Science.gov

Sample records for generation metal production

  1. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from

  2. Metallized Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Since the early 1960's, virtually all NASA spacecraft have used metallized films for a variety of purposes, principally thermal radiation insulation. King Seeley manufactures a broad line of industrial and consumer oriented metallized film, fabric, paper and foam in single layer sheets and multi-layer laminates. A few examples, commercialized by MPI Outdoor Safety Products, are the three ounce Thermos Emergency Blanket which reflects and retains up to 80 percent of the user's body heat helping prevent post accident shock or keeping a person warm for hours under emergency cold weather conditions.

  3. From Oxygen Generation to Metals Production: In Situ Resource Utilization by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khetpal, Deepak; Ducret, Andrew C.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    For the exploration of other bodies in the solar system, electrochemical processing is arguably the most versatile technology for conversion of local resources into usable commodities: by electrolysis one can, in principle, produce (1) breathable oxygen, (2) silicon for the fabrication of solar cells, (3) various reactive metals for use as electrodes in advanced storage batteries, and (4) structural metals such as steel and aluminum. Even so, to date there has been no sustained effort to develop such processes, in part due to the inadequacy of the database. The objective here is to identify chemistries capable of sustaining molten oxide electrolysis in the cited applications and to examine the behavior of laboratory-scale cells designed to generate oxygen and to produce metal. The basic research includes the study of the underlying high-temperature physical chemistry of oxide melts representative of lunar regolith and of Martian soil. To move beyond empirical approaches to process development, the thermodynamic and transport properties of oxide melts are being studied to help set the limits of composition and temperature for the processing trials conducted in laboratory-scale electrolysis cells. The goal of this investigation is to deliver a working prototype cell that can use lunar regolith and Martian soil to produce breathable oxygen along with metal by-product. Additionally, the process can be generalized to permit adaptation to accommodate different feedstock chemistries, such as those that will be encountered on other bodies in the solar system. The expected results of this research include: (1) the identification of appropriate electrolyte chemistries; (2) the selection of candidate anode and cathode materials compatible with electrolytes named above; and (3) performance data from a laboratory-scale cell producing oxygen and metal. On the strength of these results it should be possible to assess the technical viability of molten oxide electrolysis for in

  4. Pneumatic drop-on-demand generation for production of metal oxide microspheres by internal gelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, Valmor F.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Collins, Jack L.

    2010-09-01

    Drop-on-demand generation is an alternative approach to the traditional vibrating nozzle used for the production of nuclear fuel microspheres via the internal gelation method. We integrated a low-cost pneumatic setup and demonstrated that the drop-on-demand approach has some advantages, such as low inventory of feed solution (attractive for laboratory-scale research), improved drop diameter control, reproducibility, scale-up to desired throughput by simple multiplication of the number of dispensing units, and simple remote operation. However, limitations on reproducibility and drop diameter control still exist due to the intrinsic variation of physical properties, viscosity, and dispensing-tip wettability during the internal gelation process. These adverse effects can be mitigated, to a certain extent, by carefully controlling the temperature of the feed as uniformly as possible. We validated the drop-on-demand generation method by producing solid kernels of yttrium-stabilized zirconia and soft gel microspheres of iron hydroxide. In addition, we have measured the diameter change at each principal process stage. Based on the observed gas entrainment/absorption in the gel spheres, we conjectured that aging and washing are likely the critical stages determining the final precision to which microspheres can be made. Finally, we comment on potential improvements that add robustness to the method for handling other metal precursors in aqueous solutions.

  5. Metals production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Theodore S.

    1992-01-01

    Existing procedures for design of electrochemical plants can be used for design of lunar processes taking into consideration the differences in environmental conditions. These differences include: 1/6 Earth gravity, high vacuum, solar electrical and heat source, space radiation heat sink, long days and nights, and different availability and economics of materials, energy, and labor. Techniques have already been developed for operation of relatively small scale hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell systems used in the U.S. lunar landing program. Design and operation of lunar aqueous electrolytic process plants appears to be within the state-of-the-art. Finding or developing compatible materials for construction and designing of fused-magma metal winning cells will present a real engineering challenge.

  6. Metals production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Theodore S.

    1992-02-01

    Existing procedures for design of electrochemical plants can be used for design of lunar processes taking into consideration the differences in environmental conditions. These differences include: 1/6 Earth gravity, high vacuum, solar electrical and heat source, space radiation heat sink, long days and nights, and different availability and economics of materials, energy, and labor. Techniques have already been developed for operation of relatively small scale hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell systems used in the U.S. lunar landing program. Design and operation of lunar aqueous electrolytic process plants appears to be within the state-of-the-art. Finding or developing compatible materials for construction and designing of fused-magma metal winning cells will present a real engineering challenge.

  7. Metal-ferroelectric-metal capacitor based persistent memory for electronic product code class-1 generation-2 uhf passive radio-frequency identification tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Bongno; Sung, Man Young; Yeon, Sujin; Oh, Hyun S.; Kwon, Yoonjoo; Kim, Chuljin; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2009-03-01

    With the circuits using metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitor, rf operational signal properties are almost the same or superior to those of polysilicon-insulator-polysilicon, metal-insulator-metal, and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. In electronic product code global class-1 generation-2 uhf radio-frequency identification (RFID) protocols, the MFM can play a crucial role in satisfying the specifications of the inventoried flag's persistence times (Tpt) for each session (S0-S3, SL). In this paper, we propose and design a new MFM capacitor based memory scheme of which persistence time for S1 flag is measured at 2.2 s as well as indefinite for S2, S3, and SL flags during the period of power-on. A ferroelectric random access memory embedded RFID tag chip is fabricated with an industry-standard complementary MOS process. The chip size is around 500×500 μm2 and the measured power consumption is about 10 μW.

  8. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  9. Corrosion of Metals Exposed to Combustion Products Generated during Shipboard Fires.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    HY80 steel , type 304 stainless steel , brass, and Monel 400. The metallic coupons were stored under both moderate and high humidity conditions after the... HY80 Steel 25 Type 304 Stainless Steel 28 Brass 28 Monel 400 31 Summary 33 RESULTS OF TESTS W-13 AND W-13A 35 HY80 Steel 39 Type 304 Stainless Steel 50...exposed to the heavy sooty smoke produced during flaming combustion. The metallic specimens or target materials were HY80 steel , type 304

  10. Proton induced production and radiochemical isolation of 44Ti from scandium metal targets for 44Ti/44Sc generator development

    DOE PAGES

    Radchenko, Valery; Engle, Jonathan Ward; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; ...

    2017-04-07

    Scandium-44 g (half-life 3.97 h) shows promise for application in positron emission tomography (PET), due to favorable decay parameters. One of the sources of 44gSc is the 44Ti/44gSc generator, which can conveniently provide this radioisotope on a daily basis at a diagnostic facility. Titanium-44 (half-life 60.0 a), in turn, can be obtained via proton irradiation of scandium metal targets. A substantial 44Ti product batch, however, requires high beam currents, long irradiation times and an elaborate chemical procedure for 44Ti isolation and purification. This study describes the production of a combined 175 MBq (4.7 mCi) batch yield of 44Ti in weekmore » long proton irradiations at the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (LANL-IPF) and the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BNL-BLIP). A two-step ion exchange chromatography based chemical separation method is introduced: first, a coarse separation of 44Ti via anion exchange sorption in concentrated HCl results in a 44Tc/Sc separation factor of 102–103. A second, cation exchange based step in HCl media is then applied for 44Ti fine purification from residual Sc mass. In conclusion, this method yields a 90–97% 44Ti recovery with an overall Ti/Sc separation factor of ≥106.« less

  11. Light metal production

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Qinbai

    2016-04-19

    An electrochemical process for the production of light metals, particularly aluminum. Such a process involves contacting a light metal source material with an inorganic acid to form a solution containing the light metal ions in high concentration. The solution is fed to an electrochemical reactor assembly having an anode side containing an anode and a cathode side containing a cathode, with anode side and the cathode side separated by a bipolar membrane, with the solution being fed to the anode side. Light metal ions are electrochemically transferred through the bipolar membrane to the cathode side. The process further involves reducing the light metal ions to light metal powder. An associated processing system is also provided.

  12. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  13. Production of metal particles and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of producing novel metals or metal clusters in a low gravity environment was studied. The production of coordinately unsaturated metal carbonyls by thermolysis or photolysis of stable metal carbonyls has the potential to generate novel catalysts by this technique. Laser irradiation of available metal carbonyls was investigated. It is found that laser induced decomposition of metal carbonyls is feasible for producing a variety of coordinately unsaturated species. Formation of clustered species does occur but is hampered by weak metal-metal bonds.

  14. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-01-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  15. Production of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra pure elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.

  16. Pulsed metallic-plasma generators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmour, A. S., Jr.; Lockwood, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    A pulsed metallic-plasma generator is described which utilizes a vacuum arc as the plasma source. The arc is initiated on the surface of a consumable cathode which can be any electrically conductive material. Ignition is accomplished by using a current pulse to vaporize a portion of a conductive film on the surface of an insulator separating the cathode from the ignition electrode. The film is regenerated during the ensuing arc. Over 100 million ignition cycles have been accomplished by using four 0.125-in. diameter zinc cathodes operating in parallel and high-density aluminum-oxide insulators. Among the applications being investigated for the generator are metal deposition, vacuum pumping, electric propulsion, and high-power dc arc interruption.

  17. Development of new generation of perovskite based noble metal/semiconductor photocatalysts for visible-light-driven hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Peichuan

    described in this dissertation. Noble metal nanoparticles have been proved to be effective co-catalysts due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Au and Pt nanoparticles with different sizes were synthesized and deposited on CdS. Sub-nanometer Au and Pt were found to be promising co-catalysts for photocatalytic hydrogen production reaction. Specifically, sub-nm Au and sub-nm Pt nanoparticles were found to enhance the photocatalytic activity in hydrogen production of CdS by 35 and 15 times respectively. Other noble metal co-catalysts, such as Ru, Pd and Rh were also deposited on CdS and their photocatalytic activities were investigated. Additionally, a novel chamber for photocatalytic reactions was developed as a part of this dissertation. The reaction chamber has several unique features allowing different reactions and measurements. The reactor was proved to be suitable for future projects in photocatalysis such as photocatalytic CO2 conversion into hydrocarbons.

  18. PRODUCTION OF METALS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

    1961-09-19

    A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

  19. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1961-01-17

    A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

  20. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  1. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  2. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  3. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1983-06-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  4. Liquid-metal-piston MHD generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generator uses a slug or piston of liquid potassium as the working fluid. An expanding vapor of the metal is allowed to reciprocate the liquid-metal-piston through a magnetic field and the expansion energy is converted directly into electrical energy.

  5. PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.

    1963-11-01

    A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

  6. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    PubMed

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  7. Minerals, metal production and greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect

    Themelis, N.J.; Wernick, I.

    1997-12-31

    The construction minerals, industrial minerals, and metals used in the U.S. annually amount to about 2.3 billion tons or 72% of all materials produced by industry, agriculture and forestry, excluding the bulk of the fossil fuel production (about 1.9 billion tons) which is used for electricity, heating and transportation. On a global scale, the consumption of minerals and metals has increased by a factor of ten in the 20th century and is an important contributor to the generation of greenhouse gases. As the grades of mined ores diminish, the energy units required to produce minerals and metals, and the corresponding emissions to the atmosphere, will increase substantially. The current emissions of the dominant production technologies and the prospects for reducing emissions, by means of recycling and technological advances, will be discussed.

  8. Terahertz pulse generation from metal nanoparticle ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kosaku; Takano, Keisuke; Tadokoro, Yuzuru; Phan, Thanh Nhat Khoa; Nakajima, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz pulse generation from metallic nanostructures irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses is of interest because the conversion efficiency from laser pulses to terahertz waves is increased by the local field enhancement resulting from the plasmon oscillation. In this talk we present our recent study on terahertz generation from metal nanoparticle ink. We baked a silver nanoparticle ink spin-coated onto a glass coverslip in various temperatures. On the surface of the baked ink, bumpy nanostructures are spontaneously formed, and the average size of bumps depends on the baking temperature. These structures are expected to lead to local field enhancement and then large nonlinear polarizations on the surface. The baked ink was irradiated by the output of regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser at an incidence angle of 45°. Waveforms of generated terahertz pulses are detected by electro-optical sampling. The generation efficiency was high when the average diameter of bumps was around 100 nm, which is realized when the ink is baked in 205 to 235°C in our setup. One of our next research targets is terahertz wave generation from micro-patterned metallic nanoparticle ink. It is an advantage of the metal nanoparticle ink that by using inkjet printers one can fabricate various patterns with micrometer scales, in which terahertz waves have a resonance. Combination of microstructures made by a printer and nanostructure spontaneously formed in the baking process will provide us terahertz emitters with unique frequency characteristics.

  9. Generation of metal, metal oxide and metal-metal oxide powders by spray pyrolysis for microelectronic thick film applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Diptarka

    Materials in powdered form have wide ranging applications. In thick film microelectronics, powders are dispersed in organic liquids to form pastes which are screen printed on ceramic substrates and fired to fabricate active and passive electronic devices. The functional phase is a metal powder in conductive pastes, a metal or conductive metal oxide powder in resistive pastes and a ceramic powder in dielectric pastes. Particulate additives such as glasses and metal oxides in pastes promote adhesion of conductor lines to the substrate, minimize shrinkage mismatch during cofiring of conductors and dielectrics and facilitate densification of the functional phase during firing. This dissertation focuses on the generation of metal, metal oxide and metal-metal oxide powders by spray pyrolysis for microelectronic applications. The important results of this work are outlined below. (1) This work has demonstrated the ability to synthesize phase-pure, micron-sized, spherical, unagglomerated metal (gold) and metal oxide (copper (I) oxide) particles by spray pyrolysis. (2) It has extended the versatility of spray pyrolysis as a powdermaking technique to include the synthesis of metal-metal oxide composite particles. Such particles have been generated for both wetting (silver-copper (II) oxide) and poorly wetting (silver-silica) metal-metal oxide pairs. (3) The sintering of thick films of the metal-metal oxide particles has indicated the possibility of retarding the sintering kinetics of silver by using composite particles of the metal with relatively refractory metal oxides.

  10. Antifungal Properties of Electrically Generated Metallic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Berger, T. J.; Spadaro, J. A.; Bierman, Richard; Chapin, S. E.; Becker, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative investigation was undertaken to study the susceptibility of unicellular eucaryotic organisms (yeasts) to metallic cations generated by low levels of direct current. Results were characteristic of effects obtained previously using clinical and standard bacteria test organisms. The present study demonstrated that anodic silver (Ag+) at low direct currents had inhibitory and fungicidal properties. Broth dilution susceptibility tests were made on several species of Candida and one species of Torulopsis. Growth in all isolates was inhibited by concentrations of electrically generated silver ions between 0.5 and 4.7 μg/ml, and silver exhibited fungicidal properties at concentrations as low as 1.9 μg/ml. The inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations of electrically generated silver ions are lower than those reported for other silver compounds. Images PMID:1034467

  11. Motion Generated Static Electricity in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao Feng, Chung

    2004-03-01

    The charge state of a metallic object, neutral when stationary, is observed to become positive when in motion. This phenomenon was discovered while testing a hypothesis which expects atoms to be more positive when moving faster. The same hypothesis has also led to the discovery of the phenomena of static electric charges being produced by thermal changes during vaporization, condensation and heating of water. The phenomena due to thermal changes were reported at the American Physical Society meetings of MAR02 (W30 4: Electricity of Vaporization and Condensation) and MAR03 (J1 206: Static Electricity from Heating and Cooling). The phenomenon of charges generated by motion can be seen in simple experiments, by the difference in the charge state of a metal rotor between motionless and spinning. The hypothesis and the phenomenon will be discussed. Some of the experiments will be demonstrated.

  12. Revision and product generation software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed revision and product generation (RevPG) software for updating digital line graph (DLG) data and producing maps from such data. This software is based on ARC/INFO, a geographic information system from Environmental Systems Resource Institute (ESRI). RevPG consists of ARC/INFO Arc Macro Language (AML) programs, C routines, and interface menus that permit operators to collect vector data using aerial images, to symbolize the data on-screen, and to produce plots and color-separated files for use in printing maps.

  13. Revision and Product Generation Software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed revision and product generation (RevPG) software for updating digital line graph (DLG) data and producing maps from such data. This software is based on ARC/INFO, a geographic information system from Environmental Systems Resource Institute (ESRI). RevPG consists of ARC/INFO Arc Macro Language (AML) programs, C routines, and interface menus that permit operators to collect vector data using aerial images, to symbolize the data onscreen, and to produce plots and color-separated files for use in printing maps.

  14. Metal photonics and plasmonics for energy generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Prashant

    Energy generation from renewable sources and conservation of energy are important goals for reducing our carbon footprint on the environment. Important sources of renewable energy like sun and geothermal energy are difficult to harness because of their energetically broad radiation. Most of our current energy requirements are met through consumption of fossil fuels, and more than 60% of this energy is released to the environment as "waste heat". Thus, converting heat from sun, or inefficient furnaces and automobiles can provide an important source of energy generation. In the present work, I describe design, fabrication, and characterization two and three dimensional patterned metals. These nanofabricated structures can be used as selective emitters to tailor the glow of hot objects. The tailored radiation can then be converted efficiently into electricity using an infrared photocell. This thermophotovoltaic conversion can be very efficient, and useful for converting heat-to-electricity from a wide variety of sources.

  15. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation from Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kesavan, Sathees

    2006-01-01

    An economically viable and environmental friendly method of generating hydrogen for fuel cells is by the reaction of certain metals with steam, called metal-steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not generate any toxic by-products nor contributes to the undesirable greenhouse effect. From the standpoint of favorable thermodynamics, total…

  16. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation from Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kesavan, Sathees

    2006-01-01

    An economically viable and environmental friendly method of generating hydrogen for fuel cells is by the reaction of certain metals with steam, called metal-steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not generate any toxic by-products nor contributes to the undesirable greenhouse effect. From the standpoint of favorable thermodynamics, total…

  17. Stretchable Thermoelectric Generators Metallized with Liquid Alloy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Cruz, Francisco Javier; Chen, Si; Gravier, Laurent; Liu, Johan; Wu, Zhigang; Hjort, Klas; Zhang, Shi-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Bin

    2017-05-10

    Conventional thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are normally hard, rigid, and flat. However, most objects have curvy surfaces, which require soft and even stretchable TEGs for maximizing efficiency of thermal energy harvesting. Here, soft and stretchable TEGs using conventional rigid Bi2Te3 pellets metallized with a liquid alloy is reported. The fabrication is implemented by means of a tailored layer-by-layer fabrication process. The STEGs exhibit an output power density of 40.6 μW/cm(2) at room temperature. The STEGs are operational after being mechanically stretched-and-released more than 1000 times, thanks to the compliant contact between the liquid alloy interconnects and the rigid pellets. The demonstrated interconnect scheme will provide a new route to the development of soft and stretchable energy-harvesting avenues for a variety of emerging electronic applications.

  18. Generation and behavior of metal oxide colloids in PWR steam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Varsanik, R.G.

    1984-10-01

    This work reviews the curently available literature and research work on the generation and behavior of metal oxide colloids in PWR steam systems. The work of E. Matijevic et al on the generation and adhesion of iron and copper oxides is described. The role of colloid chemistry in the control of plant sludge and corrosion products is described. Factors affecting the adherence and re-entrainment of colloidal metal oxides along with possible methods for the control of metal oxide deposition are reviewed.

  19. Apparatus for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    Improved electrolytic cells for producing metals by the electrolytic reduction of a compound dissolved in a molten electrolyte are disclosed. In the improved cells, at least one electrode includes a protective layer comprising an oxide of the cell product metal formed upon an alloy of the cell product metal and a more noble metal. In the case of an aluminum reduction cell, the electrode can comprise an alloy of aluminum with copper, nickel, iron, or combinations thereof, upon which is formed an aluminum oxide protective layer.

  20. Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-07-20

    The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

  1. Guiding New Product Idea Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The creation of innovative ideas is the initial step in entrepreneurial practice and venture management. As the management of technology is now on the priority agenda of higher education institutions, there is a need to develop pedagogic schemes for idea generation. Despite its importance, the idea generation process is hard to systematize or to…

  2. Guiding New Product Idea Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The creation of innovative ideas is the initial step in entrepreneurial practice and venture management. As the management of technology is now on the priority agenda of higher education institutions, there is a need to develop pedagogic schemes for idea generation. Despite its importance, the idea generation process is hard to systematize or to…

  3. Combustion products generating and metering device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, R. E.; Klisch, J. A. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    An apparatus for generating combustion products at a predetermined fixed rate, mixing the combustion products with air to achieve a given concentration, and distributing the resultant mixture to an area or device to be tested is described. The apparatus is comprised of blowers, a holder for the combustion product generating materials (which burn at a predictable and controlled rate), a mixing plenum chamber, and a means for distributing the air combustion product mixture.

  4. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  5. Generating and Evaluating Software Product Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Ten ways to evaluate new software product ideas are presented, such as talking with computer user groups and advertising the product before development to determine consumer interest. Ten methods for generating new product ideas are also offered, including reading material on the fringe of one's work and soliciting opinions of potential clients.…

  6. Generating functions for tensor product decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuksa, Jan; Pošta, Severin

    2013-11-01

    The paper deals with the tensor product decomposition problem. Tensor product decompositions are of great importance in the quantum physics. A short outline of the state of the art for the of semisimple Lie groups is mentioned. The generality of generating functions is used to solve tensor products. The corresponding generating function is rational. The feature of this technique lies in the fact that the decompositions of all tensor products of all irreducible representations are solved simultaneously. Obtaining the generating function is a difficult task in general. We propose some changes to an algorithm using Patera-Sharp character generators to find this generating function, which simplifies the whole problem to simple operations over rational functions.

  7. Recovery and use of fission product noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.A.; Rohmann, C.A.; Perrigo, L.D.

    1980-06-01

    Noble metals in fission products are of strategic value. Market prices for noble metals are rising more rapidly than recovery costs. A promising concept has been developed for recovery of noble metals from fission product waste. Although the assessment was made only for the three noble metal fission products (Rh, Pd, Ru), there are other fission products and actinides which have potential value. (DLC)

  8. Solar-Driven Liquid-Metal MHD Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Lee, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generator with solar oven as its heat source has potential to produce electric power in space and on Earth at high efficiency. Generator focuses radiation from Sun to heat driving gas that pushes liquid metal past magnetic coil. Power is extracted directly from electric currents set up in conducting liquid. Using solar energy as fuel can save considerable costs and payload weight, compared to previous systems.

  9. Solar-Driven Liquid-Metal MHD Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Lee, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generator with solar oven as its heat source has potential to produce electric power in space and on Earth at high efficiency. Generator focuses radiation from Sun to heat driving gas that pushes liquid metal past magnetic coil. Power is extracted directly from electric currents set up in conducting liquid. Using solar energy as fuel can save considerable costs and payload weight, compared to previous systems.

  10. Goos-Hänchen shifts in harmonic generation from metals.

    PubMed

    Yallapragada, V J; Gopal, Achanta Venu; Agarwal, G S

    2013-05-06

    We present the first calculation of the Goos-Hänchen shifts in the context of the nonlinear generation of fields. We specifically concentrate on shifts of second harmonic generated at metallic surfaces. At metallic surfaces the second harmonic primarily arises from discontinuities of the field at surfaces which not only result in large harmonic generation but also in significant Goos-Hänchen shifts of the generated second harmonic. Our results can be extended to other shifts like angular shifts and Fedorov-Imbert shifts.

  11. Modulation of photoacoustic signal generation from metallic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, Trevor; Homan, Kimberly; Frey, Wolfgang; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Hazle, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to image metallic implants is important for medical applications ranging from diagnosis to therapy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been recently pursued as a means to localize metallic implants in soft tissue. The work presented herein investigates different mechanisms to modulate the PA signal generated by macroscopic metallic surfaces. Wires of five different metals are tested to simulate medical implants/tools, while surface roughness is altered or physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings are added to change the wires’ overall optical absorption. PA imaging data of the wires are acquired at 970 nm. Results indicate that PA signal generation predominately occurs in a wire’s metallic surface and not its aqueous surroundings. PA signal generation is similar for all metals tested, while addition of PVD coatings offers significant modulations (i.e., 4-dB enhancement and 26-dB reduction achieved) in PA signal generation. Results also suggest that PA signal increases with increasing surface roughness. Different coating and roughness schemes are then successfully utilized to generate spatial PA signal patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of surface modifications to enhance or reduce PA signal generation to permit improved PA imaging of implants/tools (i.e., providing location/orientation information) or to allow PA imaging of surrounding tissue. PMID:23652344

  12. Modulation of photoacoustic signal generation from metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitcham, Trevor; Homan, Kimberly; Frey, Wolfgang; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Hazle, John; Bouchard, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The ability to image metallic implants is important for medical applications ranging from diagnosis to therapy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been recently pursued as a means to localize metallic implants in soft tissue. The work presented herein investigates different mechanisms to modulate the PA signal generated by macroscopic metallic surfaces. Wires of five different metals are tested to simulate medical implants/tools, while surface roughness is altered or physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings are added to change the wires' overall optical absorption. PA imaging data of the wires are acquired at 970 nm. Results indicate that PA signal generation predominately occurs in a wire's metallic surface and not its aqueous surroundings. PA signal generation is similar for all metals tested, while addition of PVD coatings offers significant modulations (i.e., 4-dB enhancement and 26-dB reduction achieved) in PA signal generation. Results also suggest that PA signal increases with increasing surface roughness. Different coating and roughness schemes are then successfully utilized to generate spatial PA signal patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of surface modifications to enhance or reduce PA signal generation to permit improved PA imaging of implants/tools (i.e., providing location/orientation information) or to allow PA imaging of surrounding tissue.

  13. Generative inspection process planner for integrated production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.W. . Kansas City Div.); Gyorog, D.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-04-01

    This work describes the design prototype development of a generative process planning system for dimensional inspection. The system, IPPEX (Inspection Process Planning EXpert), is a rule-based expert system for integrated production. Using as advanced product modeler, relational databases, and artificial intelligence techniques, IPPEX generates the process plan and part program for the dimensional inspection of products using CMMs. Through an application interface, the IPPEX system software accesses product definition from the product modeler. The modeler is a solid geometric modeler coupled with a dimension and tolerance modeler. Resource data regarding the machines, probes, and fixtures are queried from databases. IPPEX represents inspection process knowledge as production rules and incorporates an embedded inference engine to perform decision making. The IPPEX system, its functional architecture, system architecture, system approach, product modeling environment, inspection features, inspection knowledge, hierarchical planning strategy, user interface formats, and other fundamental issues related to inspection planning and part programming for CMMs are described. 27 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Software For Generation Of ASTER Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Alexander T.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Voge, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Software functioning in EOS-DIS computing environment developed to generate data products from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). Processes high-resolution image data from visible and near infrared (VNIR), short-wavelength infrared (SWIR), and thermal infrared (TIR) radiometric readings to generate data on radiative and thermal properties of atmosphere and surface of Earth.

  15. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  16. Generation of size-monodisperse metal nanoparticles by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Hyeun

    2003-10-01

    Size-monodisperse pure copper metal particles were formed from metal salt precursors in a spray pyrolysis process that uses ethanol as a co-solvent, thus avoiding the addition of hydrogen or other reducing gases. In addition, the uniform-size particles were classified using a droplet impactor plate, which eliminates larger droplets at the atomizer prior to entering the reactor furnace. To investigate the role of ethanol co-solvent for the formation of phase pure metal particles in the spray pyrolysis process, the generation of phase pure copper and nickel particles from aqueous solutions of copper acetate, copper nitrate, and nickel nitrates over the temperature range of 450°C to 1000°C was demonstrated. Addition of ethanol as a co-solvent played a crucial role in producing phase pure metal powders. Results of a modeling study of ethanol decomposition kinetics suggested that co-solvent decomposition created a strong reducing atmosphere during spray pyrolysis via in-situ production of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With the size-classified copper spheres as well as monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres, the polarization and intensity of light scattered by those spheres, having diameters ranging from 92 nm to 218 nm, deposited on silicon substrates were measured using 442 nm, 532 nm, and 633 nm light. The results showed that accurate calculation of the scattering of light by a metal sphere requires that the near-field interaction between the sphere and its image is included in a complete manner. The normal incidence approximation did not suffice for this interaction, and the existence of any thin oxide layer on the substrate must be included in the calculation. In order to further examine the effects of light scattering by particles on a silicon substrate having an oxide coating, the polarization and intensity of light scattered by 101 nm polystyrene latex (PSL) and 100 nm copper spheres, deposited on silicon substrates containing various thickness of oxide

  17. Thermal emf generated by laser emission along thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Satiukov, D. G.; Uglov, S. A.

    1991-07-01

    Substantial pulse thermal emf values (about 1.5 V) have been detected along the substrate during the interaction of laser emission with thin metal films (Ni, Ti, and Bi) sprayed on corrugated substrates. Relationships are established between the irradiation conditions and parameters of the generated electrical signals. Possible mechanisms of thermal emf generation and promising applications are discussed.

  18. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  19. Metal(loid) contamination in seafood products.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, Gabriela; Jadán-Piedra, Carlos; Vélez, Dinoraz; Devesa, Vicenta

    2017-11-22

    Seafood products are important sources of proteins, polyunsaturated lipids and phospholipids, and also of numerous micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). However, they may also present chemical contaminants that can constitute a health risk and that must be considered when evaluating the risk/benefit associated with consumption of this group of foods. Toxic metals and metalloids in seafood, such as mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), and lead (Pb), are subjected to legislative control in order to provide the consumer with safe seafood. This review provides an exhaustive survey of the occurrence of these toxic metal(loid)s in seafood products, and of the risk resulting from their consumption. Consideration is given to aspects related to speciation, food processing, and bioavailability, which are key factors in evaluating the risk associated with the presence of these toxic trace elements in seafood products.

  20. Towards an automated intelligence product generation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alison M.; Hawes, Timothy W.; Nolan, James J.

    2015-05-01

    Creating intelligence information products is a time consuming and difficult process for analysts faced with identifying key pieces of information relevant to a complex set of information requirements. Complicating matters, these key pieces of information exist in multiple modalities scattered across data stores, buried in huge volumes of data. This results in the current predicament analysts find themselves; information retrieval and management consumes huge amounts of time that could be better spent performing analysis. The persistent growth in data accumulation rates will only increase the amount of time spent on these tasks without a significant advance in automated solutions for information product generation. We present a product generation tool, Automated PrOduct Generation and Enrichment (APOGEE), which aims to automate the information product creation process in order to shift the bulk of the analysts' effort from data discovery and management to analysis. APOGEE discovers relevant text, imagery, video, and audio for inclusion in information products using semantic and statistical models of unstructured content. APOGEEs mixed-initiative interface, supported by highly responsive backend mechanisms, allows analysts to dynamically control the product generation process ensuring a maximally relevant result. The combination of these capabilities results in significant reductions in the time it takes analysts to produce information products while helping to increase the overall coverage. Through evaluation with a domain expert, APOGEE has been shown the potential to cut down the time for product generation by 20x. The result is a flexible end-to-end system that can be rapidly deployed in new operational settings.

  1. Steam generator for liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Garner, Daniel C.; Wineman, Arthur L.; Robey, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements in the design of internal components of J-shaped steam generators for liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Complex design improvements have been made to the internals of J-shaped steam generators which improvements are intended to reduce tube vibration, tube jamming, flow problems in the upper portion of the steam generator, manufacturing complexities in tube spacer attachments, thermal stripping potentials and difficulties in the weld fabrication of certain components.

  2. Process for production of a metal hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  3. Toxic metals and metalloids in dietetic products.

    PubMed

    Dragun, Zrinka; Puntaric, Dinko; Prpic-Majic, Danica; Bosnir, Jasna; Gmajnic, Rudika; Klaric, Maja

    2003-04-01

    To determine the concentrations of cadmium, lead, mercury, and metalloid arsenic in the samples of some dietetic products marketed in Croatia, and to compare the values obtained with maximum allowed amounts (MAA) according to the law. Metal and metalloid concentrations were measured in 30 dietetic products from the group of industrial food supplements and food additives. The measurements were performed by the method of atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentrations of cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic were compared with the maximum allowed amounts for these substances in corn and corn products, and their estimated daily intake with the recommendations of the World Health Organization. Two out of 30 samples contained cadmium, 5 samples contained lead, and as many as 16 samples contained mercury in concentrations exceeding maximum allowed amounts. The concentration of arsenic was below maximum allowed amount in all samples. In total, the concentrations of metals exceeding maximum allowed amount were found in 17 out of 30 samples. Extremely high contamination with heavy metals was detected in a sample based on zinc oxide, in which the concentration of cadmium (0.418 mg/kg) was four times higher than the maximum allowed amount, and of lead (6.074 mg/kg) 15 times higher than the maximum allowed amount. The highest concentration of mercury (1.117 mg/kg), 35-fold maximum allowed amount, was found in a ginseng-based sample. Cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic were present in some dietetic products in concentrations exceeding maximum allowed amounts. Dietetic products control should match respective legal provisions of the European Union requirements, and requires continual monitoring.

  4. Production of sintered porous metal fluoride pellets

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, L.W.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1973-12-25

    Porous pellets characterized by a moderately reactive crust and a softer core of higher reactivity are produced by forming agglomerates containing a metal fluoride powder and a selected amount ofwater. The metal fluoride is selected to be sinterable and essentially non-reactive with gaseous fluorinating agents. The agglomerates are contacted with a gaseous fluorinating agent under controlled conditions whereby the heat generated by localized reaction of the agent and water is limited to values effccting bonding by localized sintering. Porous pellets composed of cryolite (Na/sub 3/AlF/sub 6/) can be used to selectively remove trace quantities of niobium pentafluoride from a feed gas consisting predominantly of uranium hexafluoride. (Official Gazette)

  5. Generation of metal-carbon and metal-nitrogen clusters with a laser induced plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B. C.; Wei, S.; Chen, Z.; Kerns, K. P.; Purnell, J.; Buzza, S.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-10-01

    During the course of investigating dehydrogenation reactions induced by transition metals, we find that using a carrier gas containing hydrocarbons and ammonia instead of pure helium, in conjunction with a laser vaporization device, enables the facile production of metal-carbon and metal-nitrogen clusters in both the neutral and ionic forms. With only a change in the nature of the carrier gas, a variety of new classes of clusters can be produced.

  6. 41 CFR 109-27.5011 - Identification marking of metals and metal products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification marking of metals and metal products. 109-27.5011 Section 109-27.5011 Public Contracts and Property..., Procedures, and Guidelines § 109-27.5011 Identification marking of metals and metal products....

  7. 41 CFR 109-27.5011 - Identification marking of metals and metal products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification marking of metals and metal products. 109-27.5011 Section 109-27.5011 Public Contracts and Property..., Procedures, and Guidelines § 109-27.5011 Identification marking of metals and metal products....

  8. 41 CFR 109-27.5011 - Identification marking of metals and metal products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Identification marking of metals and metal products. 109-27.5011 Section 109-27.5011 Public Contracts and Property..., Procedures, and Guidelines § 109-27.5011 Identification marking of metals and metal products....

  9. 41 CFR 109-27.5011 - Identification marking of metals and metal products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification marking of metals and metal products. 109-27.5011 Section 109-27.5011 Public Contracts and Property..., Procedures, and Guidelines § 109-27.5011 Identification marking of metals and metal products....

  10. 41 CFR 109-27.5011 - Identification marking of metals and metal products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification marking of metals and metal products. 109-27.5011 Section 109-27.5011 Public Contracts and Property..., Procedures, and Guidelines § 109-27.5011 Identification marking of metals and metal products....

  11. The GOES-R Product Generation Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittberner, G. J.; Kalluri, S.; Hansen, D.; Weiner, A.; Tarpley, A.; Marley, S.

    2011-12-01

    The GOES-R system will substantially improve users' ability to succeed in their work by providing data with significantly enhanced instruments, higher resolution, much shorter relook times, and an increased number and diversity of products. The Product Generation architecture is designed to provide the computer and memory resources necessary to achieve the necessary latency and availability for these products. Over time, new and updated algorithms are expected to be added and old ones removed as science advances and new products are developed. The GOES-R GS architecture is being planned to maintain functionality so that when such changes are implemented, operational product generation will continue without interruption. The primary parts of the PG infrastructure are the Service Based Architecture (SBA) and the Data Fabric (DF). SBA is the middleware that encapsulates and manages science algorithms that generate products. It is divided into three parts, the Executive, which manages and configures the algorithm as a service, the Dispatcher, which provides data to the algorithm, and the Strategy, which determines when the algorithm can execute with the available data. SBA is a distributed architecture, with services connected to each other over a compute grid and is highly scalable. This plug-and-play architecture allows algorithms to be added, removed, or updated without affecting any other services or software currently running and producing data. Algorithms require product data from other algorithms, so a scalable and reliable messaging is necessary. The SBA uses the DF to provide this data communication layer between algorithms. The DF provides an abstract interface over a distributed and persistent multi-layered storage system (e.g., memory based caching above disk-based storage) and an event management system that allows event-driven algorithm services to know when instrument data are available and where they reside. Together, the SBA and the DF provide a

  12. Generation of deformation twins in nanocrystalline metals: Theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkin, M. Yu.; Ovid'ko, I. A.; Skiba, N. V.

    2006-11-01

    A theoretical model is suggested that describes the generation of deformation twins at grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals. Within the model, a thick twin lamella in a nanoscale grain is generated due to stress-driven emission of twinning dislocations from a grain boundary. The lamella consists of overlapping stacking faults. The results account for experimental data on observation of deformation twins in nanocrystalline Al and Cu reported in the literature.

  13. Autotrophic denitrification using hydrogen generated from metallic iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Sunger, Neha; Bose, Purnendu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogenotrophic denitrification was demonstrated using hydrogen generated from anoxic corrosion of metallic iron. For this purpose, a mixture of hydrogenated water and nitrate solution was used as reactor feed. A semi-batch reactor with nitrate loading of 2000 mg m(-3) d(-1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of 0.27 mg N L(-1) (99% nitrate removal). A continuous flow reactor with nitrate loading of 28.9 mg m(-3) d(-1) and HRT of 15.6 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of approximately 0.025 mg N L(-1) (95% nitrate removal). In both cases, the concentration of nitrate degradation by-products, viz., ammonia and nitrite, were below detection limits. The rate of denitrification in the reactors was controlled by hydrogen availability, and hence to operate such reactors at higher nitrate loading rates and/or lower HRT than reported in the present study, hydrogen concentration in the hydrogenated water must be significantly increased.

  14. Replicative generation of metal microstructures by template-directed electrometallization

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, I.; Haehner, G.; Buck, M.

    2005-07-11

    Copper structures were produced by electrochemical deposition onto patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMS) of thiols adsorbed on polycrystalline gold substrates and subsequent transfer to an insulating substrate. Selective metal deposition was achieved by use of thiols which differ in their electrochemical blocking properties, namely hexadecane thiol [CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 15}SH] and {omega}-(4{sup '}-methyl-biphenyl-4-yl)-methanethiol (CH{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CH{sub 2}-SH). Besides control of the blocking properties, the SAM served to minimize adhesion between the metal deposit and the substrate, thus, allowing the transfer of the metal pattern. Since the process is replicative, it represents a very simple and fast route to generating metal patterns.

  15. Replicative generation of metal microstructures by template-directed electrometallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thom, I.; Hähner, G.; Buck, M.

    2005-07-01

    Copper structures were produced by electrochemical deposition onto patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMS) of thiols adsorbed on polycrystalline gold substrates and subsequent transfer to an insulating substrate. Selective metal deposition was achieved by use of thiols which differ in their electrochemical blocking properties, namely hexadecane thiol [CH3(CH2)15SH] and ω-(4'-methyl-biphenyl-4-yl)-methanethiol (CH3-C6H4-C6H4-CH2-SH). Besides control of the blocking properties, the SAM served to minimize adhesion between the metal deposit and the substrate, thus, allowing the transfer of the metal pattern. Since the process is replicative, it represents a very simple and fast route to generating metal patterns.

  16. Predictive cartography of metal binders using generative topographic mapping.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Igor I; Solov'ev, Vitaly P; Bagatur'yants, Alexander A; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-07-07

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) approach is used to visualize the chemical space of organic molecules (L) with respect to binding a wide range of 41 different metal cations (M) and also to build predictive models for stability constants (logK) of 1:1 (M:L) complexes using "density maps," "activity landscapes," and "selectivity landscapes" techniques. A two-dimensional map describing the entire set of 2962 metal binders reveals the selectivity and promiscuity zones with respect to individual metals or groups of metals with similar chemical properties (lanthanides, transition metals, etc). The GTM-based global (for entire set) and local (for selected subsets) models demonstrate a good predictive performance in the cross-validation procedure. It is also shown that the data likelihood could be used as a definition of the applicability domain of GTM-based models. Thus, the GTM approach represents an efficient tool for the predictive cartography of metal binders, which can both visualize their chemical space and predict the affinity profile of metals for new ligands.

  17. Predictive cartography of metal binders using generative topographic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Igor I.; Solov'ev, Vitaly P.; Bagatur'yants, Alexander A.; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-08-01

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) approach is used to visualize the chemical space of organic molecules (L) with respect to binding a wide range of 41 different metal cations (M) and also to build predictive models for stability constants (log K) of 1:1 (M:L) complexes using "density maps," "activity landscapes," and "selectivity landscapes" techniques. A two-dimensional map describing the entire set of 2962 metal binders reveals the selectivity and promiscuity zones with respect to individual metals or groups of metals with similar chemical properties (lanthanides, transition metals, etc). The GTM-based global (for entire set) and local (for selected subsets) models demonstrate a good predictive performance in the cross-validation procedure. It is also shown that the data likelihood could be used as a definition of the applicability domain of GTM-based models. Thus, the GTM approach represents an efficient tool for the predictive cartography of metal binders, which can both visualize their chemical space and predict the affinity profile of metals for new ligands.

  18. Manipulation and measurement of pH sensitive metal-ligand binding using electrochemical proton generation and metal detection.

    PubMed

    Read, Tania L; Joseph, Maxim B; Macpherson, Julie V

    2016-01-31

    Generator-detector electrodes can be used to both perturb and monitor pH dependant metal-ligand binding equilibria, in situ. In particular, protons generated at the generator locally influence the speciation of metal (Cu(2+)) in the presence of ligand (triethylenetetraamine), with the detector employed to monitor, in real time, free metal (Cu(2+)) concentrations.

  19. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  20. DWPF Hydrogen Generation Study-Form of Noble Metal SRAT Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    ) The peak hydrogen generation rate occurred three to five hours later for the regular and heat-treated co-precipitated noble metal slurries than for the slurries with trimmed noble metals. (B) The peak hydrogen generation rate was lower during processing of the co-precipitated noble metal simulant relative to the trimmed noble metal simulant data. (C) Trimmed noble metals appeared to be conservative relative to co-precipitated noble metals under the conditions of these tests as long as the peak hydrogen generation rate occurred early in the SRAT boiling period. (2) If the peak hydrogen generation rate with trimmed noble metals is near or above the DWPF limit, and if the peak occurs late in the SRAT cycle, then a potential SME cycle hydrogen generation rate issue could be anticipated when using co-precipitated noble metals, since the peak is expected to be delayed relative to trimmed noble metals. (3) The peak hydrogen generation rate increased from about 1.3 to about 3.7 lbs H{sub 2}/hr on the range of 170-190% stoichiometry, or about 0.1 lbs. H{sub 2}/hr per % change in the stoichiometric factor at DWPF scale. (4) The peak generation rate was slightly higher during processing of the heat-treated coprecipitated noble metal simulant relative to the trimmed noble metal heat-treated simulant, but this probably due to somewhat more excess acid being added to the co-precipitated noble metal test than intended. (5) The variations in the peak hydrogen generation rate appeared to track the quantity of dissolved rhodium in the SRAT product. (6) A noble metal apparently activated and then de-activated during the final hour of formic acid addition. The associated peak generation rate was <3% of the maximum rate seen in each test. Palladium may have been responsible based on literature data. (7) Planned comparisons between heat-treated and un-heat-treated simulants were complicated by the significantly altered base equivalents following heat-treatment. This necessitated making

  1. NPOESS Interface Data Processing Segment Product Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The NPOESS design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process environmental data products beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. Within the overall NPOESS processing environment, the IDPS must process a data volume nearly 1000 times the size of current systems -- in one-quarter of the time. Further, it must support the calibration, validation, and data quality improvement initiatives of the NPOESS program to ensure the production of atmospheric and environmental products that meet strict requirements for accuracy and precision. This paper will describe the architecture approach that is necessary to meet these challenging, and seemingly exclusive, NPOESS IDPS design requirements, with a focus on the processing relationships required to generate the NPP products.

  2. Old acid, new chemistry. Negative metal anions generated from alkali metal oxalates and others.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sharon; Renaud, Justin; Holmes, John L; Mayer, Paul M

    2010-11-01

    A brief search in Sci Finder for oxalic acid and oxalates will reward the researcher with a staggering 129,280 hits. However, the generation of alkali metal and silver anions via collision-induced dissociation of the metal oxalate anion has not been previously been reported, though Tian and coworkers recently investigated the dissociation of lithium oxalate. The exothermic decomposition of alkali metal oxalate anion to carbon dioxide in the collision cell of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer leaves no place for the electron to reside, resulting in a double electron-transfer reaction to produce an alkali metal anion. This reaction is facilitated by the negative electron affinity of carbon dioxide and, as such, the authors believe that metal oxalates are potentially unique in this respect. The observed dissociation reactions for collision with argon gas (1.7-1.8 × 10(-3) mbar) for oxalic acid and various alkali metal oxalates are discussed and summarized. Silver oxalate is also included to demonstrate the propensity of this system to generate transition-metal anions, as well.

  3. In-situ generation of oxygen-releasing metal peroxides

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2007-01-09

    A method for remediation of contaminants in soil and groundwater is disclosed. The method generates oxygen releasing solids in groundwater or soil by injecting an aqueous energetic oxidant solution containing free radicals, oxidative conditions can be created within or ahead of a contaminant plume. Some contaminants may be remediated directly by reaction with the free radicals. Additionally and more importantly, the free radicals create an oxidative condition whereby native or injected materials, especially metals, are converted to peroxides. These peroxides provide a long-term oxygen reservoir, releasing oxygen relatively slowly over time. The oxygen can enhance microbial metabolism to remediate contaminants, can react with contaminant metals either to form immobile precipitants or to mobilize other metals to permit remediation through leaching techniques. Various injection strategies for injecting the energetic oxidant solution are also disclosed.

  4. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1995-12-31

    The view that natural gas is thermolytic, coming from decomposing organic debris, has remained almost unchallenged for nearly half a century. Disturbing contradictions exist, however: Oil is found at great depth, at temperatures where only gas should exist and oil and gas deposits show no evidence of the thermolytic debris indicative of oil decomposing to gas. Moreover, laboratory attempts to duplicate the composition of natural gas, which is typically between 60 and 95+ wt% methane in C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}, have produced insufficient amounts of methane (10 to 60%). It has been suggested that natural gas may be generated catalytically, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. This talk will discuss experimental results that support this hypothesis. Various transition metals, as pure compounds and in source rocks, will be shown to generate a catalytic gas that is identical to natural gas. Kinetic results suggest robust catalytic activity under moderate catagenetic conditions.

  5. Semisolid Metal Processing Techniques for Nondendritic Feedstock Production

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, M. N.; Omar, M. Z.; Salleh, M. S.; Alhawari, K. S.; Kapranos, P.

    2013-01-01

    Semisolid metal (SSM) processing or thixoforming is widely known as a technology that involves the formation of metal alloys between solidus and liquidus temperatures. For the procedure to operate successfully, the microstructure of the starting material must consist of solid near-globular grains surrounded by a liquid matrix and a wide solidus-to-liquidus transition area. Currently, this process is industrially successful, generating a variety of products with high quality parts in various industrial sectors. Throughout the years since its inception, a number of technologies to produce the appropriate globular microstructure have been developed and applied worldwide. The main aim of this paper is to classify the presently available SSM technologies and present a comprehensive review of the potential mechanisms that lead to microstructural alterations during the preparation of feedstock materials for SSM processing. PMID:24194689

  6. Mercury emission and behavior in primary ferrous metal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Naomichi; Takaoka, Masaki; Doumoto, Shingo; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Morisawa, Shinsuke; Mizuno, Tadao

    2011-07-01

    Ferrous metal production is thought to be a major mercury emission source because it uses large amounts of coal and iron ore, which contain trace amounts of mercury impurities. However, there is limited information about mercury emissions during the production process. In this study, we focused on the coke-oven process, sintering furnace process, and blast furnace process. We measured the mercury concentration in the raw materials, products, and byproducts to estimate the amount of mercury emitted and to investigate the behavior of mercury during the processes. Average mercury concentrations were 30.8 μg kg -1 in 54 samples of iron ore and 59.9 μg kg -1 in 33 samples of coal. The total mercury used for ferrous metal production in Japan was estimated to be 8.45 tons in 2005, with 4.07 tons from iron ore, 3.76 tons from coal, and 0.478 tons from limestone. Emissions from the sintering process accounted for more than 90% of the total emissions, and mercury in the exhaust gas was reduced using an activated coke tower and desulfurization equipment installed downstream of an electrostatic precipitator. When byproduct gas generated from coke-oven and blast furnace processes were included, mercury emissions estimates based on actual measurements were 4.08 tons y -1 (in 2005). Thus, about 50% of the mercury input in ferrous metal production was emitted to the atmosphere. The emission factor was calculated as 0.0488 g Hg ton -1 for crude steel production. The introduction of activated coke tower or desulfurization equipment in sintering furnace facilities would reduce mercury emissions.

  7. Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Burchinov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides is studied. It is shown that, under conditions of heterogeneous photo-catalysis, along with the conventional mechanism of singlet oxygen formation due to the formation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide structure, there is an additional and more efficient mechanism involving direct optical excitation of molecular oxygen adsorbed on the oxide surface. The excited adsorbate molecule then interacts with the surface or with other adsorbate molecules. It is shown that, with respect to singlet oxygen generation, yttrium oxide is more than an order of magnitude more efficient than other oxides, including titanium dioxide.

  8. 30 kW metal diaphragm pressure wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, A.; Branje, P.; Klok, T.

    2014-01-01

    Callaghan Innovation has been developing a metal-diaphragm pressure wave generator technology for pulse tube or Stirling cryocoolers since 2005. A series of successful pressure wave generators have been designed, fabricated and demonstrated ranging in swept volume from 20 to 240 cc driven by commercially available induction motors of powers from 0.5 kW to 7.5 kW respectively. A number of pulse tubes have also been design and successfully trialed with these pressure wave generators. Cooling powers up to 600 W at 120 K have been achieved. We have now scaled the pressure wave generator technology to 1000cc swept volume, powered by a 30 kW induction motor with the intention of providing over 20 kW of acoustic power to either pulse tube or Stirling expanders. The aim is to develop a cryocooler with more than 1000 W of refrigeration at 77 K. Target applications include liquefaction and High Temperature Superconducting devices. Initial results from testing the 1000 cc pressure wave generator are presented and we will discuss the challenges and advantages involved in scaling the metal diaphragm technology to higher acoustic powers.

  9. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G. Zolotukhin, D. B.; Klimov, A. S.; Savkin, K. P.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  10. The Next Generation of HLA Image Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, N. I.; Casertano, S.; Ferguson, B.

    2012-09-01

    We present the re-engineered pipeline based on existing and improved algorithms with the aim of improving processing quality, cross-instrument portability, data flow management, and software maintenance. The Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) is a project to add value to the Hubble Space Telescope data archive by producing and delivering science-ready drizzled data products and source lists derived from these products. Initially, ACS, NICMOS, and WFCP2 data were combined using instrument-specific pipelines based on scripts developed to process the ACS GOODS data and a separate set of scripts to generate source extractor and DAOPhot source lists. The new pipeline, initially designed for WFC3 data, isolates instrument-specific processing and is easily extendable to other instruments and to generating wide-area mosaics. Significant improvements have been made in image combination using improved alignment, source detection, and background equalization routines. It integrates improved alignment procedures, better noise model, and source list generation within a single code base. Wherever practical, PyRAF based routines have been replaced with non-IRAF based python libraries (e.g. NumPy and PyFITS). The data formats have been modified to handle better and more consistent propagation of information from individual exposures to the combined products. A new exposure layer stores the effective exposure time for each pixel in the sky which is key in properly interpreting combined images from diverse data that were not initially planned to be mosaiced. We worked to improve the validity of the metadata within our FITS headers for these products relative to standard IRAF/PyRAF processing. Any keywords that pertain to individual exposures have been removed from the primary and extension headers and placed in a table extension for more direct and efficient perusal. This mechanism also allows for more detailed information on the processing of individual images to be stored and propagated

  11. The production of metal mirrors for use in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David

    This thesis demonstrates the possibility of manufacturing larger mirrors from nickel coated aluminium with a considerable cost and risk benefits compared to zero expansion glass ceramic or borosilicate. Constructing large mirrors from aluminium could cut the cost of production by one third. A new generation of very large telescopes is being designed, on the order of 100 meters diameter. The proposed designs are of mosaic type mirrors similar to the Keck Telescope primary. The enormous mass of glass required inhibits the construction, simply by its cost and production time. Very little research has been done on the processes involved in the production of large metal mirrors. However the thermal efficiency and potential improved mirror seeing benefits are documented. Space telescopes and optical telecommunications could also benefit with the application of metal mirrors. Presented here are the processes and results that culminated in the rebirth of the Birr Telescope. The main section concerns the material selection and processes in the construction of a 1.83 meter diameter 1.4 tonne aluminium primary mirror. The aluminium mirror technology developed was also applied to the construction of an aspheric thin meniscus deformable mirror. Methods employed in its production are described. Documented are the advanced computer controlled polishing methods employed in producing a one third scale model of the hyperbolic secondary mirror for the Gemini Telescopes. These were developed using an active polishing lap.

  12. Plant productivity and heavy metal contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Guidi, G.V.; Petruzzelli, G.; Vallini, G.; Pera, A.

    1990-06-01

    This article describes the potential for use of composts from green waste and from municipal solid wastes for agricultural use in Italy. The accumulation of heavy metals in compost-amended soils and crops was evaluated and the influence of these composts on plant productivity was studied. Green compost was obtained from vegetable organic residues; municipal solid waste derived compost was obtained from the aerobic biostabilization of a mixture of the organic biodegradable fraction of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge. The two composts had good chemical characteristics and their use caused no pollution to soil and plants. The overall fertilizing effect was higher for green compost even though green compost and municipal solid waste derived compost had similar contents of primary elements of fertility.

  13. Photoreactivity of Metal-Organic Frameworks in Aqueous Solutions: Metal Dependence of Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Gao, Yanxin; Liu, Jing; Wen, Yifan; Zhao, Yingcan; Zhang, Kunyang; Yu, Gang

    2016-04-05

    Promising applications of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in various fields have raised concern over their environmental fate and safety upon inevitable discharge into aqueous environments. Currently, no information regarding the transformation processes of MOFs is available. Due to the presence of repetitive π-bond structure and semiconductive property, photochemical transformations are an important fate process that affects the performance of MOFs in practical applications. In the current study, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isoreticular MIL-53s was studied. Scavengers were employed to probe the production of (1)O2, O2(•-), and •OH, respectively. In general, MIL-53(Cr) and MIL-53(Fe) are dominated by type I and II photosensitization reactions, respectively, and MIL-53(Al) appears to be less photoreactive. The generation of ROS in MIL-53(Fe) may be underestimated due to dismutation. Further investigation of MIL-53(Fe) encapsulated diclofenac transformation revealed that diclofenac can be easily transformed by MIL-53(Fe) generated ROS. However, the cytotoxicity results implied that the ROS generated from MIL-53s have little effect on the viability of the human hepatocyte (HepG2) cell line. These results suggest that the photogeneration of ROS by MOFs may be metal-node dependent, and the application of MIL-53s as drug carriers needs to be carefully considered due to their high photoreactivity.

  14. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Foran, M.T.

    1984-01-06

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150 to 260/sup 0/C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO/sub 4/ and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect. 3 tables.

  15. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  16. Electromagnetic generation of sound in metals in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronov, I. E.; Fal'ko, V. L.

    1992-11-01

    A wide range of phenomena of the electromagnetic generation of sound in metals in a magnetic field is reviewed. All phenomena of mutual conversion of waves and of sound generation are due to the interaction of conduction electrons with phonons. A wide variety of resonance effects in a magnetic field determines numerous mechanisms for direct sound generation by an external microwave. The basic equations and boundary conditions for the problem of electron-phonon interaction in metals are presented in the quasiclassical approximation. In the low-temperature region under the conditions of the anomalous skin effect the wave conversion is caused, besides by inductive interaction, also by electron-phonon interaction via the deformation potential. The major conversion mechanism of an electromagnetic wave into sound results in various resonance effects in a magnetic field in conditions of strong spatial dispersion. We present an exact solution of the problem for an alkali metal in a magnetic field normal to the surface. We analyze the asymptotic approximations related with the skin-effect anomaly, the coupling of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in metals, and the role of surface scattering. We study the effect of resonance renormalization of electron-phonon interaction in metals with a complex dispersion law, which results in a partial compensation of resonance singularities and appears in Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonances. The doppleron-phonon resonance and its polarization effects are investigated. The electromagnetic generation of sound in metals in a magnetic field parallel to the surface is due to the additional mechanism of selecting “effective” electrons, where resonance effects are observed. We study geometric and cyclotron resonances, and the resonance coupling of a sound wave with a cyclotron wave. The amplitude and phase of the generated sound depend on the character of electron scattering on the metal boundary because in specular scattering a group of

  17. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  18. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; ...

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  19. Generation and characterization of gas bubbles in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.; Witke, W.

    1996-06-01

    There is an ongoing research performed in the RCR on local transport phenomena in turbulent liquid metal (LM) duct flows exposed to external magnetic fields. In this context so-called MHD flow phenomena can be observed, which are unknown in usual hydraulic engineering. The field of interest covers also the influence of magnetic fields on the behaviour of liquid metal - gas mixtures. Profound knowledge on these LMMHD two-phase flow plays an important role in a variety of technological applications, in particular, in the design of Liquid-Metal MHD generators or for several metallurgical processes employing gas-stirred reactors. However, the highly empirical nature of two-phase flow analysis gives little hope for the prediction of MHD two-phase flows without extensive experimental data. A summary is given about the authors research activities focussing on two directions: (a) Momentum transfer between gas and liquid metal in a bubbly flow regime to investigate the influence of the external magnetic field on the velocity slip ration S (b) Peculiarities of the MHD turbulence to use small gas bubbles as local tracers in order to study the turbulent mass transfer.

  20. Optic device for generating metallic parts with the LAPS-J process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigel, Julian; Dausinger, Friedrich; Huegel, Helmut

    1997-09-01

    To increase the flexibility of the generative LAPS-J (laser aided power solidification -- powder jet) process, a special focusing device has been developed. The beam of a Nd:YAG laser is delivered into the production machine via a step-index glass fiber. To utilize the resulting top-hat intensity distribution, the end facet of the fiber is imaged on the workpiece by a special optical system, consisting of four lenses. It allows the variation of the scale of imaging between 4:1 and 1:1. By the computer controlled movement of two motors it is possible to change the width of the generated tracks in this range during laser processing. Integrated in a turning center, the LAPS-J proces allows new and complex applications, e.g. in the fields of cladding, rapid prototyping or repairing of metal parts. With an additional process control, the quality and accuracy of generated metallic parts can be considerably increased.

  1. Process for improving metal production in steelmaking processes

    DOEpatents

    Pal, U.B.; Gazula, G.K.M.; Hasham, A.

    1996-06-18

    A process and apparatus for improving metal production in ironmaking and steelmaking processes is disclosed. The use of an inert metallic conductor in the slag containing crucible and the addition of a transition metal oxide to the slag are the disclosed process improvements. 6 figs.

  2. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  3. Process for improving metal production in steelmaking processes

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B.; Gazula, Gopala K. M.; Hasham, Ali

    1996-01-01

    A process and apparatus for improving metal production in ironmaking and steelmaking processes is disclosed. The use of an inert metallic conductor in the slag containing crucible and the addition of a transition metal oxide to the slag are the disclosed process improvements.

  4. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1984-08-07

    A method is disclosed for production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of A1/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700/sup 0/-800/sup 0/ C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  5. Generation of Subwavelength Plasmonic Nanovortices via Helically Corrugated Metallic Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changming; Chen, Xianfeng; Oladipo, Abiola O; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-08-17

    We demonstrate that plasmonic helical gratings consisting of metallic nanowires imprinted with helical grooves or ridges can be used efficiently to generate plasmonic vortices with radius much smaller than the operating wavelength. In our proposed approach, these helical surface gratings are designed so that plasmon modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers (topological charge) are phase-matched, thus allowing one to generate optical plasmonic vortices with arbitrary topological charge. The general principles for designing plasmonic helical gratings that facilitate efficient generation of such plasmonic vortices are derived and their applicability to the conversion of plasmonic vortices with zero angular momentum into plasmonic vortices with arbitrary angular momentum is illustrated in several particular cases. Our analysis, based both on the exact solutions for the electromagnetic field propagating in the helical plasmonic grating and a coupled-mode theory, suggests that even in the presence of metal losses the fundamental mode with topological charge m = 0 can be converted to plasmon vortex modes with topological charge m = 1 and m = 2 with a conversion efficiency as large as 60%. The plasmonic nanovortices introduced in this study open new avenues for exciting applications of orbital angular momentum in the nanoworld.

  6. Generation of hydroxyl radicals from metal-loaded humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Paciolla, M.D.; Jansen, S.A.; Davies, G.

    1999-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are naturally occurring biopolymers that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are most commonly found in the soil, drinking water, and a variety of plants. Pharmacological and therapeutic studies involving humic acids have been reported to some extent. However, when certain transition metals are bound to humic acids, e.g., iron and copper, they can be harmful to biological organisms. For this study, humic acids were extracted from German, Irish, and New Hampshire soils that were selectively chosen because of their reich abundance in humic material. Each sample was treated at room temperature with 0.1 M ferric and cupric solutions for 48 h. The amount of iron and copper adsorbed by humic acid was accurately quantitated using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The authors further demonstrate that these metal-loaded humic acids can produce deleterious oxidizing species such as the hydroxyl radical (HO*) through the metal-driven Fenton reaction. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) employing spin trapping techniques with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) is used to confirm the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The DMPO-OH adduct with hyperfine splitting constants A{sub N} = A{sub H} = 14.9 G is observed upon the addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide. The concentration of hydroxyl radical was determined using 4-hydroxytempo (TEMPO-OH) as a spin standard. The presence of another oxidizing species, Fe{double_bond}O{sup 2+}, is also proposed in the absence of hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Effect of Metals, Metalloids and Metallic Nanoparticles on Microalgae Growth and Industrial Product Biosynthesis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Miazek, Krystian; Iwanek, Waldemar; Remacle, Claire; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a source of numerous compounds that can be used in many branches of industry. Synthesis of such compounds in microalgal cells can be amplified under stress conditions. Exposure to various metals can be one of methods applied to induce cell stress and synthesis of target products in microalgae cultures. In this review, the potential of producing diverse biocompounds (pigments, lipids, exopolymers, peptides, phytohormones, arsenoorganics, nanoparticles) from microalgae cultures upon exposure to various metals, is evaluated. Additionally, different methods to alter microalgae response towards metals and metal stress are described. Finally, possibilities to sustain high growth rates and productivity of microalgal cultures in the presence of metals are discussed. PMID:26473834

  8. Effect of Metals, Metalloids and Metallic Nanoparticles on Microalgae Growth and Industrial Product Biosynthesis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Miazek, Krystian; Iwanek, Waldemar; Remacle, Claire; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2015-10-09

    Microalgae are a source of numerous compounds that can be used in many branches of industry. Synthesis of such compounds in microalgal cells can be amplified under stress conditions. Exposure to various metals can be one of methods applied to induce cell stress and synthesis of target products in microalgae cultures. In this review, the potential of producing diverse biocompounds (pigments, lipids, exopolymers, peptides, phytohormones, arsenoorganics, nanoparticles) from microalgae cultures upon exposure to various metals, is evaluated. Additionally, different methods to alter microalgae response towards metals and metal stress are described. Finally, possibilities to sustain high growth rates and productivity of microalgal cultures in the presence of metals are discussed.

  9. Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funahashi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Takanori; Kageyama, Keisuke; Ieki, Hideharu

    2011-06-01

    Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators (TEGs) were fabricated using multilayer co-fired ceramic technology. These devices consisted of Ni0.9Mo0.1 and La0.035Sr0.965TiO3 as p- and n-type thermoelectric materials, and Y0.03Zr0.97O2 was used as an insulator, sandwiched between p- and n-type layers. To co-fire dissimilar materials, p-type layers contained 20 wt. % La0.035Sr0.965TiO3; thus, these were oxide-metal composite layers. The fabricated device had 50 pairs of p-i-n junctions of 5.9 mm × 7.0 mm × 2.6 mm. The calculated maximum value of the electric power output from the device was 450 mW/cm2 at ΔT = 360 K. Furthermore, this device generated 100 μW at ΔT = 10 K and operated a radio frequency (RF) transmitter circuit module assumed to be a sensor network system.

  10. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  11. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process: The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  12. Adaptive scallop height tool path generation for robot-based incremental sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seim, Patrick; Möllensiep, Dennis; Störkle, Denis Daniel; Thyssen, Lars; Kuhlenkötter, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    Incremental sheet metal forming is an emerging process for the production of individualized products or prototypes in low batch sizes and with short times to market. In these processes, the desired shape is produced by the incremental inward motion of the workpiece-independent forming tool in depth direction and its movement along the contour in lateral direction. Based on this shape production, the tool path generation is a key factor on e.g. the resulting geometric accuracy, the resulting surface quality, and the working time. This paper presents an innovative tool path generation based on a commercial milling CAM package considering the surface quality and working time. This approach offers the ability to define a specific scallop height as an indicator of the surface quality for specific faces of a component. Moreover, it decreases the required working time for the production of the entire component compared to the use of a commercial software package without this adaptive approach. Different forming experiments have been performed to verify the newly developed tool path generation. Mainly, this approach serves to solve the existing conflict of combining the working time and the surface quality within the process of incremental sheet metal forming.

  13. Heavy metals generate reactive oxygen species in terrestrial and aquatic ciliated protozoa.

    PubMed

    Rico, Daniel; Martín-González, Ana; Díaz, Silvia; de Lucas, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Juan-Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction by exposure to heavy metals (Cd, Cu or Zn) in diverse free-living ciliated protozoa (Tetrahymena sp. and three strains of Colpoda steinii, isolated from freshwater and soils with different level of metal pollution) has been evaluated. Using specific fluorophores, such as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, hydroethidine and dihydrorhodamine 123, and a fluorescence microscope with the program MetaMorph Imaging System 4.0, we have analyzed both the average fluorescence emission and the heterogeneous distribution of fluorescence in control and treated cells. This is the first time that these fluorophores are used to detect ROS production in ciliated protozoa. All metals generate ROS, mainly superoxide and peroxides, showing a remarkable inter- and intra-specific variations. Likewise, resistance against each metal was also very diverse. Cu and specially Cd, the most toxic heavy metal for these ciliates, are the best oxidative stress inducers. However, a correlation between fluorescence emission intensity and cellular metal sensitivity for each strain cannot be established. Results are discussed and compared with similar findings previously published in other unicellular and pluricellular organisms.

  14. Production and use of metals and oxygen for lunar propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Groth, Mary F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Colvin, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Production, power, and propulsion technologies for using oxygen and metals derived from lunar resources are discussed. The production process is described, and several of the more developed processes are discussed. Power requirements for chemical, thermal, and electrical production methods are compared. The discussion includes potential impact of ongoing power technology programs on lunar production requirements. The performance potential of several possible metal fuels including aluminum, silicon, iron, and titanium are compared. Space propulsion technology in the area of metal/oxygen rocket engines is discussed.

  15. Production and use of metals and oxygen for lunar propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Groth, Mary F.; Colvin, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Production, power, and propulsion technologies for using oxygen and metals derived from lunar resources are discussed. The production process is described, and several of the more developed processes are discussed. Power requirements for chemical, thermal, and electrical production methods are compared. The discussion includes potential impact of ongoing power technology programs on lunar production requirements. The performance potential of several possible metal fuels including aluminum, silicon, iron, and titanium are compared. Space propulsion technology in the area of metal/oxygen rocket engines is discussed.

  16. Effects of CoCr metal wear debris generated from metal-on-metal hip implants and Co ions on human monocyte-like U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Posada, Olga M; Tate, Rothwelle J; Grant, M Helen

    2015-03-01

    Hip resurfacing with cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloy was developed as a surgical alternative to total hip replacement. However, the biological effects of nanoparticles generated by wear at the metal-on-metal articulating surfaces has limited the success of such implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined exposure to CoCr nanoparticles and cobalt ions released from a resurfacing implant on monocytes (U937 cells) and whether these resulted in morphology changes, proliferation alterations, toxicity and cytokine release. The interaction between prior exposure to Co ions and the cellular response to nanoparticulate debris was determined to simulate the situation in patients with metal-on-metal implants receiving a second implant. Effects on U937 cells were mainly seen after 120h of treatment. Prior exposure to Co ions increased the toxic effects induced by the debris, and by Co ions themselves, suggesting the potential for interaction in vivo. Increased TNF-α secretion by resting cells exposed to nanoparticles could contribute to osteolysis processes in vivo, while increased IFN-γ production by activated cells could represent cellular protection against tissue damage. Data suggest that interactions between Co ions and CoCr nanoparticles would occur in vivo, and could threaten the survival of a CoCr metal implant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Generation of copper rich metallic phases from waste printed circuit boards

    SciTech Connect

    Cayumil, R.; Khanna, R.; Ikram-Ul-Haq, M.; Rajarao, R.; Hill, A.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Recycling and material recovery from waste printed circuit boards is very complex. • Thermoset polymers, ceramics and metals are present simultaneously in waste PCBs. • Heat treatment of PCBs was carried out at 1150 °C under inert conditions. • Various metallic phases could be segregated out as copper based metallic droplets. • Carbon and ceramics residues can be further recycled in a range of applications. - Abstract: The rapid consumption and obsolescence of electronics have resulted in e-waste being one of the fastest growing waste streams worldwide. Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are among the most complex e-waste, containing significant quantities of hazardous and toxic materials leading to high levels of pollution if landfilled or processed inappropriately. However, PCBs are also an important resource of metals including copper, tin, lead and precious metals; their recycling is appealing especially as the concentration of these metals in PCBs is considerably higher than in their ores. This article is focused on a novel approach to recover copper rich phases from waste PCBs. Crushed PCBs were heat treated at 1150 °C under argon gas flowing at 1 L/min into a horizontal tube furnace. Samples were placed into an alumina crucible and positioned in the cold zone of the furnace for 5 min to avoid thermal shock, and then pushed into the hot zone, with specimens exposed to high temperatures for 10 and 20 min. After treatment, residues were pulled back to the cold zone and kept there for 5 min to avoid thermal cracking and re-oxidation. This process resulted in the generation of a metallic phase in the form of droplets and a carbonaceous residue. The metallic phase was formed of copper-rich red droplets and tin-rich white droplets along with the presence of several precious metals. The carbonaceous residue was found to consist of slag and ∼30% carbon. The process conditions led to the segregation of hazardous lead and tin clusters in the

  18. Anisotropic Second Harmonic Generation at Single Crystal Metal Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kexiang, He.

    The work in this thesis comprises a set of experiments designed to study the anisotropic spatial dependence of second harmonic generation (SHG) from the surface of single crystal metals. The anisotropic dependence of reflected SHG from Al_2O_3 Al(111) interface was studied. The isotropic dependence of the SHG signal is used to probe the structural symmetry of the Al_2O_3Al(111) interface. For P- and S-polarized laser light incident at a fixed angle of 45^circ, the intensities of S- and P-polarized components of SHG signal were measured as a function of rotation angle during rotation of the surface about its normal. Anisotropic SHG studies were also performed on high Miller index surface of Al(331) and on a Al surface cut at 22.5^ circ with respect to the Al(111) surface. For the Al(331) surface, the anisotropic dependence of the SHG signal was measured for both the S- and P-polarized signals under both S- and P-polarized laser excitation. The anisotropy of the SHG from Al(331) were fit with theory using the assumption that symmetry is retained for this surface at the metal oxide-metal interface. Existing theory is used to derive the theoretical expressions predicting the anisotropic dependence of SHG from Al(331). The SHG probe was also used to follow pulsed laser annealing (PLA) of the Al_2O_3/Al(111) interface from on a chemically polished Al(111) surface. Using P-polarized pump laser light, the P-polarized SHG signal exhibits three equally spaced, equal intensity maxima during a single complete rotation of Al_2O _3/Al(111) interface about the interface normal. Annealing of the interface is found to occur when the P-polarized 1064nm pump laser light has an incident peak power of 11 times 10 ^6W/cm^2 per pulse. The intensity of the P-polarized 532nm SHG signal generated in reflection from this annealed interface exhibits a reduced anisotropic component in the SHG signal. Measurements of the anisotropic SHG signal from ionized beam deposited Al thin-films on Si(111

  19. Charge generation layers comprising transition metal-oxide/organic interfaces: Electronic structure and charge generation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Kröger, M.; Hamwi, S.; Gnam, F.; Riedl, T.; Kowalsky, W.; Kahn, A.

    2010-05-01

    The energetics of an archetype charge generation layer (CGL) architecture comprising of 4,4',4″-tris(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), tungsten oxide (WO3), and bathophenanthroline (BPhen) n-doped with cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) are determined by ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge generation process occurs at the interface between the hole-transport material (TCTA) and WO3 and not, as commonly assumed, at the interface between WO3 and the n-doped electron-transport material (BPhen:Cs2CO3). However, the n-doped layer is also essential to the realization of an efficient CGL structure. The charge generation mechanism occurs via electron transfer from the TCTA highest occupied molecular orbital level to the transition metal-oxide conduction band.

  20. Risk assessment of allergen metals in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Hande; Charehsaz, Mohammad; Güngör, Zerrin; Erdem, Onur; Soykut, Buğra; Akay, Cemal; Aydin, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetics are one of the most common reasons for hospital referrals with allergic contact dermatitis. Because of the increased use of cosmetics within the population and an increase in allergy cases, monitoring of heavy metals, especially allergen metals, is crucial. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentration of allergen metals, nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), and chromium (Cr), in the most commonly used cosmetic products including mascara, eyeliner, eye shadow, lipstick, and nail polish. In addition, for safety assessment of cosmetic products, margin of safety of the metals was evaluated. Forty-eight makeup products were purchased randomly from local markets and large cosmetic stores in Istanbul, Turkey, and an atomic absorption spectrometer was used for metal content determination. Risk assessment of the investigated cosmetic products was performed by calculating the systemic exposure dosage (SED) using Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety guideline. According to the results of this investigation in all the samples tested, at least two of the allergen metals, Ni and/or Co and/or Cr were detected. Moreover, 97% of the Ni-detected products, 96% of Cr- and 54% of Co-detected products, contained over 1 μg/g of this metals, which is the suggested ultimate target value for sensitive population and thereby can be considered as the possible allergen. On the basis of the results of this study, SED of the metals was negligible; however, contact dermatitis caused by cosmetics is most probably due to the allergen metal content of the products. In conclusion, to assess the safety of the finished products, postmarketing vigilance and routine monitoring of allergen metals are very important to protect public health.

  1. The Electrolytic Production of Metallic Uranium

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, R.

    1950-08-22

    This patent covers a process for producing metallic uranium by electrolyzing uranium tetrafluoride at an elevated temperature in a fused bath consisting essentially of mixed alkali and alkaline earth halides.

  2. Photoacoustic-pulse generation and propagation in a metal vapor.

    PubMed

    Tam, A C; Zapka, W; Chiang, K; Imaino, W

    1982-01-01

    Photoacoustic-pulse generation by breakdown is achieved in dense cesium metal vapors of vapor pressures ranging from 2 to 130 Torr by using a dye laser pulse of energy variable from 10(-6) to 10(-3) J, tuned to the Cs transition at 6010 A. The acoustic-pulse propagation is detected by the transient photorefractive deflection of a cw probe laser beam that is displaced from but parallel to the pulsed laser beam. The temperature-dependent velocity of infinitesimal ultrasonic waves in a corrosive metal vapor is measured for the first time. The supersonic propagation of finite amplitude acoustic pulses (blast waves) obtained with a higher pulse energy is also studied. Our data, with Mach numbers ranging from 2.1 down to below 1.01, agree surprisingly well with the prediction of Vlases and Jones for cylindrical blast waves. This provides a new experimental support for their theoretical trajectory formula for blast waves in the extremely weak amplitude limit.

  3. Apparatus and method for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Improved electrolytic cells and methods for producing metals by electrolytic reduction of a compound dissolved in a molten electrolyte are disclosed. In the improved cells and methods, a protective surface layer is formed upon at least one electrode in the electrolytic reduction cell and, optionally, upon the lining of the cell. This protective surface layer comprises a material that, at the operating conditions of the cell: (a) is not substantially reduced by the metal product; (b) is not substantially reactive with the cell electrolyte to form materials that are reactive with the metal product; and, (c) has an electrochemical potential that is more electronegative than that of the compound undergoing electrolysis to produce the metal product of the cell. The protective surface layer can be formed upon an electrode metal layer comprising a material, the oxide of which also satisfies the protective layer selection criteria. The protective layer material can also be used on the surface of a cell lining.

  4. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  5. NEXT GENERATION ENERGY EFFICIENT FLUORESCENT LIGHTING PRODUCT

    SciTech Connect

    Alok Srivastava; Anant Setlur

    2003-04-01

    This is the Final Report of the Next-Generation Energy Efficient Fluorescent Lighting Products program, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program was to develop novel phosphors to improve the color rendition and efficiency of compact and linear fluorescent lamps. The prime technical approach was the development of quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) to further increase the efficiency of conventional linear fluorescent lamps and the development of new high color rendering phosphor blends for compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) as potential replacements for the energy-hungry and short-lived incandescent lamps in market segments that demand high color rendering light sources. We determined early in the project that the previously developed oxide QSP, SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+}, did not exhibit an quantum efficiency higher than unity under excitation by 185 nm radiation, and we therefore worked to determine the physical reasons for this observation. From our investigations we concluded that the achievement of quantum efficiency exceeding unity in SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+} was not possible due to interaction of the Pr{sup 3+} 5d level with the conduction band of the solid. The interaction which gives rise to an additional nonradiative decay path for the excitation energy is responsible for the low quantum efficiency of the phosphor. Our work has led to the development of a novel spectroscopic method for determining photoionzation threshold of luminescent centers in solids. This has resulted in further quantification of the requirements for host phosphor lattice materials to optimize quantum efficiency. Because of the low quantum efficiency of the QSP, we were unable to demonstrate a linear fluorescent lamp with overall performance exceeding that of existing mercury-based fluorescent lamps. Our work on the high color rendering CFLs has been very successful. We have demonstrated CFLs that satisfies the EnergyStar requirement with color

  6. Rate of phytochelatin production: Importance to metal tolerance. [Deschampsia caespitosa

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton-Brown, M.; Rauser, W.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Low molecular weight, cysteine-rich metal-binding peptides are produced in plants exposed to metals. This study focuses on the hypothesis that the rate of phytochelatin production is important to metal tolerance. Four clones of Deschampsia caespitosa tolerant of Cu and Ni, and one non-tolerant clone, were exposed to Cu and Ni for various times up to 24h. Root extracts were chromatographed on an anion exchange column to separate the metal-peptide fraction from unbound metal. In three metal-tolerant clones up to 95% of the buffer-soluble Cu and Ni was found in the metal-peptide fraction after 1h of exposure, with little change occurring subsequently. The non-tolerant clone bound only 2% of the metal after 1h. Copper remained low over 24h while Ni increased in the peptide fraction to the levels found in the tolerant clones. One metal tolerant clone did not conform to the patterns found in the other three. These data support the hypothesis that metal tolerance is, in some cases, related to the ability of roots to rapidly bind the metal that enters cells.

  7. Hydrogen storage and generation using light metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, F.; Mork, B.J.; Wilkes, J.S.

    1998-07-01

    The storage of hydrogen for use in fuel cells employed as portable electric power sources is important. For many applications pressurized gas or cryogenic liquid storage is not acceptable from weight or safety standpoints. This is particularly true for moderate power systems in the 50--200 watt range. A potentially attractive technology for providing hydrogen for moderately sized fuel cell-based electric power supplies is chemical hydrides. In general, chemical hydrides are materials that store hydrogen that may be released by chemical reactions. The authors report here the use of light metal hydrides, such as lithium aluminum tetrahydride and trilithium aluminum hexahydride to store hydrogen in a very dense form; about four times the density of liquid hydrogen. The hydrogen can be released by reaction with simple chemical reagents, such as water or ammonia, at approximately atmospheric pressure and at modest temperatures. The reaction rate may be controlled to provide hydrogen at a rate appropriate to that needed by a fuel cell operating at the power levels mentioned above. Usually hydrogen is the sole gaseous product, along with several solid products.

  8. Determination of toxic metals in Indian smokeless tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Dhaware, Dhanashri; Deshpande, Aditi; Khandekar, R N; Chowgule, Rohini

    2009-10-14

    This study targets the lesser-known ingredients of smokeless tobacco products, i.e., the toxic metals, in Indian brands. The metals selected in the study included lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se). The differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) technique was used for estimating the metals Pb, Cd, and Cu; square wave voltammetry for As; and the cold vapor atomic absorption technique for Hg. The resulting levels of the metals were compared to the daily consumption of the smokeless tobacco products. It was observed that almost 30% of gutkha brand samples exceeded the permissible levels of metals Pb and Cu, when compared to the provisional tolerable intake limits determined by the FAO/WHO. The reliability of data was assured by analyzing standard reference materials.

  9. Inclusion Optimization for Next Generation Steel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sridar Seetharaman: Dr. Alan Cramb

    2006-04-06

    The project objective is to determine the conditions under which the inclusions in liquid steel can act as heterogeneous nucleants for solidification. The experimental approach consisted of measuring the undercooling of a pure iron droplet in contact with different oxides to determine which oxides promote iron solidification by providing a suitable surface for nucleation and which oxides and under which conditions the metal can be deeply undercooled. The conclusions suggest that deep undercoolings are possible at low oxygen content provided the oxygen potential is such that substrate decomposition does not occur. If the oxygen content increases the undercooling decreases.

  10. Recent plutonium metal production experience at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, M.W.; Nyman, D.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Plutonium metal is produced at the Hanford site in the remote mechanical C (RMC) line. The line is housed in the plutonium finishing plant (PFP). The PFP is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the U.S. Department of Energy. The RMC line was built in the early 1960s and operated until 1973 when it was shut down. The line was restarted in 1985 and has operated on a campaign basis since that time. The RMC line converts plutonium nitrate solution to plutonium metal in the classic precipitation/calcination/fluorination/reduction process. The operations are contained in glove boxes with a dry air atmosphere. Most of the process is remotely controlled from a central control room. Numerous process improvements were made in the line before initiating operations in 1985 and in 1988. These changes, in conjunction with improved conduct of operations, have resulted in improved yields.

  11. Electrochemical iron generation: The ideal process for simultaneous removal of heavy metals from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    At most Superfund sites, many heavy metals must be removed from contaminated groundwater. Simultaneous extraction is complicated due to the various chemical properties that metals exhibit. A comprehensive understanding of solubilities, oxidation states, and adsorptive mechanisms is needed to accomplish treatment objectives. This paper uses data from treatability tests conducted on groundwater from the King of Prussia Technical Corporation Site to discuss the electrochemical iron generation process developed by Andco Environmental Processes, Inc. Electrical current and sacrificial steel electrodes were used to put ferrous ions into solution. The chemistry was properly manipulated to provide adsorption and coprecipitation conditions capable of simultaneously removing beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, mercury, nickel, and zinc. Strict cleanup levels were required since the site is located within Pinelands National Reserve and adjacent to New Jersey`s Winslow Wildlife Refuge. System design, operating costs, and sludge production rate are also discussed.

  12. Generation of copper rich metallic phases from waste printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Cayumil, R; Khanna, R; Ikram-Ul-Haq, M; Rajarao, R; Hill, A; Sahajwalla, V

    2014-10-01

    The rapid consumption and obsolescence of electronics have resulted in e-waste being one of the fastest growing waste streams worldwide. Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are among the most complex e-waste, containing significant quantities of hazardous and toxic materials leading to high levels of pollution if landfilled or processed inappropriately. However, PCBs are also an important resource of metals including copper, tin, lead and precious metals; their recycling is appealing especially as the concentration of these metals in PCBs is considerably higher than in their ores. This article is focused on a novel approach to recover copper rich phases from waste PCBs. Crushed PCBs were heat treated at 1150°C under argon gas flowing at 1L/min into a horizontal tube furnace. Samples were placed into an alumina crucible and positioned in the cold zone of the furnace for 5 min to avoid thermal shock, and then pushed into the hot zone, with specimens exposed to high temperatures for 10 and 20 min. After treatment, residues were pulled back to the cold zone and kept there for 5 min to avoid thermal cracking and re-oxidation. This process resulted in the generation of a metallic phase in the form of droplets and a carbonaceous residue. The metallic phase was formed of copper-rich red droplets and tin-rich white droplets along with the presence of several precious metals. The carbonaceous residue was found to consist of slag and ∼30% carbon. The process conditions led to the segregation of hazardous lead and tin clusters in the metallic phase. The heat treatment temperature was chosen to be above the melting point of copper; molten copper helped to concentrate metallic constituents and their separation from the carbonaceous residue and the slag. Inert atmosphere prevented the re-oxidation of metals and the loss of carbon in the gaseous fraction. Recycling e-waste is expected to lead to enhanced metal recovery, conserving natural resources and providing an environmentally

  13. Comparison of Eleven Heavy Metals in Moringa Oleifera Lam. Products

    PubMed Central

    Limmatvapirat, C.; Limmatvapirat, S.; Charoenteeraboon, J.; Wessapan, C.; Kumsum, A.; Jenwithayaamornwech, S.; Luangthuwapranit, P.

    2015-01-01

    Eleven heavy metals in various products of Moringa oleifera were analyzed to determine eleven heavy metals (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, and Zn) using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. The products of M. oleifera were purchased in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. All products were digested with nitric acid solution before determining the concentrations of heavy metals. The recoveries of all heavy metals were found to be in the range of 99.89-103.05%. Several criteria such as linearity, limits of detection, limits of quantification, specificity, precision under repeatability conditions and intermediate precision reproducibility were evaluated. Results indicate that this method could be used in the laboratory for determination of eleven heavy metals in M. oleifera products with acceptable analytical performance. The results of analysis showed that the highest concentrations of As, Cr, Hg, and Mn were found in tea leaves while the highest concentrations of Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were found in leaf capsules. Continuous monitoring of heavy metals in M. oleifera products is crucial for consumer health. PMID:26664066

  14. Programming Productivity Enhancement by the use of Application Generators by the Use of Application Generators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    RD-Ai58 598 PROGRAMMING PRODUCTIVITY ENHANCEMIENT BY THE USE-O F APPLICATION GENERATORS.. (U) UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES DEPT OF...for Grant No. AFOSR-82-0232 I Programming Productivity Enhancement by the Use of Application Generators June 1, 1982 - May 31, 1985 by Ellis Horowitz...area of Application Generators. Systems such as RAMS, NOMAD and FOCUS had all proven * to be versatile at improving programmer productivity in the

  15. Laser thermoelastic generation in metals above the melt threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2013-11-01

    An approach is presented for calculating thermoelastic generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation. Detailed consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the appearance and subsequent growth and then contraction of the melt pool, and the time dependent thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid throughout. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place during and shortly after the laser pulse and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. It is shown how, because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be expressed as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response to these force distributions is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green's functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported on the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12 mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold.

  16. Laser thermoelastic generation in metals above the melt threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2013-11-28

    An approach is presented for calculating thermoelastic generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation. Detailed consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the appearance and subsequent growth and then contraction of the melt pool, and the time dependent thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid throughout. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place during and shortly after the laser pulse and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. It is shown how, because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be expressed as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response to these force distributions is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green's functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported on the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12 mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold.

  17. Generation of Hydroxyl Radicals from Dissolved Transition Metals in Surrogate Lung Fluid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Vidrio, Edgar; Jung, Heejung; Anastasio, Cort

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological research has linked exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) to several adverse health effects, including cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Despite these links, the mechanisms by which PM causes adverse health effects are poorly understood. The generation of hydroxyl radical (·OH) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) through transition metal-mediated pathways is one of the main hypotheses for PM toxicity. In order to better understand the ability of particulate transition metals to produce ROS, we have quantified the amounts of ·OH produced from dissolved iron and copper in a cell-free, surrogate lung fluid (SLF). We also examined how two important biological molecules, citrate and ascorbate, affect the generation of ·OH by these metals. We have found that Fe(II) and Fe(III) produce little ·OH in the absence of ascorbate and citrate, but that they efficiently make ·OH in the presence of ascorbate and this is further enhanced when citrate is also added. In the presence of ascorbate, with or without citrate, the oxidation state of iron makes little difference on the amount of ·OH formed after 24 hours. In the case of Cu(II), the production of ·OH is greatly enhanced in the presence of ascorbate, but is inhibited by the addition of citrate. The mechanism for this effect is unclear, but appears to involve formation of a citrate-copper complex that is apparently less reactive than free, aquated copper in either the generation of HOOH or in the Fenton-like reaction of copper with HOOH to make ·OH. By quantifying the amount of ·OH that Fe and Cu can produce in surrogate lung fluid, we have provided a first step into being able to predict the amounts of ·OH that can be produced in the human lung from exposure to PM containing known amounts of transition metals. PMID:19148304

  18. Generation of Hydroxyl Radicals from Dissolved Transition Metals in Surrogate Lung Fluid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, Edgar; Jung, Heejung; Anastasio, Cort

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological research has linked exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) to several adverse health effects, including cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Despite these links, the mechanisms by which PM causes adverse health effects are poorly understood. The generation of hydroxyl radical (.OH) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) through transition metal-mediated pathways is one of the main hypotheses for PM toxicity. In order to better understand the ability of particulate transition metals to produce ROS, we have quantified the amounts of .OH produced from dissolved iron and copper in a cell-free, surrogate lung fluid (SLF). We also examined how two important biological molecules, citrate and ascorbate, affect the generation of .OH by these metals. We have found that Fe(II) and Fe(III) produce little .OH in the absence of ascorbate and citrate, but that they efficiently make .OH in the presence of ascorbate and this is further enhanced when citrate is also added. In the presence of ascorbate, with or without citrate, the oxidation state of iron makes little difference on the amount of .OH formed after 24 hours. In the case of Cu(II), the production of .OH is greatly enhanced in the presence of ascorbate, but is inhibited by the addition of citrate. The mechanism for this effect is unclear, but appears to involve formation of a citrate-copper complex that is apparently less reactive than free, aquated copper in either the generation of HOOH or in the Fenton-like reaction of copper with HOOH to make .OH. By quantifying the amount of .OH that Fe and Cu can produce in surrogate lung fluid, we have provided a first step into being able to predict the amounts of .OH that can be produced in the human lung from exposure to PM containing known amounts of transition metals.

  19. Impact of heavy metals on the oil products biodegradation process.

    PubMed

    Zukauskaite, Audrone; Jakubauskaite, Viktorija; Belous, Olga; Ambrazaitiene, Dalia; Stasiskiene, Zaneta

    2008-12-01

    Oil products continue to be used as a principal source of energy. Wide-scale production, transport, global use and disposal of petroleum have made them major contaminants in prevalence and quantity in the environment. In accidental spills, actions are taken to remove or remediate or recover the contaminants immediately, especially if they occur in environmentally sensitive areas, for example, in coastal zones. Traditional methods to cope with oil spills are confined to physical containment. Biological methods can have an advantage over the physical-chemical treatment regimes in removing spills in situ as they offer biodegradation of oil fractions by the micro-organisms. Recently, biological methods have been known to play a significant role in bioremediation of oil-polluted coastal areas. Such systems are likely to be of significance in the effective management of sensitive coastal ecosystems chronically subjected to oil spillage. For this reason the aim of this paper is to present an impact of Mn, Cu, Co and Mo quantities on oil biodegradation effectiveness in coastal soil and to determine the relationship between metal concentrations and degradation of two oil products (black oil and diesel fuel). Soil was collected in the Baltic Sea coastal zone oil products degradation area (Klaipeda, Lithuania). The experiment consisted of two parts: study on the influence of micro-elements on the oil product biodegradation process; and analysis of the influence of metal concentration on the number of HDMs. The analysis performed and results obtained address the following areas: impact of metal on a population of hydrocarbon degrading micro-organisms, impact of metals on residual concentrations of oil products, influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, inter-relation of metal concentrations with degradation rates. Statistical analysis was made using ;Statgraphics plus' software. The influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, the biodegradation process

  20. Liquid flame spray for generating metal and metal oxide nanoparticle test aerosol.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J M; Aromaa, M; Rostedt, A; Krinke, T J; Janka, K; Marjamäki, M; Keskinen, J

    2009-06-01

    A flame-based method for generating nanoparticles with production rate in the order of g/min is presented to be used in a variety of applied studies concerning nanoparticle measurements and toxicological tests. In this study, ferric oxide, titanium dioxide, and silver nanoparticles were produced by this technique, as an example of the variety of producible compounds, and number and surface area were measured by state-of-art aerosol instruments. In the primary experiments of this study, the generator was used in a conventional way, in a fume cupboard, and the aerosol was measured from the exhaust duct of the cupboard. It has been shown that this steady, turbulent flame generator is also suitable for producing high-concentration aerosols in a wider concept. The generated aerosol was measured by variety of aerosol instrumentation to show the applicability of the generator. When using the generator intentionally as a source of aerosol in the flame processing room, mean nanoparticle sizes of 5-60 nm and active surface area concentration ranges of 1-10,000 microm(2)/cm(3) were covered for the room aerosol.

  1. For cermet inert anode containing oxide and metal phases useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Douglas A.

    2002-01-01

    A cermet inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a ceramic phase including an oxide of Ni, Fe and M, where M is at least one metal selected from Zn, Co, Al, Li, Cu, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Ta, W, Mo, Hf and rare earths, preferably Zn and/or Co. Preferred ceramic compositions comprise Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3, NiO and ZnO or CoO. The cermet inert anode also comprises a metal phase such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. A preferred metal phase comprises Cu and Ag. The cermet inert anodes may be used in electrolytic reduction cells for the production of commercial purity aluminum as well as other metals.

  2. Photoelectrochemical cell for simultaneous electricity generation and heavy metals recovery from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dawei; Li, Yi; Li Puma, Gianluca; Lianos, Panagiotis; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang

    2017-02-05

    The feasibility of simultaneous recovery of heavy metals from wastewater (e.g., acid mining and electroplating) and production of electricity is demonstrated in a novel photoelectrochemical cell (PEC). The photoanode of the cell bears a nanoparticulate titania (TiO2) film capped with the block copolymer [poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(propylene glycol)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)] hole scavenger, which consumed photogenerated holes, while the photogenerated electrons transferred to a copper cathode reducing dissolved metal ions and produced electricity. Dissolved silver Ag(+), copper Cu(2+), hexavalent chromium as dichromate Cr2O7(2-) and lead Pb(2+) ions in a mixture (0.2mM each) were removed at different rates, according to their reduction potentials. Reduced Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) ions produced metal deposits on the cathode electrode which were mechanically recovered, while Cr2O7(2-) reduced to the less toxic Cr(3+) in solution. The cell produced a current density Jsc of 0.23mA/cm(2), an open circuit voltage Voc of 0.63V and a maximum power density of 0.084mW/cm(2). A satisfactory performance of this PEC for the treatment of lead-acid battery wastewater was observed. The cathodic reduction of heavy metals was limited by the rate of electron-hole generation at the photoanode. The PEC performance decreased by 30% after 9 consecutive runs, caused by the photoanode progressive degradation.

  3. Products of combustion of non-metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Cortes L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate methodologies for the qualitative and quantitative determination of the gaseous products of combustion of non-metallic materials of interest to the aerospace community. The goal is to develop instrumentation and analysis procedures which qualitatively and quantitatively identify gaseous products evolved by thermal decomposition and provide NASA a detailed system operating procedure.

  4. Combustion products generating and metering device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, R. E.; Klisch, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Device simulates incipient fire conditions in closely-controlled adjustable manner, to give predetermined degree of intensity at selected locations throughout area, and to verify that detection system will respond. Device can be used with and for cross calibration and experimentation in conjunction with commercially available products of combustion analyzing meters.

  5. Nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for the electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor attached to a ceramic electrode body by a metal bond on a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  6. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Product Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, S. L.; Suggs, R. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Product Generation System (GPGS) is introduced and described. GPGS is a set of computer programs developed and maintained at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center and is designed to generate meteorological data products using visible and infrared measurements from the GOES-East Imager and Sounder instruments. The products that are produced by GPGS are skin temperature, total precipitable water, cloud top pressure, cloud albedo, surface albedo, and surface insolation. A robust cloud mask is also generated. The retrieval methodology for each product is described to include algorithm descriptions and required inputs and outputs for the programs. Validation is supplied where applicable.

  7. First Generation ASCI Production Visualization Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Heermann, P.D.

    1999-04-08

    The delivery of the first one tera-operations/sec computer has significantly impacted production data visualization, affecting data transfer, post processing, and rendering. Terascale computing has motivated a need to consider the entire data visualization system; improving a single algorithm is not sufficient. This paper presents a systems approach to decrease by a factor of four the time required to prepare large data sets for visualization.For daily production use, all stages in the processing pipeline from physics simulation code to pixels on a screen, must be balanced to yield good overall performance. Also, to complete the data path from screen to the analyst's eye, user display systems for individuals and teams are examined. Performance of the initial visualization system is compared with recent improvements. Lessons learned from the coordinated deployment of improved algorithms are also discussed, including the need for 64 bit addressing and a fully parallel data visualization pipeline.

  8. Recent plutonium metal production experience at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, M.W.; Nyman, D.H.

    1989-10-01

    Plutonium metal is produced at the Hanford Site in the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) line. The line is housed in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The RMC line was built in the early 1960s and operated until 1973 when it was shut down. The line was restarted in 1985 and has operated on a campaign basis since that time. The fiscal years (FY) 1988/89 RMC line campaigns have shown improved yields and plant safety performance when compared to previous years. This is attributed to numerous process improvements that have been made in the line and to an enhanced standard of disciplined operations. This report discusses the improvements made to the RMC line.

  9. The structure of deposited metal clusters generated by laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, P.; Brandstättner, M.; Ding, A.

    1991-09-01

    Metal clusters have been produced using a laser evaporation source. A Nd-YAG laser beam focused onto a solid silver rod was used to evaporate the material, which was then cooled to form clusters with the help of a pulsed high pressure He beam. TOF mass spectra of these clusters reveal a strong occurrence of small and medium sized clusters ( n<100). Clusters were also deposited onto grid supported thin layers of carbon-films which were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Very high resolution pictures of these grids were used to analyze the size distribution and the structure of the deposited clusters. The diffraction pattern caused by crystalline structure of the clusters reveals 3-and 5-fold symmetries as well as fcc bulk structure. This can be explained in terms of icosahedron and cuboctahedron type clusters deposited on the surface of the carbon layer. There is strong evidence that part of these cluster geometries had already been formed before the depostion process. The non-linear dependence of the cluster size and the cluster density on the generating conditions is discussed. Therefore the samples were observed in HREM in the stable DEEKO 100 microscope of the Fritz-Haber-Institut operating at 100 KV with the spherical aberration c S =0.5 mm. The quality of the pictures was improved by using the conditions of minimum phase contrast hollow cone illumination. This procedure led to a minimum of phase contrast artefacts. Among the well-crystallized particles were a great amount of five- and three-fold symmetries, icosahedra and cuboctahedra respectively. The largest clusters with five- and three-fold symmetries have been found with diameters of 7 nm; the smallest particles displaying the same undistorted symmetries were of about 2 mm. Even smaller ones with strong distortions could be observed although their classification is difficult. The quality of the images was improved by applying Fourier filtering techniques.

  10. In-situ Generated Tribomaterial in Metal/Metal Contacts: current understanding and future implications for implants.

    PubMed

    Espallargas, N; Fischer, A; Muñoz, A Igual; Mischler, S; Wimmer, M A

    2017-06-01

    Artificial hip joints operate in aqueous biofluids that are highly reactive towards metallic surfaces. The reactivity at the metal interface is enhanced by mechanical interaction due to friction, which can change the near-surface structure of the metal and surface chemistry. There are now several reports in the literature about the in-situ generation of reaction films and tribo-metallurgical transformations on metal-on-metal hip joints. This paper summarizes current knowledge and provides a mechanistic interpretation of the surface chemical and metallurgical phenomena. Basic concepts of corrosion and wear are illustrated and used to interpret available literature on in-vitro and in-vivo studies of metal-on-metal hip joints. Based on this review, three forms of tribomaterial, characterized by different combinations of oxide films and organic layers, can be determined. It is shown that the generation of these tribofilms can be related to specific electrochemical and mechanical phenomena in the metal interface. It is suggested that the generation of this surface reaction layer constitutes a way to minimize (mechanical) wear of MoM hip implants.

  11. Limitation of productivity by trace metals in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, F.M.M.; Price, N.M. ); Hudson, R.J.M. )

    1991-12-01

    Some trace metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn are essential for the growth of phytoplankton. The concentrations of these essential trace elements in seawater are so low as to limit their availability to aquatic microbiota. Trace element uptake is ultimately limited by kinetics of reaction with transport ligands or by diffusion to the cell. From what the authors know of the characteristics of the uptake systems of phytoplankton and their trace metal requirements they can estimate that Fe and Zn may at some times in some place limit phytoplankton productivity, which is in accord with available field data on trace metal enrichments.

  12. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking

    SciTech Connect

    2007-09-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to investigate reducing processing temperature, controlling the gas temperature and gas atmosphere over metallized iron nodules, and effectively using sub-bituminous coal as a reductant for producing high quality metallized iron nodules at low cost.

  13. Metal-Semiconductor Nanocomposites for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-07

    the modified phonon and alloy scattering parameters in the modeling to explain the thermoelectric properties of this material. For example, we...near future. 2. Cross-plane thermoelectric properties of perovskite oxide metal/semiconductor superlattices ( Purdue /UCSC) The cross-plane...It therefore became critical that Purdue optimize this characterization technique to extract material properties which show the potential of metal

  14. Concentrations and potential health risks of metals in lip products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sa; Hammond, S Katharine; Rojas-Cheatham, Ann

    2013-06-01

    Metal content in lip products has been an issue of concern. We measured lead and eight other metals in a convenience sample of 32 lip products used by young Asian women in Oakland, California, and assessed potential health risks related to estimated intakes of these metals. We analyzed lip products by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and used previous estimates of lip product usage rates to determine daily oral intakes. We derived acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) based on information used to determine public health goals for exposure, and compared ADIs with estimated intakes to assess potential risks. Most of the tested lip products contained high concentrations of titanium and aluminum. All examined products had detectable manganese. Lead was detected in 24 products (75%), with an average concentration of 0.36 ± 0.39 ppm, including one sample with 1.32 ppm. When used at the estimated average daily rate, estimated intakes were > 20% of ADIs derived for aluminum, cadmium, chromium, and manganese. In addition, average daily use of 10 products tested would result in chromium intake exceeding our estimated ADI for chromium. For high rates of product use (above the 95th percentile), the percentages of samples with estimated metal intakes exceeding ADIs were 3% for aluminum, 68% for chromium, and 22% for manganese. Estimated intakes of lead were < 20% of ADIs for average and high use. Cosmetics safety should be assessed not only by the presence of hazardous contents, but also by comparing estimated exposures with health-based standards. In addition to lead, metals such as aluminum, cadmium, chromium, and manganese require further investigation.

  15. Concentrations and Potential Health Risks of Metals in Lip Products

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Rojas-Cheatham, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background: Metal content in lip products has been an issue of concern. Objectives: We measured lead and eight other metals in a convenience sample of 32 lip products used by young Asian women in Oakland, California, and assessed potential health risks related to estimated intakes of these metals. Methods: We analyzed lip products by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and used previous estimates of lip product usage rates to determine daily oral intakes. We derived acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) based on information used to determine public health goals for exposure, and compared ADIs with estimated intakes to assess potential risks. Results: Most of the tested lip products contained high concentrations of titanium and aluminum. All examined products had detectable manganese. Lead was detected in 24 products (75%), with an average concentration of 0.36 ± 0.39 ppm, including one sample with 1.32 ppm. When used at the estimated average daily rate, estimated intakes were > 20% of ADIs derived for aluminum, cadmium, chromium, and manganese. In addition, average daily use of 10 products tested would result in chromium intake exceeding our estimated ADI for chromium. For high rates of product use (above the 95th percentile), the percentages of samples with estimated metal intakes exceeding ADIs were 3% for aluminum, 68% for chromium, and 22% for manganese. Estimated intakes of lead were < 20% of ADIs for average and high use. Conclusions: Cosmetics safety should be assessed not only by the presence of hazardous contents, but also by comparing estimated exposures with health-based standards. In addition to lead, metals such as aluminum, cadmium, chromium, and manganese require further investigation. PMID:23674482

  16. Microbial Metabolite Production for Accelerated Metal and Radionuclide Bioremediation (Microbial Metabolite Production Report)

    SciTech Connect

    TURICK, CHARLES

    2004-09-21

    Biogeochemical activity is an ongoing and dynamic process due to bacterial activity in the subsurface. Bacteria contribute significantly to biotransformation of metals and radionuclides. As basic science reveals more information about specific mechanisms of bacterial-metal reduction, an even greater contribution of bacteria to biogeochemical activities is realized. An understanding and application of the mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction offers tremendous potential for development into bioremedial processes and technologies. Most bacteria are capable of biogeochemical transformation as a result of meeting nutrient requirements. These assimilatory mechanisms for metals transformation include production of small molecules that serve as electron shuttles for metal reduction. This contribution to biogeochemistry is small however due to only trace requirements for minerals by bacteria. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) reduce oxidized metals and insoluble mineral oxides as a means for biological energy production during growth. These types of bacteria offer considerable potential for bioremediation of environments contaminated with toxic metals and radionuclides because of the relatively large amount of metal biotransformation they require for growth. One of the mechanisms employed by some DMRB for electron transfer to insoluble metal oxides is melanin production. The electrochemical properties of melanin provide this polymeric, humic-type compound with electron shuttling properties. Melanin, specifically, pyomelanin, increases the rate and degree of metal reduction in DMRB as a function of pyomelanin concentration. Due to its electron shuttling behavior, only low femtogram quantities per cell are required to significantly increase metal reduction capacity of DMRB. Melanin production is not limited to DMRB. In fact melanin is one of the most common pigments produced by biological systems. Numerous soil microorganisms produce melanin, contributing

  17. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  18. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  19. ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of metals in roadway particulate matter deposited in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Shafer, Martin M; Heo, Jongbae; Pardo, Michal; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Assaf; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated the possible causal role for soluble metal species extracted from roadway traffic emissions in promoting particulate matter (PM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activation. To this end, these responses have been evaluated in alveolar macrophage and epithelial lung cells that have been exposed to 'Unfiltered', 'Filtered' and 'Filtered+Chelexed' water extracts of PM samples collected from the roadway urban environments of Thessaloniki, Milan and London. Except for Thessaloniki, our results demonstrate that filtration resulted in a minor decrease in ROS activity of the fine PM fraction, suggesting that ROS activity is attributed mainly to water-soluble PM species. In contrast to ROS, ARE activity was mediated predominantly by the water-soluble component of PM present in both the fine and coarse extracts. Further removal of metals by Chelex treatment from filtered water extracts showed that soluble metal species are the major factors mediating ROS and ARE activities of the soluble fraction, especially in the London PM extracts. Finally, utilizing step-wise multiple-regression analysis, we show that 87% and 78% of the total variance observed in ROS and ARE assays, respectively, is accounted for by changes in soluble metal concentration. Using a statistical analysis we find that As, Zn and Fe best predict the ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of the near roadway particulate matter in the pulmonary cells studied. Collectively, our findings imply that soluble metals present in roadside PM are potential drivers of both pro- and anti-oxidative effects of PM in respiratory tract.

  20. Four-piston double-duct liquid metal MHD engine and AC generator

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Operating principles, features and applications of the Liquid Metal (LM) engine are presented. This engine combines a free-piston internal combustion engine with an MHD AC power generator. Liquid metal (LM) oscillates back-and-forth in two separate channels, driven by free pistons coupled magnetically to pistons driven by internal combustion. One of the principal breakthroughs is the concept of using double ducts in a Hartmann configuration for MHD production of alternating current. The LM flows in opposing directions in the two adjacent Hartmann ducts, thus eliminating magnetic-induced instabilities, eliminating vibration, and providing an ideal setup for attaching an output transformer on one side provide to provide useful ranges of current and voltage. Because LM is used, the length of the piston stroke can be easily varied over a large range, thus making possible an engine that, changes size, according to variation in output load requirements. Increasing the stroke length results in increased compression ratio, which requires computer controlled modification of the fuel injection mixture. Higher fuel efficiencies will result, whether the engine is idling or operating at maximum power. Because of viscous dissipation losses in the LM, this engine will be more efficient for larger engines. Applications include any power generation where variable load is required, such as stationary electric generators for remote towns and cities, temporary military encampments, and mobile primary power generators for off-road and on-road automotive equipment, including caterpillars, cars, military vehicles, trucks, and trains. The advantages for automotive propulsion will be described in comparisons with current and developmental vehicles using internal combustion engines. Because the LM-engine generates electricity, an LM-engine vehicle is readily adaptable to hybrid concepts. An R&D program will be outlined for bringing the concept of the LM engine to commercial application.

  1. Powder and particulate production of metallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments of particulate metallurgy of alloyed materials where the final products is a fully dense body are discussed. Particulates are defined as powders, flakes, foils, silvers, ribbons and strip. Because rapid solidification is an important factor in particulate metallurgy, all of the particulates must have at least one dimension which is very fine, sometimes as fine as 10 to 50 microns, but move typically up to several hundred microns, provided that the dimension permits a minimum solidification rate of at least 100 K/s.

  2. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, for use in fuel cells, engines, and turbines for transportation or mobile applications. Hydrogen is desirable as an energy carrier, because its oxidation by air releases substantial energy (thermally or electrochemically) and produces only water as a product. In contrast, hydrocarbon energy carriers inevitably produce CO2, contributing to global warming. While CO2 capture may prove feasible in large stationary applications, implementing it in transportation and mobile applications is a daunting challenge. Thus a zero-emission energy carrier like hydrogen is especially needed in these cases. Use of H2 as an energy carrier also brings new challenges such as safe handling of compressed hydrogen and implementation of new transport, storage, and delivery processes and infrastructure. With current storage technologies, hydrogen's energy per volume is very low compared to other automobile fuels. High density storage of compressed hydrogen requires combinations of high pressure and/or low temperature that are not very practical. An alternative for storage is use of solid light weight hydrogenous material systems which have long durability, good adsorption properties and high activity. Substantial research has been conducted on carbon materials like activated carbon, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes due to their high theoretical hydrogen capacities. However, the theoretical values have not been achieved, and hydrogen uptake capacities in these materials are below 10 wt. %. In this thesis we investigated the use of silicon for hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation via water oxidation of silicon had been ignored due to slow reaction kinetics. We hypothesized that the hydrogen generation rate could be improved by using high surface area silicon nanoparticles. Our laser-pyrolysis-produced nanoparticles showed surprisingly rapid hydrogen generation and high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical maximum of two moles of H2 per

  3. Quorum sensing in metal tolerance of Acinetobacter junii BB1A is associated with biofilm production.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Suchitra; Chakraborty, Ranadhir

    2008-05-01

    Acinetobacter junii strain BB1A, a novel metal-tolerant bacterium, produced biofilm in the presence of added ions such as Ni(2+), AsO(2)(-), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) on surfaces such as glass and polystyrene. Generation of a metal-sensitive and adhesion-deficient mutant by transposition of Tn5-mob in the A. junii genome has putatively confirmed the association of metal tolerance with the production of biofilm. The requirement of a critical cell density for biofilm formation and presence of acyl-homoserine lactone-like autoinducer molecules in the cell-free supernatant indicated the phenomenon of quorum sensing. Addition of a natural quorum-sensing inhibitor (garlic extract) or synthetic quorum-sensing inhibitor (4-nitro-pyridine oxide) significantly inhibited cell growth and biofilm formation in the presence of metal/metalloid ions.

  4. Metal Dichalcogenides Monolayers: Novel Catalysts for Electrochemical Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Catalyst-driven electrolysis of water is considered as a “cleanest” way for hydrogen production. Finding cheap and abundant catalysts is critical to the large-scale implementation of the technology. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides nanostructures have attracted increasing attention because of their catalytic performances in water electrolysis. In this work, we systematically investigate the hydrogen evolution reduction of metal dichalcogenides monolayers based on density-functional-theory calculations. We find that metal disulfide monolayers show better catalytic performance on hydrogen production than other metal dichalcogenides. We show that their hydrogen evolution reduction strongly depends on the hydrogen coverage and the catalytic performance reduces with the increment of coverage because of hydrogenation-induced lower conductivity. We further show that the catalytic performance of vanadium disulfide monolayer is comparable to that of Pt at lower hydrogen coverage and the performance at higher coverage can be improved by hybridizing with conducting nanomaterials to enhance conductivity. These metal disulfide monolayers with lower overpotentials may apply to water electrolysis for hydrogen production. PMID:24967679

  5. LePaProGen—lepton pair production generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dydyshka, Ya. V.; Yermolchyk, V. L.; Suarez, J. H.; Shumeiko, N. M.

    2017-09-01

    A Monte Carlo generator "LePaProGen" for simulation of lepton pair production at hadron colliders is presented. Higher order electroweak radiative effects are implemented. A new algorithm for selection of the optimal phase space parameterization is applied.

  6. Metal powder production by gas atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, E. Y.; Grant, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The confined liquid, gas-atomization process was investigated. Results from a two-dimensional water model showed the importance of atomization pressure, as well as delivery tube and atomizer design. The atomization process at the tip of the delivery tube was photographed. Results from the atomization of a modified 7075 aluminum alloy yielded up to 60 wt pct. powders that were finer than 45 microns in diameter. Two different atomizer designs were evaluated. The amount of fine powders produced was correlated to a calculated gas-power term. An optimal gas-power value existed for maximized fine powder production. Atomization at gas-power greater than or less than this optimal value produced coarser powders.

  7. Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Vasudevan, Asuri K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  8. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  9. Optical observation of metal jet generated by high speed inclined collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, A.; Tanaka, S.; Hokamoto, K.

    2017-02-01

    Explosive welding, one of the high energy rate material processing, is known the technique to weld strongly for the dissimilar metal combinations. When a metal is collided to the other metal at high velocity with a certain angle, good welding is achieved in this technique. Important parameters of the explosive welding method are the collision velocity and the collision angle. And it is necessary to know these parameters to obtain the explosively welded materials of several metals combinations. However, the optical observation for the collision of metal plate accelerated by the explosive is difficult because of the obstruction by the spreading of detonation gas. In the present work a single-stage powder gun and high speed video camera were used to observe the inclined collision of metals at the high velocity. Projectile consisted by a metal disc and sabot was accelerated by the deflagration of a gunpowder and was collided to another metal disc set with a certain angle. Metal jet was generated at the collision point when the projectile was collided to the target disc in the range of suitable conditions. By using this observation system, a series of the flow from the high speed collision to the generation of metal jet could be taken photographs clearly. This investigation shows the experimental results of the similar and dissimilar metal collision, with comparing the visualization of a metal jet simulated numerically.

  10. Ceramic to metal attachment system. [Ceramic electrode to metal conductor in MHD generator

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    1983-06-10

    A composition and method are described for attaching a ceramic electrode to a metal conductor. A layer of randomly interlocked metal fibers saturated with polyimide resin is sandwiched between the ceramic electrode and the metal conductor. The polyimide resin is then polymerized providing bonding.

  11. Minimization of combustion by-products: Toxic metal emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.C.; Huffman, G.L.

    1991-12-01

    Incinerators may release trace amounts of unwanted combustion by-products (CBPs), particularly if the incinerators are not well designed or properly operated. The Clean Air Act Amendment is emphasizing the control of toxic air pollutants from all combustion and process sources; some of these pollutants are CBPs. CBPs include: (1) unburned principal organic hazardous constituents (POHCs); (2) products of incomplete combustion (PICs); (3) metal emissions; (4) residuals/ashes; and (5) acid gases. This Paper is a part of a series of writings on the subject of the CBP issue from EPA's Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio and is one of the first metal emission papers in the series. It specifically addresses the aspect of potential toxic metal emissions from combustion/incineration processes.

  12. Metal-Catalyzed Asymmetric Michael Addition in Natural Product Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chunngai; Pu, Fan; Xu, Jing

    2016-12-19

    Asymmetric catalysis for chiral compound synthesis is a rapidly growing field in modern organic chemistry. Asymmetric catalytic processes have been indispensable for the synthesis of enantioselective materials to meet demands from various fields. Michael addition has been used extensively for the construction of C-C bonds under mild conditions. With the discovery and development of organo- and metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael additions, the synthesis of enantioselective and/or diastereoselective Michael adducts has become possible and increasingly prevalent in the literature. In particular, metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael addition has been employed as a key reaction in natural product synthesis for the construction of contiguous quaternary stereogenic center(s), which is still a difficult task in organic synthesis. Previously reported applications of metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael additions in natural product synthesis are presented here and discussed in depth.

  13. Levels of metals in canned meat products: Intermetallic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Brito, G. ); Diaz, C.; Galindo, L.; Hardisson, A.; Montelongo, F.G. ); Santiago, D. )

    1990-02-01

    The analytical control of heavy metals in food is particularly important, since these pollutants are notably cumulative in nature and, therefore, can be toxic to humans. Their determination in foods of animal origin is of interest. In this study analyses of seven heavy metals in semipreserved ham and shoulder pork, preserved lunch pork and pork liver paste were performed to determine the possible influence of the container itself on the levels of metals in such products. Not only were the toxic elements cadmium and lead studied, but also copper, zinc, iron, nickel and manganese which, although not essentially toxic, could, in high concentration, cause public health hazards or a decrease in the organoleptic quality of the canned product, with resultant economic effect.

  14. Generation of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions in the Gerbil Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous measurements of intracochlear and ear canal pressure responses to two-tone stimulation with fixed f2/f1 ratio allowed us to probe the physical generation sites of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in the cochlea. Our results were consistent with the notion that DPOAE emerges primarily from the generator region, where the two primaries overlap.

  15. Integrating hydrogen generation and storage in a novel compact electrochemical system based on metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, C. M.; Fernandes, V. R.; Slavkov, Y.; Bozukov, L.

    The development of efficient and reliable energy storage systems based on hydrogen technology represents a challenge to seasonal storage based on renewable hydrogen. State of the art renewable energy generation systems include separate units such as electrolyzer, hydrogen storage vessel and a fuel cell system for the conversion of H 2 back into electricity, when required. In this work, a novel electrochemical system has been developed which integrates hydrogen production, storage and compression in only one device, at relatively low cost and high efficiency. The developed prototype comprises a six-electrode cell assembly using an AB 5-type metal hydride and Ni plates as counter electrodes, in a 35-wt% KOH solution. Metal hydride electrodes with chemical composition LaNi 4.3Co 0.4Al 0.3 were prepared by high frequency vacuum melting followed by high temperature annealing. X-ray phase analysis showed typical hexagonal structure and no traces of other intermetallic compounds belonging to the La-Ni phase diagram. Thermodynamic study has been performed in a Sieverts type of apparatus produced by Labtech Int. During cycling, the charging/discharging process was studied in situ using a gas chromatograph from Agilent. It is anticipated that the device will be integrated as a combined hydrogen generator and storage unit in a stand-alone system associated to a 1-kW fuel cell.

  16. HEAVY METAL CONTENT OF AYURVEDIC HERBAL MEDICINE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case reports of individuals taking Ayurvedic herbal medicine products (HMPs) suggest that they may contain lead, mercury, and/or arsenic. We analyzed the heavy metal content of Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in India and Pakistan, available in South Asian grocery stores in the Bost...

  17. HEAVY METAL CONTENT OF AYURVEDIC HERBAL MEDICINE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case reports of individuals taking Ayurvedic herbal medicine products (HMPs) suggest that they may contain lead, mercury, and/or arsenic. We analyzed the heavy metal content of Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in India and Pakistan, available in South Asian grocery stores in the Bost...

  18. Long-term research in Japan: amorphous metals, metal oxide varistors, high-power semiconductors and superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Yorozu, M.; Sogabe, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The review revealed that significant activity is under way in the research of amorphous metals, but that little fundamental work is being pursued on metal oxide varistors and high-power semiconductors. Also, the investigation of long-term research program plans for superconducting generators reveals that activity is at a low level, pending the recommendations of a study currently being conducted through Japan's Central Electric Power Council.

  19. Process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal sulfide sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Ayala, Raul E.; Gal, Eli

    1995-01-01

    A process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal-sulfur compound. Spent metal-sulfur compound is regenerated to re-usable metal oxide by moving a bed of spent metal-sulfur compound progressively through a single regeneration vessel having a first and second regeneration stage and a third cooling and purging stage. The regeneration is carried out and elemental sulfur is generated in the first stage by introducing a first gas of sulfur dioxide which contains oxygen at a concentration less than the stoichiometric amount required for complete oxidation of the spent metal-sulfur compound. A second gas containing sulfur dioxide and excess oxygen at a concentration sufficient for complete oxidation of the partially spent metal-sulfur compound, is introduced into the second regeneration stage. Gaseous sulfur formed in the first regeneration stage is removed prior to introducing the second gas into the second regeneration stage. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the third cooling and purging stage. Except for the gaseous sulfur removed from the first stage, the combined gases derived from the regeneration stages which are generally rich in sulfur dioxide and lean in oxygen, are removed from the regenerator as an off-gas and recycled as the first and second gas into the regenerator. Oxygen concentration is controlled by adding air, oxygen-enriched air or pure oxygen to the recycled off-gas.

  20. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Kotarba, M. J.; Więcław, D.; Piestrzyński, A.

    2008-08-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977-984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. δ 13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of

  1. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Kotarba, M.J.; Wieclaw, D.; Piestrzynski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977–984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. δ13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of

  2. Metal stress in zooplankton diapause production: post-hatching response.

    PubMed

    Aránguiz-Acuña, Adriana; Pérez-Portilla, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Aquatic organisms commonly respond to harsh conditions by forming diapausing stages, which enable populations to survive adverse periods forming egg banks. Production of diapausing eggs is frequently observed in monogonont rotifers, previously changing from asexual to partial sexual reproduction (mixis). In despite that zooplankton are frequently used in ecotoxicological assessment because of their sensitivity to various toxicants and their important role in the ecosystems, toxicity evaluations often consider the directly exposed population produced by parthenogenetic reproduction, exclusively. We assessed experimentally effects of exposure to metals on mixis delay and fitness of hatchlings of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis obtained from a brackish water lagoon with high metal content, especially copper. We show that sub-lethal concentrations of copper affected traits related to sexual reproduction and diapausing egg production in the rotifer. Copper addition did not delay the start of mixis, suggesting that rapid initiation of mixis is promoted in risky environments, according to the hypothesis of mixis as an escape strategy. Higher investment in mixis was obtained when individuals were exposed to metal. Addition of copper negatively affected the hatching success of diapausing eggs and performance of hatchlings. Nevertheless, these effects were greater for individuals formed in non-metal conditions, suggesting an adaptive advantage of populations from natural sediments exposed to copper. These results highlight the ecological and evolutionary consequences of the presence of metals in freshwater environments by modulating diapause adaptive efficacy and the selective process in egg banks.

  3. Mass production of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by metal dusting process with high yield

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, H.; Rashidi, A.M.; Rastegari, S.; Mirdamadi, S.; Alaei, M.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over Fe-Ni nanoparticles supported alloy 304L. {yields} Production of carbon nanotubes with high yield (700-1000%) and low cost catalyst. {yields} Optimum growth condition is CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C under long term repetitive thermal cycling. {yields} Possibility of the mass production by metal dusting process with low cost. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube materials were synthesized over Fe-Ni nanoparticles generated during disintegration of the surface of alloy 304L under metal dusting environment. The metal dusting condition was simulated and optimized through exposing stainless steel samples during long term repetitive thermal cycling in CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, total gas flow rate 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C for 300 h. After reaction, surface morphology of the samples and also carbonaceous deposition which had grown on sample surfaces were examined by stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes could be formed over nanocatalyst generated on the alloy surface by exploiting metal dusting process. By optimization of reaction parameters the yields of carbon nanotube materials obtained were 700-1000%. Also it has been shown herein that the amount of carbon nanotube materials remarkably increases when the reaction time is extended up to 300 h, indicating a possibility of the mass production by this easy method.

  4. Modeling of all-optical even and odd parity generator circuits using metal-insulator-metal plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lokendra; Bedi, Amna; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-06-01

    Plasmonic metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides sustain excellent property of confining the surface plasmons up to a deep subwavelength scale. In this paper, linear and S-shaped MIM waveguides are cascaded together to design the model of Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). Nonlinear material has been used for switching of light across its output ports. The structures of even and odd parity generators are projected by cascading the MZIs. Parity generator and checker circuit are used for error correction and detection in an optical communication system. Study and analysis of proposed designs are carried out by using the MATLAB simulation and finite-differencetime-domain (FDTD) method.

  5. Modeling of all-optical even and odd parity generator circuits using metal-insulator-metal plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lokendra; Bedi, Amna; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides sustain excellent property of confining the surface plasmons up to a deep subwavelength scale. In this paper, linear and S-shaped MIM waveguides are cascaded together to design the model of Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). Nonlinear material has been used for switching of light across its output ports. The structures of even and odd parity generators are projected by cascading the MZIs. Parity generator and checker circuit are used for error correction and detection in an optical communication system. Study and analysis of proposed designs are carried out by using the MATLAB simulation and finite-differencetime-domain (FDTD) method.

  6. Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.; Deeds, W. Edward

    1999-01-01

    A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output.

  7. Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, C.M.; Deeds, W.E.

    1999-07-13

    A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output. 5 figs.

  8. Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, C.; Hammerer, K.; Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

  9. Production of defects in metals by collision cascades: TEM experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental TEM data on production of dislocation loops by low energy ion bombardment to low doses, as simulations of similar collision cascades produced by fast neutrons, in various metals and alloys. Dependence of vacancy dislocation loop formation on recoil energy, temperature and metal/alloy is examined. Emphasis is placed on effects on dilute alloy additions. A model for cascade melting is used to understand these effects; this will require an examination of the role of electron-phonon coupling in cascade cooling and recrystallization. Formation of interstitial dislocation loops as cascade defects and the effect of nearby surfaces are briefly discussed.

  10. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  11. MODIS Land Data Products: Generation, Quality Assurance and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, Edward; Wolfe, Robert; Morisette, Jeffery; Sinno, Scott; Teague, Michael; Saleous, Nazmi; Devadiga, Sadashiva; Justice, Christopher; Nickeson, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on-board NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua Satellites are key instruments for providing data on global land, atmosphere, and ocean dynamics. Derived MODIS land, atmosphere and ocean products are central to NASA's mission to monitor and understand the Earth system. NASA has developed and generated on a systematic basis a suite of MODIS products starting with the first Terra MODIS data sensed February 22, 2000 and continuing with the first MODIS-Aqua data sensed July 2, 2002. The MODIS Land products are divided into three product suites: radiation budget products, ecosystem products, and land cover characterization products. The production and distribution of the MODIS Land products are described, from initial software delivery by the MODIS Land Science Team, to operational product generation and quality assurance, delivery to EOS archival and distribution centers, and product accuracy assessment and validation. Progress and lessons learned since the first MODIS data were in early 2000 are described.

  12. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  13. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  14. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  15. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  16. Metallic Thin-Film Bonding and Alloy Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor); Campbell, Geoff (Inventor); Peotter, Brian S. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion bonding a stack of aluminum thin films is particularly challenging due to a stable aluminum oxide coating that rapidly forms on the aluminum thin films when they are exposed to atmosphere and the relatively low meting temperature of aluminum. By plating the individual aluminum thin films with a metal that does not rapidly form a stable oxide coating, the individual aluminum thin films may be readily diffusion bonded together using heat and pressure. The resulting diffusion bonded structure can be an alloy of choice through the use of a carefully selected base and plating metals. The aluminum thin films may also be etched with distinct patterns that form a microfluidic fluid flow path through the stack of aluminum thin films when diffusion bonded together.

  17. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGES

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; ...

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  18. 75 FR 49527 - Metaldyne Corporation, Metaldyne Tubular Products, Currently Known as Flexible Metal, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Flexible Metal, Inc., Powertrain Division, Hamburg, MI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To... automotive industry. Information shows that on June 10, 2010, Flexible Metals, Inc. purchased Metaldyne Corporation, Metaldyne Tubular Products, Powertrain Div. and is currently known as Flexible Metals, Inc...

  19. Unidirectional generation of surface plasmon polaritons by a single right-angled trapezoid metallic nanoslit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuefeng; Wang, Jun; Hann Lim, Xiao; Xu, Zhengji; Teng, Jinghua; Zhang, Dao Hua

    2017-02-01

    We report theoretical and experimental investigation on a single right-angled trapezoid metallic nanoslit for efficient unidirectional generation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) under normal incidence. The propagated SPPs intensity ratio in two directions is sensitive to the taper angle and metal thickness. Significant intensity ratio at the same propagation distances from the respective slit edges in opposite directions is demonstrated. We believe that the proposed compact unidirectional SPPs generator has high potential for applications in nanolithography and photonic integration.

  20. Efficient Third Harmonic Generation from Metal-Dielectric Hybrid Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Shibanuma, Toshihiko; Grinblat, Gustavo; Albella, Pablo; Maier, Stefan A

    2017-04-12

    High refractive index dielectric nanoantennas are expected to become key elements for nonlinear nano-optics applications due to their large nonlinearities, low energy losses, and ability to produce high electric field enhancements in relatively large nanoscale volumes. In this work, we show that the nonlinear response from a high-index dielectric nanoantenna can be significantly improved by adding a metallic component to build a metal-dielectric hybrid nanostructure. We demonstrate that the plasmonic resonance of a Au nanoring can boost the anapole mode supported by a Si nanodisk, strongly enhancing the electric field inside the large third-order susceptibility dielectric. As a result, a high third harmonic conversion efficiency, which reaches 0.007% at a third harmonic wavelength of 440 nm, is obtained. In addition, by suitably modifying geometrical parameters of the hybrid nanoantenna, we tune the enhanced third harmonic emission throughout the optical regime. Coupling metallic and dielectric nanoantennas to expand the potential of subwavelength structures opens new paths for efficient nonlinear optical effects in the visible range on the nanoscale.

  1. Selective resolution of photocurrent generating pathways in transition metal dichalcogenides by ultrafast microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew W.

    2017-02-01

    Presently, there exists no reliable in-situ time-resolved method that selectively isolates both the recombination and escape times relevant to photocurrent generation in the ultrafast regime. Transport based measurements lack the required time resolution, while purely optical measurement give a convoluted weighted-average of all electronic dynamics, offering no selectivity for photocurrent generating pathways. Recently, the ultrafast photocurrent (U-PC) autocorrelation method has successfully measured the rate limiting electronic relaxation processes in materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, and transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials. Here, we unambiguously derive and experimentally confirm a generic U-PC response function by simultaneously resolving the transient absorption (TA) and U-PC response for highly-efficient (48% IQE at 0 bias) WSe2 devices and twisted bilayer graphene. Surprisingly, both optical TA and electrical U-PC responses give the same E-field-dependent electronic escape and recombination rates. These rates further accurately quantify a material's intrinsic PC generation efficiency. We demonstrate that the chirality of the incident light impacts the U-PC kinetics, suggesting such measurements directly access the ultrafast dynamics need to complex electronic physics such as the valley-Hall effect. By combining E-field dependent ultrafast photocurrent with transient absorption microscopy, we have selectively imaged the dominant kinetic bottlenecks that inhibit photocurrent production in devices made from stacked few-layer TMD materials. This provides a new methodology to intelligently select materials that intrinsically avoid recombination bottlenecks and maximize photocurrent yield.

  2. Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2012-03-14

    Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X− = Cl−, Br−) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3−n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ≥0.05 M X−. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M−1 s−1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M−1 s−1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

  3. Bioethanol production from recovered napier grass with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chun-Han; Yu, Fan-Chun; Chang, Fang-Chih; Yang, Bing-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Hua; Hwang, Wen-Song; Tu, Ta-Chih

    2017-05-11

    Using plants to absorb and accumulate heavy metals from polluted soil, followed by the recycling of explants containing heavy metals, can help achieve the goal of reverting contaminated soil to low heavy-metal content soil. However, the re-use of recovered explants can also be problematic. Meanwhile, bioethanol has become a popular energy source. In this study, napier grass was used for the remediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals (artificially contaminated soil). The influence of bioethanol production from napier grass after phytoremediation was also investigated. The concentration of Zn, Cd, and Cr in the contaminated soil was 1000, 100, and 250 mg/kg, respectively. After napier grass phytoremediation, the concentration (dry biomass) of Zn, Cd, and Cr in the explants was 2701.97 ± 173.49, 6.1 ± 2.3, and 74.24 ± 1.42 mg/kg, respectively. Biomass production in the unpolluted soil was 861.13 ± 4.23 g. The biomass production ratio in high Zn-polluted soil was only 3.89%, while it was 4.68% for Cd and 21.4% for Cr. The biomass obtained after napier grass phytoremediation was pretreated using the steam explosion conditions of 180 °C, for 10 min, with 1.5% H2SO2, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis for Zn-polluted biomass was 90% of the unpolluted biomass, while it was 77% for Cd, and approximately the same for Cr. The fermentation efficiency of the heavy-metal-containing biomass was higher than the control biomass. The fermentation ethanol concentration obtained was 8.69-12.68, 13.03-15.50, and 18.48-19.31 g/L in Zn, Cd, and Cr environments, respectively. Results show that the heavy metals had a positive effect on bacteria fermentation. However, the fermentation efficiency was lower for biomass with severe heavy metal pollution. Thus, the utilization of napier grass phytoremediation for bioethanol production has a positive effect on the sustainability of environmental resources. Copyright © 2017

  4. Microwave pyrolysis of wheat straw: product distribution and generation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiqiang; Wang, Wenlong; Liu, Hongzhen; Ma, Chunyuan; Song, Zhanlong

    2014-04-01

    Microwave pyrolysis of wheat straw is studied, combined with analysis of products, the distribution and generation pathway of products are investigated. Only a small amount of volatiles released when microwave pyrolysis of pure straw. Mixtures of adding CuO and Fe3O4 can pyrolyze, and the majority in pyrolysis products is in liquid-phase. Severe pyrolysis occur after adding carbon residue, the CO content in pyrolysis gas products is high, and the maximum volume content of H2 can exceed 35 vol.%. The high-temperature is helpful for increasing the yield of combustible gas in gaseous products, in particular the H2 production, but also helpful for improving the conversion of sample. Pyrolysis is carried out layer by layer from the inside to outside. As the internal material firstly pyrolyze and pyrolysis products released pass through the low temperature zone, the chance of occurrence of secondary reactions is reduced.

  5. Metallic precipitate contribution to carrier generation in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors due to the Schottky effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, M. D.; Tan, T. Y.

    2004-01-01

    The contribution of metallic precipitates to carrier generation has been modeled for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor devices fabricated using Si, with the precipitate located in the depletion region of the device. The physical mechanism responsible for the electrical activity of the metallic precipitate is attributed to the Schottky junction property between the precipitate and the Si matrix materials. The precipitate serves as a highly effective carrier generation center when the capacitor is switched from the accumulation mode to the deep depletion mode. As a practical case, the electrical activity of the Cu3Si precipitate is investigated and the impact of the precipitate located at different positions within the depleted region of the MOS capacitor on the device performance degradation is analyzed.

  6. The generation of "unnatural" products: synthetic biology meets synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Goss, Rebecca J M; Shankar, Sreejith; Fayad, Antoine Abou

    2012-08-01

    Natural product analogue generation is important, providing tools for chemical biology, enabling structure activity relationship determination and insight into the way in which natural products interact with their target biomolecules. The generation of analogues is also often necessary in order to improve bioavailability and to fine tune compounds' activity. This review provides an overview of the catalogue of approaches available for accessing series of analogues. Over the last few years there have been major advances in genome sequencing and the development of tools for biosynthetic pathway engineering; it is therefore becoming increasingly easy to combine molecular biology and synthetic organic chemistry in order to enable expeditious access to series of natural products. This review outlines the various ways of combining biology and chemistry that have been applied to analogue generation, drawing upon a series of examples to illustrate each approach.

  7. Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basins Sludge and Grouted Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2004-05-21

    The evolving plan for most of the KE and KW Basin sludges is disposition to WIPP as remote handled (RH) TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the sealed transportation cask destined for WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments to WIPP likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the contained uranium metals reaction with water. Therefore, gas generation testing with uranium metal particles of known surface area and immobilized in candidate (grout) solidification matrices was used to identify the effectiveness of various candidate solidification matrices to inhibit the rate of the uranium metal-water reaction.

  8. Generation of cell lines for monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Alvin, Krista; Ye, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent the largest group of therapeutic proteins with 30 products approved in the USA and hundreds of therapies currently undergoing clinical trials. The complex nature of mAbs makes their development as therapeutic agents constrained by numerous criteria such as quality, safety, regulation, and quantity. Identification of a clonal cell line expressing high levels of mAb with adequate quality attributes and generated in compliance with regulatory standards is a necessary step prior to a program moving to large-scale production for clinical material. This chapter outlines the stable transfection technology that generates clonal cell lines for commercial manufacturing processes.

  9. A methanotroph-based biorefinery: Potential scenarios for generating multiple products from a single fermentation.

    PubMed

    Strong, P J; Kalyuzhnaya, M; Silverman, J; Clarke, W P

    2016-09-01

    Methane, a carbon source for methanotrophic bacteria, is the principal component of natural gas and is produced during anaerobic digestion of organic matter (biogas). Methanotrophs are a viable source of single cell protein (feed supplement) and can produce various products, since they accumulate osmolytes (e.g. ectoine, sucrose), phospholipids (potential biofuels) and biopolymers (polyhydroxybutyrate, glycogen), among others. Other cell components, such as surface layers, metal chelating proteins (methanobactin), enzymes (methane monooxygenase) or heterologous proteins hold promise as future products. Here, scenarios are presented where ectoine, polyhydroxybutyrate or protein G are synthesised as the primary product, in conjunction with a variety of ancillary products that could enhance process viability. Single or dual-stage processes and volumetric requirements for bioreactors are discussed, in terms of an annual biomass output of 1000 tonnesyear(-1). Product yields are discussed in relation to methane and oxygen consumption and organic waste generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron Drinking Water Pipe Corrosion Products: Concentrators of Toxic Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Metals Tammie L. Gerke and J. Barry Maynard Department of Geology University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0013 USA Todd P. Luxton and...Kirk G. Scheckel U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NRMRL, LRPCD 26 West Martin Luther King Dr. Cincinnati, OH, 45268 USA Brenda J...Little Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center, MS 39525 USA ABSTRACT The capability of iron pipe corrosion products in active drinking water

  11. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of 2-alkenals generates genotoxic 4-oxo-2-alkenals during lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Nuka, Erika; Tomono, Susumu; Ishisaka, Akari; Kato, Yoji; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Yoshichika

    2016-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation products react with cellular molecules, such as DNA bases, to form covalent adducts, which are associated with aging and disease processes. Since lipid peroxidation is a complex process and occurs in multiple stages, there might be yet unknown reaction pathways. Here, we analyzed comprehensively 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) adducts with oxidized arachidonic acid using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and found the formation of 7-(2-oxo-hexyl)-etheno-dG as one of the major unidentified adducts. The formation of this adduct was reproduced in the reaction of dG with 2-octenal and predominantly with 4-oxo-2-octenal (OOE). We also found that other 2-alkenals (with five or more carbons) generate corresponding 4-oxo-2-alkenal-type adducts. Importantly, it was found that transition metals enhanced the oxidation of C4-position of 2-octenal, leading to the formation of OOE-dG adduct. These findings demonstrated a new pathway for the formation of 4-oxo-2-alkenals during lipid peroxidation and might provide a mechanism for metal-catalyzed genotoxicity.

  12. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process. The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  13. Size characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles in commercial sunscreen products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Fong, Andrew; Linder, Sean W.

    2017-07-01

    There is an increase in the usage of engineered metal oxide (TiO2 and ZnO) nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens due to their pleasing esthetics and greater sun protection efficiency. A number of studies have been done concerning the safety of nanoparticles in sunscreen products. In order to do the safety assessment, it is pertinent to develop novel analytical techniques to analyze these nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens. This study is focused on developing analytical techniques that can efficiently determine particle size of metal oxides present in the commercial sunscreens. To isolate the mineral UV filters from the organic matrices, specific procedures such as solvent extraction were identified. In addition, several solvents (hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, and tetrahydrofuran) have been investigated. The solvent extraction using tetrahydrofuran worked well for all the samples investigated. The isolated nanoparticles were characterized by using several different techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, differential centrifugal sedimentation, and x-ray diffraction. Elemental analysis mapping studies were performed to obtain individual chemical and morphological identities of the nanoparticles. Results from the electron microscopy techniques were compared against the bulk particle sizing techniques. All of the sunscreen products tested in this study were found to contain nanosized (≤100 nm) metal oxide particles with varied shapes and aspect ratios, and four among the 11 products were showed to have anatase TiO2.

  14. Defining next-generation products: an inside look.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, B; Walleigh, R

    1997-01-01

    The continued success of technology-based companies depends on their proficiency in creating next-generation products and their derivatives. So getting such products out the door on schedule must be routine for such companies, right? Not quite. The authors recently engaged in a detailed study--in which they had access to sensitive internal information and to candid interviews with people at every level--of 28 next-generation product-development projects in 14 leading high-tech companies. They found that most of the companies were unable to complete such projects on schedule. And the companies also had difficulty developing the derivative products needed to fill the gaps in the market that their next-generation products would create. The problem in every case, the authors discovered, was rooted in the product definition phase. And not coincidentally, the successful companies in the study had all learned how to handle the technical and marketplace uncertainties in their product definition processes. The authors have discerned from the actions of those companies a set of best practices that can measurably improve the definition phase of any company's product-development process. They have grouped the techniques into three categories and carefully lay out the steps that companies need to take as they work through each stage. The best practices revealed here are not a magic formula for rapid, successful new-product definition. But they can help companies capture new markets without major delays. And that is good news for any manager facing the uncertainty that goes with developing products for a global marketplace.

  15. Third harmonic generation in phase-matched alkali metal vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, D. M.; Young, J. F.; Harris, S. E.; Bekkers, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    We report improvements in conversion efficiency for third harmonic generation in sodium and rubidium vapor. 30-psec pulses of radiation at 1.064 micron have been converted to 0.3547 micron with an energy conversion efficiency of 10%. Factors limiting conversion efficiency are discussed.

  16. Metal-centered polymers: Using controlled polymerization methodologies for the generation of responsive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert Matthew

    Controlled polymerization methods were used to prepare highly modular polymeric metal complexes via convergent and divergent strategies. In these materials, the metal center provides a versatile hub for preparing diverse architectures through coordinative bonds. Moreover, the metal complex introduces various properties to the polymer such as luminescence, magnetism, or electroactivity. Suitably functionalized metal complexes have been used for the atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylate and methacrylate monomers by metalloinitiation to generate luminescent biocompatible materials through a divergent synthesis. By cleaving the tert-butyl groups from poly(tert -butyl acrylate), water soluble [Ru(bpyPAA2)3] 2+ has been prepared as well as the amphiphilic star block copolymer [Ru{bpy(PLA-PAA)2}3]2+ (PLA = poly(lactic acid), PAA = poly(acrylic acid) Bipyridine-centered polymeric macroligands may be chelated to a variety of metal salts. The polymer size greatly influences the formation of [Fe(bpy) 3]2+ centered polymers. As the molecular weight increases (> ˜25 kDa) tris complex formation decreases. Tris(bpy) synthesis is also impacted by chemical composition. BpyPtBA2 (PtBA = poly(tert-butyl acrylate) generates an iron mono(bpy) complex before giving rise to the bis(bpy) iron complex; no tris complex is observed. In contrast, the combination of bpyPEG2 (3 equiv) (PEG = (poly(ethylene glycol)) results in the formation of some iron tris(bpy) compound; however, complete tris(bpy) product formation is suppressed, presumably because of the chelating ability of the PEG chains. These examples contrast with other polymeric macroligands such as bpyPS2, bpyPMMA2, bpyPCL2 and bpyPLA 2 (PS = polystyrene; PMMA = poly(methyl methacrylate); PCL = poly(epsilon-caprolactone); PLA = poly(DL-lactic acid)) for which chelation reactions are facile for low molecular weight macroligands (<15 kDa), with chelation efficiencies (defined as (epsilonPMC/epsilonbpy) x 100%) only declining

  17. Size distribution of mist generated during metal machining.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, J; Leith, D

    2000-08-01

    Mist generated by machining processes is formed by three mechanisms: impaction, centrifugal force, and evaporation/condensation. This study characterized the size distribution of soluble and mineral oil mists that resulted from these formation mechanisms. Salient parameters influencing the particle size distributions also were identified. Variables investigated included metalworking fluid and machining characteristics. The size distribution of the mist generated on a small lathe by each mechanism was measured using an Aerosizer LD. For impaction, only the mineral oil viscosity influenced the mass median diameter of the mist. No parameter affected the geometric standard deviation. High-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 6.1 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Low-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 21.9 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.2. The mass median diameter of the mist generated by centrifugal force depended on the type of metalworking fluid, fluid flow, and rotational speed of the lathe. Mass median diameters for low-viscosity mineral oil mist ranged from 5 to 110 microns. Mass median diameters for soluble oil mist varied between 40 and 80 microns. The average geometric standard deviation was 2.4, and was not affected by any parameter. The mass median diameter and geometric standard deviation of the mist generated by evaporation/condensation varied with the type of metalworking fluid. The mineral oil mist and soluble oil mist mass median diameters were 2.1 microns and 3.2 microns, respectively. No machining or fluid parameter was important because the mist size distribution depended on the rate of condensation, coagulation processes, and the dynamics of the apparatus. Using the size distribution data from all three mechanisms, the estimated inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions of the total mass generated for each metalworking fluid were 60 percent, 12 percent, and 8 percent

  18. High Tc SQUID Detector for Magnetic Metallic Particles in Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Akai, Tomonori; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Suzuki, Shuichi

    High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is an ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor. After the discovery of the high-Tc superconducting materials, the performance of the high-Tc SQUID has been improved and stabilized. One strong candidate for application is a detection system of magnetic foreign matters in industrial products. There is a possibility that ultra-small metallic foreign matter has been accidentally mixed with industrial products such as lithium ion batteries. If this happens, the manufacturer of the product suffers a great loss recalling products. The outer dimension of metallic particles less than 100 micron cannot be detected using X-ray imaging, which is commonly used for the inspection. Therefore a highly sensitive system for small foreign matters is required. We developed detection systems based on high-Tc SQUID for industrial products. We could successfully detect small iron particles of less than 50 micron on a belt conveyer. These detection levels were hard to be achieved using conventional X-ray detection or other methods.

  19. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria Guimarães, Rogério Contato Ribas, Rogério Marques Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins Menezes, Andréia Duarte Fridman, Daniel Pallos Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-12-04

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  20. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria; Guimarães, Rogério Contato; Ribas, Rogério Marques; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins; Menezes, Andréia Duarte; Fridman, Daniel Pallos; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-12-01

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM's position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM's ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency - SRF - cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world's largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  1. Second harmonic generation in three-dimensional structures based on homogeneous centrosymmetric metallic spheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinying; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2012-01-16

    The theory of second harmonic generation (SHG) in three-dimensional structures consisting of arbitrary distributions of metallic spheres made of centrosymmetric materials is developed by means of multiple scattering of electromagnetic multipole fields. The electromagnetic field at both the fundamental frequency and second harmonic, as well as the scattering cross section, are calculated in a series of particular cases such as a single metallic sphere, two metallic spheres, chains of metallic spheres, and other distributions of the metallic spheres. It is shown that the linear and nonlinear optical response of all ensembles of metallic spheres is strongly influenced by the excitation of localized surface plasmon-polariton resonances. The physical origin for such a phenomenon has also been analyzed.

  2. Novel metallic alloys as phase change materials for heat storage in direct steam generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Maestre, J.; Iparraguirre-Torres, I.; Velasco, Z. Amondarain; Kaltzakorta, I.; Zubieta, M. Merchan

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is one of the key electricity production renewable energy technologies with a clear distinguishing advantage: the possibility to store the heat generated during the sunny periods, turning it into a dispatchable technology. Current CSP Plants use an intermediate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF), thermal oil or inorganic salt, to transfer heat from the Solar Field (SF) either to the heat exchanger (HX) unit to produce high pressure steam that can be leaded to a turbine for electricity production, or to the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. In recent years, a novel CSP technology is attracting great interest: Direct Steam Generation (DSG). The direct use of water/steam as HTF would lead to lower investment costs for CSP Plants by the suppression of the HX unit. Moreover, water is more environmentally friendly than thermal oils or salts, not flammable and compatible with container materials (pipes, tanks). However, this technology also has some important challenges, being one of the major the need for optimized TES systems. In DSG, from the exergy point of view, optimized TES systems based on two sensible heat TES systems (for preheating of water and superheating vapour) and a latent heat TES system for the evaporation of water (around the 70% of energy) is the preferred solution. This concept has been extensively tested [1, 2, 3] using mainly NaNO3 as latent heat storage medium. Its interesting melting temperature (Tm) of 306°C, considering a driving temperature difference of 10°C, means TES charging steam conditions of 107 bar at 316°C and discharging conditions of 81bar at 296°C. The average value for the heat of fusion (ΔHf) of NaNO3 from literature data is 178 J/g [4]. The main disadvantage of inorganic salts is their very low thermal conductivity (0.5 W/m.K) requiring sophisticated heat exchanging designs. The use of high thermal conductivity eutectic metal alloys has been recently proposed [5, 6, 7] as a feasible alternative. Tms

  3. Intramolecular cyclopropanation and C-H insertion reactions with metal carbenoids generated from cyclopropenes.

    PubMed

    Archambeau, Alexis; Miege, Frédéric; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine

    2015-04-21

    incorporating an eight-membered ring. The reactivity of rhodium(II) carbenoids generated from 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenylcarbinols was also investigated in intramolecular C(sp(3))-H insertions. Despite their low electrophilic character, these purely donor rhodium(II) carbenoids underwent remarkably efficient diastereoselective 1,5- or 1,6-C-H insertions allowing access to a wide variety of substituted cyclopentanols, cyclohexanols, bicycloalkanols, and tetrahydropyrans with high level of diastereoselectivity and with complete tolerance of a free hydroxyl group. The products arising from the gold(I)- or rhodium(II)-catalyzed ring-opening/intramolecular cyclopropanation or C-H insertion of 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenylcarbinols or 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenylcarbinyl amines always incorporate an isopropylidene moiety, which can potentially undergo subsequent oxidative cleavage into a carbonyl group without epimerization. By virtue of this operation, the 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenyl group formally behaves as a valuable surrogate for an α-diazoketone, with obvious advantages considering the ease of access to the corresponding substrates and that no hazardous reagents are involved in their preparation. These studies have set a useful basis for the development of other reaction pathways involving metal carbenoids generated from these readily available families of substituted cyclopropenes, including the investigation of the yet underexploited synthetic potential of purely donor rhodium(II) carbenoids.

  4. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  5. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  6. Theory and computation of hot carriers generated by surface plasmon polaritons in noble metals.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Louie, Steven G

    2015-06-02

    Hot carriers (HC) generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in noble metals are promising for application in optoelectronics, plasmonics and renewable energy. However, existing models fail to explain key quantitative details of SPP-to-HC conversion experiments. Here we develop a quantum mechanical framework and apply first-principles calculations to study the energy distribution and scattering processes of HCs generated by SPPs in Au and Ag. We find that the relative positions of the s and d bands of noble metals regulate the energy distribution and mean free path of the HCs, and that the electron-phonon interaction controls HC energy loss and transport. Our results prescribe optimal conditions for HC generation and extraction, and invalidate previously employed free-electron-like models. Our work combines density functional theory, GW and electron-phonon calculations to provide microscopic insight into HC generation and ultrafast dynamics in noble metals.

  7. Theory and computation of hot carriers generated by surface plasmon polaritons in noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-06-01

    Hot carriers (HC) generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in noble metals are promising for application in optoelectronics, plasmonics and renewable energy. However, existing models fail to explain key quantitative details of SPP-to-HC conversion experiments. Here we develop a quantum mechanical framework and apply first-principles calculations to study the energy distribution and scattering processes of HCs generated by SPPs in Au and Ag. We find that the relative positions of the s and d bands of noble metals regulate the energy distribution and mean free path of the HCs, and that the electron-phonon interaction controls HC energy loss and transport. Our results prescribe optimal conditions for HC generation and extraction, and invalidate previously employed free-electron-like models. Our work combines density functional theory, GW and electron-phonon calculations to provide microscopic insight into HC generation and ultrafast dynamics in noble metals.

  8. Theory and computation of hot carriers generated by surface plasmon polaritons in noble metals

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Hot carriers (HC) generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in noble metals are promising for application in optoelectronics, plasmonics and renewable energy. However, existing models fail to explain key quantitative details of SPP-to-HC conversion experiments. Here we develop a quantum mechanical framework and apply first-principles calculations to study the energy distribution and scattering processes of HCs generated by SPPs in Au and Ag. We find that the relative positions of the s and d bands of noble metals regulate the energy distribution and mean free path of the HCs, and that the electron–phonon interaction controls HC energy loss and transport. Our results prescribe optimal conditions for HC generation and extraction, and invalidate previously employed free-electron-like models. Our work combines density functional theory, GW and electron–phonon calculations to provide microscopic insight into HC generation and ultrafast dynamics in noble metals. PMID:26033445

  9. Next-generation biomass feedstocks for biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Blake A; Loque, Dominique; Blanch, Harvey W

    2008-01-01

    The development of second-generation biofuels - those that do not rely on grain crops as inputs - will require a diverse set of feedstocks that can be grown sustainably and processed cost-effectively. Here we review the outlook and challenges for meeting hoped-for production targets for such biofuels in the United States. PMID:19133109

  10. Second and Third Harmonic Generation in Metal-Based Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    electrons. It has been shown that contributions to second harmonic ( SH ) generation from bound charges can be significant [10]. Free and bound...complex dielectric function defined at the fundamental and the SH frequencies [7, 11]. Bound electrons contribute to the linear dielectric constant of...fundamental (800nm) and SH (400nm) fields was modeled using free electrons only. That kind of approach forces the use of two distinct, free-electron plasma

  11. Pathways to agility in the production of neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, R.E.; Beavis, L.C.; Cutchen, J.T.; Garcia, P.; Gurule, G.A.; Harris, R.N.; McKey, P.C.; Williams, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    This report is the result of a study team commissioned to explore pathways for increased agility in the manufacture of neutron generators. As a part of Sandia`s new responsibility for generator production, the goal of the study was to identify opportunities to reduce costs and increase flexibility in the manufacturing operation. Four parallel approaches (or pathways) were recommended: (1) Know the goal, (2) Use design leverage effectively, (3) Value simplicity, and (4) Configure for flexibility. Agility in neutron generator production can be enhanced if all of these pathways are followed. The key role of the workforce in achieving agility was also noted, with emphasis on ownership, continuous learning, and a supportive environment.

  12. 40 CFR 415.110 - Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... potassium metal production subcategory. 415.110 Section 415.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Metal Production Subcategory § 415.110 Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (PMN P-09-48) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (PMN P-09-48) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 415.110 - Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... potassium metal production subcategory. 415.110 Section 415.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Metal Production Subcategory § 415.110 Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  16. 40 CFR 415.110 - Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... potassium metal production subcategory. 415.110 Section 415.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Metal Production Subcategory § 415.110 Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  17. 40 CFR 415.110 - Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... potassium metal production subcategory. 415.110 Section 415.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Metal Production Subcategory § 415.110 Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  18. 40 CFR 415.110 - Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... potassium metal production subcategory. 415.110 Section 415.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Metal Production Subcategory § 415.110 Applicability; description of the potassium metal production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  19. Engineering cyanobacteria to generate high-value products

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2011-02-01

    Although many microorganisms have been used for the bioindustrial generation of valuable metabolites, the productive potential of cyanobacterial species has remained largely unexplored. Cyanobacteria possess several advantages as organisms for bioindustrial processes, including simple input requirements, tolerance of marginal agricultural environments, rapid genetics, and carbon-neutral applications that could be leveraged to address global climate change concerns. Here, we review recent research involving the engineering of cyanobacterial species for the production of valuable bioindustrial compounds, including natural cyanobacterial products (e.g. sugars and isoprene), biofuels (e.g. alcohols, alkanes and hydrogen), and other commodity chemicals. Biological and economic obstacles to scaled cyanobacterial production are highlighted, and methods for increasing cyanobacterial production efficiencies are discussed.

  20. Engineering cyanobacteria to generate high-value products.

    PubMed

    Ducat, Daniel C; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A

    2011-02-01

    Although many microorganisms have been used for the bioindustrial generation of valuable metabolites, the productive potential of cyanobacterial species has remained largely unexplored. Cyanobacteria possess several advantages as organisms for bioindustrial processes, including simple input requirements, tolerance of marginal agricultural environments, rapid genetics, and carbon-neutral applications that could be leveraged to address global climate change concerns. Here, we review recent research involving the engineering of cyanobacterial species for the production of valuable bioindustrial compounds, including natural cyanobacterial products (e.g. sugars and isoprene), biofuels (e.g. alcohols, alkanes and hydrogen), and other commodity chemicals. Biological and economic obstacles to scaled cyanobacterial production are highlighted, and methods for increasing cyanobacterial production efficiencies are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of Wastewaters Contaminated with Heavy Metals in Bioethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Alica; Blinová, Lenka

    2017-06-01

    Bioethanol as a substitute for traditional sources of energy, especially oil transport, is currently one of the most researched alternative motor fuels. Normally, bioethanol is produced from agricultural crops such as sugar cane or corn. However, this is counter-productive, because agriculture is primarily serving to ensure enough food for the people. It is therefore necessary to look for new production of appropriate non-food crops or find an added value to this process. Utilisation of contaminated water from metal industry could be one of them. Based on the hypothesis of reduction of some toxic metals with higher oxidation number is opening the possibility of using this wastewater in alcohol fermentation of any kind of biomass. In this study, hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) was used as a model contaminant in the process of aerobic fermentation of corn to bioethanol. To determine the reduction potential of glucose to Cr(VI), and to quantitatively determinate the glucose content after saccharification, UV/VIS spectrophotometry was used. As a method of qualitative determination of fermentation product, gas chromatography with mass detection was used. Infrared spectrometry was used for qualitative analyses of produced ethanol. Based on the established results shown in this paper, we can conclude that the presence of hexavalent chromium in the fermentation process does not have a significant negative impact, while offering the opportunity of using the industrial wastewaters for the production of bioethanol fuel.

  2. Heavy metal analysis in commercial Spirulina products for human consumption

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    For consumption of health foods of Spirulina, by the general public, health food stores are increasingly offering more exotic products. Though Spirulina consumption is growing worldwide, relatively few studies have reported on the quantities of heavy metals/minerals they contain and/or their potential effects on the population’s health. This study reveals the concentrations of six typical heavy metals/minerals (Ni, Zn, Hg, Pt, Mg, and Mn) in 25 Spirulina products commercialized worldwide for direct human consumption. Samples were ground, digested and quantified by Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP–MS). The concentrations (mg/kg d.w.) were range from 0.001 to 0.012 (Pt) followed by 0.002–0.028 (Hg), 0.002–0.042 (Mg), 0.005–2.248 (Mn), 0.211–4.672 (Ni) and 0.533–6.225 (Zn). The inorganic elements of the present study were significantly lower than the recommended daily intake (RDI) level of heavy metal elements (mg/daily) Ni (0.4), Zn (13), Hg (0.01), Pt (0.002), Mg (400) and Mn (4). Based on this study the concentration of inorganic elements was not found to exceed the present regulation levels, and they can be considered as safe food. PMID:24235875

  3. Measurements of terahertz radiation generated using a metallic, corrugated pipe

    DOE PAGES

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady; Antipov, Sergey; ...

    2016-11-23

    Here, a method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 µm. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam comparedmore » to the wavelength of the radiation, but with short rise time, to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation. For the THz pulse we obtain and compare with calculations: the central frequency, the bandwidth, and the spectral power—compared to a diffraction radiation background signal.« less

  4. Measurements of terahertz radiation generated using a metallic, corrugated pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady; Antipov, Sergey; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Swinson, Christina; Xiang, Dao

    2016-11-23

    Here, a method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 µm. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam compared to the wavelength of the radiation, but with short rise time, to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation. For the THz pulse we obtain and compare with calculations: the central frequency, the bandwidth, and the spectral power—compared to a diffraction radiation background signal.

  5. Measurements of terahertz radiation generated using a metallic, corrugated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady; Antipov, Sergey; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Swinson, Christina; Xiang, Dao

    2017-02-01

    A method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 μm. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam compared to the wavelength of the radiation, but with short rise time, to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation. For the THz pulse we obtain and compare with calculations: the central frequency, the bandwidth, and the spectral power-compared to a diffraction radiation background signal.

  6. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  7. Production of defects in metals by collision cascades: TEM experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper reviews experimental TEM data on production of dislocation loops by low energy ion bombardment to low doses, as simulations of similar collision cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation, in various metals and alloys. The dependence of vacancy dislocation loop formation on recoil energy, sample temperature, and specific metal or alloy will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of dilute alloy additions. A model for cascade melting will be employed to understand these effects, and will require an examination of the role of electron-phonon coupling in cascade cooling and recrystallization. The formation of interstitial dislocation loops as cascade defects, and the influence of the nearby surfaces in these experiments is briefly discussed.

  8. The GOES-R Product Generation Architecture - Post CDR Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittberner, G.; Kalluri, S.; Weiner, A.

    2012-12-01

    The GOES-R system will substantially improve the accuracy of information available to users by providing data from significantly enhanced instruments, which will generate an increased number and diversity of products with higher resolution, and much shorter relook times. Considerably greater compute and memory resources are necessary to achieve the necessary latency and availability for these products. Over time, new and updated algorithms are expected to be added and old ones removed as science advances and new products are developed. The GOES-R GS architecture is being planned to maintain functionality so that when such changes are implemented, operational product generation will continue without interruption. The primary parts of the PG infrastructure are the Service Based Architecture (SBA) and the Data Fabric (DF). SBA is the middleware that encapsulates and manages science algorithms that generate products. It is divided into three parts, the Executive, which manages and configures the algorithm as a service, the Dispatcher, which provides data to the algorithm, and the Strategy, which determines when the algorithm can execute with the available data. SBA is a distributed architecture, with services connected to each other over a compute grid and is highly scalable. This plug-and-play architecture allows algorithms to be added, removed, or updated without affecting any other services or software currently running and producing data. Algorithms require product data from other algorithms, so a scalable and reliable messaging is necessary. The SBA uses the DF to provide this data communication layer between algorithms. The DF provides an abstract interface over a distributed and persistent multi-layered storage system (e.g., memory based caching above disk-based storage) and an event management system that allows event-driven algorithm services to know when instrument data are available and where they reside. Together, the SBA and the DF provide a flexible, high

  9. GOES-R GS Product Generation Infrastructure Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, M.; Gundy, J.

    2012-12-01

    GOES-R GS Product Generation Infrastructure Operations: The GOES-R Ground System (GS) will produce a much larger set of products with higher data density than previous GOES systems. This requires considerably greater compute and memory resources to achieve the necessary latency and availability for these products. Over time, new algorithms could be added and existing ones removed or updated, but the GOES-R GS cannot go down during this time. To meet these GOES-R GS processing needs, the Harris Corporation will implement a Product Generation (PG) infrastructure that is scalable, extensible, extendable, modular and reliable. The primary parts of the PG infrastructure are the Service Based Architecture (SBA), which includes the Distributed Data Fabric (DDF). The SBA is the middleware that encapsulates and manages science algorithms that generate products. The SBA is divided into three parts, the Executive, which manages and configures the algorithm as a service, the Dispatcher, which provides data to the algorithm, and the Strategy, which determines when the algorithm can execute with the available data. The SBA is a distributed architecture, with services connected to each other over a compute grid and is highly scalable. This plug-and-play architecture allows algorithms to be added, removed, or updated without affecting any other services or software currently running and producing data. Algorithms require product data from other algorithms, so a scalable and reliable messaging is necessary. The SBA uses the DDF to provide this data communication layer between algorithms. The DDF provides an abstract interface over a distributed and persistent multi-layered storage system (memory based caching above disk-based storage) and an event system that allows algorithm services to know when data is available and to get the data that they need to begin processing when they need it. Together, the SBA and the DDF provide a flexible, high performance architecture that can meet

  10. The elastic-plastic response of metal films subjected to ultrafast laser-generated shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Von; McGrane, Shawn; Bolme, Cynthia; Moore, David

    2011-06-01

    We have measured the free-surface response of metal films with nominal thicknesses ranging from 500 nm to 8 μm to shocks generated from chirped ultrafast lasers. We launch a single laser generated stress wave into the metal film, but measure two stress waves on the free surface separated in time. The two waves correspond to the elastic and plastic response of the thin metal films. Using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, we have measured the separation of the elastic and plastic waves to times as short as 20 picoseconds and measured peak elastic free surface velocities as high as 1.4 km/s in aluminum. We will discuss the experimental results we have measured for aluminum, copper and other metals.

  11. Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

  12. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  13. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Progress report, [1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.

    1993-08-01

    A new hypothesis is introduced for the generation of petroleum and natural gas. The transition metals, activated under the reducing conditions of diagenesis, are proposed as catalysts in the generation of light hydrocarbons. The objective of this proposal is to test that hypothesis. Transition metals (Ni, V, Ti, Co, Fe), in kerogen, porphyrins, and as pure compounds, will be tested under catagenic conditions for catalytic activity in the conversion of normal paraffins and hydrogen into light hydrocarbons. If the hypothesis is correct, kerogenous transition metals should become catalytically active under the reducing conditions of diagenesis and catalyze the conversion of paraffins into the light hydrocarbons seen in petroleum. Moreover, the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons generated catalytically should be similar in molecular and isotopic compositions to natural gas.

  14. Towards zero waste production in the minerals and metals sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, William J.

    The production of mineral and metal commodities results in large quantities of wastes (solid, liquid and gaseous) at each stage of value-adding — from mining to manufacturing. Waste production (both consumer and non-consumer) is a major contributor to environmental degradation. Approaches to waste management in the minerals industry are largely `after the event'. These have moved progressively from foul-and-flee to dilute-and-disperse to end end-of-pipe treatments. There is now a need to move to approaches which aim to reduce or eliminate waste production at source. Modern waste management strategies include the application of cleaner production principles, the use of wastes as raw materials, the reengineering of process flowsheets to minimise waste production, and use of industrial symbioses through industrial ecology to convert wastes into useful by-products. This paper examines how these can be adopted by the minerals industry, with some recent examples. The financial, technical, systemic and regulatory drivers and barriers are also examined.

  15. Surface plasma wave assisted second harmonic generation of laser over a metal film

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, Santosh; Parashar, J.

    2015-01-15

    Second harmonic generation of laser mode converted surface plasma wave (SPW) over a corrugated metal film is studied. The laser, impinged on the metal film, under attenuated total reflection configuration, excites SPW over the metal–vacuum interface. The excited SPW extends over a much wider surface area than the laser spot cross-section. It exerts a second harmonic ponderomotive force on metal electrons, imparting them velocity that beats with the surface ripple to produce a nonlinear current, driving resonant second harmonic surface plasma wave.

  16. Innovative front end processing for next generation CIS module production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Volker; Jasenek, Axel; Sandfort, Christian; Letsch, Andreas; Koetschau, Immo; Hahn, Thomas; Feichtinger, Jochen; Eschrich, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    The successful implementation of two new process steps into an existing Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIS) production line was achieved. One, a newly developed back contact, aims for a better process control, as far as the transition of the metallic back contact to a selenide/metal bi-layer during CIS-formation is concerned. This was done by the introduction of a corrosion resistant barrier layer, which reliably stops chalcogenide diffusion from the top. By doing so, a back contact layer is obtained, with well defined properties in which the functionalities of the back electrode now is divided between two separated layers. The other development presented in this paper, tackles the complexity of CIS-module production and the interferences between the different processes required. By shifting the P1-scribing process after i-ZnO deposition, the process sequence for CIS is simplified and it will be shown that this new P1i exhibits superior properties as far as CIS morphology and groove quality is concerned.

  17. CARBON-RICH DUST PRODUCTION IN METAL-POOR GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, G. C.; Matsuura, M.; Lagadec, E.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Kraemer, K. E.; McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Wood, P. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2012-06-20

    We have observed a sample of 19 carbon stars in the Sculptor, Carina, Fornax, and Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra show significant quantities of dust around the carbon stars in Sculptor, Fornax, and Leo I, but little in Carina. Previous comparisons of carbon stars with similar pulsation properties in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds revealed no evidence that metallicity affected the production of dust by carbon stars. However, the more metal-poor stars in the current sample appear to be generating less dust. These data extend two known trends to lower metallicities. In more metal-poor samples, the SiC dust emission weakens, while the acetylene absorption strengthens. The bolometric magnitudes and infrared spectral properties of the carbon stars in Fornax are consistent with metallicities more similar to carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds than in the other dwarf spheroidals in our sample. A study of the carbon budget in these stars reinforces previous considerations that the dredge-up of sufficient quantities of carbon from the stellar cores may trigger the final superwind phase, ending a star's lifetime on the asymptotic giant branch.

  18. First principles analysis of metal and oxide-metal interfacial catalysis for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Current and growing interest in the development of new catalytic materials for complex chemistries has challenged the methods traditionally employed by practitioners of computational catalysis. Explicit Density Functional Theory (DFT) analysis of all possible reaction pathways in biomass reaction networks, for example, is computationally prohibitive, and to make progress at a reasonable rate, strategies to accelerate the predictions made by DFT-based methods must be developed. In this talk, we will review some recent work in our group focusing on first principles analyses of the production of hydrogen from the decomposition of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons on heterogeneous catalytic surfaces. We will discuss, in particular, the development of accelerated DFT-based strategies to map the complex reaction networks associated with biomass decomposition at metal and oxide-metal interfaces, and we will show how these strategies can efficiently produce semi-quantitative predictions of activity and selectivity trends in hydrogen production on these surfaces. We will also briefly describe the development of reactivity trends for another chemical process that is relevant to biomass chemistry, the water-gas shift reaction, at metal-oxide interfaces, and will describe how bifunctional properties of these interfaces may promote this important chemistry.

  19. Commercial Applications of Metal Foams: Their Properties and Production

    PubMed Central

    García-Moreno, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This work gives an overview of the production, properties and industrial applications of metal foams. First, it classifies the most relevant manufacturing routes and methods. Then, it reviews the most important properties, with special interest in the mechanical and functional aspects, but also taking into account costs and feasibility considerations. These properties are the motivation and basis of related applications. Finally, a summary of the most relevant applications showing a large number of actual examples is presented. Concluding, we can forecast a slow, but continuous growth of this industrial sector. PMID:28787887

  20. Sustainable Sources of Biomass for Bioremediation of Heavy Metals in Waste Water Derived from Coal-Fired Power Generation

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Richard J.; Paul, Nicholas A.; Hu, Yi; de Nys, Rocky

    2012-01-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals using dried algal biomass has been extensively described but rarely implemented. We contend this is because available algal biomass is a valuable product with a ready market. Therefore, we considered an alternative and practical approach to algal bioremediation in which algae were cultured directly in the waste water stream. We cultured three species of algae with and without nutrient addition in water that was contaminated with heavy metals from an Ash Dam associated with coal-fired power generation and tested metal uptake and bioremediation potential. All species achieved high concentrations of heavy metals (to 8% dry mass). Two key elements, V and As, reached concentrations in the biomass of 1543 mg.kg−1 DW and 137 mg.kg−1 DW. Growth rates were reduced by more than half in neat Ash Dam water than when nutrients were supplied in excess. Growth rate and bioconcentration were positively correlated for most elements, but some elements (e.g. Cd, Zn) were concentrated more when growth rates were lower, indicating the potential to tailor bioremediation depending on the pollutant. The cosmopolitan nature of the macroalgae studied, and their ability to grow and concentrate a suite of heavy metals from industrial wastes, highlights a clear benefit in the practical application of waste water bioremediation. PMID:22590550

  1. Sustainable sources of biomass for bioremediation of heavy metals in waste water derived from coal-fired power generation.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard J; Paul, Nicholas A; Hu, Yi; de Nys, Rocky

    2012-01-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals using dried algal biomass has been extensively described but rarely implemented. We contend this is because available algal biomass is a valuable product with a ready market. Therefore, we considered an alternative and practical approach to algal bioremediation in which algae were cultured directly in the waste water stream. We cultured three species of algae with and without nutrient addition in water that was contaminated with heavy metals from an Ash Dam associated with coal-fired power generation and tested metal uptake and bioremediation potential. All species achieved high concentrations of heavy metals (to 8% dry mass). Two key elements, V and As, reached concentrations in the biomass of 1543 mg.kg(-1) DW and 137 mg.kg(-1) DW. Growth rates were reduced by more than half in neat Ash Dam water than when nutrients were supplied in excess. Growth rate and bioconcentration were positively correlated for most elements, but some elements (e.g. Cd, Zn) were concentrated more when growth rates were lower, indicating the potential to tailor bioremediation depending on the pollutant. The cosmopolitan nature of the macroalgae studied, and their ability to grow and concentrate a suite of heavy metals from industrial wastes, highlights a clear benefit in the practical application of waste water bioremediation.

  2. Composition Directed Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Irradiated Mixed Metal Sulfides Correlated with Their Photocatalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Yang, Dongfang; Xiao, Pin; Fan, Xiaoli; Zheng, Zhi; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Wamer, Wayne G; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-08-05

    The ability of nanostructures to facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species and charge carriers underlies many of their chemical and biological activities. Elucidating which factors are essential and how these influence the production of various active intermediates is fundamental to understanding potential applications of these nanostructures, as well as potential risks. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping and spin labeling techniques, we assessed 3 mixed metal sulfides of varying compositions for their abilities to generate reactive oxygen species, photogenerate electrons, and consume oxygen during photoirradiation. We found these irradiated mixed metal sulfides exhibited composition dependent generation of ROS: ZnIn2S4 can generate (•)OH, O2(-•) and (1)O2; CdIn2S4 can produce O2(-•) and (1)O2, while AgInS2 only produces O2(-•). Our characterizations of the reactivity of the photogenerated electrons and consumption of dissolved oxygen, performed using spin labeling, showed the same trend in activity: ZnIn2S4 > CdIn2S4 > AgInS2. These intrinsic abilities to generate ROS and the reactivity of charge carriers correlated closely with the photocatalytic degradation and photoassisted antibacterial activities of these nanomaterials.

  3. Real-time data flow and product generating for GNSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Caissy, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The last IGS workshop with the theme 'Towards Real-Time' resulted in the design of a prototype for real-time data and sharing within the IGS. A prototype real-time network is being established that will serve as a test bed for real-time activities within the IGS. We review the developments of the prototype and discuss some of the existing methods and related products of real-time GNSS systems. Recommendations are made concerning real-time data distribution and product generation.

  4. Gelation Mechanisms and Characterization of Electrochemically Generated Protein Films at Metal Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elizabeth J.

    Although the electrochemical behavior of metals used in orthopedic implants has been studied extensively, the material interactions with proteins during corrosion processes remains poorly understood. Some studies suggest that metal-protein interactions accelerate corrosion, while others suggest that proteins protect the material from degradation. Corrosion of implant materials is a major concern due to the metal ion release that can sometimes cause adverse local tissue reactions and ultimately, failure of the implant. The initial purpose of this research was therefore to study the corrosion behavior of CoCrMo, an alloy commonly used in hip replacements, with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) in physiologically relevant media. The QCM enables in situ characterization of surface changes accompanying corrosion and is sensitive to viscoelastic effects at its surface. Results of QCM studies in proteinaceous media showed film deposition on the alloy surface under electrochemical conditions that otherwise produced mass loss if proteins were not present in the electrolyte. Additional studies on pure Co, Cr, and Mo demonstrated that the protein films also form on Mo surfaces after a release of molybdate ions, suggesting that these ions are essential for film formation. The electrochemically generated protein films are reminiscent of carbonaceous films that form on implant surfaces in vivo, therefore a second goal of the research was to delineate mechanisms that cause the films to form. In the second stage of this research, electrochemical QCM tests were conducted on models of the CoCrMo system consisting of Cr electrodes in proteinaceous or polymeric media containing dissolved molybdate ions. Studies indicated that films can be generated through electrochemical processes so long as both amine functional groups and molybdate ions are present in the electrolyte solution. These results suggest that the films form due to an ionic cross-linking reaction between the positively

  5. Mineralogy and metals speciation in Mo rich mineral sludges generated at a metal recycling plant.

    PubMed

    Vemic, M; Bordas, F; Guibaud, G; Joussein, E; Labanowski, J; Lens, P N L; van Hullebusch, E D

    2015-04-01

    In France, more than 250 million metric tons of sludges need to be treated each year. These sludges are either dumped on the landfills or reused as secondary resources in order to preserve natural resources. A large portions of these sludges are mineral sludges, originating from metal recycling plants. In order to estimate their metal recovery potential, these mineral sludges were characterized. Four types of mineral sludge samples were collected from a metal recycling plant (3 from the recycling plant storage areas (bulk storage, barrel storage and storage shed) and 1 from the collection basin). The sludges were characterized, wherein the Mo, Ni, Cr, Co, Zn and W content and speciation were quantified. The samples had pH values between 5.9 and 10.3 with organic matter contents varying between 6.3% (storage shed) and 29.5% (bulk storage) (loss on ignition at 500 °C). Based on their leaching properties, the four mineral sludge samples (in the case of Mo) and the bulk storage sludge (in the case of Ni and Zn) were classified as potentially hazardous regarding the EN 12457-1 and EN 12457-2 method. Mineralogical results reveal that both bulk storage and the storage shed give the highest contributions to the metal content of the collection basin sample. Sequential extraction of the collection basin samples indicated that Mo is bound to the oxidizable and residual fraction, while Ni, Cr and Co were bound to the residual fraction, and Zn to the soluble acid fraction, respectively. W tends to be equally distributed among all extracted fractions. A strong correlation existed between Mo and Co, as well as between Ni, Zn and Cr, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid in nitrite-containing simulated nuclear waste media

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1994-08-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}-, and NO{sub 2}- were used as media to evaluate the stability of formic acid towards hydrogen evolution by the reaction HCO{sub 2}H {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Small scale experiments using 40-50 mL of feed simulant in closed glass reactors (250-550 mL total volume) at 80-100{degree}C were used to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate ion on the catalytic activities of the noble metals for formic acid decomposition. Reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O in the gas phase as a function of time. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O, was found to be the most active catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid above {approx}80{degree}C in the presence of nitrite ion in accord with earlier observations. The inherent homogeneous nature of the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed formic acid decomposition is suggested by the approximate pseudo first-order dependence of the hydrogen production rate on Rh concentration. Titration of the typical feed simulants containing carbonate and nitrite with formic acid in the presence of rhodium at the reaction temperature ({approx}90{degree}C) indicates that the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid occurs only after formic acid has reacted with all of the carbonate and nitrite present to form CO{sub 2} and NO/N{sub 2}O, respectively. The catalytic activities of Ru and Pd towards hydrogen generation from formic acid are quite different than those of Rh in that they are inhibited rather than promoted by the presence of nitrite ion.

  7. A novel optical lithography implement utilizing third harmonic generation via metallic tip enhanced near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Mei, Ting; He, Miao; Li, Hao; Chen, Zhenshi

    2017-01-01

    A novel scheme for near-field optical lithography utilizing a metallic tip illuminated by femtosecond laser pulses with proper polarization has been presented. The strongly enhanced near field at the metallic tip offers a localized excitation source for the third harmonic generation in the nonlinear material. The generated third harmonic via excitation of nonlinear photoresist provides good exposure contrast due to the cubic intensity dependence. The spatial resolution of this novel lithography scheme is shown to be better than that of the conventional lithography technique.

  8. Heavy Metals in the Vegetables Collected from Production Sites

    PubMed Central

    Taghipour, Hassan; Mosaferi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Contamination of vegetable crops (as an important part of people's diet) with heavy metals is a health concern. Therefore, monitoring levels of heavy metals in vegetables can provide useful information for promoting food safety. The present study was carried out in north-west of Iran (Tabriz) on the content of heavy metals in vegetable crops. Methods: Samples of vegetables including kurrat (n=20) (Allium ampeloprasumssp. Persicum), onion (n=20) (Allium cepa) and tomato (n=18) (Lycopersiconesculentum var. esculentum), were collected from production sites in west of Tabriz and analyzed for presence of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) after extraction by aqua regia method (drying, grounding and acid diges­tion). Results: Mean ± SD (mg/kg DW) concentrations of Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni and Zn were 0.32 ± 0.58, 28.86 ± 28.79, 1.75 ± 2.05, 6.37± 5.61 and 58.01 ± 27.45, respec­tively. Cr, Cu and Zn were present in all the samples and the highest concentra­tions were observed in kurrat (leek). Levels of Cd, Cr and Cu were higher than the acceptable limits. There was significant difference in levels of Cr (P<0.05) and Zn (P<0.001) among the studied vegetables. Positive correlation was observed be­tween Cd:Cu (R=0.659, P<0.001) Cr:Ni (R=0.326, P<0.05) and Cr:Zn (R=0.308, P<0.05).   Conclusion: Level of heavy metals in some of the analyzed vegetables, especially kurrat samples, was higher than the standard levels. Considering the possi­ble health outcomes due to the consumption of contaminated vegetables, it is re­quired to take proper actions for avoiding people's chronic exposure. PMID:24688968

  9. Detoxification and generation of useful products from coal combustion wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-21

    Electric utilities are on the brink of a new era in waste disposal problems. This research project addresses the issue of how to effectively dispose of flyash, bottom ash, desulfurization sludge through the generation of chemically-hardened material that could potentially be used as a cement or as a synthetic aggregate. The specific goals of this study were: (1) to study the hardness of mixtures of flyash, bottom ash, and DSG treated with lime and other hardening agents; (2) to determine the optimum solids content, setting time, moisture content, and post setting treatments that will yield the greatest strength and hardness out of these mixtures; and (3) to determine the leachability of the synthetic material as a measure of its ability to retain absorbed and/or entrained toxic metals. 50 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. A products generator for testing the performance of disassembly procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenso-Díaz, Belarmino; González Torre, Beatriz

    2004-12-01

    In recent decades, regulations and markets have been exerting pressure on designers and manufacturers to take more responsibility for the environmental impacts of their products throughout their life cycles. The problem of finding the disassembly sequence represents one of the major challenges when attempting to close product life cycles by carrying out reuse, recycling and remanufacturing practices. Many different techniques have been used to deal with this problem, varying from exact to heuristic solutions. So far, however, not much effort has gone into measuring and comparing the efficiency of this wide set of techniques. This is partly due to the difficulties of getting a wide population of real products, belonging to different industries and with different degree of complexity that might constitute a representative population for carrying out this kind of task. In this paper, a generator of complex products is presented that is able to build up products with hundreds of components joined by different kinds of joints in such a way that a theoretical "good" disassembly sequence is always known. The efficiency of different methods for general products can thus be easily compared. The performance of a Scatter Search algorithm is tested as an example of its application in this case.

  11. Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) Standard Product Generation and Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micijevic, E.; Hayes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The LDCM's Landsat 8 (L8), planned for launch in February 2013, is the latest satellite in the 40 year history of the Landsat program. The satellite will have two imagers: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). The data from both sensors will be processed and combined into the final Level 1 Terrain (L1T) standard product by the Landsat Product Generation System (LPGS) at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS). Landsat 8 products will nominally have 11 image bands; however, products will still be created if OLI only, or TIRS only collections are acquired. The LPGS is designed to create L1T products from Level 0 data by merging OLI and TIRS outputs and performing systematic radiometric and geometric corrections, followed by precision and terrain corrections that include Ground Control Points (GCP), and a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for topographic accuracy. Scenes that have a quality score of 9 or greater and a percent cloud cover less than 40 will be automatically processed. In addition, any archived scene, regardless of cloud cover, can be requested for processing through USGS EROS clients, GloVis or Earth Explorer. While most data will be processed as Level L1T, some scenes will not have ground control or elevation data necessary for precision or terrain correction, respectively. In these cases, the best level of correction will be applied (Level 1G-systematic or Level 1Gt-systematic terrain). The standard Level 1T products will contain scaled Top of Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance data, only for OLI. The conversion between radiance and reflectance within radiometric processing (L1R) will be performed using the band specific coefficients that are proportional to the respective exoatmospheric solar irradiances and the Earth-Sun distance for the scene's acquisition day. The TIRS data will contain scaled at-sensor radiances and no at-sensor brightness temperature or emissivity conversions are planned. For users that

  12. Direct generation of oxygen-stabilized radicals by H• transfer from transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jonathan L; Hartung, John; Han, Arthur; Norton, Jack R

    2015-01-28

    Transition-metal hydrides generate α-alkoxy radicals by H• transfer to enol ethers. We have measured the rate constant for transfer from CpCr(CO)3H to n-butyl vinyl ether and have examined the chemistry of radicals generated by such transfers. Radicals from appropriate substrates undergo 5-exo cyclization, with higher diastereoselectivity than the analogous all-carbon radicals. From such radicals it is straightforward to make substituted tetrahydrofurans.

  13. Direct writing computer-generated holograms on metal film by an infrared femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Quan-Zhong; Qiu, Jian-Rong; Jiang, Xiong-Wei; Dai, En-Wen; Zhou, Chang-He; Zhu, Cong-Shan

    2005-03-21

    Writing computer-generated holograms have been achieved by using a near infrared femtosecond laser selective ablation of metal film deposited on glass substrate. The diffraction features with data reconstruction of the fabricated computer-generated holograms were evaluated. Both transmission and reflection holograms can be fabricated in a single process. The process requires no mask, no pre- or post-treatment of the substrate.

  14. Broadband terahertz generation using the semiconductor-metal transition in VO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Charipar, Nicholas A. Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott A.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of broadband terahertz emitters based on the semiconductor-metal transition in thin film VO{sub 2} (vanadium dioxide). With the appropriate geometry, picosecond electrical pulses are generated by illuminating 120 nm thick VO{sub 2} with 280 fs pulses from a femtosecond laser. These ultrafast electrical pulses are used to drive a simple dipole antenna, generating broadband terahertz radiation.

  15. Assessment of Metal Media Filters for Advanced Coal-Based Power Generation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.

    2002-09-19

    Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. This paper reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion conditions.

  16. Transition metal associations with primary biological particles in sea spray aerosol generated in a wave channel.

    PubMed

    Guasco, Timothy L; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Pedler, Byron E; Ault, Andrew P; Collins, Douglas B; Zhao, Defeng; Kim, Michelle J; Ruppel, Matthew J; Wilson, Scott C; Pomeroy, Robert S; Grassian, Vicki H; Azam, Farooq; Bertram, Timothy H; Prather, Kimberly A

    2014-01-21

    In the ocean, breaking waves generate air bubbles which burst at the surface and eject sea spray aerosol (SSA), consisting of sea salt, biogenic organic species, and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). Our overall understanding of atmospheric biological particles of marine origin remains poor. Here, we perform a control experiment, using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer to measure the mass spectral signatures of individual particles generated by bubbling a salt solution before and after addition of heterotrophic marine bacteria. Upon addition of bacteria, an immediate increase occurs in the fraction of individual particle mass spectra containing magnesium, organic nitrogen, and phosphate marker ions. These biological signatures are consistent with 21% of the supermicrometer SSA particles generated in a previous study using breaking waves in an ocean-atmosphere wave channel. Interestingly, the wave flume mass spectral signatures also contain metal ions including silver, iron, and chromium. The nascent SSA bioparticles produced in the wave channel are hypothesized to be as follows: (1) whole or fragmented bacterial cells which bioaccumulated metals and/or (2) bacteria-derived colloids or biofilms which adhered to the metals. This study highlights the potential for transition metals, in combination with specific biomarkers, to serve as unique indicators for the presence of marine PBAP, especially in metal-impacted coastal regions.

  17. Toxic combustion by-products: Generation, separation, cleansing, containment

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, W.; Eger, K.; Angelo, F.; Clemens, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Focus of this paper is on diagnosis, control, and containment of potentially toxic combustion byproducts when mixed wastes are treated at elevated temperatures. Such byproducts fall into several categories: acid gases, particulates, metals, organics. Radionuclides are treated as a subset of metals, while organics are divided into two subclasses: products of incomplete combustion, and principal organic hazardous constituents. An extended flue gas cleaning system is described which can be used to contain potentially toxic organic emissions and recycle the hazrdous materials for further treatment; it uses oxygen rather than air to reduce total quantities of emissions, improve efficiency of oxidation, and minimize NOx emissions. Flue gas recycling is used for cooling and for containing all potentially toxic emissions. Three thermal treatment unit operations are used in series for more effective process control; three emission separation and containment unit operations are also used in series in the toxic emission containment system. Real time diagnostic hardware/software are used. Provision is made for automatic storage, separation of hazardous materials, commodity regeneration, and recycling of potentially harmful constituents. The greenhouse gas CO2 is recovered and not emitted to the atmosphere.

  18. Optical harmonics generation in metal/dielectric heterostructures in the presence of Tamm plasmon-polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afinogenov, B. I.; Popkova, A. A.; Bessonov, V. O.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied an influence of Tamm plasmon-polaritons (TPPs) excitation on the nonlinear-optical response of one-dimensional photonic crystal/metal structures. It was shown that in case when the fundamental radiation is in resonance with the TPP, second-harmonic generation in the sample is enhanced over two times of magnitude in comparison with a bare metal film. Using methods of nonlinear transfer matrices it was demonstrated that the third-order nonlinear response of a metal/dielectric heterostructure, when both fundamental and third-harmonic radiation are in resonance with the first- and third-order TPPs respectively, can be enhanced via two mechanisms: fundamental field localization and optical harmonic resonant tunneling. The overall enhancement of the third harmonic generation in that case can exceed three orders of magnitude in comparison with the non-resonant case.

  19. Enhancement of the second-harmonic generation in a quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the second-harmonic generation (SHG) and dipole-dipole interaction in a quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle hybrid system. A strong probe field is applied to create two-photon absorption in the quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle. SHG photons and SHG surface plasmon polaritons are emitted by the quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle, respectively. Induced dipoles are created in the quantum dot and the metallic nanoparticle due to two-photon absorption and hence both systems interact with each other via the dipole-dipole interaction. It is found that SHG signals produced by the quantum dot and nanoparticle are enhanced by the dipole-dipole interaction and also that the SHG signal can be switched on and off by applying a control field. The theoretical findings of this paper are supported by recent experimental studies. The present hybrid system can be used to fabricate nano-sensors and all-optical nano-switching devices.

  20. Carrier generation and electronic properties of a single-component pure organic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Terauchi, Takeshi; Sumi, Satoshi; Matsushita, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Metallic conduction generally requires high carrier concentration and wide bandwidth derived from strong orbital interaction between atoms or molecules. These requisites are especially important in organic compounds because a molecule is fundamentally an insulator; only multi-component salts with strong intermolecular interaction--namely, only charge transfer complexes and conducting polymers--have demonstrated intrinsic metallic behaviour. Herein we report a single-component electroactive molecule, zwitterionic tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-extended dicarboxylate radical (TED), exhibiting metallic conduction even at low temperatures. TED exhibits d.c. conductivities of 530 S cm-1 at 300 K and 1,000 S cm-1 at 50 K with copper-like electronic properties. Spectroscopic and theoretical investigations of the carrier-generation mechanism and the electronic states of this single molecular species reveal a unique electronic structure with a spin-density gradient in the extended TTF moieties that becomes, in itself, a metallic state.

  1. 75 FR 75694 - Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... United States after importation of certain semiconductor integrated circuits using tungsten metallization... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing... Manufacturing Corporation of China; Integrated Device Technology, Inc. of San Jose, California; and...

  2. Impacts of antioxidants on hydroxyl radical production from individual and mixed transition metals in a surrogate lung fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, Jessica G.; Anastasio, Cort

    2011-12-01

    Inhalation of ambient particulate matter causes morbidity and mortality in humans. One hypothesized mechanism of toxicity is the particle-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - including the highly damaging hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) - followed by inflammation and a variety of diseases. While past studies have found correlations between ROS formation and a variety of metals, there are no quantitative measurements of rad OH formation from transition metals at concentrations relevant to 24-hour ambient particulate exposure. This research reports specific and quantitative measurements of rad OH formation from 10 individual transition metals (and several mixtures) in a cell-free surrogate lung fluid (SLF) with four antioxidants: ascorbate, citrate, glutathione, and uric acid. We find that Fe and Cu can produce rad OH under all antioxidant conditions as long as ascorbate is present and that mixtures of the two metals synergistically increase rad OH production. Manganese and vanadium can also produce rad OH under some conditions, but given that their ambient levels are typically very low, these metals are not likely to chemically produce significant levels of rad OH in the lung fluid. Cobalt, chromium, nickel, zinc, lead, and cadmium do not produce rad OH under any of our experimental conditions. The antioxidant composition of our SLF significantly affects rad OH production from Fe and Cu: ascorbate is required for rad OH formation, citrate increases rad OH production from Fe, and both citrate and glutathione suppress rad OH production from Cu. MINTEQ ligand speciation modeling indicates that citrate and glutathione affect rad OH production by changing metal speciation, altering the reactivity of the metals. In the most realistic SLF (i.e., with all four antioxidants), Fe generates approximately six times more rad OH than does the equivalent amount of Cu. Since levels of soluble Fe in PM are typically higher than those of Cu, our results suggest that Fe

  3. Retrieval of Au, Ag, Cu precious metals coupled with electric energy production via an unconventional coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Min; Fan, Zheng; Xu, Wei; Feng, Xiao; Wu, Zu-Cheng

    2017-09-15

    The recovery of heavy metals from aqueous solutions or e-wastes is of upmost importance. Retrieval of Au, Ag, and Cu with electricity generation through building an ethanol-metal coupled redox fuel cells (CRFCs) is demonstrated. The cell was uniquely assembled on PdNi/C anode the electro-oxidation of ethanol takes place to give electrons and then go through the external circuit reducing metal ions to metallic on the cathode, metals are recovered. Taking an example of removal of 100mgL(-1) gold in 0.5M HAc-NaAc buffer solution as the catholyte, 2.0M ethanol in 1.0M alkaline solution as the anolyte, an open circuit voltage of 1.4V, more than 96% of gold removal efficiency in 20h, and equivalent energy production of 2.0kWhkg(-1) of gold can be readily achieved in this system. When gold and copper ions coexist, it was confirmed that metallic Cu is formed on the cathodic electrode later than metallic Au formation by XPS analysis. Thus, this system can achieve step by step electrodeposition of gold and copper while the two metal ions coexisting. This work develops a new approach to retrieve valuable metals from aqueous solution or e-wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on the crucial conditions for efficient third harmonic generation using a metal-hybrid-metal plasmonic slot waveguide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Shum, Perry Ping; Sun, Yunxu; Shao, Xuguang; Huang, Tianye

    2015-01-12

    We provide a comprehensive study on the efficient third harmonic generation (THG) in a lossy metal-hybrid-metal asymmetric plasmonic slot waveguide (MHM) to develop a method for efficient THG by focusing on the modal phase-matching condition (PMC), the third-order nonlinear susceptibility of the nonlinear interactive material, and the pump-harmonic modal overlap in conjunction with reasonable linear propagation loss. In addition to the PMC and the nonlinear material, the stimulated THG process can be greatly enhanced by the large pump-harmonic modal overlap. With 1 W pump power, simulation results present that THG conversion efficiency up to 2.79 × 10(-4) within 4.5 ����m MHM can be achieved.

  5. Characteristics of products generated by selective sintering and stereolithography rapid prototyping processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cariapa, Vikram

    1993-01-01

    The trend in the modern global economy towards free market policies has motivated companies to use rapid prototyping technologies to not only reduce product development cycle time but also to maintain their competitive edge. A rapid prototyping technology is one which combines computer aided design with computer controlled tracking of focussed high energy source (eg. lasers, heat) on modern ceramic powders, metallic powders, plastics or photosensitive liquid resins in order to produce prototypes or models. At present, except for the process of shape melting, most rapid prototyping processes generate products that are only dimensionally similar to those of the desired end product. There is an urgent need, therefore, to enhance the understanding of the characteristics of these processes in order to realize their potential for production. Currently, the commercial market is dominated by four rapid prototyping processes, namely selective laser sintering, stereolithography, fused deposition modelling and laminated object manufacturing. This phase of the research has focussed on the selective laser sintering and stereolithography rapid prototyping processes. A theoretical model for these processes is under development. Different rapid prototyping sites supplied test specimens (based on ASTM 638-84, Type I) that have been measured and tested to provide a data base on surface finish, dimensional variation and ultimate tensile strength. Further plans call for developing and verifying the theoretical models by carefully designed experiments. This will be a joint effort between NASA and other prototyping centers to generate a larger database, thus encouraging more widespread usage by product designers.

  6. Ecosystems monitoring: MODIS land products generated in CONABIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, G.; Cruz, I.; Wickel, A. J.; Acosta, J.; Ressl, R.

    The main goal of CONABIO National commission for biodiversity of Mexico is to promote coordinate support and carry out activities aimed at improving our understanding of biological diversity as well as its conservation and sustainable use for the benefit of society The aim of the ecosystems Monitoring program consists of the analysis of the detected changes -both in quality and quantity- and the analysis of the distribution of vegetation through an enhanced methodology using remote sensing techniques computing and statistics One of the last products of this program is the fire risk propagation map based on NDVI anomalies this product indicate vegetation water stress conditions and therefore a high probability of propagation of a wildfire the availability of the MODIS data has been a crucial factor for the generation of these time-series The generation of VCF Vegetation Continuous Fields for direct broadcast stations receiving MODIS data will be a very useful tool to use in vegetation monitoring due the capabilities of this product to determinate 3 components tree shrub and bare soil for each single pixel The present paper describes the develop of the mentioned applications previously and the future of the programs for the monitoring of the biodiversity in Mexico

  7. Continuous-Flow Microwave Synthesis of Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Highly Efficient Method for Large-Scale Production.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Marco; Steitz, Daniel Antti; van Bokhoven, Jeroen Anton; Ranocchiari, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks are having a tremendous impact on novel strategic applications, with prospective employment in industrially relevant processes. The development of such processes is strictly dependent on the ability to generate materials with high yield efficiency and production rate. We report a versatile and highly efficient method for synthesis of metal-organic frameworks in large quantities using continuous flow processing under microwave irradiation. Benchmark materials such as UiO-66, MIL-53(Al), and HKUST-1 were obtained with remarkable mass, space-time yields, and often using stoichiometric amounts of reactants. In the case of UiO-66 and MIL-53(Al), we attained unprecedented space-time yields far greater than those reported previously. All of the syntheses were successfully extended to multi-gram high quality products in a matter of minutes, proving the effectiveness of continuous flow microwave technology for the large scale production of metal-organic frameworks.

  8. Generation, Detection and characterization of Gas-Phase Transition Metal containing Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, Timothy

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this project was to generate, detect, and characterize small, gas-phase, metal containing molecules. In addition to being relevant to high temperature chemical environments (e.g. plasmas and combustion), gas-phase experiments on metal containing molecules serve as the most direct link to a molecular-level theoretical model for catalysis. Catalysis (i.e. the addition of a small about of recoverable material to control the rate and direction of a chemical reaction) is critical to the petroleum and pharmaceutical industries as well as environmental remediation. Currently, the majority of catalytic materials are based on very expensive metals such as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), iridium (Ir,) rhenium (Re), and rhodium (Rh). For example, the catalyst used for converting linear hydrocarbon molecules (e.g. hexane) to cyclic molecules (e.g. cyclohexane) is a mixture of Pt and Re suspended on alumina. It enables straight chain alkanes to be converted into branched-chain alkanes, cyclohexanes and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used, amongst other things, to enhance the octane number of petrol. A second example is the heterogeneous catalysis used in automobile exhaust systems to: a) decrease nitrogen oxide; b) reduce carbon monoxide; and c) oxidize unburned hydrocarbons. The exhaust is vented through a high-surface area chamber lined with Pt, Pd, and Rh. For example, the carbon monoxide is catalytically converted to carbon dioxide by reaction with oxygen. The research results from this work have been published in readily accessible journals1-28. The ground and excited electronic state properties of small metal containing molecules that we determine were: a) electronic state distributions and lifetimes, b) vibrational frequencies, c) bond lengths and angles, d) hyperfine interactions, e) permanent electric dipole moments, mel, and f) magnetic dipoles, μm. In general terms, μel, gives insight into the charge distribution and mm into

  9. Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    M. Patterson; C. Park

    2008-03-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

  10. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  11. Electrolytic production of metals using a resistant anode

    DOEpatents

    Tarcy, Gary P.; Gavasto, Thomas M.; Ray, Siba P.

    1986-01-01

    An electrolytic process comprising evolving oxygen on an anode in a molten salt, the anode comprising an alloy comprising a first metal and a second metal, both metals forming oxides, the oxide of the first metal being more resistant than the second metal to attack by the molten salt, the oxide of the second metal being more resistant than the first metal to the diffusion of oxygen. The electrode may also be formed of CuAlO.sub.2 and/or Cu.sub.2 O.

  12. Electrolytic production of metals using a resistant anode

    DOEpatents

    Tarcy, G.P.; Gavasto, T.M.; Ray, S.P.

    1986-11-04

    An electrolytic process is described comprising evolving oxygen on an anode in a molten salt, the anode comprising an alloy comprising a first metal and a second metal, both metals forming oxides, the oxide of the first metal being more resistant than the second metal to attack by the molten salt, the oxide of the second metal being more resistant than the first metal to the diffusion of oxygen. The electrode may also be formed of CuAlO[sub 2] and/or Cu[sub 2]O. 2 figs.

  13. The Live Access Server Scientific Product Generation Through Workflow Orchestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, S.; Calahan, J.; Li, J.; Manke, A.; O'Brien, K.; Schweitzer, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Live Access Server (LAS) is a well-established Web-application for display and analysis of geo-science data sets. The software, which can be downloaded and installed by anyone, gives data providers an easy way to establish services for their on-line data holdings, so their users can make plots; create and download data sub-sets; compare (difference) fields; and perform simple analyses. Now at version 7.0, LAS has been in operation since 1994. The current "Armstrong" release of LAS V7 consists of three components in a tiered architecture: user interface, workflow orchestration and Web Services. The LAS user interface (UI) communicates with the LAS Product Server via an XML protocol embedded in an HTTP "get" URL. Libraries (APIs) have been developed in Java, JavaScript and perl that can readily generate this URL. As a result of this flexibility it is common to find LAS user interfaces of radically different character, tailored to the nature of specific datasets or the mindset of specific users. When a request is received by the LAS Product Server (LPS -- the workflow orchestration component), business logic converts this request into a series of Web Service requests invoked via SOAP. These "back- end" Web services perform data access and generate products (visualizations, data subsets, analyses, etc.). LPS then packages these outputs into final products (typically HTML pages) via Jakarta Velocity templates for delivery to the end user. "Fine grained" data access is performed by back-end services that may utilize JDBC for data base access; the OPeNDAP "DAPPER" protocol; or (in principle) the OGC WFS protocol. Back-end visualization services are commonly legacy science applications wrapped in Java or Python (or perl) classes and deployed as Web Services accessible via SOAP. Ferret is the default visualization application used by LAS, though other applications such as Matlab, CDAT, and GrADS can also be used. Other back-end services may include generation of Google

  14. Amorphous semiconducting and conducting transparent metal oxide thin films and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, John; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Ginley, David; Taylor, Matthew; Neuman, George A.; Luten, Henry A.; Forgette, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, John S.

    2010-07-13

    Metal oxide thin films and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a metal oxide thin film may comprise introducing at least two metallic elements and oxygen into a process chamber to form a metal oxide. The method may also comprise depositing the metal oxide on a substrate in the process chamber. The method may also comprise simultaneously controlling a ratio of the at least two metallic elements and a stoichiometry of the oxygen during deposition. Exemplary amorphous metal oxide thin films produced according to the methods herein may exhibit highly transparent properties, highly conductive properties, and/or other opto-electronic properties.

  15. Production of the next-generation library virtual tour.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J M; Roth, L K

    2001-10-01

    While many libraries offer overviews of their services through their Websites, only a small number of health sciences libraries provide Web-based virtual tours. These tours typically feature photographs of major service areas along with textual descriptions. This article describes the process for planning, producing, and implementing a next-generation virtual tour in which a variety of media elements are integrated: photographic images, 360-degree "virtual reality" views, textual descriptions, and contextual floor plans. Hardware and software tools used in the project are detailed, along with a production timeline and budget, tips for streamlining the process, and techniques for improving production. This paper is intended as a starting guide for other libraries considering an investment in such a project.

  16. Microbial production of next-generation stevia sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Kim; Carlsen, Simon; Semmler, Angelika; Simón, Ernesto; Mikkelsen, Michael Dalgaard; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2016-12-07

    The glucosyltransferase UGT76G1 from Stevia rebaudiana is a chameleon enzyme in the targeted biosynthesis of the next-generation premium stevia sweeteners, rebaudioside D (Reb D) and rebaudioside M (Reb M). These steviol glucosides carry five and six glucose units, respectively, and have low sweetness thresholds, high maximum sweet intensities and exhibit a greatly reduced lingering bitter taste compared to stevioside and rebaudioside A, the most abundant steviol glucosides in the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. In the metabolic glycosylation grid leading to production of Reb D and Reb M, UGT76G1 was found to catalyze eight different reactions all involving 1,3-glucosylation of steviol C 13- and C 19-bound glucoses. Four of these reactions lead to Reb D and Reb M while the other four result in formation of side-products unwanted for production. In this work, side-product formation was reduced by targeted optimization of UGT76G1 towards 1,3 glucosylation of steviol glucosides that are already 1,2-diglucosylated. The optimization of UGT76G1 was based on homology modelling, which enabled identification of key target amino acids present in the substrate-binding pocket. These residues were then subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis and a mutant library containing a total of 1748 UGT76G1 variants was screened for increased accumulation of Reb D or M, as well as for decreased accumulation of side-products. This screen was performed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing all enzymes in the rebaudioside biosynthesis pathway except for UGT76G1. Screening of the mutant library identified mutations with positive impact on the accumulation of Reb D and Reb M. The effect of the introduced mutations on other reactions in the metabolic grid was characterized. This screen made it possible to identify variants, such as UGT76G1Thr146Gly and UGT76G1His155Leu, which diminished accumulation of unwanted side-products and gave increased specific accumulation of the desired Reb D

  17. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Certain ratios of light hydrocarbons remain virtually invariant over the course of petroleum generation, indicating steady-state catalysis rather than thermal cracking as the central feature to the mechanism of petroleum generation. Although the evidence for catalytic intervention is now compelling, the nature of the catalytic agent, its mode of activation and action are not clear. The author proposes that the transition metals, activated in the lipophilic domains of kerogen, are the catalytic agents in the conversion of normal paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas. The process proceeds through specific catalytic steps involving 3-, 5-, and 6-carbon ring-closures and the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds in the key steps. This hypothesis is analyzed in the context of published literature on catalysis by Ni, V, Ti, Co, and related transition metals. Activated under anaerobic conditions, these metals express extraordinary catalytic activity in each of the postulated steps. Moreover, metal-catalysis provides a reasonable kinetic pathway through which hydrogen and normal paraffins may combine to form a methane-enriched a natural gas. Given the anaerobic conditions of diagenesis and a kerogenous source of hydrogen, it is concluded that the transition metals, under catagenic conditions, are potentially active catalysts in the conversion of hydrogen and paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas.

  18. Laser-assisted sheet metal working in series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Based on the demand for a responsible use of natural resources and energy the need for lightweight materials is increasing. The most common materials for lightweight production are high and highest strength steel. These materials are difficult to machine using conventional sheet metal working processes because the high strength leads to a limited formability and high tool wear. The Fraunhofer IPT developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working. Selective laser based heating of the part directly before machining softens the material locally. Thus the quality of the following cut can be increased, for example for shearing 1.4310 the clear cut surface ratio can be increased from 20% up to 100% using a shearing gap of 10% of the sheet thickness. Because of the softening of the material and thus the increased formability, parts with a higher complexity can be produced. For example 1.4310 can be bent laser-assisted with a radius of 0.25 mm instead of 2-3 mm using the conventional process. For the first time spring steel can be embossed with conventional tools up to 50% of the sheet thickness. For the implementation in series production a modular system upgrade "hy-PRESS" has been developed to include laser and scanner technology into existing presses. For decoupling the sensitive optical elements of the machine vibrations an active-passive damping system has been developed. The combination of this new hybrid process and the system technology allows to produce parts of high strength steel with a high complexity and quality.

  19. Dynamic Gate Product and Artifact Generation from System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Maddalena; Delp, Christopher; Bindschadler, Duane; Sarrel, Marc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Lam, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is gaining acceptance as a way to formalize systems engineering practice through the use of models. The traditional method of producing and managing a plethora of disjointed documents and presentations ("Power-Point Engineering") has proven both costly and limiting as a means to manage the complex and sophisticated specifications of modern space systems. We have developed a tool and method to produce sophisticated artifacts as views and by-products of integrated models, allowing us to minimize the practice of "Power-Point Engineering" from model-based projects and demonstrate the ability of MBSE to work within and supersede traditional engineering practices. This paper describes how we have created and successfully used model-based document generation techniques to extract paper artifacts from complex SysML and UML models in support of successful project reviews. Use of formal SysML and UML models for architecture and system design enables production of review documents, textual artifacts, and analyses that are consistent with one-another and require virtually no labor-intensive maintenance across small-scale design changes and multiple authors. This effort thus enables approaches that focus more on rigorous engineering work and less on "PowerPoint engineering" and production of paper-based documents or their "office-productivity" file equivalents.

  20. Dynamic Gate Product and Artifact Generation from System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Maddalena; Delp, Christopher; Bindschadler, Duane; Sarrel, Marc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Lam, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is gaining acceptance as a way to formalize systems engineering practice through the use of models. The traditional method of producing and managing a plethora of disjointed documents and presentations ("Power-Point Engineering") has proven both costly and limiting as a means to manage the complex and sophisticated specifications of modern space systems. We have developed a tool and method to produce sophisticated artifacts as views and by-products of integrated models, allowing us to minimize the practice of "Power-Point Engineering" from model-based projects and demonstrate the ability of MBSE to work within and supersede traditional engineering practices. This paper describes how we have created and successfully used model-based document generation techniques to extract paper artifacts from complex SysML and UML models in support of successful project reviews. Use of formal SysML and UML models for architecture and system design enables production of review documents, textual artifacts, and analyses that are consistent with one-another and require virtually no labor-intensive maintenance across small-scale design changes and multiple authors. This effort thus enables approaches that focus more on rigorous engineering work and less on "PowerPoint engineering" and production of paper-based documents or their "office-productivity" file equivalents.

  1. Detection of second-generation asymptotic giant branch stars in metal-poor globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple stellar populations are actually known to be present in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The first generation (FG) displays a halo-like chemical pattern, while the second generation (SG) one is enriched in Al and Na (depleted in Mg and O).Both generations of stars are found at different evolutionary stages like the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB), but the SG seems to be absent - especially in metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs - in more evolved evolutionary stages such as the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. This suggests that not all SG stars experience the AGB phase and that AGB-manqué stars may be quite common in metal-poor GCs, which represents a fundamental problem for the theories of GC formation and evolution and stellar evolution. Very recently, we have combined the H-band Al abundances obtained by the APOGEE survey with ground-based optical photometry, reporting the first detection of SG Al-rich AGB stars in several metal-poor GCs with different observational properties such as horizontal branch (HB) morphology, metallicity, and age. The APOGEE observations thus resolve the apparent problem for stellar evolution, supporting the existing horizontal branch star canonical models, and may help to discern the nature of the GC polluters.

  2. Metal-enhanced chemiluminescence: Radiating plasmons generated from chemically induced electronic excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Aslan, Kadir; Malyn, Stuart N.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2006-04-01

    In this letter, we report the observation of metal-enhanced chemiluminescence. Silver Island films, in close proximity to chemiluminescence species, can significantly enhance luminescence intensities; a 20-fold increase in chemiluminescence intensity was observed as compared to an identical control sample containing no silver. This suggests the use of silver nanostructures in the chemiluminescence-based immunoassays used in the biosciences today, to improve signal and therefore analyte detectability. In addition, this finding suggests that surface plasmons can be directly excited by chemically induced electronically excited luminophores, a significant finding toward our understanding of fluorophore-metal interactions and the generation of surface plasmons.

  3. Metal concentrations and distribution in paint waste generated during bridge rehabilitation in New York State.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhan; Axe, Lisa; Jahan, Kauser; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V; Kochersberger, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Between 1950 and 1980, lead and chromium along with other metals have been used in paint coatings to protect bridges from corrosion. In New York State with 4500 bridges in 11 Regions 2385 of the bridges have been rehabilitated and subsequently repainted after 1989 when commercial use of lead based paint was prohibited. The purpose of this research was to address the concentration and distribution of trace metals in the paint waste generated during bridge rehabilitation. Using hypothesis testing and stratified sampling theory, a representative sample size of 24 bridges from across the state was selected that resulted in 117 paint waste samples. Field portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) analysis revealed metal concentrations ranged from 5 to 168,090 mg kg(-1) for Pb, 49,367 to 799,210 mg kg(-1) for Fe, and 27 to 425,510 mg kg(-1) for Zn. Eighty percent of the samples exhibited lead concentrations greater than 5000 mg kg(-1). The elevated iron concentrations may be attributed to the application of steel grit as an abrasive blasting material routinely used by state Departments of Transportation in the paint removal process. Other metals including Ba and Cr were observed in the paint waste as well. As a result of the paint formulation, metals were found to be associated in the paint waste (Pb correlated with Cr (r=0.85)). The elevated metal concentrations observed raises concern over the potential impact of leaching from this waste stream.

  4. Pulse laser-induced generation of cluster codes from metal nanoparticles for immunoassay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Yin; Chu, Han-Wei; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Cang, Jinshun; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we have developed an assay for the detection of proteins by functionalized nanomaterials coupled with laser-induced desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) by monitoring the generation of metal cluster ions. We achieved selective detection of three proteins [thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (VEGF-A165), and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)] by modifying nanoparticles (NPs) of three different metals (Au, Ag, and Pt) with the corresponding aptamer or antibody in one assay. The Au, Ag, and Pt acted as metal bio-codes for the analysis of thrombin, VEGF-A165, and PDGF-BB, respectively, and a microporous cellulose acetate membrane (CAM) served as a medium for an in situ separation of target protein-bound and -unbound NPs. The functionalized metal nanoparticles bound to their specific proteins were subjected to LDI-MS on the CAM. The functional nanoparticles/CAM system can function as a signal transducer and amplifier by transforming the protein concentration into an intense metal cluster ion signal during LDI-MS analysis. This system can selectively detect proteins at picomolar concentrations. Most importantly, the system has great potential for the detection of multiple proteins without any pre-concentration, separation, or purification process because LDI-MS coupled with CAM effectively removes all signals except for those from the metal cluster ions.

  5. Enhanced Product Generation at NASA Data Centers Through Grid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Hinke, Thomas H.; Gavali, Shradha; Seufzer, William J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how grid technology can support the ability of NASA data centers to provide customized data products. A combination of grid technology and commodity processors are proposed to provide the bandwidth necessary to perform customized processing of data, with customized data subsetting providing the initial example. This customized subsetting engine can be used to support a new type of subsetting, called phenomena-based subsetting, where data is subsetted based on its association with some phenomena, such as mesoscale convective systems or hurricanes. This concept is expanded to allow the phenomena to be detected in one type of data, with the subsetting requirements transmitted to the subsetting engine to subset a different type of data. The subsetting requirements are generated by a data mining system and transmitted to the subsetter in the form of an XML feature index that describes the spatial and temporal extent of the phenomena. For this work, a grid-based mining system called the Grid Miner is used to identify the phenomena and generate the feature index. This paper discusses the value of grid technology in facilitating the development of a high performance customized product processing and the coupling of a grid mining system to support phenomena-based subsetting.

  6. Energy Harvesting Thermoelectric Generators Manufactured Using the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Tsai, Wen-Jung

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of energy harvesting thermoelectric micro generators using the commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The micro generator consists of 33 thermocouples in series. Thermocouple materials are p-type and n-type polysilicon since they have a large Seebeck coefficient difference. The output power of the micro generator depends on the temperature difference in the hot and cold parts of the thermocouples. In order to increase this temperature difference, the hot part of the thermocouples is suspended to reduce heat-sinking. The micro generator needs a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures of hot part, which the post-process includes an anisotropic dry etching to etch the sacrificial oxide layer and an isotropic dry etching to remove the silicon substrate. Experiments show that the output power of the micro generator is 9.4 μW at a temperature difference of 15 K. PMID:23396193

  7. Immobilizing Molecular Metal Dithiolene-Diamine Complexes on 2D Metal-Organic Frameworks for Electrocatalytic H2 Production.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renhao; Zheng, Zhikun; Tranca, Diana C; Zhang, Jian; Chandrasekhar, Naisa; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Seifert, Gotthard; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-02-16

    Carbon electrocatalysts consisting of metal complexes such as MNx or MSx are promising alternatives to high-cost Pt catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the exact HER active sites remain elusive. Here, molecular metal dithiolene-diamine (MS2 N2 , M=Co and Ni), metal bis(dithiolene) (MS4 ), and metal bis(diamine) (MN4 ) complexes were selectively incorporated into carbon-rich 2D metal-organic frameworks (2D MOFs) as model carbon electrocatalysts. The 2D MOF single layers, powders, and composites with graphene were thus prepared and showed definite active sites for H2 generation. The electrocatalytic HER activity of the 2D MOF-based catalysts with different metal complexes follow the order of MS2 N2 >MN4 >MS4 . Moreover, the protonation preferentially occurred on the metal atoms, and the concomitant heterolytic elimination of H2 was favored on the M-N units in the MS2 N2 active centers. The results provide an in-depth understanding of the catalytic active sites, thus making way for the future development of metal complexes in carbon-rich electrode materials for energy generation.

  8. An Overview of Metallic Nanowire Networks, Promising Building Blocks for Next Generation Transparent Conductors: Emergence, Fundamentals and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirsalami, Sedigheh; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba; Daneshmanesh, Habib

    2017-08-01

    Transparent conductors (TCs) have a wide range of applications in numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices. This review provides an overview of the emergence of metallic nanowire networks (MNNs) as promising building blocks for the next generation transparent conductors. The fundamental aspects, structure-property relations, fabrication techniques and the corresponding challenges are reviewed. Theoretical and experimental researches suggest that nanowires with smaller diameter, longer length and higher aspect ratio have higher performance. Yet, the development of an efficient synthesis technique for the production of MNNs has remained a challenge. The synthesis method is also crucial to the scalability and the commercial potential of these emerging TCs. The most promising techniques for the synthesis together with their advantages, limitations and the recent findings are here discussed. Finally, we will try to show the promising future research trends in MNNs to have an approach to design the next generation TCs.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  10. Neutron generator production mission in a national laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Larry E.

    2007-08-01

    In the late 1980's the Department of Energy (DOE) faced a future budget shortfall. By the spring of 1991, the DOE had decided to manage this problem by closing three production plants and moving production capabilities to other existing DOE sites. As part of these closings, the mission assignment for fabrication of War Reserve (WR) neutron generators (NGs) was transferred from the Pinellas Plant (PP) in Florida to Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The DOE directive called for the last WR NG to be fabricated at the PP before the end of September 1994 and the first WR NG to be in bonded stores at SNL/NM by October 1999. Sandia National Laboratories successfully managed three significant changes to project scope and schedule and completed their portion of the Reconfiguration Project on time and within budget. The PP was closed in October 1995. War Reserve NGs produced at SNL/NM were in bonded stores by October 1999. The costs of the move were recovered in just less than five years of NG production at SNL/NM, and the annual savings today (in 1995 dollars) is $47 million.

  11. Heavy metal recovery combined with H₂ production from artificial acid mine drainage using the microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiping; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Bai, Yaoping; Fu, Shiyu; Hou, Yanping

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to utilize the microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for metal removal from acid mine drainage (AMD) and simultaneous H2 production. A dual-chamber MEC was developed to concurrently produce H2 and remove Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Fe(2+) from AMD under single and mixed metal conditions. With an applied voltage of 1.0V, Cu(2+) in the AMD was prior to others to be recovered at the cathode, followed by Ni(2+), and finally Fe(2+). The H2 production rates achieved during the AMD treatment were in the range of 0.4-1.1m(3)m(-3)d(-1), and the highest rate was obtained with the AMD containing single Cu(2+). The highest efficiency of cathode electron recovery reached 89%, which was obtained with the AMD containing mixed metals. The recovered electrons were used for both H2 production and metal reduction. The energy recovery efficiency of MEC reached up to 100%, suggesting that H2 generated from AMD was sufficient to offset the energy input during the treatment. The MEC was successfully applied to remove metals from the AMD, recover value-added products of Cu(0) and Ni(0), and to produce H2.

  12. Dissolution of uranium metal without hydride formation or hydrogen gas generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderquist, Chuck; McNamara, Bruce; Oliver, Brian

    2008-09-01

    This study shows that metallic uranium will cleanly dissolve in carbonate-peroxide solution without generation of hydrogen gas or uranium hydride. Metallic uranium shot, 0.5-1 mm diameter, was reacted with ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide solutions ranging in concentration from 0.13 M to 1.0 M carbonate and 0.50 M to 2.0 M peroxide. The dissolution rate was calculated from the reduction in bead mass, and independently by uranium analysis of the solution. The calculated dissolution rate ranged from about 4 × 10 -3 to 8 × 10 -3 mm/h, dependent primarily on the peroxide concentration. Hydrogen analysis of the etched beads showed that no detectable hydrogen was introduced into the uranium metal by the etching process.

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis of THP-1 Macrophages Exposed to Lipoprotein Hydrolysis Products Generated by Lipoprotein Lipase.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Marshall, Jenika D; Pickett, Arthur T; Schumacher, Clemens; Yang, Yanbo; Christian, Sherri L; Brown, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) induces lipid accumulation and promotes atherosclerosis. However, the effects of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL on macrophage-derived foam cell formation are not clearly understood. Thus, we analyzed the transcriptomic response to hydrolysis products via microarray analyses on RNA isolated from human THP-1 macrophages incubated with total lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL. The expression of 183 transcripts was significantly upregulated and 133 transcripts were significantly downregulated. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that there was a significant over-representation of genes involved in cell cycling, stress response, type I interferon signaling, cellular metal ion homeostasis, sterol metabolism, and nuclease activity. Interestingly, transcripts for 63 small nucleolar RNA were significantly upregulated. We verified the microarray data by quantitative real-time PCR and found that the expression of SNORA56, as well as the expression of genes associated with the cell cycle (PCNA and DKC1 variant 3), stress response (ATF3), type I interferon signaling (IFITM1), and lipid metabolism (CD36 and PLIN2) were significantly affected by LPL hydrolysis products. To determine if the free fatty acid (FFA) component of total lipoprotein hydrolysis products is sufficient to alter the expression of these genes, THP-1 macrophages were also incubated with the total FFA or individual classes of the FFA component. The gene regulation by the FFA component did not mimic that of the hydrolysis products, suggesting that the regulation of gene expression in THP-1 macrophages depends on the specific combination and concentration of lipid species present in the hydrolysis products, and not solely on FFA.

  14. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub

  15. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  16. NOBLE METAL CHEMISTRY AND HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-06-25

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell vessels were performed with the primary purpose of producing melter feeds for the beaded frit program plus obtaining samples of simulated slurries containing high concentrations of noble metals for off-site analytical studies for the hydrogen program. Eight pairs of 22-L simulations were performed of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. These sixteen simulations did not contain mercury. Six pairs were trimmed with a single noble metal (Ag, Pd, Rh, or Ru). One pair had all four noble metals, and one pair had no noble metals. One supporting 4-L simulation was completed with Ru and Hg. Several other 4-L supporting tests with mercury have not yet been performed. This report covers the calculations performed on SRNL analytical and process data related to the noble metals and hydrogen generation. It was originally envisioned as a supporting document for the off-site analytical studies. Significant new findings were made, and many previous hypotheses and findings were given additional support as summarized below. The timing of hydrogen generation events was reproduced very well within each of the eight pairs of runs, e.g. the onset of hydrogen, peak in hydrogen, etc. occurred at nearly identical times. Peak generation rates and total SRAT masses of CO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen were reproduced well. Comparable measures for hydrogen were reproduced with more variability, but still reasonably well. The extent of the reproducibility of the results validates the conclusions that were drawn from the data.

  17. Development of high-flexible triboelectric generators using plastic metal as electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen-Yeu; Shih, Jian-Fu; Chang, Chih-Chieh; Yang, Chii-Rong

    2017-02-01

    A triboelectric generator is a device that harvests energy through the conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy. In this work, two polymer materials (PDMS and PET) were selected as triboelectric layers in conjunction with plastic metal (PM) films as conductive layers to produce an electrode with high flexibility. The PDMS film was fabricated with a microstructural array to enhance friction. The proposed PM material was prepared by mixing gallium-indium liquid metal and a glaze powder with excellent coating ability, extensibility, and conductivity. Results demonstrate the superior characteristics of the PM flexible electrodes, including large bending angle (≥180°), small curvature radius (≤1 mm), and stable conductivity. This PM-based triboelectric generator can achieve average output voltage of 80 V and current of 37.2 μA. The proposed flexible electrode with a PM conductive layer could be expected to make a notable contribution to the development of wearable devices.

  18. Two-Dimensional Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Next-Generation Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jun; Liao, Ting; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Ziqi

    2017-04-10

    The exponential increase in research focused on two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides has offered an unprecedented opportunity for their use in energy conversion and storage devices, especially for promising next-generation rechargeable batteries, such as lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (NIBs), as well as some post-lithium batteries, including lithium-sulfur batteries, lithium-air batteries, etc. The introduction of well-designed 2D metal oxide nanomaterials into next-generation rechargeable batteries has significantly enhanced the performance of these energy-storage devices by providing higher chemically active interfaces, shortened ion-diffusion lengths, and improved in-plane carrier-/charge-transport kinetics, which have greatly promoted the development of nanotechnology and the practical application of rechargeable batteries. Here, the recent progress in the application of 2D metal oxide nanomaterials in a series of rechargeable LIBs, NIBs, and other post lithium-ion batteries is reviewed relatively comprehensively. Current opportunities and future challenges for the application of 2D nanomaterials in energy-storage devices to achieve high energy density, high power density, stable cyclability, etc. are summarized and outlined. It is believed that the integration of 2D metal oxide nanomaterials in these clean energy devices offers great opportunities to address challenges driven by increasing global energy demands. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In methanogenic microbial electrolysis cells (MMCs), CO2 is reduced to methane using a methanogenic biofilm on the cathode by either direct electron transfer or evolved hydrogen. To optimize methane generation, we examined several cathode materials: plain graphite blocks, graphite blocks coated with carbon black or carbon black containing metals (platinum, stainless steel or nickel) or insoluble minerals (ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide), and carbon fiber brushes. Assuming a stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen (abiotic):methane (biotic) of 4:1, methane production with platinum could be explained solely by hydrogen production. For most other materials, however, abiotic hydrogen production rates were insufficient to explain methane production. At −600 mV, platinum on carbon black had the highest abiotic hydrogen gas formation rate (1600 ± 200 nmol cm–3 d–1) and the highest biotic methane production rate (250 ± 90 nmol cm–3 d–1). At −550 mV, plain graphite (76 nmol cm–3 d–1) performed similarly to platinum (73 nmol cm–3 d–1). Coulombic recoveries, based on the measured current and evolved gas, were initially greater than 100% for all materials except platinum, suggesting that cathodic corrosion also contributed to electromethanogenic gas production. PMID:24741468

  20. Three generation production biotechnology of biomass into bio-fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-08-01

    The great change of climate change, depletion of natural resources, and scarcity of fossil fuel in the whole world nowadays have witnessed a sense of urgency home and abroad among scales of researchers, development practitioners, and industrialists to search for completely brand new sustainable solutions in the area of biomass transforming into bio-fuels attributing to our duty-that is, it is our responsibility to take up this challenge to secure our energy in the near future with the help of sustainable approaches and technological advancements to produce greener fuel from nature organic sources or biomass which comes generally from organic natural matters such as trees, woods, manure, sewage sludge, grass cuttings, and timber waste with a source of huge green energy called bio-fuel. Biomass includes most of the biological materials, livings or dead bodies. This energy source is ripely used industrially, or domestically for rather many years, but the recent trend is on the production of green fuel with different advance processing systems in a greener. More sustainable method. Biomass is becoming a booming industry currently on account of its cheaper cost and abundant resources all around, making it fairly more effective for the sustainable use of the bio-energy. In the past few years, the world has witnessed a remarkable development in the bio-fuel production technology, and three generations of bio-fuel have already existed in our society. The combination of membrane technology with the existing process line can play a vital role for the production of green fuel in a sustainable manner. In this paper, the science and technology for sustainable bio-fuel production will be introduced in detail for a cleaner world.

  1. Physics of Galactic Metals: Evolutionary Effects due to Production, Distribution, Feedback, and Interaction with Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Somerville, Rachel S.; Hirschmann, Michaela; Núñez, Alejandro; Hu, Chia-Yu; Oser, Ludwig

    2017-07-01

    We ask how the inclusion of various physical heating processes due to the metal content of gas affects the evolution of central massive galaxies and compute a suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that follow these systems and their supermassive black holes. We use a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code with a pressure-entropy formulation and a more accurate treatment of the metal production, turbulent diffusion, and cooling rate based on individual element abundances. The feedback models include (1) active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback via high-velocity broad absorption line winds and Compton/photoionization heating; (2) stellar feedback from multiple processes, including powerful winds from supernovae, stellar winds from young massive stars, and AGB stars, as well as radiative heating within Str\\ddot{{{o}}}mgren spheres; and (3) additional heating effects due to the presence of metals, including grain photoelectric heating and metallicity-dependent X-ray heating by nearby accreting black holes and from the cosmic X-ray background. With a suite of zoom-in simulations of 30 halos with {M}{vir}∼ {10}12.0-13.4, we show that energy and momentum budgeted from all feedback effects generate realistic galaxy properties. We explore the detailed role of each feedback model with three additional sets of simulations with varying input physics. We show that the metal-induced heating reduces the fraction of accreted stellar material but overall has a relatively minor effect on the massive central galaxies. The inclusion of AGN feedback significantly improves the ability of our simulations to yield realistic gas and stellar properties of massive galaxies with a reasonable accreted star fraction from other galaxies.

  2. Optical second harmonic generation of single metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Butet, Jérémy; Duboisset, Julien; Bachelier, Guillaume; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Benichou, Emmanuel; Jonin, Christian; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2010-05-12

    We report the optical second harmonic generation from individual 150 nm diameter gold nanoparticles dispersed in gelatin. The quadratic hyperpolarizability of the particles is determined and the input polarization dependence of the second harmonic intensity obtained. These results are found in excellent agreement with ensemble measurements and finite element simulations. These results open up new perspectives for the investigation of the nonlinear optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles.

  3. Stress waves generated in thin metallic films by a Q-switched ruby laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation results on stress waves generated by Q-switched ruby laser irradiated thin metal films under confinement, studied over a wide range of film materials and film thicknesses, are reviewed. The results indicate that the dependence on these parameters is much weaker than is predicted by heat transfer estimations commonly used to describe the interaction of laser irradiation with unconfined bulk-solid surfaces.

  4. Optical steering of thermally generated microbubbles in a liquid for targeted metallic nanoparticle delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnappa, Arjun; Abeywickrema, Ujitha; Banerjee, Partha

    2016-09-01

    A novel mathematical model is developed to investigate the behavior of thermally generated microbubbles in the presence of optical radiation to understand the mechanism of their steering. Forces acting on a bubble are studied in detail using a general force model. It has been proposed that these microbubbles with agglomerated metallic nanoparticles can be used for targeted drug delivery. The model can be extended to include the steering of bubbles with agglomerated silver or gold nanoparticles on their surface.

  5. Peptide assembly-driven metal-organic framework (MOF) motors for micro electric generators.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Fang, Justin; Wasik, Tomasz L; Uemura, Takashi; Zheng, Yongtai; Kitagawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2015-01-14

    Peptide-metal-organic framework (Pep-MOF) motors, whose motions are driven by anisotropic surface tension gradients created via peptide self-assembly around frameworks, can rotate microscopic rotors and magnets fast enough to generate an electric power of 0.1 μW. A new rigid Pep-MOF motor can be recycled by refilling the peptide fuel into the nanopores of the MOF.

  6. Low-order harmonic generation in metal ablation plasmas in nanosecond and picosecond laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Arias, M.; Oujja, M.; Sanz, M.; Castillejo, M.; Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Satlikov, N. Kh.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-02-15

    Low-order harmonics, third and fifth, of IR (1064 nm) laser emission have been produced in laser ablation plasmas of the metals manganese, copper and silver. The harmonics were generated in a process triggered by laser ablation followed by frequency up-conversion of a fundamental laser beam that propagates parallel to the target surface. These studies were carried out in two temporal regimes by creating the ablation plasma using either nanosecond or picosecond pulses and then probing the plasma plume with pulses of the same duration. The spatiotemporal behavior of the generated harmonics was characterized and reveals the distinct composition and dynamics of the plasma species that act as nonlinear media, allowing the comparison of different processes that control the generation efficiency. These results serve to guide the choice of laser ablation plasmas to be used for efficient high harmonic generation of laser radiation.

  7. Photochromic metal-organic frameworks: reversible control of singlet oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Feng, Dawei; Yuan, Shuai; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-01-07

    The controlled generation of singlet oxygen is of great interest owing to its potential applications including industrial wastewater treatment, photochemistry, and photodynamic therapy. Two photochromic metal-organic frameworks, PC-PCN and SO-PCN, have been developed. A photochromic reaction has been successfully realized in PC-PCN while maintaining its single crystallinity. In particular, as a solid-state material which inherently integrates the photochromic switch and photosensitizer, SO-PCN has demonstrated reversible control of (1)O2 generation. Additionally, SO-PCN shows catalytic activity towards photooxidation of 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene.

  8. Next Generation Agricultural System Data, Models and Knowledge Products: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antle, John M.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural system models have become important tools to provide predictive and assessment capability to a growing array of decision-makers in the private and public sectors. Despite ongoing research and model improvements, many of the agricultural models today are direct descendants of research investments initially made 30-40 years ago, and many of the major advances in data, information and communication technology (ICT) of the past decade have not been fully exploited. The purpose of this Special Issue of Agricultural Systems is to lay the foundation for the next generation of agricultural systems data, models and knowledge products. The Special Issue is based on a 'NextGen' study led by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  9. Next generation agricultural system data, models and knowledge products: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Antle, John M; Jones, James W; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E

    2017-07-01

    Agricultural system models have become important tools to provide predictive and assessment capability to a growing array of decision-makers in the private and public sectors. Despite ongoing research and model improvements, many of the agricultural models today are direct descendants of research investments initially made 30-40 years ago, and many of the major advances in data, information and communication technology (ICT) of the past decade have not been fully exploited. The purpose of this Special Issue of Agricultural Systems is to lay the foundation for the next generation of agricultural systems data, models and knowledge products. The Special Issue is based on a "NextGen" study led by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  10. Next Generation Agricultural System Data, Models and Knowledge Products: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antle, John M.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural system models have become important tools to provide predictive and assessment capability to a growing array of decision-makers in the private and public sectors. Despite ongoing research and model improvements, many of the agricultural models today are direct descendants of research investments initially made 30-40 years ago, and many of the major advances in data, information and communication technology (ICT) of the past decade have not been fully exploited. The purpose of this Special Issue of Agricultural Systems is to lay the foundation for the next generation of agricultural systems data, models and knowledge products. The Special Issue is based on a 'NextGen' study led by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  11. LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY ANALYSIS IN THE PRODUCTION OF METALS USED IN PHOTOVOLTAICS.

    SciTech Connect

    FTHENAKIS,V.M.; KIM, H.C.; WANG, W.

    2007-03-30

    Material flows and emissions in all the stages of production of zinc, copper, aluminum, cadmium, indium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, and molybdenum were investigated. These metals are used selectively in the manufacture of solar cells, and emission and energy factors in their production are used in the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaics. Significant changes have occurred in the production and associated emissions for these metals over the last 10 years, which are not described in the LCA databases. Furthermore, emission and energy factors for several of the by-products of the base metal production were lacking. This report aims in updating the life-cycle inventories associated with the production of the base metals (Zn, Cu, Al, Mo) and in defining the emission and energy allocations for the minor metals (Cd, In, Ge, Se, Te and Ga) used in photovoltaics.

  12. Ultrafine particle generation by high-velocity impact of metal projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, L.; Iannitti, G.; Vigo, P.; Ruggiero, A.; Russi, A.; Buonanno, G.

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particle generation through mechanical processes was not carefully deepened so far, even if it could be related to the human health-based researches. In particular, the evaluation of ultrafine particles produced in battlefield scenarios can be useful to quantify the exposure of soldiers to particles carrying toxic heavy metals. In the present work ultrafine particle generation during high-velocity impact of metal projectiles was deepened performing symmetrical high velocity Taylor impacts of copper cylinder tests (Rod-on-Rod tests) by means of a gas-gun facility. Particle number distributions and total concentrations were measured through one-second-time resolution instruments in a chamber where impact events at different velocities were performed. Particle number generation per impact was also evaluated. Particle concentrations in the 106 part. cm-3 range were measured corresponding to particle generations higher than 1012 particles per impact, then comparable to those typical of combustion sources. Particle number distribution showed a unimodal distribution with a 10 nm mode. Summarizing, the performed experimental campaign revealed an extremely high generation of ultrafine particles from mechanical processes.

  13. Metal kinetics and respiration rates in F1 generation of carabid beetles (Pterostichus oblongopunctatus F.) originating from metal-contaminated and reference areas.

    PubMed

    Lagisz, M; Kramarz, P; Niklinska, M

    2005-05-01

    We investigated resistance to metals in carabid beetles inhabiting metal-polluted and reference areas. Chronic multigeneration exposure to toxic metal concentrations may potentially result in adaptation through decreased metal uptake rate and/or increased excretion rate. The cost of resistance to pollution could be associated with increased metabolic rate. To test these predictions, laboratory cultured F(1)-generation beetles originating from metal-polluted and reference sites were exposed to food contaminated with zinc and/or cadmium for 10 weeks. After that, uncontaminated food was offered to the animals for another 3 weeks. During the experiment, internal concentrations of Cd and Zn were measured as were respiration rates of the animals. The results obtained show no significant differences in metal accumulation and excretion patterns or respiration rates between the populations. This may suggest that adaptation has not occurred in the beetles chronically exposed to toxic metal concentrations. The possible explanations for the lack of differences between the populations are discussed.

  14. Apparatus and method for making metal chloride salt product

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Richmann, Michael K.

    2007-05-15

    A method of producing metal chlorides is disclosed in which chlorine gas is introduced into liquid Cd. CdCl.sub.2 salt is floating on the liquid Cd and as more liquid CdCl.sub.2 is formed it separates from the liquid Cd metal and dissolves in the salt. The salt with the CdCl.sub.2 dissolved therein contacts a metal which reacts with CdCl.sub.2 to form a metal chloride, forming a mixture of metal chloride and CdCl.sub.2. After separation of bulk Cd from the salt, by gravitational means, the metal chloride is obtained by distillation which removes CdCl.sub.2 and any Cd dissolved in the metal chloride.

  15. TPV Power Generation System Using a High Temperature Metal Radiant Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, K.; Hayden, A. C. S.; Entchev, E.

    2007-02-01

    Interest has grown in micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP). Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation of electricity in fuel-fired furnaces is one of the micro-CHP technologies that are attracting technical attention. Previous investigations have shown that a radiant burner that can efficiently convert fuel chemical energy into radiation energy is crucial to realize a practical TPV power system. In this work, we developed a TPV power generation system using a gas-fired metal radiant burner. The burner consists of a high temperature alloy emitter, which could have an increased emissivity at short wavelengths and low emissivity at long wavelengths. The metal emitter is capable of bearing high temperatures of interest to fuel-fired TPV power conversion. GaSb TPV cells were tested in the combustion-driven radiant source. Electric output characteristics of the TPV cells were investigated at various operating conditions. The electric power output of the TPV cells was demonstrated to be promising. At an emitter temperature of 1185°C, an electric power density of 0.476 W/cm2 was generated by the GaSb cells. It is shown that the metal emitter is attractive and could be applied to practical fuel-fired TPV power systems.

  16. Development of Multi-Scale Finite Element Analysis Codes for High Formability Sheet Metal Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nnakamachi, Eiji; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo

    2007-05-17

    In this study, the dynamic- and static-explicit multi-scale finite element (F.E.) codes are developed by employing the homogenization method, the crystalplasticity constitutive equation and SEM-EBSD measurement based polycrystal model. These can predict the crystal morphological change and the hardening evolution at the micro level, and the macroscopic plastic anisotropy evolution. These codes are applied to analyze the asymmetrical rolling process, which is introduced to control the crystal texture of the sheet metal for generating a high formability sheet metal. These codes can predict the yield surface and the sheet formability by analyzing the strain path dependent yield, the simple sheet forming process, such as the limit dome height test and the cylindrical deep drawing problems. It shows that the shear dominant rolling process, such as the asymmetric rolling, generates ''high formability'' textures and eventually the high formability sheet. The texture evolution and the high formability of the newly generated sheet metal experimentally were confirmed by the SEM-EBSD measurement and LDH test. It is concluded that these explicit type crystallographic homogenized multi-scale F.E. code could be a comprehensive tool to predict the plastic induced texture evolution, anisotropy and formability by the rolling process and the limit dome height test analyses.

  17. Extraction procedure testing of solid wastes generated at selected metal ore mines and mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harty, David M.; Terlecky, P. Michael

    1986-09-01

    Solid waste samples from a reconnaissance study conducted at ore mining and milling sites were subjected to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency extraction procedure (EP) leaching test Sites visited included mines and mills extracting ores of antimony (Sb), mercury (Hg), vanadium (V), tungsten (W), and nickel (Ni). Samples analyzed included mine wastes, treatment pond solids, tailings, low grade ore, and other solid wastes generated at these facilities Analysis of the leachate from these tests indicates that none of the samples generated leachate in which the concentration of any toxic metal parameter exceeded EPA criteria levels for those metals. By volume, tailings generally constitute the largest amount of solid wastes generated, but these data indicate that with proper management and monitoring, current EPA criteria can be met for tailings and for most solid wastes associated with mining and milling of these metal ores. Long-term studies are needed to determine if leachate characteristics change with time and to assist in development of closure plans and post closure monitoring programs.

  18. A Covariance Generation Methodology for Fission Product Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, N.; Serot, O.; Archier, P.; Vallet, V.; De Saint Jean, C.; Sumini, M.

    2016-03-01

    Recent safety and economical concerns for modern nuclear reactor applications have fed an outstanding interest in basic nuclear data evaluation improvement and completion. It has been immediately clear that the accuracy of our predictive simulation models was strongly affected by our knowledge on input data. Therefore strong efforts have been made to improve nuclear data and to generate complete and reliable uncertainty information able to yield proper uncertainty propagation on integral reactor parameters. Since in modern nuclear data banks (such as JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1) no correlations for fission yields are given, in the present work we propose a covariance generation methodology for fission product yields. The main goal is to reproduce the existing European library and to add covariance information to allow proper uncertainty propagation in depletion and decay heat calculations. To do so, we adopted the Generalized Least Square Method (GLSM) implemented in CONRAD (COde for Nuclear Reaction Analysis and Data assimilation), developed at CEA-Cadarache. Theoretical values employed in the Bayesian parameter adjustment are delivered thanks to a convolution of different models, representing several quantities in fission yield calculations: the Brosa fission modes for pre-neutron mass distribution, a simplified Gaussian model for prompt neutron emission probability, theWahl systematics for charge distribution and the Madland-England model for the isomeric ratio. Some results will be presented for the thermal fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  19. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  20. Effect of municipal refuse metals on cellulase production by Thermomonospora curvata.

    PubMed Central

    Stutzenberger, F; Sterpu, I

    1978-01-01

    The high-concentration metals in municipal refuse compost were tested for effects on cellulase production and activity in Thermomonospora curvata. Although none altered cellulase reaction rates, both Al and Ca appeared to specifically inhibit cellulase production. PMID:697357

  1. Portable photocatalytic air cleaners: efficiencies and by-product generation.

    PubMed

    Gunschera, Jan; Markewitz, Doreen; Bansen, Birger; Salthammer, Tunga; Ding, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Portable photocatalytic air cleaners were investigated in 24 and 48 m(3) emission test chambers with regard to efficiency and by-product generation. For this purpose, formaldehyde, decane, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, toluene, α-pinene and heptanal were doped at sub-ppm concentration levels into the chambers individually and in mixtures. By way of specified test protocols, efficiencies could be distinguished but were strongly dependant on the choice of test compounds, especially on whether single or multi compound dosing was used, and on long-term effects. Initial clean air delivery rates (CADRs) up to 137 m(3)/h were measured. Typical by-products were found in significant concentrations. The main ones were formaldehyde up to 50 ppb (62 μg/m(3)) and acetone up to 80 ppb (190 μg/m(3)). Other aldehydes were also found, but at smaller levels. The detection of chloroacetone, a strong irritating compound, at concentrations up to 15 ppb (57 μg/m(3)) strengthens the importance of such investigations especially in cases were chloro-organic compounds are involved.

  2. Noble-Metal-Free Molybdenum Disulfide Cocatalyst for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Lu, Hong-Wei; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2015-12-21

    Photocatalytic water splitting using powered semiconductors as photocatalysts represents a promising strategy for clean, low-cost, and environmentally friendly production of H2 utilizing solar energy. The loading of noble-metal cocatalysts on semiconductors can significantly enhance the solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency. However, the high cost and scarcity of noble metals counter their extensive utilization. Therefore, the use of alternative cocatalysts based on non-precious metal materials is pursued. Nanosized MoS2 cocatalysts have attracted considerable attention in the last decade as a viable alternative to improve solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency because of its superb catalytic activity, excellent stability, low cost, availability, environmental friendliness, and chemical inertness. In this perspective, the design, structures, synthesis, and application of MoS2 -based composite photocatalysts for solar H2 generation are summarized, compared, and discussed. Finally, this Review concludes with a summary and remarks on some challenges and opportunities for the future development of MoS2 -based photocatalysts.

  3. Guided torsional wave generation of a linear in-plane shear piezoelectric array in metallic pipes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wensong; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Shi, Tonglu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical guided waves based techniques are effective and promising tools for damage detection in long pipes. The essential operations are generation and reception of guided waves in the structures utilizing transducers. A novel in-plane shear (d36 type) PMNT wafer is proposed to generate and receive the guided wave, especially the torsional waves, in metallic pipes. In contrast to the traditional wafer, this wafer will directly introduce in-plane shear deformation when electrical field is conveniently applied through its thickness direction. A single square d36 PMNT wafer is bonded on the surface of the pipe positioned collinearly with its axis, when actuated can predominantly generate torsional (T) waves along the axial direction, circumferential shear horizontal (C-SH) waves along circumferential direction, and other complex cylindrical Lamb-like wave modes along other helical directions simultaneously. While a linear array of finite square size d36 PMNT wafers was equally spaced circumferentially, when actuated simultaneously can nearly uniform axisymmetric torsional waves generate in pipes and non-symmetric wave modes can be suppressed greatly if the number of the d36 PMNT wafer is sufficiently large. This paper first presents the working mechanism of the linear d36 PMNT array from finite element analysis (FEA) by examining the constructive and destructive displacement wavefield phenomena in metallic pipes. Furthermore, since the amplitude of the received fundamental torsional wave signal strongly depends on frequency, a series of experiments are conducted to determine the frequency tuning curve for the torsional wave mode. All results indicate the linear d36 PMNT array has potential for efficiently generating uniform torsional wavefield of the fundamental torsional wave mode, which is more effective in monitoring structural health in metallic pipes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum: A genetic anomaly in Ordovician oils

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D. )

    1992-10-01

    The transition metals, captured from sedimentary waters by chlorophyll, have been proposed as the catalytic agents that convert n-alkane biolipids into the rearranged light hydrocarbons in petroleum. Certain ancient oils (Ordovician) display a depletion in chlorophyll, suggesting that they may have been derived from sedimentary rocks also depleted in transition metals. These oils show anomalously high concentrations of n-heptane relative to their respective rearranged isoalkane and cycloalkane products. This extraordinary enrichment in light n-alkanes appears unique to the chlorophyll-deficient Ordovician oils. The high concentrations of n-heptane may have resulted from the thermal cracking of higher n-alkanes, which are known to be dominant components of the kerogenous precursors to the Ordovician oils. However, the methylhexanes, which have no thermolytic precursors enriched in the kerogenous source, show a proportionate increase in concentration. The contention, therefore, that thermal cracking might explain the n-heptane anomaly is untenable since a kerogenous starting material enriched in n-alkanes and depleted in isoalkanes cannot reasonably crack to a light hydrocarbon product enriched in both n-alkanes and isoalkanes. According to a postulated catalytic cycle, n-alkane and isoalkane concentrations are controlled by the relative rates of two divergent pathways. If the various transition metals that may catalyze these reactions differ in activity, then a unique distribution of metals created by a chlorophyll deficiency could explain the Ordovician anomaly.

  5. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Byers, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed.

  6. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Byers, Charles H.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed.

  7. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    DOEpatents

    Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Byers, C.H.

    1992-06-16

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed. 2 figs.

  8. Steam generator conceptual design for the modular HTGR - Dissimilar metal weld considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, A.H.; Basol, M.

    1987-01-01

    The steam generator for the current Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) has evolved from a technology basis developed in U.S. and European gas-cooled reactor programs. The MHTGR steam generator is a vertically-oriented, counterflow, shell-and-tube, once-through, non-reheat, helical heat exchanger with helium on the shell side and water/steam in the tubes. In the MHTGR applications, the normal operating temperatures of the steam generator tubes can be as high as 638/sup 0/C (1180/sup 0/F). Concerns such as cost, creep strength, steam side scaling and stress corrosion cracking often lead to a design decision to use two different tube materials, one for the evaporating portion and another for the superheating portion of the steam generator. The current MHTGR steam generator design utilizes 2 1/4 CR - 1 Mo material for the economizer/evaporator/initial superheater tube section and Alloy 800H material for the finishing superheat tube section. Therefore, a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) is incorporated in each tube circuit. This feature of the design imposes certain important constraints on the steam generator designer. This paper presents an overview of the MHTGR steam generator conceptual design, and then focuses on the DMW considerations and how these have influenced the design configuration.

  9. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation using heterostructures of Si and chemically exfoliated metallic MoS2.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qi; Meng, Fei; English, Caroline R; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; Shearer, Melinda J; Liang, Dong; Daniel, Andrew S; Hamers, Robert J; Jin, Song

    2014-06-18

    We report the preparation and characterization of highly efficient and robust photocathodes based on heterostructures of chemically exfoliated metallic 1T-MoS2 and planar p-type Si for solar-driven hydrogen production. Photocurrents up to 17.6 mA/cm(2) at 0 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode were achieved under simulated 1 sun irradiation, and excellent stability was demonstrated over long-term operation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed low charge-transfer resistances at the semiconductor/catalyst and catalyst/electrolyte interfaces, and surface photoresponse measurements also demonstrated slow carrier recombination dynamics and consequently efficient charge carrier separation, providing further evidence for the superior performance. Our results suggest that chemically exfoliated 1T-MoS2/Si heterostructures are promising earth-abundant alternatives to photocathodes based on noble metal catalysts for solar-driven hydrogen production.

  10. Controllable Generation of a Submillimeter Single Bubble in Molten Metal Using a Low-Pressure Macrosized Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Alexander; Sköld, Per; Kudinov, Pavel; Bechta, Sevostian; Grishchenko, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    We develop a method for generation of a single gas bubble in a pool of molten metal. The method can be useful for applications and research studies where a controllable generation of a single submillimeter bubble in opaque hot liquid is required. The method resolves difficulties with bubble detachment from the orifice, wettability issues, capillary channel and orifice surfaces degradation due to contact with corrosive hot liquid, etc. The macrosized, 5- to 50-mm3 cavity is drilled in the solid part of the pool. Flushing the cavity with gas, vacuuming it to low pressure, as well as sealing and consequent remelting cause cavity implosion due to a few orders in magnitude pressure difference between the cavity and the molten pool. We experimentally demonstrate a controllable production of single bubbles ranging from a few milliliters down to submillimeter size. The uncertainties in size and bubble release timing are estimated and compared with experimental observations for bubbles ranging within 0.16 to 4 mm in equivalent-volume sphere diameter. Our results are obtained in heavy liquid metals such as Wood's and Lead-Bismuth eutectics at 353 K to 423 K (80 °C to 150 °C).

  11. Controllable Generation of a Submillimeter Single Bubble in Molten Metal Using a Low-Pressure Macrosized Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Alexander; Sköld, Per; Kudinov, Pavel; Bechta, Sevostian; Grishchenko, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    We develop a method for generation of a single gas bubble in a pool of molten metal. The method can be useful for applications and research studies where a controllable generation of a single submillimeter bubble in opaque hot liquid is required. The method resolves difficulties with bubble detachment from the orifice, wettability issues, capillary channel and orifice surfaces degradation due to contact with corrosive hot liquid, etc. The macrosized, 5- to 50-mm3 cavity is drilled in the solid part of the pool. Flushing the cavity with gas, vacuuming it to low pressure, as well as sealing and consequent remelting cause cavity implosion due to a few orders in magnitude pressure difference between the cavity and the molten pool. We experimentally demonstrate a controllable production of single bubbles ranging from a few milliliters down to submillimeter size. The uncertainties in size and bubble release timing are estimated and compared with experimental observations for bubbles ranging within 0.16 to 4 mm in equivalent-volume sphere diameter. Our results are obtained in heavy liquid metals such as Wood's and Lead-Bismuth eutectics at 353 K to 423 K (80 °C to 150 °C).

  12. Effects of Dopant Metal Variation and Material Synthesis Method on the Material Properties of Mixed Metal Ferrites in Yttria Stabilized Zirconia for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Production

    DOE PAGES

    Leonard, Jeffrey; Reyes, Nichole; Allen, Kyle M.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Mixed metal ferrites have shown much promise in two-step solar-thermochemical fuel production. Previous work has typically focused on evaluating a particular metal ferrite produced by a particular synthesis process, which makes comparisons between studies performed by independent researchers difficult. A comparative study was undertaken to explore the effects different synthesis methods have on the performance of a particular material during redox cycling using thermogravimetry. This study revealed that materials made via wet chemistry methods and extended periods of high temperature calcination yield better redox performance. Differences in redox performance between materials made via wet chemistry methods were minimal andmore » these demonstrated much better performance than those synthesized via the solid state method. Subsequently, various metal ferrite samples (NiFe 2 O 4 , MgFe 2 O 4 , CoFe 2 O 4 , and MnFe 2 O 4 ) in yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) were synthesized via coprecipitation and tested to determine the most promising metal ferrite combination. It was determined that 10 wt.% CoFe 2 O 4 in 8YSZ produced the highest and most consistent yields of O 2 and CO. By testing the effects of synthesis methods and dopants in a consistent fashion, those aspects of ferrite preparation which are most significant can be revealed. More importantly, these insights can guide future efforts in developing the next generation of thermochemical fuel production materials.« less

  13. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-08-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of the J-2X Direct Metal Laser Sintered Gas Generator Discharge Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esther, Elizabeth A.; Beshears, Ronald D.; Lash, Rhonda K.

    2012-01-01

    The J-2X program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) procured a direct metal laser sintered (DMLS) gas generator discharge duct from Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and Morris Technologies for a test program that would evaluate the material properties and durability of the duct in an engine-like environment. DMLS technology was pursued as a manufacturing alternative to traditional techniques, which used off nominal practices to manufacture the gas generator duct's 180 degree turn geometry. MSFC's Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Team performed radiographic, ultrasonic, computed tomographic, and fluorescent penetrant examinations of the duct. Results from the NDE examinations reveal some shallow porosity but no major defects in the as-manufactured material. NDE examinations were also performed after hot-fire testing the gas generator duct and yielded similar results pre and post-test and showed no flaw growth or development.

  15. Second harmonic generation in nanoscale films of transition metal chalcogenides: Taking into account multibeam interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, S. D.; Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Shestakova, A. P.; Kulyuk, L.; Mishina, E. D.

    2016-05-01

    Second harmonic generation is studied in structures containing nanoscale layers of transition metal chalcogenides that are two-dimensional semiconductors and deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate. The second harmonic generation intensity is calculated with allowance for multibeam interference in layers of dichalcogenide and silicon oxide. The coefficient of reflection from the SiO2-layer-based Fabry-Perot cavity is subsequently calculated for pump wave fields initiating nonlinear polarization at every point of dichalcogenide, which is followed by integration of all second harmonic waves generated by this polarization. Calculated second harmonic intensities are presented as functions of dichalcogenide and silicon oxide layer thicknesses. The dependence of the second harmonic intensity on the MoS2 layer thickness is studied experimentally in the layer of 2-140 nm. A good coincidence of the experimental data and numerical simulation results has been obtained.

  16. Assessing the environmental impact of energy production from hydrochar generated via hydrothermal carbonization of food wastes.

    PubMed

    Berge, Nicole D; Li, Liang; Flora, Joseph R V; Ro, Kyoung S

    2015-09-01

    Although there are numerous studies suggesting hydrothermal carbonization is an environmentally advantageous process for transformation of wastes to value-added products, a systems level evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent hydrochar combustion has not been conducted. The specific objectives of this work are to use a life cycle assessment approach to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with the HTC of food wastes and the subsequent combustion of the generated solid product (hydrochar) for energy production, and to understand how parameters and/or components associated with food waste carbonization and subsequent hydrochar combustion influence system environmental impact. Results from this analysis indicate that HTC process water emissions and hydrochar combustion most significantly influence system environmental impact, with a net negative GWP impact resulting for all evaluated substituted energy-sources except biomass. These results illustrate the importance of electricity production from hydrochar particularly when it is used to offset coal-based energy sources. HTC process water emissions result in a net impact to the environment, indicating a need for developing appropriate management strategies. Results from this analysis also highlight a need for additional exploration of liquid and gas-phase composition, a better understanding of how changes in carbonization conditions (e.g., reaction time and temperature) influence metal and nutrient fate, and the exploration of liquid-phase treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactive influences of bioactive trace metals on biological production in oceanic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bruland, K.W.; Donat, J.R.; Hutchins, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors present an overview of the oceanic chemistries of the bioactive trace metals, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn; the authors combine field data with results from laboratory phytoplankton culture-trace metal studies and speculate on the potential influences of these trace metals on oceanic plankton production and species composition. Most field studies have focused on the effects of single metals. However, they propose that synergistic and antagonistic interactions between multiple trace metals could be very important in the oceans. Trace metal antagonisms that may prove particularly important are those between Cu and the potential biolimiting metals Fe, Mn, and Zn. These antagonistic interactions could have the greatest influence on biological productivity in areas of the open ocean isolated from terrestrial inputs, such as the remote high nutrient regions of the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans. The emerging picture of trace metal-biota interactions in these oceanic areas is one in which biology strongly influences distribution and chemical speciation of all these bioactive trace metals. It also seems likely that many of these bioactive trace metals and their speciation may influence levels of primary productivity, species composition, and trophic structure. Future investigations should give more complete consideration to the interactive effects of biologically important trace metals.

  18. Integrated versus stand-alone second generation ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse and trash.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marina O S; Junqueira, Tassia L; Cavalett, Otávio; Cunha, Marcelo P; Jesus, Charles D F; Rossell, Carlos E V; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Bonomi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials is often conceived considering independent, stand-alone production plants; in the Brazilian scenario, where part of the potential feedstock (sugarcane bagasse) for second generation ethanol production is already available at conventional first generation production plants, an integrated first and second generation production process seems to be the most obvious option. In this study stand-alone second generation ethanol production from surplus sugarcane bagasse and trash is compared with conventional first generation ethanol production from sugarcane and with integrated first and second generation; simulations were developed to represent the different technological scenarios, which provided data for economic and environmental analysis. Results show that the integrated first and second generation ethanol production process from sugarcane leads to better economic results when compared with the stand-alone plant, especially when advanced hydrolysis technologies and pentoses fermentation are included.

  19. High-order-harmonic generation by enhanced plasmonic near-fields in metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaran, T.; Ciappina, M. F.; Guichard, R.; Pérez-Hernández, J. A.; Roso, L.; Arnold, M.; Siegel, T.; Zaïr, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-04-01

    We present theoretical investigations of high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the interaction of noble gases with localized surface plasmons. These plasmonic near-fields are produced when a metal nanoparticle is subject to a few-cycle laser pulse. The enhanced field, which largely depends on the geometrical shape of the metallic nanostructure, has a strong spatial dependency. We demonstrate that the strong nonhomogeneity of this laser field plays an important role in the HHG process and leads to a significant increase of the harmonic-cutoff energy. In order to understand and characterize this feature, we include the functional form of the laser electric field obtained from recent attosecond streaking experiments [F. Süßmann and M. F. Kling, Proc. SPIE0277-786X10.1117/12.893551 8096, 80961C (2011)] in the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. By performing classical simulations of the HHG process we show consistency between them and the quantum-mechanical predictions. These allow us to understand the origin of the extended harmonic spectra as a selection of particular trajectory sets. The use of metal nanoparticles is an alternate way of generating coherent XUV light with a laser field whose characteristics can be synthesized locally.

  20. Experimental study on detection of electrostatic discharges generated by polymer granules inside a metal silo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwangseok; Mogami, Tomofumi; Suzuki, Teruo

    2014-04-01

    To detect electrostatic discharges generated by polymer granules within a metal silo, we developed a novel and simple electrostatic discharge detector that utilizes a photosensor. The novel detector consists of a photosensor module in a metal cylinder, an optical band-pass filter, a quartz glass, a power supply, an amplifier for the photosensor module, and a digital oscilloscope. In this study, we conducted experiments at a real pneumatic powder transport facility that includes a metal silo to evaluate the novel detector using polypropylene granules. To determine the performance of the novel detector, we observed the electrostatic discharge within the metal silo using a conventional image intensifier system. The results obtained from the experiments show that the novel detector worked well in this study. The signals obtained with the novel detector were identical to the electrostatic discharges obtained with the conventional image intensifier system. The greatest advantage of this novel detector is that it is effective even when placed under external lights. In addition, the influence of various optical band-pass filters on the performance of the novel detector was discussed. Our study confirmed that an optical band-pass filter with a center wavelength of λ 330 nm (λ1/2: 315-345 nm) was the best performer among the optical band-pass filters used in this study.

  1. Reviving Lithium-Metal Anodes for Next-Generation High-Energy Batteries.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanpeng; Li, Huiqiao; Zhai, Tianyou

    2017-08-01

    Lithium-metal batteries (LMBs), as one of the most promising next-generation high-energy-density storage devices, are able to meet the rigid demands of new industries. However, the direct utilization of metallic lithium can induce harsh safety issues, inferior rate and cycle performance, or anode pulverization inside the cells. These drawbacks severely hinder the commercialization of LMBs. Here, an up-to-date review of the behavior of lithium ions upon deposition/dissolution, and the failure mechanisms of lithium-metal anodes is presented. It has been shown that the primary causes consist of the growth of lithium dendrites due to large polarization and a strong electric field at the vicinity of the anode, the hyperactivity of metallic lithium, and hostless infinite volume changes upon cycling. The recent advances in liquid organic electrolyte (LOE) systems through modulating the local current density, anion depletion, lithium flux, the anode-electrolyte interface, or the mechanical strength of the interlayers are highlighted. Concrete strategies including tailoring the anode structures, optimizing the electrolytes, building artificial anode-electrolyte interfaces, and functionalizing the protective interlayers are summarized in detail. Furthermore, the challenges remaining in LOE systems are outlined, and the future perspectives of introducing solid-state electrolytes to radically address safety issues are presented. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Experimental study on detection of electrostatic discharges generated by polymer granules inside a metal silo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kwangseok; Mogami, Tomofumi; Suzuki, Teruo

    2014-04-01

    To detect electrostatic discharges generated by polymer granules within a metal silo, we developed a novel and simple electrostatic discharge detector that utilizes a photosensor. The novel detector consists of a photosensor module in a metal cylinder, an optical band-pass filter, a quartz glass, a power supply, an amplifier for the photosensor module, and a digital oscilloscope. In this study, we conducted experiments at a real pneumatic powder transport facility that includes a metal silo to evaluate the novel detector using polypropylene granules. To determine the performance of the novel detector, we observed the electrostatic discharge within the metal silo using a conventional image intensifier system. The results obtained from the experiments show that the novel detector worked well in this study. The signals obtained with the novel detector were identical to the electrostatic discharges obtained with the conventional image intensifier system. The greatest advantage of this novel detector is that it is effective even when placed under external lights. In addition, the influence of various optical band-pass filters on the performance of the novel detector was discussed. Our study confirmed that an optical band-pass filter with a center wavelength of λ 330 nm (λ1/2: 315-345 nm) was the best performer among the optical band-pass filters used in this study.

  3. REMOVAL OF CERTAIN FISSION PRODUCT METALS FROM LIQUID BISMUTH COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.; Howe, H.E.; Avrutik, E.R.

    1959-11-24

    A method is described for purifying a solution of urarium in liquid bismuth containing at least one metal from the group consisting of selenium, tellurium, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, niobium, and zirconium. The solution is contacted with zinc in an inert atmosphere to form a homogeneous melt, a solid zinc phase is formed, and the zinc phase containing the metal is separated from the melt.

  4. Byproduct metal requirements for U.S. wind and solar photovoltaic electricity generation up to the year 2040 under various Clean Power Plan scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nassar, Nedal; Wilburn, David R.; Goonan, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The United States has and will likely continue to obtain an increasing share of its electricity from solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind power, especially under the Clean Power Plan (CPP). The need for additional solar PV modules and wind turbines will, among other things, result in greater demand for a number of minor metals that are produced mainly or only as byproducts. In this analysis, the quantities of 11 byproduct metals (Ag, Cd, Te, In, Ga, Se, Ge, Nd, Pr, Dy, and Tb) required for wind turbines with rare-earth permanent magnets and four solar PV technologies are assessed through the year 2040. Three key uncertainties (electricity generation capacities, technology market shares, and material intensities) are varied to develop 42 scenarios for each byproduct metal. The results indicate that byproduct metal requirements vary significantly across technologies, scenarios, and over time. In certain scenarios, the requirements are projected to become a significant portion of current primary production. This is especially the case for Te, Ge, Dy, In, and Tb under the more aggressive scenarios of increasing market share and conservative material intensities. Te and Dy are, perhaps, of most concern given their substitution limitations. In certain years, the differences in byproduct metal requirements between the technology market share and material intensity scenarios are greater than those between the various CPP and No CPP scenarios. Cumulatively across years 2016–2040, the various CPP scenarios are estimated to require 15–43% more byproduct metals than the No CPP scenario depending on the specific byproduct metal and scenario. Increasing primary production via enhanced recovery rates of the byproduct metals during the beneficiation and enrichment operations, improving end-of-life recycling rates, and developing substitutes are important strategies that may help meet the increased demand for these byproduct metals.

  5. NOAA Introduces its First-Generation Reference Evapotranspiration Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbins, M.; Geli, H. M.; Lewis, C.; Senay, G. B.; Verdin, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA is producing daily, gridded operational, long-term, reference evapotranspiration (ETo) data for the National Water Census (NWC). The NWC is a congressional mandate to provide water managers with accurate, up-to-date, scientifically defensible reporting on the national water cycle; as such, it requires a high-quality record of actual ET, which we derive as a fraction of NOAA's land-based ETo a fraction determined by remotely sensed (RS) LST and/or surface reflectance in an operational version of the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop). This methodology permits mapping of ET on a routine basis with a high degree of consistency at multiple spatial scales. This presentation addresses the ETo input to this process. NOAA's ETo dataset is generated from the American Society of Civil Engineers Standardized Penman-Monteith equation driven by hourly, 0.125-degree (~12-km) data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Coverage is CONUS-wide from Jan 1, 1979, to within five days of the present. The ETo is verified against agro-meteorological stations in western CONUS networks, while a first-order, second-moment uncertainty analysis indicates when, where, and to what extent each driver contributes to ETo variability (and so potentially require the most attention). As the NWC's mandate requires a nationwide coverage, the ETo dataset must also be verified outside of the measure's traditional, agricultural/irrigated areas of application. In this presentation, we summarize the verification of the gridded ETo product and demonstrate the drivers of ETo variability in space and time across CONUS. Beyond its primary use as a component of ET in the NWC, we further explore potential uses of the ETo product as an input to drought models and as a stand-alone index of fast-developing agricultural drought, or 'flash drought.' NOAA's product is the first consistently modeled, daily, continent-wide ETo dataset that is both up-to-date and as temporally

  6. Generation of chlorine by-products in simulated wash water.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cangliang; Norris, Pauline; Williams, Olivia; Hagan, Stephanie; Li, KaWang

    2016-01-01

    Free chlorine (FC) reacting with organic matter in wash water promotes the formation of chlorine by-products. This study aims to evaluate the dynamic impact of FC and organic load on the generation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) in simulated wash water. Lettuce juice was sequentially added into FC solution with FC periodically replenished. Water samples were collected after each lettuce juice addition to measure water qualities and determine HAAs and THMs using US-Environmental-Protection-Agency (EPA) methods. Concentrations of 88-2103 μg/l of total HAAs and 20.79-859.47 μg/l of total THMs were detected during the study. Monobromoacetic, tribromoacetic, chlorodibromoacetic and trichloroacetic acid were the major HAAs components. Chloroform (trichloromethane) was the primary THMs present. A significant correlation of HAAs with chemical oxygen demand and THMs with FC was observed. Results indicated that optimizing wash water sanitizing systems to limit organic matters and maintain minimal effective FC concentration is critical.

  7. Parametric investigation of the dirt spike generation in a pulsed metal vapor laser discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.E.; Yang, C.Y.; Wang, T.C.; Huang, C.L.

    1989-06-15

    The generation of dirt spikes in the discharge of a clean pulsed metal vapor laser is measured under various operating conditions, such as a change in pulse repetition rates, laser tube temperatures, buffer gas pressures, and charging voltages. It is shown that the dirt spikes will increase in magnitude for such conditions that the pulse repetition rate decreases, the laser tube temperature decreases, and the buffer gas pressure increases. The ratio of the dirt spike to the charging voltage will also increase as the charging voltage decreases. All experimental results are well explained by theoretical analyses. These results lead to a number of useful suggestions for the operation of a pulsed metal vapor laser.

  8. Redox deposition of nanoscale metal oxides on carbon for next-generation electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Sassin, Megan B; Chervin, Christopher N; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2013-05-21

    Transition metal oxides that mix electronic and ionic conductivity are essential active components of many electrochemical charge-storage devices, ranging from primary alkaline cells to more advanced rechargeable Li-ion batteries. In these devices, charge storage occurs via cation-insertion/deinsertion mechanisms in conjunction with the reduction/oxidation of metal sites in the oxide. Batteries that incorporate such metal oxides are typically designed for high specific energy, but not necessarily for high specific power. Electrochemical capacitors (ECs), which are typically composed of symmetric high-surface-area carbon electrodes that store charge via double-layer capacitance, deliver their energy in time scales of seconds, but at much lower specific energy than batteries. The fast, reversible faradaic reactions (typically described as "pseudocapacitance") of particular nanoscale metal oxides (e.g., ruthenium and manganese oxides) provide a strategy for bridging the power/energy performance gap between batteries and conventional ECs. These processes enhance charge-storage capacity to boost specific energy, while maintaining the few-second timescale of the charge-discharge response of carbon-based ECs. In this Account, we describe three examples of redox-based deposition of EC-relevant metal oxides (MnO2, FeOx, and RuO2) and discuss their potential deployment in next-generation ECs that use aqueous electrolytes. To extract the maximum pseudocapacitance functionality of metal oxides, one must carefully consider how they are synthesized and subsequently integrated into practical electrode structures. Expressing the metal oxide in a nanoscale form often enhances electrochemical utilization (maximizing specific capacitance) and facilitates high-rate operation for both charge and discharge. The "wiring" of the metal oxide, in terms of both electron and ion transport, when fabricated into a practical electrode architecture, is also a critical design parameter for

  9. Production scale purification of Ge-68 and Zn-65 from irradiated gallium metal.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M; Mausner, Leonard

    2015-07-01

    Germanium-68 (Ge-68) is produced by proton irradiation of a gallium metal target, purified by organic extraction and used in a medical isotope generator to produce Gallium-68 PET imaging agents. The purpose of this work was to implement a production scale separation of Ge-68 and Zn-65 that does not use organic solvents and uses a limited number of columns. The current separation approach was modified to use AG1 resin and/or Sephadex(©) G25 with zinc spikes to purify Ge-68 with near quantitative recovery. The purified Ge-68 meets DOE specifications. Methods utilizing zinc spikes resulted in the purist Ge-68 produced at Brookhaven National Lab with no other impurities by ICP-OES. During process optimization approximately 2.5 Ci of Ge-68 was purified utilizing the different processing methods, and the material was sold to the Nuclear Medicine community between 2012-2013. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Current Production and Metal Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Wild Type and Mutants▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bretschger, Orianna; Obraztsova, Anna; Sturm, Carter A.; Chang, In Seop; Gorby, Yuri A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Barua, Soumitra; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Saffarini, Daad; Mansfeld, Florian; Kim, Byung-Hong; Fredrickson, James K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative facultative anaerobe capable of utilizing a broad range of electron acceptors, including several solid substrates. S. oneidensis MR-1 can reduce Mn(IV) and Fe(III) oxides and can produce current in microbial fuel cells. The mechanisms that are employed by S. oneidensis MR-1 to execute these processes have not yet been fully elucidated. Several different S. oneidensis MR-1 deletion mutants were generated and tested for current production and metal oxide reduction. The results showed that a few key cytochromes play a role in all of the processes but that their degrees of participation in each process are very different. Overall, these data suggest a very complex picture of electron transfer to solid and soluble substrates by S. oneidensis MR-1. PMID:17644630

  11. Method of making metal-doped organic foam products

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for roducing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  12. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  13. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  14. Nanoscale optical properties of metal nanoparticles probed by Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Nguyen, Ngoc; Gachet, David; Maillard, Vincent; Toury, Timothée; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-05-20

    We report spatial and vectorial imaging of local fields' confinement properties in metal nanoparticles with branched shapes, using Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy. Taking advantage of the coherent nature of this nonlinear process, the technique provides a direct evidence of the coupling between the excitation polarization and both localization and polarization specificities of local fields at the sub-diffraction scale. These combined features, which are governed by the nanoparticles' symmetry, are not accessible using other contrasts such as linear optical techniques or two-photon luminescence.

  15. Generation and detection of thermoelastic waves in metals by a photothermal mirror method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capeloto, O. A.; Zanuto, V. S.; Lukasievicz, G. V. B.; Malacarne, L. C.; Bialkowski, S. E.; Požar, T.; Astrath, N. G. C.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the thermoelastic waves launched by a localized heat deposition. Pulsed laser excitation is used to generate mechanical perturbations in metals that are detected using the photothermal mirror method. This method detects the wavefront distortion of the probe beam reflected from the perturbed sample surface. Nanometer scale expansion of the material is induced just under the irradiated surface releasing transient thermoelastic waves of much smaller amplitudes on the surface. Numerical predictions and the experimental results are in a good agreement and represent both the thermal diffusion of the large amplitude, long-lasting outward bulge, and the released elastic waves.

  16. Numerical simulation of discharge plasma generation and nitriding the metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, T. V.; Manakov, R. A.; Nguyen Bao, Hung; Tran My, Kim An

    2017-01-01

    This research provides the numerical simulation of the plasma generation in a hollow cathode as well as the diffusion of nitrogen atoms into the metal in the low-pressure glow discharge plasma. The characteristics of the gas discharge were obtained and the relation of the basic technological parameters and the structural and phase state of the nitrided material were defined. Authors provided the comparison of calculations with the experimental results of titanium nitriding by low-pressure glow discharge plasma in a hollow cathode.

  17. Experimental Hydrogen Plant with Metal Hydrides to Store and Generate Electrical Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzatti, Frank; Nizolli, Vinícius; Ferrigolo, Fredi Zancan; Farret, Felix Alberto; de Mello, Marcos Augusto Silva

    2016-02-01

    Generation of electrical energy with renewable sources is interruptible due to the primary energy characteristics (sun, wind, hydro, etc.). In these cases, it is necessary to use energy storage so increasing penetrability of these sources connected to the distribution system. This paper discusses in details some equipment and accessories of an integrated power plant using fuel cell stack, electrolyzer and metal hydrides. During the plant operation were collected the power consumption data and established the efficiency of each plant component. These data demonstrated an overall efficiency of about 11% due to the low efficiencies of the commercial electrolyzers and power inverters used in the experiments.

  18. Self-sputtering far above the runaway threshold: an extraordinary metal ion generator

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Joakim; Anders, Andre

    2008-12-16

    When self-sputtering is driven far above the runaway threshold voltage, energetic electrons are made available to produce"excess plasma" far from the magnetron target. Ionization balance considerations show that the secondary electrons deliver the necessary energy to the"remote" zone. Thereby, such a system can be an extraordinarily prolific generator of useable metal ions. Contrary to other known sources, the ion current to a substrate can exceed the discharge current. For gasless self-sputtering of copper, the useable ion current scales exponentially with the discharge voltage.

  19. Experimental Hydrogen Plant with Metal Hydrides to Store and Generate Electrical Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzatti, Frank; Nizolli, Vinícius; Ferrigolo, Fredi Zancan; Farret, Felix Alberto; de Mello, Marcos Augusto Silva

    2016-02-01

    Generation of electrical energy with renewable sources is interruptible due to the primary energy characteristics (sun, wind, hydro, etc.). In these cases, it is necessary to use energy storage so increasing penetrability of these sources connected to the distribution system. This paper discusses in details some equipment and accessories of an integrated power plant using fuel cell stack, electrolyzer and metal hydrides. During the plant operation were collected the power consumption data and established the efficiency of each plant component. These data demonstrated an overall efficiency of about 11% due to the low efficiencies of the commercial electrolyzers and power inverters used in the experiments.

  20. Evaluation and development of integrated technology of rare metal concentrate production in high-level ore processing at Zashikhinsk deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhulya, MS; Mukhina, TN; Ivanova, V. A.; Mitrofanova, G. V.; Fomin, A. V.; Sokolov, VD

    2017-02-01

    The authors discuss material constitution of columbite ore sample and recommend optimized pretreatment modes to obtain ball milling products at the maximum dissociation of ore minerals in aggregates. A concentration technology is proposed, with division of material into two flows -0.315 mm and -0.2 mm in sizes, generated in the milling and screening cycles and subjected to gravity-magnetic and magnetic-gravity treatment, respectively. It is shown that the technology ensures production of both tantalum-niobium and zircon concentrates. It has become possible to additionally recover rare metal components Nb2O5 and ZrO2 from tailings through flotation.

  1. DETERMINATION OF HEAVY METALS AND PESTICIDES IN GINSENG PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Medicinal plants may carry residuals of environmentally persistent pesticides or assimilate heavy metals in varying degrees. Several factors may influence contaminant accumulation, including species, level and duration of contaminant exposure, and topography. As part of a progra...

  2. TRANSURANIC METAL HALIDES AND A PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Fried, S.

    1951-03-20

    Halides of transuranic elements are prepared by contacting with aluminum and a halogen, or with an aluminum halide, a transuranic metal oxide, oxyhalide, halide, or mixture thereof at an elevated temperature.

  3. DETERMINATION OF HEAVY METALS AND PESTICIDES IN GINSENG PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Medicinal plants may carry residuals of environmentally persistent pesticides or assimilate heavy metals in varying degrees. Several factors may influence contaminant accumulation, including species, level and duration of contaminant exposure, and topography. As part of a progra...

  4. Atomistic modeling of nanoparticle generation in short pulse laser ablation of thin metal films in water.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Chengping; Shugaev, Maxim V; Zhigilei, Leonid V

    2017-03-01

    Laser ablation in liquids is actively used for generation of clean colloidal nanoparticles with unique shapes and functionalities. The fundamental mechanisms of the laser ablation in liquids and the key processes that control the nanoparticle structure, composition, and size distribution, however, are not yet fully understood. In this paper, we report the results of first atomistic simulations of laser ablation of metal targets in liquid environment. A model combining a coarse-grained representation of the liquid environment (parameterized for water), a fully atomistic description of laser interactions with metal targets, and acoustic impedance matching boundary conditions is developed and applied for simulation of laser ablation of a thin silver film deposited on a silica substrate. The simulations, performed at two laser fluences in the regime of phase explosion, predict a rapid deceleration of the ejected ablation plume and the formation of a dense superheated molten layer at the water-plume interface. The water in contact with the hot metal layer is brought to the supercritical state and transforms into an expanding low density metal-water mixing region that serves as a precursor for the formation of a cavitation bubble. Two distinct mechanisms of the nanoparticle formation are predicted in the simulations: (1) the nucleation and growth of small (mostly ⩽10nm) nanoparticles in the metal-water mixing region and (2) the formation of larger (tens of nm) nanoparticles through the breakup of the superheated molten metal layer triggered by the emergence of complex morphological features attributed to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the interface between at the superheated metal layer and the supercritical water. The first mechanism is facilitated by the rapid cooling of the growing nanoparticles in the supercritical water environment, resulting in solidification of the nanoparticles located in the upper part of the mixing region on the timescale of nanoseconds

  5. Pulsed Neutron Measurments With A DT Neutron Generator for an Annular HEU Uranium Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Archer, Daniel E; Wright, Michael C; Mullens, James Allen

    2007-09-01

    Measurements were performed with a single annular, stainless-steel-canned casting of uranium (93.17 wt% 235U) metal ( ~18 kg) to provide data to verify calculational methods for criticality safety. The measurements used a small portable DT generator with an embedded alpha detector to time and directionally tag the neutrons from the generator. The center of the time and directional tagged neutron beam was perpendicular to the axis of the casting. The radiation detectors were 1x1x6 in plastic scintillators encased in 0.635-cm-thick lead shields that were sensitive to neutrons above 1 MeV in energy. The detector lead shields were adjacent to the casting and the target spot of the generator was about 3.8 cm from the casting at the vertical center. The time distribution of the fission induced radiation was measured with respect to the source event by a fast (1GHz) processor. The measurements described in this paper also include time correlation measurements with a time tagged spontaneously fissioning 252Cf neutron source, both on the axis and on the surface of the casting. Measurements with both types of sources are compared. Measurements with the DT generator closely coupled with the HEU provide no more additional information than those with the Cf source closely coupled with the HEU and are complicated by the time and directionally tagged neutrons from the generator scattering between the walls and floor of the measurements room and the casting while still above detection thresholds.

  6. Production of Metallic and Ceramic Parts with the Optoform Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    dedicated to the 316L, 17 - 4PH and Mo-alloys for which the powder selection, the debinding and the sintering has been performed. Some processing trials...material, hard material, metallic and ceramic material. Both last kinds will be the main purpose of this presentation. Metal (316L, 17 -4 PH, Titanium...ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17 . LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 28 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  7. METAL PRODUCTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: THE NON-GALACTIC COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, Joel N.; Anderson, Michael E.; Dai Xinyu E-mail: michevan@umich.ed

    2010-06-10

    The metallicity in galaxy clusters is expected to originate from the stars in galaxies, with a population dominated by high-mass stars likely being the most important stellar component, especially in rich clusters. We examine the relationship between the metallicity and the prominence of galaxies as measured by the star-to-baryon ratio, M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. Counter to expectations, we rule out a metallicity that is proportional to M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, where the best fit has the gas-phase metallicity decreasing with M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, or the metallicity of the gas plus the stars being independent of M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. This implies that the population of stars responsible for the metals is largely proportional to the total baryonic mass of the cluster, not to the galaxy mass within the cluster. If generally applicable, most of the heavy elements in the universe were not produced within galaxies.

  8. Dealloying of Cu-Based Metallic Glasses in Acidic Solutions: Products and Energy Storage Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifeng; Liu, Jiangyun; Qin, Chunling; Yu, Hui; Xia, Xingchuan; Wang, Chaoyang; Zhang, Yanshan; Hu, Qingfeng; Zhao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Dealloying, a famous ancient etching technique, was used to produce nanoporous metals decades ago. With the development of dealloying techniques and theories, various interesting dealloying products including nanoporous metals/alloys, metal oxides and composites, which exhibit excellent catalytic, optical and sensing performance, have been developed in recent years. As a result, the research on dealloying products is of great importance for developing new materials with superior physical and chemical properties. In this paper, typical dealloying products from Cu-based metallic glasses after dealloying in hydrofluoric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions are summarized. Several potential application fields of these dealloying products are discussed. A promising application of nanoporous Cu (NPC) and NPC-contained composites related to the energy storage field is introduced. It is expected that more promising dealloying products could be developed for practical energy storage applications. PMID:28347030

  9. Impacts of Antioxidants on Hydroxyl Radical Production from Individual and Mixed Transition Metals in a Surrogate Lung Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Jessica G.; Anastasio, Cort

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient particulate matter causes morbidity and mortality in humans. One hypothesized mechanism of toxicity is the particle-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) – including the highly damaging hydroxyl radical (·OH) – followed by inflammation and a variety of diseases. While past studies have found correlations between ROS formation and a variety of metals, there are no quantitative measurements of ·OH formation from transition metals at concentrations relevant to 24-hour ambient particulate exposure. This research reports specific and quantitative measurements of ·OH formation from 10 individual transition metals (and several mixtures) in a cell-free surrogate lung fluid (SLF) with four antioxidants: ascorbate, citrate, glutathione, and uric acid. We find that Fe and Cu can produce ·OH under all antioxidant conditions as long as ascorbate is present and that mixtures of the two metals synergistically increase ·OH production. Manganese and vanadium can also produce ·OH under some conditions, but given that their ambient levels are typically very low, these metals are not likely to chemically produce significant levels of ·OH in the lung fluid. Cobalt, chromium, nickel, zinc, lead, and cadmium do not produce ·OH under any of our experimental conditions. The antioxidant composition of our SLF significantly affects ·OH production from Fe and Cu: ascorbate is required for ·OH formation, citrate increases ·OH production from Fe, and both citrate and glutathione suppress ·OH production from Cu. MINTEQ ligand speciation modeling indicates that citrate and glutathione affect ·OH production by changing metal speciation, altering the reactivity of the metals. In the most realistic SLF (i.e., with all four antioxidants), Fe generates approximately six times more ·OH than does the equivalent amount of Cu. Since levels of soluble Fe in PM are typically higher than those of Cu, our results suggest that Fe dominates the chemical

  10. Impacts of Antioxidants on Hydroxyl Radical Production from Individual and Mixed Transition Metals in a Surrogate Lung Fluid.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Jessica G; Anastasio, Cort

    2011-11-01

    Inhalation of ambient particulate matter causes morbidity and mortality in humans. One hypothesized mechanism of toxicity is the particle-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - including the highly damaging hydroxyl radical ((·)OH) - followed by inflammation and a variety of diseases. While past studies have found correlations between ROS formation and a variety of metals, there are no quantitative measurements of (·)OH formation from transition metals at concentrations relevant to 24-hour ambient particulate exposure. This research reports specific and quantitative measurements of (·)OH formation from 10 individual transition metals (and several mixtures) in a cell-free surrogate lung fluid (SLF) with four antioxidants: ascorbate, citrate, glutathione, and uric acid. We find that Fe and Cu can produce (·)OH under all antioxidant conditions as long as ascorbate is present and that mixtures of the two metals synergistically increase (·)OH production. Manganese and vanadium can also produce (·)OH under some conditions, but given that their ambient levels are typically very low, these metals are not likely to chemically produce significant levels of (·)OH in the lung fluid. Cobalt, chromium, nickel, zinc, lead, and cadmium do not produce (·)OH under any of our experimental conditions. The antioxidant composition of our SLF significantly affects (·)OH production from Fe and Cu: ascorbate is required for (·)OH formation, citrate increases (·)OH production from Fe, and both citrate and glutathione suppress (·)OH production from Cu. MINTEQ ligand speciation modeling indicates that citrate and glutathione affect (·)OH production by changing metal speciation, altering the reactivity of the metals. In the most realistic SLF (i.e., with all four antioxidants), Fe generates approximately six times more (·)OH than does the equivalent amount of Cu. Since levels of soluble Fe in PM are typically higher than those of Cu, our results suggest that Fe

  11. 3D Nanoporous Metal Phosphides toward High-Efficiency Electrochemical Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongwen; Wang, Hao; Liu, Pan; Cheng, Chun; Zhu, Fan; Hirata, Akihiko; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-04-20

    Free-standing nanoporous metal phosphides are fabricated by a novel top-down method, by selectively leaching less-stable metal phases from rapidly solidified two-phase metal-phosphorus alloys. The phosphide phases with relatively high electrochemical stability are left as the skeletons of nanoporous structures. The resultant nanoporous phosphides with tunable pore size and porosity show superior catalytic activities toward electrochemical hydrogen production. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. High-harmonic generation by field enhanced femtosecond pulses in metal-sapphire nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seunghwoi; Kim, Hyunwoong; Kim, Yong Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seungchul; Park, In-Yong; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic high-harmonic generation (HHG) drew attention as a means of producing coherent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation by taking advantage of field enhancement occurring in metallic nanostructures. Here a metal-sapphire nanostructure is devised to provide a solid tip as the HHG emitter, replacing commonly used gaseous atoms. The fabricated solid tip is made of monocrystalline sapphire surrounded by a gold thin-film layer, and intended to produce EUV harmonics by the inter- and intra-band oscillations of electrons driven by the incident laser. The metal-sapphire nanostructure enhances the incident laser field by means of surface plasmon polaritons, triggering HHG directly from moderate femtosecond pulses of ∼0.1 TW cm−2 intensities. The measured EUV spectra exhibit odd-order harmonics up to ∼60 nm wavelengths without the plasma atomic lines typically seen when using gaseous atoms as the HHG emitter. This experimental outcome confirms that the plasmonic HHG approach is a promising way to realize coherent EUV sources for nano-scale near-field applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, lithography and atto-second physics. PMID:27721374

  13. Second-harmonic generation in metallic nanoparticles: Clarification of the role of the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciracì, Cristian; Poutrina, Ekaterina; Scalora, Michael; Smith, David R.

    2012-09-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the second-order nonlinear optical properties of metal-based metamaterial nanoresonators. The nonlinear optical response of the metal is described by a hydrodynamic model, with the effects of electron pressure in the electron gas also taken into account. We show that as the pressure term tends to zero the amount of converted second-harmonic field tends to an asymptotic value. In this limit it becomes possible to rewrite the nonlinear surface contributions as functions of the value of the polarization vector inside the bulk region. Nonlocality thus can be incorporated into numerical simulations without actually utilizing the nonlocal equation of motion or solving for the rapidly varying fields that occur near the metal surface. We use our model to investigate the second-harmonic generation process with three-dimensional gold nanoparticle arrays and show that nanocrescents can easily attain conversion efficiencies of ˜6.0×10-8 for pumping peak intensities of a few tens of MW/cm2.

  14. Phytoremediation of the toxic effluent generated during recovery of precious metals from polymetallic sea nodules.

    PubMed

    Vaseem, Huma; Banerjee, T K

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of metals from the polymetallic sea nodules at the pilot plant at National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, India has generated a highly toxic effluent. This effluent contains several metals like Mn, Cu, Zn, Fe, Pb, Cr, and Cd that pollute the neighboring water bodies when discharged. Hence detoxification of this effluent was practiced using two plants: Lemna minor and Azolla pinnata for 7 days. During investigation A. pinnata removed 96% of Mn, 97% of Cu, 98% of Zn, 70% of Fe, 96% of Pb, 93% of Cr, 78% of Cd, and was comparatively more effective than L. minor which removed 94% of Mn, 86% of Cu, 62% of Zn, 74% of Fe, 84% of Pb, 63% of Cr, 78% of Cd. During the 7 days of experiment chlorophyll content decreased by 51% and 59% in A. pinnata and L. minor respectively. Based on our findings we can suggest that these two plants have wide range of metal retention potentialities hence can be of routine use for purification of toxic effluents.

  15. The metal interlayer in the charge generation layer of tandem organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu-Hao; Lin, Ming-Wei; Wen, Ten-Chin; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2013-10-01

    This work studies the interface in the charge generation layer (CGL), consisting of aluminum (Al) doped in poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether as an n-type layer and 2, 3, 5, 6-tetrafluoro-7, 7, 8, 8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) doped in N,N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4-4'-diamine as an p-type layer, in tandem organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Introducing a thin high work function metal interlayer (e.g., Ag or Au) effectively improves the transport and inhibits the accumulation of charges in the CGL, which markedly reduces the operating voltage and enhances the efficiency of tandem OLEDs. We attribute that the high density of surface states on metal clusters (interlayer) reduce the junction barrier to facilitate the transport of carriers through CGL. Experimental results show enhancements of tandem OLEDs by an additional metal interlayer as follows: luminous efficiency increases from 37.2 to 51.4 cd A-1, the light turn-on voltage decreases from 9.2 to 6.6 V, and luminescence at 10 mA cm-2 increases from 3712 to 5211 cd m-2.

  16. Dissolution of Uranium Metal Without Hydride Formation or Hydrogen Gas Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Oliver, Brian M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2008-09-01

    This study shows that metallic uranium will cleanly dissolve in carbonate-peroxide solution without generation of hydrogen gas or uranium hydride. Metallic uranium shot, 0.5 to 1 mm diameter, were reacted with ammonium carbonate - hydrogen peroxide solution ranging in concentration from 0.13M to 1.0M carbonate and 0.50M to 2.0M peroxide. The uranium beads were weighed before and after reacting with the etch solution, and from the weights of the beads, their diameters were calculated, before and after the etch. The etch rate on the beads was then calculated from the reduction in bead diameter, and independently by uranium analysis of the solution. The calculated etch rate ranged from about 4 x 10-4 to 8 x 10-4 cm per hour, dependent primarily on the peroxide concentration. A hydrogen analysis of the etched beads showed that no detectable hydrogen was introduced into the uranium metal by the etching process.

  17. Bermudagrass sod growth and metal uptake in coal combustion by-product-amended media.

    PubMed

    Schlossberg, M J; Vanags, C P; Miller, W P

    2004-01-01

    Coal combustion by-products (CCB) include fly ash and bottom ash and are generated nationally at rates of 10(8) Mg yr(-1). Land applications of CCB have improved physicochemical properties of soil, yet inherent bulkiness and trace metal content of CCB often limit their use. Likewise, utilization of biosolids and manure as fertilizer can be problematic due to unfavorable nutrient ratios. A 2-yr field study evaluated environmental and technical parameters associated with CCB-organic waste utilization as growth media in turfgrass sod production. Experimental growth media formulated with CCB and organic waste and a sand-compost control mixture were uniformly spread at rates from 200 to 400 m3 ha(-1) and sprigged with hybrid bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy]. Leaf clippings were collected and analyzed for total elemental content each year. In Year 2, growth media samples were collected during establishment 47 and 84 days after planting (DAP) and viable Escherichia coli organisms were quantified. At harvest (99 or 114 DAP), sod biomass and physicochemical properties of the growth media were measured. During sod propagation, micronutrient and metal content in leaf clippings varied by growth media and time. After 47 d of typical sod field management, viable E. coli pathogens were detected in only one biosolids-amended plot. No viable E. coli were measured at 84 DAP. In both years, sod biomass was greatest in media containing biosolids and fly ash. Following installation of sod, evaluations did not reveal differences by media type or application volume. Using CCB-organic waste mixes at the rates described herein is a rapid and environmentally safe method of bermudagrass sod production.

  18. Second generation ethanol in Brazil: can it compete with electricity production?

    PubMed

    Dias, Marina O S; Cunha, Marcelo P; Jesus, Charles D F; Rocha, George J M; Pradella, José Geraldo C; Rossell, Carlos E V; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Bonomi, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Much of the controversy surrounding second generation ethanol production arises from the assumed competition with first generation ethanol production; however, in Brazil, where bioethanol is produced from sugarcane, sugarcane bagasse and trash will be used as feedstock for second generation ethanol production. Thus, second generation ethanol production may be primarily in competition with electricity production from the lignocellulosic fraction of sugarcane. A preliminary technical and economic analysis of the integrated production of first and second generation ethanol from sugarcane in Brazil is presented and different technological scenarios are evaluated. The analysis showed the importance of the integrated use of sugarcane including the biomass represented by surplus bagasse and trash that can be taken from the field. Second generation ethanol may favorably compete with bioelectricity production when sugarcane trash is used and when low cost enzyme and improved technologies become commercially available. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitric-oxide generation induced by metals plays a role in their accumulation by Phallusia nigra hemocytes.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Cintia Monteiro; da Fonte Carvalho Martins, Danielly; Mello, Andressa de Abreu; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Allodi, Silvana

    2017-08-02

    Ascidians are good monitors for assessing water quality, since they filter large volumes of water; however, little is known about how xenobiotics, including metals, can affect ascidian hemocytes. Metals can be either toxic or beneficial to health, inducing many different responses. The response mechanism depends on the class of metals to which organisms are exposed: essential, nonessential, and borderline. To analyze the influence of metals from different classes on the protective mechanisms of an ascidian, we investigated the production of nitric oxide (NO) after exposure to various concentrations of Mg, Mn and Pb over different time periods. We also determined the amounts of each metal in the hemocytes. Our results indicated that especially Pb could stimulate NO production. Although Pb induced the highest NO production, cell viability was not severely altered in all Pb concentrations and time periods. Ascidians might serve as biomonitor for Pb, since their vanadocytes accumulate Pb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Looking for imprints of the first stellar generations in metal-poor bulge field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira-Mello, C.; Chiappini, C.; Barbuy, B.; Freeman, K.; Ness, M.; Depagne, E.; Cantelli, E.; Pignatari, M.; Hirschi, R.; Frischknecht, U.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Efforts to look for signatures of the first stars have concentrated on metal-poor halo objects. However, the low end of the bulge metallicity distribution has been shown to host some of the oldest objects in the Milky Way and hence this Galactic component potentially offers interesting targets to look at imprints of the first stellar generations. As a pilot project, we selected bulge field stars already identified in the ARGOS survey as having [Fe/H] ≈-1 and oversolar [α/Fe] ratios, and we used FLAMES-UVES to obtain detailed abundances of key elements that are believed to reveal imprints of the first stellar generations. Aims: The main purpose of this study is to analyse selected ARGOS stars using new high-resolution (R ~ 45 000) and high-signal-to-noise (S/N> 100) spectra. We aim to derive their stellar parameters and elemental ratios, in particular the abundances of C, N, the α-elements O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, the odd-Z elements Na and Al, the neutron-capture s-process dominated elements Y, Zr, La, and Ba, and the r-element Eu. Methods: High-resolution spectra of five field giant stars were obtained at the 8 m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph in FLAMES-UVES configuration. Spectroscopic parameters were derived based on the excitation and ionization equilibrium of Fe i and Fe ii. The abundance analysis was performed with a MARCS LTE spherical model atmosphere grid and the Turbospectrum spectrum synthesis code. Results: We confirm that the analysed stars are moderately metal-poor (-1.04 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤-0.43), non-carbon-enhanced (non-CEMP) with [C/Fe] ≤ + 0.2, and α-enhanced. We find that our three most metal-poor stars are nitrogen enhanced. The α-enhancement suggests that these stars were formed from a gas enriched by core-collapse supernovae, and that the values are in agreement with results in the literature for bulge stars in the same metallicity range. No abundance anomalies (Na - O, Al - O, Al - Mg anti-correlations) were

  1. Chloro-benquinone Modified on Graphene Oxide as Metal-free Catalyst: Strong Promotion of Hydroxyl Radical and Generation of Ultra-Small Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Wang, Juehua; Zhang, Di; Dai, Qin; Han, Qingzhen; Du, Penghui; Liu, Chenming; Xie, Yongbing; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Hongbin; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-based metal-free catalyst has attracted more and more attention. It is a big challenge to improve catalytic activity of metal-free catalyst for decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radical (HO•). Here, we report chloro-benquinone (TCBQ) modified on graphene oxide (GO) as metal-free catalyst for strong promotion of HO•. By the incorporation of GO, the HO• production by H2O2 and TCBQ is significantly promoted. Based on density functional theory, TCBQ modified GO (GO-TCBQ) is more prone to be nucleophilic attacked by H2O2 to yield HO• via electron transfer acceleration. Furthermore, the generated HO• can cut GO nanosheets into uniform ultra-small graphene oxide (USGO) through the cleavage of epoxy and C-C bonds. Interestingly, the damaged GO and in situ formed GO fragments can further enhance decomposition of H2O2 to produce HO•. Different from other catalytic processes, the GO-TCBQ metal-free catalysis process can be enhanced by GO itself, producing more HO•, and uniform USGO also can be generated. Thus, the metal free catalysis will be considered a fabrication method for uniform USGO, and may be extended to other fields including detoxifying organic pollutants and the application as disinfectants. PMID:28350005

  2. Chloro-benquinone Modified on Graphene Oxide as Metal-free Catalyst: Strong Promotion of Hydroxyl Radical and Generation of Ultra-Small Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Wang, Juehua; Zhang, Di; Dai, Qin; Han, Qingzhen; Du, Penghui; Liu, Chenming; Xie, Yongbing; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Hongbin; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2017-03-28

    Carbon-based metal-free catalyst has attracted more and more attention. It is a big challenge to improve catalytic activity of metal-free catalyst for decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radical (HO•). Here, we report chloro-benquinone (TCBQ) modified on graphene oxide (GO) as metal-free catalyst for strong promotion of HO•. By the incorporation of GO, the HO• production by H2O2 and TCBQ is significantly promoted. Based on density functional theory, TCBQ modified GO (GO-TCBQ) is more prone to be nucleophilic attacked by H2O2 to yield HO• via electron transfer acceleration. Furthermore, the generated HO• can cut GO nanosheets into uniform ultra-small graphene oxide (USGO) through the cleavage of epoxy and C-C bonds. Interestingly, the damaged GO and in situ formed GO fragments can further enhance decomposition of H2O2 to produce HO•. Different from other catalytic processes, the GO-TCBQ metal-free catalysis process can be enhanced by GO itself, producing more HO•, and uniform USGO also can be generated. Thus, the metal free catalysis will be considered a fabrication method for uniform USGO, and may be extended to other fields including detoxifying organic pollutants and the application as disinfectants.

  3. Chloro-benquinone Modified on Graphene Oxide as Metal-free Catalyst: Strong Promotion of Hydroxyl Radical and Generation of Ultra-Small Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, He; Wang, Juehua; Zhang, Di; Dai, Qin; Han, Qingzhen; Du, Penghui; Liu, Chenming; Xie, Yongbing; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Hongbin; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2017-03-01

    Carbon-based metal-free catalyst has attracted more and more attention. It is a big challenge to improve catalytic activity of metal-free catalyst for decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radical (HO•). Here, we report chloro-benquinone (TCBQ) modified on graphene oxide (GO) as metal-free catalyst for strong promotion of HO•. By the incorporation of GO, the HO• production by H2O2 and TCBQ is significantly promoted. Based on density functional theory, TCBQ modified GO (GO-TCBQ) is more prone to be nucleophilic attacked by H2O2 to yield HO• via electron transfer acceleration. Furthermore, the generated HO• can cut GO nanosheets into uniform ultra-small graphene oxide (USGO) through the cleavage of epoxy and C-C bonds. Interestingly, the damaged GO and in situ formed GO fragments can further enhance decomposition of H2O2 to produce HO•. Different from other catalytic processes, the GO-TCBQ metal-free catalysis process can be enhanced by GO itself, producing more HO•, and uniform USGO also can be generated. Thus, the metal free catalysis will be considered a fabrication method for uniform USGO, and may be extended to other fields including detoxifying organic pollutants and the application as disinfectants.

  4. A Spitzer survey of asymptotic giant branch stars: Dust production and mass loss at low metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Martha L.

    We conducted infrared (IR) surveys of ten Galactic globular clusters (GCs) and eight Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies using the Spitzer Space Telescope . The main objective of these surveys is to further the understanding of dust production in low metallicity environments akin to the early Universe. In GCs, we investigate the stars with IR excesses, attributed to dust, and the intracluster medium (ICM). The GC M15 is the most metal-poor Galactic GC, and is ideal for studying dust production at metallicity less than 1% solar. The most massive Galactic GC, o Centauri, harbors three distinct populations of differing metallicities, providing the opportunity to study dust production at three metallicities within the same environment. The large population of dusty Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars present in the eight observed Local Group dwarf galaxies allows a statistically significant study of dusty stellar mass loss at a broad range of metallicities (2%-19% solar). In all observed systems, we find large populations of dust enshrouded stars and, in some cases, dusty interstellar medium. The surplus of both interstellar dust and the dust producing stars in M15 is surprising, given its extremely low metal-content. No significant amount of ICM dust is detected in any other GC observed, suggesting that ICM dust does not survive long compared to its production rate and is thus a part of a stochastic process. In oCen, we see no difference in dust production between the three populations, and overall, we see that dust is not formed in larger quantities than seen in M15. In dwarf galaxies, we see that circumstellar dust is prolific enough to create at least a small population of completely optically obscured AGB stars in each galaxy, regardless of the galaxy's metallicity, but higher metallicity galaxies tend to harbor more stars with slight IR excesses. These results suggest that dust production is not prohibited at very low metallicity, although it may be produced in

  5. Flexible and Robust Thermoelectric Generators Based on All-Carbon Nanotube Yarn without Metal Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoo; Jung, Yeonsu; Yang, Seung Jae; Oh, Jun Young; Oh, Jinwoo; Jo, Kiyoung; Son, Jeong Gon; Moon, Seung Eon; Park, Chong Rae; Kim, Heesuk

    2017-08-22

    As practical interest in flexible/or wearable power-conversion devices increases, the demand for high-performance alternatives to thermoelectric (TE) generators based on brittle inorganic materials is growing. Herein, we propose a flexible and ultralight TE generator (TEG) based on carbon nanotube yarn (CNTY) with excellent TE performance. The as-prepared CNTY shows a superior electrical conductivity of 3147 S/cm due to increased longitudinal carrier mobility derived from a highly aligned structure. Our TEG is innovative in that the CNTY acts as multifunctions in the same device. The CNTY is alternatively doped into n- and p-types using polyethylenimine and FeCl3, respectively. The highly conductive CNTY between the doped regions is used as electrodes to minimize the circuit resistance, thereby forming an all-carbon TEG without additional metal deposition. A flexible TEG based on 60 pairs of n- and p-doped CNTY shows the maximum power density of 10.85 and 697 μW/g at temperature differences of 5 and 40 K, respectively, which are the highest values among reported TEGs based on flexible materials. We believe that the strategy proposed here to improve the power density of flexible TEG by introducing highly aligned CNTY and designing a device without metal electrodes shows great potential for the flexible/or wearable power-conversion devices.

  6. Novel Two-Dimensional Mechano-Electric Generators and Sensors Based on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng; Eshun, Kwesi; Zhu, Hao; Li, Qiliang

    2015-08-04

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, provide two-dimensional atomic crystals with semiconductor band gap. In this work, we present a design of new mechano-electric generators and sensors based on transition metal dichalcogenide nanoribbon PN junctions and heterojunctions. The mechano-electric conversion was simulated by using a first-principle calculation. The output voltage of MoS2 nanoribbon PN junction increases with strain, reaching 0.036 V at 1% strain and 0.31 V at 8% strain, much larger than the reported results. Our study indicates that the length, width and layer number of TMDC nanoribbon PN junctions have an interesting but different impact on the voltage output. Also, the results indicate that doping position and concentration only cause a small fluctuation in the output voltage. These results have been compared with the mechano-electric conversion of TMDC heterojunctions. Such novel mechano-electric generators and sensors are very attractive for applications in future self-powered, wearable electronics and systems.

  7. Novel Two-Dimensional Mechano-Electric Generators and Sensors Based on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng; Eshun, Kwesi; Zhu, Hao; Li, Qiliang

    2015-08-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, provide two-dimensional atomic crystals with semiconductor band gap. In this work, we present a design of new mechano-electric generators and sensors based on transition metal dichalcogenide nanoribbon PN junctions and heterojunctions. The mechano-electric conversion was simulated by using a first-principle calculation. The output voltage of MoS2 nanoribbon PN junction increases with strain, reaching 0.036 V at 1% strain and 0.31 V at 8% strain, much larger than the reported results. Our study indicates that the length, width and layer number of TMDC nanoribbon PN junctions have an interesting but different impact on the voltage output. Also, the results indicate that doping position and concentration only cause a small fluctuation in the output voltage. These results have been compared with the mechano-electric conversion of TMDC heterojunctions. Such novel mechano-electric generators and sensors are very attractive for applications in future self-powered, wearable electronics and systems.

  8. Ultrahigh figure-of-merit for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride using ternary metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lunghao; Ceccato, R.; Raj, R.

    We report further increase in the figure-of-merit (FOM) for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4 than reported in an earlier paper [1], where a sub-nanometer layer of metal catalysts are deposited on carbon nanotube paper (CNT paper) that has been functionalized with polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic film. Ternary, Ru-Pd-Pt, instead of the binary Pd-Pt catalyst used earlier, together with a thinner CNT paper is shown to increase the figure-of-merit by up to a factor of six, putting is above any other known catalyst for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4. The catalysts are prepared by first impregnating the functionalized CNT-paper with solutions of the metal salts, followed by reduction in a sodium borohydride solution. The reaction mechanism and the catalyst efficiency are described in terms of an electric charge transfer, whereby the negative charge on the BH 4 - ion is exchanged with hydrogen via the electronically conducting SiCN/CNT substrate [1].

  9. Generation of Metal-Binding Staphylococci through Surface Display of Combinatorially Engineered Cellulose-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wernérus, Henrik; Lehtiö, Janne; Teeri, Tuula; Nygren, Per-Åke; Ståhl, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    Ni2+-binding staphylococci were generated through surface display of combinatorially engineered variants of a fungal cellulose-binding domain (CBD) from Trichoderma reesei cellulase Cel7A. Novel CBD variants were generated by combinatorial protein engineering through the randomization of 11 amino acid positions, and eight potentially Ni2+-binding CBDs were selected by phage display technology. These new variants were subsequently genetically introduced into chimeric surface proteins for surface display on Staphylococcus carnosus cells. The expressed chimeric proteins were shown to be properly targeted to the cell wall of S. carnosus cells, since full-length proteins could be extracted and affinity purified. Surface accessibility for the chimeric proteins was demonstrated, and furthermore, the engineered CBDs, now devoid of cellulose-binding capacity, were shown to be functional with regard to metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococci had gained Ni2+-binding capacity. Potential environmental applications for such tailor-made metal-binding bacteria as bioadsorbents in biofilters or biosensors are discussed. PMID:11571172

  10. Generation of metal-binding staphylococci through surface display of combinatorially engineered cellulose-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Wernérus, H; Lehtiö, J; Teeri, T; Nygren, P A; Ståhl, S

    2001-10-01

    Ni(2+)-binding staphylococci were generated through surface display of combinatorially engineered variants of a fungal cellulose-binding domain (CBD) from Trichoderma reesei cellulase Cel7A. Novel CBD variants were generated by combinatorial protein engineering through the randomization of 11 amino acid positions, and eight potentially Ni(2+)-binding CBDs were selected by phage display technology. These new variants were subsequently genetically introduced into chimeric surface proteins for surface display on Staphylococcus carnosus cells. The expressed chimeric proteins were shown to be properly targeted to the cell wall of S. carnosus cells, since full-length proteins could be extracted and affinity purified. Surface accessibility for the chimeric proteins was demonstrated, and furthermore, the engineered CBDs, now devoid of cellulose-binding capacity, were shown to be functional with regard to metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococci had gained Ni(2+)-binding capacity. Potential environmental applications for such tailor-made metal-binding bacteria as bioadsorbents in biofilters or biosensors are discussed.

  11. Technique for production of calibrated metal hydride films

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.; Browning, J.F.; Balsley, S.D.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.; Wampler, W.R.; Beavis, L.C.

    1999-11-11

    A technique has been developed for producing calibrated metal hydride films for use in the measurement of high-energy (5--15 MeV) particle reaction cross sections for hydrogen and helium isotopes on hydrogen isotopes. Absolute concentrations of various hydrogen isotopes in the film is expected to be determined to better than {+-}2% leading to the capacity of accurately measuring various reaction cross sections. Hydrogen isotope concentrations from near 100% to 5% can be made accurately and reproducibly. This is accomplished with the use of high accuracy pressure measurements coupled with high accuracy mass spectrometric measurements of each constituent partial pressure of the gas mixture during loading of the metal occluder films. Various techniques are used to verify the amount of metal present as well as the amount of hydrogen isotopes; high energy ion scattering analysis, PV measurements before, during and after loading, and thermal desorption/mass spectrometry measurements. The most appropriate metal to use for the occluder film appears to be titanium but other occluder metals are also being considered. Calibrated gas ratio samples, previously prepared, are used for the loading gas. Deviations from this calibrated gas ratio are measured using mass spectrometry during and after the loading process thereby determining the loading of the various hydrogen isotopes. These techniques are discussed and pertinent issues presented.

  12. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered.

  13. By-product metals are technologically essential but have problematic supply

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, N. T.; Graedel, T. E.; Harper, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    The growth in technological innovation that has occurred over the past decades has, in part, been possible because an increasing number of metals of the periodic table are used to perform specialized functions. However, there have been increasing concerns regarding the reliability of supply of some of these metals. A main contributor to these concerns is the fact that many of these metals are recovered only as by-products from a limited number of geopolitically concentrated ore deposits, rendering their supplies unable to respond to rapid changes in demand. Companionality is the degree to which a metal is obtained largely or entirely as a by-product of one or more host metals from geologic ores. The dependence of companion metal availability on the production of the host metals introduces a new facet of supply risk to modern technology. We evaluated companionality for 62 different metals and metalloids, and show that 61% (38 of 62) have companionality greater than 50%. Eighteen of the 38—including such technologically essential elements as germanium, terbium, and dysprosium—are further characterized as having geopolitically concentrated production and extremely low rates of end-of-life recycling. It is this subset of companion metals—vital in current technologies such as electronics, solar energy, medical imaging, energy-efficient lighting, and other state-of-the-art products—that may be at the greatest risk of supply constraints in the coming decades. PMID:26601159

  14. Simple Methods for Production of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Films from Household Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Baliss, Michelle S.; Hinman, Jordan J.; Ziegenhorn, John W.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Production of thin metal oxide films was recently explored as part of an outreach program with a goal of producing nanoscale structures with household items. Household items coated with various metals or titanium compounds can be heated to produce colorful films with nanoscale thicknesses. As part of a materials chemistry laboratory experiment…

  15. Simple Methods for Production of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Films from Household Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Baliss, Michelle S.; Hinman, Jordan J.; Ziegenhorn, John W.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Production of thin metal oxide films was recently explored as part of an outreach program with a goal of producing nanoscale structures with household items. Household items coated with various metals or titanium compounds can be heated to produce colorful films with nanoscale thicknesses. As part of a materials chemistry laboratory experiment…

  16. Phytoremediation of Metal Contaminated Soil Using Willow: Exploiting Plant-Associated Bacteria to Improve Biomass Production and Metal Uptake.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Jolien; Weyens, Nele; Croes, Sarah; Beckers, Bram; Meiresonne, Linda; Van Peteghem, Pierre; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) of willow and poplar is proposed for economic valorization and concurrently as remediation strategy for metal contaminated land in northeast-Belgium. However, metal phytoextraction appears insufficient to effectuate rapid reduction of soil metal contents. To increase both biomass production and metal accumulation of SRC, two strategies are proposed: (i) in situ selection of the best performing clones and (ii) bioaugmentation of these clones with beneficial plant-associated bacteria. Based on field data, two experimental willow clones, a Salix viminalis and a Salix alba x alba clone, were selected. Compared to the best performing commercial clones, considerable increases in stem metal extraction were achieved (up to 74% for Cd and 91% for Zn). From the selected clones, plant-associated bacteria were isolated and identified. All strains were subsequently screened for their plant growth-promoting and metal uptake enhancing traits. Five strains were selected for a greenhouse inoculation experiment with the selected clones planted in Cd-Zn-Pb contaminated soil. Extraction potential tended to increase after inoculation of S. viminalis plants with a Rahnella sp. strain due to a significantly increased twig biomass. However, although bacterial strains showing beneficial traits in vitro were used for inoculation, increments in extraction potential were not always observed.

  17. The mineral base and productive capacities of metals and non-metals of Kosovo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizaj, M.; Beqiri, E.; McBow, I.; O'Brien, E. Z.; Kongoli, F.

    2008-08-01

    All historical periods of Kosovo—Ilirik, Roman, Medieval, Turkish, and former Yugoslavian—are linked with the intensive development of mining and metallurgy. This activity influenced and still is influencing the overall position of Kosovo as a country. For example, according to a 2006 World Bank report as well as other studies, Kosovo has potential lignite resources (geological reserves) of about 1.5 billion tonnes, which are ranked fifth in the world in importance. Other significant Kosovan mineral resources include lead, zinc, gold, silver, bauxite, and uranium, and rare metals accompanying those minerals, including indium, cadmium, thallium, gallium, and bismuth. These rare metals are of particular importance in developing advanced industrial technologies. Kosovo also has reserves of high-quality non-metals, including magnesite, quartz grit, bentonite, argil, talc, and asbestos. No database exists for these non-metal reserves, and further research and studies are needed.

  18. The mineral base and productive capacities of metals and non-metals of Kosovo

    SciTech Connect

    Rizaj, M.; Beqiri, E.; McBow, I.; O'Brien, E.Z.; Kongoli, F.

    2008-08-15

    All historical periods of Kosovo - Ilirik, Roman, Medieval, Turkish, and former Yugoslavian - are linked with the intensive development of mining and metallurgy. This activity influenced and still is influencing the overall position of Kosovo as a country. For example, according to a 2006 World Bank report as well as other studies, Kosovo has potential lignite resources (geological reserves) of about 1.5 billion tonnes, which are ranked fifth in the world in importance. Other significant Kosovan mineral resources include lead, zinc, gold, silver, bauxite, and uranium, and rare metals accompanying those minerals, including indium, cadmium, thallium, gallium, and bismuth. These rare metals are of particular importance in developing advanced industrial technologies. Kosovo also has reserves of high-quality non-metals, including magnesite, quartz grit, bentonite, argil, talc, and asbestos. No database exists for these non-metal reserves, and further research and studies are needed.

  19. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-02-09

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5

  20. Metal interferences and their removal prior to the determination of As(T) and As(III) in acid mine waters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ball, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) is a sensitive and selective method for the determination of total arsenic (arsenic(III) plus arsenic(V)) and arsenic(III); however, it is subject to metal interferences for acid mine waters. Sodium borohydride is used to produce arsine gas, but high metal concentrations can suppress arsine production. This report investigates interferences of sixteen metal species including aluminum, antimony(III), antimony(V), cadmium, chromium(III), chromium(IV), cobalt, copper(II), iron(III), iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(IV), selenium(VI), and zinc ranging in concentration from 0 to 1,000 milligrams per liter and offers a method for removing interfering metal cations with cation exchange resin. The degree of interference for each metal without cation-exchange on the determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) was evaluated by spiking synthetic samples containing arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) with the potential interfering metal. Total arsenic recoveries ranged from 92 to 102 percent for all metals tested except antimony(III) and antimony(V) which suppressed arsine formation when the antimony(III)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 4 or the antimony(V)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 2. Arsenic(III) recoveries for samples spiked with aluminum, chromium(III), cobalt, iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(VI), and zinc ranged from 84 to 107 percent over the entire concentration range tested. Low arsenic(III) recoveries occurred when the molar ratios of metals to arsenic(III) were copper greater than 120, iron(III) greater than 70, chromium(VI) greater than 2, cadmium greater than 800, antimony(III) greater than 3, antimony(V) greater than 12, or selenium(IV) greater than 1. Low recoveries result when interfering metals compete for available sodium borohydride, causing incomplete arsine production, or when the interfering metal oxidizes arsenic(III). Separation of interfering metal cations using

  1. Leaching characteristics of the metal waste form from the electrometallurgical treatment process: Product consistency testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S. G.; Keiser, D. D.; Frank, S. M.; DiSanto, T.; Noy, M.

    1999-11-11

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing an electrometallurgical treatment for spent fuel from the experimental breeder reactor II. A product of this treatment process is a metal waste form that incorporates the stainless steel cladding hulls, zirconium from the fuel and the fission products that are noble to the process, i.e., Tc, Ru, Nb, Pd, Rh, Ag. The nominal composition of this waste form is stainless steel/15 wt% zirconium/1--4 wt% noble metal fission products/1--2 wt % U. Leaching results are presented from several tests and sample types: (1) 2 week monolithic immersion tests on actual metal waste forms produced from irradiated cladding hulls, (2) long term (>2 years) pulsed flow tests on samples containing technetium and uranium and (3) crushed sample immersion tests on cold simulated metal waste form samples. The test results will be compared and their relevance for waste form product consistency testing discussed.

  2. Simultaneously photodeposited rhodium metal and oxide nanoparticles promoting photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Katsuya; Kawai, Hiromasa; Yoshida, Tomoko; Yoshida, Hisao

    2011-08-21

    Photodeposition of a Rh cocatalyst under atmospheric conditions could simultaneously provide both Rh metal and oxide nanoparticles on a K(2)Ti(6)O(13) photocatalyst, both of which cooperatively promoted the photocatalytic hydrogen production from water and methane.

  3. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    DOEpatents

    Kunnmann, Walter; Larese, John Z.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  4. RARE-EARTH METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM LIQUID U-Bi

    DOEpatents

    Wiswall, R.H.

    1960-05-10

    Fission product metals can be removed from solution in liquid bismuth without removal of an appreciable quantity of uranium by contacting the liquid metal solution with fused halides, as for example, the halides of sodium, potassium, and lithium and by adding to the contacted phases a quantity of a halide which is unstable relative to the halides of the fission products, a specific unstable halide being MgCl/sub 3/.

  5. Chapter 23: Corrosion of Metals in Wood Products

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion of metals in contact with wood has been studied for over 80 years, and in most situations wood is not corrosive [1]. Recently, however, the durability of fasteners in preservative--treated wood has become a concern. Changes in legislation and certification in the United States, the European Union, and Australasia have restricted the use of chromated...

  6. Behavior of metallic fission products in uranium plutonium mixed oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, I.; Furuya, H.; Arima, T.; Idemitsu, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    1999-08-01

    Metallic fission products, ruthenium, rhodium, technetium, palladium, and molybdenum, exist in irradiated oxide fuels as metallic inclusions. In this work, the radial distributions of metallic inclusion constituents in the fuel specimen irradiated to a peak burnup of 7-13 at.% were observed with an electron probe microanalysis. Palladium concentration is high at the periphery in all the specimens. Molybdenum shows the same tendency for the 13 at.% burnup specimen. These results showed the significant difference between experimental data and calculations with ORIGEN-2 at such high burnups, which suggested that the migration of palladium and molybdenum was controlled mainly by diffusion of gaseous species containing each metal along the fuel temperature gradient.

  7. Promotion of atomic hydrogen recombination as an alternative to electron trapping for the role of metals in the photocatalytic production of H2

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ji Bong; Dillon, Robert; Lee, Ilkeun; Yin, Yadong; Bardeen, Christopher J.; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The production of hydrogen from water with semiconductor photocatalysts can be promoted by adding small amounts of metals to their surfaces. The resulting enhancement in photocatalytic activity is commonly attributed to a fast transfer of the excited electrons generated by photon absorption from the semiconductor to the metal, a step that prevents deexcitation back to the ground electronic state. Here we provide experimental evidence that suggests an alternative pathway that does not involve electron transfer to the metal but requires it to act as a catalyst for the recombination of the hydrogen atoms made via the reduction of protons on the surface of the semiconductor instead. PMID:24843154

  8. Promotion of atomic hydrogen recombination as an alternative to electron trapping for the role of metals in the photocatalytic production of H2.

    PubMed

    Joo, Ji Bong; Dillon, Robert; Lee, Ilkeun; Yin, Yadong; Bardeen, Christopher J; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-06-03

    The production of hydrogen from water with semiconductor photocatalysts can be promoted by adding small amounts of metals to their surfaces. The resulting enhancement in photocatalytic activity is commonly attributed to a fast transfer of the excited electrons generated by photon absorption from the semiconductor to the metal, a step that prevents deexcitation back to the ground electronic state. Here we provide experimental evidence that suggests an alternative pathway that does not involve electron transfer to the metal but requires it to act as a catalyst for the recombination of the hydrogen atoms made via the reduction of protons on the surface of the semiconductor instead.

  9. Generate rigorous pyrolysis models for olefins production by computer

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Broadbelt, L.J.; Grittman, D.H.

    1997-04-01

    With recent advances in the automation of the model-building process for large networks of kinetic equations, it may become feasible to generate computer pyrolysis models for naphthas and gas oil feedstocks. The potential benefit of a rigorous mechanistic model for these relatively complex liquid feedstocks is great, due to diverse characterizations and yield spectrums. An ethane pyrolysis example is used to illustrate the computer generation of reaction mechanism models.

  10. Design of optimum solid oxide membrane electrolysis cells for metals production

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.

    2015-12-24

    Oxide to metal conversion is one of the most energy-intensive steps in the value chain for metals production. Solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process provides a general route for directly reducing various metal oxides to their respective metals, alloys, or intermetallics. Because of its lower energy use and ability to use inert anode resulting in zero carbon emission, SOM electrolysis process emerges as a promising technology that can replace the state-of-the-art metals production processes. In this paper, a careful study of the SOM electrolysis process using equivalent DC circuit modeling is performed and correlated to the experimental results. Finally, amore » discussion on relative importance of each resistive element in the circuit and on possible ways of lowering the rate-limiting resistive elements provides a generic guideline for designing optimum SOM electrolysis cells.« less

  11. Direct generation of superhydrophobic microstructures in metals by UV laser sources in the nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Jose L.; Jagdheesh, R.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    The current availability of new advanced fiber and DPSS lasers with characteristic pulse lengths ranging from ns to fs has provided a unique frame in which the development of laser-generated microstructures has been made possible for very diverse kinds of materials and applications. At the same time, the development of the appropriate laser-processing workstations granting the appropriate precision and repeatability of the respective laser interaction processes in line with the characteristic dimension features required in the microstructured samples has definitively consolidated laser surface microstructuring as a reference domain, nowadays, unavoidable for the design and manufacturing of current use microsystem: MEMSs, fluidic devices, advanced sensors, biomedical devices and instruments, etc., are all among the most well-known developments of the micromanufacturing technology. Completing the broad spectrum of applications developed mostly involving the generation of geometrical features on a subtrate with specific functional purposes, a relatively new, emerging class of laser-microstructuring techniques is finding an important niche of application in the generation of physically structured surfaces (particularly of metallic materials) with specific contact, friction, and wear functionalities, for whose generation the concourse of different types of laser sources is being found as an appropriate tool. In this paper, the application of laser sources with emission in the UV and at ns time regime to the surface structuration of metal surfaces (specifically Al) for the modification of their wettability properties is described as an attractive application basis for the generation of self-cleaning properties of extended functional surfaces. Flat aluminum sheets of thickness 100 μm were laser machined with ultraviolet laser pulses of 30 ns with different laser parameters to optimize the process parameters. The samples produced at the optimum conditions with respect to

  12. Generating "Good Enough" Evidence for Co-Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durose, Catherine; Needham, Catherine; Mangan, Catherine; Rees, James

    2017-01-01

    Co-production is not a new concept but it is one with renewed prominence and reach in contemporary policy discourse. It refers to joint working between people or groups who have traditionally been separated into categories of user and producer. The article focuses on the co-production of public services, offering theory-based and knowledge-based…

  13. Generating "Good Enough" Evidence for Co-Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durose, Catherine; Needham, Catherine; Mangan, Catherine; Rees, James

    2017-01-01

    Co-production is not a new concept but it is one with renewed prominence and reach in contemporary policy discourse. It refers to joint working between people or groups who have traditionally been separated into categories of user and producer. The article focuses on the co-production of public services, offering theory-based and knowledge-based…

  14. Evaluation of best management practice products in preventing discharge of metals: a laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Büyüksönmez, Fatih; Yang, Li; Beighley, R Edward

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal accumulation in soil poses serious environmental and health risks, as metals are carried with eroded soils. In this study, 17 different soil erosion and sediment control products were investigated for their effectiveness in controlling transport of particulate heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd). Among the treatments investigated, wood mulch and tackifiers were found to be the most effective in reducing total suspended solids (TSS) and total heavy metal losses. They reduced TSS to an undetectable level during short-term simulation tests. Paper mulch was the only treatment that had no significant reduction in both total metal loss and TSS. Fiber rolls, silt fences, and gravel bags were effective in reducing sediment loss. Although the netting/blanket treatments were not effective in reducing total metal discharge, they significantly reduced sediment loss compared with the control.

  15. Electrical generation and control of the valley carriers in a monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yu; Xiao, Jun; Wang, Hailong; Ye, Ziliang; Zhu, Hanyu; Zhao, Mervin; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Jianhua; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Electrically controlling the flow of charge carriers is the foundation of modern electronics. By accessing the extra spin degree of freedom (DOF) in electronics, spintronics allows for information processes such as magnetoresistive random-access memory. Recently, atomic membranes of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) were found to support unequal and distinguishable carrier distribution in different crystal momentum valleys. This valley polarization of carriers enables a new DOF for information processing. A variety of valleytronic devices such as valley filters and valves have been proposed, and optical valley excitation has been observed. However, to realize its potential in electronics it is necessary to electrically control the valley DOF, which has so far remained a significant challenge. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the electrical generation and control of valley polarization. This is achieved through spin injection via a diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor and measured through the helicity of the electroluminescence due to the spin-valley locking in TMDC monolayers. We also report a new scheme of electronic devices that combine both the spin and valley DOFs. Such direct electrical generation and control of valley carriers opens up new dimensions in utilizing both the spin and valley DOFs for next-generation electronics and computing.

  16. Singlet-Oxygen Generation From Individual Semiconducting and Metallic Nanostructures During Near-Infrared Laser Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Hanson, Jennifer L.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Devaraj, Arun; Perea, Daniel E.; Kim, Woo-Joong; Kilcoyne, Arthur L.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-13

    Photodynamic therapy has been used for several decades in the treatment of solid tumors through the generation of reactive singlet-oxygen species (1O2). Recently, nanoscale metallic and semiconducting materials have been reported to act as photosensitizing agents with additional diagnostic and therapeutic functionality. To date there have been no reports of observing the generation of singlet-oxygen at the level of single nanostructures, particularly at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Here we demonstrate that NIR laser-tweezers can be used to observe the formation of singlet-oxygen produced from individual silicon and gold nanowires via use of a commercially available reporting dye. The laser trap also induces 2-photon photoexcitation of the dye following a chemical reaction with singlet oxygen. Corresponding 2-photon emission spectra confirms the generation of singlet oxygen from individual silicon nanowires at room temperature (30°C), suggesting a range of applications in understanding the impact of 1O2 on individual cancer cells.

  17. Enhanced Flexible Thermoelectric Generators Based on Oxide-Metal Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert, Benjamin; Brittner, Artur; Helmich, Lailah; Bittner, Michael; Feldhoff, Armin

    2017-04-01

    The thermoelectric performance of flexible thermoelectric generator stripes was investigated in terms of different material combinations. The thermoelectric generators were constructed using Cu-Ni-Mn alloy as n-type legs while varying the p-type leg material by including a metallic silver phase and an oxidic copper phase. For the synthesis of Ca_3Co_4O9/CuO/Ag ceramic-based composite materials, silver and the copper were added to the sol-gel batches in the form of nitrates. For both additional elements, the isothermal specific electronic conductivity increases with increasing amounts of Ag and CuO in the samples. The amounts for Ag and Cu were 0 mol.%, 2 mol.%, 5 mol.%, 10 mol.%, and 20 mol.%. The phases were confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, secondary electron microscopy including energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were processed in the scanning electron microscope and the transmission electron microscope. For each p-type material, the data for the thermoelectric parameters, isothermal specific electronic conductivity σ and the Seebeck coefficient α, were determined. The p-type material with a content of 5 mol.% Ag and Cu exhibited a local maximum of the power factor and led to the generator with the highest electric power output P_el.

  18. Metal-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species from amyloid proteins implicated in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Allsop, David; Mayes, Jennifer; Moore, Susan; Masad, Atef; Tabner, Brian J

    2008-12-01

    Using a method based on ESR spectroscopy and spin-trapping, we have shown that Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide) (implicated in Alzheimer's disease), alpha-synuclein (implicated in Parkinson's disease), ABri (British dementia peptide) (responsible for familial British dementia), certain toxic fragments of the prion protein (implicated in the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies) and the amylin peptide (found in the pancreas in Type 2 diabetes mellitus) all have the common ability to generate H(2)O(2) in vitro. Numerous controls (reverse, scrambled and non-toxic peptides) lacked this property. We have also noted a positive correlation between the ability of the various proteins tested to generate H(2)O(2) and their toxic effects on cultured cells. In the case of Abeta and ABri, we have shown that H(2)O(2) is generated as a short burst during the early stages of aggregation and is associated with the presence of protofibrils or oligomers, rather than mature fibrils. H(2)O(2) is readily converted into the aggressive hydroxyl radical by Fenton chemistry, and this extremely reactive radical could be responsible for much of the oxidative damage seen in all of the above disorders. We suggest that the formation of a redox-active complex involving the relevant amyloidogenic protein and certain transition-metal ions could play an important role in the pathogenesis of several different protein misfolding disorders.

  19. Generators and automated generator systems for production and on-line injections of pet radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimchuk, G.; Shimchuk, Gr; Pakhomov, G.; Avalishvili, G.; Zavrazhnov, G.; Polonsky-Byslaev, I.; Fedotov, A.; Polozov, P.

    2017-01-01

    One of the prospective directions of PET development is using generator positron radiating nuclides [1,2]. Introduction of this technology is financially promising, since it does not require expensive special accelerator and radiochemical laboratory in the medical institution, which considerably reduces costs of PET diagnostics and makes it available to more patients. POZITOM-PRO RPC LLC developed and produced an 82Sr-82Rb generator, an automated injection system, designed for automatic and fully-controlled injections of 82RbCl produced by this generator, automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis units based on generated 68Ga produced using a domestically-manufactured 68Ge-68Ga generator for preparing two pharmaceuticals: Ga-68-DOTA-TATE and Vascular Ga-68.

  20. Trace heavy metal ions promoted extracellular electron transfer and power generation by Shewanella in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Shang; Zheng, Tao; Yong, Xiao-Yu; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Si, Rong-Wei; Li, Bing; Yu, Yang-Yang; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Although microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is considered as one of the most promising technology for renewable energy harvesting, low power output still accounts one of the bottlenecks and limits its further development. In this work, it is found that Cu(2+) (0.1μgL(-1)-0.1mgL(-1)) or Cd(2+) (0.1μgL(-1)-1mgL(-1)) significantly improve the electricity generation in MFCs. The maximum power output achieved with trace level of Cu(2+) (∼6nM) or Cd(2+) (∼5nM) is 1.3 times and 1.6 times higher than that of the control, respectively. Further analysis verifies that addition of Cu(2+) or Cd(2+) effectively improves riboflavin production and bacteria attachment on the electrode, which enhances bacterial extracellular electron transfer (EET) in MFCs. These results unveil the mechanism for power output enhancement by Cu(2+) or Cd(2+) addition, and suggest that metal ion addition should be a promising strategy to enhance EET as well as power generation of MFCs.

  1. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys

    PubMed Central

    Middleburgh, S. C.; King, D. M.; Lumpkin, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)—making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance. PMID:26064629

  2. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys.

    PubMed

    Middleburgh, S C; King, D M; Lumpkin, G R

    2015-04-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)-making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance.

  3. Apparatus for production of ultrapure amorphous metals utilizing acoustic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metals are produced by forming a molten unit of metal and deploying the unit into a bidirectional acoustical levitating field or by dropping the unit through a spheroidizing zone, a slow quenching zone, and a fast quenching zone in which the sphere is rapidly cooled by a bidirectional jet stream created in the standing acoustic wave field produced between a half cylindrical acoustic driver and a focal reflector or a curved driver and a reflector. The cooling rate can be further augmented first by a cryogenic liquid collar and secondly by a cryogenic liquid jacket surrounding a drop tower. The molten unit is quenched to an amorphous solid which can survive impact in a unit collector or is retrieved by a vacuum chuck.

  4. Numerical assessment of residual formability in sheet metal products: towards design for sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsafi, Javad; Demirci, Emrah; Silberschmidt, Vadim. V.

    2016-08-01

    A new computational scheme is presented to addresses cold recyclability of sheet- metal products. Cold recycling or re-manufacturing is an emerging area studied mostly empirically; in its current form, it lacks theoretical foundation especially in the area of sheet metals. In this study, a re-formability index was introduced based on post-manufacture residual formability in sheet metal products. This index accounts for possible levels of deformation along different strain paths based on Polar Effective Plastic Strain (PEPS) technique. PEPS is strain-path independent, hence provides a foundation for residual formability analysis. A user- friendly code was developed to implement this assessment in conjunction with advanced finite- element (FE) analysis. The significance of this approach is the advancement towards recycling of sheet metal products without melting them.

  5. Scientific and Technological Foundations for Scaling Production of Nanostructured Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Davis, Casey F.; Rovira, Peter M.; Hayne, Mathew L.; Campbell, Gordon S.; Grzenia, Joel E.; Stock, Paige J.; Meagher, Rilee C.; Rack, Henry J.

    2017-05-01

    Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) has been explored in a wide range of metals and alloys. However, there are only a few industrial scale implementations of SPD for commercial alloys. To demonstrate and evolve technology for producing ultrafine grain metals by SPD, a Nanostructured Metals Manufacturing Testbed (NMMT) has been established in Golden, Colorado. Machines for research scale and pilot scale Equal Channel Angular Pressing-Conform (ECAP-C) technology have been configured in the NMMT to systematically evaluate and evolve SPD processing and advance the foundational science and technology for manufacturing. We highlight the scientific and technological areas that are critical for scale up of continuous SPD of aluminum, copper, magnesium, titanium, and iron-based alloys. Key areas that we will address in this presentation include the need for comprehensive analysis of starting microstructures, data on operating deformation mechanisms, high pressure thermodynamics and phase transformation kinetics, tribological behaviors, temperature dependence of lubricant properties, adaptation of tolerances and shear intensity to match viscoplastic behaviors, real-time process monitoring, and mechanics of billet/tooling interactions.

  6. Electric energy production by particle thermionic-thermoelectric power generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oettinger, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    Thermionic-thermoelectric power generators, composed of a thin layer of porous, low work function material separating a heated emitter electrode and a cooler collector electrode, have extremely large Seebeck coefficients of over 2 mV/K and can provide significant output power. Preliminary experiments with 20-micron thick (Ba Sr Ca)O coatings, limited by evaporative loss to temperatures below 1400 K, have yielded short circuit current densities of 500 mA/sq cm and power densities of 60 mW/ sq cm. Substantially more output is expected with cesium-coated refractory oxide particle coatings operating at higher temperatures. Practical generators will have thermal-to-electrical efficiencies of 10 to 20%. Further increases can be gained by cascading these high-temperature devices with lower temperature conventional thermoelectric generators.

  7. Production of crystalline refractory metal oxides containing colloidal metal precipitates and useful as solar-effective absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish; Chen, Yok

    1983-01-01

    This invention is a new process for producing refractory crystalline oxides having improved or unusual properties. The process comprises the steps of forming a doped-metal crystal of the oxide; exposing the doped crystal in a bomb to a reducing atmosphere at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature effecting precipitation of the dopant metal in the crystal lattice of the oxide but insufficient to effect net diffusion of the metal out of the lattice; and then cooling the crystal. Preferably, the cooling step is effected by quenching. The process forms colloidal precipitates of the metal in the oxide lattice. The process may be used, for example, to produce thermally stable black MgO crystalline bodies containing magnetic colloidal precipitates consisting of about 99% Ni. The Ni-containing bodies are solar-selective absorbers, having a room-temperature absorptivity of about 0.96 over virtually all of the solar-energy spectrum and exhibiting an absorption edge in the region of 2 .mu.m. The process parameters can be varied to control the average size of the precipitates. The process can produce a black MgO crystalline body containing colloidal Ni precipitates, some of which have the face-centered-cubic structure and others of which have the body-centered cubic structure. The products of the process are metal-precipitate-containing refractory crystalline oxides which have improved or unique optical, mechanical, magnetic, and/or electronic properties.

  8. Plant growth promotion, metabolite production and metal tolerance of dark septate endophytes isolated from metal-polluted poplar phytomanagement sites.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Charlotte; Leyval, Corinne; Foulon, Julie; Chalot, Michel; Blaudez, Damien

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies address the distribution and the diversity of dark septate endophytes (DSEs) in the literature, but little is known about their ecological role and their effect on host plants, especially in metal-polluted soils. Seven DSE strains belonging to Cadophora, Leptodontidium, Phialophora and Phialocephala were isolated from roots of poplar trees from metal-polluted sites. All strains developed on a wide range of carbohydrates, including cell-wall-related compounds. The strains evenly colonized birch, eucalyptus and ryegrass roots in re-synthesis experiments. Root and shoot growth promotion was observed and was both plant and strain dependent. Two Phialophora and Leptodontidium strains particularly improved plant growth. However, there was no correlation between the level of root colonization by DSEs and the intensity of growth promotion. All strains produced auxin and six also stimulated plant growth through the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). SPME-GC/MS analyses revealed four major VOCs emitted by Cadophora and Leptodontidium The strains exhibited growth at high concentrations of several metals. The ability of metal-resistant DSE strains to produce both soluble and volatile compounds for plant growth promotion indicates interesting microbial resources with high potential to support sustainable production of bioenergy crops within the context of the phytomanagement of metal-contaminated sites.

  9. Reduced enthalpy of metal hydride formation for Mg-Ti nanocomposites produced by spark discharge generation.

    PubMed

    Anastasopol, Anca; Pfeiffer, Tobias V; Middelkoop, Joost; Lafont, Ugo; Canales-Perez, Roger J; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas; Mulder, Fokko M; Eijt, Stephan W H

    2013-05-29

    Spark discharge generation was used to synthesize Mg-Ti nanocomposites consisting primarily of a metastable body-centered-cubic (bcc) alloy of Mg and Ti. The bcc Mg-Ti alloy transformed upon hydrogenation into the face-centered-cubic fluorite Mg1-yTiyHx phase with favorable hydrogen storage properties. Both metal and metal hydride nanocomposites showed a fractal-like porous morphology, with a primary particle size of 10-20 nm. The metal content of 70 atom % (at %) Mg and 30 at % Ti, consistently determined by XRD, TEM-EDS, and ICP-OES, was distributed uniformly across the as-prepared sample. Pressure-composition isotherms for the Mg-Ti-H nanocomposites revealed large differences in the thermodynamics relative to bulk MgH2, with a much less negative enthalpy of formation of the hydride as small as -45 ± 3 kJ/molH2 as deduced from van't Hoff plots. The plateau pressures of hydrogenation were substantially higher than those for bulk MgH2 in the low temperature range from 150 to 250 °C. The reaction entropy was simultaneously reduced to values down to 84 ± 5 J/K mol H2, following a linear relationship between the enthalpy and entropy. Plausible mechanisms for the modified thermodynamics are discussed, including the effect of lattice strains, the presence of interfaces and hydrogen vacancies, and the formation of excess free volume due to local deformations. These mechanisms all rely on the finely interdispersed nanocomposite character of the samples which is maintained by grain refinement.

  10. EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS IN THE MILKY WAY: A SECOND GENERATION FORMED AFTER REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, Michele; Shull, J. Michael E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.ed

    2010-03-20

    Cosmological simulations of Population III star formation suggest an initial mass function (IMF) biased toward very massive stars (M {approx}> 100 M{sub sun}) formed in minihalos at redshift z {approx}> 20, when the cooling is driven by molecular hydrogen. However, this result conflicts with observations of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars in the Milky Way (MW) halo, whose r-process elemental abundances appear to be incompatible with those expected from very massive Population III progenitors. We propose a new solution to the problem in which the IMF of second-generation stars formed at z {approx}> 10, before reionization, is deficient in sub-solar mass stars, owing to the high cosmic microwave background temperature floor. The observed EMP stars are formed preferentially at z {approx}< 10 in pockets of gas enriched to metallicity Z {approx}> 10{sup -3.5} Z{sub sun} by winds from Population II stars. Our cosmological simulations of dark matter halos like the MW show that current samples of EMP stars can only constrain the IMF of late-time Population III stars, formed at z {approx}< 13 in halos with virial temperature T{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 4} K. This suggests that pair instability supernovae were not produced primarily by this population. To begin probing the IMF of Population III stars formed at higher redshift will require a large survey, with at least 500 and probably several thousand EMP stars of metallicities Z {approx} 10{sup -3.5} Z{sub sun}.

  11. A modern solid waste management strategy--the generation of new by-products.

    PubMed

    Fudala-Ksiazek, Sylwia; Pierpaoli, Mattia; Kulbat, Eliza; Luczkiewicz, Aneta

    2016-03-01

    To benefit the environment and society, EU legislation has introduced a 'zero waste' strategy, in which waste material should be converted to resources. Such legislation is supported by the solid waste hierarchy concept, which is a set of priorities in waste management. Under this concept, municipal solid waste plants (MSWPs) should be equipped with sorting and recycling facilities, composting/incineration units and landfill prisms for residual bulk disposal. However, each of the aforementioned facilities generates by-products that must be treated. This project focuses on the leachates from landfill prisms, including modern prism (MP) that meet EU requirements and previous prism (PP) that provide for the storage of permitted biodegradable waste as well as technological wastewaters from sorting unit (SU) and composting unit (CU), which are usually overlooked. The physico-chemical parameters of the liquid by-products collected over 38 months were supported by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) amplifications of functional genes transcripts and a metagenomic approach that describes the archaeal and bacterial community in the MP. The obtained data show that SU and especially CU generate wastewater that is rich in nutrients, organic matter and heavy metals. Through their on-site pre-treatment and recirculation via landfill prisms, the landfill waste decomposition process may be accelerated because of the introduction of organic matter and greenhouse gas emissions may be increased. These results have been confirmed by the progressive abundance of both archaeal community and the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene. The resulting multivariate data set, supported by a principal component analysis, provides useful information for the design, operation and risk assessment of modern MSWPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

  13. Liquid drop technique for generation of organic glass and metal shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-03-01

    It was found that liquid drop techniques are very useful in several diverse areas. For producing very uniform metallic, organic, inorganic and, on particular, glassy shells, the liquid jet method is the most reproducible and exceptionally useful of all the techniques studied. The technique of capillary wave synchronization of the break-up of single and multiple component jets was utilized to produce uniform sized liquid drops and solid particles, and hollow liquid and solid shells. The technique was also used to encapsulate a number of liquids in impermeable spherical shells. Highly uniform glass shells were made by generating uniform drops of glass forming materials in an aqueous solution, subsequently evaporating the water, and then fusing and blowing the remaining solids in a high temperature vertical tube furnace. Experimental results are presented and the critical problems in further research in this field are discussed.

  14. Radon transform based automatic metal artefacts generation for 3D threat image projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megherbi, Najla; Breckon, Toby P.; Flitton, Greg T.; Mouton, Andre

    2013-10-01

    Threat Image Projection (TIP) plays an important role in aviation security. In order to evaluate human security screeners in determining threats, TIP systems project images of realistic threat items into the images of the passenger baggage being scanned. In this proof of concept paper, we propose a 3D TIP method which can be integrated within new 3D Computed Tomography (CT) screening systems. In order to make the threat items appear as if they were genuinely located in the scanned bag, appropriate CT metal artefacts are generated in the resulting TIP images according to the scan orientation, the passenger bag content and the material of the inserted threat items. This process is performed in the projection domain using a novel methodology based on the Radon Transform. The obtained results using challenging 3D CT baggage images are very promising in terms of plausibility and realism.

  15. Subwavelength grating based metal-oxide nano-hair structures for optical vortex generation.

    PubMed

    Srimathi, Indumathi Raghu; Li, Yuan; Delaney, William F; Johnson, Eric G

    2015-07-27

    An all-dielectric, subwavelength grated based metal-oxide nano-hair structure for optical vortex beam generation has been presented in the paper. The nano-hair structure fabricated with alternating layers of alumina/hafnia on a fused silica substrate has a high diffraction efficiency of ~90% around the design wavelength, λ(o) = 1.55 μm and is insensitive to the polarization of the incident optical beam. The phase in transmission of these devices are controlled by azimuthally varying the fill fraction of the subwavelength grating. Realization of phase optical elements in an all-dielectric platform, based on subwavelength gratings offering full 0-2π phase modulation, is important for miniaturization and integration of conventional refractive optical elements.

  16. Liquid drop technique for generation of organic glass and metal shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    It was found that liquid drop techniques are very useful in several diverse areas. For producing very uniform metallic, organic, inorganic and, on particular, glassy shells, the liquid jet method is the most reproducible and exceptionally useful of all the techniques studied. The technique of capillary wave synchronization of the break-up of single and multiple component jets was utilized to produce uniform sized liquid drops and solid particles, and hollow liquid and solid shells. The technique was also used to encapsulate a number of liquids in impermeable spherical shells. Highly uniform glass shells were made by generating uniform drops of glass forming materials in an aqueous solution, subsequently evaporating the water, and then fusing and blowing the remaining solids in a high temperature vertical tube furnace. Experimental results are presented and the critical problems in further research in this field are discussed.

  17. Simultaneous generation and focus of radially polarized light with metal-dielectric grating metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Zhang, Zuojun; Song, Maowen; He, Anguo; Yu, Honglin

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous manipulation of light polarization and phase possesses great significance for modern optical technologies. Here we propose metal-dielectric gratings capable of tailoring the polarization and phase of light based on polarization filtering with the polarization extinction ratio exceeding 10 dB and the transmittance higher than 65%. The standard radially polarized (RP) light with axially symmetric polarization distribution can be generated by using arrayed grating with gradient phase under the illumination of circularly polarized (CP) light. Besides, a RP metasurface lens with high numerical aperture is presented, which can convert the CP light into the focused radially polarized light at wavelength of 632.8 nm. This compact and efficient approach would have potential applications in beam manipulation, super-resolution imaging and integrated optics system.

  18. System and method for generating and/or screening potential metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Wilmer, Christopher E; Leaf, Michael; Snurr, Randall Q; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2014-12-02

    A system and method for systematically generating potential metal-organic framework (MOFs) structures given an input library of building blocks is provided herein. One or more material properties of the potential MOFs are evaluated using computational simulations. A range of material properties (surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, powder x-ray diffraction pattern, methane adsorption capability, and the like) can be estimated, and in doing so, illuminate unidentified structure-property relationships that may only have been recognized by taking a global view of MOF structures. In addition to identifying structure-property relationships, this systematic approach to identify the MOFs of interest is used to identify one or more MOFs that may be useful for high pressure methane storage.

  19. System and method for generating and/or screening potential metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Wilmer, Christopher E; Leaf, Michael; Snurr, Randall Q; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-04-21

    A system and method for systematically generating potential metal-organic framework (MOFs) structures given an input library of building blocks is provided herein. One or more material properties of the potential MOFs are evaluated using computational simulations. A range of material properties (surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, powder x-ray diffraction pattern, methane adsorption capability, and the like) can be estimated, and in doing so, illuminate unidentified structure-property relationships that may only have been recognized by taking a global view of MOF structures. In addition to identifying structure-property relationships, this systematic approach to identify the MOFs of interest is used to identify one or more MOFs that may be useful for high pressure methane storage.

  20. Metal complexes of the third-generation quinolone antimicrobial drug sparfloxacin: Structure and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Efthimiadou, Eleni K; Karaliota, Alexandra; Psomas, George

    2010-04-01

    Five metal complexes of the third-generation quinolone antimicrobial agent sparfloxacin with Fe(3+), VO(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+) and UO(2)(2+) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, sparfloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylate oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinate with distorted octahedral geometry. For VO(sparfloxacinato)(2)(H(2)O) the axial position, trans to the vanadyl oxygen, is occupied by a ketone oxygen atom. Molecular mechanics calculations have been performed in order to propose a model for the structure of each complex. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against three microorganisms showing that they exhibit lower activity than free sparfloxacin. UV spectroscopic titration with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has shown that the complexes can bind to CT DNA and the binding constants to CT DNA have been calculated. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA have shown that they bind to CT DNA probably by the intercalative binding mode. Fluorescence competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have revealed the ability of the complexes to displace the DNA-bound EB. The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to human and bovine serum albumin proteins having relatively high binding constant values. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An all-metallic microburner for a millimeter-scale thermophotovoltaic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Walker R.; Wilhite, Benjamin A.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John; Celanovic, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    Thermophotovoltaics (TPVs) is the conversion of heat to electricity via the thermal emission of photons and their subsequent absorption and conversion to electricity by infrared photovoltaic cells. One of the key challenges is designing a robust microburner with an integrated selective emitter—and having the system operate at 1000°C for thousands of hours. Previous attempts at TPV system demonstrations tend to be large, inefficient, and have limited lifetimes. Here we present a novel all metallic microburner design and experimental results in the context of a proposed small, robust, and efficient TPV generator. Fabricated entirely by machining and welding, the microburner is comprised of a serpentine channel in a 20 × 20 mm slab of Inconel with inlet and outlet capillaries that double as mechanical supports. The microburner has a thermal power input of 50 to 100 W and reaches temperatures of 700 to 1100°C. The metallic microburner is robust under high temperature operation and a 2D tantalum photonic crystal can be attached by welding for high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency. We characterized the microburner's exhaust composition and temperature distribution which matched well with CFD simulations. We operated the microburner at 60 W of input power (reaching about 1000°C) for 135 hours before it failed.

  2. Generation of liquid metal structures of high aspect ratio by application of an ac magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Oleg; Pothérat, Alban; Thess, André

    2010-06-01

    We study how the shape of parts obtained through the LASER cladding process can be controlled by application of an ac magnetic field by means of two simple physical models: a numerical and an experimental one. More specifically, we show that straight metallic joints of high aspect ratio can be obtained by using inductors of triangular cross-section that concentrate electromagnetic forces at the bottom of the joint. The effect is first demonstrated on a numerical model for an infinitely long joint such as: we illustrate how the joint shape can be controlled by varying the inclination of the inductor and for a magnetic Bond number Bom=60 (which measures the ratio of electromagnetic to capillary forces), we obtain a joint of aspect ratio up to 7.2. We further find that inductor angles in the range 15°-25° lead to joint side faces that are close to vertical. These findings are then verified experimentally by placing a liquid metal drop in a purpose built inductor of triangular cross-section. We find a good agreement between the theoretical prediction of our two-dimensional model and the real three-dimensional drop. For the highest magnetic Bond number our generator could deliver, Bom=20.19, we achieved a drop aspect ratio of 2.73.

  3. Metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial drug gatifloxacin: Synthesis, structure and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-08-01

    Three metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial agent gatifloxacin (GFLX) with Y(ΙΙΙ), Zr(ΙV) and U(VΙ) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, gatifloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry. The kinetic parameters for gatifloxacin and the three prepared complexes have been evaluated from TGA curves by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(U dbnd O), for the UO 2 bond in uranyl complex are 1.7522 Å and 639.46 N m -1. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against microorganisms, three bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and two fungi species, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.), showing that they exhibit higher activity than free ligand.

  4. Study of proton generation using thin metal wires with a sharp tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Fiksel, Gennady; Krushelnick, Karl; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Brantov, Andrey V.

    2016-10-01

    It was suggested to use the highly enhanced electric field close to a low-power-laser-illuminated metal tip for nanometric optical tweezers. Recently, a boost in proton acceleration by high-intensity laser using structured snow-like targets was observed and attributed mostly due to the field enhancement at the whisker tip. Here we report on a more controlled high-intensity laser experiment by using thin metal wires with a diameter of 20 microns with tips of different size ranging from 0.2 to 5.0 microns. 400 fs, 15 TW laser pulses were focused to an intensity of up to 3x1019 W/cm2 on a tungsten wire at different distances from the tip. We have observed two high-energy proton beams. One beam was produced through the Target Normal Sheet Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism and was perpendicular to the wire and the other one was observed from the wire tip and in the direction along the wire axis. Simultaneous measurements of maximum proton energies using CR-39 nuclear track detectors and high energy electrons using imaging plates in both direction were performed and will be presented. The experimental results were interpreted taking into account the generated electric and magnetic fields near the surface of the wire and at the wire tip as well as a strong collimated surface current along the wire. Work supported by US Department of Energy and NNSA.

  5. A metal-organic cage incorporating multiple light harvesting and catalytic centres for photochemical hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha; Li, Kang; Zhao, Fang; Zhang, Lei; Pan, Mei; Fan, Yan-Zhong; Guo, Jing; Shi, Jianying; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2016-11-09

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a natural but challenging chemical way of harnessing renewable solar power to generate clean hydrogen energy. Here we report a potential hydrogen-evolving photochemical molecular device based on a self-assembled ruthenium-palladium heterometallic coordination cage, incorporating multiple photo- and catalytic metal centres. The photophysical properties are investigated by absorption/emission spectroscopy, electrochemical measurements and preliminary DFT calculations and the stepwise electron transfer processes from ruthenium-photocentres to catalytic palladium-centres is probed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. The photocatalytic hydrogen production assessments reveal an initial reaction rate of 380 μmol h(-1) and a turnover number of 635 after 48 h. The efficient hydrogen production may derive from the directional electron transfers through multiple channels owing to proper organization of the photo- and catalytic multi-units within the octahedral cage, which may open a new door to design photochemical molecular devices with well-organized metallosupramolecules for homogenous photocatalytic applications.

  6. A metal-organic cage incorporating multiple light harvesting and catalytic centres for photochemical hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sha; Li, Kang; Zhao, Fang; Zhang, Lei; Pan, Mei; Fan, Yan-Zhong; Guo, Jing; Shi, Jianying; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a natural but challenging chemical way of harnessing renewable solar power to generate clean hydrogen energy. Here we report a potential hydrogen-evolving photochemical molecular device based on a self-assembled ruthenium–palladium heterometallic coordination cage, incorporating multiple photo- and catalytic metal centres. The photophysical properties are investigated by absorption/emission spectroscopy, electrochemical measurements and preliminary DFT calculations and the stepwise electron transfer processes from ruthenium-photocentres to catalytic palladium-centres is probed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. The photocatalytic hydrogen production assessments reveal an initial reaction rate of 380 μmol h−1 and a turnover number of 635 after 48 h. The efficient hydrogen production may derive from the directional electron transfers through multiple channels owing to proper organization of the photo- and catalytic multi-units within the octahedral cage, which may open a new door to design photochemical molecular devices with well-organized metallosupramolecules for homogenous photocatalytic applications. PMID:27827376

  7. A metal-organic cage incorporating multiple light harvesting and catalytic centres for photochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sha; Li, Kang; Zhao, Fang; Zhang, Lei; Pan, Mei; Fan, Yan-Zhong; Guo, Jing; Shi, Jianying; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2016-11-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a natural but challenging chemical way of harnessing renewable solar power to generate clean hydrogen energy. Here we report a potential hydrogen-evolving photochemical molecular device based on a self-assembled ruthenium-palladium heterometallic coordination cage, incorporating multiple photo- and catalytic metal centres. The photophysical properties are investigated by absorption/emission spectroscopy, electrochemical measurements and preliminary DFT calculations and the stepwise electron transfer processes from ruthenium-photocentres to catalytic palladium-centres is probed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. The photocatalytic hydrogen production assessments reveal an initial reaction rate of 380 μmol h-1 and a turnover number of 635 after 48 h. The efficient hydrogen production may derive from the directional electron transfers through multiple channels owing to proper organization of the photo- and catalytic multi-units within the octahedral cage, which may open a new door to design photochemical molecular devices with well-organized metallosupramolecules for homogenous photocatalytic applications.

  8. Efficient photothermal catalytic hydrogen production over nonplasmonic Pt metal supported on TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Rui; Luo, Bing; Jing, Dengwei

    2016-10-01

    Most of the traditional photocatalytic hydrogen productions were conducted under room temperature. In this work, we selected nonplasmonic Pt metal anchored on TiO2 nanoparticles with photothermal activity to explore more efficient hydrogen production technology over the whole solar spectrum. Photothermal experiments were carried out in a carefully designed top irradiated photocatalytic reactor that can withstand high temperature and relatively higher pressure. Four typical organic materials, i.e., methyl alcohol (MeOH), trielthanolamne (TEOA), formic acid (HCOOH) and glucose, were investigated. Formic acid, a typical hydrogen carrier, was found to show the best activity. In addition, the effects of different basic parameters such as sacrificial agent concentration and the temperature on the activity of hydrogen generation were systematically investigated for understanding the qualitative and quantitative effects of the photothermal catalytic reaction process. The hydrogen yields at 90 °C of the photothermal catalytic reaction with Pt/TiO2 are around 8.1 and 4.2 times higher than those of reactions carried out under photo or thermal conditions alone. We can see that the photothermal hydrogen yield is not the simple sum of the photo and thermal effects. This result indicated that the Pt/TiO2 nanoparticles can efficiently couple photo and thermal energy to more effectively drive hydrogen production. As a result, the excellent ability makes it superior to other conventional semiconductor photocatalysts and thermal catalysts. Future works could concentrate on exploring photothermal catalysis as well as the potential synergism between photo and thermal effects to find more efficient hydrogen production technology using the whole solar spectrum.

  9. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  10. System and process for production of magnesium metal and magnesium hydride from magnesium-containing salts and brines

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Peter B.; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Adint, Tyler T.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian

    2016-11-22

    A system and process are disclosed for production of consolidated magnesium metal products and alloys with selected densities from magnesium-containing salts and feedstocks. The system and process employ a dialkyl magnesium compound that decomposes to produce the Mg metal product. Energy requirements and production costs are lower than for conventional processing.

  11. Compressed Air System Overhaul Improves Production at a Powdered Metal Manufacturing Plant (GKN Sinter Metals in Salem, IN)

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-01

    In 1998, GKN Sinter Metals completed a successful compressed air system improvement project at its Salem, Indiana manufacturing facility. The project was performed after GKN undertook a survey of its system in order to solve air quality problems and to evaluate whether the capacity of their compressed air system would meet their anticipated plant expansion. Once the project was implemented, the plant was able to increase production by 31% without having to add any additional compressor capacity.

  12. Molecular identification of isolated fungi, microbial and heavy metal contamination of canned meat products sold in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Laila A.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown that canned meat products may be contaminated with fungal elements, bacteria and even heavy metals which may occur during the transportation, storage and handling processes. We conducted this study to determine the fungal, microbial and heavy metal contents of canned meats in Saudi Arabia. Of the 13 canned meat samples studied, Aspergillus and Penicillium were found in more than 70% of the total samples. Sequences of Penicillium species isolated from meat samples generated a phylogenetic tree which shows that the studied isolates were clustered in four groups. No bacterial contamination was noted in all of the samples. Nine of the 13 samples had iron concentrations above the permissible limit. All samples had zinc and copper levels below the maximum permissible limit. Four samples had cadmium levels above the maximum permissible level. All samples had levels of lead above the maximum permissible levels. These results indicate that fungal elements and higher levels of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium can be found in canned meat products. This may pose as a real danger to consumers, since canned meat products are readily accessible and convenient in Saudi Arabia. PMID:26288552

  13. Cellulolytic enzyme production and enzymatic hydrolysis for second-generation bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Li, Zhonghai; Fang, Xu; Wang, Lushan; Qu, Yinbo

    2012-01-01

    Second-generation bioethanol made from lignocellulosic biomass is considered one of the most promising biofuels. However, the enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose component to liberate glucose for ethanol fermentation is one of the major barriers for the process to be economically competitive because of the recalcitrance of feedstock. In this chapter, the progress on the understanding of the mechanisms of lignocellulose degradation, as well as the identification and optimization of fungal cellulases, cellulolytic strains, and cellulase production is reviewed. The physiologic functions and enzymatic mechanisms of two groups of enzymes involved in lignocellulose degradation, cellulases and hemicellulases, are discussed, and the synergism of the cellulase components during lignocellulose degradation is addressed. Furthermore, the methods for screening filamentous fungal strains capable of degrading lignocellulose are evaluated and the production of cellulases by these fungal strains is discussed. Aside from traditional mutagenesis for improving the secretion level and enzymatic activities of cellulases from filamentous fungal species, genetic engineering of strains and protein engineering on cellulase molecules are also highlighted.

  14. Integrated oil production and upgrading using molten alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2016-10-04

    A method that combines the oil retorting process (or other process needed to obtain/extract heavy oil or bitumen) with the process for upgrading these materials using sodium or other alkali metals. Specifically, the shale gas or other gases that are obtained from the retorting/extraction process may be introduced into the upgrading reactor and used to upgrade the oil feedstock. Also, the solid materials obtained from the reactor may be used as a fuel source, thereby providing the heat necessary for the retorting/extraction process. Other forms of integration are also disclosed.

  15. Semi-automatic simulation model generation of virtual dynamic networks for production flow planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenczyk, D.; Skolud, B.; Olender, M.

    2016-08-01

    Computer modelling, simulation and visualization of production flow allowing to increase the efficiency of production planning process in dynamic manufacturing networks. The use of the semi-automatic model generation concept based on parametric approach supporting processes of production planning is presented. The presented approach allows the use of simulation and visualization for verification of production plans and alternative topologies of manufacturing network configurations as well as with automatic generation of a series of production flow scenarios. Computational examples with the application of Enterprise Dynamics simulation software comprising the steps of production planning and control for manufacturing network have been also presented.

  16. A Low-Cost Production Method of FeSi2 Power Generation Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takahide; Kato, Masahiko; Yoneda, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    A method is proposed to reduce the production cost of power generation thermoelectric modules. FeSi2 is employed as the thermoelectric material because of its low cost, low environmental load, and oxidation resistance. The raw materials were prepared in the composition of Fe0.96Si2.1Co0.04 for n-type and Fe0.92Si2.1Mn0.08 for p-type, which were added with 0.5 wt.% Cu as the starting materials. They were sintered without pressure at 1446 K to be formed into elements. The Seebeck coefficient and resistivity at room temperature were determined to be -182 μV/K and 0.13 mΩm for n-type, and 338 μV/K and 1.13 mΩm for p-type, respectively. The brazing conditions of the direct joining between the element and the solder were examined. Pastes of BNi-6, BNi-7 or TB-608T were tried as the solder. TB-608T was useable for metallizing of insulation substrates and joining of thermoelectric elements in order to manufacture thermoelectric modules. The joining strength was determined to be 50 MPa between the alumina plate and the elements. No mechanical failure was observed in the modules after repetition of 10 or more exposures to a heat source of 670 K. No change was found in the internal resistance. The present production method will provide modules with high durability and low production cost, which will enable high-power multi-stage cascade modules at a reasonable cost.

  17. Trace metal concentration in different Indian tobacco products and related health implications.

    PubMed

    Verma, S; Yadav, S; Singh, I

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of seven heavy metals, viz. Cd, Ni, Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe and Zn were determined in 30 samples of various brands of five different tobacco product types easily available in Indian markets. Three product types cigarettes, cigars and biri (tobacco rolled in dry leaf and smoked without filter) are consumed by smoking while chewing tobacco and snuff are consumed by chewing and sniffing, respectively. The metal content showed smoking and non-smoking type, brand and element specific variations. In the non-smoking type, chewing tobacco samples contained more heavy metals compared to snuff samples. Biri showed minimum metal content compared to cigarettes and cigars among the smoking types. This could be due to the metal enrichment during both chemical and physical processing in finished product; biri being the most raw and cheap product. The intra brand variations also indicate the same as the processing technologies are exclusive and different for each brand. The results are nearly comparable to the existing data with limited exceptions. We suggest that the smoke and ash produced could be significant contributor to metal load in the soil, air and water systems in addition to the adverse human health effects via direct tobacco consumption.

  18. Complexes of earth-abundant metals for catalytic electrochemical hydrogen generation under aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Thoi, V Sara; Sun, Yujie; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2013-03-21

    Growing global energy demands and climate change motivate the development of new renewable energy technologies. In this context, water splitting using sustainable energy sources has emerged as an attractive process for carbon-neutral fuel cycles. A key scientific challenge to achieving this overall goal is the invention of new catalysts for the reductive and oxidative conversions of water to hydrogen and oxygen, respectively. This review article will highlight progress in molecular electrochemical approaches for catalytic reduction of protons to hydrogen, focusing on complexes of earth-abundant metals that can function in pure aqueous or mixed aqueous-organic media. The use of water as a reaction medium has dual benefits of maintaining high substrate concentration as well as minimizing the environmental impact from organic additives and by-products.

  19. Near Net Shape production of metal components using LENS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlienger, E.; Dimos, D.; Griffith, M.; Michael, J.; Oliver, M.; Romero, T.; Smugeresky, J.

    1998-03-01

    Rapid Prototyping and Near Net Shape manufacturing technologies are the subject of considerable attention and development efforts. At Sandia National Laboratories, one such effort is LENS (Laser Engineered Net Shaping). The LENS process utilizes a stream of powder and a focused Nd YAG laser to build near net shape fully dense metal parts. In this process, a 3-D solid model is sliced, then an X-Y table is rastered under the beam to build each slice. The laser 1 powder head is incremented upward with each slice and the deposition process is controlled via shuttering of the laser. At present, this process is capable of producing fully dense metal parts of iron, nickel and titanium alloys including tool steels and aluminides. Tungsten components have also been produced. A unique aspect of this process is the ability to produce components wherein the composition varies at differing locations in the part. Such compositional variations may be accomplished in either a stepped or graded fashion. In this paper, the details of the process will be described. The deposition mechanism will be characterized and microstructures and their associated properties will be discussed. Examples of parts which have been produced will be shown and issues regarding dimensional control and surface finish will be addressed.

  20. Evaluation of HWVP feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- Fiscal year 1993: Effect of noble metals concentration on offgas generation and ammonia formation

    SciTech Connect

    Patello, G.K.; Wiemers, K.D.; Bell, R.D.; Smith, H.D.; Williford, R.E.; Clemmer, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    The High-Level Waste Vitrification Program is developing technology for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic wastes as glass for permanent disposal. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting laboratory-scale melter feed preparation studies using a HWVP simulated waste slurry, Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW). A FY 1993 laboratory-scale study focused on the effects of noble metals (Pd, Rh, and Ru) on feed preparation offgas generation and NH{sub 3} production. The noble metals catalyze H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} production, which leads to safety concerns. The information gained from this study is intended to be used for technology development in pilot scale testing and design of the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility. Six laboratory-scale feed preparation tests were performed as part of the FY 1993 testing activities using nonradioactive NCAW simulant. Tests were performed with 10%, 25%, 50% of nominal noble metals content. Also tested were 25% of the nominal Rh and a repeat of 25% nominal noble metals. The results of the test activities are described. 6 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. OCCURRENCE OF A NEW GENERATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of disinfection by-product (DBP) occurrence in the United States was conducted at 12 drinking water treatment plants. In addition to currently regulated DBPs, more than 50 DBPs that rated a high priority for potential toxicity were studied. These priority DBPs included...

  2. OCCURRENCE OF A NEW GENERATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of disinfection by-product (DBP) occurrence in the United States was conducted at 12 drinking water treatment plants. In addition to currently regulated DBPs, more than 50 DBPs that rated a high priority for potential toxicity were studied. These priority DBPs included...

  3. Application of metal hydride paper to simple pressure generator for use in soft actuator systems.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Sakaki, Kouji; Hosono, Minako; Doi, Kouki; Shimada, Shigenobu; Chikai, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) actuators have a simple structure and a number of features that make them attractive for use in rehabilitation engineering and assistive technology. The MH actuator provides a high power-to-weight ratio, high-strain actuation, human-compatible softness, and noiseless operation, while being environmentally benign. On the other hand, there remain technical challenges to be overcome to improve the MH actuator regarding its speed of operation and energy efficiency, given the low heat conductivity of the MH powder that is used as the pressure generator for soft actuation. To overcome the issues of low heat conductivity and the handling of MH powder, we developed an MH paper, which is a special paper incorporating MH powder and carbon fiber, for use as a new pressure-generating element for a soft MH actuator system. In addition, the basic properties and structure of the proposed MH paper were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and several thermodynamic experiments. The results of these experiments showed that the hydrogen absorption and desorption rates of the MH paper were significantly higher than those of the MH powder around room temperature.

  4. Simulations and experiments of ejecta generation in twice-shocked metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkhanis, Varad; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Buttler, William; Hammerberg, James; Cherne, Frank; Andrews, Malcolm

    2016-11-01

    Using continuum hydrodynamics embedded in the FLASH code, we model ejecta generation in recent target experiments, where a metallic surface was loaded by two successive shock waves. The experimental data were obtained from a two-shockwave, high-explosive tool at Los Alamos National Laboratory, capable of generating ejecta from a shocked tin surface in to a vacuum. In both simulations and experiment, linear growth is observed following the first shock event, while the second shock strikes a finite-amplitude interface leading to nonlinear growth. The timing of the second incident shock was varied systematically in our simulations to realize a finite-amplitude re-initialization of the RM instability driving the ejecta. We find the shape of the interface at the event of second shock is critical in determining the amount of ejecta, and thus must be used as an initial condition to evaluate subsequent ejected mass using a source model. In particular, the agreement between simulations, experiments and the mass model is improved when shape effects associated with the interface at second shock are incorporated. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  5. Second harmonic generation in nanoscale films of transition metal dichalcogenide: Accounting for multipath interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Lavrov, S. D.; Shestakova, A. P.; Kulyuk, L. L.; Mishina, E. D.

    2016-09-01

    The transfer matrix method has been widely used to calculate wave propagation through the layered structures consisting entirely of either linear or nonlinear optical materials. In the present work, we develop the transfer matrix method for structures consisting of alternating layers of linear and nonlinear optical materials. The result is presented in a form that allows one to directly substitute the values of material constants, refractive index and absorption coefficient, into the expressions describing the second harmonic generation (SHG) field. The model is applied to the calculation of second harmonic (SH) field generated in nano-thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides exfoliated on top of silicon oxide/silicon Fabry-Perot cavity. These structures are intensively studied both in view of their unique properties and perspective applications. A good agreement between experimental and numerical results can be achieved by small modification of optical constants, which may arise in an experiment due to a strong electric field of an incident focused pump laser beam. By considering the SHG effect, this paper completes the series of works describing the role of Fabry-Perot cavity in different optical effects (optical reflection, photoluminescence and Raman scattering) in 2D semiconductors that is extremely important for characterization of these unique materials.

  6. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominguez, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a Joule-heated (sometimes called 'self-heating') reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. Solutions obtained by multiphysics modeling allow the identification of the critical dimensions of concept reactors.

  7. Immobilizer-assisted management of metal-contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Park, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Min-Suk; Owens, Gary; Youn, Gyu-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Su

    2012-07-15

    Production of food crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils is of concern because consumers are potentially exposed to hazardous metals via dietary intake of such crops or crop derived products. Therefore, the current study was conducted to develop management protocols for crop cultivation to allow safer food production. Metal uptake, as influenced by pH change-induced immobilizing agents (dolomite, steel slag, and agricultural lime) and sorption agents (zeolite and compost), was monitored in three common plants representative of leafy (Chinese cabbage), root (spring onion) and fruit (red pepper) vegetables, in a field experiment. The efficiency of the immobilizing agents was assessed by their ability to decrease the phytoavailability of metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn). The fruit vegetable (red pepper) showed the least accumulation of Cd (0.16-0.29 mgkg(-1) DW) and Pb (0.2-0.9 mgkg(-1) DW) in edible parts regardless of treatment, indicating selection of low metal accumulating crops was a reasonable strategy for safer food production. However, safer food production was more likely to be achievable by combining crop selection with immobilizing agent amendment of soils. Among the immobilizing agents, pH change-induced immobilizers were more effective than sorption agents, showing decreases in Cd and Pb concentrations in each plant well below standard limits. The efficiency of pH change-induced immobilizers was also comparable to reductions obtained by 'clean soil cover' where the total metal concentrations of the plow layer was reduced via capping the surface with uncontaminated soil, implying that pH change-induced immobilizers can be practically applied to metal contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

  8. Diagnostics for Characterization of Combustion Products and Heavy Metal Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hansheng

    Seeking a more efficient coal combustion system that produces less pollution is an important task. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the on-line diagnostic techniques to monitor the efficiency and the metal material in a coal combustion system. For a combustion process, the stoichiometry ( Phi ) is an important parameter. The condition where Phi < 1 represents incomplete combustion, which reduces the temperature and efficiency. Besides water and rm CO_2, toxic species such as CO, rm CH_4, and rm NO_{x} will be produced. In most cases, complete combustion (Phi = 1) is expected. However, in MHD power plant, the primary combustor is operated at a fuel rich level (0.80 < Phi < 0.95) to decompose rm NO_{x}. Then, secondary combustion is employed. In either case, an accurate measurement of combustion efficiency, which relates to the stoichiometry, is required for efficient combustion operation. Aside from coal combustion efficiency, knowledge of the composition of entrained coal and mineral matter particles in the reaction's combustion stream is also important for minimizing the environmental impact of coal combustion driven facilities. To understand the presence, transport, and deposition of the trace pollutants, such as metals and metallic oxides within the combustion system and to control the consequential release of toxic material into the environment, the on-line detection of these species is desired. The present project will study the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as two on-line diagnostic methods for coal combustion. FTIR absorption and emission spectra measurements have been conducted on a 500 kW MHD simulation facility. The analysis of these spectra results in rm CO_2 and CO concentrations and, consequently, combustion efficiencies. Temperature profiles of the gas flow are also obtained. The research of LIBS was started in the laboratory on an aerosol or particle injected flame. In

  9. Synthesis, quality control and determination of metallic impurities in (18)F-fludeoxyglucose production process.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Krzysztof; Chabecki, Bartłomiej; Kiec, Justyna; Kunka, Agnieszka; Panas, Barbara; Wójcik, Maciej; Pękal, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize (18)FDG in some consecutive runs and check the quality of manufactured radiopharmaceuticals and to determine the distribution of metallic impurities in the synthesis process. For radiopharmaceuticals the general requirements are listed in European Pharmacopeia and these parameters have to be checked before application for human use. Standard methods for the determination of basic characteristics of radiopharmaceuticals were used. Additionally, high resolution γ spectrometry was used for the assessment of nuclidic purity and inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometry to evaluate metallic content. Results showed sources and distribution of metallic and radiometallic impurities in the production process. Main part is trapped in the initial separation column of the synthesis unit and is not distributed to the final product in significant amounts. Produced (18)FDG filled requirements of Ph.Eur. and the content of radionuclidic and metallic impurities was in the acceptable range.

  10. Facility for generating crew waste water product for ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buitekant, Alan; Roberts, Barry C.

    1990-01-01

    An End-use Equipment Facility (EEF) has been constructed which is used to simulate water interfaces between the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and man systems. The EEF is used to generate waste water to be treated by ECLSS water recovery systems. The EEF will also be used to close the water recovery loop by allowing test subjects to use recovered hygiene and potable water during several phases of testing. This paper describes the design and basic operation of the EEF.

  11. Facility for generating crew waste water product for ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buitekant, Alan; Roberts, Barry C.

    1990-01-01

    An End-use Equipment Facility (EEF) has been constructed which is used to simulate water interfaces between the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and man systems. The EEF is used to generate waste water to be treated by ECLSS water recovery systems. The EEF will also be used to close the water recovery loop by allowing test subjects to use recovered hygiene and potable water during several phases of testing. This paper describes the design and basic operation of the EEF.

  12. Lignocellulosic agriculture wastes as biomass feedstocks for second-generation bioethanol production: concepts and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jitendra Kumar; Saini, Reetu; Tewari, Lakshmi

    2015-08-01

    Production of liquid biofuels, such as bioethanol, has been advocated as a sustainable option to tackle the problems associated with rising crude oil prices, global warming and diminishing petroleum reserves. Second-generation bioethanol is produced from lignocellulosic feedstock by its saccharification, followed by microbial fermentation and product recovery. Agricultural residues generated as wastes during or after processing of agricultural crops are one of such renewable and lignocellulose-rich biomass resources available in huge amounts for bioethanol production. These agricultural residues are converted to bioethanol in several steps which are described here. This review enlightens various steps involved in production of the second-generation bioethanol. Mechanisms and recent advances in pretreatment, cellulases production and second-generation ethanol production processes are described here.

  13. Non-Noble-Metal Nanoparticle Supported on Metal-Organic Framework as an Efficient and Durable Catalyst for Promoting H2 Production from Ammonia Borane under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Meicheng; Cui, Yiwen; Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Mori, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-08-24

    In this work, we propose a straightforward method to enhance the catalytic activity of AB dehydrogenation by using non-noble-metal nanoparticle supported on chromium-based metal-organic framework (MIL-101). It was demonstrated to be effective for hydrogen generation from ammonia borane under assistance of visible light irradiation as a noble-metal-free catalyst. The catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles supported on MIL-101 under visible light irradiation is remarkably higher than that without light irradiation. The TOFs of Cu/MIL-101, Co/MIL-101, and Ni/MIL-101 are 1693, 1571, and 3238 h(-1), respectively. The enhanced activity of catalysts can be primarily attributed to the cooperative promoting effects from both non-noble-metal nanoparticles and photoactive metal-organic framework in activating the ammonia borane molecule and strong ability in the photocatalytic production of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions, and electron-rich non-noble-metal nanoparticle. This work sheds light on the exploration of active non-noble metals supported on photoactive porous materials for achieving high catalytic activity of various redox reactions under visible light irradiation.

  14. In situ-generated metal oxide catalyst during CO oxidation reaction transformed from redox-active metal-organic framework-supported palladium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of redox-active metal-organic framework (ra-MOF)-supported Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via the redox couple-driven method is reported, which can yield unprotected metallic NPs at room temperature within 10 min without the use of reducing agents. The Pd@ra-MOF has been exploited as a precursor of an active catalyst for CO oxidation. Under the CO oxidation reaction condition, Pd@ra-MOF is transformed into a PdOx-NiOy/C nanocomposite to generate catalytically active species in situ, and the resultant nanocatalyst shows sustainable activity through synergistic stabilization. PMID:22898143

  15. Theoretical analysis of hard x-ray generation by nonperturbative interaction of ultrashort light pulses with a metal

    PubMed Central

    Weisshaupt, Jannick; Juvé, Vincent; Holtz, Marcel; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of intense femtosecond pulses with metals allows for generating ultrashort hard x-rays. In contrast to plasma theories, tunneling from the target into vacuum is introduced as electron generation step, followed by vacuum acceleration in the laser field and re-entrance into the target to generate characteristic x-rays and Bremsstrahlung. For negligible space charge in vacuum, the Kα flux is proportional to the incident intensity and the wavelength squared, suggesting a strong enhancement of the x-ray flux by mid-infrared driving pulses. This prediction is in quantitative agreement with experiments on femtosecond Cu Kα generation. PMID:26798790

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of product distributions and contained metal estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of product distributions of two factors was simulated by conventional Monte Carlo techniques using factor distributions that were independent (uncorrelated). Several simulations using uniform distributions of factors show that the product distribution has a central peak approximately centered at the product of the medians of the factor distributions. Factor distributions that are peaked, such as Gaussian (normal) produce an even more peaked product distribution. Piecewise analytic solutions can be obtained for independent factor distributions and yield insight into the properties of the product distribution. As an example, porphyry copper grades and tonnages are now available in at least one public database and their distributions were analyzed. Although both grade and tonnage can be approximated with lognormal distributions, they are not exactly fit by them. The grade shows some nonlinear correlation with tonnage for the published database. Sampling by deposit from available databases of grade, tonnage, and geological details of each deposit specifies both grade and tonnage for that deposit. Any correlation between grade and tonnage is then preserved and the observed distribution of grades and tonnages can be used with no assumption of distribution form.

  17. Transition metals in legume root nodules: iron-dependent free radical production increases during nodule senescence.

    PubMed Central

    Becana, M; Klucas, R V

    1992-01-01

    The cytosol from root nodules of soybean, bean, and cowpea contained Fe and Cu capable of catalyzing the formation of highly reactive free radicals. Specific and sensitive assays based on free radical-mediated DNA degradation revealed that most catalytic Fe and Cu were present as small chelates (300-600 Da). The involvement of catalytic Fe in free radical production during nodule senescence, which was induced by exposure of plants to continuous darkness for 2-4 days, was investigated. (i) Free heme remained at a constant and low concentration (1-4% of total nodule heme) during senescence, indicating that it is not an important constituent of the catalytic Fe pool of nodules. (ii) Catalytic Fe of nodule cytosol promoted deoxyribose degradation and linolenic acid peroxidation in reaction mixtures containing physiological concentrations of ascorbate and H2O2. Deoxyribose degradation but not lipid peroxidation required hydroxyl radicals to proceed. (iii) The cytosol from senescent nodules, particularly of bean and cowpea, sustained in vitro higher rates of deoxyribose degradation and lipid peroxidation than the cytosol from unstressed nodules. Both degradative processes were inhibited by the Fe chelator desferrioxamine and were correlated with the content of catalytic Fe in the nodule cytosol. (iv) Although other transition metals (Cu, Mn, Mo, and Ni) were present in significant amounts in the low molecular mass fraction (<3 kDa) of the nodule cytosol, Fe is most likely the only metal involved in free radical generation in vivo. (v) By using dimethyl sulfoxide as a molecular probe, formation of significant amounts of hydroxyl radical was observed in vivo during senescence of bean and cowpea nodules. Images PMID:11607326

  18. Production of Dry Powder Clots Using Piezoelectric Drop Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric R

    2002-09-05

    We have demonstrated that piezoelectrically driven, squeeze mode, tubular reservoir liquid drop generation, originally developed as a ''drop-on-demand'' method for ejection of microdrops of pure liquid or liquid suspensions of powdered bulk materials, can successfully operate with dry powder. Spherical silver powder with maximum particle diameter of 20 {micro}m (-635 mesh) was loaded into and ejected from a 100 {micro}m orifice glass dropper with flat piezoelectric disk driver. Time of flight experiments were performed to optimize the dropper operation parameters and to determine the size and velocity of the ejected particles. It was found that at certain values of the amplitude, duration, and repetition rate of the voltage pulses applied to the dropper piezoelectric disk, one can produce ejection of powder clots of a stable size, comparable with the dropper orifice diameter. In contrast to the dropper operation with a liquid, in the case of silver powder, a clot is not ejected at each high voltage pulse, but quasi-periodically with an interval corresponding to thousands of pulses. The application of the dry powder clot generation technique for injection of atoms into helium buffer gas at cryogenic temperatures is discussed.

  19. Dye-sensitized MIL-101 metal organic frameworks loaded with Ni/NiO{sub x} nanoparticles for efficient visible-light-driven hydrogen generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin-Ling; Wang, Rong; Yuan, Yu-Peng E-mail: cxue@ntu.edu.sg; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Xue, Can E-mail: cxue@ntu.edu.sg

    2015-10-01

    The Ni/NiO{sub x} particles were in situ photodeposited on MIL-101 metal organic frameworks as catalysts for boosting H{sub 2} generation from Erythrosin B dye sensitization under visible-light irradiation. The highest H{sub 2} production rate of 125 μmol h{sup −1} was achieved from the system containing 5 wt. % Ni-loaded MIL-101 (20 mg) and 30 mg Erythrosin B dye. Moreover, the Ni/NiO{sub x} catalysts show excellent stability for long-term photocatalytic reaction. The enhancement on H{sub 2} generation is attributed to the efficient charge transfer from photoexcited dye to the Ni catalyst via MIL-101. Our results demonstrate that the economical Ni/NiO{sub x} particles are durable and active catalysts for photocatalytic H{sub 2} generation.

  20. Dye-sensitized MIL-101 metal organic frameworks loaded with Ni/NiOx nanoparticles for efficient visible-light-driven hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Ling; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Yuan, Yu-Peng; Xue, Can

    2015-10-01

    The Ni/NiOx particles were in situ photodeposited on MIL-101 metal organic frameworks as catalysts for boosting H2 generation from Erythrosin B dye sensitization under visible-light irradiation. The highest H2 production rate of 125 μmol h-1 was achieved from the system containing 5 wt. % Ni-loaded MIL-101 (20 mg) and 30 mg Erythrosin B dye. Moreover, the Ni/NiOx catalysts show excellent stability for long-term photocatalytic reaction. The enhancement on H2 generation is attributed to the efficient charge transfer from photoexcited dye to the Ni catalyst via MIL-101. Our results demonstrate that the economical Ni/NiOx particles are durable and active catalysts for photocatalytic H2 generation.