; Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Neal, Helen L.; McDermid, I. Stuart

    2012-02-01

    For 20 years the Naval Research Laboratory has been making continuous water vapor profile measurements at 22.235 GHz with the Water Vapor Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer (WVMS) instruments, with the program expanding from one to three instruments in the first 6 years. Since the initial deployments there have been gradual improvements in the instrument design which have improved data quality and reduced maintenance requirements. Recent technological developments have made it possible to entirely redesign the instrument and improve not only the quality of the measurements but also the capability of the instrument. We present the fourth-generation instrument now operating at Table Mountain, California, which incorporates the most recent advances in microwave radiometry. This instrument represents the most significant extension of our measurement capability to date, enabling us to measure middle atmospheric water vapor from ˜26-80 km.

  16. Direct atomic absorption determination of cadmium and lead in strongly interfering matrices by double vaporization with a two-step electrothermal atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinshtein, Ilia L.; Vilpan, Yuri A.; Saraev, Alexei V.; Vasilieva, Lubov A.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal pretreatment of a sample using double vaporization in a two-step atomizer with a purged vaporizer makes possible the direct analysis of samples with strongly interfering matrices including solids. A porous-graphite capsule or a filter inserted into the vaporizer is used for solid sample analysis. The technique was used for the direct determination of Cd and Pb in human urine, potatoes, wheat, bovine liver, milk powder, grass-cereal mixtures, caprolactam, bituminous-shale and polyvinyl chloride plastic without chemical modification or any other sample pretreatment.

  17. Dual extraction based on solid phase extraction and solidified floating organic drop microextraction for speciation of arsenic and its distribution in tea leaves and tea infusion by electrothermal vaporization ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhong; Li, Jianfen; Lu, Dengbo; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-15

    A dual extraction based on solid phase extraction (SPE) and solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) was developed for As species in tea leaves and tea infusion by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, including total, suspended, soluble, organic and inorganic As as well as As(III) and As(V). In SPE step, titanium dioxide nanotubes were used for preconcentration of analytes and removal of sample matrix. Elution solution from SPE was employed for further preconcentration and separation of analytes with SFODME. Under optimal conditions, detection limits of this method were 0.046 and 0.072pgmL(-1) with relative standard deviations of 6.3% and 5.8% for As(III) and As(V) (n=9, c=1.0ngmL(-1)), respectively. A preconcentration factor of 500-fold was achieved for As(III) and As(V). This method was successfully applied for analysis of speciation of arsenic and its distribution in tea leaves, tea infusion and certified reference material of tea leaves. PMID:27283691

  18. Plasmonic Nanobubbles as Transient Vapor Nanobubbles Generated Around Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina; Hu, Ying; Latterini, Loredana; Tarpani, Luigi; Lee, Seunghyun; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Hafner, Jason H.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2010-01-01

    We have used short laser pulses to generate transient vapor nanobubbles around plasmonic nanoparticles. The photothermal, mechanical and optical properties of such bubbles were found to be different from those of plasmonic nanoparticle and vapor bubbles as well. This phenomena was considered as a new complex nanosystem – plasmonic nanobubble (PNB). Mechanical and optical scattering properties of PNB depended upon the nanoparticle surface and heat capacity, clusterization state, and the optical pulse length. The generation of the PNB required much higher laser pulse fluence thresholds than the explosive boiling level, and was characterized by the relatively high lower threshold of the minimal size (lifetime) of PNB. Optical scattering by PNB and its diameter (measured as the lifetime) has been varied with the fluence of laser pulse and this has demonstrated the tunable nature of PNB. PMID:20307085

  19. Studies of interfaces and vapors with Optical Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, C. S.

    1993-12-01

    Optical Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) has been applied to the study of soap-like molecules adsorbed to the water-air interface. By calibrating the signal from a soluble monolayer with that of an insoluble homolog, absolute measurements of the surface density could be obtained and related to the bulk concentration and surface tension. We could then demonstrate that the soluble surfactant forms a single monolayer at the interface. Furthermore, it deviates significantly from the ideal case in that its activity coefficients are far from 1, yet those coefficients remain constant over a broad range of surface pressures. We present evidence of a first-order phase transition taking place during the adsorption of this soluble monolayer. We consider the effects of the non-ideal behavior and the phase transition on the microscopic model of adsorption, and formulate an alternative to the Langmuir picture of adsorption which is just as simple, yet it can more easily allow for non-ideal behavior. The second half of this thesis considers the problem of SHG in bulk metal vapors. The symmetry of the vapor forbids SHG, yet it has been observed. We consider several models whereby the symmetry of the vapor is broken by the presence of the laser and compare their predictions to new observations we have made using a few-picosecond laser pulse. The two-lobed output beam profile shows that it is the vapor-plus-beam combination whose symmetry is important. The dependence on vapor pressure demonstrates the coherent nature of the radiation, while the dependence on buffer gas pressure hints at a change of the symmetry in time. The time-dependence is measured directly with a preliminary pump-probe measurement. The magnitude and intensity dependence of the signal are also measured. All but one of the models are eliminated by this comparison.

  20. The electrothermal ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.; Mitchell, C. E.; Shaw, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    An electrothermal ramjet configuration is examined as a possible alternative to rail guns and mass drivers for high acceleration launch missions. For a specific mission (earth escape) the idealized performance of the electrothermal ramjet, the electrothermal rocket and the electromagnetic acceleration system are compared. This comparison indicates that the gross performance of the ramjet compares favorably with that of the ideal electromagnetic acceleration system. A specific configuration for the ramjet is chosen and models for the dynamics, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics are presented. Results of calculations for a typical supersonic launch cycle suggest that pressure, temperature and power demand profiles associated with ramjet operation should be reasonable. A light gas gun is proposed to accelerate the vehicle to the critical velocity where efficient ramjet operation can begin. The theoretical performance of the ramjet is also shown to be substantially better than that of the light gas gun at high velocities.

  1. Photoacoustic-pulse generation and propagation in a metal vapor.

    PubMed

    Tam, A C; Zapka, W; Chiang, K; Imaino, W

    1982-01-01

    Photoacoustic-pulse generation by breakdown is achieved in dense cesium metal vapors of vapor pressures ranging from 2 to 130 Torr by using a dye laser pulse of energy variable from 10(-6) to 10(-3) J, tuned to the Cs transition at 6010 A. The acoustic-pulse propagation is detected by the transient photorefractive deflection of a cw probe laser beam that is displaced from but parallel to the pulsed laser beam. The temperature-dependent velocity of infinitesimal ultrasonic waves in a corrosive metal vapor is measured for the first time. The supersonic propagation of finite amplitude acoustic pulses (blast waves) obtained with a higher pulse energy is also studied. Our data, with Mach numbers ranging from 2.1 down to below 1.01, agree surprisingly well with the prediction of Vlases and Jones for cylindrical blast waves. This provides a new experimental support for their theoretical trajectory formula for blast waves in the extremely weak amplitude limit. PMID:20372402

  2. Malaria theranostics using hemozoin-generated vapor nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2014-01-01

    Malaria remains a widespread and deadly infectious human disease, with increasing diagnostic and therapeutic challenges due to the drug resistance and aggressiveness of malaria infection. Early detection and innovative approaches for parasite destruction are needed. The high optical absorbance and nano-size of hemozoin crystals have been exploited to detect and mechanically destroy the malaria parasite in a single theranostic procedure. Transient vapor nanobubbles are generated around hemozoin crystals in malaria parasites in infected erythrocytes in response to a single short laser pulse. Optical scattering signals of the nanobubble report the presence of the malaria parasite. The mechanical impact of the same nanobubble physically destroys the parasite in nanoseconds in a drug-free manner. Laser-induced nanobubble treatment of human blood in vitro results in destruction of up to 95% of parasites after a single procedure, and delivers an 8-fold better parasiticidal efficacy compared to standard chloroquine drug treatment. The mechanism of destruction is highly selective for malaria infected red cells and does not harm neighboring, uninfected erythrocytes. Thus, laser pulse-induced vapor nanobubble generation around hemozoin supports both rapid and highly specific detection and destruction of malaria parasites in one theranostic procedure.

  3. Nonequilibrium vapor-generation model for flashing flows

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, P.; Abuaf, N.; Wu, B. J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A nonequilibrium vapor generation model for flashing flows is presented. The model consists of a flashing inception point, a bubbly flow regime followed by a bubbly-slug regime, an annular or annular-mist regime, and finally a dispersed-droplet regime. Existence of superheated liquid at the inception point and beyond is recognized. The vapor generation rate in each flow regime is calculated from the estimates for interfacial area density and net interfacial heat flux. However, the bubble number density at the flashing inception point was varied to obtain optimum fits with the void fraction data taken in a vertical converging-diverging nozzle. The interfacial area density at the inception point, thus determined, showed a rapid increase with the decrease in the liquid superheat at that point. This trend is correct since in the limit of thermal equilibrium flow where the liquid superheat approaches zero, the interfacial area for heat and mass transfer should approach infinity. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Direct determination of cadmium in foods by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a tungsten coil trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Mao, Xuefei; Liu, Jixin; Wang, Min; Qian, Yongzhong; Gao, Chengling; Qi, Yuehan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a solid sampling device consisting of a tungsten coil trap, porous carbon vaporizer and on-line ashing furnace of a Ni-Cr coil was interfaced with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A modified double gas circuit system was employed that was composed of carrier and supplemental gas lines controlled by separate gas mass flow controllers. For Cd determination in food samples using the assembled solid sampling ICP-MS, the optimal ashing and vaporization conditions, flow rate of the argon-hydrogen (Ar/H2) (v:v = 24:1) carrier gas and supplemental gas, and minimum sampling mass were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of quantification was 0.5 pg and the relative standard deviation was within a 10.0% error range (n = 10). Furthermore, the mean spiked recoveries for various food samples were 99.4%-105.9% (n = 6). The Cd concentrations measured by the proposed method were all within the certified values of the reference materials or were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from those of the microwave digestion ICP-MS method, demonstrating the good accuracy and precision of the solid sampling ICP-MS method for Cd determination in food samples.

  5. Electrothermal oscillations and the quasilinear theory of electron enthalpy fluctuations in magnetohydrodynamic generators and magnetoplasmadynamic arc thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Flucturations in electron density and temperature coupled through OHM's Law are studied for MHD power generator and MPD arc thruster applications. The dispersion relation based on linear theory is derived, and the two limiting cases of infinite ionization rate and frozen flow are examined. The nonlinear effects of the frozen flow case are then studied in the quasilinear limit. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation and its effect upon Ohm's Law and the electron temperature equation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined, and effective transport properties are determined.

  6. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  7. Electrothermal pumping with interdigitated electrodes and resistive heaters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stuart J; Green, Nicolas G

    2015-08-01

    Interdigitated electrodes are used in electrokinetic lab-on-a-chip devices for dielectrophoretic trapping and characterization of suspended particles, as well as the production of field-induced fluid flow via AC electroosomosis and electrothermal mechanisms. However, the optimum design for dielectrophoresis, that if symmetrical electrodes, cannot induce bulk electrohydrodynamic pumping. In addition, the mechanism of intrinsic electrothermal pumping is affected by the properties of the fluid, with thermal fields being generated by Joule Heating. This work demonstrates the incorporation of an underlying thin film heater, electrically isolated from the interdigitated electrodes by an insulator layer, to enhance bulk electrothermal pumping. The use of integrated heaters allows the thermal field generation to be controlled independently of the electric field. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the importance of geometrical arrangement of the heater with respect to the interdigitated electrodes, as well as electrode size, spacing, and arrangement. The optimization of such a system is a careful balance between electrokinetics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics. The heater location and electrode spacing influence the rate of electrothermal pumping significantly more than electrode width and insulator layer thickness. This demonstration will aid in the development of microfluidic electrokinetic systems that want to utilize the advantages associated with electrothermal pumping while simultaneously applying other lab-on-a-chip electrokinetics like dielectrophoresis.

  8. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  9. Electromagnetic Properties of Impact-Generated Plasma, Vapor and Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.A.; Schultz, P.H.

    1998-11-02

    Plasma, vapor and debris associated with an impact or explosive event have been demonstrated in the laboratory to produce radiofrequency and optical electromagnetic emissions that can be diagnostic of the event. Such effects could potentially interfere with communications or remote sensing equipment if an impact occurred, for example, on a satellite. More seriously, impact generated plasma could end the life of a satellite by mechanisms that are not well understood and not normally taken into account in satellite design. For example, arc/discharge phenomena resulting from highly conductive plasma acting as a current path across normally shielded circuits may have contributed to the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite on August 11, 1993. The possibility of significant storm activity during the Leonid meteor showers of November 1998, 1999 and 2000 (impact velocity, 72 km/s) has heightened awareness of potential vulnerabilities from hypervelocity electromagnetic effects to orbital assets. The concern is justified. The amount of plasma, electrostatic charge and the magnitude of the resulting currents and electric fields scale nearly as the cube of the impact velocity. Even for microscopic Leonid impacts, the amount of plasma approaches levels that could be dangerous to spacecraft electronics. The degree of charge separation that occurs during hypervelocity impacts scales linearly with impactor mass. The resulting magnetic fields increase linearly with impactor radius and could play a significant role in our understanding of the paleomagnetism of planetary surfaces. The electromagnetic properties of plasma produced by hypervelocity impact have been exploited by researchers as a diagnostic tool, invoked to potentially explain the magnetically jumbled state of the lunar surface and blamed for the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite. The production of plasma in and around an impact event can lead to several effects: (1) the

  10. Continuous generation of rubidium vapor in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Donvalkar, Prathamesh S; Ramelow, Sven; Clemmen, Stéphane; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate high optical depths (50±5) that last for hours in rubidium-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers, which represent a 1000× improvement over the operation times previously reported. We investigate the vapor generation mechanism using both a continuous wave and a pulsed light source, and find that the mechanism for generating the rubidium atoms is primarily due to thermal vaporization. The continuous generation of large vapor densities should enable measurements at the single-photon level by averaging over longer time scales. PMID:26565879

  11. Vapor bubble generation around gold nano-particles and its application to damaging of cells.

    PubMed

    Kitz, M; Preisser, S; Wetterwald, A; Jaeger, M; Thalmann, G N; Frenz, M

    2011-01-11

    We investigated vapor bubbles generated upon irradiation of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses. Bubble formation was studied both with optical and acoustic means on supported single gold nanoparticles and single nanoparticles in suspension. Formation thresholds determined at different wavelengths indicate a bubble formation efficiency increasing with the irradiation wavelength. Vapor bubble generation in Bac-1 cells containing accumulations of the same particles was also investigated at different wavelengths. Similarly, they showed an increasing cell damage efficiency for longer wavelengths. Vapor bubbles generated by single laser pulses were about half the cell size when inducing acute damage.

  12. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) The application and end use of... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer...

  13. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) The application and end use of... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer...

  14. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) The application and end use of... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer...

  15. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) The application and end use of... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer...

  16. 46 CFR 52.25-10 - Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1 through PVG-12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) The application and end use of... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Organic fluid vaporizer generators (modifies PVG-1... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-10 Organic fluid vaporizer...

  17. Current technology in ion and electrothermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finke, R. C.; Murch, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    High performance propulsion devices, such as electrostatic ion engines and electrothermal thrusters, are achieving wide user acceptance. The current technology and projected development trends in the areas of ion and electrothermal propulsion systems and components are surveyed.

  18. A bibliography of electrothermal thruster technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Hardy, T. L.; Englehart, M.

    1986-01-01

    Electrothermal propulsion concepts are briefly discussed as an introduction to a bibliography and author index. Nearly 700 citations are given for resistojets, thermal arcjets, pulsed electrothermal thrusters, microwave heated devices, solar thermal thrusters, and laser thermal thrusters.

  19. Trace Explosives Vapor Generation and Quantitation at Parts per Quadrillion Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Braden C; Field, Christopher R; Andrews, Benjamin; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Rogers, Duane; Collins, Greg E

    2016-04-01

    The generation of trace 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) vapors using a pneumatically modulated liquid delivery system (PMLDS) coupled to a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) total-consumption micronebulizer is presented. The vapor generator operates in a continuous manner with final vapor concentrations proportional to the explosive concentration in aqueous solution delivered through the nebulizer and the diluent air flow rate. For quantitation of concentrations in the parts per billionvolume (ppbv) to parts per trillionvolume (pptrv) range, Tenax-TA thermal desorption tubes were used for vapor collection with subsequent analysis on a thermal-desorption system programmable-temperature vaporization gas chromatograph (TDS-PTV-GC) with a μ-ECD detector. With 30 min sample times and an average sampling rate of 100 mL min(-1), vapor concentrations of 38 pptrv for TNT, 25 pptrv for RDX, and 26 pptrv for PETN were determined. For parts per quadrillionvolume (ppqv) vapor quantitation of TNT and RDX, an online PTV-GC system with a negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (methane reagent gas) was used for direct sampling and capture of the vapor on the PTV inlet. Vapor concentrations as low as 160 ppqv and 710 ppqv for TNT and RDX were quantified, respectively, with an instrument duty cycle as low as 4 min. PMID:26971624

  20. Electrothermal Analysis of Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Bharathan, D.; Duong, T.

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the electrothermal analysis and testing of lithium ion battery performance. The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop an electrothermal process/model for predicting thermal performance of real battery cells and modules; and (2) use the electrothermal model to evaluate various designs to improve battery thermal performance.

  1. Mitigation of Electrothermal Instabilities with Thick Insulating Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kyle; Awe, Thomas; Yu, Edmund; Sinars, Daniel; Cuneo, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We will show results of recent experiments on Sandia's Z facility that demonstrate a dramatic reduction in instability growth when thick insulating coatings are used to mitigate electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven imploding liners. These results also provide further evidence that the inherent surface roughness as a result of target fabrication is not the dominant seed for the growth of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities in liners with carefully machined smooth surfaces (~100 nm surface RMS or better), but rather electrothermal instabilities that form early in the electrical current pulse as Joule heating melts and vaporizes the liner surface. More importantly, these results suggest a mechanism for possibly reducing the integral MRT instability growth substantially in magnetically driven inertial confinement fusion concepts such as MagLIF. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  3. Optimized design for an electrothermal microactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎlimǎnescu, Ioan; Stan, Liviu-Constantin; Popa, Viorica

    2015-02-01

    In micromechanical structures, electrothermal actuators are known to be capable of providing larger force and reasonable tip deflection compared to electrostatic ones. Many studies have been devoted to the analysis of the flexure actuators. One of the most popular electrothermal actuators is called `U-shaped' actuator. The device is composed of two suspended beams with variable cross sections joined at the free end, which constrains the tip to move in an arcing motion while current is passed through the actuator. The goal of this research is to determine via FEA the best fitted geometry of the microactuator (optimization input parameters) in order to render some of the of the output parameters such as thermal strain or total deformations to their maximum values. The software to generate the CAD geometry was SolidWorks 2010 and all the FEA analysis was conducted with Ansys 13 TM. The optimized model has smaller geometric values of the input parameters that is a more compact geometry; The maximum temperature reached a smaller value for the optimized model; The calculated heat flux is with 13% bigger for the optimized model; the same for Joule Heat (26%), Total deformation (1.2%) and Thermal Strain (8%). By simple optimizing the design the dimensions and the performance of the micro actuator resulted more compact and more efficient.

  4. Microwave-enhanced cold vapor generation for speciation analysis of mercury by atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Long, Zhou; Liu, Liwei; Zhou, Qin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Zheng, Chengbin

    2012-05-30

    A new and simple cold vapor generation technique utilizing microwave irradiation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry is developed for the speciation analysis of mercury in biological and geological samples. In the presence of formic acid, inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) and total mercury (both Hg(2+) and methylmercury (MeHg)) can be converted to mercury cold vapor (Hg(0)) by microwave irradiation without and with H(2)O(2), respectively. The cold vapor was subsequently released from the liquid phase and rapidly transported to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for the mercury detection. Optimum conditions for vapor generation as well as interferences from concomitant ions were carefully investigated. The conventionally required evaporation of the remnants of acid or oxidants was avoided because no significant interferences from these substances were observed, and thus analyte loss and potential contamination were minimized. A limit of detection of 0.005 ng mL(-1) for total mercury or inorganic mercury was obtained. A precision of less than 3% (RSD) at 2 μg L(-1) of mercury species was typical. The accuracy of the method was validated by determination of mercury in geological and biological certified reference materials. The speciation analysis of Hg(2+) and MeHg was achieved by controlling the conditions of microwave-enhanced cold vapor generation and validated via determination of Certified Reference Materials DORM-2, DORM-3 and a real river water sample.

  5. Generation of Shock-Wave Disturbances at Plasma-Vapor Bubble Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N. S.; Yudin, A. S.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    The complex physical and mathematical model describing all steps of plasma-vapor bubble evolution in the system of the water-ground condensed media is presented. Discharge circuit operation, discharge plasma channel expansion, its transformation into the vapor-plasma bubble and its pulsation, pressure wave generation and propagation of the mechanical stress waves in the ground are self-consistently considered in the model. The model allows investigation of the basic laws of stored energy transformation into the discharge plasma channel, next to the plasma-vapor bubble and transformation of this energy to the energy of pressure wave compressing the surrounding ground. Power characteristics of wave disturbances generated by gas-vapor bubble oscillation in liquid depending on the circuit parameters are analyzed for the prediction of the ground boundary displacement. The dynamics of the shock-wave propagation in water-ground condensed media depending on the rate of the plasma channel energy release is investigated. Simulation of the shock-wave phenomena at a plasma-vapor bubble oscillation in condensed media consecutively describes the physical processes underlying technology for producing piles by electro-discharge stuffing. The quantitative model verified by physical experimental tests will allow optimization of pulse generator parameters and electrode system construction of high-voltage equipment.

  6. Electrothermal Analysis of Three-Dimensional Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Theodore Robert

    2011-12-01

    Transient electro-thermal simulation of a three dimensional integrated circuit (3DIC) is reported that uses a cell-based simulation to provide a selected transistor thermal profile while providing advantages of hierarchical simulation. Due to CPU and memory limitations, full transistor electro-thermal simulations on a useful scale are not possible. Standard cells are considered on a per-instance basis and modeled with electro-thermal macro-models developed in a multi-physics simulator. Simulations are compared favorably to measurements for a token-generating 3DIC clocking at a maximum of 1 GHz. The 3DIC, which is composed of 9 by 3 layers of repetitive frequency multipliers and dividers, was fabricated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory (MITLL) 3DIC process. Measurements indicated a linear rise in temperature of the active areas over a range of applied background ambient temperatures. An average of 7.5 K change in temperature was measured across dense areas of circuitry. For thermal simulation, the physical characteristics of the 3DIC were extracted from flattened OpenAccess layout files. Material parameters, connections, and geometries were considered in order to create a more physically accurate resistive thermal mesh. Physical thermal networks extracted with resolutions of 10 mum and 5 mum connect thermal terminals of the electrothermal macromodel cell elements to active layers yielding temporal and spatial simulated dynamic thermal results in three dimensions. Coupled with model-order reduction techniques, hierarchical dynamic electrothermal simulation of large 3DICs is shown to be tractable, yielding spatial and temporal selected transistor-level thermal profiles.

  7. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  8. Testing and Results of Human Metabolic Simulation Utilizing Ultrasonic Nebulizer Technology for Water Vapor Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbe, Matthew; Curley, Su

    2010-01-01

    Life support technology must be evaluated thoroughly before ever being implemented into a functioning design. A major concern during that evaluation is safety. The ability to mimic human metabolic loads allows test engineers to evaluate the effectiveness of new technologies without risking injury to any actual humans. The main function of most life support technologies is the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) vapor. As such any good human metabolic simulator (HMS) will mimic the human body s ability to produce these items. Introducing CO2 into a test chamber is a very straightforward process with few unknowns so the focus of this particular new HMS design was on the much more complicated process of introducing known quantities of H2O vapor on command. Past iterations of the HMS have utilized steam which is very hard to keep in vapor phase while transporting and injecting into a test chamber. Also steam adds large quantities of heat to any test chamber, well beyond what an actual human does. For the new HMS an alternative approach to water vapor generation was designed utilizing ultrasonic nebulizers as a method for creating water vapor. Ultrasonic technology allows water to be vibrated into extremely tiny pieces (2-5 microns) and evaporate without requiring additional heating. Doing this process inside the test chamber itself allows H2O vapor generation without the unwanted heat and the challenging process of transporting water vapor. This paper presents the design details as well as results of all initial and final acceptance system testing. Testing of the system was performed at a range of known human metabolic rates in both sea-level and reduced pressure environments. This multitude of test points fully defines the systems capabilities as they relate to actual environmental systems testing.

  9. NASA electrothermal auxiliary propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Electrothermal auxiliary propulsion systems provide high performance options which can have major mission benefits. There are several electrothermal concepts which offer a range of characteristics and benefits. Resistojets are the highest thrust to power option and are currently operational at mission average values of specific impulse, I sub sp approximately 295 sec. Long life, multipropellant resistojets are being developed for the space station, and resistojet technology advancements are being pursued to improve the I sub sp by more than 20 percent for resistojets used in satellite applications. Direct current arcjets have the potential of I sub sp over 400 sec with storable propellants and should provide over 1000 sec with hydrogen. Advanced concepts are being investigated to provide high power density options and possible growth to primary propulsion applications. Broad based experimental and analytical research and technology programs of NASA are summarized and recent significant advances are reviewed.

  10. Electrothermal branding for embryo labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Beebe, D J; Williams, A R; Easley, K D

    1997-11-01

    A novel embryo labeling technique based on electrothermal branding is developed. Two types of micro branding irons are fabricated and tested. One utilizes 25 microns tungsten wire as the heating element. The other utilizes surface micromachining techniques to fabricate polysilicon branding irons. The thermal behavior of the branding irons and the heat distributions in the embryos are analytically modeled. Micron-scale labels on unfertilized bovine embryos are achieved.

  11. Advancements in oxygen generation and humidity control by water vapor electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Sudar, M.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of manned spacecraft atmospheres or other manned habitats are essential for realization of long-term space missions. These processes include oxygen generation through water electrolysis. One promising technique of water electrolysis is the direct conversion of the water vapor contained in the cabin air to oxygen. This technique is the subject of the present program on water vapor electrolysis development. The objectives were to incorporate technology improvements developed under other similar electrochemical programs and add new ones; design and fabricate a mutli-cell electrochemical module and a testing facility; and demonstrate through testing the improvements. Each aspect of the water vapor electrolysis cell was reviewed. The materials of construction and sizing of each element were investigated analytically and sometime experimentally. In addition, operational considerations such as temperature control in response to inlet conditions were investigated. Three specific quantitative goals were established.

  12. Investigation of a repetitive pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster with 1000:1 ratio nozzle is tested in a repetitive mode on water propellant. The thruster is driven by a 60J pulse forming network at repetition rates up to 10 Hz (600W). The pulse forming network has a .31 ohm impedance, well matched to the capillary discharge resistance of .40 ohm, and is directly coupled to the thruster electrodes without a switch. The discharge is initiated by high voltage breakdown, typically at 2500V, through the water vapor in the interelectrode gap. Water is injected as a jet through a .37 mm orifice on the thruster axis. Thruster voltage, current and impulse bit are recorded for several seconds at various power supply currents. Thruster to power ratio is typically T/P = .07 N/kW. Tank background pressure precludes direct measurement of exhaust velocity which is inferred from calculated pressure and temperature in the discharge to be about 14 km/sec. Efficiency, based on this velocity and measured T/P is .54 + or - .07. Thruster ablation is zero at the throat and becomes measurable further upstream, indicating that radiative ablation is occurring late in the pulse.

  13. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    PubMed

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:24852493

  14. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    PubMed

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. Permanent modification in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — advances, anticipations and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Georgieva, Rositsa

    2000-05-01

    Permanent modification is an important recent development in chemical modification techniques which is promising in view of increasing sample throughput with 'fast' programs, reducing reagent blanks, preliminary elimination of unwanted modifier components, compatibility with on-line and in situ enrichment, etc. An overview of this approach based on the authors' recent research and scarce literature data is given, revealing both success and failure in studies with permanently modified surfaces (carbides, non-volatile noble metals, noble metals on carbide coatings, etc.), as demonstrated in examples of direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) applications to biological and environmental matrices and vapor generation (VG)-ETAAS coupling with in-atomizer trapping of hydrides and other analyte vapors. Permanent modifiers exhibit certain drawbacks and limitations such as: poorly reproducible treatment technologies — eventually resulting in poor tube-to-tube repeatability and double or multiple peaks; impaired efficiency compared with modifier addition to each sample aliquot; relatively short lifetimes; limitations imposed on temperature programs, the pyrolysis, atomization and cleaning temperatures being set somewhat lower to avoid excessive loss of modifier; applicability to relatively simple sample solutions rather than to high-salt matrices and acidic digests; side effects of overstabilization, etc. The most important niches of application appear to be the utilization of permanently modified surfaces in coupled VG-ETAAS techniques, analysis of organic solvents and extracts, concentrates and fractions obtained after enrichment and/or speciation separations and direct ETAAS determinations of highly volatile analytes in relatively simple sample matrices.

  16. Design and calibration of pulsed vapor generators for TNT, RDX and PETN

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.P.; Blackwood, L.G.; Davis, S.G.; Goodrich, L.D.; Larson, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    Computer controlled explosive vapor generators for 2,4,6trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were built and calibrated to support an Independent Validation and Verification (IV&V) facility for Explosive Detection Systems (EDS) for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The generators were constructed using pure explosive suspended on quartz beads which were then loaded into a stainless steel tube. The tube was coiled and placed into a temperature controlled chamber. A carrier gas (ultra-pure air) was passed through the coil to carry the explosive molecules. The generators are capable of delivering a pulse of varying explosive mass through the control of coil temperature, air flow rate, and pulse width. Preliminary calibrations have been completed in the picogram to nanogram range using an Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) as the calibrating instrument. The explosive vapor generators will be used as quantitative vapor standards to establish the lower limit of detection for EDS systems at the IV&V.

  17. Second harmonic generation in ZnO thin films fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. Y.; Zhang, B. P.; Binh, N. T.; Segawa, Y.

    2004-07-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) from ZnO thin films fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique was carried out. By comparing the second harmonic signal generated in a series of ZnO films with different deposition temperatures, we conclude that a significant part of second harmonic signal is generated at the film deposited with appropriate temperature. The second-order susceptibility tensor χ(2)zzz=9.2 pm/V was deduced for a film deposited at 250 °C.

  18. CHEMISTRY OF IMPACT-GENERATED SILICATE MELT-VAPOR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Channon; Fegley, Bruce Jr.

    2013-04-10

    In the giant impact theory for lunar origin, the Moon forms from material ejected by the impact into an Earth-orbiting disk. Here we report the initial results from a silicate melt-vapor equilibrium chemistry model for such impact-generated planetary debris disks. In order to simulate the chemical behavior of a two-phase (melt+vapor) disk, we calculate the temperature-dependent pressure and chemical composition of vapor in equilibrium with molten silicate from 2000 to 4000 K. We consider the elements O, Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti, and Zn for a range of bulk silicate compositions (Earth, Moon, Mars, eucrite parent body, angrites, and ureilites). In general, the disk atmosphere is dominated by Na, Zn, and O{sub 2} at lower temperatures (<3000 K) and SiO, O{sub 2}, and O at higher temperatures. The high-temperature chemistry is consistent for any silicate melt composition, and we thus expect abundant SiO, O{sub 2}, and O to be a common feature of hot, impact-generated debris disks. In addition, the saturated silicate vapor is highly oxidizing, with oxygen fugacity (f{sub O{sub 2}}) values (and hence H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO ratios) several orders of magnitude higher than those in a solar-composition gas. High f{sub O{sub 2}} values in the disk atmosphere are found for any silicate composition because oxygen is the most abundant element in rock. We thus expect high oxygen fugacity to be a ubiquitous feature of any silicate melt-vapor disk produced via collisions between rocky planets.

  19. Evolution of light-induced vapor generation at a liquid-immersed metallic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Zhen, Yu-Rong; Neumann, Oara; Polman, Albert; García de Abajo, F Javier; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-04-10

    When an Au nanoparticle in a liquid medium is illuminated with resonant light of sufficient intensity, a nanometer scale envelope of vapor-a "nanobubble"-surrounding the particle, is formed. This is the nanoscale onset of the well-known process of liquid boiling, occurring at a single nanoparticle nucleation site, resulting from the photothermal response of the nanoparticle. Here we examine bubble formation at an individual metallic nanoparticle in detail. Incipient nanobubble formation is observed by monitoring the plasmon resonance shift of an individual, illuminated Au nanoparticle, when its local environment changes from liquid to vapor. The temperature on the nanoparticle surface is monitored during this process, where a dramatic temperature jump is observed as the nanoscale vapor layer thermally decouples the nanoparticle from the surrounding liquid. By increasing the intensity of the incident light or decreasing the interparticle separation, we observe the formation of micrometer-sized bubbles resulting from the coalescence of nanoparticle-"bound" vapor envelopes. These studies provide the first direct and quantitative analysis of the evolution of light-induced steam generation by nanoparticles from the nanoscale to the macroscale, a process that is of fundamental interest for a growing number of applications.

  20. Electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor and its in-situ trapping in gold-covered graphite tube atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červený, Václav; Rychlovský, Petr; Netolická, Jarmila; Šíma, Jan

    2007-03-01

    The combination of more efficient flow-through electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation with its in-situ trapping in a graphite tube atomizer is described. This coupled technique has been optimized to attain the maximum sensitivity for Hg determination and to minimize the limits of detection and determination. A laboratory constructed thin-layer flow-through cell with a platinum cathode served as the cold vapor generator. Various cathode arrangements with different active surface areas were tested. Automated sampling equipment for the graphite atomizer with an untreated fused silica capillary was used for the introduction of the mercury vapor. The inner surface of the graphite tube was covered with a gold foil placed against the sampling hole. The results attained for the electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation (an absolute limit of detection of 80 pg; peak absorbance, 3 σ criterion) were compared with the traditional vapor generation using NaBH 4 as the reducing agent (an absolute limit of detection of 124 pg; peak absorbance, 3 σ criterion). The repeatability at the 5 ng ml - 1 level was better than 4.1% (RSD) for electrochemical mercury vapor generation and better than 5.6% for the chemical cold vapor generation. The proposed method was applied to the determination the of Hg contents in a certified reference material and in spiked river water samples.

  1. Environmental chemistry at vapor/water interfaces: insights from vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jubb, Aaron M; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2012-01-01

    The chemistry that occurs at surfaces has been an intense area of study for many years owing to its complexity and importance in describing a wide range of physical phenomena. The vapor/water interface is particularly interesting from an environmental chemistry perspective as this surface plays host to a wide range of chemistries that influence atmospheric and geochemical interactions. The application of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG), an inherently surface-specific, even-order nonlinear optical spectroscopy, enables the direct interrogation of various vapor/aqueous interfaces to elucidate the behavior and reaction of chemical species within the surface regime. In this review we discuss the application of VSFG to the study of a variety of atmospherically important systems at the vapor/aqueous interface. Chemical systems presented include inorganic ionic solutions prevalent in aqueous marine aerosols, small molecular solutes, and long-chain fatty acids relevant to fat-coated aerosols. The ability of VSFG to probe both the organization and reactions that may occur for these systems is highlighted. A future perspective toward the application of VSFG to the study of environmental interfaces is also provided.

  2. Studies on Aspirin Crystals Generated by a Modified Vapor Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit; Malhotra, Deepak; Jain, Preeti; Kalia, Anupama; Shunmugaperumal, Tamilvanan

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of the current investigation were (1) to study the influence of selected two different non-solvents (diethylether and dichloromethane) on the drug crystal formation of a model drug, aspirin (ASP-I) by the modified vapor diffusion method and (2) to characterize and compare the generated crystals (ASP-II and ASP-III) using different analytical techniques with that of unprocessed ASP-I. When compared to the classical vapor diffusion method which consumes about 15 days to generate drug crystals, the modified method needs only 12 h to get the same. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that the internal structures of ASP-II and ASP-III crystals were identical when compared with ASP-I. Although the drug crystals showed a close similarity in X-ray diffraction patterns, the difference in the relative intensities of some of the diffraction peaks (especially at 2θ values of around 7.7 and 15.5) could be attributed to the crystal habit or crystal size modification. Similarly, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study speculates that only the crystal habit modifications might occur but without involving any change in internal structure of the generated drug polymorphic form I. This is further substantiated from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures that indicated the formation of platy shape for the ASP-II crystals and needle shape for the ASP-III crystals. In addition, the observed slow dissolution of ASP crystals should indicate polymorph form I formation. Thus, the modified vapor diffusion method could routinely be used to screen and legally secure all possible forms of other drug entities too.

  3. On line vapor generation of osmium based on solution cathode glow discharge for the determination by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenli; Huang, Chunying; He, Qian; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Zhifu; Zhang, Suicheng; Hu, Shenghong

    2013-03-15

    A novel plasma induced vapor generation method is proposed to determine osmium in solutions. Without any chemical oxidizing agents, osmium ion can be readily converted to volatile osmium tetraoxide vapor in the solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) system. The generated osmium vapor is then transported to inductively coupled plasma for determination by optical emission spectrometry. The influences of background electrolyte, carrier gas flow rate, sample flow rate, ICP power and discharge current were investigated. The analytical performances of this proposed technique were evaluated under optimized conditions. The detection limit of Os was calculated to be 0.51 ng mL(-1). The reproducibility, expressed as the relative standard deviation (n=11) of a 2.0 μg mL(-1) standard solution, was 1.9%. This SCGD induced vapor generation is sensitive and simple, oxidation reagents free, providing an alternative analytical method for measuring Os in geological or environmental water samples. PMID:23598105

  4. On line vapor generation of osmium based on solution cathode glow discharge for the determination by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenli; Huang, Chunying; He, Qian; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Zhifu; Zhang, Suicheng; Hu, Shenghong

    2013-03-15

    A novel plasma induced vapor generation method is proposed to determine osmium in solutions. Without any chemical oxidizing agents, osmium ion can be readily converted to volatile osmium tetraoxide vapor in the solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) system. The generated osmium vapor is then transported to inductively coupled plasma for determination by optical emission spectrometry. The influences of background electrolyte, carrier gas flow rate, sample flow rate, ICP power and discharge current were investigated. The analytical performances of this proposed technique were evaluated under optimized conditions. The detection limit of Os was calculated to be 0.51 ng mL(-1). The reproducibility, expressed as the relative standard deviation (n=11) of a 2.0 μg mL(-1) standard solution, was 1.9%. This SCGD induced vapor generation is sensitive and simple, oxidation reagents free, providing an alternative analytical method for measuring Os in geological or environmental water samples.

  5. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV). PMID:21315908

  6. A kinetic model for stress generation in thin films grown from energetic vapor fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chason, E.; Karlson, M.; Colin, J. J.; Magnfält, D.; Sarakinos, K.; Abadias, G.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a kinetic model for residual stress generation in thin films grown from energetic vapor fluxes, encountered, e.g., during sputter deposition. The new analytical model considers sub-surface point defects created by atomic peening, along with processes treated in already existing stress models for non-energetic deposition, i.e., thermally activated diffusion processes at the surface and the grain boundary. According to the new model, ballistically induced sub-surface defects can get incorporated as excess atoms at the grain boundary, remain trapped in the bulk, or annihilate at the free surface, resulting in a complex dependence of the steady-state stress on the grain size, the growth rate, as well as the energetics of the incoming particle flux. We compare calculations from the model with in situ stress measurements performed on a series of Mo films sputter-deposited at different conditions and having different grain sizes. The model is able to reproduce the observed increase of compressive stress with increasing growth rate, behavior that is the opposite of what is typically seen under non-energetic growth conditions. On a grander scale, this study is a step towards obtaining a comprehensive understanding of stress generation and evolution in vapor deposited polycrystalline thin films.

  7. Vapor generation - atomic spectrometric techniques. Expanding frontiers through specific-species preconcentration. A review.

    PubMed

    Gil, Raúl A; Pacheco, Pablo H; Cerutti, Soledad; Martinez, Luis D

    2015-05-22

    We review recent progress in preconcentration strategies associated to vapor generation techniques coupled to atomic spectrometric (VGT-AS) for specific chemical species detection. This discussion focuses on the central role of different preconcentration approaches, both before and after VG process. The former was based on the classical solid phase and liquid-liquid extraction procedures which, aided by automation and miniaturization strategies, have strengthened the role of VGT-AS in several research fields including environmental, clinical, and others. We then examine some of the new vapor trapping strategies (atom-trapping, hydride trapping, cryotrapping) that entail improvements in selectivity through interference elimination, but also they allow reaching ultra-low detection limits for a large number of chemical species generated in conventional VG systems, including complete separation of several species of the same element. This review covers more than 100 bibliographic references from 2009 up to date, found in SCOPUS database and in individual searches in specific journals. We finally conclude by giving some outlook on future directions of this field.

  8. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV).

  9. Generation and multi-pass propagation of a squeezed vacuum field in hot Rb vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mi; Lanning, R. Nicholas; Xiao, Zhihao; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.

    2016-05-01

    We study a squeezed vacuum field generated in hot Rb vapor via the polarization self-rotation effect. By propagating the strong laser beam through a vapor cell once, we were able to achieve a noise suppression of 2 dB below shot noise. Our previous experiments showed that the amount of observed squeezing may be limited by the contamination of the squeezed vacuum output with higher-order spatial modes, also generated inside the cell. Here, we investigate whether or not the squeezing can be improved by making the light interact several times with a less dense atomic ensemble. We carry out a comparison of various conditions, e.g. injection power, atomic density, passing numbers etc., and studied their effect on squeezing level and the spatial structure of the output squeezed vacuum field. We observe that multiple passages of beam through the medium can lead to an improvement of squeezing, and minimum noise occurs at almost the same effective atomic density for all setups. We show optimization of the conditions can lead to higher achievable squeezing which would be very useful for precision metrology and quantum memory applications. We acknowledge support from AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-13-1- 0098, ARO Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0381, NSF Grant No. 1403105, and the Northrop Grumman Corporation.

  10. Microfluidic pumping optimization in microgrooved channels with ac electrothermal actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, E.; Manoochehri, Souran

    2010-01-01

    An optimization methodology is developed and applied to an ac electrothermal pump design with patterned microgrooved features. The microgrooved configuration can overcome the restrictions of the conventional planar configuration on pumping performance by diminishing fast backward flows and suppressing prolonged streamlines. At all frequency excitations (0.2-1000 MHz) and ion concentration conditions (5×10-3-0.1 M), the optimum microgrooved configuration generates much faster flow rate than planar configuration. This happens without additional increases in the maximum temperature values. The effects of elevated temperature on ac ET flow behavior is investigated and analyzed.

  11. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-01

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration.

  12. Net vapor generation point in boiling flow of trichlorotrifluoroethane at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions at which the void in subcooled boiling starts to undergo a rapid increase were studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in a 12.7 x 9.5 mm rectangular channel. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in one wall. The pressure ranged from 9.45 to 20.7 bar, mass velocity from 600 to 7000 kg/sq m sec, and subcooling from 16 to 67 C. Photographs were used to determine when detached bubbles first appeared in the bulk flow. Measurements of bubble layer thickness along the wall were also made. Results showed that the point of net vapor generation is close to the occurrence of fully-developed boiling.

  13. Hemozoin-generated vapor nanobubbles for transdermal reagent- and needle-free detection of malaria.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Campbell, Kelly M; Constantinou, Pamela E; Braam, Janet; Olson, John S; Ware, Russell E; Sullivan, David J; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2014-01-21

    Successful diagnosis, screening, and elimination of malaria critically depend on rapid and sensitive detection of this dangerous infection, preferably transdermally and without sophisticated reagents or blood drawing. Such diagnostic methods are not currently available. Here we show that the high optical absorbance and nanosize of endogenous heme nanoparticles called "hemozoin," a unique component of all blood-stage malaria parasites, generates a transient vapor nanobubble around hemozoin in response to a short and safe near-infrared picosecond laser pulse. The acoustic signals of these malaria-specific nanobubbles provided transdermal noninvasive and rapid detection of a malaria infection as low as 0.00034% in animals without using any reagents or drawing blood. These on-demand transient events have no analogs among current malaria markers and probes, can detect and screen malaria in seconds, and can be realized as a compact, easy-to-use, inexpensive, and safe field technology.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra at vapor/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectra at vapor/water interface were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with a classical flexible and nonpolarizable model. The present model well describes the spectral diffusion of 2D infrared spectrum of bulk water as well as 2D HD-VSFG at the interface. The effect of isotopic dilution on the 2D HD-VSFG was elucidated by comparing the normal (H{sub 2}O) water and HOD water. We further performed decomposition analysis of 2D HD-VSFG into the hydrogen-bonding and the dangling (or free) OH vibrations, and thereby disentangled the different spectral responses and spectral diffusion in the 2D HD-VSFG. The present MD simulation demonstrated the role of anharmonic coupling between these modes on the cross peak in the 2D HD-VSFG spectrum.

  15. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    DOEpatents

    Kunnmann, Walter; Larese, John Z.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  16. Critical evaluation of the application of photochemical vapor generation in analytical atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yihua; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin; Sturgeon, Ralph E

    2007-06-01

    Chemical vapor generation (CVG) is a widely adopted sample introduction method for analytical atomic spectrometry. Nonvolatile precursors (usually ionic, metallic or organometallic species) can be transferred from the condensed phase to the gas phase, yielding the advantages of efficient matrix separation, high analyte transport efficiency, high selectivity, simple instrumentation, and ease of automation. Hydride generation enjoys the greatest popularity as a consequence of its ease of implementation, fast reaction and high yield; but photo-CVG, a newly emerging research field in analytical chemistry, may provide a powerful alternative to conventional CVG due to its simplicity, versatility and cost effectiveness. Although photocatalytic pre-reduction has been used for a number of years, the most attractive aspect of this newly emerging area is the direct generation of volatile species using photochemical reactions. Recent studies undertaken with flow through and batch reactors employing low molecular weight organic acids as photochemical agents are highlighted in this study for such systems as mercury and selenium, as well as reaction mechanisms considered for these processes. Discussion is focused on recent advances in photo-CVG, which we believe will become the subject of intensive future research initiatives. PMID:17235500

  17. Isolated electrothermal capsulorrhaphy in overhand athletes.

    PubMed

    Enad, Jerome G; ElAttrache, Neal S; Tibone, James E; Yocum, Lewis A

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of arthroscopic electrothermal capsulorrhaphy for the treatment of instability in overhand athletes. Electrothermal capsulorrhaphy without labral repair was used to treat 20 symptomatic overhand athletes (15 baseball, 3 softball, and 2 volleyball). Nineteen patients were evaluated at a mean of 23 months. Overall Rowe results were 10 excellent, 4 good, 2 fair, and 3 poor, with a mean score of 82. The overall mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 85.7 (mean pain score, 42.2; mean score for activities of daily living, 43.5). Two failures (ten percent) required open shoulder stabilization. Ten athletes returned to their prior level of sport, three returned to a lower level, and six were unable to return to their sport. These preliminary results indicate that treatment of the overhand athlete with isolated electrothermal capsulorrhaphy is favorable but does not reproduce the success of open surgery. Overall recurrence and failure rates were high. Instability in overhand athletes may require something other than isolated electrothermal capsulorrhaphy to address laxity.

  18. Comparative study of component erosion for electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourham, M. A.; Hankins, O. E.; Gilligan, J. G.; Hurley, J. D.; Earnhart, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The electrothermal launcher SIRENS has been used to study the erosion of critical components (rails and insulators) of plasma-driven launchers. SIRENS can produce high-density (above 10 exp 25/cu m) low-temperature (1-3 eV) plasma, formed by the ablation of the insulator (Lexan), with currents up to 100 kA. The incident heat flux varies between 2 to 90 GW/sq m over 100 microsec duration, for input energies 1-10 kJ. Erosion studies have been performed on several insulators, pure and coated metals, alloys and several graphite grades. The fraction of the total incident energy that is transmitted to the eroded surface varies from 12 to 30 percent for the materials tested and decreases to 5-7 percent as the incident energy fluence increases. Such reduction in erosion for a given incident fluence is due to the vapor shield effect. The scaling law for the energy transmission factor through the vapor shield layer was obtained for the exposed materials.

  19. Transient Flowfield Characteristics of Polycarbonate Plasma Discharge from Pulse-powered Electrothermal Gun Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungjin

    2008-12-01

    An electrothermal gun is the device that produces high-temperature and high-velocity plasma vapor using high current pulsed power and has a potential to be an efficient method for producing a variety of nanomaterials. Pulsed plasma discharge from the electrothermal gun into the open air has been investigated numerically, and the time-dependent inviscid gas dynamics equations are solved for the two-dimensional computational domain including electrothermal gun and the open-air space using flux-corrected transport (FCT) scheme. The modeling of the Joule heating and the mass ablation from the bore wall are incorporated in the computation. The computational results yield the details of the plasma discharge behavior inside and outside the capillary bore including choked condition at the bore exit and complex shock structure of external plasma discharge. The flow structure of freely expanding plasma discharge in the open air is essentially the highly underexpanded supersonic jet featuring Mach disk, barrel shock, contact surface, and spherical blast wave. Compared to the experiments, the numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental data such as the capillary mass ablation and shock structure of the plasma jet.

  20. Electrothermal energy conversion using electron gas volumetric change inside semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyze an electrothermal energy converter using volumetric changes in non-equilibrium electron gas inside semiconductors. The geometric concentration of electron gas under an electric field increases the effective pressure of the electrons, and then a barrier filters out cold electrons, acting like a valve. Nano- and micro-scale features enable hot electrons to arrive at the contact in a short enough time to avoid thermalization with the lattice. Key length and time scales, preliminary device geometry, and anticipated efficiency are estimated for electronic analogs of Otto and Brayton power generators and Joule-Thomson micro refrigerators on a chip. The power generators convert the energy of incident photons from the heat source to electrical current, and the refrigerator can reduce the temperature of electrons in a semiconductor device. The analytic calculations show that a large energy conversion efficiency or coefficient of performance may be possible.

  1. Improving Battery Design with Electro-Thermal Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Kim, G.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Operating temperature greatly affects the performance and life of batteries in electric and hybrid vehicles. Increased attention is necessary to battery thermal management. Electrochemical models and finite element analysis tools are available for predicting the thermal performance of batteries, but each has limitations. In this study we describe an electro-thermal finite element approach that predicts the thermal performance of a cell or module with realistic geometry. To illustrate the process, we simulated the thermal performance of two generations of Panasonic prismatic nickel-metal-hydride modules used in the Toyota Prius. The model showed why the new generation of Panasonic modules had better thermal performance. Thermal images from two battery modules under constant current discharge indicate that the model predicts the experimental trend reasonably well.

  2. Near-Infrared-Activated Nanocalorifiers in Microcapsules: Vapor Bubble Generation for In Vivo Enhanced Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingxin; Xuan, Mingjun; Dai, Luru; Si, Tieyan; Li, Junbai; He, Qiang

    2015-10-19

    Photothermal therapy based on gold nanostructures has been widely investigated as a state-of-the-art noninvasive therapy approach. Because single nanoparticles cannot harvest sufficient energy, self-assemblies of small plasmonic particles into large aggregates are required for enhanced photothermal performance. Self-assembled gold nanorods in lipid bilayer-modified microcapsules are shown to localize at tumor sites, generate vapor bubbles under near-infrared light exposure, and subsequently damage tumor tissues. The polyelectrolyte multilayer enables dense packing of gold nanorods during the assembly process, which leads to the formation of vapor bubbles around the excited capsules. The resulting vapor bubbles achieve a high efficiency of suppressing tumor growth compared to single gold nanorods. In vivo experiments demonstrated the ability of soft-polymer multilayer microcapsules to cross the biological barriers of the body and localize at target tissues.

  3. Near-Infrared-Activated Nanocalorifiers in Microcapsules: Vapor Bubble Generation for In Vivo Enhanced Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingxin; Xuan, Mingjun; Dai, Luru; Si, Tieyan; Li, Junbai; He, Qiang

    2015-10-19

    Photothermal therapy based on gold nanostructures has been widely investigated as a state-of-the-art noninvasive therapy approach. Because single nanoparticles cannot harvest sufficient energy, self-assemblies of small plasmonic particles into large aggregates are required for enhanced photothermal performance. Self-assembled gold nanorods in lipid bilayer-modified microcapsules are shown to localize at tumor sites, generate vapor bubbles under near-infrared light exposure, and subsequently damage tumor tissues. The polyelectrolyte multilayer enables dense packing of gold nanorods during the assembly process, which leads to the formation of vapor bubbles around the excited capsules. The resulting vapor bubbles achieve a high efficiency of suppressing tumor growth compared to single gold nanorods. In vivo experiments demonstrated the ability of soft-polymer multilayer microcapsules to cross the biological barriers of the body and localize at target tissues. PMID:26306782

  4. Periodically poled vapor transport equilibrated lithium niobate for visible light generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussev, Rostislav V.; Route, Roger; Schaar, Joseph; Urbanek, Karel; Fejer, Martin M.; Jundt, Dieter; Kajiyama, Claudia

    2006-02-01

    The ability to achieve high quality periodic poling in lithium niobate (LN) has allowed quasi-phase-matching to be used for second-order nonlinear optics, leading to experimental demonstration of efficient optical frequency generation throughout its wide transparency range (0.35-4.5 microns). Applications of congruent lithium niobate involving visible or ultraviolet wavelengths are limited to low power or high temperature operation due to the effects of photorefractive damage (PRD) and green-induced infrared absorption (GRIIRA). The standard methods of suppressing PRD include doping with 5 mol-% MgO or ZnO and varying crystal stoichiometry. More recent methods employ a combination of lower doping level and near-stoichiometric composition. We use vapor transport equilibration (VTE) and significantly lower MgO doping (<0.5% in the melt) to obtain near-stoichiometric PRD-resistant crystals with improved parameters for periodic poling compared to the commercially available 5% MgO-doped congruent crystals. An efficient process for periodic poling at room temperature using baked photoresist as a patterned dielectric on one crystal surface with LiCl-solution electrodes was developed for periods as short as 8.3 microns for 0.5% and 7 microns for 0.3% MgO-doped VTE:LN. The quality of periodic poling improves as the MgO concentration is lowered. Stable second harmonic generation of 1.3-W continuous-wave 532-nm radiation was observed near room temperature (43 degrees Celsius, as determined by the phase matching condition) with no sign of degradation in a 1.5-cm long crystal of 0.3-% MgO-doped VTE:LN periodically poled with a period of 7.06 microns.

  5. Characterization of acoustic droplet vaporization for control of bubble generation under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Luan; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the manipulation of bubbles generated by acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under clinically relevant flow conditions. Optical microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging were used to observe bubbles generated by 2-MHz ultrasound pulses at different time points after the onset of ADV. The dependence of the bubble population on droplet concentration, flow velocity, fluid viscosity and acoustic parameters, including acoustic pressure, pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. The results indicated that post-ADV bubble growth spontaneously driven by air permeation markedly affected the bubble population after insonation. The bubbles can grow to a stable equilibrium diameter as great as twice the original diameter in 0.5-1 s, as predicted by the theoretical calculation. The growth trend is independent of flow velocity, but dependent on fluid viscosity and droplet concentration, which directly influence the rate of gas uptake by bubbles and the rate of gas exchange across the wall of the semipermeable tube containing the bubbles and, hence, the gas content of the host medium. Varying the acoustic pressure does not markedly change the formation of bubbles as long as the ADV thresholds of most droplets are reached. Varying pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency markedly reduces the number of bubbles. Lengthening pulse duration favors the production of large bubbles, but reduces the total number of bubbles. Increasing the PRF interestingly provides superior performance in bubble disruption. These results also suggest that an ADV bubble population cannot be assessed simply on the basis of initial droplet size or enhancement of imaging contrast by the bubbles. Determining the optimal acoustic parameters requires careful consideration of their impact on the bubble population produced for different application scenarios.

  6. Photochemical vapor generation of lead for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hualing; Zhang, Ningning; Gong, Zhenbin; Li, Weifeng; Hang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Photochemical vapor generation (PCVG) of lead was successfully achieved with a simplified and convenient system, in which only low molecular weight organic acid and a high-efficiency photochemical reactor were needed. The reactor was used to generate lead volatile species when a solution of lead containing a small amount of low molecular weight organic acid was pumped through. Several factors, including the concentration of acetic acid, the concentration of hydrochloride acid, and the irradiation time of UV light were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, including the addition of 0.90% (v/v) acetic acid and 0.03% (v/v) hydrochloride acid, and irradiation time of 28 s, intense and repeatable signal of lead volatile species was successfully obtained and identified with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). In addition, the effects from inorganic anions and transition metal ions, including Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -, Cu2 +, Fe3 +, Co2 + and Ni2 +, were investigated, which suggests that their suppression to the PCVG of lead was in the order of Cl- < SO42 - < NO3- for anions and Ni2 +, Co2 + < Fe3 + < Cu2 + for transition metal ions. Under optimized conditions, relative standard derivation (RSD) of 4.4% was achieved from replicate measurements (n = 5) of a standard solution of 0.1 μg L- 1 lead. And, the limit of quantitation (LOQ, 10σ) of 0.012 μg L- 1 lead was obtained using this method and the method blank could be easily controlled down to 0.023 μg L- 1. To validate applicability of this method, it was also employed for the determination of lead in tap water, rain water and lake water.

  7. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg-1), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg-1, respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (~0.4 MPa).Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid

  8. Electrothermal micromixing in 96 well plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Loire, Sophie; Mezic, Igor

    2011-11-01

    Diagnostic and pharmacology processes could be greatly accelerated by appropriate mixing. Here electrothermal flows are explored to provide mixing of conductive physiological solutions (=1.6 S/m) in a 96 well plate. Three interdigitated electrodes provide an electric field (< 15Vpp, 1MHz) beneath each well. Polarization and conduction phenomenon of the fluid in a well will be first modeled numerically and compared to an electrical circuit model. Due to high conductivity and permittivity of the fluid, the impedance of the array of filled wells collapse dramatically (96 wells: R = 1Ohm, C=250nF). The power supply challenges accordingly raised by arrays of electrothermal micromixers will be then analyzed. The efficiency of different methods of mixing in those wells will be also compared: the addition of low frequency signal leading to AC electro-osmotic perturbations, a blinking vortices method. The experimental results will be compared to simulations.

  9. Electrothermal thruster diagnostics. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zafran, S.; Jackson, B.

    1983-01-01

    A flight-qualified electrothermal thruster demonstrated its adaptability to a variety of propellants. Originally qualified for operation with hydrazine propellant, it was operated with nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia propellants, demonstrating 73, 61, and 52 percent overall efficiency with these propellants, respectively, when tested over a wide range of operating conditions. By introducing a preheater to admit hot, rather than cold, propellant inlet gases to the thruster's augmentation heat exchanger, delivered specific impulse closer to theoretical performance limits should be achieved.

  10. Comment on "Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds in the vapor phase at trace levels: A tool for testing and developing sensitive and selective substrates for explosive detection"

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-02-13

    The evaluation of developed technologies and research on new detection approaches require the ability to generate explosive vapors in the gas phase. In this correspondence, the authors comment on a technical note describing a vaopr generator, discuss safety issues associated with explosives for vapor generators, and provide a concise review of vapor generators for explosive compounds. Approaches to measuring or monitoring the output of a vapor generators are also discussed.

  11. Electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven pulsed power liners

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Yu, Edmund P.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Nakhleh, Charles

    2012-09-15

    This paper explores the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. Comparatively little is known about these types of instabilities compared to the well known Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. We present simulations that show electrothermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent MRT instability growth. We also present the results of several experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These experiments show excellent agreement with electrothermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone.

  12. Speciation analysis of mercury in cereals by liquid chromatography chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang-Yen; Chang, Lan-Fang; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2008-08-27

    A simple and rapid procedure for the separation and determination of inorganic, methyl, and ethyl mercury compounds was described using liquid chromatography (LC) followed by vapor generation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (VG-ICP-MS). Well resolved chromatograms were obtained within 5 min by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with a C8 column as the stationary phase and a pH 4.7 solution containing 0.5% v/v 2-mercaptoethanol and 5% v/v methanol as the mobile phase. The separated mercury compounds were converted to mercury vapors by an in situ nebulizer/vapor generation system for their introduction into ICP. The concentrations of NaBH4 and HNO3 required for vapor generation were also optimized. The method was applied for the speciation of mercury in reference materials NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and also rice flour and wheat flour samples purchased locally. The accuracy of the procedure was verified by analyzing the certified reference material NRCC DOLT-3 Dogfish Liver for methyl mercury. Precision between sample replicates was better than 13% for all the determinations. The detection limits of the mercury compounds studied were in the range 0.003-0.006 ng Hg mL(-1) in the injected solutions, which correspond to 0.02-0.06 ng g(-1) in original flour samples. A microwave-assisted extraction procedure was adopted for the extraction of mercury compounds from rice flour, wheat flour, and fish samples using a mobile phase solution.

  13. Three-dimensional time-dependent computer modeling of the electrothermal atomizers for analytical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivilskiy, I. V.; Nagulin, K. Yu.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    A full three-dimensional nonstationary numerical model of graphite electrothermal atomizers of various types is developed. The model is based on solution of a heat equation within solid walls of the atomizer with a radiative heat transfer and numerical solution of a full set of Navier-Stokes equations with an energy equation for a gas. Governing equations for the behavior of a discrete phase, i.e., atomic particles suspended in a gas (including gas-phase processes of evaporation and condensation), are derived from the formal equations molecular kinetics by numerical solution of the Hertz-Langmuir equation. The following atomizers test the model: a Varian standard heated electrothermal vaporizer (ETV), a Perkin Elmer standard THGA transversely heated graphite tube with integrated platform (THGA), and the original double-stage tube-helix atomizer (DSTHA). The experimental verification of computer calculations is carried out by a method of shadow spectral visualization of the spatial distributions of atomic and molecular vapors in an analytical space of an atomizer.

  14. Hg speciation by differential photochemical vapor generation at UV-B and UV-C wavelengths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mercury speciation was accomplished by differential photochemical reduction at two UV wavelengths; the resulting Hg(O) vapor was quantified by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. After microwave digestion and centrifugation, analyte solutions were mixed with 20% (v/v) formic acid in a reactor coil, an...

  15. Highly vibrationally excited CO generated in a low-temperature chemical reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jans, E.; Frederickson, K.; Yurkovich, M.; Musci, B.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A chemical flow reactor is used to study the vibrational population distribution of CO produced by a reaction between carbon vapor generated in an arc discharge and molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate formation of highly vibrationally excited CO, up to vibrational level v = 14, at low temperatures, T = 400-450 K, with population inversion at v = 4-7, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of reaction enthalpy. The results show feasibility of development of a new CO chemical laser using carbon vapor and oxygen as reactants.

  16. Treatment of multilevel degenerative disc disease with intradiscal electrothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Malik, K

    2007-04-01

    Intradiscal electrothermal therapy is a frequently performed procedure for the pain of internal disc disruption. It is typically performed on one to two discs; the discal treatment is followed by a long period of rest and rehabilitation. In patients with multilevel disc disease, intradiscal electrothermal therapy is either not contemplated or only one to two discs are treated at a time. This approach therefore either denies these patients the potential benefits of intradiscal electrothermal therapy or significantly prolongs the period of pain and disability. A 25-year-old female patient presented with internal disc disruption at four lumbar disc levels, diagnosed by provocative discography and post discography CT scan. All these discs were treated simultaneously by intradiscal electrothermal therapy. The patient tolerated the procedure well and responded favourably with significant and prolonged decrease in her symptoms. She reported sustained reduction in her pain and showed no clinical evidence of early neurological or infectious complications during 18 months of follow-up. This report indicates that intradiscal electrothermal therapy can be performed at multiple levels at a single sitting, compared to intradiscal electrothermal therapy performed at one to two discs at a time, this approach may obviate the need for surgery and may reduce the duration of pain and disability incurred. However, the influence of multilevel intradiscal electrothermal therapy on long-term complications or outcome is not known. PMID:17444324

  17. Predicted dynamic electrothermal performance of thermistor bolometer radiometers for Earth radiation budget applications.

    PubMed

    Haeffelin, M P; Mahan, J R; Priestley, K J

    1997-10-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) rely on scanning thermistor bolometer radiometers of a similar design for accomplishing their mission. High-level dynamic electrothermal models of these instruments have been developed on the basis of the Monte Carlo ray-trace, finite-difference, and finite-element methods. The models are capable of simulating the end-to-end response of the ERBE and the CERES instruments to simulated sequences of Earth scenes. Such models will prove useful in the design of future generations of similar instruments, in defining ground-based and in-flight calibration and data-reduction strategies, in the interpretation of flight data, and in understanding data anomalies that might arise after the instruments have been placed in orbit. Two modules that make up the end-to-end model are presented: the optical-thermal radiative module and the thermistor bolometer dynamic electrothermal module. The optics module is used to determine the point-spread function of the optics, which establishes that the instrument has sharply defined footprints on the Earth. Results obtained with the thermistor bolometer dynamic electrothermal module provide valuable insights into the details of channel operation and establish its high level of equivalence. The combination of the two modules allows the point-spread function of the instrument to be determined and reveals the potential of this tool for scanning realistic Earth scenes.

  18. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Valeria; Biagi, Simona; Ghimenti, Silvia; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2011-11-01

    Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg 0, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H 2 microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10 - 5 mol L - 1 ), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L - 1 (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 μmol L - 1 were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were never less than 91%. Flow injection

  19. Electrothermal ring burn from a car battery.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Paul A; Godwin, Kenneth A

    2013-08-01

    Despite prevention efforts, burn injuries among auto mechanics are described in the literature. Electrothermal ring burns from car batteries occur by short-circuiting through the ring when it touches the open terminal or metal housing. This article describes a 34-year-old male auto mechanic who was holding a wrench when his gold ring touched the positive terminal of a 12-volt car battery and the wrench touched both his ring and the negative terminal. He felt instant pain and had a deep partial-thickness circumferential burn at the base of his ring finger. No other soft tissues were injured. He was initially managed conservatively, but after minimal healing at 3 weeks, he underwent a full-thickness skin graft. The graft incorporated well and healed by 4 weeks postoperatively. He had full range of motion. The cause of ring burns has been controversial, but based on reports similar to the current patient's mechanism, they are most likely electrothermal burns. Gold, a metal with high thermal conductivity, can heat up to its melting point in a matter of seconds. Many treatments have been described, including local wound care to split- and full-thickness skin grafts. Because most burns are preventable, staff should be warned and trained about the potential risks of contact burns. All jewelry should be removed, and the live battery terminal should be covered while working in the vicinity of the battery.

  20. Benefits of Low-Power Electrothermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Sankovic, John M.

    1997-01-01

    Mission analyses were completed to show the benefits of low-power electrothermal propulsion systems for three classes'of LEO smallsat missions. Three different electrothermal systems were considered: (1) a 40 W ammonia resistojet system, (2) a 600 W hydrazine arcjet system, and (3) a 300 W ammonia resistojet. The benefits of using two 40 W ammonia resistojet systems were analyzed for three months of drag makeup of a Shuttle-launched 100 kg spacecraft in a 297 km orbit. The two 46 W resistojets decreased the propulsion system wet mass by 50% when compared to state-of-art hydrazine monopropellant thrusters. The 600 W arcjet system was used for a 300 km sun synchronous makeup mission of a 1000 kg satellite and was found to decrease the wet propulsion mass by 30%. Finally, the 300 W arcjet system was used on a 200 kg Earth-orbiting spacecraft for both orbit transfer from 300 to 400 km, two years of drag makeup, and a final orbit rise to 700 km. The arcjet system was determined to halve the propulsion system wet mass required for that scenario as compared to hydrazine monopropellant thrusters.

  1. A Fundamental Study of Vapor Generation from Nonaqeuous Phase Liquid Sources as a Function of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, B. G.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Sauck, C.; Sakaki, T.; Christ, J.

    2011-12-01

    The intrusion of vapor phase contaminants from subsurface sources into occupied buildings represents a possible exposure pathway and threat to human health. To make informed risk-management decisions regarding this pathway, it is important to build a conceptual model of the physical and chemical processes that govern vapor intrusion, and specifically to understand the source of the contaminant vapors. One vapor source includes nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) entrapped within the vadose zone. The generation of vapors in the vadose zone from these sources under transient conditions imparted by the heat and water flux boundary conditions at the land surface involves complex mass-transfer processes; partitioning occurs simultaneously between NAPL, air, water and soil phases. Advection and diffusion within the air and water phases also play a critical role. It is our contention that the mass transfer to the air phase is a strong function of the soil moisture conditions in the direct vicinity of the NAPL source. We hypothesize that NAPL sources located in zones of high water saturation will have lower effective mass transfer rates than NAPLs located in low saturation regions, due to the higher diffusion resistance in the aqueous phase. Several studies have investigated NAPL mass transfer under unsaturated conditions and variable soil moisture (Ho and Udell 1992; Wilkins et al. 1995; Yoon et al. 2002); however, to build on this knowledge base, laboratory experimentation is needed under controlled conditions that considers spatially and temporally variable airflow fields and soil moisture saturations that occur in source zones in response to rain events and other climatic phenomena. The fundamental knowledge needed to address field problems cannot be generated in field systems due to lack of control and geologic complexities that are hard to characterize, leading to the need to use intermediate scale test systems. To investigate this problem, experiments were first

  2. On-site measurement of trace-level sulfide in natural waters by vapor generation and microchannel collection.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Kuwahara, Haruka; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2011-07-01

    Aqueous sulfide plays an important role in the environment even at low concentrations. However, it is unstable, which means field samples cannot be transported to the laboratory for analysis without fixation. In this work, a novel method was developed to determine trace levels of sulfide on site. This method is based on vapor generation and collection in a special microchannel device followed by fluorescence measurement (VG-μGAS). The microchannel scrubber gave a high enrichment factor, and a high sensitivity was achieved, which allowed measurement of nanomolar (nM) levels of sulfide. The theoretical approach to vapor generation for several compounds is discussed to evaluate the applicability of the method to these analytes, and compounds having a low Henry's law constant (<1 M atm(-1)) are suitable to measure by VG-μGAS. Under optimized conditions, concentrations of 1.0-100 nM of sulfide could be measured. The sulfide contents of hot spring, aquarium, pond, and seawater were successfully measured by this method. Nanomolar levels of sulfide could be measured on site without loss of analyte, and results were obtained instantly in the field, both of which are advantageous for effective field surveys. The method was also applied to field measurements of aqueous sulfide in the Ariake Sea and Lake Baikal.

  3. The use of emulsions for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish-eggs oil by cold vapor generation in a flow injection system with atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Burguera, J L; Quintana, I A; Salager, J L; Burguera, M; Rondón, C; Carrero, P; Anton de Salager, R; Petit de Peña, Y

    1999-04-01

    An on-line time based injection system used in conjunction with cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry and microwave-aided oxidation with potassium persulfate has been developed for the determination of the different mercury species in fish-eggs oil samples. A three-phase surfactant-oil-water emulsion produced an advantageous flow when a peristaltic pump was used to introduce the highly viscous sample into the system. The optimum proportion of the oil-water mixture ratio was 2:3 v/v with a Tween 20 surfactant concentration in the emulsion of 0.008% v/v. Inorganic mercury was determined after reduction with sodium borohydride while total mercury was determined after an oxidation step with persulfate prior to the reduction step to elemental mercury with the same reducing agent. The difference between total and inorganic mercury determined the organomercury content in samples. A linear calibration graph was obtained in the range 0.1-20 micrograms l-1 of Hg2+ by injecting 0.7 ml of samples. The detection limits based on 3 sigma of the blank signals were 0.11 and 0.12 microgram l-1 for total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The relative standard deviation of ten independent measurements were 2.8 and 2.2% for 10 micrograms l-1 and 8.8 and 9.0% for 0.1 microgram l-1 amounts of total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The recoveries of 0.3, 0.6 and 8 micrograms l-1 of inorganic and organic mercury added to fish-eggs oil samples ranged from 93.0 to 94.8% and from 100 to 106%, respectively. Good agreement with those values obtained for total mercury content in real samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was also obtained, differences between mean values were < 7%. With the proposed procedure, 22 proteropterous catfish-eggs oil samples from the northwestern coast of Venezuela were measured; while the organic mercury lay in the range 2.0 and 3.3 micrograms l-1, inorganic mercury was not detected.

  4. Evaluation of Five Phase Digitally Controlled Rotating Field Plasma Source for Photochemical Mercury Vapor Generation Optical Emission Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Ślachciński, Mariusz; Pawłowski, Paweł; Portalski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A new sensitive method for total mercury determination in reference materials using a 5-phase digitally controlled rotating field plasma source (RFP) for optical emission spectrometry (OES) was developed. A novel synergic effect of ultrasonic nebulization (USN) and ultraviolet-visible light (UV-Vis) irradiation when used in combination was exploited for efficient Hg vapor generation. UV- and Vis-based irradiation systems were studied. It was found that the most advantageous design was an ultrasonic nebulizer fitted with a 6 W mercury lamp supplying a microliter sample to a quartz oscillator, converting liquid into aerosol at the entrance of the UV spray chamber. Optimal conditions involved using a 20% v/v solution of acetic acid as the generation medium. The mercury cold vapor, favorably generated from Hg(2+) solutions by UV irradiation, was rapidly transported into a plasma source with rotating field generated within the five electrodes and detected by digitally controlled rotating field plasma optical emission spectrometry (RFP-OES). Under optimal conditions, the experimental concentration detection limit for the determination, calculated as the concentration giving a signal equal to three times the standard deviation of the blank (LOD, 3σblank criterion, peak height), was 4.1 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation for samples was equal to or better than 5% for liquid analysis and microsampling capability. The methodology was validated through determination of mercury in three certified reference materials (corresponding to biological and environmental samples) (NRCC DOLT-2, NRCC PACS-1, NIST 2710) using the external aqueous standard calibration techniques in acetic acid media, with satisfactory recoveries. Mercury serves as an example element to validate the capability of this approach. This is a simple, reagent-saving, cost-effective and green analytical method for mercury determination. PMID:26460362

  5. Electrothermal modeling of silicon PCR chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zheng; Zhao, Zhan; Xia, Shanhong

    2001-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a microchip has drawn considerable attention in recent years. Although a microchip can have must fast heating and cooling rate, the delicacy in its structure makes the PCR experiment difficult and cracks often occurs particularly for the thin membrane type of PCR chips. Electrothermal modeling of PCR chips is presented using commercial MEMS software tool IntelliSuiteTM, with the aim of identifying the problems encountered in experiment and finding an optimum chip structure. Heating characteristics of four different heater designs have been compared, so have the PCR chambers with fixed frame and with suspended frame. The thermal stress analysis has shown that the structure and heater design can make significant difference in heating characteristics and in reducing the failure of PCR chips. The computer simulation has confirmed what has been found in experiment the reason of membrane cracks. Improvement in PCR chip design has been proposed.

  6. Electrothermal MEMS fiber scanner for optical endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Hwang, Kyungmin; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-02-22

    We report a novel MEMS fiber scanner with an electrothermal silicon microactuator and a directly mounted optical fiber. The microactuator comprises double hot arm and cold arm structures with a linking bridge and an optical fiber is aligned along a silicon fiber groove. The unique feature induces separation of resonant scanning frequencies of a single optical fiber in lateral and vertical directions, which realizes Lissajous scanning during the resonant motion. The footprint dimension of microactuator is 1.28 x 7 x 0.44 mm3. The resonant scanning frequencies of a 20 mm long optical fiber are 239.4 Hz and 218.4 Hz in lateral and vertical directions, respectively. The full scanned area indicates 451 μm x 558 μm under a 16 Vpp pulse train. This novel laser scanner can provide many opportunities for laser scanning endomicroscopic applications.

  7. Study of monopropellants for electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzly, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A 333 mN electrothermal thruster designed to use MIL-grade hydrazine was demonstrated to be suitable for operation with low freezing point monopropellants containing hydrazine azide, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical-dimethylhydrazine and ammonia. The steady-state specific impulse was greater than 200 sec for all propellants. The pulsed-mode specific impulse for an azide blend exceeded 175 sec for pulse widths greater than 50 msec; propellants containing carbonaceous species delivered 175 sec pulsed-mode specific impulses for pulse widths greater than 100 msec. Longer thrust chamber residence times were required for the carbonaceous propellants; the original thruster design was modified by increasing the characteristic chamber length and screen packing density. Specific recommendations were made for the work required to design and develop flight worthy thrusters, including methods to increase propellant dispersal at injection, thruster geometry changes to reduce holding power levels and methods to initiate the rapid decomposition of the carbonaceous propellants.

  8. Experiments on a repetitively pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results from an investigation of a pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster using water propellant. The PET thruster is operated on a calibrated thrust stand, and produces a thrust to power ratio of T/P = 0.07 + or - 0.01 N/kW. The discharge conditions are inferred from a numerical model which predicts pressure and temperature levels of 300-500 atm and 20,000 K, respectively. These values in turn correctly predict the measured values of impulse bit and discharge resistance. The inferred ideal exhaust velocity from these conditions is 17 km/sec, but the injection of water propellant produces a test tank background pressure of 10-20 Torr, which reduces the exhaust velocity to 14 km/sec. This value corresponds to a thrust efficiency of 54 + or - 7 percent when all experimental errors are taken into account.

  9. Transition-edge sensor with enhanced electrothermal feedback for cryogenic particle detection

    DOEpatents

    Nam, Sae Woo; Cabrera, Blas

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting transition-edge sensor with an electrothermal-feedback circuit, a heat sink thermally coupled thereto, a bias-feedback circuit electrically coupled with the electrothermal feedback circuit, and a current sensor electrically coupled with the bias-feedback circuit and inductively coupled with the electrothermal-feedback circuit.

  10. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  11. Dynamic vapor generator that simulates transient odor emissions of victims entrapped in the voids of collapsed buildings.

    PubMed

    Statheropoulos, M; Pallis, G C; Mikedi, K; Giannoukos, S; Agapiou, A; Pappa, A; Cole, A; Vautz, W; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-04-15

    The design, development, and validation of a dynamic vapor generator are presented. The generator simulates human scent (odor) emissions from trapped victims in the voids of collapsed buildings. The validation of the device was carried out using a reference detector: a quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with a pulsed sampling (PS-MS) system. A series of experiments were conducted for evaluating the simulator's performance, defining types and weights of different factors, and proposing further optimization of the device. The developed device enabled the production of stable and transient odor profiles in a controllable and reproducible way (relative standard deviation, RSD < 11%) at ppbv to low ppmv concentrations and allowed emission durations up to 30 min. Moreover, the factors affecting its optimum performance (i.e., evaporation chamber temperature, air flow rate through the mixing chamber, air flow rate through the evaporation chamber, and type of compound) were evaluated through an analysis of variance (ANOVA) tool revealing the next steps toward optimizing the generator. The developed simulator, potentially, can also serve the need for calibrating and evaluating the performance of analytical devices (e.g., gas chromatographers, ion mobility spectrometers, mass spectrometers, sensors, e-noses) in the field. Furthermore, it can contribute in better training of urban search and rescue (USaR) canines.

  12. Particle generators for the calibration and testing of narcotic and explosive vapor/particle detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, John P.; Hallowell, Susan F.; Hoglund, David E.

    1994-03-01

    A review of data on narcotics and explosives particulates is presented. Methods to generate particles of narcotics and explosives will be discussed with respect to resulting particle size distribution and mass output. The application of these standards to the testing of narcotic and explosive particle detection systems will be addressed.

  13. Dynamics of vapor bubbles growth at boiling resulting from enthalpy excess of the surrounding superheated liquid and sound pulses generated by bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeev, B. M.; Volkova, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experiments investigating the exponential dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time at saturated boiling are generalized. Three different methods to obtain this dependence are suggested: (1) by the application of the transient heat conduction equation, (2) by using the correlations of energy conservation, and (3) by solving a similar electrodynamic problem. Based on the known experimental data, the accuracy of the dependence up to one percent and a few percent accuracy of its description based on the sound pressure generated by a vapor bubble have been determined. A significant divergence of the power dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time (with an exponent of 1/2) with the experimental results and its inadequacy for the description of the sound pulse generated by the bubble have been demonstrated.

  14. UV-photochemical vapor generation of selenium for atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization and 75Se radiotracer efficiency study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybínová, Marcela; Musil, Stanislav; Červený, Václav; Vobecký, Miloslav; Rychlovský, Petr

    2016-09-01

    Volatile selenium compounds were generated UV-photochemically in the continuous flow mode using four UV-photoreactors differing in the material of the reaction coil; Teflon tubing and quartz tubes with various inner diameters and wall thicknesses were tested. Atomic absorption spectrometry with an externally heated quartz furnace atomizer was employed as the detector. The relevant experimental generation parameters were optimized and the basic analytical characteristics were determined. Using formic acid as the photochemical agent, limits of detection achieved for selenium were in the range 46-102 ng L- 1 in dependence on the type of UV-photoreactor employed. When nitric acid was also added to the photochemical agent, the limits of detection were reduced to 27-44 ng L- 1. The repeatability did not exceed 2.4% (5 μg L- 1 Se(IV), n = 10). Experiments with 75Se radiotracer have been performed for the first time to quantify the efficiency of UV-photochemical vapor generation (UV-PVG) of selenium. The highest efficiency of 67 ± 1% was obtained for a UV-photoreactor containing a quartz reaction coil (2.0 mm i.d., 4.0 mm o.d.). The generation efficiency of 61 ± 1% was obtained for a Teflon reaction coil (1.0 mm i.d., 1.4 mm o.d.). Mapping of the radiotracer distribution in the individual parts of the apparatus did not reveal substantial transport losses of the analyte in the UV-PVG system.

  15. Detection of bromine by ICP-oa-ToF-MS following photochemical vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Ralph E

    2015-03-01

    A unique flow-through photochemical reactor is utilized for the generation of volatile methyl bromide from aqueous solutions of bromide and bromate ions in a medium of 2% acetic acid containing 3000 μg/mL NH4Cl. The volatile product is transported to a thin-film gas-liquid phase separator and directed to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tine-of-flight mass spectrometer for detection and quantitation using either of the (79)Br or (81)Br isotopes. Utilizing a sample flow rate of 3.3 mL/min and a 13 s irradiation time, a detection limit of 0.14 ng/mL is achieved, yielding a 17-fold enhancement over conventional solution nebulization. The estimated generation efficiency of 95% provides for a significant increase in analyte transport efficiency to the ICP. Precision of replicate measurement is 2.5% (RSD) at 20 ng/mL. The methodology was validated by successful determination of bromine in reference materials, including IRMM (BCR-611) low level bromide in groundwater, NIST SRM 1568b Rice Flour, and SRM 1632 bituminous coal. PMID:25649253

  16. Detection of bromine by ICP-oa-ToF-MS following photochemical vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Ralph E

    2015-03-01

    A unique flow-through photochemical reactor is utilized for the generation of volatile methyl bromide from aqueous solutions of bromide and bromate ions in a medium of 2% acetic acid containing 3000 μg/mL NH4Cl. The volatile product is transported to a thin-film gas-liquid phase separator and directed to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tine-of-flight mass spectrometer for detection and quantitation using either of the (79)Br or (81)Br isotopes. Utilizing a sample flow rate of 3.3 mL/min and a 13 s irradiation time, a detection limit of 0.14 ng/mL is achieved, yielding a 17-fold enhancement over conventional solution nebulization. The estimated generation efficiency of 95% provides for a significant increase in analyte transport efficiency to the ICP. Precision of replicate measurement is 2.5% (RSD) at 20 ng/mL. The methodology was validated by successful determination of bromine in reference materials, including IRMM (BCR-611) low level bromide in groundwater, NIST SRM 1568b Rice Flour, and SRM 1632 bituminous coal.

  17. Mechanisms of chemical vapor generation by aqueous tetrahydridoborate. Recent developments toward the definition of a more general reaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    A reaction model describing the reactivity of metal and semimetal species with aqueous tetrahydridoborate (THB) has been drawn taking into account the mechanism of chemical vapor generation (CVG) of hydrides, recent evidences on the mechanism of interference and formation of byproducts in arsane generation, and other evidences in the field of the synthesis of nanoparticles and catalytic hydrolysis of THB by metal nanoparticles. The new "non-analytical" reaction model is of more general validity than the previously described "analytical" reaction model for CVG. The non-analytical model is valid for reaction of a single analyte with THB and for conditions approaching those typically encountered in the synthesis of nanoparticles and macroprecipitates. It reduces to the previously proposed analytical model under conditions typically employed in CVG for trace analysis (analyte below the μM level, borane/analyte ≫ 103 mol/mol, no interference). The non-analytical reaction model is not able to explain all the interference effects observed in CVG, which can be achieved only by assuming the interaction among the species of reaction pathways of different analytical substrates. The reunification of CVG, the synthesis of nanoparticles by aqueous THB and the catalytic hydrolysis of THB inside a common frame contribute to rationalization of the complex reactivity of aqueous THB with metal and semimetal species.

  18. Investigation of a pulsed electrothermal thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hilko, B. K.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of an ablative wall Pulsed Electrothermal (PET) thruster is accurately characterized on a calibrated thrust stand, using polyethylene propellant. The thruster is tested for four configurations of capillary length and pulse length. The exhaust velocity is determined with twin time-of-flight photodiode stagnation probes, and the ablated mass is measured from the loss over ten shots. Based on the measured thrust impulse and the ablated mass, the specific impulse varies from 1000 to 1750 seconds. The thrust to power varies from .05 N/kW (quasi-steady mode) to .10 N/kW (unsteady mode). The thruster efficiency varies from .56 at 1000 seconds to .42 at 1750 seconds. A conceptual design is presented for a 40 kW PET propulsion system. The point design system performance is .62 system efficiency at 1000 seconds specific impulse. The system's reliability is enhanced by incorporating 20, 20 kW thruster modules which are fired in pairs. The thruster design is non-ablative, and uses water propellant, from a central storage tank, injected through the cathode.

  19. Design and characterization of a microelectromechanical system electro-thermal linear motor with interlock mechanism for micro manipulators.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tengjiang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Xiuyuan; Zhao, You; Bai, Yingwei

    2016-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a novel electro-thermal linear motor for micro manipulators is presented in this paper. The V-shape electro-thermal actuator arrays, micro lever, micro spring, and slider are introduced. In moving operation, the linear motor can move nearly 1 mm displacement with 100 μm each step while keeping the applied voltage as low as 17 V. In holding operation, the motor can stay in one particular position without consuming energy and no creep deformation is found. Actuation force of 12.7 mN indicates the high force generation capability of the device. Experiments of lifetime show that the device can wear over two million cycles of operation. A silicon-on-insulator wafer is introduced to fabricate a high aspect ratio structure and the chip size is 8.5 mm × 8.5 mm × 0.5 mm.

  20. Design and characterization of a microelectromechanical system electro-thermal linear motor with interlock mechanism for micro manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tengjiang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Xiuyuan; Zhao, You; Bai, Yingwei

    2016-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a novel electro-thermal linear motor for micro manipulators is presented in this paper. The V-shape electro-thermal actuator arrays, micro lever, micro spring, and slider are introduced. In moving operation, the linear motor can move nearly 1 mm displacement with 100 μm each step while keeping the applied voltage as low as 17 V. In holding operation, the motor can stay in one particular position without consuming energy and no creep deformation is found. Actuation force of 12.7 mN indicates the high force generation capability of the device. Experiments of lifetime show that the device can wear over two million cycles of operation. A silicon-on-insulator wafer is introduced to fabricate a high aspect ratio structure and the chip size is 8.5 mm × 8.5 mm × 0.5 mm.

  1. Design and characterization of a microelectromechanical system electro-thermal linear motor with interlock mechanism for micro manipulators.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tengjiang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Xiuyuan; Zhao, You; Bai, Yingwei

    2016-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a novel electro-thermal linear motor for micro manipulators is presented in this paper. The V-shape electro-thermal actuator arrays, micro lever, micro spring, and slider are introduced. In moving operation, the linear motor can move nearly 1 mm displacement with 100 μm each step while keeping the applied voltage as low as 17 V. In holding operation, the motor can stay in one particular position without consuming energy and no creep deformation is found. Actuation force of 12.7 mN indicates the high force generation capability of the device. Experiments of lifetime show that the device can wear over two million cycles of operation. A silicon-on-insulator wafer is introduced to fabricate a high aspect ratio structure and the chip size is 8.5 mm × 8.5 mm × 0.5 mm. PMID:27036807

  2. The generation of HCl in the system CaCl2-H2O: Vapor-liquid relations from 380-500°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fournier, Robert O.

    1996-01-01

    We determined vapor-liquid relations (P-T-x) and derived critical parameters for the system CaCl2-H2O from 380-500??C. Results show that the two-phase region of this system is extremely large and occupies a significant portion of the P-T space to which circulation of fluids in the Earth's crust is constrained. Results also show the system generates significant amounts of HCl (as much as 0.1 mol/kg) in the vapor phase buffered by the liquid at surprisingly high pressures (???230 bars at 380??C, <580 bars at 500??C), presumably by hydrolysis of CaCl2: CaCl2 + 2H2O = Ca(OH)2 + 2HCl. We interpret the abundance of HCl in the vapor as due to its preference for the vapor phase, and by the preference of Ca(OH)2 for either the liquid phase or solid. The recent recognition of the abundance of CaCl2 in deep brines of the Earth's crust and their hydrothermal mobilization makes the hydrolysis of CaCl2 geologically important. The boiling of Ca-rich brines produces abundant HCl buffered by the presence of the liquid at moderate pressures. The resultant Ca(OH)2 generated by this process reacts with silicates to form a variety of alteration products, such as epidote, whereas the vapor produces acid-alteration of rocks through which it ascends.

  3. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-08-13

    Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the core

  4. Study of monopropellants for electrothermal thrusters: Analytical task summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzly, J. D.; Grabbi, R.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of operating small thrust level electrothermal thrusters is determined with monopropellants other than MIL-grade hydrazine. The work scope includes analytical study, design and fabrication of demonstration thrusters, and an evaluation test program where monopropellants with freezing points lower than MIL-grade hydrazine are evaluated and characterized to determine their applicability to electrothermal thrusters for spacecraft attitude control. Results of propellant chemistry studies and performance analyses indicated that the most promising candidate monopropellants to be investigated are monomethylhydrazine, Aerozine-50, 77% hydrazine-23% hydrazine azide blend, and TRW formulated mixed hydrazine monopropellant (MHM) consisting of 35% hydrazine-50% monomethylhydrazine-15% ammonia.

  5. Second-Harmonic Generation and Relaxation in Polyurea Thin Films Prepared by Vapor Deposition Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikita, Masayuki; Yamada, Sinichi; Mizutani, Teruyosi

    1993-06-01

    Aromatic polyurea thin (PU) films were fabricated by means of coevaporation of 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and either 4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (DDM) or 4,4'-diamino diphenyl ether (DDE). For the two PU films, second-harmonic generation (SHG) caused by corona poling and the subsequent isothermal decay were investigated. The second-order nonlinear coefficient d33 was estimated to be 5.3 and 6.3 pm/V for PU(DDM) and PU(DDE), respectively, and proved to exhibit almost no decay with time up to 2000 h. It was also found that annealing prior to the poling process caused no additional increase of SHG. This result was interpreted in terms of increase in the packing density of molecules, leading to suppression of the molecular orientation. PU films containing excess residual isocyanate groups showed a large SHG decay to about 60% of the initial value within 10 min. It was concluded that the residual isocyanate groups in as-deposited PU films greatly affects the behavior of SHG relaxation.

  6. Ultrathin phase-change coatings on metals for electrothermally tunable colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Ayas, Sencer; Saidzoda, Tohir; Celebi, Kemal; Dana, Aykutlu

    2016-08-01

    Metal surfaces coated with ultrathin lossy dielectrics enable color generation through strong interferences in the visible spectrum. Using a phase-change thin film as the coating layer offers tuning the generated color by crystallization or re-amorphization. Here, we study the optical response of surfaces consisting of thin (5-40 nm) phase-changing Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) films on metal, primarily Al, layers. A color scale ranging from yellow to red to blue that is obtained using different thicknesses of as-deposited amorphous GST layers turns dim gray upon annealing-induced crystallization of the GST. Moreover, when a relatively thick (>100 nm) and lossless dielectric film is introduced between the GST and Al layers, optical cavity modes are observed, offering a rich color gamut at the expense of the angle independent optical response. Finally, a color pixel structure is proposed for ultrahigh resolution (pixel size: 5 × 5 μm2), non-volatile displays, where the metal layer acting like a mirror is used as a heater element. The electrothermal simulations of such a pixel structure suggest that crystallization and re-amorphization of the GST layer using electrical pulses are possible for electrothermal color tuning.

  7. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyang

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg 0, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL -1 for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury ( n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  8. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Zu, Wenchuan; Wang, Zhenghao

    2016-03-01

    A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL(-1) methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH3(+) solutions were in the range of 0.2-5 ng mL(-1)(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88×10(-3)ng mL(-1) and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL(-1) standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7-45.8 ng g(-1). The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6-103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n=6) were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis.

  9. The annular flow electrothermal ramjet. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    The annular flow, electrothermal, plug ramjet is examined as a possible means of achieving rapid projectile acceleration to velocities for such applications as direct launch of spacebound payloads. The performance of this ramjet operating with hydrogen propellant is examined for cases where this working fluid is treated: (1) as a perfect gas, and (2) as a gas that is allowed to dissociate and ionize and then recombine with finite reaction rates in the nozzle. Performance results for these cases are compared to the performance of a conventional ramjet operating with perfect gas hydrogen propellant. The performance of the conventional ramjet is superior to that of the annular flow, electrothermal ramjet. However, it is argued that the mechanical complexities associated with conventional ramjet operation are difficult to attain, and for this reason the annular flow, electrothermal ramjet is more desirable as a launch system. Models are presented which describe both electrothermal plug ramjet and conventional ramjet operation, and it is shown that for a given flight velocity there is a rate of heat addition per unit propellant mass for which ramjet operation is optimized.

  10. Determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laiana O B; Leao, Danilo J; dos Santos, Debora C; Matos, Geraldo D; de Andrade, Jailson B; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of a method for the determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG AAS). Chemometric tools were employed to characterize the influence of several factors on the generation of volatile copper species. First, a two-level full factorial design was performed that included the following chemical variables: hydrochloric acid concentration, tetrahydroborate concentration, sulfanilamide concentration and tetrahydroborate volume, using absorbance as the response. Under the established experimental conditions, the hydrochloric acid concentration had the greatest influence on the generation of volatile copper species. Subsequently, a Box-Behnken design was performed to determine the optimum conditions for these parameters. A second chemometric study employing a two-level full factorial design was performed to evaluate the following physical factors: tetrahydroborate flow rate, flame composition, alcohol volume and sample volume. The results of this study demonstrated that the tetrahydroborate flow rate was critical for the process. The chemometric experiments determined the following experimental conditions for the method: hydrochloric acid concentration, 0.208 M; tetrahydroborate concentration, 4.59%; sulfanilamide concentration, 0.79%; tetrahydroborate volume, 2.50 mL; tetrahydroborate flow rate, 6.50 mL min(-1); alcohol volume, 200 µL; and sample volume, 7.0 mL. Thus, this method, using a slurry volume of 500 µL and a final dilution of 7 mL, allowed for the determination of copper with limits of detection and quantification of 0.30 and 0.99 µg L(-1), respectively. Precisions, expressed as RSD%, of 4.6 and 2.8% were obtained using copper solutions at concentrations of 5.0 and 50.0 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material of urban particulate matter. The copper concentration

  11. Determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laiana O B; Leao, Danilo J; dos Santos, Debora C; Matos, Geraldo D; de Andrade, Jailson B; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of a method for the determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG AAS). Chemometric tools were employed to characterize the influence of several factors on the generation of volatile copper species. First, a two-level full factorial design was performed that included the following chemical variables: hydrochloric acid concentration, tetrahydroborate concentration, sulfanilamide concentration and tetrahydroborate volume, using absorbance as the response. Under the established experimental conditions, the hydrochloric acid concentration had the greatest influence on the generation of volatile copper species. Subsequently, a Box-Behnken design was performed to determine the optimum conditions for these parameters. A second chemometric study employing a two-level full factorial design was performed to evaluate the following physical factors: tetrahydroborate flow rate, flame composition, alcohol volume and sample volume. The results of this study demonstrated that the tetrahydroborate flow rate was critical for the process. The chemometric experiments determined the following experimental conditions for the method: hydrochloric acid concentration, 0.208 M; tetrahydroborate concentration, 4.59%; sulfanilamide concentration, 0.79%; tetrahydroborate volume, 2.50 mL; tetrahydroborate flow rate, 6.50 mL min(-1); alcohol volume, 200 µL; and sample volume, 7.0 mL. Thus, this method, using a slurry volume of 500 µL and a final dilution of 7 mL, allowed for the determination of copper with limits of detection and quantification of 0.30 and 0.99 µg L(-1), respectively. Precisions, expressed as RSD%, of 4.6 and 2.8% were obtained using copper solutions at concentrations of 5.0 and 50.0 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material of urban particulate matter. The copper concentration

  12. Single drop solution electrode glow discharge for plasma assisted-chemical vapor generation: sensitive detection of zinc and cadmium in limited amounts of samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-ang; Tan, Qing; Hou, Xiandeng; Xu, Kailai; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-12-16

    A simple and sensitive approach is proposed and evaluated for determination of ultratrace Zn and Cd in limited amounts of samples or tens of cells based on a novel single drop (5-20 μL) solution electrode glow discharge assisted-chemical vapor generation technique. Volatile species of Zn and Cd were immediately generated and separated from the liquid phase for transporting to atomic fluorescence or atomic mass spectrometric detectors for their determination only using hydrogen when the glow discharge was ignited between the surface of a liquid drop and the tip of a tungsten electrode. Limits of detection are better than 0.01 μg L(-1) (0.2 pg) for Cd and 0.1 μg L(-1) (2 pg) for Zn, respectively, and comparable or better than the previously reported results due to only a 20 μL sampling volume required, which makes the proposed technique convenient for the determination of Zn and Cd in limited amounts of samples or even only tens of cells. The proposed method not only retains the advantages of conventional chemical vapor generation but also provides several unique advantages, including better sensitivity, lower sample and power consumption, higher chemical vapor generation efficiencies and simpler setup, as well as greener analytical chemistry. The utility of this technique was demonstrated by the determination of ultratrace Cd and Zn in several single human hair samples, Certified Reference Materials GBW07601a (human hair powder) and paramecium cells. PMID:25409265

  13. Design and calibration of pulsed vapor generators for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine, and pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.P.; Blackwood, L.G.; Davis, S.G.; Goodrich, L.D.; Larson, R.A. )

    1993-11-01

    Computer-controlled pulsed explosive vapor generators for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol (PETN) were built and calibrated to support an independent validation and verification facility for explosive detection systems for the Federal Aviation Administration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The explosive vapor generators will be used as quantitative vapor standards to establish the lower limits of detection of explosive detection systems. The generators were constructed using pure explosive suspended on quartz beads which were then loaded into a stainless steel tube. The tube was coiled and placed into a temperature-controlled chamber. A carrier gas (ultrapure air) was passed through the coil to carry the explosive molecules. The generators are capable of delivering a pulse of varying explosive mass through the control of coil temperature, airflow rate, and pulse width. Preliminary calibrations have been completed in the picogram to nanogram range using an ion mobility spectrometer as the calibrating instrument. 8 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Direct Determination of Trace Antimony in Natural Waters by Photochemical Vapor Generation ICPMS: Method Optimization and Comparison of Quantitation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Mester, Zoltán; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin; Yang, Lu

    2015-08-01

    A novel and sensitive approach for the accurate determination of antimony (Sb) in natural waters is described using photochemical vapor generation (PVG) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for detection. Utilizing a unique flow-through photochemical reactor capable of subjecting the samples to deep-UV (185 nm) radiation, generation efficiency was found to be independent of whether Sb(III), Sb(V), or organometallic species [trimethyltantimony(V)dibromine, TMSb(V)] were present, eliminating the shortcoming of Sb species depended sensitivity encountered during direct solution nebulization by ICPMS. Furthermore, the potentially severe matrix effect from seawater was efficiently eliminated by using a mixture of 5% (v/v) formic and 15% acetic acids (v/v) as the photochemical reductant, making direct determination of Sb in seawater feasible. The proposed method provides a 15-fold improvement in sensitivity over direct solution nebulization. A method detection limit of 0.0006 ng g(-1) based on external calibration was obtained (0.0002 ng g(-1) for isotope dilution), yielding a 15-fold improvement over that for direct solution nebulization. Accuracy is demonstrated by analysis of two water certified reference materials (CRMs, e.g., SLRS-6 and NIST 1640a) with satisfying results. In addition, spike recoveries of 100.6 ± 5.5% and 100.8 ± 3.8% (standard deviation, n = 3) were obtained for NASS-6 and CASS-5 seawater CRMs, respectively, since no certified values for Sb has been established for these materials. The performance of several calibration strategies, including double isotope dilution (ID), multiple and single-point gravimetric standard additions with internal standardization, as well as multiple and single-point gravimetric standard additions alone was examined. High precision of determination of Sb in four natural water samples (0.51-1.4%) was realized based on ID calibration, whereas one-point gravimetric standard addition calibration

  15. Solution cathode glow discharge induced vapor generation of mercury and its application to mercury speciation by high performance liquid chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Qian; Zhu, Zhenli; Hu, Shenghong; Jin, Lanlan

    2011-07-15

    A novel solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) induced vapor generation was developed as interface to on-line couple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) for the speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), methyl-mercury (MeHg) and ethyl-mercury (EtHg). The decomposition of organic mercury species and the reduction of Hg(2+) could be completed in one step with this proposed SCGD induced vapor generation system. The vapor generation is extremely rapid and therefore is easy to couple with flow injection (FI) and HPLC. Compared with the conventional HPLC-CV-AFS hyphenated systems, the proposed HPLC-SCGD-AFS system is very simple in operation and eliminates auxiliary redox reagents. Parameters influencing mercury determination were optimized, such as concentration of formic acid, discharge current and argon flow rate. The method detection limits for HPLC-SCGD-AFS system were 0.67 μg L(-1) for Hg(2+), 0.55 μg L(-1) for MeHg and 1.19 μg L(-1) for EtHg, respectively. The developed method was validated by determination of certified reference material (GBW 10029, tuna fish) and was further applied for the determination of mercury in biological samples. PMID:21641599

  16. Direct measurement of axial momentum imparted by an electrothermal radiofrequency plasma micro-thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick; Bish, Andrew; Khayms, Vadim; Scholz, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    Gas flow heating using radio frequency plasmas offers the possibility of depositing power in the centre of the flow rather than on the outside, as is the case with electro-thermal systems where thermal wall losses lower efficiency. Improved systems for space propulsion are one possible application and we have tested a prototype micro-thruster on a thrust balance in vacuum. For these initial tests, a fixed component radio frequency matching network weighing 90 grams was closely attached to the thruster in vacuum with the frequency agile radio frequency generator power being delivered via a 50 Ohm cable. Without accounting for system losses (estimated at around 50%), for a few 10s of Watts from the radio frequency generator the specific impulse was tripled to ˜48 seconds and the thrust tripled from 0.8 to 2.4 milli-Newtons.

  17. Determination of mercury in fish otoliths by cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS)†

    PubMed Central

    Kenduzler, Erdal; Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; McHenry, Melanie; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    A method based on cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS) has been developed for determination of inorganic mercury, Hg(II), and total mercury in fish otoliths. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was used as the only reducing agent and its concentration was optimized across an acidity gradient to selectively reduce Hg(II) without affecting methylmercury, CH3Hg(I). Inorganic Hg was quantitatively reduced to elemental mercury (Hg0) with 1×10−4% (m/v) NaBH4. CH3Hg(I) required a minimum of 0.5% (m/v) NaBH4 for complete reduction. Increasing the HCl concentration of solution to 5% (v/v) improved the selectivity toward Hg(II) as it decreased the signals from CH3Hg(I) to baseline levels. Potassium ferricyanide solution was the most effective in eliminating the memory effects of Hg compared with a number of chelating and oxidizing agents, including EDTA, gold chloride, thiourea, cerium ammonium nitrate and 2-mercaptoethylamine chloride. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5% for 1.0 μg L−1 Hg(II) solution. The detection limits were 4.2 and 6.4 ng L−1 (ppt) for Hg(II) and total Hg, respectively. Sample dissolution conditions and recoveries were examined with ultra-pure CaCO3 (99.99%) spiked with Hg(II) and CH3HgCl. Methylmercury was stable when dissolution was performed with up to 20% (v/v) HCl at 100 oC. Recoveries from spiked solutions were higher than 95% for both Hg(II) and CH3Hg(I). The method was applied to the determination of Hg(II) and total Hg concentrations in the otoliths of red emperor (CRM 22) and Pacific halibut. Total Hg concentration in the otoliths was 0.038 ± 0.004 μg g−1 for the red emperor and 0.021 ± 0.003 μg g−1 for the Pacific halibut. Inorganic Hg accounted for about 25% of total Hg indicating that Hg in the otoliths was predominantly organic mercury (e.g., methylmercury). However, as opposed to the bioaccumulation in tissues, methylmercury levels in otoliths was very low suggesting a

  18. Simulations of electrothermal instability growth in solid aluminum rods

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Nakhleh, Charles; Herrmann, Mark C.; Koning, Joseph M.; Marinak, Michael M.

    2013-05-15

    A recent publication [K. J. Peterson et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 092701 (2012)] describes simulations and experiments of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns rise time current pulse on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator. Quantitative analysis of the high precision radiography data obtained in the experiments showed excellent agreement with simulations and demonstrated levels of instability growth in dense matter that could not be explained by magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities alone. This paper extends the previous one by examining the nature of the instability growth in 2D simulations in much greater detail. The initial instability growth in the simulations is shown via several considerations to be predominantly electrothermal in nature and provides a seed for subsequent magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor growth.

  19. A numerical and experimental investigation of electrothermal aircraft deicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffel, K.; Masiulaniec, K. C.; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained for the deicing characteristics of a stationary UH-1H helicopter blade which had been fitted with an electrothermal deicer assembly. The tests were run in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and yielded transient temperature responses for the substrate, heater and abrasion shield at selected positions around the blade. The data at the abrasion shield-ice interface clearly documented when melting, shedding or refreezing occurred. Comparisons were made between the experimental data and a one-dimensional numerical model. The agreement was generally very good, with the simulations being shown to be capable of predicting the transient temperature responses along with phase change and ice shedding. At many blade positions, the model was capable of accurately simulating the thermal response of the electrothermal deicer assembly.

  20. Electrothermally activated microchips for implantable drug delivery and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Maloney, John M; Uhland, Scott A; Polito, Benjamin F; Sheppard, Norman F; Pelta, Christina M; Santini, John T

    2005-12-01

    Novel drug delivery and biosensing devices have the potential to increase the efficacy of drug therapy by providing physicians and patients the ability to precisely control key therapy parameters. Such "intelligent" systems can enable control of dose amount and the time, rate, and location of drug delivery. We have developed and demonstrated the operation of an electrothermal mechanism to precisely control the delivery of drugs and exposure of biosensors. These microchip devices contain an array of individually sealed and actuated reservoirs, each capped by a thin metal membrane comprised of either gold or multiple layers of titanium and platinum. The passage of a threshold level of electric current through the membrane causes it to disintegrate, thereby exposing the protected contents (drugs or biosensors) of the reservoir to the surrounding environment. This paper describes the theory and experimental characterization of the electrothermal method and includes in vitro release results for a model compound.

  1. Electro-thermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Marsili, F.; Najafi, F.; Herder, C.; Berggren, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Electro-Thermal Modeling to Improve Battery Design: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Vlahinos, A.

    2005-09-01

    Operating temperature greatly affects the performance and life of batteries in electric and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Increased attention is necessary to battery thermal management. Electrochemical models and finite element analysis tools are available for predicting the thermal performance of batteries, but each has limitations. This study describes an electro-thermal finite element approach that predicts the thermal performance of a battery cell or module with realistic geometry.

  3. Improving Battery Design with Electro-Thermal Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Bharathan, D.; Kim, G.-H.; Duong, T.

    2005-08-01

    Temperature greatly affects the performance and life of batteries in electric and hybrid vehicles under real driving conditions, so increased attention is being paid to battery thermal management. Sophisticated electrochemical models and finite element analysis tools are available for predicting the thermal performance of batteries, but each has limitations. In this study we describe an electro-thermal finite element approach that predicts the thermal performance of a cell or module with realistic geometry, material properties, loads, and boundary conditions.

  4. Improving Battery Design with Electro-Thermal Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Bharathan, D.; Kim, G.; Vlahinos, A.; Duong, T.

    2005-04-01

    Temperature greatly affects the performance and life of batteries in electric and hybrid vehicles under real driving conditions, so increased attention is being paid to battery thermal management. Sophisticated electrochemical models and finite element analysis tools are available for predicting the thermal performance of batteries, but each has limitations. In this study we describe an electro-thermal finite element approach that predicts the thermal performance of a cell or module with realistic geometry, material properties, loads, and boundary conditions.

  5. Thermal characterization of large size lithium-ion pouch cell based on 1d electro-thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertiz, G.; Oyarbide, M.; Macicior, H.; Miguel, O.; Cantero, I.; Fernandez de Arroiabe, P.; Ulacia, I.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management is one of the key factors to keep lithium-ion cells in optimum electrical performance, under safe working conditions and into a reasonably low ageing process. This issue is becoming particularly relevant due to the heterogeneous heat generation along the cell. Cell working temperature is determined by ambient temperature, heat generation and evacuation capacity. Therefore, thermal management is established by: i) the intrinsic thermal properties (heat capacity & thermal conductivity) and ii) the heat generation electro-thermal parameters (internal resistance, open circuit voltage & entropic factor). In this research, different methods - calculated and experimental - are used to characterize the main heat properties of a 14Ah -LiFePO4/graphite-commercial large sizes pouch cell. In order to evaluate the accuracy of methods, two comparisons were performed. First, Newman heat generation estimations were compared with experimental heat measurements. Secondly, empirical thermal cell behaviour was match with 1D electro-thermal model response. Finally, considering the results, the most adequate methodology to evaluate the key thermal parameters of a large size Lithium-ion pouch cell are proposed to be: i) pulse method for internal resistance, ii)heat loss method for entropic factor; and iii)experimental measurement (ARC calorimeter and C-177-97 standard method) for heat capacity and thermal conductivity.

  6. Vapor shielding effects on energy transfer from plasma-gun generated ELM-like transient loads to material surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Isono, W.; Nakazono, T.; Nakane, M.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer processes from ELM-like pulsed helium (He) plasmas with a pulse duration of ˜0.1 ms to aluminum (Al) and tungsten (W) surfaces were experimentally investigated by the use of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device. The surface absorbed energy density of the He pulsed plasma on the W surface measured with a calorimeter was ˜0.44 MJ m-2, whereas it was ˜0.15 MJ m-2 on the Al surface. A vapor layer in front of the Al surface exposed to the He pulsed plasma was clearly identified by Al neutral emission line (Al i) measured with a high time resolution spectrometer, and fast imaging with a high-speed visible camera filtered around the Al i emission line. On the other hand, no clear evaporation in front of the W surface exposed to the He pulsed plasma was observed in the present condition. Discussions on the reduction in the surface absorbed energy density on the Al surface are provided by considering the latent heat of vaporization and radiation cooling due to the Al vapor cloud.

  7. Photo-induced cold vapor generation with low molecular weight alcohol, aldehyde, or carboxylic acid for atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of mercury.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunfang; Zheng, Chengbin; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Guanglei; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2007-06-01

    With UV irradiation, Hg(2+) in aqueous solution can be converted into Hg(0) cold vapor by low molecular weight alcohols, aldehydes, or carboxylic acids, e.g., methanol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glycol, 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, acetic acid, oxalic acid, or malonic acid. It was found that the presence of nano-TiO(2) more or less improved the efficiency of the photo-induced chemical/cold vapor generation (photo-CVG) with most of the organic reductants. The nano-TiO(2)-enhanced photo-CVG systems can be coupled to various analytical atomic spectrometric techniques for the determination of ultratrace mercury. In this work, we evaluated the application of this method to the atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) determination of mercury in cold vapor mode. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the instrumental limits of detection (based on three times the standard deviation of 11 measurements of a blank solution) were around 0.02-0.04 microg L(-1), with linear dynamic ranges up to 15 microg L(-1). The interference of transition metals and the mechanism of the photo-CVG are briefly discussed. Real sample analysis using the photo-CVG-AFS method revealed that it was promising for water and geological analysis of ultralow levels of mercury.

  8. VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1959-08-25

    Electromagnetically operated vapor valves are described for apparatus employed in the separation of isotopes or elements to control the flow of gaseous vapors between a vaporizing charge chamber and an ionizing chamber, The charge chamber and ionizing chamber are positioned in a magnetic field, and the flow of vapors through an orifice connecting the chambers is regulated by regulating the flow of current through a resilient metal strip rigidly mounted at one end and positioned in the magnetic field adjacent to the orifice.

  9. Determination of Se in biological samples by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after digestion with aqua regia and on-line chemical vapor generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Éder José; Herrmann, Amanda Beatriz; de Caires, Suzete Kulik; Frescura, Vera Lúcia Azzolin; Curtius, Adilson José

    2009-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the determination of Se in biological samples, including food, by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using on-line chemical vapor generation (CVG-ICP OES) is proposed. The concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4, used in the chemical vapor generation were optimized by factorial analysis. Six certified materials (non-fat milk powder, lobster hepatopancreas, human hair, whole egg powder, oyster tissue, and lyophilised pig kidney) were treated with 10 mL of aqua regia in a microwave system under reflux for 15 min followed by additional 15 min in an ultrasonic bath. The solutions were transferred to a 100 mL volumetric flask and the final volume was made up with water. The Se was determined directly in these solutions by CVG-ICP OES, using the analytical line at 196.026 nm. Calibration against aqueous standards in 10% v/v aqua regia in the concentration range of 0.5-10.0 µg L - 1 Se(IV) was used for the analysis. The quantification limit, considering a 0.5 g sample weight in a final volume of 100 mL - 1 was 0.10 µg g - 1. The obtained concentration values were in agreement with the total certified concentrations, according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level.

  10. Determination of mercury compounds in fish by microwave-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography-vapor generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chwei-Sheng; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Kumar Danadurai, K. Suresh

    2001-07-01

    A method employing a vapor generation system and LC combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) is presented for the determination of mercury in biological tissues. An open vessel microwave digestion system was used to extract the mercury compounds from the sample matrix. The efficiency of the mobile phase, a mixture of L-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol, was evaluated for LC separation of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)], methylmercury (methyl-Hg) and ethylmercury (ethyl-Hg). The sensitivity, detection limits and repeatability of the liquid chromatography (LC) ICP-MS system with a vapor generator were comparable to, or better than, that of an LC-ICP-MS system with conventional pneumatic nebulization, or other sample introduction techniques. The experimental detection limits for various mercury species were in the range of 0.05-0.09 ng ml -1 Hg, based on peak height. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury compounds in a swordfish sample purchased from the local market. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analyzing a marine biological certified reference material (DORM-2, NRCC).

  11. On-line vapor-phase generation followed by Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry for the quantitative analysis of water-soluble penicillin G in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Zeeb, Mohsen; Kalaee, Mohammad R

    2010-01-01

    The combination of vapor-phase generation (VPG) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry was performed as an alternative analytical technique for the determination of water-soluble penicillin G (PENG). Samples were transferred into a heated reactor, and a potassium iodate solution was injected into the reactor. Carbon monoxide (CO) generated under these conditions was carried via a N(2) gas carrier stream inside the IR gas cell, and the corresponding FTIR spectra were continuously recorded as a function of time. Analytical measurements were made using the maximum absorbance of the CO band at 2170 +/- 4 cm(-1). Various factors influencing the analytical signals were evaluated and selected. The figures of merit of the proposed method involve a linear calibration curve over the range of 3 to 320 mg L(-1), a limit of detection of 0.5 mg L(-1) and a precision of 2.6%. The method was successfully applied to PENG determination in pharmaceutical preparations.

  12. Role of plant-generated water vapor and VOC fluxes in shoot chamber measurements of O3 and NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joensuu, J.; Altimir, N.; Raivonen, M.; Kolari, P.; Keronen, P.; Vesala, T.; Bäck, J.; Hari, P.; Järvinen, E.; Nikinmaa, E.

    2012-04-01

    One of the processes underlying the atmospheric balance of O3 and NOx is their interaction with vegetation. Both are removed, absorbed, and NOx potentially also emitted by foliage. Uncertainties remain on relevant factors controlling O3 and NOx interactions with foliage as well as on including them in large-scale models. One reason for the uncertainty is that chamber measurements of O3 and NOx fluxes are complicated. These reactive gases are adsorbed and desorbed on the chamber walls, depending on the conditions (i.e. humidity). These artefact gas fluxes (chamber blank) must also be quantified and taken into account in the data analysis. Their importance increases when measuring in clean air, where the fluxes are generally small. At near-zero concentrations, the fluxes may not pass the detection limit of the instrumentation, which usually means it is not possible to separate the plant-related fluxes from the chamber blank. The long-term field measurements at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, have provided valuable insights into O3 and NOx exchange (i.e. Raivonen & al. 2009, Altimir & al. 2006). This project builds up on the expertise and conclusions from these works. The aim of this study was to improve the reliability of the measuring system by checking the role of potential measuring artefact(s). A live shoot, enclosed in a chamber, creates a water vapor in the chamber flux by transpiring. There are also biogenic VOC emissions from the shoot. In principle, these may affect the reactions of O3 and possibly NOx in the chamber. The potential interference of these fluxes created naturally during chamber closure is a main concern. Their effect on the O3 and NOx flux measurements has been tested with field calibrations in 2010-2011. In these calibrations, a controlled water vapor /VOC flux was fed into an empty shoot measurement chamber, and the H2O, CO2, O3 and NOx fluxes created in the chamber were measured. The created water vapor flux pattern

  13. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  14. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  15. An electro-thermally activated rotary micro-positioner for slider-level dual-stage positioning in hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keong Lau, Gih; Yang, Jiaping; Tan, Cheng Peng; Boon Chong, Nyok

    2016-03-01

    Slider-level micro-positioners are useful to assist a voice coil motor to perform fine head positioning over a Tb/in2 magnetic disk. Recently, a new kind of slider-level micro-positioner was developed using the thermal unimorph of the Si/SU8 composite. It has the advantages of a very small footprint and high mechanical resonant frequency, but its stroke generation is inadequate, with a 50 nm dynamic stroke at 1 kHz. There is a need for a larger thermally induced stroke. This paper presents a rotary design of an electrothermal micro-positioner to address the stroke requirements without consuming more power or decreasing the mechanical resonant frequency. Experimental studies show the present rotary design can produce a six-fold larger displacement, as compared to the previous lateral design, while possessing a 35 kHz resonant frequency. In addition, simple analytical models were developed to estimate: (i) the rotational stiffness and system’s natural frequency, (ii) thermal unimorph bending and stage rotation, and (iii) the system’s thermal time constant for this rotary electro-thermal micro-positioner. This study found that this rotary electro-thermal micro-positioner can meet the basic stroke requirement and high mechanical resonant frequency for a moving slider, but its thermal cut-off frequency needs to be increased further.

  16. A novel SU-8 electrothermal microgripper based on the type synthesis of the kinematic chain method and the stiffness matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jinkui; Zhang, Ran; Chen, Zhaopeng

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a new systematic design and optimization procedure used for the microgrippers driven by a chevron electrothermal actuator. The procedure includes three steps: first, a suitable rigid-body gripper mechanism is selected using the type synthesis of the kinematic chain method; then, the rigid-body mechanism is transferred into a compliant microgripper; finally, by the stiffness matrix model and the genetic algorithm, a geometry parametric optimization with the high output stiffness objective is carried out. Using this procedure, a novel SU-8 electrothermal microgripper is obtained. According to the FEM simulation, the microgripper meets the design requirements and satisfies the constraints. To eliminate the out-of-plane actuation, a novel processing technology is implemented to fabricate the microgripper with a sandwich structure actuator. The experimental results demonstrate that a jaw gap change of 107.5 µm requires only 73.6 mV, 25.61 mW and only 44.92 °C temperature increase at the actuator and the out-of-plane actuation is almost eliminated. A micromanipulation of a micro blood vessel specimen and a micro-assembly for micro-tensile testing studies of fine hair are demonstrated. Hence, the design procedure is valid to generate novel compliant micro mechanisms. The fabrication process can be used in the fabrication of other SU-8 MEMS devices actuated by the electrothermal actuator.

  17. Plasma formation and expansion in an electrothermal plasma injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental device SIRENS has been used to conduct studies on plasma formation and expansion in electrothermal launchers. The 1-D, time-dependent fluid dynamics code, ODIN, models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and the equation-of-state of the source and barrel of the SIRENS experiment. Because electrothermal plasmas are highly collisional (high-density, low-temperature), the plasma is modeled as a viscous fluid, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium for each cell. The viscous drag forces were varied according to the Reynolds number of each cell. As the Reynolds number increases the modeled drag forces change accordingly, going from laminar to smooth turbulent to rough turbulent. The measured mass loss of the ablating liner (Lexan) in the source section is in good agreement with that predicted by the code. Comparisons between the measured and predicted pressures inside the barrel are in good agreement. The pressure reaches its maximum inside the source at approximately 45 {mu}s, then decreases steadily due to the drop in temperature and density. The plasma flows into the barrel and the pressure profile begins to flatten out and drop as the plasma exits the barrel. The variation of the plasma parameters as a function of the energy input to the source have also been calculated and will be discussed.

  18. Monolithic Fabry-Perot Wavelength Tunable Filter with Electrothermal Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Myung Lae; Jun, Chi-Hoon; Choi, Chang Auck

    2005-02-01

    We report on a micromachined monolithic Fabry-Perot wavelength tunable filter with a thick moving structure operated by an electrothermal actuation. The monolithic structure simplifies the fabrication process and the electrothermal actuation mechanism reduces the required operation voltage. For the wet etching of the AlGaAs sacrificial layer, an HCl-based solution rather than a HF-based one was used because it results in a larger selectivity between the AlxGa1-xAs layers and less damage to the suspended structure. The wavelength tuning range of the 7.64-μm-thick structure was 47 nm for the power consumption of 5 mW, which results in the high tuning efficiency of ˜9.9 nm/mW. The wide tuning range of 81.2 nm for the 5.2-μm-thick structure, that is not possible with an electrostatic actuation mechanism due to the occurrence of breakdown, is achieved at the driving voltage below 5.7 V. Due to the simplicity of fabrication and the ease of integration, this structure is advantageous for use in wavelength tunable light sources and photodetectors.

  19. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition – A facile method for encapsulation of diverse cell types in silica matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason C.; Tartis, Michaelann

    2014-12-12

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex vivo environments necessitates development of bio–nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cells are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters, thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. Furthermore, the ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell–silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications.

  20. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) Deposition- A Facile Method for Encapsulation of Diverse Cell Types in Silica Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason C.; Tartis, Michaelann

    2014-01-01

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex-vivo environments necessitates development of bio-nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cells are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. The ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell-silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications. PMID:25688296

  1. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition – A facile method for encapsulation of diverse cell types in silica matrices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason C.; Tartis, Michaelann

    2014-12-12

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex vivo environments necessitates development of bio–nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cellsmore » are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters, thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. Furthermore, the ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell–silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications.« less

  2. Effects of an Early-Time Impact Generated Vapor Blast in the Martian Atmosphere: Formation of High-Latitude Pedestal Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrobel, K. E.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Following impact, vapor expansion creates an intense airblast that interacts with the ambient atmosphere. The resulting hemi-spherical shock wave leaves a signature on the surface that is dependent on initial atmospheric and surface conditions. Here we propose that the formation of pedestal craters (craters surrounded by an erosion-resistant pedestal) may be a direct consequence of extreme winds and elevated temperatures generated by such an impact-induced atmospheric blast. Pedestal craters, first recognized in Mariner 9 data, are a unique feature on Mars and likely a signature of near-surface volatiles. They are found at high latitudes (small pedestals, Amazonian to Late Hesperian in age) and in thick equatorial mantling deposits (larger pedestals, early Hesperian to Noachian in age). Previously suggested mechanisms for pedestal crater formation (e.g., wind: ejecta curtain vortices or vapor blast; and ejecta dust: armoring) do not provide a complete picture. The clear evidence for near-surface volatiles at high latitudes requires a re-evaluation of these alternative models. The results presented here suggest that a combined atmospheric blast/thermal model provides a plausible formation hypothesis.

  3. Electrothermal Microactuators With Peg Drive Improve Performance for Brain Implant Applications

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sindhu; Sutanto, Jemmy; Baker, Michael S.; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new actuation scheme for in-plane bidirectional translation of polysilicon microelectrodes. The new Chevron-peg actuation scheme uses microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electrothermal microactuators to move microelectrodes for brain implant applications. The design changes were motivated by specific needs identified by the in vivo testing of an earlier generation of MEMS microelectrodes that were actuated by the Chevron-latch type of mechanism. The microelectrodes actuated by the Chevron-peg mechanism discussed here show improved performance in the following key areas: higher force generation capability (111 μN per heat strip compared to 50 μN), reduced power consumption (91 mW compared to 360 mW), and reliable performance with consistent forward and backward movements of microelectrodes. Failure analysis of the Chevron-latch and the Chevron-peg type of actuation schemes showed that the latter is more robust to wear over four million cycles of operation. The parameters for the activation waveforms for Chevron-peg actuators were optimized using statistical analysis. Waveforms with a 1-ms time period and a 1-Hz frequency of operation showed minimal error between the expected and the actual movement of the microelectrodes. The new generation of Chevron-peg actuators and microelectrodes are therefore expected to enhance the longevity and performance of implanted microelectrodes in the brain.  [2011-0341] PMID:24431926

  4. Electrothermal Microactuators With Peg Drive Improve Performance for Brain Implant Applications.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sindhu; Sutanto, Jemmy; Baker, Michael S; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2012-07-13

    This paper presents a new actuation scheme for in-plane bidirectional translation of polysilicon microelectrodes. The new Chevron-peg actuation scheme uses microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electrothermal microactuators to move microelectrodes for brain implant applications. The design changes were motivated by specific needs identified by the in vivo testing of an earlier generation of MEMS microelectrodes that were actuated by the Chevron-latch type of mechanism. The microelectrodes actuated by the Chevron-peg mechanism discussed here show improved performance in the following key areas: higher force generation capability (111 μN per heat strip compared to 50 μN), reduced power consumption (91 mW compared to 360 mW), and reliable performance with consistent forward and backward movements of microelectrodes. Failure analysis of the Chevron-latch and the Chevron-peg type of actuation schemes showed that the latter is more robust to wear over four million cycles of operation. The parameters for the activation waveforms for Chevron-peg actuators were optimized using statistical analysis. Waveforms with a 1-ms time period and a 1-Hz frequency of operation showed minimal error between the expected and the actual movement of the microelectrodes. The new generation of Chevron-peg actuators and microelectrodes are therefore expected to enhance the longevity and performance of implanted microelectrodes in the brain.  [2011-0341].

  5. A MECHANISTIC MODEL FOR MERCURY CAPTURE WITH IN-SITU GENERATED TITANIA PARTICLES: ROLE OF WATER VAPOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mechanistic model to predict the capture of gas phase mercury species using in-situ generated titania nanosize particles activated by UV irradiation is developed. The model is an extension of a recently reported model1 for photochemical reactions that accounts for the rates of...

  6. Vapor Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthoud, Georges

    A vapor explosion results from the rapid and intense heat transfer that may follow contact between a hot liquid and a cold, more volatile one. Because it can happen during severe-accident sequences of a nuclear power plan, that is, when a large part of the core is molten, vapor explosions have been widely studied. The different sequences of a vapor explosion are presented, including premixing, triggering, propagation, and expansion. Typical experimental results are also analyzed to understand the involved physics. Then the different physics involved in the sequences are addressed, as well as the present experimental program.

  7. Detection of zeptojoule microwave pulses using an electrothermal bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govenius, Joonas; Lake, Russell; Tan, Kuan; Möttönen, Mikko

    We utilize electrothermal feedback for the threshold detection of weak 8.4 GHz microwave pulses containing approximately 200 × h × (8 . 4 GHz) ~ 1 . 1 ×10-21 J of energy. The feedback couples the electrical and thermal degrees of freedom in the central component of our detector, a metallic nanowire that absorbs the incoming microwave radiation and transduces the temperature change into a radio-frequency electrical signal. We can tune the feedback in situ, which provides access to both positive and negative feedback regimes with rich nonlinear dynamics. In particular, strong positive feedback leads to the emergence of two metastable electron temperature states in the millikelvin range. We use these states in the threshold detection protocol.

  8. Experimental investigation of the pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hiko, B. K.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Burton et al. (1982) have discussed the theory of the Pulsed Electrothermal (PET) thruster, a device which in principle can operate with 70 percent efficiency at a specific impulse of 1000 seconds and higher. It is pointed out that this level of performance would be particularly attractive for orbit raising of large satellites and other near-earth missions, which cannot be easily accomplished by chemical propulsion. The present investigation is concerned with two PET thruster operating modes. A PET thruster was built and tested on a thrust stand. Exhaust velocities for polyethylene propellant vary from 20 to 27 km/sec. Single pulse specific impulse and efficiency measurements based on ablated mass show a thruster efficiency of 37-56 percent in the time range from 1000 to 1750 seconds. It is believed that an improved design with a thruster efficiency in the range from 70 to 80 percent might be possible.

  9. Performance of an electrothermal swing adsorption system with postdesorption liquefaction for organic gas capture and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Rood, Mark J

    2013-07-01

    The use of adsorption on activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) and postdesorption pressure and temperature control allows organic gases with boiling points below 0 °C to be captured from air streams and recovered as liquids. This technology has the potential to be a more sustainable abatement technique when compared to thermal oxidation. In this paper, we determine the process performance and energy requirements of a gas recovery system (GRS) using ACFC-ESA for three adsorbates with relative pressures between 8.3 × 10(-5) and 3.4 × 10(-3) and boiling points as low as -26.3 °C. The GRS is able to capture > 99% of the organic gas from the feed air stream, which is comparable to destruction efficiencies for thermal oxidizers. The energy used per liquid mole recovered ranges from 920 to 52,000 kJ/mol and is a function of relative pressure of the adsorbate in the feed gas. Quantifying the performance of the bench-scale gas recovery system in terms of its ability to remove organic gases from the adsorption stream and the energy required to liquefy the recovered organic gases is a critical step in developing new technologies to allow manufacturing to occur in a more sustainable manner. To our knowledge, this is the first time an ACFC-ESA system has been used to capture, recover, and liquefy organic compounds with vapor pressures as low as 8.3 × 10(-5) and the first time such a system has been analyzed for process performance and energy consumption. PMID:23789711

  10. Performance of an electrothermal swing adsorption system with postdesorption liquefaction for organic gas capture and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Rood, Mark J

    2013-07-01

    The use of adsorption on activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) and postdesorption pressure and temperature control allows organic gases with boiling points below 0 °C to be captured from air streams and recovered as liquids. This technology has the potential to be a more sustainable abatement technique when compared to thermal oxidation. In this paper, we determine the process performance and energy requirements of a gas recovery system (GRS) using ACFC-ESA for three adsorbates with relative pressures between 8.3 × 10(-5) and 3.4 × 10(-3) and boiling points as low as -26.3 °C. The GRS is able to capture > 99% of the organic gas from the feed air stream, which is comparable to destruction efficiencies for thermal oxidizers. The energy used per liquid mole recovered ranges from 920 to 52,000 kJ/mol and is a function of relative pressure of the adsorbate in the feed gas. Quantifying the performance of the bench-scale gas recovery system in terms of its ability to remove organic gases from the adsorption stream and the energy required to liquefy the recovered organic gases is a critical step in developing new technologies to allow manufacturing to occur in a more sustainable manner. To our knowledge, this is the first time an ACFC-ESA system has been used to capture, recover, and liquefy organic compounds with vapor pressures as low as 8.3 × 10(-5) and the first time such a system has been analyzed for process performance and energy consumption.

  11. Cloud point extraction preconcentration prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Ping

    2005-12-14

    A cloud point extraction methodology was developed for simultaneous preconcentration of Hg(II), methylmercury (MeHg), ethylmercury (EtHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) prior to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on-line coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish. The four mercury species were taken into complexes with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) in aqueous nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 medium and concentrated in the surfactant-rich phase by bringing the solution to the temperature of 40 degrees C. Baseline separation of the enriched complexes was achieved on an RP-C(18) column with a mixture of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (65:15:20, v/v) containing 200 mmol L(-1) HAc (pH 3.5) as the mobile phase. An on-line postcolumn oxidation of the effluent from HPLC, in the presence of K2S2O8 in HCl, was applied in the system followed by an optimal cold vapor generation of mercury species. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were examined. The preconcentration of 10 mL of solution with 0.08% w/v Triton X-114 and 0.04% w/v APDC at pH 3.5 gave enrichment factors of 29, 43, 80, and 98 for MeHg, EtHg, PhHg, and Hg(II), respectively. Low detection limits (S/N = 3) were obtained, ranging from 2 to 9 ng L(-1) (as Hg) for all species. The developed method was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury in real fish samples.

  12. Cloud point extraction preconcentration prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Ping

    2005-12-14

    A cloud point extraction methodology was developed for simultaneous preconcentration of Hg(II), methylmercury (MeHg), ethylmercury (EtHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) prior to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on-line coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish. The four mercury species were taken into complexes with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) in aqueous nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 medium and concentrated in the surfactant-rich phase by bringing the solution to the temperature of 40 degrees C. Baseline separation of the enriched complexes was achieved on an RP-C(18) column with a mixture of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (65:15:20, v/v) containing 200 mmol L(-1) HAc (pH 3.5) as the mobile phase. An on-line postcolumn oxidation of the effluent from HPLC, in the presence of K2S2O8 in HCl, was applied in the system followed by an optimal cold vapor generation of mercury species. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were examined. The preconcentration of 10 mL of solution with 0.08% w/v Triton X-114 and 0.04% w/v APDC at pH 3.5 gave enrichment factors of 29, 43, 80, and 98 for MeHg, EtHg, PhHg, and Hg(II), respectively. Low detection limits (S/N = 3) were obtained, ranging from 2 to 9 ng L(-1) (as Hg) for all species. The developed method was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury in real fish samples. PMID:16332112

  13. Chemical vapor generation for atomic spectrometry. A contribution to the comprehension of reaction mechanisms in the generation of volatile hydrides using borane complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Baiocchi, Cristiano; Pitzalis, Emanuela; Onor, Massimo; Zamboni, Roberto

    2004-04-01

    A systematic study has been developed in order to clarify the mechanism of hydride generation using different borane complexes [sodium tetrahydroborate(III), NaBH 4 (THB); borane-ammonia complex, H 3B-NH 3 (AB); borane- tert-Butylamine complex, H 3B-NH 2C(CH 3) 3 (TBAB)], as derivatizing reagents. Stannane, stibine and bismuthine were generated in a continuous flow reaction system at different acidities in the pH range of 1.38-12.7. The pH of sample solution was pre-equilibrated on-line in a mixing loop by the addition of appropriate solution before the reaction with the derivatizing reagent in a reaction loop. The generated hydrides were delivered to a miniature argon hydrogen flame atomizer and free atoms detected by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The effect of pH on the relative sensitivity has been investigated by varying both the mixing loop volume (4, 15 and 50 μl) and reaction loop volume (100 and 500 μl). The mixing rates of the solutions have been also tested to avoid any undesired effect arising from the incomplete mixing of the solution in the flow reaction system. The generation of hydrides using on-line pre-equilibration of pH can be observed also in alkaline or neutral conditions, while the generation of the same hydrides is observed only in acidic solution if the equilibration of pH was performed off-line. Stannane generation using amineboranes has never been reported before. Kinetic calculations were performed in order to estimate the concentration of nascent hydrogen arising from the decomposition of the derivatizing agents in the flow reaction system. It has been found that in many cases, the mechanism of nascent hydrogen failed to explain the generation of the hydrides. The direct action of BH 4- and H 3B-X species (X=ammonia or amino group) on the analyte element, present in solution in a suitable chemical form, is the only possible mechanism of hydride formation in a wide range of solution acidities, from pH 4.5 up to pH 12.7. The

  14. Statistical mechanics of sum frequency generation spectroscopy for the liquid-vapor interface of dilute aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Smith, Jared D.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2009-01-02

    We demonstrate a theoretical description of vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) at the boundary of aqueous electrolyte solutions. This approach identifies and exploits a simple relationship between SFG lineshapes and the statistics of molecular orientation and electric field. Our computer simulations indicate that orientational averages governing SFG susceptibility do not manifest ion-specific shifts in local electric field, but instead, ion-induced polarization of subsurface layers. Counterbalancing effects are obtained for monovalent anions and cations at the same depth. Ions held at different depths induce an imbalanced polarization, suggesting that ion-specific effects can arise from weak, long ranged influence on solvent organization.

  15. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis - chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min- 1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values.

  16. Novel chemical vapor deposition process of ZnO films using nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small amount of O2 below 1%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Yukinori; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Ashida, Atsushi; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Norifumi

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process of ZnO films involving a nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small O2 concentration (O2%) below 1%. In the optical emission (OE) spectra of the plasma, OE lines corresponding to the NO-γ system ( A 2 Σ + → X 2 Πγ + ) were observed, despite the only introduced gases being N2 and O2; these vanish at an O2% of more than 1%. ZnO films were grown on a glass substrate placed in the plasma at a growth temperature of as low as 200 °C and at an O2% of below 1% in the presence of the NO-γ system. This plasma yielded almost the same growth rate for ZnO films as O2 plasma including atomic O radicals that are often observed in low-pressure O2 plasma, suggesting that some highly reactive oxidant was sufficiently generated in such a small O2%. ZnO films synthesized using this plasma exhibited excellent ( 0001 ) preferred orientation without other diffractions such as 10 1 ¯ 1 diffraction, and with an optical bandgap of 3.30 eV. Based on the analyses of the plasma and the exhaust gases, the coexistence state of NO-γ and O3 should be essential and useful for the decomposition and oxidation of Zn source material in the proposed CVD process.

  17. Numerical study of the dielectric liquid around an electrical discharge generated vapor bubble in ultrasonic assisted EDM.

    PubMed

    Shervani-Tabar, Mohammad T; Mobadersany, Nima

    2013-07-01

    In electrical discharge machining due to the electrical current, very small bubbles are created in the dielectric fluid between the tool and the workpiece. Increase of the number of bubbles and their growth in size generate a single bubble. The bubble has an important role in electrical discharge machining. In this paper the effect of ultrasonic vibration of the tool and the velocity fields and pressure distribution in the dielectric fluid around the bubble in the process of electrical discharge machining are studied numerically. The boundary integral equation method is applied for the numerical solution of the problem. It is shown that ultrasonic vibration of the tool has great influence on the evolution of the bubble, fluid behavior and the efficiency of the machining in EDM. At the last stages of the collapse phase of the bubble, a liquid jet develops on the bubble which has different shapes. Due to the different cases, and a high pressure region appears just near the jet of the bubble. Also the fluid particles have the highest relative velocity just near the liquid jet of the bubble.

  18. Numerical study of the dielectric liquid around an electrical discharge generated vapor bubble in ultrasonic assisted EDM.

    PubMed

    Shervani-Tabar, Mohammad T; Mobadersany, Nima

    2013-07-01

    In electrical discharge machining due to the electrical current, very small bubbles are created in the dielectric fluid between the tool and the workpiece. Increase of the number of bubbles and their growth in size generate a single bubble. The bubble has an important role in electrical discharge machining. In this paper the effect of ultrasonic vibration of the tool and the velocity fields and pressure distribution in the dielectric fluid around the bubble in the process of electrical discharge machining are studied numerically. The boundary integral equation method is applied for the numerical solution of the problem. It is shown that ultrasonic vibration of the tool has great influence on the evolution of the bubble, fluid behavior and the efficiency of the machining in EDM. At the last stages of the collapse phase of the bubble, a liquid jet develops on the bubble which has different shapes. Due to the different cases, and a high pressure region appears just near the jet of the bubble. Also the fluid particles have the highest relative velocity just near the liquid jet of the bubble. PMID:23490015

  19. Dynamic Electrothermal Model of a Sputtered Thermopile Thermal Radiation Detector for Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weckmann, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aimed at evaluating the global energy balance. Current scanning radiometers used for CERES consist of thin-film thermistor bolometers viewing the Earth through a Cassegrain telescope. The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently studying a new sensor concept to replace the current bolometer: a thermopile thermal radiation detector. This next-generation detector would consist of a thermal sensor array made of thermocouple junction pairs, or thermopiles. The objective of the current research is to perform a thermal analysis of the thermopile. Numerical thermal models are particularly suited to solve problems for which temperature is the dominant mechanism of the operation of the device (through the thermoelectric effect), as well as for complex geometries composed of numerous different materials. Feasibility and design specifications are studied by developing a dynamic electrothermal model of the thermopile using the finite element method. A commercial finite element-modeling package, ALGOR, is used.

  20. Study on an alternating current electrothermal micropump for microneedle-based fluid delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rumi; Jullien, Graham A.; Dalton, Colin

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a modeling study of an AC electrothermal (ACET) micropump with high operating pressures as well as fast flow rates. One specific application area is for fluid delivery using microneedle arrays which require higher pressures and faster flow rates than have been previously reported with ACET devices. ACET is very suitable for accurate actuation and control of fluid flow, since the technique has been shown to be very effective in high conductivity fluids and has the ability to create a pulsation free flow. However, AC electrokinetic pumps usually can only generate low operating pressures of 1 to 100 Pa, where flow reversal is likely to occur with an external load. In order to realize a high performance ACET micropump for continuous fluid delivery, applying relatively high AC operating voltages (20 to 36 Vrms) to silicon substrate ACET actuators and using long serpentine channel allows the boosting of operating pressure as well as increasing the flow rates. Fast pumping flow rates (102-103 nl/s) and high operating pressures (1-12 kPa) can be achieved by applying both methods, making them of significant importance for continuous fluid delivery applications using microneedle arrays and other such biomedical devices.

  1. Electrothermal piezoresistive cantilever resonators for personal measurements of nanoparticles in workplace exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Wu, Wenze; Uhde, Erik; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Low-cost and low-power piezoresistive cantilever resonators with integrated electrothermal heaters are developed to support the sensing module enhancement of the second generation of handheld cantilever-based airborne nanoparticle (NP) detector (CANTOR-2). These sensors are used for direct-reading of exposure to carbon engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) at indoor workplaces. The cantilever structures having various shapes of free ends are created using silicon bulk micromachining technologies (i.e, rectangular, hammer-head, triangular, and U-shaped cantilevers). For a complete wearable CANTOR-2, all components of the proposed detector can be grouped into two main units depending on their packaging placements (i.e., the NP sampler head and the electronics mounted in a handy-format housing). In the NP sampler head, a miniaturized electrophoretic aerosol sampler and a resonant silicon cantilever mass sensor are employed to collect the ENPs from the air stream to the cantilever surfaces and measuring their mass concentration, respectively. After calibration, the detected ENP mass concentrations of CANTOR-2 show a standard deviation from fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS, TSI 3091) of 8-14%.

  2. Evaluation of the ruggedness of power DMOS transistor from electro-thermal simulation of UIS behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoval, Daniel; Vrbicky, Andrej; Marek, Juraj; Chvala, Ales; Beno, Peter

    2008-06-01

    High-voltage power MOSFETs have been widely used in switching mode power supply circuits as output drivers for industrial and automotive electronic control systems. However, as the device size is reduced, the energy handling capability is becoming a very important issue to be addressed together with the trade-off between the series on-resistance RON and breakdown voltage VBR. Unclamped inductive switching (UIS) condition represents the circuit switching operation for evaluating the "ruggedness", which characterizes the device capability to handle high avalanche currents during the applied stress. In this paper we present an experimental method which modifies the standard UIS test and allows extraction of the maximum device temperature after the applied standard stress pulse vanishes. Corresponding analysis and non-destructive prediction of the ruggedness of power DMOSFETs devices supported by advanced 2-D mixed mode electro-thermal device and circuit simulation under UIS conditions using calibrated physical models is provided also. The results of numerical simulation are in a very good correlation with experimental characteristics and contribute to their physical interpretation by identification of the mechanism of heat generation and heat source location and continuous temperature extraction.

  3. A review of research and development on the microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Martin C.; Asmussen, Jes; Filpus, John W.; Frasch, Lydell L.; Whitehair, Stanley; Morin, T. J.; Chapman, R.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket (MWPETR) shows promise for spacecraft propulsion and maneuvering, without some of the drawbacks of competitive electric propulsion systems. In the MWPETR, the electric power is first converted to microwave-frequency radiation. In a specially-designed microwave cavity system, the electromagnetic energy of the radiation is transferred to the electrons in a plasma sustained in the working fluid. The resulting high-energy electrons transfer their energy to the atoms and molecules of the working fluid by collisions. The working fluid, thus heated, expands through a nozzle to generate thrust. In the MWPETR, no electrodes are in contact with the working fluid, the energy is transferred into the working fluid by nonthermal mechanisms, and the main requirement for the materials of construction is that the walls of the plasma chamber be insulating and transparent to microwave radiation at operating conditions. In this survey of work on the MWPETR, several experimental configurations are described and compared. Diagnostic methods used in the study are described and compared, including titration, spectroscopy, calorimetry, electric field measurements, gas-dynamic methods, and thrust measurements. Measured and estimated performance efficiencies are reported. Results of computer modeling of the plasma and of the gas flowing from the plasma are summarized.

  4. Review of research and development on the microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.C.; Asmussen, J.; Filpus, J.W.; Frasch, L.L.; Whitehair, S.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave-plasma electrothermal rocket (MWPETR) shows promise for spacecraft propulsion and maneuvering, without some of the drawbacks of competitive electric propulsion systems. In the MWPETR, the electric power is first converted to microwave-frequency radiation. In a specially-designed microwave cavity system, the electromagnetic energy of the radiation is transferred to the electrons in a plasma sustained in the working fluid. The resulting high-energy electrons transfer their energy to the atoms and molecules of the working fluid by collisions. The working fluid, thus heated, expands through a nozzle to generate thrust. In the MWPETR, no electrodes are in contact with the working fluid, the energy is transferred into the working fluid by nonthermal mechanisms, and the main requirement for the materials of construction is that the walls of the plasma chamber be insulating and transparent to microwave radiation at operating conditions. In this survey of work on the MWPETR, several experimental configurations are described and compared. Diagnostic methods used in the study are described and compared, including titration, spectroscopy, calorimetry, electric field measurements, gas-dynamic methods, and thrust measurements. Measured and estimated performance efficiencies are reported. Results of computer modeling of the plasma and of the gas flowing from the plasma are summarized. 32 references.

  5. Experimental Studies of the Electrothermal and Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities on Thin Metal Foil Ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Adam; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Patel, Sonal; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) and magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability (MRT) are important in the implosion of metallic liners, such as magnetized liner implosion fusion (MagLIF). The MAIZE linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan generates 200 ns risetime-current pulses of 500 to 600 kA into Al foil liners to study plasma instabilities and implosion dynamics, most recently MRT growth on imploding cylindrical liners. A full circuit model of MAIZE, along with I-V measurements, yields time-resolved load inductance. This has enabled measurements of an effective current-carrying radius to determine implosion velocity and plasma-vacuum interface acceleration. Measurements are also compared to implosion data from 4-time-frame laser shadowgraphy. Improved resolution measurements on the laser shadowgraph system have been used to examine the liner interface early in the shot to examine surface perturbations resulting from ETI for various seeding conditions. Fourier analysis examines the growth rates of wavelength bands of these structures to examine the transition from ETI to MRT. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE through award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel is supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager is supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  6. Optimisation of air cooled, open-cathode fuel cells: Current of lowest resistance and electro-thermal performance mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Quentin; Ronaszegi, Krisztian; Pei-June, Gan; Curnick, Oliver; Ashton, Sean; Reisch, Tobias; Adcock, Paul; Shearing, Paul R.; Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Selecting the ideal operating point for a fuel cell depends on the application and consequent trade-off between efficiency, power density and various operating considerations. A systematic methodology for determining the optimal operating point for fuel cells is lacking; there is also the need for a single-value metric to describe and compare fuel cell performance. This work shows how the 'current of lowest resistance' can be accurately measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and used as a useful metric of fuel cell performance. This, along with other measures, is then used to generate an 'electro-thermal performance map' of fuel cell operation. A commercial air-cooled open-cathode fuel cell is used to demonstrate how the approach can be used; in this case leading to the identification of the optimum operating temperature of ∼45 °C.

  7. Vapor fragrancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Q. Tran; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1987-05-01

    This invention relates to a vapor fragrancer for continuously, uniformly, and economically odorizing or deodorizing an environment. Homes, offices, automobiles, and space stations require either odorizing or deodorizing of the atmosphere to create pleasant conditions for work or leisure. A vapor fragrancer is provided to accomplish these goals. A supplier continuously supplies a predetermined amount of desired liquid fragrance from a container to a retaining material, which is positioned in the circulation path of the atmosphere. The supplier is either a low powered pump or a gravity dispenser. The atmosphere flowing in a circulation path passes over the retaining material containing the liquid fragrance and lifts a fragrant vapor from the retaining material. The atmosphere is thereby continuously and uniformly fragranced.

  8. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  9. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  10. Determination of thimerosal in pharmaceutical industry effluents and river waters by HPLC coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry through post-column UV-assisted vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Gimena; Spisso, Adrián; Fernández, Liliana P; Martinez, Luis D; Pacheco, Pablo H; Gil, Raúl A

    2015-03-15

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry method for the determination of thimerosal (sodium ethylmercury thiosalicylate, C9H9HgNaO2S), ethylmercury, and inorganic mercury is proposed. Mercury vapor is generated by the post-column reduction of mercury species in formic acid media using UV-radiation. Thimerosal is quantitatively converted to Hg(II) followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). This method is applied to the determination of thimerosal (THM), ethylmercury (EtHg) and inorganic Hg in samples of a pharmaceutical industry effluent, and in waters of the San Luis River situated in the west side of San Luis city (Middle West, Argentine) where the effluents are dumped. The limit of detections, calculated on the basis of the 3σ criterion, where 0.09, 0.09 and 0.07 μg L(-1) for THM, EtHg(II) and for Hg(II), respectively. Linearity was attained from levels close to the detection limit up to at least 100 μg L(-1).

  11. Development of single-channel heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation spectroscopy and its application to the water/vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2015-07-01

    Single-channel heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation (HD-SFG) spectroscopy for selectively measuring vibrational spectra of liquid interfaces is presented. This new methodology is based on optical interference between sum frequency signal light from a sample interface and phase-controlled local oscillator light. In single-channel HD-SFG, interferometric and spectrometric measurements are simultaneously carried out with an input IR laser scanned in a certain wavenumber range, which results in a less task than existing phase-sensitive sum frequency spectroscopy. The real and imaginary parts of second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (χ(2)) of interfaces are separately obtained with spectral resolution as high as 4 cm-1 that is approximately six times better than existing multiplex HD-SFG. In this paper, the experimental procedure and theoretical background of single-channel HD-SFG are explicated, and its application to the water/vapor interface is demonstrated, putting emphasis on the importance of a standard for the complex phase of χ(2).

  12. Recyclable decoration of amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with Ni(2+) for determination of histidine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Chengbin; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2014-01-01

    It is critically important to accurately determine histidine since it is an indicator for many diseases when at an abnormal level. Here, an inexpensive and simple method using an amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle-based Ni(2+)-histidine affinity pair system was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of histidine in human urine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry. Ni(2+) was first bound to the amine groups of the amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and then liberated to solution via the highly specific interaction between the histidine and Ni(2+) in the presence of histidine. The liberated histidine-Ni(2+) complex was exposed to UV irradiation in the presence of formic acid to form gaseous nickel tetracarbonyl, which was separated from the sample matrix and determined by atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry. Compared to other methods, this approach promises high sensitivity, simplicity in design, and convenient operation. The need for organic solvents, enzymatic reactions, separation processes, chemical modification, expensive instrumentations, and sophisticated and complicated pretreatment is minimized with this strategy. A limit of detection of 1 nM was obtained and provided tens-to-hundreds of fold improvements over that achieved with conventional methods. The protocol was evaluated by analysis of several urine samples with good recoveries and showed great potential for practical application. PMID:24286112

  13. Quantifying uncertainty in measurement of mercury in suspended particulate matter by cold vapor technique using atomic absorption spectrometry with hydride generator.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nahar; Ahuja, Tarushee; Ojha, Vijay Narain; Soni, Daya; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Leito, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    As a result of rapid industrialization several chemical forms of organic and inorganic mercury are constantly introduced to the environment and affect humans and animals directly. All forms of mercury have toxic effects; therefore accurate measurement of mercury is of prime importance especially in suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected through high volume sampler (HVS). In the quantification of mercury in SPM samples several steps are involved from sampling to final result. The quality, reliability and confidence level of the analyzed data depends upon the measurement uncertainty of the whole process. Evaluation of measurement uncertainty of results is one of the requirements of the standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005 (European Standard EN IS/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, issue1:1-28, 2006). In the presented study the uncertainty estimation in mercury determination in suspended particulate matter (SPM) has been carried out using cold vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometer-Hydride Generator (AAS-HG) technique followed by wet chemical digestion process. For the calculation of uncertainty, we have considered many general potential sources of uncertainty. After the analysis of data of seven diverse sites of Delhi, it has been concluded that the mercury concentration varies from 1.59 ± 0.37 to 14.5 ± 2.9 ng/m(3) with 95% confidence level (k = 2). PMID:24083104

  14. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Mark L. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Nakamura, Barbara J. (Inventor); Oconnor, Dennis E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  15. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Mark L.; Williams, Robert M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Oconnor, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  16. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Mark L.; Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Nakamura, Barbara J.; Oconnor, Dennis E.

    1995-08-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  17. Improving the binding efficiency of quartz crystal microbalance biosensors by applying the electrothermal effect

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao-Hung; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Chao, Sheng D.; Wu, Kuang-Chong; Huang, Long-Sun

    2014-01-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) serving as a biosensor to detect the target biomolecules (analytes) often suffers from the time consuming process, especially in the case of diffusion-limited reaction. In this experimental work, we modify the reaction chamber of a conventional QCM by integrating into the multi-microelectrodes to produce electrothermal vortex flow which can efficiently drive the analytes moving toward the sensor surface, where the analytes were captured by the immobilized ligands. The microelectrodes are placed on the top surface of the chamber opposite to the sensor, which is located on the bottom of the chamber. Besides, the height of reaction chamber is reduced to assure that the suspended analytes in the fluid can be effectively drived to the sensor surface by induced electrothermal vortex flow, and also the sample costs are saved. A series of frequency shift measurements associated with the adding mass due to the specific binding of the analytes in the fluid flow and the immobilized ligands on the QCM sensor surface are performed with or without applying electrothermal effect (ETE). The experimental results show that electrothermal vortex flow does effectively accelerate the specific binding and make the frequency shift measurement more sensible. In addition, the images of the binding surfaces of the sensors with or without applying electrothermal effect are taken through the scanning electron microscopy. By comparing the images, it also clearly indicates that ETE does raise the specific binding of the analytes and ligands and efficiently improves the performance of the QCM sensor. PMID:25538808

  18. An in-depth evaluation of accuracy and precision in Hg isotopic analysis via pneumatic nebulization and cold vapor generation multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rua-Ibarz, Ana; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) isotopic analysis via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can provide relevant biogeochemical information by revealing sources, pathways, and sinks of this highly toxic metal. In this work, the capabilities and limitations of two different sample introduction systems, based on pneumatic nebulization (PN) and cold vapor generation (CVG), respectively, were evaluated in the context of Hg isotopic analysis via MC-ICP-MS. The effect of (i) instrument settings and acquisition parameters, (ii) concentration of analyte element (Hg), and internal standard (Tl)-used for mass discrimination correction purposes-and (iii) different mass bias correction approaches on the accuracy and precision of Hg isotope ratio results was evaluated. The extent and stability of mass bias were assessed in a long-term study (18 months, n = 250), demonstrating a precision ≤0.006% relative standard deviation (RSD). CVG-MC-ICP-MS showed an approximately 20-fold enhancement in Hg signal intensity compared with PN-MC-ICP-MS. For CVG-MC-ICP-MS, the mass bias induced by instrumental mass discrimination was accurately corrected for by using either external correction in a sample-standard bracketing approach (SSB) or double correction, consisting of the use of Tl as internal standard in a revised version of the Russell law (Baxter approach), followed by SSB. Concomitant matrix elements did not affect CVG-ICP-MS results. Neither with PN, nor with CVG, any evidence for mass-independent discrimination effects in the instrument was observed within the experimental precision obtained. CVG-MC-ICP-MS was finally used for Hg isotopic analysis of reference materials (RMs) of relevant environmental origin. The isotopic composition of Hg in RMs of marine biological origin testified of mass-independent fractionation that affected the odd-numbered Hg isotopes. While older RMs were used for validation purposes, novel Hg isotopic data are provided for the

  19. Reexamination of basal plane thermal conductivity of suspended graphene samples measured by electro-thermal micro-bridge methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael T.; Lindsay, Lucas; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden L.; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-05-01

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the room-temperature thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier's law despite the increase in the reported apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed apparent thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about 1680 ± 180 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the apparent thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about 880 ± 60 and 730 ± 60 Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  20. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-05-18

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivitymore » of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.« less

  1. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-05-18

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  2. Electrothermal flow on electrodes arrays at physiological conductivities.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Anil; Tansel, Osman; Oksuzoglu, Hakan; Sabuncu, Ahmet C

    2016-04-01

    AC electrothermal (ET) flow is inevitable for microfluidic systems dissipating electric energy in a conducting medium. Therefore, many practical applications of biomicrofluidics are prone to ET flow. Here, a series of observations are reported on ET flow in a microfluidic chamber that houses three electrode pairs. The observations indicate that the variations in liquid conductivity and channel height critically impact the structure and magnitude of the flow field. Observations indicate that after a critical conductivity a global ET flow is present in the chamber, while at lower conductivities a vortex is present at every electrode edge. In addition, no ET flow is observed when the chamber height is kept below a critical value at physiological conductivity (∼1.5 S/m). The experimental observations are compared with the numerical simulations of ET flow. The validity of the assumptions made in the current AC ET flow theory is also discussed in the light of the experimental data. The observations can be critical while designing microfluidic systems that involve power dissipation in conductive fluids. PMID:27074854

  3. Electro-thermal modeling of a microbridge gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J.; Huber, R.J.

    1997-08-01

    Fully CMOS-compatible, surface-micromachined polysilicon microbridges have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in catalytic, calorimetric gas sensing. To improve sensor behavior, extensive electro-thermal modeling efforts were undertaken using SPICE. The validity of the SPICE model was verified comparing its simulated behavior with experiment. Temperature distribution of an electrically heated microbridges was measured using an infrared microscope. Comparisons among the measured distribution, the SPICE simulation, and distributions obtained by analytical methods show that heating at the ends of a microbridges has important implications for device response. Additional comparisons between measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics, as well as transient response, further support the accuracy of the model. A major benefit of electro- thermal modeling with SPICE is the ability to simultaneously simulate the behavior of a device and its control/sensing electronics. Results for the combination of a unique constant-resistance control circuit and microbridges gas sensor are given. Models of in situ techniques for monitoring catalyst deposition are shown to be in agreement with experiment. Finally, simulated chemical response of the detector is compared with the data, and methods of improving response through modifications in bridge geometry are predicted.

  4. Compatibility experiments of facilities, materials, and propellants for electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, M. V.; Grisnik, S. P.; Sovey, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the compatibility of materials and propellants for electro-thermal thrusters. Candidate propellants for resistojet propulsion include carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, and hydrazine. The materials being examined are grain stabilized platinum for resistojets for Space station and rhenium for high performance resistojets for satellites. Heater mass loss and deterioration of materials were evaluated. A coiled tube of platinum, with yttria dispersed throughout the base material to inhibit grain growth, was tested in carbon dioxide at 1300 C for 2000 hr. Post-test examination indicated the platinum-yttria heater would last over 100 000 hr with less than 10 percent mass loss. Short-term compatibility tests were conducted to test the integrity of the platinum-yttria in hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide/methane mixtures and ammonia environments. In each of these 100 hr tests, the platinum-yttria mass change indicated a minimum coil life of 100 000 hr. Facility related effects were investigated in materials tests using rhenium heated to high tempertures. Vacuum facility water reduction was monitored using a mass spectrometer. In vacuum environments obtained using only diffusion pumping and those obtained with the assistance of cryogenic equipment there were mass gains in the rhenium heaters. These mass gains were the result of the high amount of oxygen and water contained in the gas. Propellant purity and preferred test facility environments are discussed.

  5. Electrothermal flow on electrodes arrays at physiological conductivities.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Anil; Tansel, Osman; Oksuzoglu, Hakan; Sabuncu, Ahmet C

    2016-04-01

    AC electrothermal (ET) flow is inevitable for microfluidic systems dissipating electric energy in a conducting medium. Therefore, many practical applications of biomicrofluidics are prone to ET flow. Here, a series of observations are reported on ET flow in a microfluidic chamber that houses three electrode pairs. The observations indicate that the variations in liquid conductivity and channel height critically impact the structure and magnitude of the flow field. Observations indicate that after a critical conductivity a global ET flow is present in the chamber, while at lower conductivities a vortex is present at every electrode edge. In addition, no ET flow is observed when the chamber height is kept below a critical value at physiological conductivity (∼1.5 S/m). The experimental observations are compared with the numerical simulations of ET flow. The validity of the assumptions made in the current AC ET flow theory is also discussed in the light of the experimental data. The observations can be critical while designing microfluidic systems that involve power dissipation in conductive fluids.

  6. Optimization of energy transfer in microwave electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. J.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from preliminary tests conducted to evaluate the performance of a prototype microwave electrothermal thruster. The primary component of the device is a microwave resonant cavity. The device produces stable axial plasmas within a pressurized section of the cavity with the plasma positioned in the inlet region of the nozzle. Plasma stability is enhanced by axial power coupling, an optimal distribution of electric power density within the cavity, and a propellant gas flow which has a large vortical velocity component. The thruster has been operated with a number of propellant gases: helium, nitrogen, ammonia, and hydrogen. Plasmas can be formed in a reliable manner at cavity pressures of 1 kPa and incident power levels ranging from 50 W to 350 W, depending on the gas used, and can be operated at pressures up to 300 kPa at power levels up to 2200 W. Ideal performance results of vacuum Isp and thermal efficiency vs. specific power are presented for each gas. Representative results of this preliminary work are: He - Isp = 625 s, eta-thermal = 90 percent; N2 - Isp = 270 s, eta-thermal = 41 percent; NH3 - Isp = 475 s, eta-thermal= 55 percent; H2 - Isp = 1040 s, eta-thermal = 53 percent.

  7. Design and Simulation of an Electrothermal Actuator Based Rotational Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, Sterling; Dallas, Tim

    2008-10-01

    As a participant in the Micro and Nano Device Engineering (MANDE) Research Experience for Undergraduates program at Texas Tech University, I learned how MEMS devices operate and the limits of their operation. Using specialized AutoCAD-based design software and the ANSYS simulation program, I learned the MEMS fabrication process used at Sandia National Labs, the design limitations of this process, the abilities and drawbacks of micro devices, and finally, I redesigned a MEMS device called the Chevron Torsional Ratcheting Actuator (CTRA). Motion is achieved through electrothermal actuation. The chevron (bent-beam) actuators cause a ratcheting motion on top of a hub-less gear so that as voltage is applied the CTRA spins. The voltage applied needs to be pulsed and the frequency of the pulses determine the angular frequency of the device. The main objective was to design electromechanical structures capable of transforming the electrical signals into mechanical motion without overheating. The design was optimized using finite element analysis in ANSYS allowing multi-physics simulations of our model system.

  8. Electrothermal response testing more than a quality assurance tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, A. C.

    A simple engineering model of hot wire behavior was constructed based on the electrothermal parameters that can be obtained by the application of that nondestructive test technique. The model uses the data taken before the pyrotechnic charge is loaded on the wire as background data. The data taken as a loaded component is modified by the before loading data. The ETR data is combined with the auto-ignition temperature for the pyrotechnic and the restive heating capacity for the bridgewire to predict an approximate ignition time for the device. A modification of the procedure can be used to predict the no-fire level of the device. A reasonable estimate of the spread in ignition threshold currents at constant current can be obtained by applying the data spread in the ETR gamma values to the no-fire estimate. One of the major benefits of the model is that the temperature of the pyrotechnic mix and the bridgewire can be calculated and presented graphically. This visualization brings together many of the known facts about the electrically ignited system. The relationship between hot and cold firings, high and low current inputs, and the thermal properties of the ignition interface are easily seen.

  9. Bioactivity of electro-thermally poled bioactive silicate glass.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, C R; Yunos, D M; Boccaccini, A R; Roling, B

    2009-05-01

    A 45S5 bioactive glass (nominal composition: 46.1 mol.% SiO2, 2.6 mol.% P2O5, 26.9 mol.% CaO, 24.4 mol.% Na2O) was electrothermally poled by applying voltages up to 750 V for 45 min at 200 degrees C, and the thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs) were recorded. Changes in chemical composition and electrical properties after poling were investigated by TSDC measurements, impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). The poling led to the formation of interfacial layers underneath the surface in contact with the electrodes. Under the positive electrode, the layer was characterized by Na+ ion depletion and by a negative charge density, and the layer was more resistive than the bulk. The influence of poling on the bioactivity was studied by immersion of samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) with subsequent cross-sectional SEM/EDX and X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that poling leads to morphological changes in the silica-rich layer and to changes in the growth rate of amorphous calcium phosphate and bone-like apatite on the glass surface. The bone-like apatite layer under the positive electrode was slightly thicker than that under the negative electrode.

  10. Electro-thermal modelling of a supercapacitor and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrueta, Alberto; San Martín, Idoia; Hernández, Andoni; Ursúa, Alfredo; Sanchis, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports on the electro-thermal modelling of a Maxwell supercapacitor (SC), model BMOD0083 with a rated capacitance of 83 F and rated voltage of 48 V. One electrical equivalent circuit was used to model the electrical behaviour whilst another served to simulate the thermal behaviour. The models were designed to predict the SC operating voltage and temperature, by taking the electric current and ambient temperature as input variables. A five-stage iterative method, applied to three experiments, served to obtain the parameter values for each model. The models were implemented in MATLAB-Simulink®, where they interacted to reciprocally provide information. These models were then validated through a number of tests, subjecting the SC to different current and frequency profiles. These tests included the validation of a bank of supercapacitors integrated into an electric microgrid, in a real operating environment. Satisfactory results were obtained from the electric and thermal models, with RMSE values of less than 0.65 V in all validations.

  11. The use of debonding microspheres in electrothermal debonding.

    PubMed

    Swinburne, Marissa Louise; Willmot, Derrick; Patrick, David

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if debonding microspheres (DM) could enhance electrothermal orthodontic debonding, and specifically to evaluate if the addition of DM, in varying concentrations to the orthodontic adhesive process, will affect bond strength. Bovine teeth (n=8) were mounted in acrylic using a silicone mould. Four test groups of three preparations of primer (Rely-a-Bond) with DM and a control were examined. Five incisor brackets were bonded to each tooth using the assigned primer and cold cure composite (Rely-a-Bond). Bracket tensile bond strength was measured in vitro in an Instron machine and recorded as debonding force (N). Differences between the groups were statistically analysed using analysis of variance, and repeatability was assessed. The mean debonding force of the control group was statistically significantly greater than all the other groups to which DM had been added (P<0.001). Comparison of the mean debonding forces of 1, 2.5, and 5 per cent concentrations of DM revealed no statistically significant difference between the groups. The addition of DM to orthodontic adhesive produced a highly statistically significant reduction in debonding force. There was no statistical difference in debonding force between varying concentrations of DM.

  12. A review of production methods of carbon nanotube and graphene thin films for electrothermal applications.

    PubMed

    Janas, D; Koziol, K K

    2014-03-21

    Electrothermal materials transform electric energy into heat due to the Joule effect. To date, resistive wires made of heavy metal alloys have primarily been used as the heat source in many appliances surrounding us. Recent discoveries in the field of carbon nanostructures revealed that they can offer a spectrum of advantages over the traditional materials. We review the production methods of thin films composed of carbon nanotubes or graphene and depict how they can be used as conductive coatings for electrothermal applications. We screen all reports from the field up to now and highlight the features of designed nanoheaters. A particular focus is placed on the analysis of general findings of how to tune their electrothermal properties, why carbon nanostructure devices operate the way they do and in what aspects they are superior to the currently available materials on the market. PMID:24519536

  13. Efficient generation of volatile cadmium species using Ti(III) and Ti(IV) and application to determination of cadmium by cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS)†

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Zikri; Yilmaz, Vedat; Rose, LaKeysha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a highly efficient chemical vapor generation (CVG) approach is reported for determination of cadmium (Cd). Titanium (III) and titanium (IV) were investigated for the first time as catalytic additives along with thiourea, L-cysteine and potassium cyanide (KCN) for generation of volatile Cd species. Both Ti(III) and Ti(IV) provided the highest enhancement with KCN. The improvement with thiourea was marginal (ca. 2-fold), while L-cysteine enhanced signal slightly only with Ti(III) in H2SO4. Optimum CVG conditions were 4% (v/v) HCl + 0.03 M Ti(III) + 0.16 M KCN and 2% (v/v) HNO3 + 0.03 M Ti(IV) + 0.16 M KCN with a 3% (m/v) NaBH4 solution. The sensitivity was improved about 40-fold with Ti(III) and 35-fold with Ti(IV). A limit of detection (LOD) of 3.2 ng L−1 was achieved with Ti(III) by CVG-ICP-MS. The LOD with Ti(IV) was 6.4 ng L−1 which was limited by the blank signals in Ti(IV) solution. Experimental evidence indicated that Ti(III) and Ti(IV) enhanced Cd vapor generation catalytically; for best efficiency mixing prior to reaction with NaBH4 was critical. The method was highly robust against the effects of transition metal ions. No significant suppression was observed in the presence of Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) up to 1.0 μg mL−1. Among the hydride forming elements, no interference was observed from As(III) and Se(IV) at 0.5 μg mL−1 level. The depressive effects from Pb(II) and Sb(III) were not significant at 0.1 μg mL−1 while those from Bi(III) and Sn(II) were marginal. The procedures were validated with determination of Cd by CVG-ICP-MS in a number certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), Dogfish liver (DOLT-4), Mussel tissue (SRM 2976) and Domestic Sludge (SRM 2781). PMID:26251554

  14. Electrothermally-Actuated Micromirrors with Bimorph Actuators--Bending-Type and Torsion-Type.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hua; Tsai, Chun-Wei; Chang, Hsu-Tang; Liu, Shih-Hsiang; Tsai, Jui-Che

    2015-01-01

    Three different electrothermally-actuated MEMS micromirrors with Cr/Au-Si bimorph actuators are proposed. The devices are fabricated with the SOIMUMPs process developed by MEMSCAP, Inc. (Durham, NC, USA). A silicon-on-insulator MEMS process has been employed for the fabrication of these micromirrors. Electrothermal actuation has achieved a large angular movement in the micromirrors. Application of an external electric current 0.04 A to the bending-type, restricted-torsion-type, and free-torsion-type mirrors achieved rotation angles of 1.69°, 3.28°, and 3.64°, respectively. PMID:26110409

  15. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Jin, Yan; Han, Weiying; Miao, Qiang; Bi, Shuping

    2006-07-01

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH 4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h - 1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l - 1 for Hg 2+ and 2.0 ng l - 1 for CH 3Hg +. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l - 1 of Hg 2+ and CH 3Hg + were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  16. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A C

    2015-02-20

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL(-1) Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample.

  17. Polarization of signal wave radiation generated by parametric four-wave mixing in rubidium vapor: Ultrafast ({approx}150-fs) and nanosecond time scale excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, C.-J.; Senin, A.A.; Lu, Z.-H.; Gao, J.; Xiao, Y.; Eden, J.G.

    2005-08-15

    The polarization characteristics of the signal wave produced in Rb vapor by difference-frequency, parametric four-wave mixing (FWM) has been investigated for either ultrafast ({approx}150 fs) or nanosecond time-scale excitation of the 5s{yields}{yields}5d, 7s two photon transitions. The electronic configurations of the 5d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} and 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} states of Rb, as well as their energy separation ({approx}608 cm{sup -1}), offers the opportunity to examine separately the resonantly enhanced 5s{yields}{yields}7s, 5d{yields}6p{yields}5s FWM pathways on the nanosecond time scale and then to drive both channels simultaneously with an ultrafast pulse of sufficient spectral width. As expected, dye laser ({approx}10 ns) excitation of the 5s{yields}{yields}5d (J=5/2) transition produces a signal wave ({lambda}{sub s}{approx}420 nm) having the same ellipticity as the driving optical field. Two photon excitation of Rb (7s) on the same time scale, however, generates an elliptically polarized signal when the pump is linearly polarized ({epsilon}=1), a result attributed to 7s{yields}6p, 5p amplified spontaneous emission at {approx}4 {mu}m and {approx}741 nm, respectively. Simultaneous excitation of the 5s{yields}{yields}7s, 5d transitions with {approx}150 fs pulses centered at {approx}770 nm yields polarization characteristics that can be approximated as a superposition of those for the individual transitions, thus displaying weak coupling between the two FWM channels. Also, the influence of molecular contributions to the FWM signal is observed for Rb number densities above {approx}5x10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}.

  18. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Hlongwane, Miranda; Heitmann, Uwe; Florek, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 μg·L- 1 using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed.

  19. Water vaporization on Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A search is presently conducted for OH generated by the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor in long-exposure IUE spectra of the region around Ceres. A statistically significant detection of OH is noted in an exposure off the northern limb of Ceres after perihelion. The amount of OH is consistent with a polar cap that might be replenished during winter by subsurface percolation, but which dissipates in summer.

  20. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W; Marzouk, A; Crisostomo, M C; Weatherby, D R

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use of a "Stomacher" blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15 percent, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8 percent (mean +/- SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung greater than heart greater than bone greater than kidney greater than brain greater than testis greater than fat greater than liver greater than spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl2 (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 micrograms per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 micrograms per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl2-treated rats rank as follows: kidney much greater than lung greater than spleen greater than testis greater than heart greater than fat greater than liver greater than bone greater than brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4037701

  1. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Marzouk, A.; Crisostomo, M.C.; Weatherby, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use by a Stomacher blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15%, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8% (mean +/-SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung > heart > bone > kidney > brain > testis > fat > liver > spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 ..mu..g per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 ..mu..g per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl/sub 2/-treated rats rank as follows: kidney >> lung > spleen > testis > heart > fat > liver > bone > brain. The present method fills the need for an accurate, sensitive, and practical technique to determine tissue Ni concentrations, with stringent precautions to minimize Ni contamination during tissue sampling and processing. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  2. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W; Marzouk, A; Crisostomo, M C; Weatherby, D R

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use of a "Stomacher" blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15 percent, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8 percent (mean +/- SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung greater than heart greater than bone greater than kidney greater than brain greater than testis greater than fat greater than liver greater than spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl2 (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 micrograms per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 micrograms per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl2-treated rats rank as follows: kidney much greater than lung greater than spleen greater than testis greater than heart greater than fat greater than liver greater than bone greater than brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Aqueous solution sampling and the effects of water vapor in glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ratliff, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    Glow discharge mass spectrometry is a technique for the analysis of trace elements in solid materials. In this dissertation, the sampling of small volume aqueous solution samples has been explored. This method uses electrothermal vaporization of a solution residue for atomization, while a glow discharge provides the excitation and ionization. The main advantage of this technique over other glow discharge solution analysis schemes is the increase in sensitivity for a given sample since the analyte is atomized in a short time. The effects of the electrothermal filament current on the plasma processes were studied, since this could influence the discharge processes as well as ion transport to the mass spectrometer. Variables such as pressure, cathode-to-exit orifice distance, atomization current, and sample placement on the cathode were evaluated and the best parameters presented. The method was had relative standard deviations between 15--20%. Multi-element samples may be analyzed using either mass spectral scanning or separation of the elements by their vaporization temperature. The effects of water vapor on the processes of the glow discharge were investigated. Water vapor exhibits detrimental effects on both atomization and ionization in the plasma. Mass spectra taken with less than 5% water vapor resulted in ion signals primarily from H[sub 2]O, H[sub 3]O, ArH, and O[sub 2]. A liquid nitrogen coil was constructed to aid in the removal and control of water vapor in the ion source. Mass spectra obtained while cooling the source contained ion signals mainly from the cathode material. Different cathodes were investigated to observe the varying effects of the water vapor. When sputtering reactive metals the water problem may be minimized. Steady state and pulsed addition of water were examined to determine the processes occurring in the plasma.

  4. Two-dimensional, three-fluid modeling of capillary plasma discharges in electrothermal mass accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmond, M. J.; Winfrey, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Electrothermal (ET) plasma launchers have a wide array of applications as mass acceleration devices. An ET plasma launcher utilizes an ET plasma discharge to accelerate a projectile. ET plasma discharges are arc-driven capillary discharges that ablate liner materials and form partially ionized plasmas. ET plasma discharges are generated by driving current pulses through a capillary source. Current pulses typically have peak currents on the order of tens of kA with pulse lengths on the order of hundreds of μs. These types of plasma discharges have been explored for their application to military ballistics, electric thrusters, and nuclear fusion power. ET plasma discharges have been studied using 0D, 1D, and semi-2D fluid models. In this work, a three-fluid, fully two-dimensional model of ET plasma discharges is presented. First approximations used in the newly developed model and code are discussed and simulation results are compared with experiment. Simulation results indicate the development of back flow inside ET plasma discharges due to collisional drag forces between individual plasma species. This back flow is observed for simulations of ET plasma discharges receiving current pulses with peak currents of 10, 20, 30, and 40 kA. Simulation results also reveal the development of fluid perturbations near the breech of the plasma source. These perturbations cause variations in the plasma electrical conductivity and ultimately cause changes in the local ablation rate of the source liner. At higher current pulses, these perturbations are more localized in the region of the source closest to the breech. This effect causes a decrease in the ablated mass in this region relative to the region of the source experiencing the highest ablation.

  5. Dynamic electro-thermo-mechanical modelling of a U-shaped electro-thermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Hussein; Tahhan, Aref; Le Moal, Patrice; Bourbon, Gilles; Haddab, Yassine; Lutz, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we develop original analytical electro-thermal and thermo-mechanical models for the U-shaped electro-thermal actuator. The dynamics of the temperature distribution and displacement are obtained as a direct relationship between the system’s dimensions, material properties and electrical input. The electro-thermal model provides an exact solution of the hybrid partial differential equations that describe the electro-thermal behaviour for each of the actuator’s three connected arms. The solution is obtained using a new calculation method that allows the representation of an integrable function by a hybrid infinite sum of sine and cosine functions. The displacement at the actuator’s tip is then calculated using a quasi-static model based on the superposition and virtual works principles. The obtained temperature and displacement solutions are then discussed and compared with finite element method simulations via ANSYS® and experimental results. Comparisons showed good agreement making the proposed modelling a reliable alternative which paves the way for improving the design and optimising the dimensions of U-shaped micro-actuators.

  6. Electrode Arrangement As Substitute Bottom For An Electrothermic Slag Smelting Furnace.

    DOEpatents

    Aune, Jan Arthur; Brinch, Jon Christian; Johansen, Kai

    2005-12-27

    The electrode arrangement uses vertically oriented electrodes with side wall contacts for an electrothermic smelting furnace for aluminum production. The side wall contacts are radially moveable into the furnace to compensate for wear on the contacts. The side wall contacts can be hollow to allow a slag forming charge to be fed to the furnace.

  7. The use of an electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system in the management of lung hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Mario; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Milione, Roberta; Vicidomini, Giovanni; Accardo, Marina

    2014-10-01

    Surgery is the treatment of choice for management of pulmonary hydatid cysts. Total pericystectomy provided the best results concerning the recurrence of the disease, but haemorrhagia and air leak during dissection of the pericystic space are the main disadvantages of such a method. To avoid these complications, we proposed the use of an electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. After the extraction of the hydatid cyst, a small space is created between the pericyst and normal lung, and the separation between the two zones is joined using the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. This procedure reduces the risk of bleeding and of air leaks because the bronchi and the vessels encountered during dissection are sealed by the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. When the pericystic membrane (inflammatory host reaction) is intimately adherent to the lung, total pericystectomy demands greater technical training because the bronchovascular axes of the healthy segments are situated in the pericyst. In such cases, the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system allowed creation of an appropriate plane through the parenchyma close to the pericyst, minimizing the normal lung exposed to resection as much as possible and reducing the resulting bleeding and air leak. This procedure was successfully applied in 4 consecutive patients each with a giant hydatid cyst. PMID:24994701

  8. Development of a System to Generate Near Real Time Tropospheric Delay and Precipitable Water Vapor in situ at Geodetic GPS Stations, to Improve Forecasting of Severe Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. W.; Bock, Y.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Laber, J. L.; Morris, T.; Offield, D. G.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    We describe a system under development for generating ultra-low latency tropospheric delay and precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates in situ at a prototype network of geodetic GPS sites in southern California, and demonstrating their utility in forecasting severe storms commonly associated with flooding and debris flow events along the west coast of North America through infusion of this meteorological data at NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices and the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL). The first continuous geodetic GPS network was established in southern California in the early 1990s and much of it was converted to real-time (latency <1s) high-rate (1Hz) mode over the following decades. GPS stations are multi-purpose and can also provide estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy PWV using collocated pressure and temperature measurements, the basis for GPS meteorology (Bevis et al. 1992, 1994; Duan et al. 1996) as implemented by NOAA with a nationwide distribution of about 300 GPS-Met stations providing PW estimates at subhourly resolution currently used in operational weather forecasting in the U.S. We improve upon the current paradigm of transmitting large quantities of raw data back to a central facility for processing into higher-order products. By operating semi-autonomously, each station will provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of the narrow communications bandwidth that often occurs in the aftermath of natural disasters. The onsite ambiguity-resolved precise point positioning solutions are enabled by a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS and a low-cost MEMS meteorological sensor package. The decreased latency (~5 minutes) PW estimates will provide the detailed knowledge of the distribution and magnitude of PW that NWS forecasters require to monitor and predict severe winter

  9. Development of Electrothermal Pulsed Plasma Thrusters for Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Yushuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Minetsugu; Tahara, Hirokazu

    2008-12-31

    The Project of Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship (PROITERES) was started at Osaka Institute of Technology. In PROITERES, a 10-kg small satellite with electrothermal pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs), named JOSHO, will be launched in 2010. The main mission is powered flight of small satellite by electric thruster itself. Electrothermal PPTs were studied with both experiments and numerical simulations. An electrothermal PPT with a side-fed propellant feeding mechanism achieved a total impulse of 3.6 Ns with a repetitive 10000-shot operation. An unsteady numerical simulation showed the existence of considerable amount of ablation delaying to the discharge. However, it was also shown that this phenomenon should not be regarded as the 'late time ablation' for electrothermal PPTs.

  10. Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

    2007-12-31

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b

  11. Infrared spectral evaluation of methanol/ammonia vapor mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Paul E.; Combs, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The vapor analytes of methanol and ammonia are quantitatively generated separately and as mixtures in the presence of water vapor. Generation of these analytes relies on the vapor liquid equilibria properties of the associated aqueous solutions for delivering targeted vapor amounts into an equilibrium vapor cell. The amount delivered to the equilibrium vapor cell is controlled by use of gravimetrically prepared solutions and maintaining a constant solution temperature. The cell vapor contents are examined with a laboratory Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Vapor phase spectra are acquired for the analyte mixtures in the Beer's Law concentration range using a fixed path length optical cell. Comparison to literature vapor liquid equilibrium measurements indicates the assumption of ideal solution behavior for methanollammonia interactions in the ternary solutions to be valid.

  12. Capture and recovery of isobutane by electrothermal swing adsorption with post-desorption liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Johnsen, David L; Rood, Mark J

    2010-09-15

    A bench-scale capture and recovery system to convert a low concentration organic gas to a liquid is described here. Adsorption of isobutane onto activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal desorption and subsequent liquefaction is demonstrated. Experimental conditions to condense desorbed isobutane were determined based on Dalton's law and Antoine's equation. Breakthrough curves for a gas stream containing 2000 ppm(v) isobutane in air adsorbing onto ACFC-15 demonstrate an adsorption capacity of 0.094 ± 0.017 g of isobutane/g of ACFC with >98% capture efficiency. The system described here utilizes two adsorbers, which operate cyclically to allow for continuous treatment of the isobutane. Adsorption followed by electrothermal desorption provided a concentration ratio of 240, which facilitates condensation of the isobutane after compression and cooling and is an order of magnitude greater than what has been previously demonstrated. PMID:20722439

  13. Electrothermal MEMS parallel plate rotation for single-imager stereoscopic endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyung-Won; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Baek, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Min-Suk; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Kim, Min H; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-01

    This work reports electrothermal MEMS parallel plate-rotation (PPR) for a single-imager based stereoscopic endoscope. A thin optical plate was directly connected to an electrothermal MEMS microactuator with bimorph structures of thin silicon and aluminum layers. The fabricated MEMS PPR device precisely rotates an transparent optical plate up to 37° prior to an endoscopic camera and creates the binocular disparities, comparable to those from binocular cameras with a baseline distance over 100 μm. The anaglyph 3D images and disparity maps were successfully achieved by extracting the local binocular disparities from two optical images captured at the relative positions. The physical volume of MEMS PPR is well fit in 3.4 mm x 3.3 mm x 1 mm. This method provides a new direction for compact stereoscopic 3D endoscopic imaging systems.

  14. Electrothermal MEMS parallel plate rotation for single-imager stereoscopic endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyung-Won; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Baek, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Min-Suk; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Kim, Min H; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-01

    This work reports electrothermal MEMS parallel plate-rotation (PPR) for a single-imager based stereoscopic endoscope. A thin optical plate was directly connected to an electrothermal MEMS microactuator with bimorph structures of thin silicon and aluminum layers. The fabricated MEMS PPR device precisely rotates an transparent optical plate up to 37° prior to an endoscopic camera and creates the binocular disparities, comparable to those from binocular cameras with a baseline distance over 100 μm. The anaglyph 3D images and disparity maps were successfully achieved by extracting the local binocular disparities from two optical images captured at the relative positions. The physical volume of MEMS PPR is well fit in 3.4 mm x 3.3 mm x 1 mm. This method provides a new direction for compact stereoscopic 3D endoscopic imaging systems. PMID:27137580

  15. Capture and recovery of isobutane by electrothermal swing adsorption with post-desorption liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Johnsen, David L; Rood, Mark J

    2010-09-15

    A bench-scale capture and recovery system to convert a low concentration organic gas to a liquid is described here. Adsorption of isobutane onto activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal desorption and subsequent liquefaction is demonstrated. Experimental conditions to condense desorbed isobutane were determined based on Dalton's law and Antoine's equation. Breakthrough curves for a gas stream containing 2000 ppm(v) isobutane in air adsorbing onto ACFC-15 demonstrate an adsorption capacity of 0.094 ± 0.017 g of isobutane/g of ACFC with >98% capture efficiency. The system described here utilizes two adsorbers, which operate cyclically to allow for continuous treatment of the isobutane. Adsorption followed by electrothermal desorption provided a concentration ratio of 240, which facilitates condensation of the isobutane after compression and cooling and is an order of magnitude greater than what has been previously demonstrated.

  16. Insights in the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal generation underwater using dual pulse excitation — Part I: Vapor bubble, shockwaves and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazic, V.; Laserna, J. J.; Jovicevic, S.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma and vapor bubble formation and evolution after a nanosecond laser pulse delivered to aluminum targets inside water were studied by fast photography. This technique was also applied to monitor the plasma produced by a second laser pulse and for different interpulse delays. The bubble growth was evident only after 3 μs from the first laser pulse and the bubble shape changed during expansion and collapse cycles. The evolution and propagation of the initial shockwave and its reflections both from the back sample surface and cell walls were detected by Schlieren photography. The primary plasma develops in two phases: violent particle expulsion and ionization during the first μs, followed by slow plasma growth from the ablation crater into the evolving vapor bubble. The shape of the secondary plasma strongly depends on the inner bubble pressure whereas the particle expulsion into the expanded bubble is much less evident. Both the primary and secondary plasma have similar duration of about 30 μs. Detection efficiency of the secondary plasma is much reduced by light refraction at the curved bubble-water interface, which behaves as a negative lens; this leads to an apparent reduction of the plasma dimensions. Defocusing power of the bubble lens increases with its expansion due to the lowering of the vapor's refraction index with respect to that of the surrounding liquid (Lazic et al., 2012 [1]). Smell's reflections of secondary plasma radiation at the expanded bubble wall redistribute the detected intensity on a wavelength-dependent way and allow gathering of the emission also from the external plasma layer that otherwise, would not enter into the optical system.

  17. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  18. Experimental study of flash boiling spray vaporization through quantitative vapor concentration and liquid temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaoming; Hung, David L. S.; Xu, Min

    2014-08-01

    Flash boiling sprays of liquid injection under superheated conditions provide the novel solutions of fast vaporization and better air-fuel mixture formation for internal combustion engines. However, the physical mechanisms of flash boiling spray vaporization are more complicated than the droplet surface vaporization due to the unique bubble generation and boiling process inside a superheated bulk liquid, which are not well understood. In this study, the vaporization of flash boiling sprays was investigated experimentally through the quantitative measurements of vapor concentration and liquid temperature. Specifically, the laser-induced exciplex fluorescence technique was applied to distinguish the liquid and vapor distributions. Quantitative vapor concentration was obtained by correlating the intensity of vapor-phase fluorescence with vapor concentration through systematic corrections and calibrations. The intensities of two wavelengths were captured simultaneously from the liquid-phase fluorescence spectra, and their intensity ratios were correlated with liquid temperature. The results show that both liquid and vapor phase of multi-hole sprays collapse toward the centerline of the spray with different mass distributions under the flash boiling conditions. Large amount of vapor aggregates along the centerline of the spray to form a "gas jet" structure, whereas the liquid distributes more uniformly with large vortexes formed in the vicinity of the spray tip. The vaporization process under the flash boiling condition is greatly enhanced due to the intense bubble generation and burst. The liquid temperature measurements show strong temperature variations inside the flash boiling sprays with hot zones present in the "gas jet" structure and vortex region. In addition, high vapor concentration and closed vortex motion seem to have inhibited the heat and mass transfer in these regions. In summary, the vapor concentration and liquid temperature provide detailed information

  19. Three-Dimensional Electro-Thermal Verilog-A Model of Power MOSFET for Circuit Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvála, A.; Donoval, D.; Marek, J.; Príbytný, P.; Molnár, M.; Mikolášek, M.

    2014-04-01

    New original circuit model for the power device based on interactive coupling of electrical and thermal properties is described. The thermal equivalent network for a three-dimensional heat flow is presented. Designed electro-thermal MOSFET model for circuit simulations with distributed properties and three-dimensional thermal equivalent network is used for simulation of multipulse unclamped inductive switching (UIS) test of device robustness. The features and the limitations of the new model are analyzed and presented.

  20. Optimisation of trench isolated bipolar transistors on SOI substrates by 3D electro-thermal simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigrin, S.; Armstrong, G. A.; Kranti, A.

    2007-09-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of thermal resistance of trench isolated bipolar transistors on SOI substrates based on 3D electro-thermal simulations calibrated to experimental data. The impact of emitter length, width, spacing and number of emitter fingers on thermal resistance is analysed in detail. The results are used to design and optimise transistors with minimum thermal resistance and minimum transistor area.

  1. Acoustic Behavior of Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Oguz, Hasan N.

    1996-01-01

    In a microgravity environment vapor bubbles generated at a boiling surface tend to remain near it for a long time. This affects the boiling heat transfer and in particular promotes an early transition to the highly inefficient film boiling regime. This paper describes the physical basis underlying attempts to remove the bubbles by means of pressure radiation forces.

  2. A novel alternating current multiple array electrothermal micropump for lab-on-a-chip applications

    PubMed Central

    Salari, A.; Navi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The AC electrothermal technique is very promising for biofluid micropumping, due to its ability to pump high conductivity fluids. However, compared to electroosmotic micropumps, a lack of high fluid flow is a disadvantage. In this paper, a novel AC multiple array electrothermal (MAET) micropump, utilizing multiple microelectrode arrays placed on the side-walls of the fluidic channel of the micropump, is introduced. Asymmetric coplanar microelectrodes are placed on all sides of the microfluidic channel, and are actuated in different phases: one, two opposing, two adjacent, three, or all sides at the same time. Micropumps with different combinations of side electrodes and cross sections are numerically investigated in this paper. The effect of the governing parameters with respect to thermal, fluidic, and electrical properties are studied and discussed. To verify the simulations, the AC MAET concept was then fabricated and experimentally tested. The resulted fluid flow achieved by the experiments showed good agreement with the corresponding simulations. The number of side electrode arrays and the actuation patterns were also found to greatly influence the micropump performance. This study shows that the new multiple array electrothermal micropump design can be used in a wide range of applications such as drug delivery and lab-on-a-chip, where high flow rate and high precision micropumping devices for high conductivity fluids are needed. PMID:25713695

  3. Distributed and coupled 2D electro-thermal model of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ghania; Lefebvre, Stéphane; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Bouarroudj-Berkani, Mounira; Labrousse, Denis; Rostaing, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The development of power electronics in the field of transportations (automotive, aeronautics) requires the use of power semiconductor devices providing protection and diagnostic functions. In the case of series protections power semiconductor devices which provide protection may operate in shortcircuit and act as a current limiting device. This mode of operations is very constraining due to the large dissipation of power. In these particular conditions of operation, electro-thermal models of power semiconductor devices are of key importance in order to optimize their thermal design and increase their reliability. The development of such an electro-thermal model for power MOSFET transistors based on the coupling between two computation softwares (Matlab and Cast3M) is described in this paper. The 2D electro-thermal model is able to predict (i) the temperature distribution on chip surface well as in the volume under short-circuit operations, (ii) the effect of the temperature on the distribution of the current flowing within the die and (iii) the effects of the ageing of the metallization layer on the current density and the temperature. In this paper, the electrical and thermal models are described as well as the implemented coupling scheme.

  4. A non-resonant fiber scanner based on an electrothermally-actuated MEMS stage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Duan, Can; Liu, Lin; Li, Xingde; Xie, Huikai

    2015-01-01

    Scanning fiber tips provides the most convenient way for forward-viewing fiber-optic microendoscopy. In this paper, a distal fiber scanning method based on a large-displacement MEMS actuator is presented. A single-mode fiber is glued on the micro-platform of an electrothermal MEMS stage to realize large range non-resonantscanning. The micro-platform has a large piston scan range of up to 800 µm at only 6V. The tip deflection of the fiber can be further amplified by placing the MEMS stage at a proper location along the fiber. A quasi-static model of the fiber-MEMS assembly has been developed and validated experimentally. The frequency response has also been studied and measured. A fiber tip deflection of up to 1650 µm for the 45 mm-long movable fiber portion has been achieved when the MEMS electrothermal stage was placed 25 mm away from the free end. The electrothermally-actuated MEMS stage shows a great potential for forward viewing fiber scanning and optical applications. PMID:26347583

  5. Development of an electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry procedure for direct measurements of arsenic in diluted serum.

    PubMed

    Swart, D J; Simeonsson, J B

    1999-11-01

    A procedure for the direct determination of arsenic in diluted serum by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS) is reported. Laser radiation needed to excite As at 193.696 and 197.197 nm is generated as the second anti-Stokes stimulated Raman scattering output of a frequency-doubled dye laser operating near 230.5 and 235.5 nm, respectively. Two different LEAFS schemes have been utilized and provide limits of detection of 200-300 fg for As in aqueous standards. When measurements of serum samples diluted 1:10 with deionized water are performed, a stable background signal is observed that can be accounted for by taking measurements with the laser tuned off-wavelength. No As is detected in any of the bovine or human serum samples analyzed. Measurements of 100 pg/mL standard additions of As to a diluted bovine serum sample utilizing either inorganic or organic As species demonstrate a linear relationship of the fluorescence signal to As spike concentration, but exhibit a sensitivity of approximately half that observed in pure aqueous standards. The limit of detection for As in 1:10 diluted serum samples is 65 pg/mL or 650 fg absolute mass, which corresponds to 0.65 ng/mL As in undiluted serum. To our knowledge, the ETA-LEAFS procedure is currently the only one capable of directly measuring As in diluted serum at these levels.

  6. Marine loading vapor control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babet, F.H.

    1996-09-01

    The EPA and State air quality control boards have mandated the collection and destruction or recovery of vapors generated by the loading of some hydrocarbons and chemicals into marine vessels. This is a brief overview of the main US Coast Guard requirements for marine vapor control systems. As with most regulations, they are open to interpretation. In an attempt to more clearly define the intent of the regulations, the US Coast Guard has issued guidelines to assist the certifying entities in ensuring compliance with intended regulations. If a company is contemplating the installation of a marine loading vapor control system, the authors strongly recommend that one engage the services of a certifying entity, either as the designer, or an advisor and ultimately the certifier of the system. This should be done well up front in the design of the system to avoid costly mistakes which can occur as a result of lack of knowledge or misinterpretation of the regulations and guidelines.

  7. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully. PMID:17143595

  8. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully.

  9. Study of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference in the selenium determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela

    2002-02-01

    The use of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference when measuring selenium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with deuterium background correction was evaluated. Ammonium molybdate did not produce a selenium thermal stabilization; however, the presence of ammonium molybdate decreased the phosphate interference. The study was carried out with mussel acid digests and mussel slurries. Pd-Mg(NO 3) 2 was used as a chemical modifier at optimum concentrations of 300 and 250 mg l -1, respectively, yielding optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 and 2100 °C, respectively. A yellow solid (ammonium molybdophosphate) was obtained when adding ammonium molybdate to mussel acid digest solutions. This precipitate can be removed after centrifugation prior to ETAAS determination. Additionally, studies on the sampling of the solid ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) together with the liquid phase, as a slurry, were also developed. The volatilization of the solid AMP was not reached at temperatures lower than 2500 °C. By this way, phosphate, as AMP, is not present in the vapor phase at the atomization temperature (2100 °C), yielding a reduction of the spectral interference by phosphate. The proposed method was validated analyzing three reference materials of marine origin (DORM-1, DOLT-1 and TORT-1). Good agreement with the certified selenium contents was reached for all cases.

  10. Solid phase extraction of cadmium on 2-mercaptobenzothiazole loaded on sulfur powder in the medium of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Pourreza, N; Ghanemi, K

    2010-06-15

    A novel solid phase extractor for preconcentration of cadmium at ng L(-1) levels has been developed. Cadmium ions were retained on a column packed with sulfur powder modified with 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-MBT) in the medium of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim](+)PF(6)(-)) ionic liquid. The presence of ionic liquid during modification of sulfur enhanced the retention of cadmium ions on the column. The retained cadmium ions were eluted with 2 mol L(-1) solution of HCl and measured by cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG-AAS). By using reaction cell-gas liquid separator (RC-GLS), gaseous cadmium vapors were produced and reached the atomic absorption spectrometer, instantaneously. The influence of different variables on both processes of solid phase extraction and CVG-AAS determination of cadmium ions was investigated. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 10-200 ng L(-1)of cadmium in the initial solution with r=0.9992 (n=8) under optimum conditions. The limit of detection based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3S(b), n=10) was 4.6 ng L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 25 and 150 ng L(-1) of cadmium was 4.1 and 2.2% (n=8), respectively. The procedure was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material (DORM-3), water and fish samples.

  11. Iron bromide vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  12. The electrical resistivity of some graphite types as used in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademeyer, C. J.; Human, H. G. C.; Faure, P. K.

    This paper describes the measurement of the electrical resistivity of four types of graphite as used in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Results are presented for temperatures in a range between 140 and 1800°C. From 1200°C on the resistivity was found to depend linearly on temperature. The regression coefficients for the corresponding straight portions of the experimental curves are given to provide data for extrapolating the resistivity values to 2500°C and to calculate the dynamic temperature characteristics of the graphite tubes in ETAAS.

  13. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  14. A low power, on demand electrothermal valve for wireless drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Po-Ying; Givrad, Tina K; Sheybani, Roya; Holschneider, Daniel P; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Meng, Ellis

    2010-01-01

    We present a low power, on demand Parylene MEMS electrothermal valve. A novel Omega-shaped thermal resistive element requires low power (approximately mW) and enables rapid valve opening (approximately ms). Using both finite element analysis and valve opening experiments, a robust resistive element design for improved valve opening performance in water was obtained. In addition, a thermistor, as an inrush current limiter, was added into the valve circuit to provide variable current ramping. Wireless activation of the valve using RF inductive power transfer was demonstrated.

  15. A low power, on demand electrothermal valve for wireless drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Givrad, Tina K.; Sheybani, Roya; Holschneider, Daniel P.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a low power, on demand Parylene MEMS electrothermal valve. A novel Ω-shaped thermal resistive element requires low power (~mW) and enables rapid valve opening (~ms). Using both finite element analysis and valve opening experiments, a robust resistive element design for improved valve opening performance in water was obtained. In addition, a thermistor, as an inrush current limiter, was added into the valve circuit to provide variable current ramping. Wireless activation of the valve using RF inductive power transfer was demonstrated. PMID:20024057

  16. Evaluation of candidate working fluid formulations for the electrothermal - chemical wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyurtlu, Jale F.; Akyurtlu, Ates

    1991-01-01

    Various candidate chemical formulations are evaluated as a precursor for the working fluid to be used in the electrothermal hypersonic test facility which was under study at the NASA LaRC Hypersonic Propulsion Branch, and the formulations which would most closely satisfy the goals set for the test facility are identified. Out of the four tasks specified in the original proposal, the first two, literature survey and collection of kinetic data, are almost completed. The third task, work on a mathematical model of the ET wind tunnel operation, was started and concentrated on the expansion in the nozzle with finite rate kinetics.

  17. [Electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants and plant products].

    PubMed

    Karpova, E A; Malysheva, A G; Ermakov, A A; Sidorenkova, N K

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed the optimal temperature-time parameters of electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants after their acid predigestion. The matrix modifier is 1% nickel nitrate or palladium nitrate solution. Cuvettes (ovens) are simple, made of porous or pyrolytic graphite. The analytical program is suitable for both spectrometers with Zeeman and deuterium background correction. The correctness of the procedure has been estimated from the results of analysis of state reference samples certified for their arsenic content. The coefficient of variation was 20-35% for the concentration range of 0.02-0.2 mg/kg.

  18. Experimental performance of a microwave electrothermal thruster with high temperature nozzle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehair, S.; Frasch, L.L.; Asmussen, J.

    1987-05-01

    Testing of various modifications of a microwave electrothermal thruster, including the use of boron nitride and metal nozzles, the cooling of the nozzle with the incoming propellant, and the use of a spherical dome discharge chamber, is discussed. Tests were performed in nitrogen and helium gases over a 500-5000-sccm flow range and at pressures of up to 1500 torr, and experimental results are presented for specific impulse and energy efficiency. For the nitrogen experiments, excellant results were found for metal nozzle thrusters at very low flow rates in comparison with previous results for quartz nozzles at higher flow rates, and nozzle melting and erosion problems were eliminated. 11 references.

  19. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using electrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  20. Long throw and rotary output electro-thermal actuators based on bent-beam suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Chu, L.L.; Siwapornsathain, E.; Oliver, A.D.; Gianchandani, Y.B.

    1999-11-22

    This paper reports on significant advances in electrothermal bent beam actuators. Designs for long throw linear and rotary actuators are described. Silicon p++ devices showed 20--30 {mu}m displacements with 150 {micro}N loads at actuation levels of 6--8 V, and 250--300 mW. An electroplated version provided 15 {mu}m displacements at 0.8 V and 450 mW. Inchworm type devices are reported that had linear displacements of 100 {micro}m with 200 {micro}N loads. Refinements in the modeling to account for non-linear thermal expansion coefficients and buckling are also reported.

  1. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion, and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S.-Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using eiectrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  2. Inhibiting electro-thermal breakdown of acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators by dielectric gel coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is very localized; a spark and a pinhole (puncture) in dielectric ends up with short-circuit. This letter shows that prevention of electrothermal breakdown helps defer failure of DEAs even with conductive-grease electrodes. Dielectric gel encapsulation or coating (Dow Corning 3-4170) helps protect acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905), making it thermally more stable and delaying its thermal oxidation (burn) from 218 °C to 300 °C. Dielectric-gel-coated acrylic DEAs can withstand higher local leak-induced heating and thus achieve higher dielectric strengths than non-coated DEAs do.

  3. Evaluation of mesoporous silicon thermal conductivity by electrothermal finite element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Laurent; Capelle, Marie; Roqueta, Fabrice; Lysenko, Vladimir; Gautier, Gael

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the thermal conductivity of mesoporous silicon (PoSi) by fitting the experimental results with simulated ones. The electrothermal response (resistance versus applied current) of differently designed test lines integrated onto PoSi/silicon substrates and the bulk were compared to the simulations. The PoSi thermal conductivity was the single parameter used to fit the experimental results. The obtained thermal conductivity values were compared with those determined from Raman scattering measurements, and a good agreement between both methods was found. This methodology can be used to easily determine the thermal conductivity value for various porous silicon morphologies.

  4. Evaluation of mesoporous silicon thermal conductivity by electrothermal finite element simulation.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Laurent; Capelle, Marie; Roqueta, Fabrice; Lysenko, Vladimir; Gautier, Gael

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the thermal conductivity of mesoporous silicon (PoSi) by fitting the experimental results with simulated ones. The electrothermal response (resistance versus applied current) of differently designed test lines integrated onto PoSi/silicon substrates and the bulk were compared to the simulations. The PoSi thermal conductivity was the single parameter used to fit the experimental results. The obtained thermal conductivity values were compared with those determined from Raman scattering measurements, and a good agreement between both methods was found. This methodology can be used to easily determine the thermal conductivity value for various porous silicon morphologies.

  5. Mechanisms of the micro-crack generation in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. Q.; Takahashi, T.; Ide, T.; Shimizu, M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the generation mechanisms of micro-cracks (MCs) in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice (SL) structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The SL is intended to be used as an interlayer (IL) for relaxing tensile stress and obtaining high-quality crack-free GaN grown on Si substrates. It is found that the MCs can be generated by two different mechanisms, where large mismatches of the lattice constant (LC) and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) play key roles in the issue. Different MC configurations (low-density and high-density MCs) are observed, which are considered to be formed during the different growth stages (SL growth and cooling down processes) due to the LC and the CTE effects. In-situ and ex-situ experimental results support the mechanism interpretations of the MCs generation. The mechanism understanding makes it possible to optimize the SL IL structure for growing high-quality crack-free GaN films on Si substrates for optical and electronic device applications.

  6. Mechanisms of the micro-crack generation in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. Q. Takahashi, T.; Ide, T.; Shimizu, M.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate the generation mechanisms of micro-cracks (MCs) in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice (SL) structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The SL is intended to be used as an interlayer (IL) for relaxing tensile stress and obtaining high-quality crack-free GaN grown on Si substrates. It is found that the MCs can be generated by two different mechanisms, where large mismatches of the lattice constant (LC) and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) play key roles in the issue. Different MC configurations (low-density and high-density MCs) are observed, which are considered to be formed during the different growth stages (SL growth and cooling down processes) due to the LC and the CTE effects. In-situ and ex-situ experimental results support the mechanism interpretations of the MCs generation. The mechanism understanding makes it possible to optimize the SL IL structure for growing high-quality crack-free GaN films on Si substrates for optical and electronic device applications.

  7. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  8. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  9. Determination of chromium in treated crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by electrothermal ASS: study of chromium accumulation in different tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, F.; Diaz, J.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.

    1986-06-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of chromium in muscle, hepatopancreas, antennal glands, and gills of Procambarus clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following Cr(VI)-exposure. Determinations of chromium were made by using Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and the standard additions method.

  10. Improved electrothermal performance of custom-shaped micro heater based on anisotropic laser-reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tian-Yu; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Qian; Wang, Dan-Yang; Deng, Ning-Qin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a flexible heater based on anisotropic laser-reduced graphene oxide (LRGO) is established. Attributing to precision and shape design of laser processing and excellent adhesion of graphene oxide, the LRGO-based heater can be microminiaturized with custom patterns and integrated on various substrates, which is what the existing film heaters cannot do and can be widely used for wearable heating devices, flexural warming systems in medical science, and light deicing equipment and heaters for aero vehicles. The electrothermal performance of the anisotropic LRGO is investigated systematically through a series of experiments including Raman spectra, SEM, white-light interferograms, IV testing, and infrared thermography. The electrothermal performance of the LRGO with the parallel aligned direction is better than the LRGO with the vertical aligned direction. The electrothermal performance can be improved greatly through radiating repeatedly. The saturated temperature and heating rate of the LRGO radiated twice are almost double that of the LRGO radiated once. Radiating thrice damages the material and structure, reducing electrothermal performance.

  11. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Son, H K; Sivakumar, S; Rood, M J; Kim, B J

    2016-01-15

    Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40-900 ppm(v)) and superficial gas velocity (6.3-9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system. PMID:26342148

  12. Electrothermal shrinkage reduces laxity but alters creep behavior in a lapine ligament model.

    PubMed

    Wallace, A L; Hollinshead, R M; Frank, C B

    2001-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of collagen in ligament tissue has the potential to enhance arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Previous studies have shown that laser energy produces significant capsular shortening without alteration of viscoelastic properties, but little information is available on the effects of radio frequency electrothermal energy. We assessed the acute effects of radio frequency shrinkage with use of the lapine medial collateral ligament model, in which the tibial insertion was shifted proximally to produce abnormal laxity. Thermal treatment resulted in restoration of laxity from 3.33 +/- 0.25 mm to 0.66 +/- 0.31 mm, which was not significantly different from medial collateral ligaments replaced anatomically (0.50 +/- 0.34 mm). When tested at 4.1 megapascals, cyclic and static creep strains were increased twofold to threefold in thermally-treated ligaments (P <.01), and partial failure occurred in 2 of 8 cases. We conclude that radio frequency electrothermal shrinkage is effective at reducing laxity but significantly alters viscoelastic properties, posing a risk of recurrent stretching-out at "physiological" loads. PMID:11182728

  13. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Son, H K; Sivakumar, S; Rood, M J; Kim, B J

    2016-01-15

    Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40-900 ppm(v)) and superficial gas velocity (6.3-9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system.

  14. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  15. Overview of numerical codes developed for predicted electrothermal deicing of aircraft blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Wright, William B.; Masiulaniec, K. Cyril

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the deicing computer codes that have been developed at the University of Toledo under sponsorship of the NASA-Lewis Research Center is presented. These codes simulate the transient heat conduction and phase change occurring in an electrothermal deicier pad that has an arbitrary accreted ice shape on its surface. The codes are one-dimensional rectangular, two-dimensional rectangular, and two-dimensional with a coordinate transformation to model the true blade geometry. All modifications relating to the thermal physics of the deicing problem that have been incorporated into the codes will be discussed. Recent results of reformulating the codes using different numerical methods to increase program efficiency are described. In particular, this reformulation has enabled a more comprehensive two-dimensional code to run in much less CPU time than the original version. The code predictions are compared with experimental data obtained in the NASA-Lewis Icing Research Tunnel with a UH1H blade fitted with a B. F. Goodrich electrothermal deicer pad. Both continuous and cyclic heater firing cases are considered. The major objective in this comparison is to illustrate which codes give acceptable results in different regions of the airfoil for different heater firing sequences.

  16. Generation of sub-ppb level vapor phase mixtures of biogenic volatile organic compounds from liquid phase standards and stepwise characterization of their volatilization properties by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad Asif; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-12-19

    In the analysis of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in ambient air, preparation of a sub-ppb level standard is an important factor. This task is very challenging as most BVOCs (e.g., monoterpenes) are highly volatile and reactive in nature. As a means to produce sub-ppb gaseous standards for BVOCs, we investigated the dynamic headspace (HS) extraction technique through which their vapors are generated from a liquid standard (mixture of 10 BVOCs: (1) α-pinene, (2) β-pinene, (3) 3-carene, (4) myrcene, (5) α-phellandrene, (6) α-terpinene, (7) R-limonene, (8) γ-terpinene, (9) p-cymene, and (10) Camphene) spiked into a chamber-style impinger. The quantification of BVOCs was made by collection on multiple-bed sorbent tubes (STs) and subsequent analysis by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). Using this approach, sub-ppb level mixtures of gaseous BVOCs were generated at different sweep cycles. The mean concentrations of 10 BVOCs generated from the most stable conditions (i.e., in the third sweep cycle) varied in the range of 0.37±0.05 to 7.27±0.86ppb depending on the initial concentration of liquid standard spiked into the system. The reproducibility of the gaseous BVOCs generated as mixture standards, if expressed in terms of relative standard error using the concentration datasets acquired under stable conditions, ranged from 1.64 (α-phellandrene) to 9.67% (R-limonene).

  17. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, Gregory M.; McRae, Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  18. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/ temperature / humidity (FTH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the

  19. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/temperature/humidity (FIFH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the Kennedy

  20. Supplemental fuel vapor system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, P.M.

    1991-01-08

    This patent describes a supplemental fuel system utilizing fuel vapor. It comprises: an internal combustion engine including a carburetor and an intake manifold; a fuel tank provided with air vents; a fuel conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank and in communication with liquid fuel in the tank and a second end connected to the carburetor; the fuel conduit delivering the liquid fuel to the carburetor from the fuel tank; a fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank at a location displaced from contact with the liquid fuel and a second end connected to a carbon canister; a PCV conduit having a first end connected to a pollution control valve and a second end connected to the intake manifold; and, an intermediate fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel vapor conduit and a second end connected to the PCV conduit; wherein the air vents continuously provide air to the tank to mix with the liquid fuel and form fuel vapor. The fuel vapor drawn from the fuel tank by vacuum developed in the intake manifold and flows through the fuel vapor conduit. The intermediate fuel vapor conduit and the intake manifold to combustion chambers of the internal combustion engine so as to supplement fuel delivered to the engine by the fuel conduit. The liquid fuel and the fuel vapor constantly delivered to the engine during normal operation.

  1. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    EPA Science Inventory

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  2. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  3. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  4. Water Vapor Effects on Silica-Forming Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Silica-forming ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 are proposed for applications in combustion environments. These environments contain water vapor as a product of combustion. Oxidation of silica-formers is more rapid in water vapor than in oxygen. Parabolic oxidation rates increase with the water vapor partial pressure with a power law exponent value close to one. Molecular water vapor is therefore the mobile species in silica. Rapid oxidation rates and large amounts of gases generated during the oxidation reaction in high water vapor pressures may result in bubble formation in the silica and nonprotective scale formation. It is also shown that silica reacts with water vapor to form Si(OH)4(g). Silica volatility has been modeled using a laminar flow boundary layer controlled reaction equation. Silica volatility depends on the partial pressure of water vapor, the total pressure, and the gas velocity. Simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions have been modeled with paralinear kinetics.

  5. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1989--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes research to reduce the intrinsic bonding defects in amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloys by controlling the bonding chemistry and the microstructure via the deposition process reactions. The specific approach was to use remote plasma-enhanced, chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) and reactive magnetron sputtering to limit the multiplicity of deposition inaction pathways, and thereby gain increased control over the thin-film chemistry and microstrucre. The research included (1) the deposition of amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloy materials by the PECVD process and by reactive magnetron sputtering, and (2) the evaluation of the material properties of these films for potential applications in PV devices. The focus of the research was on pining a fundamental understanding of the relationships between deposition reaction pathways, the bonding of dopant and alloy atoms, and the electrical provides of importance for PV applications. This involved studying the factors that contribute to defect generation and to defect removal and/or neutralization. In addition to the experimental studies, the research also included theoretical and modeling studies aimed at understanding the relationships between local atomic arrangements of Si and alloy atoms, and the electrical, optical, vibrational, and defect properties.

  6. Quasi-transverse optical phonon mode in self-generated semipolar AlN grains embedded in c-oriented AlN matrix grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. Y.; Zhou, T. F.; Zheng, S. N.; Liu, X. H.; Zhao, J. J.; Su, X. J.; Huang, J.; Qiu, Y. X.; Zhang, J. C.; Xu, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we present a microspectroscopic investigation on the quasi-transverse optical phonon modes Q(TO) in some self-generated aluminum nitride (AlN) grains grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, these grains were confirmed to be embedded in (0001)-AlN (c-AlN) epitaxial matrix with an appearance plane of (10 1 ¯ 1 ) (s-plane). Two beam bright field images further showed that the AlN grains were free of dislocation. In-plane phonon anisotropy of the AlN grains was discussed in detail using angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of pure Raman phonons intensity on rotation angle agrees well with the calculation. The Q(TO) phonon intensity exhibited similar behavior to that of A1(TO) phonon, which can be explained by Loudon's formula. However, the observed frequency fluctuation for the Q(TO) phonon differs from that of the pure phonon modes, which cannot be directly understood from the classic Loudon's formula. A modified Loudon's formula appropriate to non-normal incidence was presented to explain the observed Q(TO) phonon frequency fluctuation. Combining with the angular-dependent Raman spectra, we proposed that a small inclination of s-plane along with the various in-plane orientations in c-AlN matrix lead to the frequency fluctuation of Q(TO) in these embedded semipolar AlN grains.

  7. Treatment of ligament laxity by electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication: a morphologic and mechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adam M; Jones, Ioan T; Hansen, Ulrich; Suri, Amrita; Sandison, Ann; Moss, Jill; Wallace, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    Capsular plication or thermal shrinkage can be used to enhance surgical joint stabilization. We compared mechanical or morphologic properties of the medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee treated by either bipolar radiofrequency electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication. After 12 weeks, the medial collateral ligaments were procured from treated and contralateral knees to undergo viscoelastic (creep) testing, quantitative transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Creep strain in thermal (1.85% +/- 0.32%) and plicated (1.92% +/- 0.36%) ligaments was almost twice that of the control group (1.04% +/- 0.15%), although there was no difference between treatment modalities. The morphologic parameters of all 3 groups were significantly different (P < .001). The thermal ligaments demonstrated predominantly small fibrils, whereas the plicated group displayed an intermediate distribution of heterogeneous fibrils, suggesting a different pattern of remodeling. Viscoelastic properties are similar after thermal shrinkage or plication, though inferior to those of intact ligaments. PMID:17030129

  8. Detection of Zeptojoule Microwave Pulses Using Electrothermal Feedback in Proximity-Induced Josephson Junctions.

    PubMed

    Govenius, J; Lake, R E; Tan, K Y; Möttönen, M

    2016-07-15

    We experimentally investigate and utilize electrothermal feedback in a microwave nanobolometer based on a normal-metal (Au_{x}Pd_{1-x}) nanowire with proximity-induced superconductivity. The feedback couples the temperature and the electrical degrees of freedom in the nanowire, which both absorbs the incoming microwave radiation, and transduces the temperature change into a radio-frequency electrical signal. We tune the feedback in situ and access both positive and negative feedback regimes with rich nonlinear dynamics. In particular, strong positive feedback leads to the emergence of two metastable electron temperature states in the millikelvin range. We use these states for efficient threshold detection of coherent 8.4 GHz microwave pulses containing approximately 200 photons on average, corresponding to 1.1×10^{-21}  J≈7.0  meV of energy. PMID:27472107

  9. Acceleration of mini-projectiles using a small-caliber electrothermal gun for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    The small-caliber electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS has been used to accelerate mini-projectiles to demonstrate the feasibility of using such guns as a pellet injector for fueling of future fusion reactors. The gun has been modified to accommodate acceleration of plastic projectiles to simulate frozen hydrogenic pellets required to fuel fusion reactors. Barrel sections are equipped with diagnostics for velocity and position of the projectile. The length of the acceleration path could be varied between 15 and 45 cm. The pulse forming network (PFN) can provide up to 100 kJ discharge energy over 0.1 to 1.0 ms pulse duration. The projectile velocities have been measured via a set of break wires. The ODIN code has been modified to account for the projectile mass, acceleration and friction. Plasma parameters compared to code results are discussed in detail.

  10. Numerical simulation of an electrothermal deicer pad. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marano, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical simulation is developed to investigate the removal of ice from composite aircraft blades by means of electrothermal deicing. The model considers one dimensional, unsteady state heat transfer in the composite blade-ice body. The heat conduction equations are approximated by using the Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme, and the phase change in the ice layer is handled using the Enthalpy method. To solve the system of equations which result, Gauss-Seidel iteration is used. The simulation computes the temperature profile in the composite blade-ice body, as well as the movement of the ice-water interface, as a function of time. This information can be used to evaluate deicer performance. The simulation can also be used to solve a variety of other heat conduction problems involving composite bodies.

  11. Detection of Zeptojoule Microwave Pulses Using Electrothermal Feedback in Proximity-Induced Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govenius, J.; Lake, R. E.; Tan, K. Y.; Möttönen, M.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate and utilize electrothermal feedback in a microwave nanobolometer based on a normal-metal (AuxPd1 -x) nanowire with proximity-induced superconductivity. The feedback couples the temperature and the electrical degrees of freedom in the nanowire, which both absorbs the incoming microwave radiation, and transduces the temperature change into a radio-frequency electrical signal. We tune the feedback in situ and access both positive and negative feedback regimes with rich nonlinear dynamics. In particular, strong positive feedback leads to the emergence of two metastable electron temperature states in the millikelvin range. We use these states for efficient threshold detection of coherent 8.4 GHz microwave pulses containing approximately 200 photons on average, corresponding to 1.1 ×10-21 J ≈7.0 meV of energy.

  12. In-bore diagnostic and modeling of an electrothermal plasma launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A diagnostic method has been developed to measure the high heat flux produced in the electrothermal plasma launcher SIRENS. The method involves attaching a thermocouple to the back surface of a target to obtain the temperature history of the back surface, which is a direct indication of the heat flux incident on the front surface. The measured temperature history is an input to a developed one dimensional (1-D), time dependent heat conduction code which uses the temperature history of the back surface to determine the incident heat flux on the front surface of the target. A one dimensional time dependent code, ODIN, was developed to model the plasma formation and flow in electrothermal launchers. ODIN models the plasma formation and flow into the source section and the plasma expansion into and through the barrel section. ODIN models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and equation-of-state. The source and barrel sections were broken into a specific number of cells and each cell was considered to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), with the plasma modeled as a viscous fluid. The primary objective of the numerical simulation was to predict the time and axial variation of the plasma flow and to predict the magnitude of the drag forces acting on the plasma. SIRENS has been operated at atmospheric conditions using a fuse placed between the two electrodes in the source section to initiate the discharge. Three different types of fuses were tested, with the best results obtaining using a thin triangular shaped aluminum fuse. SIRENS has also be used to launch projectiles, with projectile masses ranging from 400 mg to 1500 mg. The maximum velocity obtained was 1.74 km/sec at an input energy of 2.5 kJ, using a 540 mg Lexan projectile with an efficiency of 33%.

  13. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  14. Condensation on a noncollapsing vapor bubble in a subcooled liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure is presented by which an estimate can be made of the condensation coefficient on a noncollapsing stationary vapor bubble in subcooled liquid nitrogen. Film boiling from a thin wire was used to generate vapor bubbles which remain fixed to the wire at their base. A balance was established between the evaporation in the thin annular region along the wire and the condensation in the vapor bubbles.

  15. The oscillations of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Yin, Z.; Yang, B.

    2003-04-01

    Bob Apfel had so many interests that it is impossible-however fitting and desirable-to pay homage to his work as a whole. Some of his early studies were devoted to bubble nucleation at high superheats. In the first part of this paper a recent application of this phenomenon is described. Once a vapor bubble is generated, its subsequent oscillations (free and forced) present analogies and differences with those of a gas bubble: the second part of the paper focuses on this topic. [Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  16. The oscillation of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Yin, Zhizhong

    2001-05-01

    Bob Apfel had so many interests that it is impossible-however fitting and desirable-to pay homage to his work as a whole. Some of his early studies were devoted to bubble nucleation at high superheats. In the first part of this paper a recent application of this phenomenon is described. Once a vapor bubble is generated, its subsequent oscillations (free and forced) present analogies and differences with those of a gas bubble: the second part of the paper focuses on this topic. [Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  17. Second Vapor-Level Sensor For Vapor Degreaser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, Nance M.; Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Second vapor-level sensor installed at lower level in vapor degreaser makes possible to maintain top of vapor at that lower level. Evaporation reduced during idle periods. Provides substantial benefit, without major capital cost of building new vapor degreaser with greater freeboard height.

  18. Vapor generator steam drum spray head

    DOEpatents

    Fasnacht, Jr., Floyd A.

    1978-07-18

    A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and "cooldown" water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure.

  19. Competition between Induced-Charge Electro-Osmosis and Electrothermal Effects at Low Frequencies around a Weakly Polarizable Microchannel Corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehavi, Matan; Boymelgreen, Alicia; Yossifon, Gilad

    2016-04-01

    Sharp corners are an inherent component of most planar microfluidic systems, and thus their influence on flow within the microchannel is of significant interest. Here, we demonstrate that in electrokinetically driven devices, the presence of a sharp corner may result in localized vortices due to nonlinear induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) and/or electrothermal forces. Application of an alternating-current electric field enables quantification of the nonlinear ICEO ejection-flow effect by isolating it from linear electro-osmotic background flow which is present under dc forcing. The hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of a sharp channel corner is analyzed using experimental micro-particle-image-velocimetry and numerical simulations for different buffer concentrations, frequencies, and applied voltages. Divergence from the purely ICEO flow with increasing buffer conductivity is shown to be a result of increasing electrothermal effects due to Joule heating.

  20. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  1. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  2. Secondhand Exposure to Vapors From Electronic Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Czogala, Jan; Fidelus, Bartlomiej; Zielinska-Danch, Wioleta; Travers, Mark J.; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are designed to generate inhalable nicotine aerosol (vapor). When an e-cigarette user takes a puff, the nicotine solution is heated and the vapor is taken into lungs. Although no sidestream vapor is generated between puffs, some of the mainstream vapor is exhaled by e-cigarette user. The aim of this study was to evaluate the secondhand exposure to nicotine and other tobacco-related toxicants from e-cigarettes. Materials and Methods: We measured selected airborne markers of secondhand exposure: nicotine, aerosol particles (PM2.5), carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an exposure chamber. We generated e-cigarette vapor from 3 various brands of e-cigarette using a smoking machine and controlled exposure conditions. We also compared secondhand exposure with e-cigarette vapor and tobacco smoke generated by 5 dual users. Results: The study showed that e-cigarettes are a source of secondhand exposure to nicotine but not to combustion toxicants. The air concentrations of nicotine emitted by various brands of e-cigarettes ranged from 0.82 to 6.23 µg/m3. The average concentration of nicotine resulting from smoking tobacco cigarettes was 10 times higher than from e-cigarettes (31.60±6.91 vs. 3.32±2.49 µg/m3, respectively; p = .0081). Conclusions: Using an e-cigarette in indoor environments may involuntarily expose nonusers to nicotine but not to toxic tobacco-specific combustion products. More research is needed to evaluate health consequences of secondhand exposure to nicotine, especially among vulnerable populations, including children, pregnant women, and people with cardiovascular conditions. PMID:24336346

  3. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be underestimated, owing to deposition of SOA-forming vapors to the chamber wall. We present here an experimental protocol and a model framework to constrain the vapor-wall interactions in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is exhibited by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. By optimizing the model output to the observed vapor decay profiles, we identified that the dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αwi), which can be correlated through its volatility with the number of carbons and oxygens in the molecule. By doing so, the wall-induced deposition rate of intermediate/semi-volatile organic vapors can be reasonably predicted based on their molecular constituency. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and the chamber wall. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will dominate wall deposition for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For compounds characterized by relatively large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber wall even with perfect particle accommodation.

  4. Laser vaporization generation of Al sup 12 C, Al sup 13 C, Al sup 12 C sub 2 , and Al sup 13 C sub 2 for rare gas matrix electron spin resonance studies: Experimental--theoretical comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, L.B. Jr.; Cobranchi, S.T.; Herlong, J.O.; Arrington, C.A. )

    1990-05-15

    The metal carbide radicals AlC and AlC{sub 2} have been generated by the laser vaporization of aluminum carbide and trapped in neon and argon matrices at 4 K for electron spin resonance (ESR) characterization. These results provide the first experimental evidence showing that AlC has a {sup 4}{Sigma} ground electronic state and that AlC{sub 2} is {ital X} {sup 2}{ital A}{sub 1}. {ital Ab} {ital initio} theoretical calculations were conducted for the geometries and various nuclear hyperfine parameters in both radicals which yielded {ital A} values in reasonable agreement with the observed. In AlC, the three unpaired electrons reside primarily on carbon with the following neon matrix magnetic parameters (MHz): {ital g}{sub {parallel}}=2.000(1); {ital g}{sub {perpendicular}}=2.0010(5); {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}(Al){vert bar}=33.2(5); {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {parallel}}(Al){vert bar}=3(3); {ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}({sup 13}C)=52.1(5); {ital A}{sub {parallel}}({sup 13}C)=52(2); and {ital D}(zero field splitting)=374(1). For AlC{sub 2}, the spin density resides predominantly in an aluminum 3{ital p}{sub {ital z}}/3{ital s} hybrid directed away from C{sub 2}. The neon magnetic parameters (MHz) are: {ital g}{sub {parallel}}=2.0005(5); {ital g}{sub {perpendicular}}=1.9965(3); {ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}(Al)=941.5(5); {ital A}{sub {parallel}}(Al)=1067(1); {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {parallel}}({sup 13}C){vert bar}=59(1); and {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}({sup 13}C){vert bar}=52(1).

  5. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  6. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  8. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  9. Sorption and modeling of mass transfer of toxic chemical vapors in activated-carbon fiber-cloth adsorbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Sagen, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorber coupled with an electrothermal regenerator and a cryogenic condenser was designed and developed to efficiently capture and recover toxic chemical vapors (TCVs) from simulated industrial gas streams. The system was characterized for adsorption by ACFC, electrothermal desorption, and cryogenic condensation to separate acetone and methyl ethyl ketone from gas streams. Adsorption dynamics are numerically modeled to predict system characteristics during scale-up and optimization of the process in the future. The model requires diffusivities of TCVs into an activated-carbon fiber (ACF) as an input. Effective diffusivities of TCVs into ACFs were modeled as a function of temperature, concentration, and pore size distribution. Effective diffusivities for acetone at 65 ??C and 30-60 ppmv were measured using a chromatography method. The energy factor for surface diffusion was determined from comparison between the experimental and modeled effective diffusivities. The modeled effective diffusivities were used in a dispersive computational model to predict mass transfer zones of TCVs in fixed beds of ACFC under realistic conditions for industrial applications.

  10. Vapor core propulsion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Nils J.

    1991-01-01

    Many research issues were addressed. For example, it became obvious that uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is a most preferred fuel over uranium hexafluoride (UF6). UF4 has a very attractive vaporization point (1 atm at 1800 K). Materials compatible with UF4 were looked at, like tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, carbon. It was found that in the molten state, UF4 and uranium attacked most everything, but in the vapor state they are not that bad. Compatible materials were identified for both the liquid and vapor states. A series of analyses were established to determine how the cavity should be designed. A series of experiments were performed to determine the properties of the fluid, including enhancement of the electrical conductivity of the system. CFD's and experimental programs are available that deal with most of the major issues.

  11. Fuel Vaporization Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosque, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effects of fuel-air preparation characteristics on combustor performance and emissions at temperature and pressure ranges representative of actual gas turbine combustors is discussed. The effect of flameholding devices on the vaporization process and NOx formation is discussed. Flameholder blockage and geometry are some of the elements that affect the recirculation zone characteristics and subsequently alter combustion stability, emissions and performance. A water cooled combustor is used as the test rig. Preheated air and Jet A fuel are mixed at the entrance of the apparatus. A vaporization probe is used to determine percentage of vaporization and a gas sample probe to determine concentration of emissions in the exhaust gases. The experimental design is presented and experimental expected results are discussed.

  12. Vapor concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  13. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, Richard A.; Szydlowski, Donald F.; Sawyer, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well.

  14. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  15. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.20... SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-11 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo... psig; (3) Prevent a vacuum in the cargo tank vapor space, whether generated by withdrawal of cargo...

  16. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.20... SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-11 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo... psig; (3) Prevent a vacuum in the cargo tank vapor space, whether generated by withdrawal of cargo...

  17. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.20... SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-11 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo... psig; (3) Prevent a vacuum in the cargo tank vapor space, whether generated by withdrawal of cargo...

  18. BTSC VAPOR INSTRUSION PRIMER "VAPOR INTRUSION CONSIDERATION FOR REDEVELOPMENT"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This primer is designed for brownfields stakeholders concerned about vapor intrusion, including property owners, real estate developers, and contractors performing environmental site investigations. It provides an overview of the vapor intrusion issue and how it can impact the ap...

  19. Model-Based Angular Scan Error Correction of an Electrothermally-Actuated MEMS Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Dacheng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Qiao; Xie, Huikai; Li, Suiqiong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the actuation behavior of a two-axis electrothermal MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) mirror typically used in miniature optical scanning probes and optical switches is investigated. The MEMS mirror consists of four thermal bimorph actuators symmetrically located at the four sides of a central mirror plate. Experiments show that an actuation characteristics difference of as much as 4.0% exists among the four actuators due to process variations, which leads to an average angular scan error of 0.03°. A mathematical model between the actuator input voltage and the mirror-plate position has been developed to predict the actuation behavior of the mirror. It is a four-input, four-output model that takes into account the thermal-mechanical coupling and the differences among the four actuators; the vertical positions of the ends of the four actuators are also monitored. Based on this model, an open-loop control method is established to achieve accurate angular scanning. This model-based open loop control has been experimentally verified and is useful for the accurate control of the mirror. With this control method, the precise actuation of the mirror solely depends on the model prediction and does not need the real-time mirror position monitoring and feedback, greatly simplifying the MEMS control system. PMID:26690432

  20. Flow sensing by buckling monitoring of electrothermally actuated double-clamped micro beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Y.; Krylov, S.; Liberzon, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a flow sensing approach based on deflection monitoring of a micro beam buckled by the compressive thermal stress due to electrothermal Joule's heating. The air stream, convectively cooling the device, affects both the critical buckling values of the electric current and the postbuckling deflections of the structure. After calibration, the flow velocity can be obtained from the deflection measurements. The quasi-static responses of 1000 μm and 2000 μm long, 10 μm wide, and 30 μm high single crystal silicon beams were consistent with the prediction of the model, which couples thermoelectric, thermofluidic, and structural domains. The deflection sensitivity of up to 1.5 μm/(m/s) and the critical current sensitivity of up to 0.43 mA/(m/s) were registered in the experiments. Our model and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the sensing approach and further suggest that simple, robust, and potentially downscalable beam-type devices may have use in flow velocity and wall shear stress sensors.

  1. Assessment of toxic metals in raw and processed milk samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Shah, Abdul Qadir

    2009-09-01

    Milk and dairy products have been recognized all over the world for their beneficial influence on human health. The levels of toxic metals (TMs) are an important component of safety and quality of milk. A simple and efficient microwave assisted extraction (MAE) method has been developed for the determination of TMs (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb), in raw and processed milk samples. A Plackett-Burman experimental design and 2(3)+star central composite design, were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for MAE. Concentrations of TMs were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by standard addition method and conventional wet acid digestion method (CDM), for comparative purpose. No significant differences were observed (P>0.05), when comparing the values obtained by the proposed MAE method and CDM (paired t-test). The average relative standard deviation of the MAE method varied between 4.3% and 7.6% based on analyte (n=6). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of understudy TMs in milk samples. The results of raw and processed milk indicated that environmental conditions and manufacturing processes play a key role in the distribution of toxic metals in raw and processed milk.

  2. Creep behavior of a rabbit model of ligament laxity after electrothermal shrinkage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew L; Hollinshead, Robert M; Frank, Cyril B

    2002-01-01

    Deformation of capsular tissue under constant load (creep) may lead to recurrent laxity after thermal shrinkage for shoulder instability. We investigated the effects of thermal shrinkage in a rabbit model in which the tibial insertion of the medial collateral ligament was elevated and shifted toward the joint line to create abnormal laxity. On the right side, radiofrequency electrothermal energy was applied to the shifted ligament, while the left side served as a control. Length, laxity, mass, cross-sectional area, water content, and creep behavior of the ligament were assessed at 0 (N = 8), 3 (N = 7), and 12 (N = 6) weeks postoperatively. Laxity was reduced with thermal treatment (0.65 +/- 0.31 compared with 3.33 +/- 0.25 mm). After 3 weeks, ligament mass, area, and water content were significantly increased in the thermally treated group compared with the untreated controls. At 12 weeks, cyclic creep strain remained greater than that in controls (1.25% +/- 0.65% compared with 0.93% +/- 0.22%). Although thermal shrinkage reduced laxity, there was increased potential to creep and failure at low physiologic stresses. These findings suggest that loading of thermally treated tissues should be carefully controlled during the early phase of rehabilitation after surgery. PMID:11799003

  3. Application of flow injection on-line electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry to the determination of rhodium.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Rojas, Fuensanta; Bosch Ojeda, Catalina; Cano Pavón, José Manuel

    2005-06-01

    A fully automated procedure for the determination of rhodium has been developed using flow injection (FI) on-line microcolumn preconcentration coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The proposed FI manifold and its operation make possible the introduction of the total eluate volume into the graphite atomizer, avoiding the necessity for optimisation of subsampling the eluate. Rhodium is adsorbed on a microcolumn packed with 1,5-bis(di-2-pyridyl)methylene thiocarbohydrazide immobilized on silica gel (DPTH-gel). Under the optimum conditions, using a 60 s preconcentration time, a sample flow rate of 3.5 mL min(-1) and an injection volume of eluent of 50 microL, a linear calibration graph was obtained from 1 to at least 40 ng mL(-1) and the detection limit was 1 ng mL(-1). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of samples. Its performance was investigated against certified reference catalyst sample SRM-2557 and by recovery measurements on spiked samples (soil, foods and beverages).

  4. Model-Based Angular Scan Error Correction of an Electrothermally-Actuated MEMS Mirror.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Dacheng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Qiao; Xie, Huikai; Li, Suiqiong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the actuation behavior of a two-axis electrothermal MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) mirror typically used in miniature optical scanning probes and optical switches is investigated. The MEMS mirror consists of four thermal bimorph actuators symmetrically located at the four sides of a central mirror plate. Experiments show that an actuation characteristics difference of as much as 4.0% exists among the four actuators due to process variations, which leads to an average angular scan error of 0.03°. A mathematical model between the actuator input voltage and the mirror-plate position has been developed to predict the actuation behavior of the mirror. It is a four-input, four-output model that takes into account the thermal-mechanical coupling and the differences among the four actuators; the vertical positions of the ends of the four actuators are also monitored. Based on this model, an open-loop control method is established to achieve accurate angular scanning. This model-based open loop control has been experimentally verified and is useful for the accurate control of the mirror. With this control method, the precise actuation of the mirror solely depends on the model prediction and does not need the real-time mirror position monitoring and feedback, greatly simplifying the MEMS control system.

  5. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  6. Experimental Investigation of the Electrothermal Instability on Planar Foil Ablation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Adam; Patel, Sonal; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2014-10-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) is an important early-time physical effect on pulsed power foil ablation experiments due to its ability to seed the destructive magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. ETI occurs whenever electrical resistivity has temperature dependence; when resistivity increases with temperature, as with solid metal liners or foils, ETI forms striation structures perpendicular to current flow. These striations provide an initial perturbation for the MRT instability, which is the dominant late-time instability in planar foil ablations. The MAIZE linear transformer driver was used to drive current pulses of approximately 600 kA into 400 nm-thick aluminum foils in order to study ETI in planar geometry. Shadowgraph images of the aluminum plasmas were taken for multiple shots at various times within approximately 50 ns of current start. Fourier analysis extracted the approximate wavelengths of the instability structures on the plasma-vacuum interface. Surface metrology of pre-shot foils was performed to provide a comparison between surface roughness features and resulting plasma structure. This work was supported by US DoE. S.G. Patel and A.M. Steiner supported by NPSC funded by Sandia. D.A. Yager supported by NSF fellowship Grant # DGE 1256260.

  7. Determination of sulphur in various vegetables by solid sampling high-resolution electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2015-04-01

    Sulphur was determined in various vegetables via molecular absorption of carbon monosulphide (CS) at 258.056 nm using a solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (SS HR-CS ETAAS). Samples were dried, ground and directly introduced into the ruthenium coated graphite furnace as 0.05 to 0.50mg. All determinations were performed using palladium+citric acid modifier and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000 °C and a volatilisation temperature of 2400 °C. The results were in good agreement with certified sulphur concentrations of various vegetal CRM samples applying linear calibration technique prepared from thioacetamide. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 7.5 and 8.7 ng of S, respectively. The concentrations of S in various spinach, leek, lettuce, radish, Brussels sprouts, zucchini and chard samples were determined. It was showed that distribution of sulphur in CRM and grinded food samples were homogeneous even in micro-scale. PMID:25442545

  8. Determination of silicon in serum and urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhuo-er

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and accurate method for the routine determination of trace silicon in serum and urine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The samples are directly determined after 20-fold dilution of serum and 100-fold dilution of urine. No L'vov platform is used. The signal enhancement of silicon atomization in pyrolytic graphite coated graphite tubes is achieved by using a mixture of calcium chloride and lanthanum nitrate as chemical modifier. The interferences arising from the biological matrices have been eliminated by the addition of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate in the sample solutions. The aqueous calibration curve is linear to at least 300 μg l -1, the characteristic mass is 37 pg (integrated absorbance signal), whereas the detection limit (3SD) is 1.5 μg l -1 for silicon in both diluted serum and urine samples. The recoveries of silicon added to the diluted samples are 101 ± 1.8% for sera and 98.2 ± 3.5% for the urine specimens, independent of the dilution ratio. The silicon measurement results for the serum and urine from healthy adults and for the serum from the patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis are presented.

  9. Model-Based Angular Scan Error Correction of an Electrothermally-Actuated MEMS Mirror.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Dacheng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Qiao; Xie, Huikai; Li, Suiqiong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the actuation behavior of a two-axis electrothermal MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) mirror typically used in miniature optical scanning probes and optical switches is investigated. The MEMS mirror consists of four thermal bimorph actuators symmetrically located at the four sides of a central mirror plate. Experiments show that an actuation characteristics difference of as much as 4.0% exists among the four actuators due to process variations, which leads to an average angular scan error of 0.03°. A mathematical model between the actuator input voltage and the mirror-plate position has been developed to predict the actuation behavior of the mirror. It is a four-input, four-output model that takes into account the thermal-mechanical coupling and the differences among the four actuators; the vertical positions of the ends of the four actuators are also monitored. Based on this model, an open-loop control method is established to achieve accurate angular scanning. This model-based open loop control has been experimentally verified and is useful for the accurate control of the mirror. With this control method, the precise actuation of the mirror solely depends on the model prediction and does not need the real-time mirror position monitoring and feedback, greatly simplifying the MEMS control system. PMID:26690432

  10. Determination of sulphur in various vegetables by solid sampling high-resolution electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2015-04-01

    Sulphur was determined in various vegetables via molecular absorption of carbon monosulphide (CS) at 258.056 nm using a solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (SS HR-CS ETAAS). Samples were dried, ground and directly introduced into the ruthenium coated graphite furnace as 0.05 to 0.50mg. All determinations were performed using palladium+citric acid modifier and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000 °C and a volatilisation temperature of 2400 °C. The results were in good agreement with certified sulphur concentrations of various vegetal CRM samples applying linear calibration technique prepared from thioacetamide. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 7.5 and 8.7 ng of S, respectively. The concentrations of S in various spinach, leek, lettuce, radish, Brussels sprouts, zucchini and chard samples were determined. It was showed that distribution of sulphur in CRM and grinded food samples were homogeneous even in micro-scale.

  11. Proposed system design for a 20 kW pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hilko, B. K.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a Pulsed Electrothermal (PET) propulsion system for the Air Force Space Based Radar satellite, which has a mass of 7000 kg. The proposed system boosts the SBR satellite from 150 n.m. to 600 n.m. with a 4 deg plane change, for a total mission Delta v of 1 km/sec. Satellite power available is 50 kW, and 45 kW are used to drive two water-injected 20 kW PET thrusters, delivering 5.6 N thrust to the SBR at 1000 seconds specific impulse. The predicted mission trip time is 15 days. The proposed system consumes 850 kg of water propellant, stored in a central tank and injected with pressurized helium. Component mass estimates based on space-qualified hardware are presented for the propellant handling, power conditioning and thruster subsystems. The estimated total mass is 400 kg and the propulsion system specific mass is alpha = 10 kg/kW. The proposed system efficiency of 0.62 at 1000 seconds specific impulse is supported by experimental performance measurements.

  12. Ion-exchange preconcentration and determination of vanadium in milk samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Viñas, Pilar; Romero-Romero, Rafael; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2009-06-15

    A new method for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of vanadium in milk and infant formulas using suspensions to avoid the need for previous dissolution of samples is described. Sensitivity is improved by a procedure based on preconcentration and removal of the matrix, using ion-exchange (Dowex 1X8-100). Suspensions of 15% (m/v) infant formula samples were prepared in a medium containing 0.05M sodium citrate (pH 7.2) and passed through the ion exchange column. Vanadium was eluted from the column using 1M hydrochloric acid and injected in the graphite furnace using a mixture of hydrofluoric acid plus magnesium nitrate as chemical modifiers. Calibration was carried out using multiple injection and aqueous standards prepared in the same medium. Detection limits were 0.2 ng g(-1) for infant formulas and 0.02 microg L(-1) for cow milk samples. The reliability of the procedure was checked by comparing the results obtained with those found using a previous mineralization stage and by analyzing five certified reference materials.

  13. Gold in natural water: A method of determination by solvent extraction and electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed using electrothermal atomization to effectively determine the amount of gold in natural water within the nanogram range. The method has four basic steps: (1) evaporating a 1-L sample; (2) putting it in hydrobromic acid-bromine solution; (3) extracting the sample with methyl-isobutyl-ketone; and (4) determining the amount of gold using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The limit of detection is 0.001 ??g gold per liter. Results from three studies indicate, respectively, that the method is precise, effective, and free of interference. Specifically, a precision study indicates that the method has a relative standard deviation of 16-18%; a recovery study indicates that the method recovers gold at an average of 93%; and an interference study indicates that the interference effects are eliminated with solvent extraction and background correction techniques. Application of the method to water samples collected from 41 sites throughout the Western United States and Alaska shows a gold concentration range of < 0.001 to 0.036 ??g gold per liter, with an average of 0.005 ??g/L. ?? 1984.

  14. Experimentation in the low-density plume of a simulated electrothermal thruster for computer code validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Dana L.

    1993-01-01

    Pressures and flow angles are measured in the plume of a 20 deg half-angle, conical nozzle in vacuum with Pitot tubes and conical probes. The area of measurement in the plume ranges from the nozzle exit plane to 480 mm axially downstream and from the plume centerline to 60 mm radially. The nozzle has an exit-to-throat area ratio of 100:1 and a throat diameter of 3.2 mm. The nozzle flow exhausts to a vacuum of order 10(exp -2) Pa to simulate a resistojet (an electrothermal rocket of less than 1 N of thrust) operating in space. Experimental data are given for flows of nitrogen at 55 and 68 mg/s, stagnation temperatures between 695 and 921 K, and stagnation pressures ranging from 5600 to 7100 Pa. Data are also given for argon at a rate of 68 mg/s, a stagnation temperature of 648 K, and stagnation pressures of 4500, 4750, and 4770 Pa. Measurements in the nitrogen plume are compared with computational results from a direct-simulation Monte Carlo method.

  15. Determination of ytterbium in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, E C; Krug, F J; Nóbrega, J A; Nogueira, A R

    1998-11-01

    A method for ytterbium determination in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TCAAS) was developed. Faeces were dry-ashed in a muffle furnace, the ashes were treated with hydrochloric acid, and 10 mul of sample solution were delivered into 150-W tungsten coil atomizer. A matrix-matching procedure employing a 66-s heating program proved to be efficient for obtaining accurate results. Characteristic mass and detection limit were 7.1 pg and 0.35 mug g(-1) Yb, respectively. The tungsten coil atomizer lifetime exceeded 300 firings with digested solutions and R.S.D. of measurements was 1.9% after ten consecutive injections of 10.0 mug l(-1) Yb. Accuracy of the proposed method was assessed by employing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure. Application of the paired t-test did not reveal any significant difference for ytterbium contents determined by both methods at 95% confidence level. It was demonstrated that the proposed procedure can successfully be used for evaluation of kinetic passage rate of feed through digestive tract of animals. PMID:18967363

  16. Atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials by use of electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, E.Y.; Simon, F.O.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials, that utilizes electrothermal atomization after a separation by solvent extraction. Samples are decomposed with hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid in Teflon-lined pressure decomposition vessels. Beryllium is isolated by its extraction as beryllium acetylacetonate at pH 8 into xylene and back-extraction in 3M hydrochloric acid. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. Four subsamples from four bottles of each standard sample were analysed in random order. The mean beryllium contents (ppm) are: AGV-1, 1.98; PCC-1, 0.024; MAG-1, 2.84; BHVO-1, 0.90; DTS-1, 0.026; SCo-1, 1.74; SDC-1, 2.52; BCR-1, 1.44; GSP-1, 1.22; SGR-1, 0.86; QLO-1, 1.83; RGM-1, 2.21; STM-1, 8.75; G-2, 2.29. An analysis of variance shows that all the samples may be considered homogeneous at F0.95 except AGV-1 and DTS-1 which may be considered homogeneous at F0.99. ?? 1978.

  17. Preliminary investigation of high power microwave plasmas for electrothermal thruster use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, John L.; Sullivan, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported from preliminary tests to evaluate the high power microwave electrothermal thruster (MET) concept, which employs a free-floating plasma discharge maintained by applied CW microwave power to heat a propellant gas flow. Stable plasmas have been created and maintained in helium (He), nitrogen (N2), and hydrogen (H2) as propellants in both the TM(sub 011) and TM(sub 012) modes at discharge pressures from 10 Pa to 69 kPa. Reproducible starting conditions of pressure and power have been documented for all the plasmas. Vortical inflow of the propellant gas was observed to cause the formation of on-axis 'spike' plasmas. The formation and unformation conditions of these plasmas were studied. Operation in the spike plasma condition enables maximum power absorption with minimum wall heating and offers maximum efficiency in heating the propellant gas. In the spike condition, plasmas of the three propellant gases were investigated in an open channel configuration to a maximum applied power level of 11.2 kW (in N2). Microwave power coupling efficiencies of over 90 percent were routinely obtained at absorbed power levels up to 2 kW. Magnetic nozzle effects were investigated with a superconducting solenoid Al magnet applying a high magnetic field to the plasmas in and exiting from the discharge tube.

  18. Stabilizing agents for calibration in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L(-1) TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants.

  19. Water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, R.; Mcilrath, T.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of measuring atmospheric water vapor by means of a tunable lidar operated from the space shuttle. The specific method evaluated was differential absorption, a two-color method in which the atmospheric path of interest is traversed by two laser pulses. Results are reported.

  20. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  1. Solvent vapor collector

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  2. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  3. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  4. Effect of Increased Water Vapor Levels on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Garner, George Walter; Lowe, Tracie M; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased water vapor levels on thermal barrier coating (TBC) lifetime, furnace cycle tests were performed at 1150 C in air with 10 vol.% water vapor (similar to natural gas combustion) and 90 vol.%. Either Pt diffusion or Pt-modified aluminide bond coatings were applied to specimens from the same batch of a commercial second-generation single-crystal superalloy and commercial vapor-deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats were applied. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure to compare the average lifetimes obtained in dry O{sub 2}, using the same superalloy batch and coating types. Average lifetimes with Pt diffusion coatings were unaffected by the addition of water vapor. In contrast, the average lifetime of Pt-modified aluminide coatings was reduced by more than 50% with 10% water vapor but only slightly reduced by 90% water vapor. Based on roughness measurements from similar specimens without a YSZ coating, the addition of 10% water vapor increased the rate of coating roughening more than 90% water vapor. Qualitatively, the amount of {beta}-phase depletion in the coatings exposed in 10% water vapor did not appear to be accelerated.

  5. Metal vapor lasers with increased reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Sabotinov, N. V.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Shumeiko, A. S.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    Results of investigation and development of an excitation pulse generator with magnetic pulse compression by saturation chokes for pumping of active media of CuBr, Sr, and Ca vapor lasers are presented. A high-power IGBT transistor is used as a commutator. The generator can operate at excitation pulse repetition frequencies up to 20 kHz. The total average power for all laser lines of the CuBr laser pumped by this generator is ~6.0 W; it is ~1.3-1.7 W for the Sr and Ca lasers.

  6. Electrothermal actuation of metal-insulator transition in SmNiO3 thin film devices above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sieu D.; Viswanath, B.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that a metal-insulator phase transition can be electrothermally actuated in the correlated complex oxide SmNiO3 (SNO) above room temperature from current-voltage measurements on thin film two-terminal devices. We simulate the internal temperature of SmNiO3 as a function of applied dc power by a Joule heating mechanism with substrate/electrode dissipation and find good agreement with experiment and device scaling. The results are relevant towards integrating correlated oxide phase transition functionality into semiconductor electronic/optoelectronic platforms.

  7. Development of a simple method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Pereira, Raimundo N; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it was developed a method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry of NO produced by thermal decomposition of nitrate in a graphite furnace. The NO line at 215.360 nm was used for all analytical measurements and the signal obtained by integrated absorbance of three pixels. A volume of 20 μL of standard solution or groundwater sample was injected into graphite furnace and 5 μL of a 1% (m/v) Ca solution was co-injected as chemical modifier. The pyrolisis and vaporization temperatures established were of 150 and 1300°C, respectively. Under these conditions, it was observed a difference of thermal stability among the two nitrogen species in the presence of hydrochloric acid co-injected. While that the nitrite signal was totally suppressed, nitrate signal remained nearly stable. This way, nitrogen can be quantified only as nitrate. The addition of hydrogen peroxide provided the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate, which allowed the total quantification of the species and nitrite obtained by difference. A volume of 5 μL of 0.3% (v/v) hydrochloric acid was co-injected for the elimination of nitrite, whereas that hydrogen peroxide in the concentration of 0.75% (v/v) was added to samples or standards for the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Analytical curve was established using standard solution of nitrate. The method described has limits of detection and quantification of 0.10 and 0.33 μg mL(-1) of nitrogen, respectively. The precision, estimated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was of 7.5 and 3.8% (n=10) for groundwater samples containing nitrate-N concentrations of 1.9 and 15.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of 10 groundwater samples and the results were compared with those obtained by ion chromatography method. In all samples analyzed, the concentration of nitrite-N was always below of the limit of

  8. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  9. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be substantially underestimated owing to deposition of SOA-forming compounds to chamber walls. We present here an experimental protocol to constrain the nature of wall deposition of organic vapors in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. The dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αw,i), which can be correlated through its volatility (Ci*) with the number of carbons (nC) and oxygens (nO) in the molecule. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is approached by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and chamber walls. Gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is established relatively rapidly in the presence of perfect accommodation of organic vapors onto particles or when a sufficiently large concentration of suspended particles is present. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will be dominant for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber walls even with perfect particle accommodation.

  10. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  11. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The nitric acid vapor was generated from concentrated acid solutions and detected by trapping in a water bubbler for pH measurements. Both low and moderate relative humidity conditions were used. All carbons were effective at vapor contact times representative of air-purifying respirator use. One surprising observation was the desorption of low levels of ammonia from impregnated carbons. This was apparently due to residual ammonia from the impregnation processes.

  12. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  13. Characterization of Bioeffects on Endothelial Cells under Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    PubMed

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2015-12-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization, which results in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events, resulting in cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was subjected to acoustic droplet vaporization using a 3.5-MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional) and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The bubble cloud generated was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application.

  14. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study. PMID:25127637

  15. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study.

  16. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  17. Effects of capillarity and vapor adsorption in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs in natural (undisturbed) conditions contain water as both vapor and liquid phases. The most compelling evidence for the presence of distributed liquid water is the observation that vapor pressures in these systems are close to saturated vapor pressure for measured reservoir temperatures (White et al., 1971; Truesdell and White, 1973). Analysis of natural heat flow conditions provides additional, indirect evidence for the ubiquitous presence of liquid. From an analysis of the heat pipe process (vapor-liquid counterflow) Preuss (1985) inferred that effective vertical permeability to liquid phase in vapor-dominated reservoirs is approximately 10{sup 17} m{sup 2}, for a heat flux of 1 W/m{sup 2}. This value appears to be at the high end of matrix permeabilities of unfractured rocks at The Geysers, suggesting that at least the smaller fractures contribute to liquid permeability. For liquid to be mobile in fractures, the rock matrix must be essentially completely liquid-saturated, because otherwise liquid phase would be sucked from the fractures into the matrix by capillary force. Large water saturation in the matrix, well above the irreducible saturation of perhaps 30%, has been shown to be compatible with production of superheated steam (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1982). In response to fluid production the liquid phase will boil, with heat of vaporization supplied by the reservoir rocks. As reservoir temperatures decline reservoir pressures will decline also. For depletion of ''bulk'' liquid, the pressure would decline along the saturated vapor pressure curve, while for liquid held by capillary and adsorptive forces inside porous media, an additional decline will arise from ''vapor pressure lowering''. Capillary pressure and vapor adsorption effects, and associated vapor pressure lowering phenomena, have received considerable attention in the geothermal literature, and also in studies related to geologic disposal of heat generating

  18. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  19. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Vojtková, Blanka

    2007-03-01

    A true direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method with Zeeman-effect background correction (Analytik Jena ZEEnit 60 AAS) was developed for the determination of As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn in powdered titanium dioxide of pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics grade. The interaction of the titanium matrix and graphite surface of the sample carrier boat in a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer was investigated. Conversion of titanium dioxide to interfering TiO 2-TiC-liquid phase, running out the sampling boat, was observed at temperatures above 2000 °C. The temperature program was optimized accordingly for these volatile analytes in atomization and cleaning steps in order to prevent this interference and to prolong significantly the analytical lifetime of the boat to more than one thousand runs. For all elements, calibration by aqueous standard addition method, by wet-chemically analyzed samples with different content of analytes and/or by dosing one sample in different amounts, were proved as adequate quantification procedures. Linear dynamic calibration working ranges can be considerably expanded up to two orders of magnitude within one measurement run by applying three-field dynamic mode of the Zeeman background correction system. The results obtained by true direct solid sampling technique are compared with those of other independent, mostly wet-chemical methods. Very low limits of detection (3 σ criterion) of true solid sampling technique of 21, 0.27, 24, 3.9, 6.3 and 0.9 ng g - 1 were achieved for As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn, respectively.

  20. Direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Éder C.; Krug, Francisco José; Arruda, Marco A. Z.

    1998-04-01

    A simplified method for direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks, syrups and honeys by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without sample digestion is proposed. Samples were dissolved in water, acidified to 0.2% (v/v) HNO 3, and directly injected into an end-capped transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). Building up of carbonaceous residue inside the atomizer was effectively precluded for sugar solutions not exceeding 8.0% (m/v) when a heating program with two pyrolysis steps (600 and 1000°C) was carried out without air-ashing. Under these conditions one atomizer supported about 250 firings. Among various chemical modifiers tested, better recovery and repeatability results were obtained with a 5 μg Pd + 3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 mixture. Tests carried out with individual concomitants containing up to 1.0 μg Na, K, Ca or Cl, and up to 10.0 μg phosphate or sulphate, and several mixtures of these six concomitants, did not reveal significant interferences on lead atomization. Characteristic mass and detection limit based on integrated absorbance were 15 and 11 pg Pb, respectively. The relative standard deviation based on 10 measurements for typical samples (20-60 ng g -1 Pb) was always lower than 5.5%. The detection limit of 7.0 ng g -1 Pb attained the Codex recommendation for the maximum allowed lead contents in the sugar samples. Application of t-test to the results obtained by the proposed direct analysis, and the official method adopted by Food Chemical Codex, demonstrated that there were no significant differences at the 5% probability level.

  1. Multiplexed actuation using ultra dielectrophoresis for proteomics applications: a comprehensive electrical and electrothermal design methodology.

    PubMed

    Emaminejad, Sam; Dutton, Robert W; Davis, Ronald W; Javanmard, Mehdi

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we present a methodological approach to analyze an enhanced dielectrophoresis (DEP) system from both a circuit analysis and electrothermal view points. In our developed model, we have taken into account various phenomena and constraints such as voltage degradation (due to the presence of the protecting oxide layer), oxide breakdown, instrumentation limitations, and thermal effects. The results from this analysis are applicable generally to a wide variety of geometries and high voltage microsystems. Here, these design guidelines were applied to develop a robust electronic actuation system to perform a multiplexed bead-based protein assay. To carry out the multiplexed functionality, along a single microfluidic channel, an array of proteins is patterned, where each element is targeting a specific secondary protein coated on micron-sized beads in the subsequently introduced sample solution. Below each element of the array, we have a pair of addressable interdigitated electrodes. By selectively applying voltage at the terminals of each interdigitated electrode pair, the enhanced DEP, or equivalently 'ultra'-DEP (uDEP) force detaches protein-bound beads from each element of the array, one by one, without disturbing the bound beads in the neighboring regions. The detached beads can be quantified optically or electrically downstream. For proof of concept, we illustrated 16-plex actuation capability of our device to elute micron-sized beads that are bound to the surface through anti-IgG and IgG interaction which is on the same order of magnitude in strength as typical antibody-antigen interactions. In addition to its application in multiplexed protein analysis, our platform can be potentially utilized to statistically characterize the strength profile of biological bonds, since the multiplexed format allows for high throughput force spectroscopy using the array of uDEP devices, under the same buffer and assay preparation conditions. PMID:24801800

  2. Determination of lead in hair and its segmental analysis by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Asli; Akman, Suleyman

    2010-04-01

    A rapid and practical solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method was described for the determination of lead in scalp hair. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 °C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, atomization temperature, the amount of sample as well as addition of a modifier (Pd/Mg) and/or auxiliary digesting agents (hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid) and/or a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the recovery of lead were investigated. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 °C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The limit of detection for lead (3 σ, N = 10) was 0.3 ng/g The addition of modifier, acids, oxidant and surfactant hardly improved the results. Due to the risk of contamination and relatively high blank values, the lead in hair were determined directly without adding any reagent(s). Finally, the method was applied for the segmental determination of lead concentrations in hair of different persons which is important to know when and how much a person was exposed to the analyte. For this purpose, 0.5 cm of pieces were cut along the one or a few close strands and analyzed by solid sampling.

  3. Intradiscal Electrothermal Treatment for Chronic Lower Back Pain Patients with Internal Disc Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Young; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Park, Moon Soo; Kim, Hak-Sun; Choi, Youn-Jin

    2005-01-01

    Chronic lower back pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal problems; it is also the most expensive industrial injury. Not surprisingly, many treatments have been developed to combat this expensive and debilitating condition. One of these, intradiscal electrothermal treatment (IDET), was developed for patients with chronic discogenic lower back pain who failed to improve with any of the wide variety of non-surgical treatments. The present study sought to evaluate the efficacy of IDET for patients with chronic lower back pain. Twenty-five patients were enrolled in this prospective study; the patients received IDET between June 2001 and June 2003. MRI was used to confirm the diagnosis of internal disc disruption in all patients. The patients then underwent a pre-operative provocative test and discography. The follow-up duration was at least 1 year in all cases, and the visual analogue scale, recovery rate, and satisfaction of each patient were evaluated. The average age of the patients was 32 years (age range 18 to 49 years), and the patient group was 33% male and 67% female. Of the 25 patients, 5 underwent lumbar fusion surgery within 1 year of IDET. After IDET, 8 patients (32%) reported more pain than before, 14 patients (56%) reported less pain, and 3 patients (12%) experienced no change. Twelve patients (48%) were satisfied with IDET, 11 (44%) were dissatisfied, and 2 (8%) were undecided about the treatment. At least 1 year after IDET, nearly half the study patients were dissatisfied with their medical outcome. Consequently, 5 patients (20%) underwent fusion surgery at 1 year after IDET. Although other studies have shown good results with IDET for at least 2 years, this investigation suggests the IDET may be somewhat less effective. In order to firmly establish the efficacy of IDET for treating chronic discogenic lower back pain, additional studies with larger numbers of patients evaluated over longer time periods are recommended. PMID:16127780

  4. Role of Co-Vapors in Vapor Deposition Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Younghee; Ahn, Ki-Jin; Huh, Jinyoung; Shim, Hyeon Woo; Sampath, Gayathri; Im, Won Bin; Huh, Yang–Il; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2015-02-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy)/cellulose (PPCL) composite papers were fabricated by vapor phase polymerization. Importantly, the vapor-phase deposition of PPy onto cellulose was assisted by employing different co-vapors namely methanol, ethanol, benzene, water, toluene and hexane, in addition to pyrrole. The resulting PPCL papers possessed high mechanical flexibility, large surface-to-volume ratio, and good redox properties. Their main properties were highly influenced by the nature of the co-vaporized solvent. The morphology and oxidation level of deposited PPy were tuned by employing co-vapors during the polymerization, which in turn led to change in the electrochemical properties of the PPCL papers. When methanol and ethanol were used as co-vapors, the conductivities of PPCL papers were found to have improved five times, which was likely due to the enhanced orientation of PPy chain by the polar co-vapors with high dipole moment. The specific capacitance of PPCL papers obtained using benzene, toluene, water and hexane co-vapors was higher than those of the others, which is attributed to the enlarged effective surface area of the electrode material. The results indicate that the judicious choice and combination of co-vapors in vapor-deposition polymerization (VDP) offers the possibility of tuning the morphological, electrical, and electrochemical properties of deposited conducting polymers.

  5. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  6. Passive vapor transport solar heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In the systems under consideration, refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed in thermal storage for space or water heating located within the building at a level below that of the collector. Condensed liquid is lifted to an accumulator above the collector by the vapor pressure generated in the collector. Tests of two systems are described, and it is concluded that one of these systems offers distinct advantages.

  7. Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles

    DOEpatents

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2005-04-19

    An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

  8. Discussion of parameters associated with the determination of arsenic by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry in slurried environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, E; Baeten, H; Hoenig, M

    2001-01-01

    A slurry sampling-fast program procedure has been developed for the determination of arsenic in plants, soils and sediments by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Efficiencies of various single and mixed modifiers for thermal stabilization of arsenic and for a better removal of the matrix during pyrolysis step were compared. The influence of the slurry concentration, amounts of modifier and parameters of the pyrolysis step on the As integrated absorbance signals have been studied and a comparison between fast and conventional furnace programs was also made. The ultrasonic agitation of the slurry followed by a fast electrothermal program using an Ir/Mg modifier provides the most consistent performance in terms of precision and accuracy. The reliability of the whole procedure has been compared with results obtained after application of a wet digestion method with an HF step and validated by analyzing eleven certified reference materials. Arsenic detection and quantitation limits expressed on dry sample matter were about 30 and 100 micrograms kg-1, respectively.

  9. A direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for the determination of silicon in biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. D.; Krivan, V.

    2007-03-01

    A solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for direct determination of trace silicon in biological materials was developed and applied to analysis of pork liver, bovine liver SRM 1577b and pure cellulose. The organic matrix was destroyed and expelled from the furnace in the pyrolysis stage involving a step-wise increasing the temperature from 160 °C to 1200 °C. The mixed Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2 modifier has proved to be the optimum one with respect to the achievement of maximum sensitivity, elimination of the effect of the remaining inorganic substances and the possibility of using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions for quantification. For the maximum applicable sample amount of 6 mg, the limit of detection was found to be 30 ng g - 1 . The results were compared with those obtained by different spectrometric methods involving sample digestion, by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using slurry sampling, by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The method seems to be a promising one for analysis of biological materials containing no significant fraction of silicon in form of not naturally occurring volatile organosilicon compounds. The still incessant serious limitations and uncertainties in the determination of trace silicon in solid biological materials are discussed.

  10. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization of freeze dryers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J W; Arnold, J F; Nail, S L; Renzi, E

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to steam sterilization has been examined using a pilot plant freeze dryer equipped with a prototype vapor generator. Specific objectives of the study discussed in this presentation were to: 1. Identify critical process variables affecting the lethality of VHP to Bacillus stearothermophilus spores, particularly within dead legs in the system. 2. Measure the efficacy of system degassing after sterilization. 3. Determine the effect of repeated sterilization cycles on the integrity of elastomeric components of the freeze dryer. Penetration of adequate concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor into small diameter piping, such as tubing connected to pressure gauges, is the most challenging aspect of VHP sterilization of freeze dryers. Prior to equipment modifications, spore strips placed within such dead legs remained positive irrespective of the number of gas/degas pulses and system pressure. Equipment modifications necessary to effect complete kill of biological indicators placed in system dead legs is discussed. Results of this study support the conclusion that vaporized hydrogen peroxide shows promise as an alternative sterilization method for freeze dryers. PMID:1474433

  11. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  12. Vapor Diffusion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA and VDA-2) was developed by the University of Alabama in Birmingham for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. In the original VDA, a protein solution and a precipitant are extruded by two plungers onto the tip of a small syringe and allowed to evaporate, raising the concentration and prompting protein molecules to crystallize. In the VDA-2 version, a third plunger was added to mix the two solutions before returning the mix to the syringe tip. The principal investigator is Dr. Larry Delucas of the University of Alabama in Birmingham

  13. Vapor Diffusion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA-2) was developed by the University of Alabama in Birmingham for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. In the original VDA, a protein solution and a precipitant are extruded by two plungers onto the tip of a small syringe and allowed to evaporate, raising the concentration and prompting protein molecules to crystallize. In the VDA-2 version, a third plunger was added to mix the two solutions before returning the mix to the syringe tip. The principal investigator is Dr. Larry Delucas of the University of Alabama in Birmingham.

  14. Revisiting an idea of G D Botto: a solar thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, R.; Ganci, S.; Zozzaro, P.

    2008-11-01

    In an experiment performed by G D Botto in 1833 it was shown that it was possible to produce hydrogen gas by hydrolysis by means of an electromotive force obtained by connecting in series more than 100 thermocouples heated by a flame of burning alcohol. In the system we study, we adopt the same basic idea for an electro-thermal converter, by assuming that concentrated solar radiation heats N thermocouples in series to generate an electromotive force f0.

  15. Sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vapor generation device coupled with anion exchange chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for speciation analysis of selenium species in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-ni; Lin, Cheng-hsing; Hsu, I-hsiang; Sun, Yuh-chang

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an on-line sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vaporization device (SPADVD), which operates through the nano-TiO2-catalyzed photo-oxidation and reduction of selenium (Se) species, for coupling between anion exchange chromatography (LC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) systems to provide a simple and sensitive hyphenated method for the speciation analysis of Se species without the need for conventional chemical digestion and vaporization techniques. Because our proposed on-line SPADVD allows both organic and inorganic Se species in the column effluent to be converted on-line into volatile Se products, which are then measured directly through ICP-MS, the complexity of the procedure and the probability of contamination arising from the use of additional chemicals are both low. Under the optimized conditions for SPADVD - using 1g of nano-TiO2 per liter, at pH 3, and illuminating for 80 s - we found that Se(IV), Se(VI), and selenomethionine (SeMet) were all converted quantitatively into volatile Se products. In addition, because the digestion and vaporization efficiencies of all the tested selenicals were improved when using our proposed on-line LC/SPADVD/ICP-MS system, the detection limits for Se(IV), Se(VI), and SeMet were all in the nanogram-per-liter range (based on 3σ). A series of validation experiments - analysis of neat and spiked extracted samples - indicated that our proposed methods could be applied satisfactorily to the speciation analysis of organic and inorganic Se species in the extracts of Se-enriched supplements. PMID:24331052

  16. Explosive vaporization of a large transparent droplet irradiated by a high intensity laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Z; Lam, J K; Wood, C F; Chu, B T; Chang, R K

    1987-11-15

    Shadowgraph studies of the explosive vaporization of a transparent water droplet after irradiation by a high intensity beam show that dielectric breakdown occurs within the droplet shadow face and generates a dense plasma, which absorbs the laser pulse. The convective forces expel the vapor from the droplet shadow face. We have deduced (1) the vapor propagation velocities, (2) the recoil velocity of the remaining droplet, and (3) the deformation rate of the illuminated face. Droplets are noted to eject fingerlike material from the surface facing the single laser-vaporized droplet when the asymmetrical vapor intercepts the neighboring droplets.

  17. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, G. M.; McRae, T. G.

    1983-06-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote IR gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote IR sensor which measures the gas composition.

  18. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  19. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of <150 m. Static gas accumulation and dynamic bubble coalescence are both manifestations of vapor segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  1. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  2. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  3. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  4. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  5. Depth profiling of ultra trace metal impurities in polytetrafluoroethylene wares by surface scraping and acid-vapor extraction followed by ICP-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masafumi; Takahashi, Makoto

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the development of the depth profiling method of ultra trace metal impurities in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) wares based on contamination-free sampling followed by acid-vapor extraction and its application to evaluate the washing method for PTFE wares. A contamination-free sampling process was achieved by scraping the surface of PTFE wares with the cleft face of a silicon wafer followed by exposing the PTFE scraped to highly pure acid-vapor. The concentration of metal impurities in extractants was determined by ICP-MS equipped with an electrothermal vaporizer (ETV-ICP-MS). The blank values of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu by the depth profiling method were 0.006, 0.004, 0.005, 0.002 and 0.003 ng, respectively. By analyzing the depth profile of beakers, the distributions of ultra trace (ng g(-1) level) metal impurities were clarified. An examination of the washing methods by the depth profiling method also clarified that exposing to acid-vapor was more effective than the acid-dipping method for the elimination of metal impurities.

  6. Modeling and validation of microwave ablations with internal vaporization.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this paper, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10, and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67, and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  7. Modeling and validation of microwave ablations with internal vaporization.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this paper, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10, and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67, and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally.

  8. Modeling and Validation of Microwave Ablations with Internal Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this work, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10 and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intra-procedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard Index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard Index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67 and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  9. Determining trace element concentrations in marine larvae using electrothermal vaporization and laser ablation technology. Final report, 1 March 1997--28 February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, L.A.

    1998-09-29

    The objective of this DURIP award was the acquisition of an instrument to enhance analytical capabilities in support of grant no. N00014-96- 1-0025 (Bay Ocean Exchange Processes: Development and Application of a Meroplankton Tracer Technique). This research is concerned with (1) determining the uptake and retention of trace metals by invertebrate larvae and (2) elemental fingerprinting of naturally occurring larvae as a means to determine site of origin. The objective was to quantify composition of multiple trace elements for small samples (i.e., individual larvae). With DURIP funds an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometer was purchased for the Scripps Institution of Oceanography analytical facilities. The ICP-OES has been used to characterize the elemental composition of newly hatched crab larvae sampled from San Diego Bay, neighboring embayments and coastal habitats. Results have shown that elements can be quantified for individual larvae and are useful in distinguishing larvae originating from inner vs outer San Diego Bay and coastal habitats. Other applications of the Scripps ICP-OES since its purchase include trace element characterization of (a) contaminated sediments to develop remediation methods, (b) meteorites to model age of the early solar system, and (c) igneous rocks to track earth history.

  10. Serum and tissue selenium contents related to renal disease and colon cancer as determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marchante-Gayón, J M; Sánchez-Uría, J E; Sanz-Medel, A

    1996-12-01

    Microwave digestion with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide was applied to the determination of selenium in biological tissues by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETAAS). Validation of this method is presented in terms of adequate recovery of selenium from standard reference materials and the method is applied to carcinogen human colon tissue. Ultramicrofiltration was used to study selenium protein binding and its fractionation and speciation in blood serum. These studies showed that 95% of the total selenium in serum seems to be bonded to high-molecular-weight proteins. Experiments with renal failure patients showed lower selenium levels than in the health population (0.57 +/- 0.23 mM versus 0.81 +/- 0.11 mM). A wider distribution pattern of total serum selenium concentration (from 0.1 to 1 mM) was clearly observed in renal failure patients. However, the ultramicrofiltrable selenium fraction was always constant, even in the presence of desferrioxamine (DFO).

  11. Simultaneous measurements of the specific heat and thermal conductivity of suspended thin samples by transient electrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Ma, Weigang; Li, Zhixin; Zhang, Xing

    2009-06-01

    The electrothermal technique is developed to simultaneously measure the specific heat and thermal conductivity of individual thin samples suspended across two heat sinks, resorting to pulsed direct currents with or without a dc offset. The temperature evolution due to Joule self-heating is recorded and compared with the numerical solutions of transient heat conduction equations using the finite volume method. The thermal conductivity is determined by the steady temperature level and the specific heat by the transient temperature rise or relaxation. This technique is applied to a 10 microm thick platinum wire and the thermal conductivity and specific heat are in good agreement with the literature values. In addition, the influences of thermal radiation and thermal boundary resistance between the sample and heat sinks on the experimental results are discussed. PMID:19566218

  12. Electrothermal Annealing (ETA) Method to Enhance the Electrical Performance of Amorphous-Oxide-Semiconductor (AOS) Thin-Film Transistors (TFTs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Kim, Eungtaek; Lee, Myung Keun; Park, Jun-Young; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Jun, Sungwoo; Park, Sang-Hee K; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-09-14

    An electro-thermal annealing (ETA) method, which uses an electrical pulse of less than 100 ns, was developed to improve the electrical performance of array-level amorphous-oxide-semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The practicality of the ETA method was experimentally demonstrated with transparent amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs. The overall electrical performance metrics were boosted by the proposed method: up to 205% for the trans-conductance (gm), 158% for the linear current (Ilinear), and 206% for the subthreshold swing (SS). The performance enhancement were interpreted by X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), showing a reduction of oxygen vacancies in a-IGZO after the ETA. Furthermore, by virtue of the extremely short operation time (80 ns) of ETA, which neither provokes a delay of the mandatory TFTs operation such as addressing operation for the display refresh nor demands extra physical treatment, the semipermanent use of displays can be realized. PMID:27552134

  13. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a pressure-controlled electrothermal atomizer.

    PubMed

    Lonardo, R F; Yuzefovsky, A I; Irwin, R L; Michel, R G

    1996-02-01

    A theoretical model was developed to describe the loss of analyte atoms in graphite furnaces during atomization. The model was based on two functions, one that described the supply of analyte by vaporization, and another that described the removal of the analyte by diffusion. Variation in working pressure was shown to affect the competition between these two processes. Optimal atomization efficiency was predicted to occur at a pressure where the supply of the analyte was maximized, and gas phase interactions between the analyte and matrix were minimized. Experiments to test the model included the direct determination of phosphorus and tellurium in nickel alloys and of cobalt in glass. In all cases, reduction in working pressure from atmospheric pressure to 7 Pa decreased sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude, but improved temporal peak shape. For the atomization of tellurium directly from a solid nickel alloy, and the atomization of cobalt from an aqueous solution, no change in sensitivity was observed as the working pressure was reduced from atmospheric pressure to approximately 70 kPa. If a reduction in working pressure affected only the diffusion of the analyte, poorer sensitivity should have been obtained. Only a commensurate increase in analyte vaporization could account for maintained sensitivity at lower working pressures. Overall, analyte vaporization was not dramatically improved at reduced working pressures, and maximum atomization efficiency was found to occur near atmospheric pressure. PMID:8712359

  14. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  15. Tested Demonstrations. Gasoline Vapor: An Invisible Pollutant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Edgar R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a demonstration concerning the air pollution aspects of gasoline vapor which provides an estimation of the vapor pressure of test fuel, the molecular weight of the vapor, and illustrates a method of controlling the pollution. (SL)

  16. User's manual for the NASA Lewis ice accretion/heat transfer prediction code with electrothermal deicer input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, Konstanty C.; Wright, William B.

    1994-01-01

    A version of LEWICE has been developed that incorporates a recently developed electrothermal deicer code, developed at the University of Toledo by William B. Wright. This was accomplished, in essence, by replacing a subroutine in LEWICE, called EBAL, which balanced the energies at the ice surface, with a subroutine called UTICE. UTICE performs this same energy balance, as well as handles all the time-timperature transients below the ice surface, for all of the layers of a composite blade as well as the ice layer itself. This new addition is set up in such a fashion that a user may specify any number of heaters, any heater chordwise length, and any heater gap desired. The heaters may be fired in unison, or they may be cycled with periods independent of each other. The heater intensity may also be varied. In addition, the user may specify any number of layers and thicknesses depthwise into the blade. Thus, the new addition has maximum flexibility in modeling virtually any electrothermal deicer installed into any airfoil. It should be noted that the model simulates both shedding and runback. With the runback capability, it can simulate the anti-icing mode of heater performance, as well as detect icing downstream of the heaters due to runback in unprotected portions of the airfoil. This version of LEWICE can be run in three modes. In mode 1, no conduction heat transfer is modeled (which would be equivalent to the original version of LEWICE). In mode 2, all heat transfer is considered due to conduction but no heaters are firing. In mode 3, conduction heat transfer where the heaters are engaged is modeled, with subsequent ice shedding. When run in the first mode, there is virtually identical agreement with the original version of LEWICE in the prediction of accreted ice shapes. The code may be run in the second mode to determine the effects of conduction on the ice accretion process.

  17. Chromium determination in pharmaceutical grade barium sulfate by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Bolzan, Rodrigo Cordeiro; Rodrigues, Luis Frederico; Mattos, Júlio Cezar Paz de; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes

    2007-11-15

    A procedure for chromium (Cr) determination in pharmaceutical grade barium sulfate by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (DSS-ET AAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction was developed. Operational conditions for the proposed procedure and the use of citric acid, ammonium phosphate, palladium and magnesium nitrate as chemical modifiers were evaluated. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were set at 1500 and 2400 degrees C, respectively and the use of matrix modifiers did not improve these conditions. Graphite platform presented high degradation rate, but minima changes were observed in the sensitivity or signal profile. Samples (0.3-1 mg) were weighted and introduced into the furnace using a manual solid sampling system. The linear concentration range of the calibration curve was from 100 to 1800 pg (R(2)>0.995). The characteristic mass was 7.7 pg and the limit of detection was 2.4 pg. Chromium concentration in commercial samples ranged from 0.45 to 1.06 microg g(-1) and these results were confirmed by standard addition method. The mean reproducibility was 12% (n=20 in a 3-day period) and repeatability was less than 9%. Results obtained using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after extraction with HNO3 were around 20% lower than those obtained by the proposed procedure. It was assumed that the low results were due to incomplete extraction even using hard conditions related to temperature and pressure. The proposed procedure by DSS-ET AAS provided some advantages related to recommended pharmacopoeias methodology, as lower risks of contamination and analyte losses, higher specificity, accuracy and sensitivity, no toxic or unstable reagents are required, and calibration with aqueous standards was feasible.

  18. User's manual for the NASA Lewis ice accretion/heat transfer prediction code with electrothermal deicer input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiulaniec, Konstanty C.; Wright, William B.

    1994-07-01

    A version of LEWICE has been developed that incorporates a recently developed electrothermal deicer code, developed at the University of Toledo by William B. Wright. This was accomplished, in essence, by replacing a subroutine in LEWICE, called EBAL, which balanced the energies at the ice surface, with a subroutine called UTICE. UTICE performs this same energy balance, as well as handles all the time-timperature transients below the ice surface, for all of the layers of a composite blade as well as the ice layer itself. This new addition is set up in such a fashion that a user may specify any number of heaters, any heater chordwise length, and any heater gap desired. The heaters may be fired in unison, or they may be cycled with periods independent of each other. The heater intensity may also be varied. In addition, the user may specify any number of layers and thicknesses depthwise into the blade. Thus, the new addition has maximum flexibility in modeling virtually any electrothermal deicer installed into any airfoil. It should be noted that the model simulates both shedding and runback. With the runback capability, it can simulate the anti-icing mode of heater performance, as well as detect icing downstream of the heaters due to runback in unprotected portions of the airfoil. This version of LEWICE can be run in three modes. In mode 1, no conduction heat transfer is modeled (which would be equivalent to the original version of LEWICE). In mode 2, all heat transfer is considered due to conduction but no heaters are firing. In mode 3, conduction heat transfer where the heaters are engaged is modeled, with subsequent ice shedding. When run in the first mode, there is virtually identical agreement with the original version of LEWICE in the prediction of accreted ice shapes. The code may be run in the second mode to determine the effects of conduction on the ice accretion process.

  19. A first-order estimate of shock heating and vaporization in oceanic impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The vaporization of water in oceanic impacts of asteroids or comets of multikilometer dimensions is estimated by a semianalytical modeling of impact heating and shock isobar geometry that is based on computer code calculations. The mass of water vaporized in an infinitely deep ocean by the impact of a 10 km diameter asteroid at 25 km/sec (these values have been proposed for the Cretaceous/Tertiary extinction bolide) is approximately equal to the total mass of water vapor present in the earth's atmosphere, and 3-4 orders of magnitude larger than the mass of water vapor in the stratosphere. For projectiles of this size, however, the finite depth of the ocean becomes significant and may considerably reduce the amount of water vapor initially generated by the impact. Climatological models and extinction scenarios invoking the effects of impact-generated water vapor may critically depend on the a priori ambiguous details of the hypothesized impact.

  20. Vapor Pressure, Vapor Composition and Fractional Vaporization of High Temperature Lavas on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Schaefer, L.; Kargel, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    Observations show that Io's atmosphere is dominated by SO2 and other sulfur and sulfur oxide species, with minor amounts of Na, K, and Cl gases. Theoretical modeling and recent observations show that NaCl, which is produced volcanically, is a constituent of the atmosphere. Recent Galileo, HST and ground-based observations show that some volcanic hot spots on Io have extremely high temperatures, in the range 1400-1900 K. At similar temperatures in laboratory experiments, molten silicates and oxides have significant vapor pressures of Na, K, SiO, Fe, Mg, and other gases. Thus vaporization of these species from high temperature lavas on Io seems likely. We therefore modeled the vaporization of silicate and oxide lavas suggested for Io. Our results for vapor chemistry are reported here. The effects of fractional vaporization on lava chemistry are given in a companion abstract by Kargel et al.

  1. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  2. Experimental investigation of pneumatic soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Høier, C K; Sonnenborg, T O; Jensen, K H; Kortegaard, C; Nasser, M M

    2007-01-01

    Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) is a common remediation technique for removing volatile organic compounds from unsaturated contaminated soils. Soil heterogeneities can however cause serious limitations to the applicability of SVE due to air bypassing low permeable areas of the soil, leading to diffusion limitation of the remediation. To enhance removal from areas subject to diffusion limitation a new remediation technique, pneumatic soil vapor extraction, is proposed. In contrast to traditional SVE, in which soil vapor is extracted continuously by a vacuum pump, pneumatic SVE is based on enforcing a sequence of large pressure drops on the system to enhance the recovery from the low-permeable areas. The pneumatic SVE technique was investigated in the laboratory using TCE as a model contaminant. 2D-laboratory tank experiments were performed on homogeneous and heterogeneous sand packs. The heterogeneous packs consisted of a fine sand lens surrounded by a coarser sand matrix. As expected when using traditional SVE, the removal of TCE from the low permeable lens was extremely slow and subject to diffusion limitation. In contrast when pneumatic venting was used removal rates increased by up to 77%. The enhanced removal was hypothesized to be attributed to mixing of the contaminated air inside the lens and generation of net advective transport out of the lens due to air expansion.

  3. Experimental investigation of pneumatic soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Høier, C K; Sonnenborg, T O; Jensen, K H; Kortegaard, C; Nasser, M M

    2007-01-01

    Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) is a common remediation technique for removing volatile organic compounds from unsaturated contaminated soils. Soil heterogeneities can however cause serious limitations to the applicability of SVE due to air bypassing low permeable areas of the soil, leading to diffusion limitation of the remediation. To enhance removal from areas subject to diffusion limitation a new remediation technique, pneumatic soil vapor extraction, is proposed. In contrast to traditional SVE, in which soil vapor is extracted continuously by a vacuum pump, pneumatic SVE is based on enforcing a sequence of large pressure drops on the system to enhance the recovery from the low-permeable areas. The pneumatic SVE technique was investigated in the laboratory using TCE as a model contaminant. 2D-laboratory tank experiments were performed on homogeneous and heterogeneous sand packs. The heterogeneous packs consisted of a fine sand lens surrounded by a coarser sand matrix. As expected when using traditional SVE, the removal of TCE from the low permeable lens was extremely slow and subject to diffusion limitation. In contrast when pneumatic venting was used removal rates increased by up to 77%. The enhanced removal was hypothesized to be attributed to mixing of the contaminated air inside the lens and generation of net advective transport out of the lens due to air expansion. PMID:16987566

  4. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, Jana; Kozubková, Milada

    2016-06-01

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ɛ model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  5. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  7. Multiwavelength Strontium Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Yudin, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of experimental and theoretical works, modern notion on conditions of forming of population density inversion on self-terminating IR transitions of alkali-earth metals is given. It is demonstrated that there is a significant difference in the inversion formation in lasers on self-terminating transitions in the visible and near-IR ranges and lasers on self-terminating transitions of alkali-earth metals lasing IR lines in the mid-IR range. It is shown that in the discharge circuit of lasers on self-terminating metal atom transitions (LSMT) there are processes strengthening the influence of the known mechanism limiting the frequency and energy characteristics (FEC) of radiation caused by the presence of prepulse electron concentration. The mechanism of influence of these processes on FEC of the LSMT and technical methods of their neutralization are considered. The possibility of obtaining average lasing power of ~200 W from one liter volume of the active medium of the strontium vapor laser is demonstrated under conditions of neutralization of these processes.

  8. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  9. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  10. Slurry sampling techniques for the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Kaneco, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tohru; Katsumata, Hideyuki; Ohta, Kiyohisa

    2005-05-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer has been applied to the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples. The slurry sampling conditions, such as slurry stabilizing agent, slurry concentration, pyrolysis temperature for the slurried fish samples, particle size and ultrasonic agitation time, were optimized for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with the Mo tube atomizer. Thiourea was used as the chemical modifier for the interference of matrix elements. The detection limit was 53 fg (3S/N). The determined amount of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples was consistent with those measured in the dissolved acid-digested samples. The advantages of the proposed methods are easy calibration, simplicity, low cost and rapid analysis.

  11. Electron beam targets vapor-phase contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Electron-beam bombardment has long been known to break down complex molecules. Zapit Technology, Inc. (Santa Clara, California) is in the process of commercializing a treatment system, tested in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses electron beams to destroy vapor-phase toxic wastes. Drawing relatively low-power beams, the system is said to offer a low-cost way to oxidize chlorinated and non-chlorinated organic compounds. The unit has been developed to treat vapor-phase organic wastes at temperatures less than 400 F, and at ambient pressures. Candidates streams include process of gases, and organics collected during soil-vapor extraction or stripped from wastewater and groundwater streams. Inside the Zapit treatment unit, a continuous stream of ionizing electrons is generated by a cathode and is accelerated to nearly the speed of light through a metal grid. As the pollutant stream passes through the reaction chamber, it is bombarded by this electron beam. In the process, complex organic molecules are broken down into water, carbon dioxide, and, if chlorinated compounds are present, hydrochloric acid. During groundwater treatment, an air stripper converts dissolved organics in a vapor phase, which is passed through the electron-beam unit. The offgases from the Zapit unit are passed through an acid scrubber (using sodium hydroxide) to neutralize any byproduct HCl and through a carbon-adsorption unit for final polishing. Industrial offgases can be fed directly into the Zapit treatment unit, without the intermediate air stripper. Electrical power requirements are relatively low.

  12. Low defect InGaAs quantum well selectively grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on Si(100) 300 mm wafers for next generation non planar devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cipro, R.; Gorbenko, V.; Baron, T. Martin, M.; Moeyaert, J.; David, S.; Bassani, F.; Bogumilowicz, Y.; Barnes, J. P.; Rochat, N.; Loup, V.; Vizioz, C.; Allouti, N.; Chauvin, N.; Bao, X. Y.; Ye, Z.; Pin, J. B.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-06-30

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs, InGaAs, and AlGaAs on nominal 300 mm Si(100) at temperatures below 550 °C was studied using the selective aspect ratio trapping method. We clearly show that growing directly GaAs on a flat Si surface in a SiO{sub 2} cavity with an aspect ratio as low as 1.3 is efficient to completely annihilate the anti-phase boundary domains. InGaAs quantum wells were grown on a GaAs buffer and exhibit room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Cathodoluminescence reveals the presence of dark spots which could be associated with the presence of emerging dislocation in a direction parallel to the cavity. The InGaAs layers obtained with no antiphase boundaries are perfect candidates for being integrated as channels in n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET), while the low temperatures used allow the co-integration of p-type MOSFET.

  13. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  14. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  15. A stratospheric water vapor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Variations in stratospheric water vapor play a role in the evolution of our climate. We show here that variations in water vapor since 2004 can be traced to tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature perturbations from at least three processes: the quasi-biennial oscillation, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and the temperature of the troposphere. The connection between stratospheric water vapor and the temperature of the troposphere implies the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the feedback in a chemistry-climate model to have a magnitude of +0.3 W/m2/K, which could be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. About two-thirds of the feedback comes from the extratropical stratosphere below ~16 km (the lowermost stratosphere), with the rest coming from the stratosphere above ~16 km (the overworld).

  16. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  17. The ion mobility spectrometer for high explosive vapor detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.J.; Stimac, R.M.; Wernlund, R.F.

    1984-07-01

    The Phemto-Chem /SUP R/ Model 100 Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) operates in air and measures a number of explosive vapors at levels as low as partsper-trillion in seconds. The theory and operation of this instrument is discussed. The IMS inhales the vapor sample in a current of air and generates characteristic ions which are separated by time-of -ion drift in the atmospheric pressure gas. Quantitative results, using a dilution tunnel and standard signal generator with TNT, nitroglycerine, ethylene glycol dinitrate, cyclohexanone, methylamine, octafluoronaphthalene and hexafluorobenzene, are given. Rapid sample treatment with sample concentrations, microprocessor signal readout and chemical identification, offer a realistic opportunity of rapid explosive vapor detection at levels down to 10/sup -14/ parts by volume in air.

  18. Smoke generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A smoke generator is disclosed which is particularly suitable for mounting on the wing tips of an aircraft and for conducting airflow studies. The device includes a network of thermally insulated tubes for carrying a fluid which is used to produce smoke. The fluid, which need not be combustible, is heated above its vaporization temperature by electric current which is passed through the fluid conduit tubes, so that the tubes serve both as fluid conduits and resistance heating elements. Fluid supply and monitoring systems and electrical control systems are also disclosed.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

  20. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOEpatents

    Blocher, Jr., John M.; Veigel, Neil D.; Landrigan, Richard B.

    1983-04-19

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  1. Vapor layer evolution during drop impact on a heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyeon; Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Jisan; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid drop impacts on a sufficiently hot surface above the boiling point, a vapor layer is formed between the drop and the surface, preventing direct contact between them and as a result levitating the drop, known as the Leidenfrost effect. Understanding the evolution of the vapor layer is largely unexplored despite its importance in estimating heat transfer in cooling systems of thermal or nuclear power plants. The side-profile visualization of the vapor layer, as absolutely required for investigating its evolution, has been however unavailable by conventional optical microscopy. In this study, by employing ultrafast X-ray phase contrast imaging, we directly visualize the profiles of the vapor layers during liquid drop impact on a hot surface and elucidate the evolution of the vapor layers during spreading and retraction of the drop as functions of impact height and surface temperature. We reveal that the evolution is governed by the propagation of capillary waves generated in retraction and the wavelength of capillary waves λ is inversely proportional to the impact height h with a relation ~σ/ρh ~We-1 where We is weber number. Capillary waves that converge at the center of the vapor layers are linked to the bouncing behavior of the drop.

  2. Vapor passage fuel blockage removal

    SciTech Connect

    Faeth, W.P.

    1993-08-31

    In a method of making a system for dispensing gasoline fuel into a vehicle fuel tank, said system is described comprising a dispenser pump, a nozzle, a fuel hose connecting said dispenser pump to said nozzle for dispensing said fuel from said pump to said tank, a vapor recovery hose surrounding said fuel hose for conducting fuel vapors from the fuel tank to a storage reservoir, said fuel hose and vapor recovery hose adapted to form at least one looped low portion during dispensing of fuel into a fuel tank whereat condensed fuel vapors tend to collect in said vapor recovery passage, and a venturi means having inlet means disposed in said vapor recovery passage so as to be at said one looped low portion during said dispensing of fuel, said venturi means being so arranged that said fuel being dispensed from said pump to said tank will flow through said venturi means and create a suction at said inlet means, the improvement comprising the step of forming said inlet means to comprise a plurality of separate inlets disposed in a spaced apart relation.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facility is using vapor suppressants to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions, the organic HAP... the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor test... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facility is using vapor suppressants to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions, the organic HAP... the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor test... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  7. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  13. Dispensing fuel with aspiration of condensed vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Butkovich, M.S.; Strock, D.J.

    1993-08-10

    A vapor recovery process is described, comprising the steps of: fueling a motor vehicle with gasoline by discharging gasoline into a fill opening or filler pipe of a tank of said vehicle through a fuel outlet conduit of a nozzle; emitting gasoline vapors from said tank during said fueling; substantially collecting said vapors during said fueling with a vapor return conduit of said nozzle and passing said vapors through said vapor return conduit in counter current flow relationship to said discharging gasoline in said fuel conduit; conveying said vapors from said vapor return conduit to a vapor return hose; at least some of said vapors condensing to form condensate in said vapor return hose; substantially removing said condensate from said vapor return hose during said fueling with a condensate pickup tube from said nozzle by passing said condensate through said condensate pickup tube in counter current flow relationship to said conveying vapors in said vapor return hose; sensing the presence of gasoline with a liquid sensing tube in said vapor return conduit of said nozzle between inner and outer spouts of said nozzle to detect when said tank of said vehicle is filled with said fuel conduit being within the inner spout of said nozzle; and automatically shutting off said fueling and condensate removing when said liquid sensing tube detects when said tank of said vehicle is filled and fuel enters said vapor return conduit.

  14. Explosive vaporization of metallic sodium microparticles by CW resonant laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Atutov, S N; Baldini, W; Biancalana, V; Calabrese, R; Guidi, V; Mai, B; Mariotti, E; Mazzocca, G; Moi, L; Pod'yachev, S P; Tomassetti, L

    2001-11-19

    Explosive vaporization of metallic Na microparticles stimulated by resonant cw laser radiation has been observed in a glass cell. Vaporization occurs at low laser-power density. The effect consists in the generation of optically thick and sharply localized Na vapor clouds propagating in the cell against the laser beam. The effect is explained by laser excitation of Na atoms, which collide onto the surface of the microparticles and transfer their internal energy. This causes other atoms to be vaporized and to continue the avalanche process. PMID:11736344

  15. Explosive vaporization of metallic sodium microparticles by CW resonant laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Atutov, S N; Baldini, W; Biancalana, V; Calabrese, R; Guidi, V; Mai, B; Mariotti, E; Mazzocca, G; Moi, L; Pod'yachev, S P; Tomassetti, L

    2001-11-19

    Explosive vaporization of metallic Na microparticles stimulated by resonant cw laser radiation has been observed in a glass cell. Vaporization occurs at low laser-power density. The effect consists in the generation of optically thick and sharply localized Na vapor clouds propagating in the cell against the laser beam. The effect is explained by laser excitation of Na atoms, which collide onto the surface of the microparticles and transfer their internal energy. This causes other atoms to be vaporized and to continue the avalanche process.

  16. Multimegawatt NEP with vapor core reactor MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-01-01

    Efforts at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute have assessed the feasibility of combining gaseous or vapor core reactors with magnetohydrodynamic power generators to provide extremely high quality, high density, and low specific mass electrical power for space applications. Innovative shielding strategies are employed to maintain an effective but relatively low mass shield, which is the most dominating part of multi-megawatt space power systems. The fission driven magnetohydrodynamic generator produces tens of kilowatt DC power at specific mass of less than 0.5 kg/kW for the total power system. The MHD output with minor conditioning is coupled to magnetoplasmadynamic thruster to achieve an overall NEP system specific mass of less than 1.0 kg/kW for power levels above 20 MWe. Few other concepts would allow comparable ensuing payload savings and flexible mission abort options for manned flights to Mars for example. .

  17. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Crystal growth of cadmium oxide from the vapor phase

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Nomura, S.; Kodaira, K.; Matsushita, T.

    1987-10-01

    Single crystals of CdO were grown at temperatures of 930/sup 0/ to 1080/sup 0/C from the vapor phase by air oxidation of Cd vapors which were generated at a constant rate by reaction of CdO with graphite. A prolonged growth up to 70 h at 1030/sup 0/C produced a crystal conglomerate with a maximum size of 13.5 mm. The electrical resistivity and electron density of the crystal in the direction of <100> were 5x10/sup -4/ ..cap omega...cm and 1.3x10/sup 20/cm/sup 3/, respectively, at 20/sup 0/C.oefficients

  19. Application of a newly developed hydrogen peroxide vapor phase sensor to HPV sterilizer.

    PubMed

    Taizo, I; Sinichi, A; Kawamura, K

    1998-01-01

    A new type of concentration sensor for hydrogen peroxide vapor has been developed by making use of a semiconductor. Output from the vapor sensor has been shown to have a good linear relationship with the logarithm of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor. Concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor introduced into the sterilization chamber could be kept constant by monitoring the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide vapor continuously and controlling the vapor supply. Temperature and humidity have also been kept constant. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined by using the combination system of the hydrogen peroxide vapor sensor, the hydrogen peroxide vapor supplier, thermosensor and humidity sensor. D-values at the temperature of 30 degrees C and the absolute humidity of 0.7 mg H2O/L thus obtained, were 0.2 minutes at hydrogen peroxide concentration of 600 ppm and 1.2 minutes at 200 ppm at the temperature of 30 degrees C and 0.7 mg/L absolute humidity. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various temperatures, humidity and levels of hydrogen peroxide concentration have also been determined. These fundamental data indicate that the sterilization by hydrogen peroxide vapor can be validated as precisely as steam sterilization by measuring and controlling the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor using a combination of the hydrogen peroxide concentration sensor and the vapor generator. Influence of temperature and humidity have also been studied. The hydrogen peroxide sensor has been calibrated and standardized by using the standard hydrogen peroxide vapor whose concentration has been determined by calculating partial pressure of hydrogen peroxide over the water-hydrogen peroxide solution. PMID:9542409

  20. Electrical Breakdown in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Skoro, N.; Maric, D.; Malovic, G.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper investigations of the voltage required to break down water vapor are reported for the region around the Paschen minimum and to the left of it. In spite of numerous applications of discharges in biomedicine, and recent studies of discharges in water and vapor bubbles and discharges with liquid water electrodes, studies of the basic parameters of breakdown are lacking. Paschen curves have been measured by recording voltages and currents in the low-current Townsend regime and extrapolating them to zero current. The minimum electrical breakdown voltage for water vapor was found to be 480 V at a pressure times electrode distance (pd) value of around 0.6 Torr cm ({approx}0.8 Pa m). The present measurements are also interpreted using (and add additional insight into) the developing understanding of relevant atomic and particularly surface processes associated with electrical breakdown.

  1. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, David C.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  2. Large-strain, multiform movements from designable electrothermal actuators based on large highly anisotropic carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingwei; Liu, Changhong; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-01-27

    Many electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators use diverse configurations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as pliable electrodes to realize discontinuous, agile movements, for CNTs are conductive and flexible. However, the reported CNT-based EAP actuators could only accomplish simple, monotonous actions. Few actuators were extended to complex devices because efficiently preparing a large-area CNT electrode was difficult, and complex electrode design has not been carried out. In this work, we successfully prepared large-area CNT paper (buckypaper, BP) through an efficient approach. The BP is highly anisotropic, strong, and suitable as flexible electrodes. By means of artful graphic design and processing on BP, we fabricated various functional BP electrodes and developed a series of BP-polymer electrothermal actuators (ETAs). The prepared ETAs can realize various controllable movements, such as large-stain bending (>180°), helical curling (∼ 630°), or even bionic actuations (imitating human-hand actions). These functional and interesting movements benefit from flexible electrode design and the anisotropy of BP material. Owing to the advantages of low driving voltage (20-200 V), electrolyte-free and long service life (over 10000 times), we think the ETAs will have great potential applications in the actuator field. PMID:25559661

  3. Investigation of lead contents in lipsticks by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the lead contents of different kinds of lipsticks were determined by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS ET AAS) and the results were compared with those obtained after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples. The experimental parameters for solid sampling such as the maximum amount of sample on the platforms of solid autosampler, graphite furnace program were optimized. Samples were directly loaded on the platforms of solid autosampler between 0.25 and 2.0mg and lead was determined applying 800 °C for pyrolysis and 2100 °C for atomization. Under optimized conditions, interference-free determination could be performed using aqueous standards. The LOD and the characteristic mass were 21.3 and 12.6 pg, respectively. The lead in the same lipstick samples was determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion and compared with those found by solid sampling. Mostly, there was no significant difference between the lead concentrations found by the two techniques. The lead in 25 lipstick samples with different properties were 0.11-4.48 ng mg(-1) which were not significantly different from those (<0.026-7.19 ng mg(-1)) reported by FDA for around 400 samples.

  4. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nageotte, S M; Day, J P

    1998-01-01

    A major source of environmental lead, particularly in urban areas, has been from the combustion of leaded petrol. Street dust has previously been used to assess urban lead contamination, and the dust itself can also be a potential source of lead ingestion, particularly to children. The progressive reduction of lead in petrol, in recent years, would be expected to have been reflected in a reduction of lead in urban dust. We have tested this hypothesis by repeating an earlier survey of Manchester street dust and carrying out a comparable survey in Paris. Samples were collected from streets and parks, lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead isotope ratios were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Manchester show that lead concentrations have fallen by about 40% (street dust averages, 941 micrograms g-1 (ppm) in 1975 down to 569 ppm in 1997). In Paris, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between types of street (not seen in Manchester). Additionally, lead levels in parks were much lower than in Manchester. Samples collected under the Eiffel Tower had very high concentrations and lead isotope ratios showed that this was unlikely to be fallout from motor vehicles but could be due to the paint used on the tower. Isotope ratios measurements also revealed that lead additives used in France and the UK come from different sources.

  5. Fast determination of phosphorus in honey, milk and infant formulas by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a slurry sampling procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, I.; Viñas, P.; Romero-Romero, R.; Hernández-Córdoba, M.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of phosphorus in honey, milk and infant formulas using slurried samples is described. Suspensions prepared in a medium containing 50% v/v concentrated hydrogen peroxide, 1% v/v concentrated nitric acid, 10% m/v glucose, 5% m/v sucrose and 100 mg l - 1 of potassium were introduced directly into the furnace. For the honey samples, multiple injection of the sample was necessary. The modifier selected was a mixture of 20 μg palladium and 5 μg magnesium nitrate, which was injected after the sample and before proceeding with the drying and calcination steps. Calibration was performed using aqueous standards prepared in the same suspension medium and the graph was linear between 5 and 80 mg l - 1 of phosphorus. The reliability of the procedure was checked by comparing the results obtained by the new developed method with those found when using a reference spectrophotometric method after a mineralization step, and by analyzing several certified reference materials.

  6. Development of azimuthally correlated instabilities for MagLIF seeded by electro-thermal and material strength effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecover, James; Weinwurm, Marcus; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is a promising route to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The concept involves magnetically imploding a metal liner; a key limitation of such systems is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. MagLIF relevant liner implosions carried out at Sandia showed high amplitude MRT growth. 3D simulations with our MHD code Gorgon have shown that azimuthal correlation required to explain this can be contributed to by early time effects the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an ``electro-choric instability'' (ECI). Shear forces can damp short wavelength perturbations while the liner remains solid, potentially setting axial wavelengths for the ETI and ECI. We can now model shear stresses in solids with Gorgon using a Johnson-Cook strength model and a bulk modulus calculated from the FEOS equation of state. Gorgon results with the strength model are compared to results from the shock hydrodynamics code iSALE. Results for liners show elongation of perturbations at the outer edge relative to the case without strength. We present results showing the model applied to liner implosions with axial magnetic fields of 0 T and 10 T.

  7. Determination of trace nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gai

    2012-01-01

    Microwave digestion of hydrogenated cottonseed oil prior to trace nickel determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is proposed here for the first time. Currently, the methods outlined in U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) or British Pharmacopeia (BP2003) are recommended as the official methods for analyzing nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil. With these methods the samples may be pre-treated by a silica or a platinum crucible. However, the samples were easily tarnished during sample pretreatment when using a silica crucible. In contrast, when using a platinum crucible, hydrogenated cottonseed oil acting as a reducing material may react with the platinum and destroy the crucible. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion avoided tarnishing of sample in the process of sample pretreatment and also reduced the cycle of analysis. The programs of microwave digestion and the parameters of ETAAS were optimized. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated by analyzing real samples. The results were compared with the ones by pressurized-PTFE-bomb acid digestion and ones obtained by the U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) method. The new method involves a relatively rapid matrix destruction technique compared with other present methods for the quantification of metals in oil. PMID:22133102

  8. Investigation of lead contents in lipsticks by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the lead contents of different kinds of lipsticks were determined by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS ET AAS) and the results were compared with those obtained after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples. The experimental parameters for solid sampling such as the maximum amount of sample on the platforms of solid autosampler, graphite furnace program were optimized. Samples were directly loaded on the platforms of solid autosampler between 0.25 and 2.0mg and lead was determined applying 800 °C for pyrolysis and 2100 °C for atomization. Under optimized conditions, interference-free determination could be performed using aqueous standards. The LOD and the characteristic mass were 21.3 and 12.6 pg, respectively. The lead in the same lipstick samples was determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion and compared with those found by solid sampling. Mostly, there was no significant difference between the lead concentrations found by the two techniques. The lead in 25 lipstick samples with different properties were 0.11-4.48 ng mg(-1) which were not significantly different from those (<0.026-7.19 ng mg(-1)) reported by FDA for around 400 samples. PMID:23099440

  9. Method development for Cd and Hg determination in biodiesel by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with emulsion sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Pedro R; Gásquez, José A; Olsina, Roberto A; Martinez, Luis D; Gil, Raúl A

    2012-11-15

    A novel method for analysis of biodiesel by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. This analytical strategy involves sample preparation as emulsions for routine and reliable determination of Cd and Hg. Several experimental conditions were investigated, including emulsion stability and composition, furnace temperature program and matrix modification. Different calibration strategies were also evaluated, being the analyte addition method preferred both for Cd and Hg. The accuracy was verified through comparison with an acid digestion in a microwave closed system. The injection repeatability was evaluated as the average relative standard deviation (R.S.D %) for five successive firings and was better than 4.4% for Cd and 5.4% Hg respectively. The detection limits, evaluated by the 3σ concept of calculation (n=10), were of 10.2 μg kg(-1) (0.9 μg L(-1)) for Hg and 0.3 μg kg(-1) (0.04 μg L(-1)) for Cd. This method was successfully applied to the determination of Cd and Hg in biodiesel samples obtained from local vendors.

  10. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Georg; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-25

    The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 ± 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 ± 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L(-1) is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L(-1). The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L(-1) is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples. PMID:23312311

  11. Spurious phenomena occurring during current measurement on ultra-thin dielectric layers: From electro-thermal effects to surface damage

    SciTech Connect

    Grandfond, A.; Gautier, B.; Militaru, L.; Albertini, D.; Descamps-Mandine, A.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, the conduction properties of dielectric ultra-thin layers are studied using atomic force microscopy. Especially, the conductive-atomic force microscope allows to measure the leakage current at the nanoscale and to study the degradation mechanisms locally. Nonetheless, the dielectric layer seems to be damaged by a technique's specific phenomenon: hillocks appear when a positive tip bias is applied on different dielectrics. In this paper, the formation of these hillocks is studied. Contrary to what is observed during the dielectric breakdown, the conductivity is reduced after hillocks formation which occurs after the dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we have observed the formation of cavities in the silicon substrate linked to the formation of hillocks, which is not compatible with a swelling process (as dielectric breakdown induced epitaxy). We propose that these results may be explained by an electro-thermal effect due to the large dissipated energy, maybe combined with the oxidation of the substrate. Finally, the interdependence of measurements is demonstrated during serial acquisition.

  12. Determination of trace nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gai

    2012-01-01

    Microwave digestion of hydrogenated cottonseed oil prior to trace nickel determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is proposed here for the first time. Currently, the methods outlined in U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) or British Pharmacopeia (BP2003) are recommended as the official methods for analyzing nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil. With these methods the samples may be pre-treated by a silica or a platinum crucible. However, the samples were easily tarnished during sample pretreatment when using a silica crucible. In contrast, when using a platinum crucible, hydrogenated cottonseed oil acting as a reducing material may react with the platinum and destroy the crucible. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion avoided tarnishing of sample in the process of sample pretreatment and also reduced the cycle of analysis. The programs of microwave digestion and the parameters of ETAAS were optimized. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated by analyzing real samples. The results were compared with the ones by pressurized-PTFE-bomb acid digestion and ones obtained by the U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) method. The new method involves a relatively rapid matrix destruction technique compared with other present methods for the quantification of metals in oil.

  13. Comparative study of pretreatment methods for the determination of metals in atmospheric aerosol by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karanasiou, A A; Thomaidis, N S; Eleftheriadis, K; Siskos, P A

    2005-03-15

    A comparative study of pretreatment methods for the determination of 10 elements (As, Cd, Pb, V, Ni, Mn, Cr, Cu, Fe, Al) in atmospheric aerosols by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was conducted. For the digestion of the particulates collected in filters, six methods were compared using a mixture of HNO(3) and HF with or without the addition of various oxidative agents (HClO(4) or H(2)O(2)) or acids (HCl). The comparative study was performed using loaded cellulose filter samples, which were digested in Parr bombs and heated in a conventional oven at 170 degrees C for 5h. The extraction efficiency and blanks were compared and it was proved that the digestion method using only HNO(3)-HF extracted most of the metals and gave the lowest blanks. The HNO(3)-HF mixture was selected for the development of an improved microwave digestion method specific for aerosol-loaded filters. The operating parameters were optimized, so that quantitative recovery of the reference materials NIST 1649a urban dust and NIST 1648 urban particulate matter was achieved. The blank of cellulose and teflon filters were also determined and compared. Teflon filters present the lowest blanks for all the elements. The obtained limits of detection for each type of filters were adequate for environmental monitoring purposes. ETAAS instrumental operation was also optimized for the compensation and the elimination of interferences. The temperature optimization was performed for each metal in every type of filter and optimized parameters are proposed for 10 elements.

  14. Preconcentration of lead using solidification of floating organic drop and its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Akhoundzadeh, Jeiran; Arbab-zavar, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    A simple microextraction method based on solidification of a floating organic drop (SFOD) was developed for preconcentration of lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was used as complexing agent, and the formed complex was extracted into a 20 μL of 1-undecanol. The extracted complex was diluted with ethanol and injected into a graphite furnace. An orthogonal array design (OAD) with OA16 (45) matrix was employed to study the effects of different parameters such as pH, APDC concentration, stirring rate, sample solution temperature and the exposure time on the extraction efficiency. Under the optimized experimental conditions the limit of detection (based on 3 s) and the enhancement factor were 0.058 μg L−1 and 113, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 8 replicate determinations of 1 μg L−1 of Pb was 8.8%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials and was successfully applied to the determination of lead in water and infant formula base powder samples. PMID:25685441

  15. Speciation of silver nanoparticles and Ag(I) species using cloud point extraction followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Ignacio; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles in the presence of Triton-X114 were extracted into a micellar phase obtained after incubation at 40 °C for 10 min followed by centrifugation. After injection of an aliquot (30 μL) of the surfactant-rich phase into the electrothermal atomizer, the enrichment effect due to cloud point extraction allowed a detection limit of 2 ng L- 1 silver to be achieved. The preconcentration factor was 242, and the repeatability for ten measurements at a 50 ng L- 1 silver level was 4.6%. Ag(I) species were adsorbed onto the silver nanoparticles and were also extracted in the micellar phase. The incorporation of 0.01 mol L- 1 ammonium thiocyanate to the sample solution prevented the extraction of Ag(I) species. Speciation was carried out using two extractions, one in the absence and the other in the presence of thiocyanate, the concentration of Ag(I) species being obtained by difference. The procedure was applied to the determination of silver nanoparticles and Ag(I) species in waters and in lixiviates obtained from sticking plasters and cleaning cloths.

  16. Determination of nickel in saliva by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using various chemical modifiers with Zeeman-effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Burguera, E; Sanchez de Briceño, A; Rondon, C E; Burguera, J L; Burguera, M; Carrero, P

    1998-07-01

    The profile of nickel signal using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium and Zeeman-effect background correction is presented. The Zeeman effect system of background correction offered definitive advantages and therefore was used for the determination of nickel in saliva in the presence of various isomorphous metals. The highest nickel absorbance values corresponded at 200, 300, 300, 300, 600, and 200 ng of Tb, Mg, Sm, Lu, Tm, and Pd, respectively. On the other hand, the addition of Eu, Er, and Ho decreased the nickel signal. The presence on each modifier alone does not eliminate the matrix interference. However, the use of 200 ng of Pd in conjuction with 300 ng of Lu has a higher sensitivity, offers an advantage against interference from the background of saliva matrix and produces good recoveries (98 to 102% from unspiked and spiked saliva samples). The limit of detection was 0.11 micrograms/L for a characteristic mass of 16.6 pg of nickel using Pd-Lu as modifier. The within-batch precision varied between 0.8 and 1.5% relative standard deviations. The analysis of thirty samples of whole saliva gave an average of 0.81 +/- 0.30 of micrograms/L of Ni (range from 0.5 to 2.0 micrograms/L of Ni). The agreement between the observed and certified values obtained from a Seronorm Blood Serum Standard Reference Material was good.

  17. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Georg; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-25

    The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 ± 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 ± 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L(-1) is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L(-1). The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L(-1) is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples.

  18. In-situ monitoring of actinides and rare earth elements by electrothermal hollow cathode discharge spectrometry. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Edelson, M.C.

    1992-12-01

    This report describes an Electrothermal Hollow Cathode Discharge Spectrometry (ET-HCDS) source being constructed for the analytical determination of actinides and rare earth elements. This work was initiated with the support of the Office of Safeguards and Security; the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration began funding work in this area in mid-FY1992 and the work is continuing into FY1993 with funds from both sources. Special features of this instrument should permit it to be used for the determination of individual isotopic species, which is important for safeguard`s materials control and accountancy. ET-HCDS can be achieved using compact instrumentation suitable for use in field laboratories. The technique is capable of determining a suite of environmentally-important species, such as the actinides and the heavy metals, in a variety of physical forms (e.g., in solution, as found on air particulates, or in soils). ET-HCDS should be capable of very sensitive analyses and should require very small samples (e.g., microgram). Since ET-HCDS is possible in an air atmosphere (at reduced pressures), it may be useful for the real-time determination of hazardous materials, both radioactive and non radioactive, contained in dusts released during waste retrieval operations; ET-HCDS should also be useful for the rapid and sensitive analysis of metals in soils.

  19. Instability growth for magnetized liner inertial fusion seeded by electro-thermal, electro-choric, and material strength effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pecover, J. D.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2015-10-15

    A critical limitation of magnetically imploded systems such as magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability which primarily disrupts the outer surface of the liner. MagLIF-relevant experiments have showed large amplitude multi-mode MRT instability growth growing from surface roughness [McBride et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 135004 (2012)], which is only reproduced by 3D simulations using our MHD code Gorgon when an artificially azimuthally correlated initialisation is added. We have shown that the missing azimuthal correlation could be provided by a combination of the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an “electro-choric” instability (ECI); describing, respectively, the tendency of current to correlate azimuthally early in time due to temperature dependent Ohmic heating; and an amplification of the ETI driven by density dependent resistivity around vapourisation. We developed and implemented a material strength model in Gorgon to improve simulation of the solid phase of liner implosions which, when applied to simulations exhibiting the ETI and ECI, gave a significant increase in wavelength and amplitude. Full circumference simulations of the MRT instability provided a significant improvement on previous randomly initialised results and approached agreement with experiment.

  20. Determination of total tin in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of total tin in geological materials, with use of a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace. The sample is decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 10% hydrochloric acid. Tin is then extracted into trioctylphosphine oxide-methyl isobutyl ketone prior to atomization. Impregnation of the furnace with a sodium tungstate solution increases the sensitivity of the determination and improves the precision of the results. The limits of determination are 0.5-20 ppm of tin in the sample. Higher tin values can be determined by dilution of the extract. Replicate analyses of eighteen geological reference samples with diverse matrices gave relative standard deviations ranging from 2.0 to 10.8% with an average of 4.6%. Average tin values for reference samples were in general agreement with, but more precise than, those reported by others. Apparent recoveries of tin added to various samples ranged from 95 to 111% with an average of 102%. ?? 1984.