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Sample records for generation sfq vibrational

  1. A Report on Stochastic Fairness Queueing (SFQ) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denny, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed an improved queueing algorithm, known as Stochastic Fairness Queueing (SFQ), for best-effort traffic (i.e., traffic that does not require any guaranteed service). SFQ is a probablistic variant of strict fair queueing where instead of a single queue being allocated per flow, a fixed number of queues are used and a hash function maps the IP source and destination to a particular queue. A seed to the hash function is also perturbed occasionally to help distribute the flows amongst different queues when more than one flow maps to the same queue during the lifetime of the flow. SFQ provides 'fair' access by trying to ensure that each flow from source to destination host obtains equal access to the available bandwidth. This report covers a series of experiments performed on DARTnet evaluating the behavior and performance of SFQ against a FIFO queueing discipline. These experiments were designed to show SFQ's advantages and performance, and include tests demonstrating: Fair utilization of available resources; Starvation prevention; Graceful degradation under overload conditions; and Resource usage. In general, the experiments do show that SFQ is better than FIFO queueing at allocating bandwidth equally among a set of flows. SFQ also prevents a stream from dominating the available bandwidth, which seems to be a tendency with FIFO queueing (i.e., if a flow demands more than its share of the available bandwidth, with FIFO queueing that stream receives a disproportionate amount when compared to flows demanding less than their share). Furthermore, SFQ seems to reward 'nice' users of the network by providing a lower variance in delay and more throughput when their resource demand is less than their available share. Both SFQ and FIFO queueing seem to degrade fairly well as the network becomes saturated and to recover well as the network becomes less congested. Not unexpectedly, FIFO queueing is a little more efficient than SFQ-the delays are

  2. Design and Demonstration of a 4×4 SFQ Network Switch Prototype System and 10-Gbps Bit-Error-Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Yoshihito; Yorozu, Shinichi

    We developed a 4×4 SFQ network switch prototype system and demonstrated its operation at 10Gbps. The system's core is composed of two SFQ chips: a 4×4 switch and a 6-channel voltage driver. The 4×4 switch chip contained both a switch fabric (i. e. a data path) and a switch scheduler (i. e. a controller). Both chips were attached to a multichip-module (MCM) carrier, which was then installed in a cryocooled system with 32 10-Gbps ports. Each chip contained about 2100 Josephson junctions on a 5-mm×5-mm die. An NEC standard 2.5-kA/cm2 fabrication process was used for the switch chip. We increased the critical current density to 10kA/cm2 for the driver chip to improve speed while maintaining wide bias margins. MCM implementation enabled us to use a hybrid critical current density technology. Voltage pulses were transferred between two chips through passive transmission lines on the MCM carrier. The cryocooled system was cooled down to about 4K using a two-stage 1-W cryocooler. We correctly operated the whole system at 10Gbps. The switch scheduler, which is driven by an on-chip clock generator, operated at 40GHz. The speed gap between SFQ and room temperature devices was filled by on-chip SFQ FIFO buffers or shift registers. We measured the bit error rate at 10Gbps and found that it was on the order of 10-13 for the 4×4 SFQ switch fabric. In addition, using semiconductor interface circuitry, we built a four-port SFQ Ethernet switch. All the components except for a compressor were installed in a standard 19-inch rack, filling a space 21 U (933.5mm or 36.75 inches) in height. After four personal computers (PCs) were connected to the switch, we have successfully transferred video data between them.

  3. Operation of high- Tc SFQ devices at near liquid nitrogen temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kang, J. H.; Lee, J. M.; Hahn, T. S.; Choi, S. S.; Park, S. J.

    1997-02-01

    As the operating temperature of the SFQ logic circuits gets higher by using high- Tc superconductors, the effect of noise on switching a Josephson junction to the voltage state becomes more important. In this paper, we report our work on high- Tc SFQ RS flip-flop which was made with YBCO thin film deposited on a SrTiO 3 bi-crystal. The circuit operated correctly at 71 K over the 200 computer-generated clock cycles without making errors, where a reset or a set operation was made over one clock cycle. Good agreement between the measured data and the calculation based on the thermal activation theory was obtained. The effective noise temperature used to fit the data was much higher than the physical temperature. This could be due to the instrument noise. Improvement in the measurement set-up might reduce the effective noise temperature. Also our measurement results indicate that the elevation of the operating temperature near the liquid nitrogen temperature may not affect the margin of the circuit.

  4. Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-11-28

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

  5. Multireflection sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-18

    We developed a multireflection data collection method in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, which we refer to as multireflection SFG, or MRSFG for short. To achieve MRSFG, a collinear laser beam propagation geometry was adopted and trapezoidal Dove prisms were used as sample substrates. An in-depth discussion on the signal and SNR in MRSFG was performed. We showed experimentally, with "m" total internal reflections in a Dove prism, MRSFG signal is ∼m times that of conventional SFG; SNR of the SFG signal-to-background is improved by a factor of >m(1/2) and vibrational signals. Surface molecular structures of adsorbed ethanol molecules, polymer films, and a lipid monolayer were characterized using both MRSFG and conventional SFG. Molecular orientation information on lipid molecules with a 9% composition in a mixed monolayer was measured using MRSFG, which showed a good agreement with that derived from 100% lipid surface coverage using conventional SFG. MRSFG can both improve the spectral quality and detection limit of SFG spectroscopy and is expected to have important applications in surface science for studying structures of molecules with a low surface coverage or less ordered molecular moieties. PMID:26176565

  6. Dynamic Loads Generation for Multi-Point Vibration Excitation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    A random-force method has been developed to predict dynamic loads produced by rocket-engine random vibrations for new rocket-engine designs. The method develops random forces at multiple excitation points based on random vibration environments scaled from accelerometer data obtained during hot-fire tests of existing rocket engines. This random-force method applies random forces to the model and creates expected dynamic response in a manner that simulates the way the operating engine applies self-generated random vibration forces (random pressure acting on an area) with the resulting responses that we measure with accelerometers. This innovation includes the methodology (implementation sequence), the computer code, two methods to generate the random-force vibration spectra, and two methods to reduce some of the inherent conservatism in the dynamic loads. This methodology would be implemented to generate the random-force spectra at excitation nodes without requiring the use of artificial boundary conditions in a finite element model. More accurate random dynamic loads than those predicted by current industry methods can then be generated using the random force spectra. The scaling method used to develop the initial power spectral density (PSD) environments for deriving the random forces for the rocket engine case is based on the Barrett Criteria developed at Marshall Space Flight Center in 1963. This invention approach can be applied in the aerospace, automotive, and other industries to obtain reliable dynamic loads and responses from a finite element model for any structure subject to multipoint random vibration excitations.

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of vibration, generated by monorail trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Samuil A.; Makhortykh, Sergey A.; Kostarev, Stanislav A.

    2002-11-01

    Monorail transport as all other city transport vehicles is the source of high noise and vibration levels. It is less widespread than cars or underground transport but its influence in modern cities enhances. Now in Moscow the first monorail road with trains on tires is designed, therefore the problem of vibration and noise assessments and prediction of its impact on the residential region appears. To assess the levels of generated vibration a physical model of interaction in the system wagon-tire-road coating-viaduct-soil has been proposed and then numerically analyzed. The model is based on the known from publications facts of automobile transport vibration and our own practice concerning underground trains vibration generation. To verify computer simulation results and adjust model parameters the series of measurements of noise and vibration near experimental monorail road was carried out. In the report the results of calculations and measurements will be presented and some outcomes of possible acoustical ecologic situation near monorail roads will be proposed.

  8. Capacitance-Based Frequency Adjustment of Micro Piezoelectric Vibration Generator

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinhua; He, Qing; Li, Hong; Chu, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Micro piezoelectric vibration generator has a wide application in the field of microelectronics. Its natural frequency is unchanged after being manufactured. However, resonance cannot occur when the natural frequencies of a piezoelectric generator and the source of vibration frequency are not consistent. Output voltage of the piezoelectric generator will sharply decline. It cannot normally supply power for electronic devices. In order to make the natural frequency of the generator approach the frequency of vibration source, the capacitance FM technology is adopted in this paper. Different capacitance FM schemes are designed by different locations of the adjustment layer. The corresponding capacitance FM models have been established. Characteristic and effect of the capacitance FM have been simulated by the FM model. Experimental results show that the natural frequency of the generator could vary from 46.5 Hz to 42.4 Hz when the bypass capacitance value increases from 0 nF to 30 nF. The natural frequency of a piezoelectric vibration generator could be continuously adjusted by this method. PMID:25133237

  9. Capacitance-based frequency adjustment of micro piezoelectric vibration generator.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinhua; He, Qing; Li, Hong; Chu, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Micro piezoelectric vibration generator has a wide application in the field of microelectronics. Its natural frequency is unchanged after being manufactured. However, resonance cannot occur when the natural frequencies of a piezoelectric generator and the source of vibration frequency are not consistent. Output voltage of the piezoelectric generator will sharply decline. It cannot normally supply power for electronic devices. In order to make the natural frequency of the generator approach the frequency of vibration source, the capacitance FM technology is adopted in this paper. Different capacitance FM schemes are designed by different locations of the adjustment layer. The corresponding capacitance FM models have been established. Characteristic and effect of the capacitance FM have been simulated by the FM model. Experimental results show that the natural frequency of the generator could vary from 46.5 Hz to 42.4 Hz when the bypass capacitance value increases from 0 nF to 30 nF. The natural frequency of a piezoelectric vibration generator could be continuously adjusted by this method.

  10. High-speed test of SFQ-shift register files using PTL wiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Yamashiro, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.; Hashimoto, Y.; Yorozu, S.; Terai, H.; Fujimaki, A.

    2004-10-01

    We have been developing an SFQ shift register memory, which is one candidate to realize high-throughput and high-density superconductive memories. We have modified our memory architecture in order to adapt it to our SFQ microprocessor, CORE1. The new version of the shift register memory is composed of shift registers with non-destructive readout operation, which have an internal feedback. We have also studied the availability of passive transmission line (PTL) wiring in the memory system at high speed. The tested circuit is a 4-byte shift register file, where four kinds of wiring circuits are used between a decoder and shift registers. We have measured the dependences of the DC bias margin on the operating frequency for all wiring methods, and obtained almost the same dependences, which shows the availability of the PTL wiring in the memory system. We have used the NEC 2.5 kA/cm 2 Nb standard process and the CONNECT cell library.

  11. Interferometric vibration sensor using phase-generated carrier method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Liu, Yan; Ma, Lin; Tan, Zhongwei; Jian, Shuisheng

    2013-09-01

    An interferometric fiber-optic vibration sensing system using the phase-generated carrier (PGC) method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensing section consists of a Sagnac interferometer combined with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a length of sensing fiber is shared between the two interferometers. The PGC demodulation scheme is used to demodulate the time-varying phase shifts induced by vibrations. Spatial information can be extracted from the demodulated results. A prototype sensing system with a 628 m long sensing fiber has been tested and a spatial resolution better than 12 m is successfully achieved.

  12. Vibration damage mechanism analysis on rotor of diesel generating set with rigid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Shi, Weizhen; Hua, Chunrong; Liu, Jingming; Dong, Dawei; Chen, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The crankshaft output end is generally connected with generator rotor through the coupling in diesel generating set. When using rigid coupling, the attachments and connecting parts of generator rotor (especially at larger gyration radius) are vulnerable to fatigue damage even if the vibration level of the generating set does not exceed the acceptable “usual value”. In order to investigate the reasons, the torsional vibration of the rotor in the diesel generating set was calculated and measured in this paper, which shows that using high rigidity coupling would result in large torsional vibration on the generator rotor, and that the linear vibration (the tangential vibration) value induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius of generator motor is almost the same as the vibration level of the generating set. Then, the vibration level of generating set was obtained, and the maximum vibration velocities of the generator are below the permissible value regulated by ISO 8528-9. But the velocities of synthetic vibration of the generating set vibration and the linear vibration induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius are much higher than permissible value 2(28mm/s) regulated by ISO 8528-9, which may be the reason of the mechanical damage of the attachments and connecting parts at larger gyration radius of generator motor caused by exceeded vibration.

  13. Study of micro piezoelectric vibration generator with added mass and capacitance suitable for broadband vibration

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qing Mao, Xinhua Chu, Dongliang

    2015-07-15

    This study proposes an optimized frequency adjustment method that uses a micro-cantilever beam-based piezoelectric vibration generator based on a combination of added mass and capacitance. The most important concept of the proposed method is that the frequency adjustment process is divided into two steps: the first is a rough adjustment step that changes the size of the mass added at the end of cantilever to adjust the frequency in a large-scale and discontinuous manner; the second step is a continuous but short-range frequency adjustment via the adjustable added capacitance. Experimental results show that when the initial natural frequency of a micro piezoelectric vibration generator is 69.8 Hz, then this natural frequency can be adjusted to any value in the range from 54.2 Hz to 42.1 Hz using the combination of the added mass and the capacitance. This method simply and effectively matches a piezoelectric vibration generator’s natural frequency to the vibration source frequency.

  14. Vibration power generator for a linear MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan

    2010-10-01

    The paper describes the structure and the results of numerical calculations and experimental tests of a newly developed vibration power generator for a linear magnetorheological (MR) damper. The generator consists of permanent magnets and coil with foil winding. The device produces electrical energy according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. This energy is applied to vary the damping characteristics of the MR damper attached to the generator by the input current produced by the device. The objective of the numerical calculations was to determine the magnetic field distribution in the generator as well as the electric potential and current density in the generator's coil during the idle run and under the load applied to the MR damper control coil. The results of the calculations were used during the design and manufacturing stages of the device. The objective of the experimental tests carried out on a dynamic testing machine was to evaluate the generator's efficiency and to compare the experimental and predicted data. The experimental results demonstrate that the engineered device enables a change in the kinetic energy of the reciprocal motion of the MR damper which leads to variations in the damping characteristics. That is why the generator may be used to build up MR damper based vibration control systems which require no external power.

  15. Virtual Reality of Sound Generated from Vibrating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S. J.; SONG, J. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The advancement of virtual reality (VR) technology in cyberspace is amazing, but its development is mainly concentrated on the visual part. In this paper, the development of VR technology to produce sound based on the exact physics is studied. Our main concern is on the sound generated from vibrating structures. This may be useful, for example, in apprehending sound field characteristics of an aircraft cabin in design stage. To calculate sound pressure from curved surface of a structure, a new integration scheme is developed in boundary element method. Several example problems are solved to confirm our integration scheme. The pressure distributions on a uniformly driven sphere and cylinders are computed and compared with analytic solutions, and radiation efficiency of a vibrating plate under one-dimensional flow is also calculated. Also, to realize sound through computer simulation, two concepts, "structure-oriented analysis" and "human-oriented analysis", are proposed. Using these concepts, virtual sound field of an aircraft cabin is created.

  16. Generation of Vibrationally Excited HCP from a Stable Synthetic Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Alexander W.; Jiang, Jun; Erickson, Trevor J.; Womack, Carrie; Nava, Matthew; Cummins, Christopher; Field, Robert W.

    2015-06-01

    HCP belongs to a class of reactive small molecules with much interest to spectroscopists. It bears certain similarities to HCN, including a strong {A}(bent) - {X}(linear) ultraviolet transition, associated with the HCP-HPC isomerization pathway. HCP has traditionally been generated by the in situ reaction of PH_3 and acetylene. In this talk, we will discuss a recently developed synthetic precursor molecule, 1,1-((triphenylphosphoranylidene)methyl)-9,10-phosphanoanthracene. At temperatures above 200 degrees Celsius, this precursor is thought to release HCP in a vibrationally excited state. We will present preliminary spectra on this system obtained by LIF and chirped pulse millimeter wave spectroscopy.

  17. A multiple scales approach to sound generation by vibrating bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, James F.; Pope, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of determining the acoustic field in an inviscid, isentropic fluid generated by a solid body whose surface executes prescribed vibrations is formulated and solved as a multiple scales perturbation problem, using the Mach number M based on the maximum surface velocity as the perturbation parameter. Following the idea of multiple scales, new 'slow' spacial scales are introduced, which are defined as the usual physical spacial scale multiplied by powers of M. The governing nonlinear differential equations lead to a sequence of linear problems for the perturbation coefficient functions. However, it is shown that the higher order perturbation functions obtained in this manner will dominate the lower order solutions unless their dependence on the slow spacial scales is chosen in a certain manner. In particular, it is shown that the perturbation functions must satisfy an equation similar to Burgers' equation, with a slow spacial scale playing the role of the time-like variable. The method is illustrated by a simple one-dimenstional example, as well as by three different cases of a vibrating sphere. The results are compared with solutions obtained by purely numerical methods and some insights provided by the perturbation approach are discussed.

  18. Analysis of heat generation using ultrasonic vibration for post removal.

    PubMed

    Dominici, John T; Clark, Stephen; Scheetz, James; Eleazer, Paul D

    2005-04-01

    This study measured the temperature of the root surface and post during the application of ultrasonic vibration to cemented posts to simulate post removal procedure. Root canal therapy was performed on ten extracted maxillary incisors. A stainless steel Parapost was cemented into each prepared post space. Ultrasonic vibration was applied to the post and temperatures were recorded at the coronal post and the cervical root surface. Data were analyzed with ANOVA using the independent variables of (a) time of ultrasonic application (15, 30, 45 and 60 s) and 2) location (post and root surface). Greater temperature increase was observed at the post (52.6 degrees C, SD 11.1; 82.6 degrees C, SD 20.1; 111.0 degrees C, SD 29.1; 125.3 degrees C, SD 33.2) compared to the root surface (9.5 degrees C, SD 4.6; 17.5 degrees C, SD 4.8; 25.4 degrees C, SD 7.3; 32.2 degrees C, SD 8.1) for each time period, P < 0.001. Ultrasonic application to the post for longer than 15 s generates high temperature on the root surface.

  19. Investigating buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the studies of buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Both buried solid/liquid and solid/solid interfaces involving polymeric materials are discussed. SFG studies of polymer/water interfaces show that different polymers exhibit varied surface restructuring behavior in water, indicating the importance of probing polymer/water interfaces in situ. SFG has also been applied to the investigation of interfaces between polymers and other liquids. It has been found that molecular interactions at such polymer/liquid interfaces dictate interfacial polymer structures. The molecular structures of silane molecules, which are widely used as adhesion promoters, have been investigated using SFG at buried polymer/silane and polymer/polymer interfaces, providing molecular-level understanding of polymer adhesion promotion. The molecular structures of polymer/solid interfaces have been examined using SFG with several different experimental geometries. These results have provided molecular-level information about polymer friction, adhesion, interfacial chemical reactions, interfacial electronic properties, and the structure of layer-by-layer deposited polymers. Such research has demonstrated that SFG is a powerful tool to probe buried interfaces involving polymeric materials, which are difficult to study by conventional surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:21113334

  20. Automatic Generation of Analytic Equations for Vibrational and Rovibrational Constants from Fourth-Order Vibrational Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.; Stanton, John F.

    2014-06-01

    The derivation of analytic expressions for vibrational and rovibrational constants, for example the anharmonicity constants χij and the vibration-rotation interaction constants α^B_r, from second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) can be accomplished with pen and paper and some practice. However, the corresponding quantities from fourth-order perturbation theory (VPT4) are considerably more complex, with the only known derivations by hand extensively using many layers of complicated intermediates and for rotational quantities requiring specialization to orthorhombic cases or the form of Watson's reduced Hamiltonian. We present an automatic computer program for generating these expressions with full generality based on the adaptation of an existing numerical program based on the sum-over-states representation of the energy to a computer algebra context. The measures taken to produce well-simplified and factored expressions in an efficient manner are discussed, as well as the framework for automatically checking the correctness of the generated equations.

  1. Ground vibration generated by trains in underground tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, J. A.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2006-07-01

    A popular method used to reduce vibration transmitted from underground railways into nearby buildings is floating-slab track, whereby a concrete slab supporting the two rails is mounted on rubber bearings or steel springs to isolate it from the tunnel invert. This paper adds a track model to a previously developed three-dimensional tunnel model in order to assess the effectiveness of floating-slab track. A slab beam coupled to the tunnel in the wavenumber domain, with the slab bearings represented by an elastic layer, is examined first. A second beam representing the two rails together is then coupled to the slab, and axle masses representing a train are added to the rail beam. Power-spectral densities and RMS levels of soil vibration due to random roughness-displacement excitation between the masses and the rail beam are calculated. Analytical techniques are used to minimise the computational requirements of the model. The results demonstrate the inadequacy of simple mass-spring and Winkler-beam models with rigid foundations for the assessment of the vibration-isolation performance of railway track. They suggest that the achievable insertion loss is modest and that floating the track slab may in fact cause increased transmission of vibration under certain conditions.

  2. U-shape magnetostrictive vibration based power generator for universal use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, T.

    2016-04-01

    Vibrational power generator extracts electrical energy from ambient vibration. Author invented novel configuration using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beams of iron-gallium alloy and magnetic material, and features high efficiency, high robustness, and low electrical impedance. In this paper, author proposes U-shape generator for universal use. It consists of the parallel beams and fixed and free end beams forming U-shape frame flexibly modified for variety of mechanical input. Miniature U-shape prototype using Fe-Ga rod 6 by 0.5 by 13 mm3 exhibited average power of 3.7 mW under vibration of 166 Hz and 2.5 G. L-shape type was demonstrated to generate electromotive force by two directional vibrations. In switch type, maximum energy of 0.7 mJ was retrieved by one pushing force. The performances are sufficient to drive wireless module for heath monitoring and remote control.

  3. Vibration Energy Harvesting Characterization of 1 cm2 Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Generators in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ziping; Zhang, Jinya; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2011-09-01

    In this study, poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) was used as a piezoelectric element to fabricate small size (two-dimensional area <1 cm2) generators with low resonant frequency (about 100 Hz) for matching the frequency of vibration sources. To clarify the effect of the air damping on the vibration energy harvesting, PVDF generators were investigated in three measurement conditions: “unpackaged in air”, “packaged in air”, and “unpackaged in vacuum”. It was found that the output power of generators “unpackaged in vacuum” was almost twice that of generators “packaged in air” at 0.5g acceleration. With the increase in vibration acceleration, the output power of generators “unpackaged in vacuum” rapidly increased in a quadratic relationship with the acceleration at low acceleration level, and then the increasing ratio decreased at high acceleration. At 4.31g acceleration, the output power reached 100.833 µW.

  4. Role of structural noise in aircraft pressure cockpit from vibration action of new-generation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of new-generation aircraft engines is transitioning from a bypass ratio of 4-6 to an increased ratio of 8-12. This is leading to substantial broadening of the vibration spectrum of engines with a shift to the low-frequency range due to decreased rotation speed of the fan rotor, in turn requiring new solutions to decrease structural noise from engine vibrations to ensure comfort in the cockpits and cabins of aircraft.

  5. Performance of improved magnetostrictive vibrational power generator, simple and high power output for practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Toshiyuki

    2015-05-07

    Vibration based power generation technology is utilized effectively in various fields. Author has invented novel vibrational power generation device using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beam structure consisting of a rod of iron-gallium alloy wound with coil and yoke accompanied with permanent magnet. When bending force is applied on the tip of the device, the magnetization inside the rod varies with induced stress due to the inverse magnetostrictive effect. In vibration, the time variation of the magnetization generates voltage on the wound coil. The magnetostrictive type is advantageous over conventional such using piezoelectric or moving magnet types in high efficiency and high robustness, and low electrical impedance. Here, author has established device configuration, simple, rigid, and high power output endurable for practical applications. In addition, the improved device is lower cost using less volume of Fe-Ga and permanent magnet compared to our conventional, and its assembly by soldering is easy and fast suitable for mass production. Average power of 3 mW/cm{sup 3} under resonant vibration of 212 Hz and 1.2 G was obtained in miniature prototype using Fe-Ga rod of 2 × 0.5× 7 mm{sup 3}. Furthermore, the damping effect was observed, which demonstrates high energy conversion of the generator.

  6. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  7. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signaturesmore » in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.« less

  8. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  9. Quantitative Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Surfaces and Interfaces: Lineshape, Polarization and Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Velarde, Luis; Gan, Wei; Fu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) can provide detailed information and understanding of molecular vibrational spectroscopy, orientational and conformational structure, and interactions of molecular surfaces and interfaces, through quantitative measurement and analysis. In this review, we present the current status and discuss the main developments on the measurement of intrinsic SFG spectral lineshape, formulations for polarization measurement and orientation analysis of the SFG-VS spectra. The main focus is to present a coherent formulation and discuss the main concepts or issues that can help to make SFG-VS a quantitative analytical and research tool in revealing the chemistry and physics of complex molecular surface and interface.

  10. Wide operation frequency band magnetostrictive vibration power generator using nonlinear spring constant by permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumachi, S.; Ueno, T.

    2016-04-01

    We study magnetostrictive vibration based power generator using iron-gallium alloy (Galfenol). The generator is advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric material in the point of high efficiency highly robust and low electrical impedance. Generally, the generator exhibits maximum power when its resonant frequency matches the frequency of ambient vibration. In other words, the mismatch of these frequencies results in significant decrease of the output. One solution is making the spring characteristics nonlinear using magnetic force, which distorts the resonant peak toward higher or lower frequency side. In this paper, vibrational generator consisting of Galfenol plate of 6 by 0.5 by 13 mm wound with coil and U shape-frame accompanied with plates and pair of permanent magnets was investigated. The experimental results show that lean of resonant peak appears attributed on the non-linear spring characteristics, and half bandwidth with magnets is 1.2 times larger than that without. It was also demonstrated that the addition of proof mass is effective to increase the sensitivity but also the bandwidth. The generator with generating power of sub mW order is useful for power source of wireless heath monitoring for bridge and factory machine.

  11. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Shota Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  12. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-01

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  13. Vibration effect on cross-flow and co-flow focusing mechanism for droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Microbubbles are widely used in many industries such as water treatment, drug coating, and ultrasonic contrast agents. Cross-flow focusing and co-flow focusing are considered basic mechanisms used for microbubble generation. Typically, to achieve micron-sized droplets requires structure dimensions in the same order of magnitude of the desired droplet sizes. In this paper we report a method of applying an external vibration to a cross-flow and co-flow focusing structure, which allows for smaller droplets to be generated. The junction dimension was 700×400 μm, and the channel width was 800 μm. The two assumed fluids are selected in a way that the Capillary number is high (Ca>10) to make use of necking effect occurred in the downstream. Linear vibration was exerted on the microchannel structure in the direction of central flow. A 2D structure was simulated using finite element software, and the numerical approach was then verified by comparing the experimental data of a typical cross-flow focusing structure taken from our previous study with the corresponding simulation assuming the same parameters. The results show that although the droplet generation regime depends on flow ratio (Qa/Qw) and vibration parameter (ampl×freq), Capillary number also has a significant effect on the regime. Briefly, applying a low-cost linear vibration to the conventional flow focusing structures can be used as an accurate controlling technique for increasing the chance of droplet generation. In fact, vibration motion can change the flow regime and breakup mechanism. It can also change the breakup point at which the droplets are formed.

  14. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  15. Generation of longitudinal vibrations in piano strings: From physics to sound synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Balázs; Sujbert, László

    2005-04-01

    Longitudinal vibration of piano strings greatly contributes to the distinctive character of low piano notes. In this paper a simplified modal model is developed, which describes the generation of phantom partials and longitudinal free modes jointly. The model is based on the simplification that the coupling from the transverse vibration to the longitudinal polarization is unidirectional. The modal formulation makes it possible to predict the prominent components of longitudinal vibration as a function of transverse modal frequencies. This provides a qualitative insight into the generation of longitudinal vibration, while the model is still capable of explaining the empirical results of earlier works. The semi-quantitative agreement with measurement results implies that the main source of phantom partials is the transverse to longitudinal coupling, while the string termination and the longitudinal to transverse coupling have only small influence. The results suggest that the longitudinal component of the tone can be treated as a quasi-harmonic spectrum with formantlike peaks at the longitudinal modal frequencies. The model is further simplified and applied for the real-time synthesis of piano sound with convincing sonic results. .

  16. Generation of longitudinal vibrations in piano strings: from physics to sound synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bank, Balázs; Sujbert, László

    2005-04-01

    Longitudinal vibration of piano strings greatly contributes to the distinctive character of low piano notes. In this paper a simplified modal model is developed, which describes the generation of phantom partials and longitudinal free modes jointly. The model is based on the simplification that the coupling from the transverse vibration to the longitudinal polarization is unidirectional. The modal formulation makes it possible to predict the prominent components of longitudinal vibration as a function of transverse modal frequencies. This provides a qualitative insight into the generation of longitudinal vibration, while the model is still capable of explaining the empirical results of earlier works. The semi-quantitative agreement with measurement results implies that the main source of phantom partials is the transverse to longitudinal coupling, while the string termination and the longitudinal to transverse coupling have only small influence. The results suggest that the longitudinal component of the tone can be treated as a quasi-harmonic spectrum with formantlike peaks at the longitudinal modal frequencies. The model is further simplified and applied for the real-time synthesis of piano sound with convincing sonic results. PMID:15898667

  17. Numerical study of liquid-hydrogen droplet generation from a vibrating orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Celik, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2005-08-01

    Atomic hydrogen propellant feed systems for far-future spacecraft may utilize solid-hydrogen particle carriers for atomic species that undergo recombination to create hot rocket exhaust. Such technology will require the development of particle generation techniques. One such technique could involve the production of hydrogen droplets from a vibrating orifice that would then freeze in cryogenic helium vapor. Among other quantities, the shape and size of the droplet are of particular interest. The present paper addresses this problem within the framework of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows, in order to unravel the basic mechanisms of droplet formation with a view to control them. Surface tension, one of the most important mechanisms to determine droplet shape, is modeled as the source term in the momentum equation. Droplet shape is tracked using a volume-of-fluid approach. A dynamic meshing technique is employed to accommodate the vibration of the generator orifice. Numerically predicted droplet shapes show satisfactory agreement with photographs of droplets generated in experiments. A parametric study is carried out to understand the influence of injection velocity, nozzle vibrational frequency, and amplitude on the droplet shape and size. The computational model provides a definitive qualitative picture of the evolution of droplet shape as a function of the operating parameters. It is observed that, primarily, the orifice vibrational frequency affects the shape, the vibrational amplitude affects the time until droplet detachment from the orifice, and the injection velocity affects the size. However, it does not mean that, for example, there is no secondary effect of amplitude on shape or size.

  18. Generation of higher harmonics in longitudinal vibration of beams with breathing cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, D.; Pieczonka, L.; Hiwarkar, V.; Staszewski, W. J.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    Classical nonlinear vibration methods used for structural damage detection are often based on higher- and sub-harmonic generation. However, nonlinearities arising from sources other than damage - e.g. boundary conditions or a measurement chain - are a primary concern in these methods. This paper focuses on localisation of damage-related nonlinearities based on higher harmonic generation. Numerical and experimental investigations in longitudinal vibration of beams with breathing cracks are presented. Numerical modelling is performed using a two-dimensional finite element approach. Different crack depths, locations and boundary conditions are investigated. The results demonstrate that nonlinearities in cracked beams are particularly strong in the vicinity of damage, allowing not only for damage localisation but also for separation of crack induced nonlinearity from other sources of nonlinearities.

  19. Generation of tailored aerosols for inhalative drug delivery employing recent vibrating-mesh nebulizer systems.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Adam; Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Direct drug delivery to the lungs is considered the gold standard for the treatment of a variety of respiratory diseases, owing to the increased therapeutic selectivity of the inhalative approach. Airborne formulations with defined size characteristics are required to improve the deposition pattern within the airways. In this respect, different nebulizer systems have been conceived, which has enabled the generation of respirable medicament mists. Here, vibrating-mesh technology revealed significant potential to overcome the main shortcomings associated with 'traditional' devices. Tailored orifice dimensions and defined formulation characteristics are of special interest for the generation of suitable aerosol droplets for inhalative purposes. Ongoing developments in device and formulation design will optimize the clinical outcome of inhalative drug delivery under application of vibrating-mesh technology.

  20. Vibration Testing of the Pluto/New Horizons Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Charles D. Griffin

    2006-06-01

    The Radioisotopic Thermal Generator (RTG) for the Pluto/New Horizons spacecraft was subjected to a flight dynamic acceptance test to demonstrate that it would perform successfully following launch. Seven RTGs of this type had been assembled and tested at Mound, Ohio from 1984 to 1997. This paper chronicles major events in establishing a new vibration test laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory and the nineteen days of dynamic testing.

  1. Over-the-road shock and vibration testing of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert heat generated by radioactive decay into electricity through the use of thermocouples. The RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance, which make them particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). To meet these regulations, a RTG Transportation System (RTGTS) that fully complies with 10 CFR 71 has been developed, which protects RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock, vibration, and heat). To ensure the protection of RTGs from shock and vibration loadings during transport, extensive over-the-road testing was conducted on the RTG`S to obtain real-time recordings of accelerations of the air-ride suspension system trailer floor, packaging, and support structure. This paper provides an overview of the RTG`S, a discussion of the shock and vibration testing, and a comparison of the test results to the specified shock response spectra and power spectral density acceleration criteria.

  2. Wear studies of materials for tubes and anti-vibration bars in nuclear steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.L.; Taponat, M.C.; Zbinden, M.

    1995-12-01

    Wear occurs as a result of relative motion at the interface of two contacting bodies. In nuclear power steam generators, high flow rates can induce vibration of the tubes resulting in wear damage due to impact and sliding contacts between the tubes and their supports. A research project aiming to gain better understanding of the mechanisms and mechanics involved in vibratory wear and to develop a more versatile predictive wear model was carried out. Combinations of Inconel tubes against flat anti-vibration bars of 403 s.s. and electrolytic chrome plated Inconel 600 were tested under conditions of reciprocating sliding and impacting in water at room temperature and at 250 C. The results show that depending on the material combinations and the loading conditions distinctively different wear mechanisms and often drastically different wear rates can occur.

  3. Automatic generation of force fields and property surfaces for use in variational vibrational calculations of anharmonic vibrational energies and zero-point vibrational averaged properties.

    PubMed

    Kongsted, Jacob; Christiansen, Ove

    2006-09-28

    An automatic and general procedure for the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the energy and general property surfaces for molecular systems is developed and implemented. General expressions for an n-mode representation are derived, where the n-mode representation includes only the couplings between n or less degrees of freedom. The general expressions are specialized to derivative force fields and property surfaces, and a scheme for calculation of the numerical derivatives is implemented. The implementation is interfaced to electronic structure programs and may be used for both ground and excited electronic states. The implementation is done in the context of a vibrational structure program and can be used in combination with vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF), vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), vibrational Moller-Plesset, and vibrational coupled cluster calculations of anharmonic wave functions and calculation of vibrational averaged properties at the VSCF and VCI levels. Sample calculations are presented for fundamental vibrational energies and vibrationally averaged dipole moments and frequency dependent polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of water and formaldehyde.

  4. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibration in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

    2004-03-26

    OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by

  5. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm.

    PubMed

    Kosch, Sebastian; Ashgriz, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator. PMID:25933899

  6. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Sebastian; Ashgriz, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  7. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    SciTech Connect

    Kosch, Sebastian E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca; Ashgriz, Nasser E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca

    2015-04-15

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  8. Repulsively driven frequency-increased-generators for durable energy harvesting from ultra-low frequency vibration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiaochu; Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2014-04-01

    An electromagnetic kinetic energy harvester has been developed, which can convert ultra-low-frequency motion and vibration energy into electrical power. This harvester employs a two-stage vibratory structure to collect low-frequency kinetic energy and effectively transfer it into electric power by using a pair of high-frequency resonant generators. Non-contact magnetic repulsive force is herein utilized for the 1st-stage sliding vibrator to drive the 2nd-stage resonators into frequency-up-conversion resonance. The non-contact actuation is helpful for durable and long-life working of the device. The prototyped device is fabricated and the design is well confirmed by experimental test. The harvester can be well operated at the frequency as low as 0.25 Hz. Under driving acceleration of 1 g at 0.5 Hz, the miniaturized harvester can generate a peak power of 4.42 mW and an average power of 158 μW. PMID:24784650

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy at interfaces by IR-VIS sum-frequency generation using CLIO FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Peremans, A.; Tadjeddine, A.; Wan Quan, Z.

    1995-12-31

    IR-vis sum-frequency generation (SFG) has developed into a versatile technique for probing the vibrational structure of interfaces. To overcome the limited spectral range accessible by benchtop IR lasers, we have developed an SFG spectrometer that makes use of the broad band tuneable infrared beam provided by the CLIO-FEL. We will evaluate the gain in sensitivity of the FEL-SFG spectrometer in comparison to that of benchtop lasers, taking account of the surface damage by laser heating. Thereafter, we review the different research projects undertaken using this facility: (1) The interface selectivity of SFG makes it particularly suitable for probing buried liquid/solid interface. We took advantage of the spectrometer sensitivity to monitor the electrochemical deposition of hydrogen on platinum single crystals at under- and overpotential (2) Because of its sensitivity to the molecular symmetry, SFG allows probing the conformation of self assembled monolayers deposited on metals. We discuss SFG spectra of {omega}(4-nitroanilino)-dodecane adsorbed on polycrystalline gold and silver films; in the 1550 - 900 cm{sup -1} spectral range. (3) We have undertaken a spectroscopic approach for the investigation of polymer films adhesion on glass. Polyurethane/glass interface is investigated in the 2200 - 1600 cin{sup -1} spectral region. (4) The use of the CLIO FEL allows probing of the vibrational dynamics of the prominent IR active vibrations between 1500 and 500 cm{sup -1} of fullerene epitaxial films. These modes are modified upon charge transfer from the substrate to the C{sub 60} molecules. Preliminary SFG spectra of C{sub 60}/Ag interface are presented. (5) Site specific detection of CO adsorption and CO + O coadsorption on Pd(111) are studied.

  10. Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Study of Hydrous Species in Soda Lime Silica Float Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiawei; Banerjee, Joy; Pantano, Carlo G; Kim, Seong H

    2016-06-21

    It is generally accepted that the mechanical properties of soda lime silica (SLS) glass can be affected by the interaction between sodium ions and hydrous species (silanol groups and water molecules) in its surface region. While the amount of these hydrous species can be estimated from hydrogen profiles and infrared spectroscopy, their chemical environment in the glass network is still not well understood. This work employed vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical environment of hydrous species in the surface region of SLS float glass. SLS float glass shows sharp peaks in the OH stretching vibration region in SFG spectra, while the OH stretch peaks of glasses that do not have leachable sodium ions and the OH peaks of water molecules in condensed phases are normally broad due to fast hydrogen bonding dynamics. The hydrous species responsible for the sharp SFG peaks for the SLS float glass were found to be thermodynamically more stable than physisorbed water molecules, did not exchange with D2O, and were associated with the sodium concentration gradient in the dealkalized subsurface region. These results suggested that the hydrous species reside in static solvation shells defined by the silicate network with relatively slow hydrogen bonding dynamics, compared to physisorbed water layers on top of the glass surface. A putative radial distribution of the hydrous species within the SLS glass network was estimated based on the OH SFG spectral features, which could be compared with theoretical distributions calculated from computational simulations. PMID:27254814

  11. Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Study of Hydrous Species in Soda Lime Silica Float Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiawei; Banerjee, Joy; Pantano, Carlo G; Kim, Seong H

    2016-06-21

    It is generally accepted that the mechanical properties of soda lime silica (SLS) glass can be affected by the interaction between sodium ions and hydrous species (silanol groups and water molecules) in its surface region. While the amount of these hydrous species can be estimated from hydrogen profiles and infrared spectroscopy, their chemical environment in the glass network is still not well understood. This work employed vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical environment of hydrous species in the surface region of SLS float glass. SLS float glass shows sharp peaks in the OH stretching vibration region in SFG spectra, while the OH stretch peaks of glasses that do not have leachable sodium ions and the OH peaks of water molecules in condensed phases are normally broad due to fast hydrogen bonding dynamics. The hydrous species responsible for the sharp SFG peaks for the SLS float glass were found to be thermodynamically more stable than physisorbed water molecules, did not exchange with D2O, and were associated with the sodium concentration gradient in the dealkalized subsurface region. These results suggested that the hydrous species reside in static solvation shells defined by the silicate network with relatively slow hydrogen bonding dynamics, compared to physisorbed water layers on top of the glass surface. A putative radial distribution of the hydrous species within the SLS glass network was estimated based on the OH SFG spectral features, which could be compared with theoretical distributions calculated from computational simulations.

  12. Drop generation from a vibrating nozzle in an immiscible liquid-liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrandias, A.; Duval, H.; Casalinho, J.; Giorgi, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    Drop generation from an axially vibrating nozzle exhibits a transition in drop diameter when varying the vibration amplitude. Below a threshold amplitude, forcing has essentially no effect on drop size and drops form in dripping mode. Above the threshold, drop size is controlled by forcing: drops detach at resonance, i.e., when the first eigenfrequency of the growing drop coincides with the forcing frequency. We experimentally study the impact of the nozzle inner diameter, dispersed phase flow rate, interfacial tension, and dispersed phase viscosity on this transition. Drop diameter is well correlated to the mode 1 eigenfrequency of Strani and Sabetta for a drop in partial contact with a spherical bowl. We propose a transient model to describe drop dynamics until detachment. The drop is modelled as a linearly forced harmonic oscillator, with the eigenfrequency of Strani and Sabetta. Since the dispersed phase does not wet the nozzle tip, an additional damping coefficient is introduced to account for the viscous dissipation in the film of continuous phase between the drop and nozzle surface. The model adequately reproduces the effect of the different parameters on the threshold amplitude.

  13. Highly vibrationally excited CO generated in a low-temperature chemical reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jans, E.; Frederickson, K.; Yurkovich, M.; Musci, B.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A chemical flow reactor is used to study the vibrational population distribution of CO produced by a reaction between carbon vapor generated in an arc discharge and molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate formation of highly vibrationally excited CO, up to vibrational level v = 14, at low temperatures, T = 400-450 K, with population inversion at v = 4-7, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of reaction enthalpy. The results show feasibility of development of a new CO chemical laser using carbon vapor and oxygen as reactants.

  14. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  15. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-02-22

    Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

  16. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20–26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected. PMID:25608712

  17. Vibrationally resonant sum-frequency generation microscopy with a solid immersion lens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Seong; Lee, Sang-Won; Hsu, Julie; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    We use a hemispheric sapphire lens in combination with an off-axis parabolic mirror to demonstrate high-resolution vibrationally resonant sum-frequency generation (VR-SFG) microscopy in the mid-infrared range. With the sapphire lens as an immersed solid medium, the numerical aperture (NA) of the parabolic mirror objective is enhanced by a factor of 1.72, from 0.42 to 0.72, close to the theoretical value of 1.76 ( = nsapphire). The measured lateral resolution is as high as 0.64 μm. We show the practical utility of the sapphire immersion lens by imaging collagen-rich tissues with and without the solid immersion lens. PMID:25071953

  18. Design and analysis of a plane vibration-based electromagnetic generator using a magnetic spring and ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siqi; Li, Decai

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a plane vibration-based electromagnetic generator that is capable of converting low-frequency vibration energy into electrical energy. A magnetic spring is formed by a magnetic attractive force between fixed and movable permanent magnets. The ferrofluid is employed on the bottom of the movable permanent magnet to suspend it and reduce the mechanical damping as a fluid lubricant. When the electromagnetic generator with a ferrofluid of 0.3 g was operated under a resonance condition, the output power reached 0.27 mW, and the power density of the electromagnetic generator was 5.68 µW/cm2. The electromagnetic generator was also used to harvest energy from human motion. The measured average load powers of the electromagnetic generator from human waist motion were 0.835 mW and 1.3 mW during walking and jogging, respectively.

  19. Modal Analysis and Study of the Vibration Characteristics of the Thermoelectric Modules of Vehicle Exhaust Power-Generation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Mu, Yu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Yu, Rui; Li, Guodong; Zhang, Qingjie

    2014-06-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials and modules are important components of vehicle exhaust power-generation systems. The road and the engine, the main sources of vibration of TE modules, have substantial effects on the vibration characteristics of TE modules. In this work, modal analysis and the vibration characteristics of TE modules were investigated in detail. On the basis of the TE modules and their service environment, simulations for modal analysis were performed by use of the finite-element method, and the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the TE modules were obtained. The numerical results were used to compare the natural frequencies of TE modules under different contact stiffness with the range of excitation frequencies of road and engine, in an attempt to prevent severe resonance. The effects on the vibration characteristics of geometric dimensions, service temperature, and thermal stress of the TE modules are also discussed in detail. The results reveal the vibration characteristics of the TE modules and provide theoretical guidance for structure optimization in the design of vehicle exhaust power-generation systems.

  20. Influence of water depth on the sound generated by air-bubble vibration in the water musical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Yoshito; Nakazono, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a water musical instrument that generates sound by the falling of water drops within resonance tubes. The instrument can give people who hear it the healing effect inherent in the sound of water. The sound produced by falling water drops arises from air- bubble vibrations. To investigate the impact of water depth on the air-bubble vibrations, we conducted experiments at varying values of water pressure and nozzle shape. We found that air-bubble vibration frequency does not change at a water depth of 50 mm or greater. Between 35 and 40 mm, however, the frequency decreases. At water depths of 30 mm or below, the air-bubble vibration frequency increases. In our tests, we varied the nozzle diameter from 2 to 4 mm. In addition, we discovered that the time taken for air-bubble vibration to start after the water drops start falling is constant at water depths of 40 mm or greater, but slower at depths below 40 mm.

  1. Operational Safety Assessment of Turbo Generators with Wavelet Rényi Entropy from Sensor-Dependent Vibration Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals’ wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance. PMID:25894934

  2. Operational safety assessment of turbo generators with wavelet Rényi entropy from sensor-dependent vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-04-16

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals' wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance.

  3. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Gruenbaum, S. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-11-14

    Understanding the structure of water near cell membranes is crucial for characterizing water-mediated events such as molecular transport. To obtain structural information of water near a membrane, it is useful to have a surface-selective technique that can probe only interfacial water molecules. One such technique is vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. As model systems for studying membrane headgroup/water interactions, in this paper we consider lipid and surfactant monolayers on water. We adopt a theoretical approach combining molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive VSFG to investigate water structure near these interfaces. Our simulated spectra are in qualitative agreement with experiments and reveal orientational ordering of interfacial water molecules near cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic interfaces. OH bonds of water molecules point toward an anionic interface leading to a positive VSFG peak, whereas the water hydrogen atoms point away from a cationic interface leading to a negative VSFG peak. Coexistence of these two interfacial water species is observed near interfaces between water and mixtures of cationic and anionic lipids, as indicated by the presence of both negative and positive peaks in their VSFG spectra. In the case of a zwitterionic interface, OH orientation is toward the interface on the average, resulting in a positive VSFG peak.

  4. Quantification of multiple fault parameters in flexible turbo-generator systems with incomplete rundown vibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Mohit; Tiwari, Rajiv

    2013-12-01

    A turbo-generator system of the modern rotating machinery consists of the driver and driven shafts, which are coupled through flexible couplings and mounted on flexible bearings. Dynamic characterisation of vital machine elements of such rotating machinery is a challenging problem for reliable and accurate response predictions. In this paper, a key intention is to estimate the bearing and coupling dynamic parameters along with residual unbalances at predefined planes, and the misalignment forces and moments at the coupling based on the rundown vibration data. To tackle a practical difficulty of limited measurements and a numerical difficulty of the conventional dynamic condensation in the development of identification algorithm, a novel condensation technique has been implemented especially to overcome measurement of transverse rotational DOFs. Numerical examples are also presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The measurement noise has been added in numerically simulated responses that are used in the present algorithm to identify the parameters and it is found to be robust. Modelling errors of few physical parameters are also considered and estimates are found to be very good.

  5. Environmental chemistry at vapor/water interfaces: insights from vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jubb, Aaron M; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2012-01-01

    The chemistry that occurs at surfaces has been an intense area of study for many years owing to its complexity and importance in describing a wide range of physical phenomena. The vapor/water interface is particularly interesting from an environmental chemistry perspective as this surface plays host to a wide range of chemistries that influence atmospheric and geochemical interactions. The application of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG), an inherently surface-specific, even-order nonlinear optical spectroscopy, enables the direct interrogation of various vapor/aqueous interfaces to elucidate the behavior and reaction of chemical species within the surface regime. In this review we discuss the application of VSFG to the study of a variety of atmospherically important systems at the vapor/aqueous interface. Chemical systems presented include inorganic ionic solutions prevalent in aqueous marine aerosols, small molecular solutes, and long-chain fatty acids relevant to fat-coated aerosols. The ability of VSFG to probe both the organization and reactions that may occur for these systems is highlighted. A future perspective toward the application of VSFG to the study of environmental interfaces is also provided.

  6. Characterization of starch polymorphic structures using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingyan; Lee, Christopher; Kim, Seong H; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2014-02-20

    The polymorphic structures of starch were characterized with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. The noncentrosymmetry requirement of SFG spectroscopy allows for the detection of the ordered domains without spectral interferences from the amorphous phase and also the distinction of the symmetric elements among crystalline polymorphs. The V-type amylose was SFG-inactive due to the antiparallel packing of single helices in crystal unit cells, whereas the A- and B-type starches showed strong SFG peaks at 2904 cm(-1) and 2952-2968 cm(-1), which were assigned to CH stretching of the axial methine group in the ring and CH2 stretching of the exocyclic CH2OH side group, respectively. The CH2/CH intensity ratios of the A- and B-type starches are significantly different, indicating that the conformation of hydroxymethyl groups in these two polymorphs may be different. Cyclodextrin inclusion complexes were also analyzed as a comparison to the V-type amylose and showed that the head-to-tail and head-to-head stacking patterns of cyclodextrin molecules govern their SFG signals and peak positions. Although the molecular packing is different between V-type amylose and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes, both crystals show the annihilation of SFG signals when the functional group dipoles are arranged pointing in opposite directions. PMID:24432980

  7. Characterization of starch polymorphic structures using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingyan; Lee, Christopher; Kim, Seong H; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2014-02-20

    The polymorphic structures of starch were characterized with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. The noncentrosymmetry requirement of SFG spectroscopy allows for the detection of the ordered domains without spectral interferences from the amorphous phase and also the distinction of the symmetric elements among crystalline polymorphs. The V-type amylose was SFG-inactive due to the antiparallel packing of single helices in crystal unit cells, whereas the A- and B-type starches showed strong SFG peaks at 2904 cm(-1) and 2952-2968 cm(-1), which were assigned to CH stretching of the axial methine group in the ring and CH2 stretching of the exocyclic CH2OH side group, respectively. The CH2/CH intensity ratios of the A- and B-type starches are significantly different, indicating that the conformation of hydroxymethyl groups in these two polymorphs may be different. Cyclodextrin inclusion complexes were also analyzed as a comparison to the V-type amylose and showed that the head-to-tail and head-to-head stacking patterns of cyclodextrin molecules govern their SFG signals and peak positions. Although the molecular packing is different between V-type amylose and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes, both crystals show the annihilation of SFG signals when the functional group dipoles are arranged pointing in opposite directions.

  8. Quantitative Surface Chirality Detection with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy: Twin Polarization Angle Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Feng; Xu, Yanyan; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hongfei

    2009-12-27

    Here we report a novel twin polarization angle (TPA) approach in the quantitative chirality detection with the surface sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS). Generally, the achiral contribution dominates the surface SFG-VS signal, and the pure chiral signal is usually two or three orders of magnitude smaller. Therefore, it has been difficult to make quantitative detection and analysis of the chiral contributions to the surface SFG- VS signal. In the TPA method, by varying together the polarization angles of the incoming visible light and the sum frequency signal at fixed s or p polarization of the incoming infrared beam, the polarization dependent SFG signal can give not only direct signature of the chiral contribution in the total SFG-VS signal, but also the accurate measurement of the chiral and achiral components in the surface SFG signal. The general description of the TPA method is presented and the experiment test of the TPA approach is also presented for the SFG-VS from the S- and R-limonene chiral liquid surfaces. The most accurate degree of chiral excess values thus obtained for the 2878 cm⁻¹ spectral peak of the S- and R-limonene liquid surfaces are (23.7±0.4)% and ({25.4±1.3)%, respectively.

  9. Advanced nebulizer designs employing vibrating mesh/aperture plate technologies for aerosol generation.

    PubMed

    Waldrep, J C; Dhand, R

    2008-04-01

    Recent technological advances and improved nebulizer designs have overcome many limitations of jet nebulizers. Newer devices employ a vibrating mesh or aperture plate (VM/AP) for the generation of therapeutic aerosols with consistent, increased efficiency, predominant aerosol fine particle fractions, low residuals, and the ability to nebulize even microliter volumes. These enhancements are achieved through several different design features and include improvements that promote patient compliance, such as compact design, portability, shorter treatment durations, and quiet operation. Current VM/AP devices in clinical use are the Omron MicroAir, the Nektar Aeroneb, and the Pari eFlow. However, some devices are only approved for use with specific medications. Development of "smart nebulizers" such as the Respironics I-neb couple VM technologies with coordinated delivery and optimized inhalation patterns to enhance inhaled drug delivery of specialized, expensive formulations. Ongoing development of advanced aerosol technologies should improve clinical outcomes and continue to expand therapeutic options as newer inhaled drugs become available. PMID:18393813

  10. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  11. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Uvan Catton; Vijay K. Dhir; Deepanjan Mitra; Omar Alquaddoomi; Pierangelo Adinolfi

    2004-04-06

    Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers.

  12. Insight from Laboratory Experiments on the Generation of Granular Flows on the Flanks of Vibrated Pyroclastic Cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Romano, G. P.; Ventura, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out laboratory experiments to study the generation of granular flows on the slopes of pyroclastic cones that are experiencing volcanic tremor or tectonic earthquakes. These experiments are inspired by the occurrence of granular flows on the flanks of Mount Vesuvius during its 1944 eruption. Our laboratory model consists of sand cones built around a vibrating tube which represents a volcanic conduit with erupting magma inside. A video camera allows the study of the granular flow inception, movement and deposition. Although the collapse of the entire cone is obtained at a specific resonance frequency, individual granular flows can be generated by all the vibration frequencies and all the vibration amplitudes that our experimental apparatus has allowed us to adopt. We believe that this is due to the fact that the energy threshold to generate the flows is small in value. Therefore, if this is true in nature as well, shaken pyroclastic cones are always potentially dangerous because they can easily generate flows that can strike the surrounding areas.

  13. A three-dimensional electret-based micro power generator for low-level ambient vibrational energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Kai; Liu, Shuwei; Woh Lye, Sun; Miao, Jianmin; Hu, Xiao

    2014-06-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) electret-based micro power generator with multiple vibration modes has been developed, which is capable of converting low-level ambient kinetic energy to electrical energy. The device is based on a rotational symmetrical resonator which consists of a movable disc-shaped seismic mass suspended by three sets of spiral springs. Experimental analysis shows that the proposed generator operates at an out-of-plane direction at mode I of 66 Hz and two in-plane directions at mode II of 75 Hz and mode III of 78.5 Hz with a phase difference of about 90°. A corona localized charging method is also proposed that employs a shadow mask and multiple discharge needles for the production of micro-sized electret array. From tests conducted at an acceleration of 0.05 g, the prototype can generate a maximum power of 4.8 nW, 0.67 nW and 1.2 nW at vibration modes of I, II and III, respectively. These values correspond to the normalized power densities of 16 µW cm-3 g-2, 2.2 µW cm-3 g-2 and 4 µW cm-3 g-2, respectively. The results show that the generator can potentially offer an intriguing alternative for scavenging low-level ambient energy from 3D vibration sources.

  14. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, Zakaria, Lambang, Lullus; Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-03-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  15. Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin Yu, Qiangmo; Zhao, Jiangxin; Zhao, Nian; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Qiu, Jing

    2014-09-21

    To scavenge energy from ambient vibrations with arbitrary in-plane motion directions and over a wide frequency range, a novel electromagnetic vibration energy harvester is designed and optimized. In the harvester, a circular cross-section elastic rod, not a traditional thin cantilever beam, is used to extract ambient vibration energy because of its capability to collect vibration from arbitrary in-plane motion directions. The magnetic interaction between magnets and the iron core contributes to a nonlinear oscillation of the rod with increased frequency bandwidth. The influences of the structure configurations on the electrical output and the working bandwidth of the harvester are investigated using Ansoft's Maxwell 3D to achieve optimal performance. The experimental results show that the harvester is sensitive to vibrations from arbitrary in-plane directions and it exhibits a bandwidth of 5.7 Hz and a maximum power of 13.4 mW at an acceleration of 0.6 g (with g=9.8 ms⁻²).

  16. ENIDINE: Vibration and seismic isolation technologies for power generation station applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zemanek, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    ENIDINE Inc. is a world leader in the design and manufacture of shock and vibration mounts. Founded in 1966, the company has two manufacturing facilities, employs over 300 people and supports a worldwide network of distributors and representatives. ENIDINE Inc. is part of the ENIDINE Corporate Group which owns a number of companies that design and manufacture Hydraulic/Pneumatic cylinders, Electromechanical devices, Hydraulic Control Valves and a number of Industrial Distribution companies throughout Europe. In total, the ENIDINE Corporate Group has over 900 employees with annual sales of over $100 million. ENIDINE shock and vibration mounts are used to isolate the vibration of missiles from their guidance systems, pumps from hospital operating equipment and off shore oil rigs, from the shock energy of waves in the North Sea. ENIDINE products can be found on all Boeing and McDonnell Douglas aircraft, as well as many electronic and weapons systems on board Navy ships.

  17. Fabrication and performance evaluation of a metal-based bimorph piezoelectric MEMS generator for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Lin, Shun-Chiu; Wu, Wen-Jong

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a bimorph microelectromechanical system (MEMS) generator for vibration energy harvesting. The bimorph generator is in cantilever beam structure formed by laminating two lead zirconate titanate thick-film layers on both sides of a stainless steel substrate. Aiming to scavenge vibration energy efficiently from the environment and transform into useful electrical energy, the two piezoelectric layers on the device can be poled for serial and parallel connections to enhance the output voltage or output current respectively. In addition, a tungsten proof mass is bonded at the tip of the device to adjust the resonance frequency. The experimental result shows superior performance the generator. At the 0.5 g base excitation acceleration level, the devices pooled for serial connection and the device poled for parallel connection possess an open-circuit output voltage of 11.6 VP-P and 20.1 VP-P, respectively. The device poled for parallel connection reaches a maximum power output of 423 μW and an output voltage of 15.2 VP-P at an excitation frequency of 143.4 Hz and an externally applied based excitation acceleration of 1.5 g, whereas the device poled serial connection achieves a maximum power output of 413 μW and an output voltage of 33.0 VP-P at an excitation frequency of 140.8 Hz and an externally applied base excitation acceleration of 1.5 g. To demonstrate the feasibility of the MEMS generator for real applications, we finished the demonstration of a self-powered Bluetooth low energy wireless temperature sensor sending readings to a smartphone with only the power from the MEMS generator harvesting from vibration.

  18. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-09-07

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-{sigma} bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as {pi}-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can

  19. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  20. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships.

  1. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships. PMID:26062639

  2. Eccentrically mounted rotor pack and its influence on the vibration and noise of an asynchronous generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donát, Martin; Dušek, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Time-varying magnetic forces are the main source of vibrations in rotating electrical machines. A number of papers dealing with computational modelling of the dynamic behaviour of rotating electrical machines have been published. Almost all of these papers do not consider electro-mechanical interaction between the stator and the rotor of the machine. A computational model including electro-mechanical interaction is proposed in this paper. The influence of the air gap eccentricity due to eccentric mounting of the rotor pack on the shaft of the rotor is investigated. Electromagnetic coupled-field analysis was performed to obtain the dependence of the magnetic forces, which act on the stator and the rotor pack, on the time and air gap eccentricity. Attention has been paid to the air gap eccentricity due to the interaction between the stator and the rotor and the influence of the air gap eccentricity on the vibration and sound power of the machine. The obtained results show that the air gap eccentricity affects the amplitude spectrum of the magnetic forces. This change of amplitude spectrum causes a significant increase in the torsional vibration of the stator of the examined machine. The air gap eccentricity is also significantly reflected in the trajectory of the rotor centre line and radial load of bearings in the machine.

  3. Friction control in automotive seat belt systems by piezoelectrically generated ultrasonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Shravan; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2010-04-01

    Active control of friction between sliding surfaces is of significant interest in automotive applications. It has been shown that the friction force between sliding surfaces can be reduced by superimposing ultrasonic vibrations on the sliding velocity. This principle can be applied to systems in which solid state lubrication is advantageous. This paper investigates ultrasonic lubrication for creating adaptive seat belts with controllable force at the interface between the D-ring and webbing. By precisely controlling the seat belt force during a crash event, superior restraint can be achieved relative to existing systems which are designed as a compromise for various occupants and loading conditions. Proof-of-concept experiments are conducted in order to experimentally determine the performance limits and mechanics of a seat belt webbing subjected to macroscopic sliding motion and superimposed out-of-plane ultrasonic vibrations. The experimental setup consists of a high-capacity ultrasonic plastic welder and an apparatus for creating controlled relative motion between the welder tip and seat belt webbing. Analytical modeling using LuGre friction is presented which characterizes the parametric dependence of friction reduction on system settings in the presence of ultrasonic vibrations.

  4. Generation of laser-induced plasma in supercritical water and vibrational spectroscopic study of accompanying stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Hiroharu; Tomai, Takaaki; Sawada, Masayoshi; Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-08-01

    We have formed a laser-induced plasma (LIP) in supercritical water (SCW) and studied associated molecular vibrations using spectroscopic methods. The accompanying forward and backward stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of water molecules showed anisotropic behavior at supercritical conditions (>647 K and >22.1 MPa). The Raman shift of the backward SRS indicated that attractive interactions between water molecules and excess electrons generated by the LIP were dominant in the SCW. The backward SRS spectrum provided a microscopic view of the hydration environment around an excess electron, which is useful for controlling electron-driven chemical reactions and materials processing in SCW.

  5. Generation of laser-induced plasma in supercritical water and vibrational spectroscopic study of accompanying stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yui, Hiroharu; Tomai, Takaaki; Sawada, Masayoshi; Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-08-29

    We have formed a laser-induced plasma (LIP) in supercritical water (SCW) and studied associated molecular vibrations using spectroscopic methods. The accompanying forward and backward stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of water molecules showed anisotropic behavior at supercritical conditions (>647 K and >22.1 MPa). The Raman shift of the backward SRS indicated that attractive interactions between water molecules and excess electrons generated by the LIP were dominant in the SCW. The backward SRS spectrum provided a microscopic view of the hydration environment around an excess electron, which is useful for controlling electron-driven chemical reactions and materials processing in SCW.

  6. Investigation of concurrent energy harvesting from ambient vibrations and wind using a single piezoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibo, A.; Daqaq, M. F.

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, a single vibratory energy harvester integrated with an airfoil is proposed to concurrently harness energy from ambient vibrations and wind. In terms of its transduction capabilities and power density, the integrated device is shown to have a superior performance under the combined loading when compared to utilizing two separate devices to harvest energy independently from the two available energy sources. Even below its flutter speed, the proposed device was able to provide 2.5 times the power obtained using two separate harvesters.

  7. Use of a magnetic force exciter to vibrate a piezocomposite generating element in a small-scale windmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truyen Luong, Hung; Goo, Nam Seo

    2012-02-01

    A piezocomposite generating element (PCGE) can be used to convert ambient vibrations into electrical energy that can be stored and used to power other devices. This paper introduces a design of a magnetic force exciter for a small-scale windmill that vibrates a PCGE to convert wind energy into electrical energy. A small-scale windmill was designed to be sensitive to low-speed wind in urban regions for the purpose of collecting wind energy. The magnetic force exciter consists of exciting magnets attached to the device’s input rotor and a secondary magnet fixed at the tip of the PCGE. The PCGE is fixed to a clamp that can be adjusted to slide on the windmill’s frame in order to change the gap between exciting and secondary magnets. Under an applied wind force, the input rotor rotates to create a magnetic force interaction that excites the PCGE. The deformation of the PCGE enables it to generate electric power. Experiments were performed with different numbers of exciting magnets and different gaps between the exciting and secondary magnets to determine the optimal configuration for generating the peak voltage and harvesting the maximum wind energy for the same range of wind speeds. In a battery-charging test, the charging time for a 40 mA h battery was approximately 3 h for natural wind in an urban region. The experimental results show that the prototype can harvest energy in urban regions with low wind speeds and convert the wasted wind energy into electricity for city use.

  8. Vocal development during postnatal growth and ear morphology in a shrew that generates seismic vibrations, Diplomesodon pulchellum.

    PubMed

    Zaytseva, Alexandra S; Volodin, Ilya A; Mason, Matthew J; Frey, Roland; Fritsch, Guido; Ilchenko, Olga G; Volodina, Elena V

    2015-09-01

    The ability of adult and subadult piebald shrews (Diplomesodon pulchellum) to produce 160Hz seismic waves is potentially reflected in their vocal ontogeny and ear morphology. In this study, the ontogeny of call variables and body traits was examined in 11 litters of piebald shrews, in two-day intervals from birth to 22 days (subadult), and ear structure was investigated in two specimens using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Across ages, the call fundamental frequency (f0) was stable in squeaks and clicks and increased steadily in screeches, representing an unusual, non-descending ontogenetic pathway of f0. The rate of the deep sinusoidal modulation (pulse rate) of screeches increased from 75Hz at 3-4 days to 138Hz at 21-22 days, probably relating to ontogenetic changes in contraction rates of the same muscles which are responsible for generating seismic vibrations. The ear reconstructions revealed that the morphologies of the middle and inner ears of the piebald shrew are very similar to those of the common shrew (Sorex araneus) and the lesser white-toothed shrew (Crocidura suaveolens), which are not known to produce seismic signals. These results suggest that piebald shrews use a mechanism other than hearing for perceiving seismic vibrations.

  9. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  10. Vocal development during postnatal growth and ear morphology in a shrew that generates seismic vibrations, Diplomesodon pulchellum.

    PubMed

    Zaytseva, Alexandra S; Volodin, Ilya A; Mason, Matthew J; Frey, Roland; Fritsch, Guido; Ilchenko, Olga G; Volodina, Elena V

    2015-09-01

    The ability of adult and subadult piebald shrews (Diplomesodon pulchellum) to produce 160Hz seismic waves is potentially reflected in their vocal ontogeny and ear morphology. In this study, the ontogeny of call variables and body traits was examined in 11 litters of piebald shrews, in two-day intervals from birth to 22 days (subadult), and ear structure was investigated in two specimens using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Across ages, the call fundamental frequency (f0) was stable in squeaks and clicks and increased steadily in screeches, representing an unusual, non-descending ontogenetic pathway of f0. The rate of the deep sinusoidal modulation (pulse rate) of screeches increased from 75Hz at 3-4 days to 138Hz at 21-22 days, probably relating to ontogenetic changes in contraction rates of the same muscles which are responsible for generating seismic vibrations. The ear reconstructions revealed that the morphologies of the middle and inner ears of the piebald shrew are very similar to those of the common shrew (Sorex araneus) and the lesser white-toothed shrew (Crocidura suaveolens), which are not known to produce seismic signals. These results suggest that piebald shrews use a mechanism other than hearing for perceiving seismic vibrations. PMID:26112702

  11. Elucidation of molecular structures at buried polymer interfaces and biological interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Myers, John; Chen, Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been developed into an important technique to study surfaces and interfaces. It can probe buried interfaces in situ and provide molecular level structural information such as the presence of various chemical moieties, quantitative molecular functional group orientation, and time dependent kinetics or dynamics at such interfaces. This paper focuses on these three most important advantages of SFG and reviews some of the recent progress in SFG studies on interfaces related to polymer materials and biomolecules. The results discussed here demonstrate that SFG can provide important molecular structural information of buried interfaces in situ and in real time, which is difficult to obtain by other surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:23710244

  12. Probing surface and interfacial molecular structures of a rubbery adhesion promoter using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yong; Li, Bolin; Yu, Jincheng; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Xin; Shao, Wei; Lu, Xiaolin

    2013-09-01

    The molecular structures of an adhesion promoter, polybutadiene-modified epoxy (PBME) rubber at surfaces and buried interfaces with gold (Au) were studied using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The SFG spectra showed that the soft butadiene part of PBME can segregate to the surfaces and buried interfaces in two base formulations. This is consistent with its application as an adhesion promoter. For the first time, the orientation of the segregated vinyl methylene groups of PBME at the surface and buried interface was evaluated. We found that the vinyl methylene groups at the surface were highly tilted and twisted by quantitative analysis; while the vinyl methylene groups at the buried Au interface were highly tilted by qualitative estimation. Furthermore, this study confirms that the sandwiched-face-down experimental setup can be employed to study the buried interfaces. This could be developed into a standard way to probe the buried interfaces between the commercialized resins and metal substrates.

  13. Bend Vibration of Surface Water Investigated by Heterodyne-Detected Sum Frequency Generation and Theoretical Study: Dominant Role of Quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Achintya; Tanaka, Shogo; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Ahmed, Mohammed; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Sawai, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-07-01

    Heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy was applied to the water surface for measuring the imaginary part of second-order nonlinear susceptibility (Im χ((2))) spectrum in the bend frequency region for the first time. The observed Im χ((2)) spectrum shows an overall positive band around 1650 cm(-1), contradicting former theoretical predictions. We further found that the Im χ((2)) spectrum of NaI aqueous solution exhibits an even larger positive band, which is apparently contrary to the flip-flop orientation of surface water. These unexpected observations are elucidated by calculating quadrupole contributions beyond the conventional dipole approximation. It is indicated that the Im χ((2)) spectrum in the bend region has a large quadrupole contribution from the bulk water. PMID:27322348

  14. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Vicente J.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Callahan, John

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical RPS launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources was designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  15. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Callahan, John

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical radioisotope power system (RPS) launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources were designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  16. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-21

    In this report, we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm(-1) resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra of the -CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral line shapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt line shape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall line shape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ± 0.02 cm(-1) peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm(-1) and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm(-1), respectively, for the -CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm(-1) agrees quantitatively with a Voigt line shape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm(-1) and an inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm(-1). These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the line shapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general. PMID:26801040

  17. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm-1 resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra of the -CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral line shapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt line shape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall line shape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ± 0.02 cm-1 peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm-1 and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm-1, respectively, for the -CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm-1 agrees quantitatively with a Voigt line shape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm-1 and an inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm-1. These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the line shapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  18. A Narrow Amide I Vibrational Band Observed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Highly Ordered Structures of a Biofilm Protein at the Air/Water Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Morales-Acosta, M. Daniela; Li, Shanghao; Liu, Wei; Kanai, Tapan; Liu, Yuting; Chen, Ya-Na; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized BslA, a bacterial biofilm protein, at the air/water interface using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and observed one of the sharpest amide I band ever reported. Combining methods of surface pressure measurements, thin film X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, we showed extremely ordered BslA at the interface. PMID:26779572

  19. Vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopic study of crystalline cellulose in biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong H.; Lee, Christopher M.; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Yong Bum; Xi, Xiaoning

    2013-09-01

    The noncentrosymmetry requirement of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy allows selective detection of crystalline cellulose in plant cell walls and lignocellulose biomass without spectral interferences from hemicelluloses and lignin. In addition, the phase synchronization requirement of the SFG process allows noninvasive investigation of spatial arrangement of crystalline cellulose microfibrils in the sample. This paper reviews how these principles are applied to reveal structural information of crystalline cellulose in plant cell walls and biomass.

  20. Numerical prediction of turbulence-induced steam generator tube vibration: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhmiller, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    This project investigates promising techniques for predicting turbulent buffeting of tubes leading to tube damage from wear given overall steam generator geometry and operating conditions. The specified overall steam generator operating conditions are used in a model for the steam generator inlet region to evaluate local measures of incoming turbulent flow such as velocity, pressure, turbulence intensity and spectra. A range of models differing in degree of completeness may be used to calculate the incoming flow turbulence. The simplest of the three models is to use a thermal-hydraulic code such as EPRI's ATHOS or PORTHOS code to calculate the steady state flow field (u, v, w and p). Crude, empirical estimates for turbulence intensities and spectra may be deduced from the steady flow results. The best approach, which is chosen for the present study, is Large Eddy Simulation (LES) which gives detailed transient flow results that are in essence a complete description of incoming turbulence. LES results for turbulent flow in the steam generator inlet region provide the necessary local flow conditions for input into tube structural dynamic simulations. This project uses transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of flow within the tube bank to determine the instantaneous, circumferentially integrated force on each tube as a function of position along its axis. The resulting force component time histories provide a complete description of the force imposed on a rigid tube due to the incoming flow turbulence. Tube motion under the action of flow induced forces is determined from models of structural dynamics. This project models one-dimensional motion of the multispan tube including finite tube support clearances and the resulting tube-support impact force. 25 refs., 99 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to monitoring circuitry for the real time detection of vibrations of a predetermined frequency and which are greater than a predetermined magnitude. The circuitry produces an instability signal in response to such detection. The circuitry is particularly adapted for detecting instabilities in rocket thrusters, but may find application with other machines such as expensive rotating machinery, or turbines. The monitoring circuitry identifies when vibration signals are present having a predetermined frequency of a multi-frequency vibration signal which has an RMS energy level greater than a predetermined magnitude. It generates an instability signal only if such a vibration signal is identified. The circuitry includes a delay circuit which responds with an alarm signal only if the instability signal continues for a predetermined time period. When used with a rocket thruster, the alarm signal may be used to cut off the thruster if such thruster is being used in flight. If the circuitry is monitoring tests of the thruster, it generates signals to change the thruster operation, for example, from pulse mode to continuous firing to determine if the instability of the thruster is sustained once it is detected.

  2. Orientation determination of interfacial bent α-helical structures using Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan

    2015-02-01

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) has been shown to be a powerful and versatile technique in studies of proteins/peptides at surfaces and interfaces. Recently SFG was successfully applied in studies of interfacial macro-molecules with increasing size and complexity. In this report we continued to employ bond additivity model and group theory to demonstrate the importance of both the inter-helical tilt angle and the lengths of the helical segments assembling the structures being studies. Specifically, a newly improved SFG data analysis of multiple α-helical structures on melittin was used to interpret the SFG experimental observation and also verified the findings with the recent insights brought by other spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Accurate line shapes from sub-1 cm(-1) resolution sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of α-pinene at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, Amanda L; Velarde, Luis; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian T; Negre, Christian F A; Ebben, Carlena J; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin L; Thomson, Regan J; Batista, Victor S; Wang, Hong-Fei; Geiger, Franz M

    2015-02-26

    Despite the importance of terpenes in biology, the environment, and catalysis, their vibrational spectra remain unassigned. Here, we present subwavenumber high-resolution broad-band sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene that reveal 10 peaks in the C-H stretching region at room temperature. The high spectral resolution resulted in spectra with more and better resolved spectral features than those of the Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra in the bulk condensed phase and those of the conventional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule on a surface. Experiment and simulation show the spectral line shapes with HR-BB-SFG to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 ps are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations. Phase-resolved spectra provided their orientational information. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time domain vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules at molecular surfaces or interfaces.

  4. New Insights from Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy into the Interactions of Islet Amyloid Polypeptides with Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Batista, Victor S.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of amyloid polypeptides on membrane surfaces have gained increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have revealed that membranes can catalyze protein aggregation and that the early products of amyloid aggregation can disrupt membrane integrity, increasing water permeability and inducing ion cytotoxicity. Nonetheless, probing aggregation of amyloid proteins on membrane surfaces is challenging. Surface-specific methods are required to discriminate contributions of aggregates at the membrane interface from those in the bulk phase and to characterize protein secondary structures in situ and in real time without the use of perturbing spectroscopic labels. Here, we review the most recent applications of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy applied in conjunction with computational modeling techniques, a joint experimental and computational methodology that has provided valuable insights into the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) on membrane surfaces. These applications show that SFG can provide detailed information about structures, kinetics, and orientation of IAPP during interfacial aggregation, relevant to the molecular mechanisms of type II diabetes. These recent advances demonstrate the promise of SFG as a new approach for studying amyloid diseases at the molecular level and for the rational drug design targeting early aggregation products on membrane surfaces. PMID:26697504

  5. Multimodal Broadband Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation (MM-BB-V-SFG) Spectrometer and Microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Huang, Shixin; Kim, Seong H

    2016-01-14

    A broadband sum frequency generation (BB-SFG) spectrometer with multimodal (MM) capabilities was constructed, which could be routinely reconfigured for tabletop experiments in reflection, transmission, and total internal reflection (TIR) geometries, as well as microscopic imaging. The system was constructed using a Ti:sapphire amplifier (800 nm, pulse width = 85 fs, repetition rate = 2 kHz), an optical parameter amplification (OPA) system for production of broadband IR pulses tunable between 1000 and 4000 cm(-1), and two Fabry-Pérot etalons arranged in series for production of narrowband 800 nm pulses. The key feature allowing the MM operation was the nearly collinear alignment of the visible (fixed, 800 nm) and infrared (tunable, 1000-4000 cm(-1)) pulses which were spatially separated. Physical insights discussed in this paper include the comparison of spectral bandwidth produced with 40 and 85 fs pump beams, the improvement of spectral resolution using etalons, the SFG probe volume in bulk analysis, the normalization of SFG signals, the stitching of multiple spectral segments, and the operation in different modes for air/liquid and adsorbate/solid interfaces, bulk samples, as well as spectral imaging combined with principle component analysis (PCA). The SFG spectral features obtained with the MM-BB-SFG system were compared with those obtained with picosecond-scanning-SFG system and high-resolution BB-SFG system (HR-BB-SFG) for dimethyl sulfoxide, α-pinene, and various samples containing cellulose (purified commercial products, Cladophora cell wall, cotton and flax fibers, and onion epidermis cell wall). PMID:26718642

  6. An empirical approach to the bond additivity model in quantitative interpretation of sum frequency generation vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Zhang, Wen-kai; Gan, Wei; Cui, Zhi-feng; Wang, Hong-fei

    2006-10-01

    Knowledge of the ratios between different polarizability βi'j'k' tensor elements of a chemical group in a molecule is crucial for quantitative interpretation and polarization analysis of its sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) spectrum at interface. The bond additivity model (BAM) or the hyperpolarizability derivative model along with experimentally obtained Raman depolarization ratios has been widely used to obtain such tensor ratios for the CH3, CH2, and CH groups. Successfully, such treatment can quantitatively reproduce the intensity polarization dependence in SFG-VS spectra for the symmetric (SS) and asymmetric (AS) stretching modes of CH3 and CH2 groups, respectively. However, the relative intensities between the SS and AS modes usually do not agree with each other within this model even for some of the simplest molecular systems, such as the air/methanol interface. This fact certainly has cast uncertainties on the effectiveness and conclusions based on the BAM. One of such examples is that the AS mode of CH3 group has never been observed in SFG-VS spectra from the air/methanol interface, while this AS mode is usually very strong for SFG-VS spectra from the air/ethanol interface, other short chain alcohol, as well as long chain surfactants. In order to answer these questions, an empirical approach from known Raman and IR spectra is used to make corrections to the BAM. With the corrected ratios between the βi'j'k' tensor elements of the SS and AS modes, all features in the SFG-VS spectra of the air/methanol and air/ethanol interfaces can be quantitatively interpreted. This empirical approach not only provides new understandings of the effectiveness and limitations of the bond additivity model but also provides a practical way for its application in SFG-VS studies of molecular interfaces.

  7. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kweskin, Sasha Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non

  8. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  9. Partially Hydrated Electrons at the Air/Water Interface Observed by UV-Excited Time-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Korenobu; Kusaka, Ryoji; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Nagata, Takashi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-06-22

    Hydrated electrons are the most fundamental anion species, consisting only of electrons and surrounding water molecules. Although hydrated electrons have been extensively studied in the bulk aqueous solutions, even their existence is still controversial at the water surface. Here, we report the observation and characterization of hydrated electrons at the air/water interface using new time-resolved interface-selective nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy. With the generation of electrons at the air/water interface by ultraviolet photoirradiation, we observed the appearance of a strong transient band in the OH stretch region by heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation. Through the comparison with the time-resolved spectra at the air/indole solution interface, the transient band was assigned to the vibration of water molecules that solvate electrons at the interface. The analysis of the frequency and decay of the observed transient band indicated that the electrons are only partially hydrated at the water surface, and that they escape into the bulk within 100 ps. PMID:27281547

  10. Unified treatment and measurement of the spectral resolution and temporal effects in frequency-resolved sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-14

    The emergence of sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BBSFG-VS) [Velarde et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 241102] has offered new opportunities in obtaining and understanding the spectral lineshape and temporal effects on the surface vibrational spectroscopy. Particularly, the high accuracy in the HR-BBSFG-VS spectral lineshape measurement provides detailed information on the complex coherent vibrational dynamics through spectral measurement. Here we present a unified formalism of the theoretical and experimental approaches for obtaining the accurate lineshape of the SFG response, and then present a analysis on the higher and lower spectral resolution SFG spectra as well as their temporal effects of the cholesterol molecules at the air/water interface. With the high spectral resolution and accurate lineshape, it is shown that the parameters from the sub-wavenumber resolution SFG spectra can be used not only to understand but also to quantitatively reproduce the temporal effects in the lower resolution SFG measurement. These not only provide a unified picture in understanding both the frequency-domain and the time-domain SFG response of the complex molecular interface, but also provide novel experimental approaches that can directly measure them.

  11. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  12. Power-Generation Characteristics After Vibration and Thermal Stresses of Thermoelectric Unicouples with CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kwang Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok; Kim, Kyung-Hun; Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Lee, Soonil; Hwang, Hae Jin

    2015-06-01

    Reliability tests for thermoelectric unicouples were carried out to investigate the adhesion properties of CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces. The n-type In0.25 Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 and p-type In0.25Co3FeSb12 bulks were prepared for fabricating a thermoelectric unicouple (one p- n couple) by an induction melting and a spark plasma sintering process. Mo-Cu alloy was selected as an electrode for the unicouples due to its high melting temperature and proper work function value. Many thermoelectric unicouples with the CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces were fabricated with the proper brazing materials by means of a repeated firing process. Reliability of the unicouples with the interfaces was evaluated by a vibration test and a thermal cycling test. After the thermal cycling and vibration tests, the power-generation characteristics of the unicouples were compared with the unicouples before the tests. Even after the vibration test, electrical power with a power density of 0.5 W/cm2 was generated. The Ti-interlayer is considered as a possible candidate for making a reliable unicouple with high adhesion strength. With the thermal cycling test, the resistance of the unicouple increased and the electrical power from the unicouple decreased. A failure mode by the thermal cycling test was ascribed to a complex effect of micro-cracks originated from the thermal stress and oxidation problem of the thermoelectric materials; that is, a thick oxide layer more than 300 μm was detected after a high-temperature durability test of n-type In0.25Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 material at 773 K in air for 7 days.

  13. Interfacial Water Structure and Cation Binding with the Dppc Phosphate at Air /aqueous Interfaces Studied by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C.

    2012-06-01

    Molecular-level knowledge of water structure and cation binding specificity to lipid headgroups at lipid/water interfaces plays a key role in many relevant chemical, biological, and environmental processes. To obtain information on the molecular organization at aqueous interfaces, vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) has been applied extensively as an interface-specific technique. Dipalmitoylphosphocholine (DPPC) is a major component of cell membranes and has been used as a proxy for the organic coating on fat-coated aerosols. In the present work, in addition to conventional VSFG studies on cation interaction with the phosphate headgroup moiety of DPPC, we employ phase-sensitive vibrational sum frequency generation (PS-VSFG) to investigate the average direction of the transition dipole moment of interfacial water molecules. The average orientation of water structure at DPPC/water interfaces is inferred. DPPC orients interfacial water molecules on average with their net transition dipole moment pointing towards the surface. The influence of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ is identified in regard to interfacial water structure and DPPC headgroup organization. Ca2+ is observed to have greater impact on the water structure and a unique binding affinity to the phosphate headgroup relative to other cations tested. In highly concentrated Ca2+ regimes the already disturbed interfacial hydrogen-bonding network reorganizes to resemble that of the neat salt solution interface.

  14. 2D heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation study on the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of H{sub 2}O and HOD water at charged interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichi; Singh, Prashant C.; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectroscopy is applied to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of water at positively charged aqueous interfaces, and 2D HD-VSFG spectra of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/water interfaces in the whole hydrogen-bonded OH stretch region (3000 cm{sup −1} ≤ ω{sub pump} ≤ 3600 cm{sup −1}) are measured. 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/isotopically diluted water (HOD-D{sub 2}O) interface exhibits a diagonally elongated bleaching lobe immediately after excitation, which becomes round with a time constant of ∼0.3 ps due to spectral diffusion. In contrast, 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface at 0.0 ps clearly shows two diagonal peaks and their cross peaks in the bleaching region, corresponding to the double peaks observed at 3230 cm{sup −1} and 3420 cm{sup −1} in the steady-state HD-VSFG spectrum. Horizontal slices of the 2D spectrum show that the relative intensity of the two peaks of the bleaching at the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface gradually change with the change of the pump frequency. We simulate the pump-frequency dependence of the bleaching feature using a model that takes account of the Fermi resonance and inhomogeneity of the OH stretch vibration, and the simulated spectra reproduce the essential features of the 2D HD-VSFG spectra of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface. The present study demonstrates that heterodyne detection of the time-resolved VSFG is critically important for studying the ultrafast dynamics of water interfaces and for unveiling the underlying mechanism.

  15. Intrinsic chirality and prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-limonene interfaces: spectral signatures with interference chiral sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhe-Hao; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2014-09-01

    We report in this work detailed measurements of the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050 cm(-1)) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the RS racemic mixture (50/50 equal amount mixture), show that the corresponding molecular groups of the R and S enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit a spectral signature from the chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and a spectral signature from the prochiral response of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-(+)-limonene to S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and disappears for the RS racemic mixture surface. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and also surprisingly remains the same for the RS racemic mixture surface. Therefore, the structures of the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the liquid interfaces are nevertheless not mirror images to each other, even though the corresponding groups have the same tilt angle from the interfacial normal, i.e., the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the surface are diastereomeric instead of enantiomeric. These results provide detailed information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces and demonstrate the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as a unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  16. A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the Amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide

    SciTech Connect

    York, Roger L.; Holinga, George J.; Guyer, Dean R.; McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-05-03

    We describe a new optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that employs lithium thioindate, LiInS{sub 2} (LIS), to create tunable infrared light between 1500 cm{sup -1} and 2000 cm{sup -1}. The OPA based on LIS described within provides intense infrared light with a good beam profile relative to similar OPAs built on silver gallium sulfide, AgGaS{sub 2} (AGS), or silver gallium selenide, AgGaSe{sub 2} (AGSe). We have used the new LIS OPA to perform surface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I vibrational mode of a model peptide at the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d{sub 8}-PS)-phosphate buffered saline interface. This model polypeptide (which is known to be an ?-helix in the bulk solution under the high ionic strength conditions employed here) contains hydrophobic leucyl (L) residues and hydrophilic lysyl (K) residues, with sequence Ac-LKKLLKLLKKLLKL-NH{sub 2}. The amide I mode at the d{sub 8}-PS-buffer interface was found to be centered around 1655 cm{sup -1}. This can be interpreted as the peptide having maintained its {alpha}-helical structure when adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface, although other interpretations are discussed.

  17. Adsorption of 4-picoline and piperidine to the hydrated SiO2 surface: probing the surface acidity with vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingfang; Ma, Gang; Allen, Heather C

    2005-04-01

    Vapor adsorption is an important process influencing the migration and the fate of many organic pollutants in the environment. In this study, vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy was used to study the adsorption of two surface acidity probe molecules, 4-picoline (pKa = 5.94) and piperidine (pKa = 11.24), onto the amorphous SiO2 surface. The adsorption of 4-picoline onto the silica surface occurs by forming weak hydrogen bonds between the nitrogen atoms of 4-picoline molecules and the hydrogen atoms of surface silanol OH groups. Piperidine molecules are strongly chemisorbed onto the SiO2 surface through the protonation of piperidine molecules by surface silanol OH groups. The SFG results indicate that the surface acidity constant of silanol OH groups (pKa-(HOSi triple bond)) is in the range of 5.94-11.24 at the air/solid interface. Although this range of surface acidity constants is quite wide, it is possible to narrow it by choosing probe molecules with a smaller pKa range. Together with theoretical prediction methods, adsorption studies using vibrational SFG spectroscopy are capable of quantifying the surface acidity of mineral oxides by carefully choosing the acidity probe molecules.

  18. Efficient Spectral Diffusion at the Air/Water Interface Revealed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-05-19

    Femtosecond vibrational dynamics at the air/water interface is investigated by time-resolved heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (TR-HD-VSFG) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The low- and high-frequency sides of the hydrogen-bonded (HB) OH stretch band at the interface are selectively excited with special attention to the bandwidth and energy of the pump pulses. Narrow bleach is observed immediately after excitation of the high-frequency side of the HB OH band at ∼3500 cm(-1), compared to the broad bleach observed with excitation of the low-frequency side at ∼3300 cm(-1). However, the time-resolved spectra observed with the two different excitations become very similar at 0.5 ps and almost indistinguishable by 1.0 ps. This reveals that efficient spectral diffusion occurs regardless of the difference of the pump frequency. The experimental observations are well-reproduced by complementary MD simulation. There is no experimental and theoretical evidence that supports extraordinary slow dynamics in the high-frequency side of the HB OH band, which was reported before. PMID:27120559

  19. A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide.

    PubMed

    York, Roger L; Holinga, George J; Guyer, Dean R; McCrea, Keith R; Ward, Robert S; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2008-09-01

    We describe a new optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that employs lithium thioindate, LiInS2 (LIS), to create tunable infrared light between 1500 cm(-1) and 2000 cm(-1). The OPA based on LIS described within provides intense infrared light with a good beam profile relative to similar OPAs built on silver gallium sulfide, AgGaS2 (AGS), or silver gallium selenide, AgGaSe2 (AGSe). We have used the new LIS OPA to perform surface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I vibrational mode of a model peptide at the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d8-PS)-phosphate buffered saline interface. This model polypeptide (which is known to be an alpha-helix in the bulk solution under the high ionic strength conditions employed here) contains hydrophobic leucyl (L) residues and hydrophilic lysyl (K) residues, with sequence Ac-LKKLLKLLKKLLKL-NH2. The amide I mode at the d8-PS-buffer interface was found to be centered around 1655 cm(-1). This can be interpreted as the peptide having maintained its alpha-helical structure when adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface, although other interpretations are discussed. PMID:18801230

  20. Catalyzed hydrogenation of nitrogen and ethylene on metal (Fe, Pt) single crystal surfaces and effects of coadsorption: A sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Westerberg, Staffan Per Gustav

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure catalytic reactions and associated processes, such as adsorption have been studied on a molecular level on single crystal surfaces. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy together with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Gas Chromatography (GC) were used to investigate the nature of species on catalytic surfaces and to measure the catalytic reaction rates. Special attention has been directed at studying high-pressure reactions and in particular, ammonia synthesis in order to identify reaction intermediates and the influence of adsorbates on the surface during reaction conditions. The adsorption of gases N2, H2, O2 and NH3 that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH2 (~3325 cm-1) and NH (~3235 cm-1) under high pressure of ammonia (200 Torr) on the clean Fe(111) surface. Addition of 0.5 Torr of oxygen to 200 Torr of ammonia does not significantly change the bonding of dissociation intermediates to the surface. However, it leads to a phase change of nearly 180° between the resonant and non-resonant second order non-linear susceptibility of the surface, demonstrated by the reversal of the SFG spectral features. Heating the surface in the presence of 200 Torr ammonia and 0.5 Torr oxygen reduces the oxygen coverage, which can be seen from the SFG spectra as another relative phase change of 180°. The reduction of the oxide is also supported by Auger electron spectroscopy. The result suggests that the phase change of the spectral features could serve as a sensitive indicator of the chemical environment of the adsorbates.

  1. Ab initio wavenumber accurate spectroscopy : {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN vibrational levels on automatically generated IMLS potential energy surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, R.; Wagner, A. F.; Thompson, D. L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Missouri at Columbia

    2009-04-23

    We report here calculated J = 0 vibrational frequencies for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN with root-mean-square error relative to available measurements of 2.0 cm{sup -1} and 3.2 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These results are obtained with DVR calculations with a dense grid on ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). The ab initio electronic structure calculations employed are Davidson-corrected MRCI calculations with double-, triple-, and quadruple-{zeta} basis sets extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. In the {sup 1}CH{sub 2} case, Full CI tests of the Davidson correction at small basis set levels lead to a scaling of the correction with the bend angle that can be profitably applied at the CBS limit. Core-valence corrections are added derived from CCSD(T) calculations with and without frozen cores. Relativistic and non-Born-Oppenheimer corrections are available for HCN and were applied. CBS limit CCSD(T) and CASPT2 calculations with the same basis sets were also tried for HCN. The CCSD(T) results are noticeably less accurate than the MRCI results while the CASPT2 results are much poorer. The PESs were generated automatically using the local interpolative moving least-squares method (L-IMLS). A general triatomic code is described where the L-IMLS method is interfaced with several common electronic structure packages. All PESs were computed with this code running in parallel on eight processors. The L-IMLS method provides global and local fitting error measures important in automatically growing the PES from initial ab initio seed points. The reliability of this approach was tested for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} by comparing DVR-calculated vibrational levels on an L-IMLS ab initio surface with levels generated by an explicit ab initio calculation at each DVR grid point. For all levels ({approx}200) below 20000 cm{sup -1}, the mean unsigned difference between the levels of these two calculations was 0.1 cm{sup -1}, consistent with the L-IMLS estimated mean unsigned

  2. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  3. Vibrational rainbows

    SciTech Connect

    Drolshagen, G.; Mayne, H.R.; Toennies, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    We extend the theory of inelastic rainbows to include vibrationally inelastic scattering, showing how the existence of vibrational rainbows can be deduced from collinear classical scattering theory. Exact close-coupling calculations are carried out for a breathing sphere potential, and rainbow structures are, in fact, observed. The location of the rainbows generally agrees well with the classical prediction. In addition, the sensitivity of the location of the rainbow to changes in the vibrational coupling has been investigated. It is shown that vibrational rainbows persist in the presence of anisotropy. Experimental results (R. David, M. Faubel, and J. P. Toennies, Chem. Phys. Lett. 18, 87 (1973)) are examined for evidence of vibrational rainbow structure, and it is shown that vibrational rainbow theory is not inconsistent with these results.

  4. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  5. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  6. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Studies on ModelPeptide Adsorption at the Hydrophobic Solid-Water and HydrophilicSolid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    York, Roger L.

    2007-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been used to study the interfacial structure of several polypeptides and amino acids adsorbed to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces under a variety of experimental conditions. Peptide sequence, peptide chain length, peptide hydrophobicity, peptide side-chain type, surface hydrophobicity, and solution ionic strength all affect an adsorbed peptide's interfacial structure. Herein, it is demonstrated that with the choice of simple, model peptides and amino acids, surface specific SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be a powerful tool to elucidate the interfacial structure of these adsorbates. Herein, four experiments are described. In one, a series of isosequential amphiphilic peptides are synthesized and studied when adsorbed to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces of deuterated polystyrene, it was determined that the hydrophobic part of the peptide is ordered at the solid-liquid interface, while the hydrophilic part of the peptide appears to have a random orientation at this interface. On a hydrophilic surface of silica, it was determined that an ordered peptide was only observed if a peptide had stable secondary structure in solution. In another experiment, the interfacial structure of a model amphiphilic peptide was studied as a function of the ionic strength of the solution, a parameter that could change the peptide's secondary structure in solution. It was determined that on a hydrophobic surface, the peptide's interfacial structure was independent of its structure in solution. This was in contrast to the adsorbed structure on a hydrophilic surface, where the peptide's interfacial structure showed a strong dependence on its solution secondary structure. In a third experiment, the SFG spectra of lysine and proline amino acids on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces were obtained by using a different experimental geometry that increases the SFG signal. Upon comparison of

  7. Hydration of Sulphobetaine (SB) and Tetra(ethylene glycol) (EG4)-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers Studied by Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, M. Jeanette; Weidner, Tobias; McCrea, Keith; Castner, David G.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2010-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to study the surface and the underlying substrate of both homogeneous and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 11-mercaptoundecyl-1-sulphobetainethiol (HS(CH2)11N+(CH3)2(CH2)3SO3−, SB) and 1-mercapto-11-undecyl tetra(ethylene glycol) (HS(CH2)11O(CH2CH2O)4OH, EG4) with an 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (HS(CH2)11OH, MCU) diluent. SFG results on the C–H region of the dry and hydrated SAMs gave an in situ look into the molecular orientation and suggested an approach to maximize signal-to-noise ratio on these difficult to analyze hydrophilic SAMs. Vibrational fingerprint studies in the 3000–3600 cm−1 spectral range for the SAMs exposed serially to air, water, and deuterated water revealed that a layer of tightly-bound structured water was associated with the surface of a non-fouling monolayer but was not present on a hydrophobic N-undecylmercaptan (HS(CH2)10CH3, UnD) control. The percentage of water retained upon submersion in D2O correlated well with the relative amount of protein that was previously shown to absorb onto the monolayers. These results provide evidence supporting the current theory regarding the role of a tightly-bound vicinal water layer in the protein resistance of a non-fouling group. PMID:19639981

  8. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  9. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  10. Anomalous effective polarity of an air/liquid-mixture interface: a heterodyne-detected electronic and vibrational sum frequency generation study.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sudip Kumar; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-10-01

    We study the effective polarity of an air/liquid-mixture interface by using interface-selective heterodyne-detected electronic sum frequency generation (HD-ESFG) and vibrational sum frequency generation (HD-VSFG) spectroscopies. With water and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) chosen as two components of the liquid mixture, the bulk polarity of the mixture is controlled nearly arbitrarily by the mixing ratio. The effective polarity of the air/mixture interface is evaluated by HD-ESFG with a surface-active solvatochromic molecule used as a polarity indicator. Surprisingly, the interfacial effective polarity of the air/mixture interface increases significantly, when the bulk polarity of the mixture decreases (i.e. when the fraction of DMF increases). Judging from the hydrogen-bond structure at the air/mixture interface clarified by HD-VSFG, this anomalous change of the interfacial effective polarity is attributed to the interface-specific solvation structure around the indicator molecule at the air/mixture interface.

  11. Hydrogenation of the alpha,beta-Unsaturated Aldehydes Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde, and Prenal over Pt Single Crystals: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, C.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-11-26

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the surface reaction intermediates during the hydrogenation of three {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal, over Pt(111) at Torr pressures (1 Torr aldehyde, 100 Torr hydrogen) in the temperature range of 295K to 415K. SFG-VS data showed that acrolein has mixed adsorption species of {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-trans, {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-cis as well as highly coordinated {eta}{sub 3} or {eta}{sub 4} species. Crotonaldehyde adsorbed to Pt(111) as {eta}{sub 2} surface intermediates. SFG-VS during prenal hydrogenation also suggested the presence of the {eta}{sub 2} adsorption species, and became more highly coordinated as the temperature was raised to 415K, in agreement with its enhanced C=O hydrogenation. The effect of catalyst surface structure was clarified by carrying out the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over both Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals while acquiring the SFG-VS spectra in situ. Both the kinetics and SFG-VS showed little structure sensitivity. Pt(100) generated more decarbonylation 'cracking' product while Pt(111) had a higher selectivity for the formation of the desired unsaturated alcohol, crotylalcohol.

  12. Effect of fluid flow on cavitation erosion of materials under exposure to vibrations from a hydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganiev, R. F.; Zhebynev, D. A.; Feldman, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    The results of investigation of cavitation erosion of lead in various places of a hydrodynamic-generator submerged jet are presented. Features of erosion caused by the effect of flow are established. It can both strengthen the erosion intensity and weaken it in dependence on the angle of incidence. The stratification of air bubbles under the action of pressure waves is possible in the flow under the interaction with the surface of objects. The flow can change the number of air bubbles participating in the cavitation near the surface. It can also influence the mechanical effect on the surface of the tested materials inducing their nonuniform deformation. All the factors listed affect the cavitation erosion complicating considerably the physics of the process.

  13. Insights into heterogeneous atmospheric oxidation chemistry through vibrational sum frequency generation studies of tailor-made model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Andrea Beth

    2006-04-01

    As surfaces are known to have profound implications for chemical transport, reactivity, and energy budgets in atmospheric environments, we have designed a nonlinear optical sum frequency generation (SFG) system that can be used to study atmospherically relevant heterogeneous chemistry. The aims of this project were two-fold: first, to develop and characterize tailor-made organically coated substrates relevant to tropospheric chemistry and second, carry out kinetic studies that model naturally occurring heterogeneous atmospheric reactions. After construction of the broadband SFG system, we studied siloxane substrates functionalized with organic adlayers. The organic adlayers were specifically chosen to contain environmentally relevant functional groups, namely, an acid-terminated alkyl chain, several ester functionalized alkyl chains, and a non-functionalized alkyl chain. Hydrolysis of methyl ester functionalized surfaces was carried out to produce carboxylic acid functionalized surfaces and monitored using SFG. In order to access more complicated atmospherically relevant substrates, we then focused on the synthesis and characterization of a derivative of limonene, a biogenically emitted compound, chemically bound to a glass surface. We employed both electrophilic, and nucleophilic linker chemistries to increase the versatility of our approach. SFG spectra indicated that while orientation of the surface-bound terpenes depended on the linker strategy we employed, the C=C double bond was accessible to gas phase ozone regardless of the strategy applied. We then used SFG to track the interaction of a terpene-linked species with ozone and calculate reaction probabilities. Exposure of the amide-linked terpene substrate to ppm levels of ozone at a total pressure of 1 atm and 300 K yielded an initial reaction probability of approximately 1 x 10 -5, which was significantly higher than the corresponding gas phase reaction involving 1-methyl-1-cyclohexene. The chemical

  14. The crystal structure, vibrational spectra, thermal behaviour and second harmonic generation of aminoguanidinium(1+) hydrogen L-tartrate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macháčková, Zorka; Němec, Ivan; Teubner, Karel; Němec, Petr; Vaněk, Přemysl; Mička, Zdeněk

    2007-04-01

    Aminoguanidinium(1+) hydrogen L-tartrate monohydrate was prepared by crystallisation from aqueous solution and X-ray structural analysis was carried out. The substance crystallises in the orthorhombic system in space group P2 12 12 1, a = 7.1380(2) Å, b = 9.9700(4) Å, c = 14.0790(6) Å, V = 1001.94(7) Å 3, Z = 4, R = 0.0271 for 2272 observed reflections. The crystal structure consists of a 3D framework formed by hydrogen tartrate anions and water molecules with incorporated aminoguanidinium(1+) cations connected by a system of hydrogen bonds. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of natural and N,O-deuterated compounds were measured and discussed at laboratory temperature. DSC measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 95 to 380 K. A weak anomaly was observed at a temperature of 268 K. Quantitative measurements of second harmonic generation of powdered aminoguanidinium(1+) hydrogen tartrate monohydrate at 800 nm were performed relative to KDP and a relative efficiency of 14% was observed.

  15. Probing crystal structure and mesoscale assembly of cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls, tunicate tests, and bacterial films using vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Yong Bum; Kim, Seong H

    2014-06-14

    This study reports that the noncentrosymmetry and phase synchronization requirements of the sum frequency generation (SFG) process can be used to distinguish the three-dimensional organization of crystalline cellulose distributed in amorphous matrices. Crystalline cellulose is produced as microfibrils with a few nanometer diameters by plants, tunicates, and bacteria. Crystalline cellulose microfibrils are embedded in wall matrix polymers and assembled into hierarchical structures that are precisely designed for specific biological and mechanical functions. The cellulose microfibril assemblies inside cell walls are extremely difficult to probe. The comparison of vibrational SFG spectra of uniaxially-aligned and disordered films of cellulose Iβ nanocrystals revealed that the spectral features cannot be fully explained with the crystallographic unit structure of cellulose. The overall SFG intensity, the alkyl peak shape, and the alkyl/hydroxyl intensity ratio are sensitive to the lateral packing and net directionality of the cellulose microfibrils within the SFG coherence length scale. It was also found that the OH SFG stretch peaks could be deconvoluted to find the polymorphic crystal structures of cellulose (Iα and Iβ). These findings were used to investigate the cellulose crystal structure and mesoscale cellulose microfibril packing in intact plant cell walls, tunicate tests, and bacterial films.

  16. Studies of Heterogeneously Catalyzed Liquid-Phase Alcohol Oxidation on Platinum bySum-frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Reaction Rate Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Christopher

    2014-05-15

    Compared to many branches of chemistry, the molecular level study of catalytically active surfaces is young. Only with the invention of ultrahigh vacuum technology in the past half century has it been possible to carry out experiments that yield useful molecular information about the reactive occurrences at a surface. The reason is two-fold: low pressure is necessary to keep a surface clean for an amount of time long enough to perform an experiment, and most atomic scale techniques that are surface speci c (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, etc.) cannot be used at ambient pressures, because electrons, which act as chemical probes in these techniques, are easily scattered by molecules. Sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is one technique that can provide molecular level information from the surface without the necessity for high vacuum. Since the advent of SFG as a surface spectroscopic tool it has proved its worth in the studies of surface catalyzed reactions in the gas phase, with numerous reactions in the gas phase having been investigated on a multitude of surfaces. However, in situ SFG characterization of catalysis at the solid-liquid interface has yet to be thoroughly pursued despite the broad interest in the use of heterogeneous catalysts in the liquid phase as replacements for homogeneous counterparts. This work describes an attempt to move in that direction, applying SFG to study the solid-liquid interface under conditions of catalytic alcohol oxidation on platinum.

  17. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-08-19

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  18. Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ankur; SenGupta, Sumana; Kumar, Awadhesh; Choudhury, Sipra; Naik, Prakash D.

    2016-08-01

    The structure and orientation of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate [PF3(C2F5)3], commonly known as [bmim][fap], have been investigated at the air-[bmim][fap] and air-water interfaces, employing vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. The VSFG spectra in the CH stretch region suggest presence of the [bmim] cation at the interfaces. Studies reveal that the butyl chain protrudes out into air, and the imidazolium ring lies almost planar to the interface. The CH stretch intensities get enhanced at the air-water interface, mainly because of polar orientation of imidazolium cation induced by interfacial water molecules. The OH stretch intensities are also enhanced at the air-water interface due to polar orientation of interfacial water molecules induced by [bmim][fap]. The Brewster angle microscopy suggests self aggregation of [bmim][fap] in the presence of water, and the aggregation becomes extensive showing dense surface domains with time. However, the surface pressure is almost unaffected due to aggregation.

  19. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  20. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  1. Quantitative time-resolved vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy as a tool for thin film kinetic studies: new insights into oleic acid monolayer oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Joscha; Laß, Kristian; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2013-08-22

    Environmental air-water interfaces are often covered by thin films of surface-active organic substances that play an important role for air-sea gas exchange and aerosol aging. Surface-sensitive vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy has been widely used to study the static structure of organic monolayers serving as simple model systems of such films. Probably due to the difficulties to correlate the SFG signal intensity with the surface concentration, corresponding time-resolved studies of surface reactions are scarce. In this study, quantitative time-resolved measurements have been performed on the oleic acid monolayer ozonolysis, which is considered a benchmark system for investigating the reactivity and fate of unsaturated natural organics. Surface concentration calibration data have been obtained by combining the pressure-area isotherm and VSFG spectra acquisition such that the 2D phase behavior of the oleic acid film could be properly taken into account. In contrast to literature reports, surface-active oxidation products were found to be negligible and do not interfere with the VSFG measurements. A pseudo-first-order kinetic analysis of the time-resolved data yielded a bimolecular rate constant of k2(oleic acid + O3 → products) = (1.65 ± 0.64) × 10(-16) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), corresponding to an uptake coefficient of γ = (4.7 ± 1.8) × 10(-6). This result is in very good agreement with most recent monolayer measurements based on alternative methods and underlines the reliability of the time-resolved VSFG approach.

  2. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  3. Effect of vibration on dispersal of Cladosporium cladosporioides bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Uk

    2010-05-01

    The vibration of fungal cultures was evaluated to determine its potential effect on the dispersal of airborne fungal microorganisms suspected of being pathogens. An artificial vibration system, which simulates the actual environmental vibration of fungal structures, was designed and constructed for this purpose. Experiments featured the use of low-frequency vibrations similar to those induced by earthquakes. Within the range of conditions tested, the vibration of fungal cultures was found to affect the airflow-driven generation of bioaerosols.

  4. Good Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) sponsorship from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, assisted MetroLaser, of Irvine, California, in the development of a self-aligned laser vibrometer system. VibroMet, capable of measuring surface vibrations in a variety of industries, provides information on the structural integrity and acoustical characteristics of manufactured products. This low-cost, easy-to-use sensor performs vibration measurement from distances of up to three meters without the need for adjustment. The laser beam is simply pointed at the target and the system then uses a compact laser diode to illuminate the surface and to subsequently analyze the reflected light. The motion of the surface results in a Doppler shift that is measured with very high precision. VibroMet is considered one of the many behind-the-scenes tools that can be relied on to assure the quality, reliability and safety of everything from airplane panels to disk brakes

  5. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  6. Non-resonant vibration conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreemann, D.; Manoli, Y.; Folkmer, B.; Mintenbeck, D.

    2006-09-01

    The development of distributed wireless sensor systems for automotive, medical or industrial monitoring applications is one of the aims for MEMS technology. For applications where environmental vibrations are present, the harvesting of this kinetic energy is an opportunity to power remote sensor nodes. For the conversion, typically resonant spring-mass-damper systems are considered. In this paper, a novel non-resonant conversion mechanism is presented. Depending on the geometry of the harvester and the vibration, this conversion mechanism shows a few advantages: low frequencies can be converted, higher or lower modes of vibration will be converted instantaneously, the transducer has 2 DOF for energy conversion and the generation of energy is not limited to a small frequency band. Based on a vibration amplitude of 100 µm, the behavior of a fine-mechanical generator and a MEMS generator has been simulated. The results of the fine-mechanical generator were verified by measurements of a prototype with 1.5 cm3 volume. So far the transducer is capable of producing 0.4-3 mW for vibration frequencies ranging from 30 to 80 Hz.

  7. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  8. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-01-01

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N2, H2, O2 and NH3 that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH2 (~3325 cm-1) and NH (~3235 cm-1) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH2, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH2 signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H2O and D2O, the only spectral feature was in the range of

  9. Analysis of railway track vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, K.; Yamada, M.

    1989-04-01

    Analytical formulae are developed for estimating the amplitudes of the vibrations generated in railway tracks by wheels and rail discontinuities or by unevennesses on their surfaces. Rails are assumed to be supported elastically on concrete sleepers by resilient rail-pads inserted between them. The elasticities and the masses of track materials and those of the roadbed are also taken into consideration. It is shown that after an impulse is applied to the track, not only is a vibration with a comparatively low natural frequency generated, but also traveling waves with higher frequencies, and the latter propagate lengthwise along the track or downwards into the roadbed. With the assumption that the power spectral density of the unevennesses on the rail surface is in proportion to the third power of the wavelength, or to (wavenumber) -3, the amplitudes of the vibrations in railway tracks supported by rail-pads and roadbeds with various magnitudes of elastic constants are analyzed and the values for each one-third octave band are estimated. The velocity of the vibration takes on a maximum value for the band with a center frequency of 63 Hz, which corresponds to the resonant frequency of the system composed of the wheel and the track. As the frequency increases beyond this value, the velocity of the vibration takes on a second maximum value at a frequency of about 1000 Hz. These estimates are compared with the data obtained from field measurements and reasonably good correlations are found between them.

  10. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to the

  11. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  12. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  13. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  14. Ultrasound vibrometry using orthogonal- frequency-based vibration pulses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2013-11-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals, the amplitudes of which increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses.

  15. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  16. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  17. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  18. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  19. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchet, F.; Lis, D.; Caudano, Y.; Mani, A. A.; Peremans, A.; Champagne, B.; Guthmuller, J.

    2012-03-01

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  20. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  1. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  2. Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Nonlinear Vibrational Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Boik, John; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging with spectroscopic vibrational contrast is a label-free solution for visualizing, identifying, and quantifying a wide range of biomolecular compounds in biological materials. Both linear and nonlinear vibrational microscopy techniques derive their imaging contrast from infrared active or Raman allowed molecular transitions, which provide a rich palette for interrogating chemical and structural details of the sample. Yet nonlinear optical methods, which include both second-order sum-frequency generation (SFG) and third-order coherent Raman scattering (CRS) techniques, offer several improved imaging capabilities over their linear precursors. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy features unprecedented vibrational imaging speeds, provides strategies for higher spatial resolution, and gives access to additional molecular parameters. These advances have turned vibrational microscopy into a premier tool for chemically dissecting live cells and tissues. This review discusses the molecular contrast of SFG and CRS microscopy and highlights several of the advanced imaging capabilities that have impacted biological and biomedical research. PMID:23245525

  3. Control System Damps Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopf, E. H., Jr.; Brown, T. K.; Marsh, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    New control system damps vibrations in rotating equipment with help of phase-locked-loop techniques. Vibrational modes are controlled by applying suitable currents to drive motor. Control signals are derived from sensors mounted on equipment.

  4. Settling time of a vibrational wavepacket in ionization

    PubMed Central

    Nabekawa, Yasuo; Furukawa, Yusuke; Okino, Tomoya; Amani Eilanlou, A.; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational wavepacket of a diatomic molecular ion at the time of ionization is usually considered to be generated on the basis of the Franck–Condon principle. According to this principle, the amplitude of each vibrational wavefunction in the wavepacket is given by the overlap integral between each vibrational wavefunction and the ground vibrational wavefunction in the neutral molecule, and hence, the amplitude should be a real number, or equivalently, a complex number the phase of which is equal to zero. Here we report the observation of a non-trivial phase modulation of the amplitudes of vibrational wavefunctions in a wavepacket generated in the ground electronic state of a molecular ion at the time of ionization. The phase modulation results in a group delay of the specific vibrational states of order 1 fs, which can be regarded as the settling time required to compose the initial vibrational wavepacket. PMID:26324319

  5. Hermetically sealed vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, D. G.

    1969-01-01

    Simple fluidic vibration damper for installation at each pivotal mounting between gimbals isolates inertial measuring units from external vibration and other disruptive forces. Installation between each of the three gimbal axes can dampen vibration and shock in any direction while permitting free rotation of the gimbals.

  6. Vibration energy harvester optimization using artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Z.; Ondrusek, C.; Kurfurst, J.; Singule, V.

    2011-06-01

    This paper deals with an optimization study of a vibration energy harvester. This harvester can be used as autonomous source of electrical energy for remote or wireless applications, which are placed in environment excited by ambient mechanical vibrations. The ambient energy of vibrations is usually on very low level but the harvester can be used as alternative source of energy for electronic devices with an expected low level of power consumption of several mW. The optimized design of the vibration energy harvester was based on previous development and the sensitivity of harvester design was improved for effective harvesting from mechanical vibrations in aeronautic applications. The vibration energy harvester is a mechatronic system which generates electrical energy from ambient vibrations due to precision tuning up generator parameters. The optimization study for maximization of harvested power or minimization of volume and weight are the main goals of our development. The optimization study of such complex device is complicated therefore artificial intelligence methods can be used for tuning up optimal harvester parameters.

  7. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Diana Christine

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  8. Applying Thermal Gradients To Control Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edberg, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal actuators used to stabilize large structures. New damping concept calls for application of suitably timed and shaped thermal-gradient waveforms to generate expansions and contractions counteracting vibrations. Responding to processed signal from accelerometer, thermoelectric heat pumps apply thermal gradients producing expansions and contractions in upper and lower caps of cantilever beam. These expansions and contractions partly counteract vibrations sensed by accelerometer, thus contributing to damping.

  9. Vibration ride comfort criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study directed to derive equal vibration discomfort curves, to determine the influence of vibration masking in order to account for the total discomfort of any random vibration, and to develop a scale of total vibration discomfort in the case of human response to whole-body vertical vibration. Discomfort is referred to as a subjective discomfort associated with the acceleration level of a particular frequency band. It is shown that passenger discomfort to whole-body vibration increases linearly with acceleration level for each frequency. Empirical data provide a mechanism for determining the degree of masking (or summation) of the discomfort of multiple frequency vibration. A scale for the prediction of passenger discomfort is developed.

  10. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered.

  11. Optimizing Vibrational Coordinates To Modulate Intermode Coupling.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Paul M; Smereka, Peter

    2016-04-12

    The choice of coordinate system strongly affects the convergence properties of vibrational structure computations. Two methods for efficient generation of improved vibrational coordinates are presented and justified by analysis of a model anharmonic two-mode Hessian and numerical computations on polyatomic molecules. To produce optimal coordinates, metrics which quantify off-diagonal couplings over a grid of Hessian matrices are minimized through unitary rotations of the vibrational basis. The first proposed metric minimizes the total squared off-diagonal coupling, and the second minimizes the total squared change in off-diagonal coupling. In this procedure certain anharmonic modes tend to localize, for example X-H stretches. The proposed methods do not rely on prior fitting of the potential energy, vibrational structure computations, or localization metrics, so they are unique from previous vibrational coordinate generation algorithms and are generally applicable to polyatomic molecules. Fitting the potential to the approximate n-mode representation in the optimized bases for all-trans polyenes shows that off-diagonal anharmonic couplings are substantially reduced by the new choices of coordinate system. Convergence of vibrational energies is examined in detail for ethylene, and it is shown that coupling-optimized modes converge in vibrational configuration interaction computations to within 1 cm(-1) using only 3-mode couplings, where normal modes require 4-mode couplings for convergence. Comparison of the vibrational configuration interaction convergence with respect to excitation level for the two proposed metrics shows that minimization of the total off-diagonal coupling is most effective for low-cost vibrational structure computations.

  12. Statistical quality control through overall vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnero, M. a. Carmen; González-Palma, Rafael; Almorza, David; Mayorga, Pedro; López-Escobar, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The present study introduces the concept of statistical quality control in automotive wheel bearings manufacturing processes. Defects on products under analysis can have a direct influence on passengers' safety and comfort. At present, the use of vibration analysis on machine tools for quality control purposes is not very extensive in manufacturing facilities. Noise and vibration are common quality problems in bearings. These failure modes likely occur under certain operating conditions and do not require high vibration amplitudes but relate to certain vibration frequencies. The vibration frequencies are affected by the type of surface problems (chattering) of ball races that are generated through grinding processes. The purpose of this paper is to identify grinding process variables that affect the quality of bearings by using statistical principles in the field of machine tools. In addition, an evaluation of the quality results of the finished parts under different combinations of process variables is assessed. This paper intends to establish the foundations to predict the quality of the products through the analysis of self-induced vibrations during the contact between the grinding wheel and the parts. To achieve this goal, the overall self-induced vibration readings under different combinations of process variables are analysed using statistical tools. The analysis of data and design of experiments follows a classical approach, considering all potential interactions between variables. The analysis of data is conducted through analysis of variance (ANOVA) for data sets that meet normality and homoscedasticity criteria. This paper utilizes different statistical tools to support the conclusions such as chi squared, Shapiro-Wilks, symmetry, Kurtosis, Cochran, Hartlett, and Hartley and Krushal-Wallis. The analysis presented is the starting point to extend the use of predictive techniques (vibration analysis) for quality control. This paper demonstrates the existence

  13. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    SciTech Connect

    Galchev, Tzeno; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The

  14. Hybrid isolation of micro vibrations induced by reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-02-01

    As the technology for precision satellite payloads continues to advance, the requirements for the pointing stability of the satellites are becoming extremely high. In many situations, even small amplitude disturbances generated by the onboard components may cause serious degradation in the performance of high precision payloads. In such situations, vibration isolators can be installed to reduce the vibration transmission. In this work, a hybrid vibration isolator comprising passive and active components is proposed to provide an effective solution to the vibration problems caused by the reaction wheel disturbances. Firstly, mathematical modeling and experimental study of a single axis vibration isolator having high damping and high roll-off rate for the high frequency region and active components that enhance isolation performance for narrow frequency bands are presented. This concept is then extended to multi-axis by forming Stewart platform and the performance is experimentally verified. The tests on a flexible testbed show effective vibration isolation by the proposed vibration isolator.

  15. Damage monitoring and impact detection using optical fiber vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. C.; Han, K. S.

    2002-06-01

    Intensity-based optical fiber vibrations sensors (OFVSs) are used in damage monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastics, in vibration sensing, and location of impacts. OFVSs were constructed by placing two cleaved fiber ends in a capillary tube. This sensor is able to monitor structural vibrations. For vibration sensing, the optical fiber sensor was mounted on the carbon fiber reinforced composite beam, and its response was investigated for free and forced vibration. For locating impact points, four OFVSs were placed at chosen positions and the different arrival times of impact-generated vibration signals were recorded. The impact location can be determined from these time delays. Indentation and tensile tests were performed with the measurement of the optical signal and acoustic emission (AE). The OFVSs accurately detected both free and forced vibration signals. Accurate locations of impact were determined on an acrylate plate. It was found that damage information, comparable in quality to AE data, could be obtained from the OFVS signals.

  16. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Ehman, E C; Rossman, P J; Kruse, S A; Sahakian, A V; Glaser, K J

    2008-02-21

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  17. Vibration and noise analysis of a gear transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Qian, W.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive procedure to predict both the vibration and noise generated by a gear transmission system under normal operating conditions. The gearbox vibrations were obtained from both numerical simulation and experimental studies using a gear noise test rig. In addition, the noise generated by the gearbox vibrations was recorded during the experimental testing. A numerical method was used to develop linear relationships between the gearbox vibration and the generated noise. The hypercoherence function is introduced to correlate the nonlinear relationship between the fundamental noise frequency and its harmonics. A numerical procedure was developed using both the linear and nonlinear relationships generated from the experimental data to predict noise resulting from the gearbox vibrations. The application of this methodology is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and experimental results from the gear noise test rig.

  18. Plants respond to leaf vibrations caused by insect herbivore chewing.

    PubMed

    Appel, H M; Cocroft, R B

    2014-08-01

    Plant germination and growth can be influenced by sound, but the ecological significance of these responses is unclear. We asked whether acoustic energy generated by the feeding of insect herbivores was detected by plants. We report that the vibrations caused by insect feeding can elicit chemical defenses. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) rosettes pre-treated with the vibrations caused by caterpillar feeding had higher levels of glucosinolate and anthocyanin defenses when subsequently fed upon by Pieris rapae (L.) caterpillars than did untreated plants. The plants also discriminated between the vibrations caused by chewing and those caused by wind or insect song. Plants thus respond to herbivore-generated vibrations in a selective and ecologically meaningful way. A vibration signaling pathway would complement the known signaling pathways that rely on volatile, electrical, or phloem-borne signals. We suggest that vibration may represent a new long distance signaling mechanism in plant-insect interactions that contributes to systemic induction of chemical defenses.

  19. Substrate Vibrations during Courtship in Three Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Valerio; Anfora, Gianfranco; Virant-Doberlet, Meta

    2013-01-01

    While a plethora of studies have focused on the role of visual, chemical and near-field airborne signals in courtship of Drosophila fruit flies, the existence of substrate-borne vibrational signals has been almost completely overlooked. Here we describe substrate vibrations generated during courtship in three species of the D. melanogaster group, from the allegedly mute species D. suzukii, its sister species D. biarmipes, and from D. melanogaster. In all species, we recorded several types of substrate vibrations which were generated by locomotion, abdominal vibrations and most likely through the activity of thoracic wing muscles. In D. melanogaster and D. suzukii, all substrate vibrations described in intact males were also recorded in males with amputated wings. Evidence suggests that vibrational signalling may be widespread among Drosophila species, and fruit flies may provide an ideal model to study various aspects of this widespread form of animal communication. PMID:24260459

  20. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  1. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  2. Prediction of Ground Vibration from Freight Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Block, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    Heavy freight trains emit ground vibration with predominant frequency components in the range 4-30 Hz. If the amplitude is sufficient, this may be felt by lineside residents, giving rise to disturbance and concern over possible damage to their property. In order to establish the influence of parameters of the track and rolling stock and thereby enable the design of a low vibration railway, a theoretical model of both the generation and propagation of vibration is required. The vibration is generated as a combination of the effects of dynamic forces, due to the unevenness of the track, and the effects of the track deformation under successive axle loads. A prediction scheme, which combines these effects, has been produced. A vehicle model is used to predict the dynamic forces at the wheels. This includes the non-linear effects of friction damped suspensions. The loaded track profile is measured by using a track recording coach. The dynamic loading and the effects of the moving axles are combined in a track response model. The predicted track vibration is compared to measurements. The transfer functions from the track to a point in the ground can be calculated by using a coupled track and a three-dimensional layered ground model. The propagation effects of the ground layers are important but the computation of the transfer function from each sleeper, which would be required for a phase coherent summation of the vibration in the ground, would be prohibitive. A compromise summation is used and results are compared with measurements.

  3. Vibration assisted femtosecond laser machining on metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Kyu; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach to improve laser machining quality on metals by vibrating the optical objective lens with a frequency (of 500 Hz) and various displacements (0-16.5 μm) during a femtosecond laser machining process. The laser used in this experiment is an amplified Ti:sapphire fs laser system that generates 100 fs pulses having an energy of 3.5 mJ/pulse with a 5 kHz repetition rate at a central wavelength of 790 nm. It is found that both the wall surface finish of the machined structures and the aspect ratio obtained using the frequency vibration assisted laser machining are improved, compared to those derived via laser machining without vibration assistance. This is the first report of low frequency vibration of an optical objective lens in the femtosecond laser machining process being exploited to obtain significantly improved surface roughness of machined side walls and increased aspect ratios.

  4. Long-range vibration sensor based on correlation analysis of optical frequency-domain reflectometry signals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Han, Qun; Meng, Zhuo; Chen, Hongxin

    2012-12-17

    We present a novel method to achieve a space-resolved long- range vibration detection system based on the correlation analysis of the optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) signals. By performing two separate measurements of the vibrated and non-vibrated states on a test fiber, the vibration frequency and position of a vibration event can be obtained by analyzing the cross-correlation between beat signals of the vibrated and non-vibrated states in a spatial domain, where the beat signals are generated from interferences between local Rayleigh backscattering signals of the test fiber and local light oscillator. Using the proposed technique, we constructed a standard single-mode fiber based vibration sensor that can have a dynamic range of 12 km and a measurable vibration frequency up to 2 kHz with a spatial resolution of 5 m. Moreover, preliminarily investigation results of two vibration events located at different positions along the test fiber are also reported.

  5. Integrated predictive maintenance program vibration and lube oil analysis: Part I - history and the vibration program

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, H.

    1996-12-01

    This paper is the first of two papers which describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machines at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The organization has recently been restructured and significant benefits have been realized by the interaction, or {open_quotes}synergy{close_quotes} between the Vibration Program and the Lube Oil Analysis Program. This paper starts with the oldest part of the program - the Vibration Program and discusses the evolution of the program to its current state. The {open_quotes}Vibration{close_quotes} view of the combined program is then presented.

  6. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  7. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  8. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOEpatents

    Cericola, Fred; Doggett, James W.; Ernest, Terry L.; Priddy, Tommy G.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  9. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.

    1991-08-27

    An apparatus is discussed for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 {degrees} around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  10. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.; Priddy, T.G.

    1990-03-21

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis. 1 fig.

  11. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Levin, Ira W.

    2011-07-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, commonly associated with IR absorption and Raman scattering, has provided a powerful approach for investigating interactions between biomolecules that make up cellular membranes. Because the IR and Raman signals arise from the intrinsic properties of these molecules, vibrational spectroscopy probes the delicate interactions that regulate biomembranes with minimal perturbation. Numerous innovative measurements, including nonlinear optical processes and confined bilayer assemblies, have provided new insights into membrane behavior. In this review, we highlight the use of vibrational spectroscopy to study lipid-lipid interactions. We also examine recent work in which vibrational measurements have been used to investigate the incorporation of peptides and proteins into lipid bilayers, and we discuss the interactions of small molecules and drugs with membrane structures. Emerging techniques and measurements on intact cellular membranes provide a prospective on the future of vibrational spectroscopic studies of biomembranes.

  12. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  13. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  14. Airfoil Vibration Dampers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Airfoil Vibration Damper program has consisted of an analysis phase and a testing phase. During the analysis phase, a state-of-the-art computer code was developed, which can be used to guide designers in the placement and sizing of friction dampers. The use of this computer code was demonstrated by performing representative analyses on turbine blades from the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) and High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The testing phase of the program consisted of performing friction damping tests on two different cantilever beams. Data from these tests provided an empirical check on the accuracy of the computer code developed in the analysis phase. Results of the analysis and testing showed that the computer code can accurately predict the performance of friction dampers. In addition, a valuable set of friction damping data was generated, which can be used to aid in the design of friction dampers, as well as provide benchmark test cases for future code developers.

  15. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  16. A rotary ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-10-01

    A rotary ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducers is proposed. In each transducer, two orthogonal bending vibrations are superimposed and an elliptical trajectory is generated at the driving foot. Typical output of the prototype is a no-load speed of 58 rpm and maximum torque of 9·5 Nm under an exciting voltage of 200 V(rms).

  17. Vibration dissipation mount for motors or the like

    DOEpatents

    Small, Thomas R.

    1987-01-01

    A vibration dissipation mount which permits the mounting of a motor, generator, or the like such that the rotatable shaft thereof passes through the mount and the mount permits the dissipation of self-induced and otherwise induced vibrations wherein the mount comprises a pair of plates having complementary concave and convex surfaces, a semi-resilient material being disposed therebetween.

  18. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches.

  19. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B.; Stanton, Tasha R.; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one’s own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both ‘upward-downward’ and ‘towards-away from the elbow’ planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a ‘telescoping’ effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length. PMID:27305112

  20. Laser vibrometry measurements of rotating blade vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, A.K.; Kadambi, J.R.; Quinn, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    One of the most important design factors in modern turbomachinery is the vibration of turbomachinery blading. There is a need for developing an in-service, noncontacting, noninterfering method for the measurement and monitoring of gas turbine, jet engine, and steam turbine blade vibrations and stresses. Such a technique would also be useful for monitoring rotating helicopter blades. In the power generation industry, blade failures can result in millions of dollars of downtime. The measurement of blade vibrations and dynamic stresses is an important guide for preventive maintenance, which can be a major contributor to the availability of steam turbine, gas turbine, and helicopter operations. An experiment is designed to verify the feasibility of such a vibration monitoring system using the reference beam on-axis laser-Doppler technique. The experimental setup consists of two flat, cantilever blades mounted on a hub attached to the shaft of a dc motor. The motor rests on a linear bearing permitting motion only in the direction of the motor shaft. The motor and blade assembly is then excited via an electrodynamic shaker at the first natural frequency of the blades. The resulting blade vibration is then detected using a laser vibrometer. The vibration frequencies and amplitudes of the two rotating blades are successfully measured.

  1. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B; Stanton, Tasha R; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one's own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both 'upward-downward' and 'towards-away from the elbow' planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a 'telescoping' effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length. PMID:27305112

  2. Laser vibrometry measurements of rotating blade vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, A.K.; Kadambi, J.R.; Quinn, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    One of the most important design factors in modern turbomachinery is the vibration of turbomachinery blading. There is a need for developing an in-service, noncontacting, noninterfering method for the measurement and monitoring of gas turbine, jet engine, and steam turbine blade vibrations and stresses. Such a technique would also be useful for monitoring rotating helicopter blades. In the power generation industry, blade failures can result in millions of dollars of downtime. The measurement of blade vibrations and dynamic stresses is an important guide for preventive maintenance which can be a major contributor to the availability of steam turbine, gas turbine, and helicopter operations. An experiment is designed to verify the feasibility of such a vibration monitoring system using the reference beam on-axis laser Doppler technique. The experimental setup consists of two flat, cantilever blades mounted on a hub attached to the shaft of a dc motor. The motor rests on a linear bearing permitting motion only in the direction of the motor shaft. The motor and blade assembly is then excited via an electrodynamic shaker at the first natural frequency of the blades. The resulting blade vibration is then detected using a laser vibrometer. The vibration frequencies and amplitudes of the two rotating blades are successfully measured.

  3. Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-09-17

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

  4. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. PMID:27516544

  5. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity.

  6. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2015-03-01

    We have recently found that a long length of fiber of up to 1 km terminated with an in-fiber cavity structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 2 kHz. We want to determine whether the sensor (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to maintenance cost. The sensor may also help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that requires the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Acoustic vibration monitoring may need sensing at even higher frequencies (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed longgauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  7. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2014-11-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 1 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large reenforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  8. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 2 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  9. Compact Active Vibration Control System for a Flexible Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A diamond-shaped actuator for a flexible panel has an inter-digitated electrode (IDE) and a piezoelectric wafer portion positioned therebetween. The IDE and/or the wafer portion are diamond-shaped. Point sensors are positioned with respect to the actuator and measure vibration. The actuator generates and transmits a cancelling force to the panel in response to an output signal from a controller, which is calculated using a signal describing the vibration. A method for controlling vibration in a flexible panel includes connecting a diamond-shaped actuator to the flexible panel, and then connecting a point sensor to each actuator. Vibration is measured via the point sensor. The controller calculates a proportional output voltage signal from the measured vibration, and transmits the output signal to the actuator to substantially cancel the vibration in proximity to each actuator.

  10. Vibrations and structureborne noise in space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.; Lyrintzis, C. S.; Bofilios, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to predict vibrations and structureborne noise generation of cylindrical and rectangular acoustic enclosures. These models are then used to determine structural vibration levels and interior noise to random point input forces. The guidelines developed could provide preliminary information on acoustical and vibrational environments in space station habitability modules under orbital operations. The structural models include single wall monocoque shell, double wall shell, stiffened orthotropic shell, descretely stiffened flat panels, and a coupled system composed of a cantilever beam structure and a stiffened sidewall. Aluminum and fiber reinforced composite materials are considered for single and double wall shells. The end caps of the cylindrical enclosures are modeled either as single or double wall circular plates. Sound generation in the interior space is calculated by coupling the structural vibrations to the acoustic field in the enclosure. Modal methods and transfer matrix techniques are used to obtain structural vibrations. Parametric studies are performed to determine the sensitivity of interior noise environment to changes in input, geometric and structural conditions.

  11. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  12. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  13. Built-up edge investigation in vibration drilling of Al2024-T6.

    PubMed

    Barani, A; Amini, S; Paktinat, H; Fadaei Tehrani, A

    2014-07-01

    Adding ultrasonic vibrations to drilling process results in an advanced hybrid machining process, entitled "vibration drilling". This study presents the design and fabrication of a vibration drilling tool by which both rotary and vibrating motions are applied to drill simultaneously. High frequency and low amplitude vibrations were generated by an ultrasonic transducer with frequency of 19.65 kHz. Ultrasonic transducer was controlled by a MPI ultrasonic generator with 3 kW power. The drilling tool and workpiece material were HSS two-flute twist drill and Al2024-T6, respectively. The aim of this study was investigating on the effect of ultrasonic vibrations on built-up edge, surface quality, chip morphology and wear mechanisms of drill edges. Therefore, these factors were studied in both vibration and ordinary drilling. Based on the achieved results, vibration drilling offers less built-up edge and better surface quality compared to ordinary drilling.

  14. Built-up edge investigation in vibration drilling of Al2024-T6.

    PubMed

    Barani, A; Amini, S; Paktinat, H; Fadaei Tehrani, A

    2014-07-01

    Adding ultrasonic vibrations to drilling process results in an advanced hybrid machining process, entitled "vibration drilling". This study presents the design and fabrication of a vibration drilling tool by which both rotary and vibrating motions are applied to drill simultaneously. High frequency and low amplitude vibrations were generated by an ultrasonic transducer with frequency of 19.65 kHz. Ultrasonic transducer was controlled by a MPI ultrasonic generator with 3 kW power. The drilling tool and workpiece material were HSS two-flute twist drill and Al2024-T6, respectively. The aim of this study was investigating on the effect of ultrasonic vibrations on built-up edge, surface quality, chip morphology and wear mechanisms of drill edges. Therefore, these factors were studied in both vibration and ordinary drilling. Based on the achieved results, vibration drilling offers less built-up edge and better surface quality compared to ordinary drilling. PMID:24582556

  15. Distributed bearing fault diagnosis based on vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, Boštjan; Boškoski, Pavle; Juričić, Đani

    2016-01-01

    Distributed bearing faults appear under various circumstances, for example due to electroerosion or the progression of localized faults. Bearings with distributed faults tend to generate more complex vibration patterns than those with localized faults. Despite the frequent occurrence of such faults, their diagnosis has attracted limited attention. This paper examines a method for the diagnosis of distributed bearing faults employing vibration analysis. The vibrational patterns generated are modeled by incorporating the geometrical imperfections of the bearing components. Comparing envelope spectra of vibration signals shows that one can distinguish between localized and distributed faults. Furthermore, a diagnostic procedure for the detection of distributed faults is proposed. This is evaluated on several bearings with naturally born distributed faults, which are compared with fault-free bearings and bearings with localized faults. It is shown experimentally that features extracted from vibrations in fault-free, localized and distributed fault conditions form clearly separable clusters, thus enabling diagnosis.

  16. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  17. Mechanical characteristics of strained vibrating strings and a vibration-induced electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivin, Yu. K.

    2012-11-01

    The mechanical characteristics of vibrating strings strained between rigid supports and a vibration-induced electric field are studied. Experiments are conducted with nylon, rubber, and metallic strings. Vibrations are excited by a pinch at different sites along the string. The motion of the string is filmed, and the attendant electric field is detected. Experimental data are analyzed under the assumption that the field is induced by unlike charges generated by the moving string. It is found that the field allows one to determine the time characteristics of the motion of the string and discriminate the types of its deformations. Young moduli observed under the static extension of thin nylon strings are compared with those calculated from the natural frequencies of vibration measured for differently strained strings. The mathematical pattern of the motion of the string is compared with the real situation.

  18. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  19. System characterization in nonlinear random vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Linear structural models are frequently used for structural system characterization and analysis. In most situations they can provide satisfactory results, but under some circumstances they are insufficient for system definition. The present investigation proposes a model for nonlinear structure characterization, and demonstrates how the functions describing the model can be identified using a random vibration experiment. Further, it is shown that the model is sufficient to completely characterize the stationary random vibration response of a structure that has a harmonic frequency generating form of nonlinearity. An analytical example is presented to demonstrate the plausibility of the model.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-03-01

    Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic glucocorticoid with potent anti-inflammatory activity that has been used effectively in the treatment of chronic asthma. The present work reports a vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate and gives proposed molecular assignments on the basis of ab initio calculations using BLYP density functional theory with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Several spectral features and band intensities are explained. This study generated a library of information that can be employed to aid the process monitoring of fluticasone propionate.

  1. Vibration analysis methods for piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, R. J.

    1981-09-01

    Attention is given to flow vibrations in pipe flow induced by singularity points in the piping system. The types of pressure fluctuations induced by flow singularities are examined, including the intense wideband fluctuations immediately downstream of the singularity and the acoustic fluctuations encountered in the remainder of the circuit, and a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics is developed. The response of the piping systems to the pressure fluctuations thus generated is considered, and the calculation of the modal characteristics of piping containing a dense fluid in order to obtain the system transfer function is discussed. The TEDEL program, which calculates the vibratory response of a structure composed of straight and curved pipes with variable mechanical characteristics forming a three-dimensional network by a finite element method, is then presented, and calculations of fluid-structural coupling in tubular networks are illustrated.

  2. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  3. In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-06-30

    Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The α-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the

  4. Mechanical vibration to electrical energy converter

    DOEpatents

    Kellogg, Rick Allen; Brotz, Jay Kristoffer

    2009-03-03

    Electromechanical devices that generate an electrical signal in response to an external source of mechanical vibrations can operate as a sensor of vibrations and as an energy harvester for converting mechanical vibration to electrical energy. The devices incorporate a magnet that is movable through a gap in a ferromagnetic circuit, wherein a coil is wound around a portion of the ferromagnetic circuit. A flexible coupling is used to attach the magnet to a frame for providing alignment of the magnet as it moves or oscillates through the gap in the ferromagnetic circuit. The motion of the magnet can be constrained to occur within a substantially linear range of magnetostatic force that develops due to the motion of the magnet. The devices can have ferromagnetic circuits with multiple arms, an array of magnets having alternating polarity and, encompass micro-electromechanical (MEM) devices.

  5. Vibration and structureborne noise in space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical models and computer programs for structural response calculations under action of mechanical point loads were developed for single wall shells (composite or aluminum), double wall shells (composite or aluminum), and single wall or double wall circular plates (aluminum). The design configuration of the habitability modules of the space station concept are expected to be discretely stiffened cylindrical shells with truncated cone type end caps or flat but stiffened circular end plates. Analytical formulations and response calculations were performed for the case where the stiffened shell is represented by an orthotropic shell model. The natural frequencies can be calculated. For application to low frequency (below 1000Hz) vibrations and noise generation, such a model might be adequate to evaluate vibration and noise transmission characteristics of space station habitability modules. Parametric studies are now being performed to assess interior noise environment inside a habitability module to mechanically induced vibrations.

  6. The vibrations of texture.

    PubMed

    BensmaIa, Sliman J; Hollins, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Pacinian channel has been implicated in the perception of fine textures (Hollins et al., Somatosens Mot Res 18: 253-262, 2001a). In the present study, we investigate candidate codes for Pacinian-mediated roughness perception. We use a Hall effect transducer to record the vibrations elicited in the skin when a set of textured surfaces is passively presented to the index finger. The peak frequency of the vibrations is found to decrease systematically as spatial period increases. The power of the vibrations--weighted according to the spectral sensitivity of the Pacinian system--increases with spatial period for all but the coarsest surfaces. By varying the scanning velocity, we manipulate the temporal and intensive characteristics of the texture-induced vibrations and assess the effect of the manipulation on perceived roughness. We find that doubling the scanning velocity does not result in the substantial decrease in roughness predicted by a frequency theory of vibrotactile roughness perception. On the other hand, the effects of speed on roughness match those of speed on power. We propose that the roughness of a fine surface (spatial period<200 microm) is a function of the Pacinian-weighted power of the vibrations it elicits.

  7. The Physics of Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippard, A. B.

    1989-11-01

    The study of vibration in physical systems is an important part of almost all fields in physics and engineering. This work, originally published in two volumes, examines the classical aspects in Part I and the quantum oscillator in Part II. The classical linear vibrator is treated first and the underlying unity of all linear oscillations in electrical, mechanical and acoustic systems is emphasized. Following this the book turns to the treatment of nonlinear vibrations, a field with which engineers and physicists are generally less familiar. In Part II the emphasis turns to quantum systems, that is those systems which can only be adequately described by quantum mechanics. The treatment concentrates on vibrations in atoms and molecules and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The similarities of classical and quantum methods are stressed and the limits of the classical treatment are examined. Throughout the book, each phenomenon discussed is illustrated with many examples and theory and experiment are compared. Although the reader may find that the physics discussed is demanding and the concepts are subtle in places, all mathematics used is familiar to both engineers and experimental scientists. Although not a textbook this is a useful introduction to the more advanced mathematical treatment of vibrations as it bridges the gap between the basic principles and more specialized concepts. It will be of great interest to advanced undergraduates and postgraduates as well as applied mathematicians, physicists and engineers in university and industry.

  8. Nonlinear resonance ultrasonic vibrations in Czochralski-silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapenko, S.; Tarasov, I.

    2000-04-01

    A resonance effect of generation of subharmonic acoustic vibrations is observed in as-grown, oxidized, and epitaxial silicon wafers. Ultrasonic vibrations were generated into a standard 200 mm Czochralski-silicon (Cz-Si) wafer using a circular ultrasound transducer with major frequency of the radial vibrations at about 26 kHz. By tuning frequency (f) of the transducer within a resonance curve, we observed a generation of intense f/2 subharmonic acoustic mode assigned as a "whistle." The whistle mode has a threshold amplitude behavior and narrow frequency band. The whistle is attributed to a nonlinear acoustic vibration of a silicon plate. It is demonstrated that characteristics of the whistle mode are sensitive to internal stress and can be used for quality control and in-line diagnostics of oxidized and epitaxial Cz-Si wafers.

  9. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  11. Analysis of real-time vibration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, a few structures have been instrumented to provide continuous vibration data in real time, recording not only large-amplitude motions generated by extreme loads, but also small-amplitude motions generated by ambient loads. The main objective in continuous recording is to track any changes in structural characteristics, and to detect damage after an extreme event, such as an earthquake or explosion. The Fourier-based spectral analysis methods have been the primary tool to analyze vibration data from structures. In general, such methods do not work well for real-time data, because real-time data are mainly composed of ambient vibrations with very low amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios. The long duration, linearity, and the stationarity of ambient data, however, allow us to utilize statistical signal processing tools, which can compensate for the adverse effects of low amplitudes and high noise. The analysis of real-time data requires tools and techniques that can be applied in real-time; i.e., data are processed and analyzed while being acquired. This paper presents some of the basic tools and techniques for processing and analyzing real-time vibration data. The topics discussed include utilization of running time windows, tracking mean and mean-square values, filtering, system identification, and damage detection.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  13. Vibrational Dynamics and Thermodynamics of AgCu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Abdelkader; Yildirim, Handan; Rahman, Talat S.; Ferrando, Ricardo

    2006-03-01

    We present results of a systematic study of the structure, vibrational dynamics and thermodynamics of AgnCu34-n nanoparticles including. The starting structure were generated using a structural optimization using a genetic algorithm [1]. Using the embedded atom method potentials, we have calculated the vibrational densities of states for all stoichiometries and the corresponding vibrational free energies, in the harmonic approximations. At 300K, the vibrational free energy is found to behave linearly with the increasing number of Ag atoms in the nanoparticles. The vibrational contributions to the free energy increase from 5.5% for Ag0Cu34 to 8.3% Ag34Cu0. Selected force constants for several nanoparticles were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and were found to be very close to those determined using EAM potentials. [1] G. Rossi, A. Rapallo, C. Mottet, A. Fortunelli, F. Baletto and R. Ferrando Phys. Rev. Lett, 93, 105503 (2004)

  14. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  15. Tool-specific performance of vibration-reducing gloves for attenuating palm-transmitted vibrations in three orthogonal directions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Peterson, Donald R.; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Warren, Christopher; Asaki, Takafumi; Kudernatsch, Simon; Brammer, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been increasingly used to help reduce vibration exposure, but it remains unclear how effective these gloves are. The purpose of this study was to estimate tool-specific performances of VR gloves for reducing the vibrations transmitted to the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions (3-D) in an attempt to assess glove effectiveness and aid in the appropriate selection of these gloves. Four typical VR gloves were considered in this study, two of which can be classified as anti-vibration (AV) gloves according to the current AV glove test standard. The average transmissibility spectrum of each glove in each direction was synthesized based on spectra measured in this study and other spectra collected from reported studies. More than seventy vibration spectra of various tools or machines were considered in the estimations, which were also measured in this study or collected from reported studies. The glove performance assessments were based on the percent reduction of frequency-weighted acceleration as is required in the current standard for assessing the risk of vibration exposures. The estimated tool-specific vibration reductions of the gloves indicate that the VR gloves could slightly reduce (<5%) or marginally amplify (<10%) the vibrations generated from low-frequency (<25 Hz) tools or those vibrating primarily along the axis of the tool handle. With other tools, the VR gloves could reduce palm-transmitted vibrations in the range of 5%–58%, primarily depending on the specific tool and its vibration spectra in the three directions. The two AV gloves were not more effective than the other gloves with some of the tools considered in this study. The implications of the results are discussed. Relevance to industry Hand-transmitted vibration exposure may cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves are considered as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. This study provides useful information

  16. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  17. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  18. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  19. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  20. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  1. Human discomfort response to noise combined with vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted (1) to determine the effects of combined environmental noise and vertical vibration upon human subjective discomfort response, (2) to develop a model for the prediction of passenger discomfort response to the combined environment, and (3) to develop a set of noise-vibration curves for use as criteria in ride quality design. Subjects were exposed to parametric combinations of noise and vibrations through the use of a realistic laboratory simulator. Results indicated that accurate prediction of passenger ride comfort requires knowledge of both the level and frequency content of the noise and vibration components of a ride environment as well as knowledge of the interactive effects of combined noise and vibration. A design tool in the form of an empirical model of passenger discomfort response to combined noise and vertical vibration was developed and illustrated by several computational examples. Finally, a set of noise-vibration criteria curves were generated to illustrate the fundamental design trade-off possible between passenger discomfort and the noise-vibration levels that produce the discomfort.

  2. Vibration characteristics of ultrasonic complex vibration for hole machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2012-05-01

    Complex vibration sources that use diagonal slits as a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter have been applied to ultrasonic motors, ultrasonic rock drilling, and ultrasonic welding. However, there are few examples of the application of these sources to ultrasonic machining in combination with an abrasive. Accordingly, a new method has been developed for machining of holes in brittle materials by using the ultrasonic longitudinal and torsional vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn with a diagonal slit vibration converter. In this paper, we compared vibration of a uniform rod and a hollow-type stepped horn, both with diagonal slits, when the conditions of the diagonal slits are constant.

  3. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  4. Molecular histopathology by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-07-01

    A rapid label-free approach for molecular histopathology is presented and reviewed. Broadband vibrational spectra are generated by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging (NIVI), a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)- based technique that uses interferometry and signal processing approaches to acquire Raman-like profiles with suppression of the non-resonant background. This allows for the generation of images that provide contrast based on quantitative chemical composition with high spatial and spectral resolution. Algorithms are demonstrated for reducing the diagnostic spectral information into color-coded composite images for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in skin, as well as differentiating normal from abnormal tissue in a pre-clinical tumor model for human breast cancer. This technology and methodology could result in an alternative method to the traditional histological staining and subjective interpretation procedure currently used in the diagnosis of disease, and has the potential for future in vivo molecular histopathology.

  5. Vibrational Photoacoustic Tomography: Chemical Imaging beyond the Ballistic Regime

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Proof-of-concept of vibrational photoacoustic tomography is demonstrated with a homebuilt Raman laser generating greater than 100 mJ of energy per pulse at 1197 nm wavelength. We employed this system for excitation of second overtone transition of C-H bonds. Vibrational photoacoustic signal from C-H rich polyethylene tube phantom placed under 3 cm thick chicken breast tissue was obtained with a signal to noise ratio of 2.5. Further, we recorded photoacoustic image of a polyethylene ring placed under 5 mm chicken tissue with excellent contrast. This development opens new opportunities of performing label free vibrational imaging in the deep tissue regime. PMID:24224071

  6. Estimating Vibrational Powers Of Parts In Fluid Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, S. A.; Kwok, L. C.

    1995-01-01

    In new method of estimating vibrational power associated with component of fluid-machinery system, physics of flow through (or in vicinity of) component regarded as governing vibrations. Devised to generate scaling estimates for design of new parts of rocket engines (e.g., pumps, combustors, nozzles) but applicable to terrestrial pumps, turbines, and other machinery in which turbulent flows and vibrations caused by such flows are significant. Validity of method depends on assumption that fluid flows quasi-steadily and that flow gives rise to uncorrelated acoustic powers in different parts of pump.

  7. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; CAP,JEROME S.; TOGAMI,THOMAS C.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD,JAMES RONALD

    1999-11-11

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented.

  8. Vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.

    1987-10-01

    Experiments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft and observations made by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) have provided evidence for the existence of energetic particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere of Jupiter from the magnetosphere. This auroral precipitation has been shown to generate large ionization and dissociation rates, to excite auroral emissions, and also to vibrationally excite molecular hydrogen. A theoretical model of vibrationally excited H2 in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter is presented in this paper. Models are considered for both the auroral region and also for lower latitudes, where H2 is vibrationally excited owing to processes associated with the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation.

  9. Gerotor and bearing system for whirling mass orbital vibrator

    DOEpatents

    Brett, James Ford; Westermark, Robert Victor; Turner, Jr., Joey Earl; Lovin, Samuel Scott; Cole, Jack Howard; Myers, Will

    2007-02-27

    A gerotor and bearing apparatus for a whirling mass orbital vibrator which generates vibration in a borehole. The apparatus includes a gerotor with an inner gear rotated by a shaft having one less lobe than an outer gear. A whirling mass is attached to the shaft. At least one bearing is attached to the shaft so that the bearing engages at least one sleeve. A mechanism is provided to rotate the inner gear, the mass and the bearing in a selected rotational direction in order to cause the mass, the inner gear, and the bearing to backwards whirl in an opposite rotational direction. The backwards whirling mass creates seismic vibrations.

  10. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  11. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  12. Vibration and acoustic testing of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft are subjected to a variety of dynamics environments, which may include: quasi-static, vibration and acoustic loads at launch: pyrotechnic shocks generated by separation mechanisms; on orbit jitter; and sometimes, planetary landing loads. There is a trend in the aerospace industry to rely more on structural analyses and less on testing to simulate these environments, because dynamics testing of spacecraft is time consuming, risky and expensive.

  13. Free vibrations of delaminated beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, M.-H. H.; Grady, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Free vibration of laminated composite beams is studied. The effect of interply delaminations on natural frequencies and mode shapes is evaluated both analytically and experimentally. A generalized vibrational principle is used to formulate the equation of motion and associated boundary conditions for the free vibration of a composite beam with a delamination of arbitrary size and location. The effect of coupling between longitudinal vibration and bending vibration is considered. This coupling effect is shown to significantly affect the calculated natural frequencies and mode shapes of the delaminated beam.

  14. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1987-07-07

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  15. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  16. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, Basil A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration.

  17. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it

  18. Noise and vibration control for HVAC and piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yerges, J.F.; Yerges, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    This article offers engineering advice on how to avoid noise and vibration problems through good mechanical engineering design and strategic communication with other members of the construction team. The design of ducted HVAC systems must address six distinct but related issues--airborne equipment noise, equipment vibration, ductborne fan noise, duct breakout noise, flow generated noise, and ductborne crosstalk. Each and every one of these issues must be addressed, or the design will fail.

  19. Vibrational molecular modulation in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu Wei; Chen, Wei-Jan; Kung, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    Detailed numerical modeling of using the vibrational coherence of H2 for molecular modulation is presented. The focus of the calculation is on a strongly driven system aimed at producing many sidebands in the presence of Doppler broadening and the effects of collisions at room temperature. It is shown that Dicke narrowing that reduces the Doppler width plays a critical role in high order sideband generation in room temperature H2 . In addition, the calculation shows that generation of many sidebands favors the phased state as has been reported in all gas phase experiments and is primarily a consequence of the Stark shifts that result from the applied high intensities. The influence of self-focusing in the gas medium that has been conjectured in previous studies is only secondary. The numerical results agree with experimental data obtained in our laboratory, where we have succeeded in generating collinearly propagating Raman sidebands with wavelengths that range from 2216nm in the infrared to 133nm in the vacuum ultraviolet. The frequencies covered by these sidebands span over four octaves for a total of more than 70600cm-1 in the optical region of the spectrum.

  20. Animal Communications Through Seismic Vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Peggy

    2001-05-02

    Substrate vibration has been important to animals as a channel of communication for millions of years, but our literature on vibration in this context of biologically relevant information is only decades old. The jaw mechanism of the earliest land vertebrates allowed them to perceive substrate vibrations as their heads lay on the ground long before airborne sounds could be heard. Although the exact mechanism of vibration production and the precise nature of the wave produced are not always understood, recent development of affordable instrumentation to detect and measure vibrations has allowed researchers to answer increasingly sophisticated questions about how animals send and receive vibration signals. We now know that vibration provides information used in predator defense, prey detection, recruitment to food, mate choice, intrasexual competition, and maternal/brood social interactions in a variety of insect orders, spiders, crabs, scorpions, chameleons, frogs, golden moles, mole rats, kangaroos rats, wallabies, elephants and bison.

  1. Vibrationally and rotationally nonadiabatic calculations on H3+ using coordinate-dependent vibrational and rotational masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Leonardo G.; Mohallem, José Rachid; Alijah, Alexander; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    Using the core-mass approach, we have generated a vibrational-mass surface for the triatomic H3+. The coordinate-dependent masses account for the off-resonance nonadiabatic coupling and permit a very accurate determination of the rovibrational states using a single potential energy surface. The new, high-precision measurements of 12 rovibrational transitions in the ν2 bending fundamental of H3+ by Wu [Phys. Rev. A1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.88.032507 88, 032507 (2013)] are used to scale this surface empirically and to derive state-dependent vibrational and rotational masses that reproduce the experimental transition energies to 10-3cm-1. Rotational term values for J≤10 are presented for the two lowest vibrational states and equivalent transitions in D3+ considered.

  2. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  3. Flow-induced vibration -- 1994. PVP-Volume 273

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Fujita, K.

    1994-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration is a subject of practical interest to many engineering disciplines, including the power generation, process, and petrochemical industries. In the nuclear industry, flow-induced vibration reaches a higher level of concern because of safety issues and the huge cost associated with down time and site repair. Not surprisingly, during the last 25 years a tremendous amount of effort has been spent in the study of flow-induced vibration phenomena related to nuclear plant components, notably nuclear steam generator tube banks and nuclear fuel bundles. Yet, in spite of this concentrated effort, the industry is still not free from flow-induced vibration-related problems. This explains why in this volume almost half of the papers address the issue of cross-flow induced vibration in tube bundles, with applications to the nuclear steam generator and nuclear fuel bundles in mind. Unlike 10 or 15 years ago, when flow-induced vibration studies almost always involved experimentation and empirical studies, the advent of high-speed computers has enabled numerical calculation and simulation of this complex phenomenon to take place. Separate abstracts were prepared for 27 papers in this volume.

  4. Effect of grease type on abnormal vibration of ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Takayoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Igarashib, Teruo

    2003-12-01

    The abnormal vibration of ball bearings lubricated with grease was studied. The test bearings were lubricated with three types of grease: Li soap/silicone oil grease, Na soap/mineral oil grease and Li soap/mineral oil grease. In the experiments, the axial-loaded ball bearings were operated at a constant rotational speed, and the vibration and the outer ring temperatures of the test bearings were measured. In addition, the shear stress and shear rate of the greases were measured by a rheometer. The experimental results showed that the abnormal vibration occurs on the test bearings lubricated with all three types of grease. Based on the experimental results, the generating mechanisms of the abnormal vibrations were discussed. From the discussions, it seems reasonable to conclude: (1) Li soap/silicone oil grease and Na soap/mineral oil grease both have a negative damping moment characteristic. The abnormal vibrations of the ball bearings lubricated with these greases are generated by the negative damping moment. (2) The abnormal vibration of the ball bearings lubricated with Li soap/mineral oil grease is generated by the decreasing positive damping moment of the grease due to the rising temperature.

  5. Multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies stress impact on human femur computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Bertram; Yeoh, Han Teik

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body vibration training using single-frequency methods has been reported to improve bone mineral density. However, the intensities can exceed safe levels and have drawn unfavorable comments from subjects. In a previous article, whole-body vibration training using multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies (MVDMVF) was reported. This article presents the computational simulation evaluation of stress dispersion on a femur with and without the MVDMVF input. A model of bone femur was developed from a computed tomography image of the lower limb with Mimics software from Materialise (Plymouth, Michigan). We analyzed the mesh model in COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL, Inc; Burlington, Massachusetts) with and without MVDMVF input, with constraints and load applied to the femur model. We compared the results with published joint stresses during walking, jogging, and stair-climbing and descending and with standard vibration exposure limits. Results showed stress levels on the femur are significantly higher with MVDMVF input than without. The stress levels were within the published levels during walking and stair-climbing and descending but below the stress levels during jogging. Our computational results demonstrate that MVDMVF generates stress level equivalent to the level during walking and stair-climbing. This evidence suggests that MVDMVF is safe for prolonged use in subjects with osteoporosis who ambulate independently. PMID:21480091

  6. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  7. [Capillaroscopy in vibration disease].

    PubMed

    Vayssairat, M; Patri, B; Guilmot, J L; Housset, E; Dubrisay, J

    1982-10-23

    The results of nailfold capillary microscopy were compared in 107 lumberers who had been using a chain saw for more than 3 years and 115 manual workers who had never used vibrating tools. The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon was 61.7% in lumberers and 5.2% in the control group. The mean time of exposure to risk before the condition developed was 7.86 years. The syndrome was usually mild, but the patients had an abnormally high incidence of accidents at work, including wounds and cut off fingers. The number of capillary loops was significantly reduced. The lumberers affected showed an abnormal spasm of the digital artery in response to cold; the predictive value of this test was 88%. It is suggested that nailfold capillary microscopy should be systematically used in industrial medicine for monitoring workers using a vibrating tool.

  8. Thermoelastic vibration test techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Michael W.; Snyder, H. Todd

    1991-01-01

    The structural integrity of proposed high speed aircraft can be seriously affected by the extremely high surface temperatures and large temperature gradients throughout the vehicle's structure. Variations in the structure's elastic characteristics as a result of thermal effects can be observed by changes in vibration frequency, damping, and mode shape. Analysis codes that predict these changes must be correlated and verified with experimental data. The experimental modal test techniques and procedures used to conduct uniform, nonuniform, and transient thermoelastic vibration tests are presented. Experimental setup and elevated temperature instrumentation considerations are also discussed. Modal data for a 12 by 50 inch aluminum plate heated to a temperature of 475 F are presented. These data show the effect of heat on the plate's modal characteristics. The results indicated that frequency decreased, damping increased, and mode shape remained unchanged as the temperature of the plate was increased.

  9. Vibrational stability of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangfan; Wang, Biao

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP) models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D) materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202). This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC), defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D) materials.

  10. Vibrational Dynamics of Tricyanomethanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, Daniel; Houchins, Cassidy; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2011-06-01

    Time-resolved and steady-state IR spectroscopy have been used to characterize vibrational spectra and energy relaxation dynamics of the CN stretching band of the tricyanomethanide (TCM, C(CN)3-) anion near 2170 Cm-1 in solutions of water, heavy water, methanol, formamide, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and the ionic liquid 1-butyl methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]). The band intensity is strong (˜1500 M-1Cm-1) and the vibrational energy relaxation times are relatively long (˜5 ps in water, 12 ps in heavy water, and ˜30 ps in DMSO and [BMIM][BF4]). They are longer than those previously reported for dicyanamide in the same solvents. Although the static TCM frequency generally shifts to higher frequency with more strongly interacting solvents, the shift does not follow the same trend as the vibrational dynamics. The results for the experimental frequencies and intensities agree well with results from ab initio calculations. Proton and electron affinities for TCM are also calculated because they are relevant to potential applications of this anion in low viscosity ionic liquids.

  11. Vibrational Echo Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbury, John B.; Steinel, Tobias; Fayer, M. D.

    Multidimensional vibrational echo correlation spectroscopy with full phase resolution is used to measure hydrogen bond dynamics in water and methanol. The OD hydroxyl stretches of methanol-OD oligomers in CCl4 and HOD inH2O are studied using the shortest mid-IR pulses (< 45 fs, < 4 cycles of light) produced to date. The pulses have sufficient spectral bandwidth to span the very broad (> 400 cm-1) spectrum of the 0-1 and 1-2 vibrational transitions. Hydrogen bond population dynamics are extricated with exceptional detail in MeOD oligomers because the different hydrogen-bonded species are spectrally distinct. The experimental results along with detailed calculations indicate the strongest hydrogen bonds are selectively broken through a non-equilibrium relaxation pathway following vibrational relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch. Following hydrogen bond breaking, the broken MeOD oligomers retain a detailed structural memory of the prior intact hydrogen bond network. The correlation spectra are also a sensitive probe of the structural fluctuations in water and provide a stringent test of water models that are widely used in simulations of aqueous systems. The analysis of the 2D band shapes demonstrates that different hydrogen-bonded species are subject to distinct (wavelength-dependent) ultrafast (˜ 100 fs) local fluctuations and essentially identical slower (0.4 ps and ˜ 2 ps) structural rearrangements. Observation of wavelength-dependent dynamics demonstrates that standard theoretical approaches assuming Gaussian fluctuations cannot adequately describe water dynamics.

  12. Estimate exchanger vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, C.D.; Zengyan, H.

    1986-04-01

    Based on the classical beam theory, a simple method for calculating the natural frequency of unequally spanned tubes is presented. The method is suitable for various boundary conditions. Accuracy of the calculations is sufficient for practical applications. This method will help designers and operators estimate the vibration of tubular exchangers. In general, there are three reasons why a tube vibrates in cross flow: vortex shedding, fluid elasticity and turbulent buffeting. No matter which is the cause, the basic reason is that the frequency of exciting force is approximately the same as or equal to the natural frequency of the tube. To prevent the heat exchanger from vibrating, it is necessary to select correctly the shell-side fluid velocity so that the frequency of exciting force is different from the natural frequency of the tube, or to vary the natural frequency of the heat exchanger tube. So precisely determining the natural frequency of the heat exchanger, especially its foundational frequency under various supporting conditions, is of significance.

  13. Optimization design of high power ultrasonic circular ring radiator in coupled vibration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Lin, Shuyu; Hu, Wenxu

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a new high power ultrasonic (HPU) radiator, which consists of a transducer, an ultrasonic horn, and a metal circular ring. Both the transducer and horn in longitudinal vibrations are used to drive a metal circular ring in a radial-axial coupled vibration. This coupled vibration cannot only generate ultrasound in both the radial and axial directions, but also focus the ultrasound inside the circular ring. Except for the radial-axial coupled vibration mode, the third longitudinal harmonic vibration mode with relative large vibration amplitude is also detected, which can be used as another operation mode. Overall, the HPU with these two vibration modes should have good potential to be applied in liquid processing, such as sonochemistry, ultrasonic cleaning, and Chinese herbal medicine extraction.

  14. Metrology of vibration measurements by laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Martens, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Metrology as the art of careful measurement has been understood as uniform methodology for measurements in natural sciences, covering methods for the consistent assessment of experimental data and a corpus of rules regulating application in technology and in trade and industry. The knowledge, methods and tools available for precision measurements can be exploited for measurements at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology. A metrological approach to the preparation, execution and evaluation (including expression of uncertainty) of measurements of translational and rotational motion quantities using laser interferometer methods and techniques will be presented. The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and upgraded ISO standards are reviewed with respect to their suitability for ensuring traceable vibration measurements and calibrations in an extended frequency range of 0.4 Hz to higher than 100 kHz. Using adequate vibration exciters to generate sufficient displacement or velocity amplitudes, the upper frequency limits of the laser interferometer methods specified in ISO 16063-11 for frequencies <= 10 kHz can be expanded to 100 kHz and beyond. A comparison of different methods simultaneously used for vibration measurements at 100 kHz will be demonstrated. A statistical analysis of numerous experimental results proves the highest accuracy achievable currently in vibration measurements by specific laser methods, techniques and procedures (i.e. measurement uncertainty 0.05 % at frequencies <= 10 kHz, <= 1 % up to 100 kHz).

  15. A novel wireless and temperature-compensated SAW vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-01-01

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements. PMID:25372617

  16. A novel wireless and temperature-compensated SAW vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-11-03

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  17. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches. PMID:27096701

  18. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  19. Natural vibration dynamics of Rainbow Bridge, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Wood, J. R.; Doyle, S.; Stanfield, E.; White, B.

    2015-12-01

    We measured resonant frequencies of Rainbow Bridge, Utah, one of the world's longest rock spans, during a field experiment recording ambient vibration data. Measurements were generated over 20 hours on March 23-24, 2015 using two broadband three-component seismometers placed on the bridge, and compared to concurrent data from nearby reference stations 20 and 220 m distant. We identified seven distinct modes of vibration for Rainbow Bridge between 1 and 6 Hz. Data for each resonant frequency was then analyzed to determine the frequency-dependent polarization vector in an attempt to clarify mode shapes; e.g. the fundamental mode represents out-of-plane horizontal flexure. We compared experimental data to results of 3D numerical modal analysis, using a new photogrammetric model of Rainbow Bridge generated in this study imported into COMSOL Multiphysics. Results compare well with measured data for seven of the first eight modeled modes, matching vibrational frequencies and polarization orientations generally within 10%. Only predicted mode 6 was not explicitly apparent in our experimental data. Large site-to-reference spectral ratios resolved from experimental data indicate high amplification on the bridge as compared to nearby bedrock.

  20. Vibrational averages along thermal lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of vibrational quantum and thermal expectation values of physical properties from first principles. Thermal lines are introduced: these are lines in configuration space parametrized by temperature, such that the value of any physical property along them is approximately equal to the vibrational average of that property. The number of sampling points needed to explore the vibrational phase space is reduced by up to an order of magnitude when the full vibrational density is replaced by thermal lines. Calculations of the vibrational averages of several properties and systems are reported, namely, the internal energy and the electronic band gap of diamond and silicon, and the chemical shielding tensor of L-alanine. Thermal lines pave the way for complex calculations of vibrational averages, including large systems and methods beyond semilocal density functional theory.

  1. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  2. Vibration in operating heavy haul trucks in overburden mining.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shrawan

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the vibration in sagittal (x), coronal (y) and vertical (z) axes of the seat pan of the heavy haul trucks used in overburden mining, and the vibration experienced by the drivers at the third lumbar and seventh cervical vertebral levels in operating these trucks exceeded the ISO standards, thereby posing threat to safety. A new and an old truck of two different makes and different carrying capacities (200 and 300 series) were instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer on the seat pan. Fourteen drivers (8 male and 6 female) were instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer at C7 and L3 spinous processes. The vibration at the seat pan, C7, and L3 levels were recorded using an onboard computer with PCMCIA card and, compared against the ISO standards. The vertical vibration of the seat pan in the entire sample ranged from a low of .37 m/s2 to a high of 11.73 m/s2. The vibration at the lumbar level in the sample ranged between .34 and 2.72 m/s2. The values for cervical level vertical vibration in the sample ranged between .2 and 2.22 m/s2. The gender of the driver, truck make, and it's carrying capacity did not have a significant effect on the vibration. However, the body weight of the driver, the segment of the truck and the site of measurement revealed significant differences in vibration (p < 0.001). Out of a total 36 combinations (4 trucks x 9 recording locations) the seat pan vertical vibration exceeded the ISO standards 8 times for males and 9 times for females. The lumbar vertebral vertical vibration in males exceeded ISO standards 12 times and in females 11 times. The cervical vertebral vertical vibration exceeded ISO standards once in females only. However, in sagittal and coronal planes the whole body vibration exceeded the ISO standards many times. Heavy haul trucks (240 and 320 ton capacity) frequently generated vibrations in excess of ISO standards in overburden mining operation representing a health hazard.

  3. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  4. Transportation Shock and Vibration Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Maheras, Steven J.; Lahti, Erik A.; Ross, Steven B.

    2013-06-06

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT-13OR08220112, "Report Documenting Experimental Activities." The purpose of this report is to document the results of a literature review conducted of studies related to the vibration and shock associated with the normal conditions of transport for rail shipments of used nuclear fuel from commercial light-water reactors. As discussed in Adkins (2013), the objective of this report is to determine if adequate data exist that would enable the impacts of the shock and vibration associated with the normal conditions of transport on commercial light-water reactor used nuclear fuel shipped in current generation rail transportation casks to be realistically modeled.

  5. Stroboscopic Interferometer for Measuring Mirror Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Robers, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Stroboscopic interferometry is a technique for measuring the modes of vibration of mirrors that are lightweight and, therefore, unavoidably flexible. The technique was conceived especially for modal characterization of lightweight focusing mirror segments to be deployed in outer space; however, the technique can be applied to lightweight mirrors designed for use on Earth as well as the modal investigation of other optical and mechanical structures. To determine the modal structure of vibration of a mirror, it is necessary to excite the mirror by applying a force that varies periodically with time at a controllable frequency. The excitation can utilize sinusoidal, square, triangular, or even asynchronous waveforms. Because vibrational modes occur at specific resonant frequencies, it is necessary to perform synchronous measurements and sweep the frequency to locate the significant resonant modes. For a given mode it is possible to step the phase of data acquisition in order to capture the modal behavior over a single cycle of the resonant frequency. In order to measure interferometrically the vibrational response of the mirror at a given frequency, an interferometer must be suitably aligned with the mirror and adjustably phase-locked with the excitation signal. As in conventional stroboscopic photography, the basic idea in stroboscopic interferometry is to capture an image of the shape of a moving object (in this case, the vibrating mirror) at a specified instant of time in the vibration cycle. Adjusting the phase difference over a full cycle causes the interference fringes to vary over the full range of motion for the mode at the excitation frequency. The interference-fringe pattern is recorded as a function of the phase difference, and, from the resulting data, the surface shape of the mirror for the given mode is extracted. In addition to the interferometer and the mirror to be tested, the equipment needed for stroboscopic interferometry includes an arbitrary

  6. Measuring Vibrations With Nonvibration Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Information about vibrations of structure and/or of nonvibration sensor attached to structure extracted from output of sensor. Sensor operated in usual way except, output fed to power-spectral-density analyzer. Vibrational components easily distinguishable in analyzer output because they have frequencies much higher than those of more-slowly-varying temperature, pressure, or other normally desired components. Spectral-analysis technique applied successfully to high-frequency resistance changes in output of platinum-wire resistance thermometer: vibrational peaks in resistance frequency spectrum confirmed by spectrum from accelerometer. Technique also showed predicted 17-kHz vibrational resonance in strain-guage-supporting beam in pressure sensor.

  7. Computer analysis of railcar vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlaminck, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models and techniques for calculating railcar vibrations are discussed along with criteria for vehicle ride optimization. The effect on vibration of car body structural dynamics, suspension system parameters, vehicle geometry, and wheel and rail excitation are presented. Ride quality vibration data collected on the state-of-the-art car and standard light rail vehicle is compared to computer predictions. The results show that computer analysis of the vehicle can be performed for relatively low cost in short periods of time. The analysis permits optimization of the design as it progresses and minimizes the possibility of excessive vibration on production vehicles.

  8. Electronic damping of mechanical vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilyev, P.; Navitskas, A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions required for measuring and recording the patterns of vibration of a process are discussed. It is stated that the frequency of the process being investigated must be an order of magnitude lower than the natural frequency of the sensitive receiving element for sufficient accuracy. The elastic element must damp so the frequency range of the vibrational patterns being investigated can be expanded. This is especially true of the tensile stresses of a moving signal carrier. A method is proposed for damping mechanical vibrations of elastic sensitive elements with semiconductor strain gages, based on electronic compensation of the natural vibrations. A schematic diagram is provided to show the conditions.

  9. Resonance vibrations of aircraft propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebers, Fritz

    1932-01-01

    On the basis of the consideration of various possible kinds of propeller vibrations, the resonance vibrations caused by unequal impacts of the propeller blades appear to be the most important. Their theoretical investigation is made by separate analysis of torsional and bending vibrations. This method is justified by the very great difference in the two natural frequencies of aircraft propeller blades. The calculated data are illustrated by practical examples. Thereby the observed vibration phenomenon in the given examples is explained by a bending resonance, for which the bending frequency of the propeller is equal to twice the revolution speed.

  10. Certain characteristics and capture regions of nonlinear vibrating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragulskene, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    Free vibrations of a system and vibrations which are multiples of them in frequency are discussed. The corresponding periodic forced vibrations of the type n/m (n is the number of periods of disturbance between periods of movement and m is the number of periods of movement in one period of disturbance), generated by a harmonic or close to harmonic disturbance, are propagated close to the corresponding curves of the free vibrations and their frequency multiples. It has been proposed that investigation of transitional modes of motion and capture regions be carried out by precise methods in phase space, with the least number of coordinates. Thus, for example, for nonautonomous second order equations (for example, the Duffing equations), in place of three variables (coordinates, velocity, phases), it is proposed to use two: velocity during transition of the coordinate through zero and phase.

  11. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  12. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  13. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  14. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  15. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies and vibrationally averaged structures and nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of FHF-.

    PubMed

    Hirata, So; Yagi, Kiyoshi; Perera, S Ajith; Yamazaki, Shiori; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2008-06-01

    The anharmonic vibrational frequencies of FHF(-) were computed by the vibrational self-consistent-field, configuration-interaction, and second-order perturbation methods with a multiresolution composite potential energy surface generated by the electronic coupled-cluster method with various basis sets. Anharmonic vibrational averaging was performed for the bond length and nuclear magnetic resonance indirect spin-spin coupling constants, where the latter computed by the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method. The calculations placed the vibrational frequencies at 580 (nu(1)), 1292 (nu(2)), 1313 (nu(3)), 1837 (nu(1) + nu(3)), and 1864 cm(-1) (nu(1) + nu(2)), the zero-point H-F bond length (r(0)) at 1.1539 A, the zero-point one-bond spin-spin coupling constant [(1)J(0)(HF)] at 124 Hz, and the bond dissociation energy (D(0)) at 43.3 kcal/mol. They agreed excellently with the corresponding experimental values: nu(1) = 583 cm(-1), nu(2) = 1286 cm(-1), nu(3) = 1331 cm(-1), nu(1) + nu(3) = 1849 cm(-1), nu(1) + nu(2) = 1858 cm(-1), r(0) = 1.1522 A, (1)J(0)(HF) = 124+/-3 Hz, and D(0) = 44.4+/-1.6 kcal/mol. The vibrationally averaged bond lengths matched closely the experimental values of five excited vibrational states, furnishing a highly dependable basis for correct band assignments. An adiabatic separation of high- (nu(3)) and low-frequency (nu(1)) stretching modes was examined and found to explain semiquantitatively the appearance of a nu(1) progression on nu(3). Our calculations predicted a value of 186 Hz for experimentally inaccessible (2)J(0)(FF).

  16. Studies on the Vibrational and Rovibrational Energies and Vibrational Force Constants of Diatomic Molecular States Using Algebraic and Variational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiguo; Hou, Shilin; Feng, Hao; Ren, Weiyi

    2002-09-01

    Alternative expressions for vibrational and rotational spectrum constants and energies of diatomic molecular electronic states based on perturbation theory are suggested. An algebraic method (AM) is proposed to generate a converged full vibrational spectrum from limited energy data, and a potential variational method (PVM) is suggested to produce the vibrational force constants fn and rotational spectrum constants using the perturbation formulae and the AM vibrational constants. The AM and PVM have been applied to study 10 diatomic electronic states: the X1Σ g+ and C1Π u- states of H 2; the X1Σ g+, A3Σ u+, B' 3Σ u-, and B3Π g states of N 2; the X3Σ g-, A3Σ u+, and c1Σ u- states of O 2; and the X1Σ g+ state of Br 2. Calculations show that (1) the AM Eυ max converges to the correct molecular dissociation energy; (2) the AM not only reproduce the input energies, but also generate the Eυ's of high vibrational excited states which may be difficult to obtain experimentally or theoretically; (3) the PVM vibrational force constants fn may be used to measure the relative chemical bondstrengths of different diatomic electronic states for a molecule quantitatively.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  18. A new approach for vibration control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An approach for augmenting vibration damping characteristics in space structures with large panels is presented. It is based on generation of bending moments rather than forces. The moments are generated using bimetallic strips, suitably mounted at selected stations on both sides of the large panels, under the influence of differential solar heating, giving rise to thermal gradients and stresses. The collocated angular velocity sensors are utilized in conjunction with mini-servos to regulate the control moments by flipping the bimetallic strips. A simple computation of the rate of dissipation of vibrational energy is undertaken to assess the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engine to excessive vibration stresses. This must be shown by a vibration investigation. (c) No part of the rotor drive system may be subjected to excessive vibration stresses. Rotor Drive System...

  20. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engine to excessive vibration stresses. This must be shown by a vibration investigation. (c) No part of the rotor drive system may be subjected to excessive vibration stresses. Rotor Drive System...

  1. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engine to excessive vibration stresses. This must be shown by a vibration investigation. (c) No part of the rotor drive system may be subjected to excessive vibration stresses. Rotor Drive System...

  2. Ball bearing vibrations amplitude modeling and test comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, Richard A., III; Bailey, Dave

    1995-01-01

    Bearings generate disturbances that, when combined with structural gains of a momentum wheel, contribute to induced vibration in the wheel. The frequencies generated by a ball bearing are defined by the bearing's geometry and defects. The amplitudes at these frequencies are dependent upon the actual geometry variations from perfection; therefore, a geometrically perfect bearing will produce no amplitudes at the kinematic frequencies that the design generates. Because perfect geometry can only be approached, emitted vibrations do occur. The most significant vibration is at the spin frequency and can be balanced out in the build process. Other frequencies' amplitudes, however, cannot be balanced out. Momentum wheels are usually the single largest source of vibrations in a spacecraft and can contribute to pointing inaccuracies if emitted vibrations ring the structure or are in the high-gain bandwidth of a sensitive pointing control loop. It is therefore important to be able to provide an a priori knowledge of possible amplitudes that are singular in source or are a result of interacting defects that do not reveal themselves in normal frequency prediction equations. This paper will describe the computer model that provides for the incorporation of bearing geometry errors and then develops an estimation of actual amplitudes and frequencies. Test results were correlated with the model. A momentum wheel was producing an unacceptable 74 Hz amplitude. The model was used to simulate geometry errors and proved successful in identifying a cause that was verified when the parts were inspected.

  3. Longitudinally-vibrating surgical microelectrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D.; Kawabus, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Microelectrode attached to cone of loudspeaker imparting longitudinal vibrations, penetrates relatively tough tissue of arterial walls easier and with more precise depth control because dimpling is eliminated. Vibrating microelectrode has been successfully used to make accurate oxygen-content measurements in arterial walls.

  4. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  5. Non-contact defect diagnostics in Cz-Si wafers using resonance ultrasonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A.; Kochelap, V. A.; Tarasov, I.; Ostapenko, S.

    2001-01-01

    A new resonance effect of generation of sub-harmonic acoustic vibrations was applied to characterize defects in as-grown and processed Cz-Si wafers. Ultrasonic vibrations were generated into standard 8″ wafers using an external ultrasonic transducer and their amplitude recorded in a non-contact mode using a scanning acoustic probe. By tuning the frequency, f, of the transducer we observed generation of intense sub-harmonic acoustic mode ("whistle" or w-mode) with f/2 frequency. The characteristics of the w-mode-amplitude dependence, frequency scans, spatial distribution allow a clear distinction versus harmonic vibrations of the same wafer. The origin of sub-harmonic vibrations observed on 8″ Cz-Si wafers is attributed to a parametric resonance of flexural vibrations in thin silicon circular plates. We present evidence that "whistle" effect shows a strong dependence on the wafer's growth and processing history and can be used for quality assurance purposes.

  6. The origins of vibration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimarogonas, A. D.

    1990-07-01

    The Ionian School of natural philosophy introduced the scientific method of dealing with natural phenomena and the rigorous proofs for abstract propositions. Vibration theory was initiated by the Pythagoreans in the fifth century BC, in association with the theory of music and the theory of acoustics. They observed the natural frequency of vibrating systems and proved that it is a system property and that it does not depend on the excitation. Pythagoreans determined the fundamental natural frequencies of several simple systems, such as vibrating strings, pipes, vessels and circular plates. Aristoteles and the Peripatetic School founded mechanics and developed a fundamental understanding of statics and dynamics. In Alexandrian times there were substantial engineering developments in the field of vibration. The pendulum as a vibration, and probably time, measuring device was known in antiquity, and was further developed by the end of the first millennium AD.

  7. Low Cost Digital Vibration Meter

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W. Vance; Geist, Jon

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the development of a low cost, digital Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) vibration meter that reports an approximation to the RMS acceleration of the vibration to which the vibration meter is subjected. The major mechanical element of this vibration meter is a cantilever beam, which is on the order of 500 µm in length, with a piezoresistor deposited at its base. Vibration of the device in the plane perpendicular to the cantilever beam causes it to bend, which produces a measurable change in the resistance of a piezoresistor. These changes in resistance along with a unique signal-processing scheme are used to determine an approximation to the RMS acceleration sensed by the device. PMID:27110459

  8. Coherent vibrational climbing in carboxyhemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ventalon, Cathie; Fraser, James M; Vos, Marten H; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Martin, Jean-Louis; Joffre, Manuel

    2004-09-01

    We demonstrate vibrational climbing in the CO stretch of carboxyhemoglobin pumped by midinfrared chirped ultrashort pulses. By use of spectrally resolved pump-probe measurements, we directly observed the induced absorption lines caused by excited vibrational populations up to v = 6. In some cases, we also observed stimulated emission, providing direct evidence of vibrational population inversion. This study provides important spectroscopic parameters on the CO stretch in the strong-field regime, such as transition frequencies and dephasing times up to the v = 6 to v = 7 vibrational transition. We measured equally spaced vibrational transitions, in agreement with the energy levels of a Morse potential up to v = 6. It is interesting that the integral of the differential absorption spectra was observed to deviate far from zero, in contrast to what one would expect from a simple one-dimensional Morse model assuming a linear dependence of dipole moment with bond length.

  9. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  10. Vibration analysis using digital correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Lehner, David L.; Dudderar, T. Dixon; Matthys, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a computer-based optical method for locating the positions of nodes and antinodes in vibrating members. Structured light patterns are projected at an angle onto the vibrating surface using a 35 mm slide projector. The vibrating surface and the projected images are captured in a time averaged photograph which is subsequently digitized. The inherent fringe patterns are filtered to determine amplitudes of vibration, and computer programs are used to compare the time averaged images to images recorded prior to excitation to locate nodes and antinodes. Some of the influences of pattern regularity on digital correlation are demonstrated, and a speckle-based method for determining the mode shapes and the amplitudes of vibration with variable sensitivity is suggested.

  11. Free Vibration of Uncertain Unsymmetrically Laminated Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Goyal, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation and Stochastic FEA are used to predict randomness in the free vibration response of thin unsymmetrically laminated beams. For the present study, it is assumed that randomness in the response is only caused by uncertainties in the ply orientations. The ply orientations may become random or uncertain during the manufacturing process. A new 16-dof beam element, based on the first-order shear deformation beam theory, is used to study the stochastic nature of the natural frequencies. Using variational principles, the element stiffness matrix and mass matrix are obtained through analytical integration. Using a random sequence a large data set is generated, containing possible random ply-orientations. This data is assumed to be symmetric. The stochastic-based finite element model for free vibrations predicts the relation between the randomness in fundamental natural frequencies and the randomness in ply-orientation. The sensitivity derivatives are calculated numerically through an exact formulation. The squared fundamental natural frequencies are expressed in terms of deterministic and probabilistic quantities, allowing to determine how sensitive they are to variations in ply angles. The predicted mean-valued fundamental natural frequency squared and the variance of the present model are in good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulation. Results, also, show that variations between plus or minus 5 degrees in ply-angles can affect free vibration response of unsymmetrically and symmetrically laminated beams.

  12. The Vibration Ring. Phase 1; [Seedling Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Krantz, Timothy L.; Delap, Damon C.; Stringer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The vibration ring was conceived as a driveline damping device to prevent structure-borne noise in machines. It has the appearance of a metal ring, and can be installed between any two driveline components like an ordinary mechanical spacer. Damping is achieved using a ring-shaped piezoelectric stack that is poled in the axial direction and connected to an electrical shunt circuit. Surrounding the stack is a metal structure, called the compression cage, which squeezes the stack along its poled axis when excited by radial driveline forces. The stack in turn generates electrical energy, which is either dissipated or harvested using the shunt circuit. Removing energy from the system creates a net damping effect. The vibration ring is much stiffer than traditional damping devices, which allows it to be used in a driveline without disrupting normal operation. In phase 1 of this NASA Seedling Fund project, a combination of design and analysis was used to examine the feasibility of this concept. Several designs were evaluated using solid modeling, finite element analysis, and by creating prototype hardware. Then an analytical model representing the coupled electromechanical response was formulated in closed form. The model was exercised parametrically to examine the stiffness and loss factor spectra of the vibration ring, as well as simulate its damping effect in the context of a simplified driveline model. The results of this work showed that this is a viable mechanism for driveline damping, and provided several lessons for continued development.

  13. Modeling the IR Spectra of Acetaldehyde from a New Vibrational Configuration Interaction Method

    SciTech Connect

    Begue, Didier; Pouchan, Claude

    2007-12-26

    In this paper we present a new vibrational configuration interaction method known as a parallel vibrational multiple window configuration interaction P lowbar VMWCI which generates several VCI matrices and enables the variational treatment of medium size molecular systems. Application to acetaldehyde gives a new interpretation of the MIR experimental data.

  14. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed. PMID:22559386

  15. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed.

  16. Fundamental Study on the Effect of High Frequency Vibration on Ride Comfort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Chizuru; Shimamune, Ryohei; Watanabe, Ken; Suzuki, Erimitsu

    To develop a more suitable method of evaluating ride comfort of high speed trains, a fundamental study was conducted on sensitivity of passengers to various frequencies of vibration with respect to ride comfort. Experiments were performed on 55 subjects using an electrodynamic vibration system that can generate vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 80 Hz in the vertical direction. Results of experiments indicated that the subjects tend to experience greater discomfort when exposed to high frequency vibrations than that presumed by the conventional Japanese ride comfort assessment method, the "Ride Comfort Level."

  17. Reed vibration in lingual organ pipes without the resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, András; Angster, Judit; Pitsch, Stephan; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2003-02-01

    Vibrations of plucked and blown reeds of lingual organ pipes without the resonators have been investigated. Three rather surprising phenomena are observed: the frequency of the reed plucked by hand is shifted upwards for large-amplitude plucking, the blown frequency is significantly higher than the plucked one, and peaks halfway between the harmonics of the fundamental frequency appear in the spectrum of the reed velocity. The dependence of the plucked frequency on the length of the reed reveals that the vibrating length at small vibrations is 3 mm shorter than the apparent free length. The frequency shift for large-amplitude plucking is explained by the periodic change of the vibrating length during the oscillation. Reed vibrations of the blown pipe can be described by a physical model based on the assumption of air flow between the reed and the shallot. Aerodynamic effects may generate and sustain the oscillation of the reed without acoustic feedback. The appearance of subharmonics is explained by taking into account the periodic modulation of the stress in the reed material by the sound field. Therefore, a parametric instability appears in the differential equation of vibration, leading to the appearance of subharmonics.

  18. Numerical modelling of longitudinal vibrations of a sucker rod string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shardakov, I. N.; Wasserman, I. N.

    2010-03-01

    A new technique for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a sucker rod string used in the oil well industry is presented. The main difficulty in the numerical calculation of the examined structure is a multivalued velocity—force relation determined by Coulomb's friction and by loads generated during operation of pump valves. Both the monotonic and nonmonotonic velocity—force relations are considered. A quasi-variational inequality formulation of the problem is proposed. The solution of the inequality amounts to finding the minimum of a convex nonsmooth functional at each time step by means of the Newmark difference time scheme, successive iterations and finite element discretization. The problem of functional minimization is reduced to construction of a sequence of smooth nonlinear programming problems by introducing the auxiliary variables and applying the augmented Lagrangian method. The proposed approach is used to study the longitudinal vibrations of sucker rod strings under near-real conditions. In such systems the most commonly occurring vibration modes are the stick-slip vibrations and the vibrations with natural force excited twice a cycle. The nonmonotonic character of the friction law leads to intensification of these vibrations. In the case of nonmonotonic friction law the stick-slip vibrations can occur even under the action of constant external forces.

  19. Detecting small surface vibrations by passive electro-optical illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoni, Matthew; Pereira, Wellesley; Weber, Reed A.; Garcia-Cervera, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    We have performed research to understand the feasibility of using signals received by EOIR sensors to detect small vibrations in surfaces illuminated by sunlight. The vibration models consider buildings with vibrating roofs, as well as ground vibrations due to buried structures. For the surface buildings, we investigated two approaches. One involved treating the roof as an elastic medium subject to deformation resulting in a PDE whose solution describes the fluctuation in the surface's normal direction vector. The second approach treated the roof as a rigid mass subject to motion in six degrees of freedom, while modeling the dynamics of the building's frame, and tuning the parameters to result in resonant frequencies similar to real buildings (~3-7 Hz). We applied the appropriate physical models of reflected and scattered light to various surfaces, specular (insulator or conductor), rough but still reflective, or diffusely scattering (Lambertian). Matlab code was developed to perform numerical simulations of any system configuration described above and easily add new models. The main engine of the code is a signal calculator and analyzer that sums the total intensity of received light over a "scene" with a variety of surface materials, orientations, polarization (if any), and other parameters. A resulting signal versus time is generated that may be analyzed in order to: 1) optimize sensitivity, or 2) detect the vibration signature of a structure of interest. The results of this study will enable scientists/engineers to optimize signal detection, possibly from space, for passive exploitation of scattered light modulated by vibrating surfaces.

  20. On the control of vibrations using synchrophasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dench, M. R.; Brennan, M. J.; Ferguson, N. S.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the application of a technique, known as synchrophasing, to the control of machinery vibration. It is applicable to machinery installations, in which several synchronous machines, such as those driven by electrical motors, are fitted to an isolated common structure known as a machinery raft. To reduce the vibration transmitted to the host structure to which the machinery raft is attached, the phase of the electrical supply to the motors is adjusted so that the net transmitted force to the host structure is minimised. It is shown that while this is relatively simple for an installation consisting of two machines, it is more complicated for installations in which there are more than two machines, because of the interaction between the forces generated by each machine. The development of a synchrophasing scheme, which has been applied to propeller aircraft, and is known as Propeller Signature Theory (PST) is discussed. It is shown both theoretically and experimentally, that this is an efficient way of controlling the phase of multiple machines. It is also shown that synchrophasing is a worthwhile vibration control technique, which has the potential to suppress vibration transmitted to the host structure by up to 20 dB at certain frequencies. Although the principle of synchronisation has been demonstrated on a one-dimensional structure, it is believed that this captures the key features of the approach. However, it should be realised that the mode-shapes of a machinery raft may be more complex than that of a one-dimensional structure and this may need to be taken into account in a real application.

  1. Current structural vibration problems associated with noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    As the performance of aerospace vehicles has increased, the noise generated by the propulsion system and by the passage of the vehicle through the air has also increased. Further increases in performance are now underway for space vehicles such as the space shuttle vehicle and for short distance takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft, and are being planned for supersonic aircraft. The flight profiles and design features of these high-performance vehicles are reviewed and an estimate made of selected noise-induced structural vibration problems. Considerations for the prevention of acoustic fatigue, noise transmission, and electronic instrument malfunction are discussed.

  2. Transient vibration of thin viscoelastic orthotropic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, J.; Valeš, F.; Volek, J.; Skočilas, J.

    2011-02-01

    This article deals with solutions of transient vibration of a rectangular viscoelastic orthotropic thin 2D plate for particular deformation models according to Flügge and Timoshenko-Mindlin. The linear model, a general standard viscoelastic body, of the rheologic properties of a viscoelastic material was applied. The time and coordinate curves of the basic quantities displacement, rotation, velocity, stress and deformation are compared. The results obtained by an approximate analytic method are compared with numerical results for 3D plate generated by FEM application and with experimental investigation.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy of N-phenylmaleimide.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stewart F

    2006-03-01

    A combination of infrared, Raman and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopies with density functional theory (DFT) calculations is used to provide a complete assignment of the vibrational spectra of N-phenylmaleimide and N-(perdeuterophenyl)maleimide. DFT is shown to give very good results for the frequencies and atomic displacements in the modes. These are used to generate INS spectra which are excellent agreement with the observed. The calculated infrared and Raman spectra are much less reliable, although this may be more of a presentation problem than a real failing. PMID:16157505

  4. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept.

  5. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept. PMID:27336793

  6. Vibration budget for observatory equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Thompson, Hugh

    2015-07-01

    Vibration from equipment mounted on the telescope and in summit support buildings has been a source of performance degradation at existing astronomical observatories, particularly for adaptive optics performance. Rather than relying only on best practices to minimize vibration, we present here a vibration budget that specifies allowable force levels from each source of vibration in the observatory (e.g., pumps, chillers, cryocoolers, etc.). This design tool helps ensure that the total optical performance degradation due to vibration is less than the corresponding error budget allocation and is also useful in design trade-offs, specifying isolation requirements for equipment, and tightening or widening individual equipment vibration specifications as necessary. The vibration budget relies on model-based analysis of the optical consequences that result from forces applied at different locations and frequencies, including both image jitter and primary mirror segment motion. We develop this tool here for the Thirty Meter Telescope but hope that this approach will be broadly useful to other observatories, not only in the design phase, but for verification and operations as well.

  7. Acoustic Levitation Transportation of Small Objects Using a Ring-type Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gilles P. L.; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Adamowski, Julio C.; Silva, Eḿílio C. N.

    A new device for noncontact transportation of small solid objects is presented here. Ultrasonic flexural vibrations are generated along the ring shaped vibrator using two Langevin transducers and by using a reflector parallel to the vibrator, small particles are trapped at the nodal points of the resulting acoustic standing wave. The particles are then moved by generating a traveling wave along the vibrator, which can be done by modulating the vibration amplitude of the transducers. The working principle of the traveling wave along the vibrator has been modeled by the superposition of two orthogonal standing waves, and the position of the particles can be predicted by using finite element analysis of the vibrator and the resulting acoustic field. A prototype consisting of a 3 mm thick, 220 mm long, 50 mm wide and 52 mm radius aluminum ring-type vibrator and a reflector of the same length and width was built and small polystyrene spheres have been successfully transported along the straight parts of the vibrator.

  8. Synchrotron-derived vibrational data confirm unprotonated oxo ligan in myoglobin compound II.

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Sage, J. T.; Northeastern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Recent structural investigations have generated uncertainty regarding the protonation state of the exogenous oxo ligand in ferryl derivatives of several heme proteins. We used nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to reveal the complete spectrum of Fe-ligand modes for compound II of myoglobin. Comparison with vibrational DFT predictions allows us to identify vibrations involving FeO tilting, coupled with stretching of the Fe-N bonds to the heme, and stretching of the proximal Fe-His bond, in addition to the previously observed Fe-O stretching vibration. Additional calculations, coupled with measurements on the hydroxyl derivative of metmyoglobin, reveal vibrational signatures for the putative protonated ferryl species. These include a 33 cm{sup -1} splitting of the FeO tilting modes due to the asymmetrically placed proton, as well as a 250 cm{sup -1} decrease of the Fe-O stretching frequency. The vibrational data suggest a fully deprotonated oxo ligand in compound II.

  9. Two-photon vibrational excitation of air by long-wave infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Peñano, J.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort long-wave infrared (LWIR) laser pulses can resonantly excite vibrations in N2 and O2 through a two-photon transition. The absorptive vibrational component of the ultrafast optical nonlinearity grows in time, starting smaller than but quickly surpassing the electronic, rotational, and vibrational refractive components. The growth of the vibrational component results in a novel mechanism of third-harmonic generation, providing an additional two-photon excitation channel, fundamental + third harmonic. The original and emergent two-photon excitations drive the resonance exactly out of phase, causing spatial decay of the absorptive vibrational nonlinearity. This nearly eliminates two-photon vibrational absorption. Here we present simulations and analytical calculations demonstrating how these processes modify the ultrafast optical nonlinearity in air. The results reveal nonlinear optical phenomena unique to the LWIR regime of ultrashort pulse propagation in the atmosphere.

  10. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-01

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. PMID:20846656

  11. An electromagnetic inerter-based vibration suppression device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Clare, L. R.; Neild, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.; Inman, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how an inerter-based device for structural vibration suppression can be realized using an electromagnetic transducer such as a linear motor. When the motor shaft moves, a difference of voltage is generated across the transducer coil. The voltage difference is proportional to the relative velocity between its two terminals. The electromagnetic transducer will exert a force proportional to current following the Lorentz principle if the circuit is closed around the transducer coil. If an electronic circuit consisting of a capacitor, an inductance and a resistance with the appropriate configuration is connected, the resulting force reflected back into the mechanical domain is equivalent to that achieved by a mechanical inerter-based device. The proposed configuration is easy to implement and very versatile, provided a high quality conversion system with negligible losses. With the use of electromagnetic devices, a new generation of vibration absorbers can be realized, for example in the electrical domain it would be relatively uncomplicated to synthesize multi-frequency or real time tunable vibration absorbers by adding electrical components in parallel. In addition by using resistance emulators in the electrical circuits, part of the absorbed vibration energy can be converted into usable power. Here an electromagnetic tuned inerter damper (E-TID) is tested experimentally using real time dynamic substructuring. A voltage compensation unit was developed in order to compensate for coil losses. This voltage compensation unit requires power, which is acquired through harvesting from the vibration energy using a resistance emulator. A power balance analysis was developed in order to ensure the device can be self sufficient. Promising experimental results, using this approach, have been obtained and are presented in this paper. The ultimate goal of this research is the development of autonomous electromagnetic vibration absorbers, able to harvest energy

  12. Suppression of rotary unbalance spin-up vibration using passive and semi-active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begg, Colin Duncan

    Rotating machine unbalance can be the source of unwanted vibrations in many mechanical systems. One problematic form of unbalance force is generated by machine start-up or shut-down. Start-up/shut-down unbalance induces a harmonic excitation force with a varying frequency that is directly proportional to rotor speed, and an amplitude that is proportional to the square of the frequency. When the frequency of a start-up/shut-down unbalance approaches or passes a system resonant frequency, large amplitude vibrations can occur. These vibrations generate greater than normal system operating forces, which could accelerate cumulative part wear and damage internal components. Such degradation could significantly reduce a mechanical system's life. This thesis presents a passive and a semi-active control method for the suppression of vibrations caused by unbalance spin-up excitation (focusing on the start-up scenario) in a mechanical structure. Both methods employ dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). A passive control method using dual mechanical DVAs has been previously proposed (Bursal, 1995). As a basis for design, Bursal (1995) made a conjecture that shaping the system's frequency response function (FRF) by using DVAs to provide a low, flattened, FRF curve over the excitation spin-up frequency range, would minimize the structural vibration response for an unbalance spin-up event. Although the method has been shown to be effective for a few sets of conditions, the conjecture of using steady-state-based FRF-Shaping to suppress transient responses (spin-up unbalance generates a transient response) has not been substantiated. This thesis validates the dual absorber design conjecture and provides additional information regarding the optimal design of such a system. The parametric studies compare the performances between an optimal design (minimum peak response) and the FRF-Shaping design. It is shown that the performances of the two designs are similar for very slow spin

  13. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOEpatents

    Obermeyer, Franklin D.; Middlebrooks, Willis B.; DeMario, Edmund E.

    1994-01-01

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube.

  14. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOEpatents

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Middlebrooks, W.B.; DeMario, E.E.

    1994-10-18

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels is disclosed. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube. 14 figs.

  15. Effect of Slot Combination and Skewed Slot on Electromagnetic Vibration of Capacitor Motor under Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsuka, Isao; Tsuboi, Kazuo

    The capacitor motor (CRM) is widely used to drive industrial equipments and electric home appliances. Recently, the reduction in the vibration and noise of the CRM has become increasingly important from the standpoint of environmental improvement. However, the electromagnetic vibration of the CRM under load has not been analyzed sufficiently. Therefore, we have studied the electromagnetic vibration of CRM for the purpose of reducing it. In a previous paper, the relationships for a backward magnetic field, the equivalent circuit current, and the vibration of the CRM were clarified. The present paper theoretically and experimentally discusses the effect of the slot combination and skewed slot on the electromagnetic vibration of CRM under load. The primary conclusions are as follows: (1) In the case of 4-pole and 6-pole CRMs, the dominant electromagnetic vibration of CRMs was theoretically attributed to three types of electromagnetic force waves. Two types of electromagnetic force waves are generated: one wave is generated by the interaction of two forward magnetic fluxes, such as those of a three-phase squirrel-cage induction motor, and the other wave is generated under the influence of a backward magnetic flux. (2) The characteristics of dominant electromagnetic vibration depending on load and running capacitor were classified theoretically and experimentally into three types based on the characteristics of the electromagnetic force wave and equivalent circuit current. (3) The influences of magnetic saturation in dominant electromagnetic vibration were verified experimentally and their causes were clarified theoretically in relation to electromagnetic force waves.

  16. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  17. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  18. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  19. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Testing of IBCs § 178.819 Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the... vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample IBC, selected at random, must be filled and closed as...

  20. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  1. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  2. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  3. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  4. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  5. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  6. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  7. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  8. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  9. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  10. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  11. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  12. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  13. A Hair-cell Structure based Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Operating under Three Dimensional Arbitrary Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.; Na, Y.; Park, J.; Park, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    A hair-cell structure based piezoelectric energy harvester was newly developed to effectively scavenge three-dimensional vibrations. The cantilever of the proposed energy harvester, called a hair-cell structure, is deliberately elongated and curled so that it oscillates with decent displacement under not only vertically induced vibrations, but also under longitudinally and horizontally induced vibrations. The proposed energy harvester is comprised of an elongated and curled piezoelectric cantilever and a proof mass with high aspect ratio at the free end of the cantilever. The fabricated device generated the peak output voltage of 15 mV under vertically induced vibrations with an acceleration of 50 m/s2 at its resonance frequency of 116 Hz. Furthermore, it also generated the peak output voltage of 33 mV and 10 mV under longitudinally and horizontally induced vibrations, respectively.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy of stichtite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Erickson, Kristy L.

    2004-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the mineral stitchtite, a hydrotalcite of formula Mg 6Cr 2(CO 3)(OH) 16·4H 2O. Two bands are observed at 1087 and 1067 cm -1 with an intensity ratio of ˜2.5/1 and are attributed to the symmetric stretching vibrations of the carbonate anion. The observation of two bands is attributed to two species of carbonate in the interlayer, namely weakly hydrogen bonded and strongly hydrogen bonded. Two infrared bands are found at 1457 and 1381 cm -1 and are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching modes. These bands were not observed in the Raman spectrum. Two infrared bands are observed at 744 and 685 cm -1 and are assigned to the ν4 bending modes. Two Raman bands were observed at 539 and 531 cm -1 attributed to the ν2 bending modes. Importantly the band positions of the paragenically related hydrotalcites stitchtite, iowaite, pyroaurite and reevesite all of which contain the carbonate anion occur at different wavenumbers. Consequently, Raman spectroscopy can be used to distinguish these minerals, particularly in the field where many of these hydrotalcites occur simultaneously in ore zones.

  15. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.

  16. Temporomandibular joint vibration in bruxers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueling; Lin, Xuefeng; Wang, Yan

    2009-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint vibration is considered an important physical sign of joint dysfunction and/or joint pathology. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of joint vibration between bruxers and asymptomatic individuals, evaluate the effect of bruxism on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the association between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders. Twenty-four (24) bruxers and 16 asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. Bilateral joint vibrations with jaw tracking were recorded using a TMJ detecting instrument during rhythmic jaw opening and closing movement. The results showed that the vibratory energy and amplitude of the moderate to severe bruxers were significantly higher than that of the mild bruxers and asymptomatic subjects. The percentage of joint vibration occurrence in asymptomatic subjects, mild bruxers, and moderate to severe bruxers was 75.0%, 77.8%, and 100%, respectively. It was concluded that bruxism might induce abnormal joint vibrations, and that the energy of abnormal vibrations might increase with the degree of bruxism.

  17. Rhodopsin photochemistry is vibrationally coherent

    SciTech Connect

    Mathies, R.A.; Wang, Q.; Peteanu, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    Visual excitation is initiated by the absorption of a photon by the 11-cis retinal chromophore bound within the pigment called rhodopsin. We have used a variety of vibrational spectroscopies to obtain information about the vibrational nuclear dynamics that lead to this efficient photochemical isomerization. The cis-trans isomerization in rhodopsin is complete in only 200 fs. The extreme speed of this process, which is consistent with the {approximately}50 fs lifetime indicated by the spontaneous emission yield, suggests that the photochemistry involves non-stationary states or vibrational coherence. Recent studies have in fact observed vibrationally coherent oscillations of the ground state photoproduct called bathorhodopsin following impulsive excitation of the rhodopsin reactant. This conclusively demonstrates that the isomerization process in rhodopsin is vibrationally coherent. These observations further suggest that the isomerization quantum yield is directly dependent on the excited-state torsional velocity and can be thought of as a Landau-Zener tunneling process. This work establishes a vibrationally coherent paradigm for the photochemistry of vision that may be relevant for many other photochemical and photobiological processes including photosynthesis and proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin.

  18. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  19. Tunable Vibration Energy Harvester for Condition Monitoring of Maritime Gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on a new tuning concept, which enables the operation of a vibration generator for energy autonomous condition monitoring of maritime gearboxes. The tuning concept incorporates a circular tuning magnet, which interacts with a coupling magnet attached to the active transducer element. The tuning range can be tailored to the application by careful design of the gap between tuning magnet and coupling magnet. A total rotation angle of only 180° is required for the tuning magnet in order to obtain the full frequency bandwidth. The tuning concept is successfully demonstrated by charging a 0.6 F capacitor on the basis of physical vibration profiles taken from a gearbox.

  20. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  1. Compensated vibrating optical fiber pressure measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Goff, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A microbending optical fiber is attached under tension to a diaphragm to se a differential pressure applied across the diaphragm which it causes it to deflect. The fiber is attached to the diaphragm so that one portion of the fiber, attached to a central portion of the diaphragm, undergoes a change in tension; proportional to the differential pressure applied to the diaphragm while a second portion attached at the periphery of the diaphragm remains at a reference tension. Both portions of the fiber are caused to vibrate at their natural frequencies. Light transmitted through the fiber is attenuated by both portions of the tensioned sections of the fiber by an amount which increases with the curvature of fiber bending so that the light signal is modulated by both portions of the fiber at separate frequencies. The modulated light signal is transduced into a electrical signal. The separate modulation signals are detected to generate separate signals having frequencies corresponding to the reference and measuring vibrating sections of the continuous fiber, respectively. A signal proportional to the difference between these signals is generated which is indicative of the measured pressure differential across the diaphragm. The reference portion of the fiber is used to compensate the pressure signal for zero and span changes resulting from ambient temperature and humidity effects upon the fiber and the transducer fixture.

  2. Calculation of ground vibration spectra from heavy military vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, V. V.; Pickup, S.; McNuff, J.

    2010-07-01

    The demand for reliable autonomous systems capable to detect and identify heavy military vehicles becomes an important issue for UN peacekeeping forces in the current delicate political climate. A promising method of detection and identification is the one using the information extracted from ground vibration spectra generated by heavy military vehicles, often termed as their seismic signatures. This paper presents the results of the theoretical investigation of ground vibration spectra generated by heavy military vehicles, such as tanks and armed personnel carriers. A simple quarter car model is considered to identify the resulting dynamic forces applied from a vehicle to the ground. Then the obtained analytical expressions for vehicle dynamic forces are used for calculations of generated ground vibrations, predominantly Rayleigh surface waves, using Green's function method. A comparison of the obtained theoretical results with the published experimental data shows that analytical techniques based on the simplified quarter car vehicle model are capable of producing ground vibration spectra of heavy military vehicles that reproduce basic properties of experimental spectra.

  3. An innovative and multi-functional smart vibration platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, C.; Song, G.; Mo, Y. L.

    2007-08-01

    Recently, there has been increasing efforts to incorporate vibration damping or energy dissipation mechanisms into civil structures, particularly by using smart materials technologies. Although papers about structural vibration control using smart materials have been published for more than two decades, there has been little research in developing teaching equipment to introduce smart materials to students via in-classroom demonstration or hands-on experiments. In this paper, an innovative and multi-functional smart vibration platform (SVP) has been developed by the Smart Materials and Structures Laboratory at the University of Houston to demonstrate vibration control techniques using multiple smart materials for educational and research purposes. The vibration is generated by a motor with a mass imbalance mounted on top of the frame. Shape memory alloys (SMA) and magneto-rheological (MR) fluid are used to increase the stiffness and damping ratio, respectively, while a piezoceramic sensor (lead zirconate titanate, or PZT) is used as a vibration sensing device. An electrical circuit has been designed to control the platform in computer-control or manual mode through the use of knobs. The former mode allows for an automated demonstration, while the latter requires the user to manually adjust the stiffness and damping ratio of the frame. In addition, the system accepts network connections and can be used in a remote experiment via the internet. This platform has great potential to become an effective tool for teaching vibration control and smart materials technologies to students in civil, mechanical and electrical engineering for both education and research purposes.

  4. Fluid patterns and dynamics induced by vibrations in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana

    Understanding the effects of vibrations is extremely important in microgravity environments where residual acceleration, or g-jitter, is easily generated by crew manoeuvring or machinery, and can have a significant impact on material processing systems and on-board experiments. Indeed, vibrations can dramatically affect fluid behaviour whether gravity is present or not, inducing instability in some cases while suppressing it in others. We will describe the results of investigations being conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluids interfaces, most notably with the forcing oriented parallel to the fluid surface. Pattern formation properties will be described in detail, and the importance of symmetry constraints and mean flows will be considered. Current exper-imental results are intriguing and have challenged existing assumptions in the field, particularly with regard to the parametric instability underlying subharmonic cross-waves. They suggest an intimate connection between Faraday waves, which are observed in vertically vibrated systems, and cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems. Concurrent theoretical work, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, will then be described. Finally, this research will be placed in a microgravity context and used to motivate the defini-tion of a proposed set of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments would be in the large-aspect-ratio-limit, requiring relatively high frequency but low amplitude vibrations, where comparatively little microgravity research has been done. The interest of such a microgravity experiment will be discussed, with emphasis on fluid management and the potential of vibrations to act as a kind of artificial gravity by orienting surfaces (or density contours) perpendicular to the axis of vibration.

  5. Experimental characterization of a nonlinear vibration absorber using free vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Brennan, M. J.; Gatti, G.; Ferguson, N. S.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the nonlinear characteristics of a vibration absorber is important if its performance is to be predicted accurately when connected to a host structure. This can be achieved theoretically, but experimental validation is necessary to verify the modelling procedure and assumptions. This paper describes the characterization of such an absorber using a novel experimental procedure. The estimation method is based on a free vibration test, which is appropriate for a lightly damped device. The nonlinear absorber is attached to a shaker which is operated such that the shaker works in its mass-controlled regime, which means that the shaker dynamics, which are also included in the measurement, are considerably simplified, which facilitates a simple estimation of the absorber properties. From the free vibration time history, the instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous damped natural frequency are estimated using the Hilbert transform. The stiffness and damping of the nonlinear vibration absorber are then estimated from these quantities. The results are compared with an analytical solution for the free vibration of the nonlinear system with cubic stiffness and viscous damping, which is also derived in the paper using an alternative approach to the conventional perturbation methods. To further verify the approach, the results are compared with a method in which the internal forces are balanced at each measured instant in time.

  6. Study of the Ambient Vibration Energy Harvesting Based on Piezoelectric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Hongyu; Dong, Jinlu; Chen, Lei; Sun, Laizhi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Gao, Mintian

    2014-01-01

    The resonance between piezoelectric vibrator and the vibration source is the key to maximize the ambient vibration energy harvesting by using piezoelectric generator. In this paper, the factors that influence the output power of a single piezoelectric vibrator are analyzed. The effect of geometry size (length, thickness, width of piezoelectric chip and thickness of metal shim) of a single cantilever piezoelectric vibrator to the output power is analyzed and simulated with the help of MATLAB (matrix laboratory). The curves that output power varies with geometry size are obtained when the displacement and load at the free end are constant. Then the paper points out multi-resonant frequency piezoelectric power generation, including cantilever multi-resonant frequency piezoelectric power generation and disc type multi-resonant frequency piezoelectric generation. Multi-resonant frequency of cantilever piezoelectric power generation can be realized by placing different quality mass at the free end, while disc type multi-resonant frequency piezoelectric generation can be realized through series and parallel connection of piezoelectric vibrator.

  7. Termites assess wood size by using vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Evans, Theodore A; Lai, Joseph C S; Toledano, Emilie; McDowall, Lee; Rakotonarivo, Sandrine; Lenz, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Contrary to the common perception that termites are indiscriminant eaters, termites choose their food carefully; however, the methods by which they choose food are not well understood. Using choice experiments and recordings of termites feeding on wooden blocks of different sizes, we show that worker drywood termites (Cryptotermes domesticus) use the resonant frequency of a block of wood to assess its size. Drywood termites showed differences in their response to vibration recordings of termites compared with artificially generated signals, suggesting that they can discriminate the source of vibration. Furthermore, fewer workers matured into neotenic reproductives when recorded termite signals were played, suggesting that vibration signals play an important role in termite communication. PMID:15734796

  8. Noise, vibration, harshness model of a rotating tyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcker, Manfred; Gallrein, Axel; Roller, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The tyre plays a fundamental role in the generation of acoustically perceptible driving noise and vibrations inside the vehicle. An essential part of these vibrations is induced by the road excitation and transferred via the tyre into the vehicle. There are two basic ways to study noise, vibration, harshness (NVH) behaviour: Simulations in time and frequency domains. Modelling the tyre transfer behaviour in frequency domain requires special attention to the rotation of the tyre. This paper shows the approach taken by the authors to include the transfer behaviour in the frequency range up to 250 Hz from geometric road excitations to resulting spindle forces in frequency domain. This paper validates the derived NVH tyre model by comparison with appropriate transient simulations of the base transient model.

  9. Balanced polarization maintaining fiber Sagnac interferometer vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kenji; Narui, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Daiki; Matsuyama, Tetsuya; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2011-10-24

    To achieve a nearly zero-delay operating point in a polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber Sagnac interferometer, two identical PM fibers were incorporated so that their two main axes were orthogonally coupled to each other. A simple fiber vibration sensor system was constructed with a light emitting diode and a balanced PM fiber Sagnac interferometer, in which one of the PM fibers was used as a sensing cable and the other as a reference cable. The vibration sensor was confirmed to be temperature-compensated and generated a phase shift per unit length and unit strain of the sensor of 4.7 milliradian/(m·με) when mechanical vibrations with 1 kHz sinusoidal and triangular waves were stably observed under an input power of 10 μW.

  10. Sensitive acoustic vibration sensor using single-mode fiber tapers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Xiaozhen; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2011-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are a good alternative to piezoelectric devices in electromagnetic sensitive environments. In this study, we reported a fiber acoustic sensor based on single-mode fiber (SMF) tapers. The fiber taper is used as the sensing arm in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Benefiting from their micrometer dimensions, fiber tapers have shown higher sensitivities to the acoustic vibrations than SMFs. Under the same conditions, the thinnest fiber taper in this report, with a diameter of 1.7 µm, shows a 20 dB improvement in the signal to noise ratio as compared to that of an SMF. This acoustic vibration sensor can detect the acoustic waves over the frequencies of 30 Hz-40 kHz, which is limited by the acoustic wave generator in experiments. We also discussed the phase changes of fiber tapers with different diameters under acoustic vibrations.

  11. Totally implantable ventricular assist system using a vibrating flow pump.

    PubMed

    Nitta, S; Yambe, T; Sonobe, T; Naganuma, S; Kakinuma, Y; Kobayashi, S; Tanaka, M; Matsuki, H; Abe, K; Yoshizawa, M

    1995-07-01

    A totally implantable ventricular assist system (VAS), including a drive system and a percutaneous electric energy transmission system, was developed and evaluated in acute animal experiments using adult goats. This newly designed VAS mainly consists of a vibrating tube, coils, magnets, and a jelly-fish valve as the outlet valve. For energy transmission, a new implantable transmitter with a plain weave structure was proposed as a noncontacting transform by using the spinal amorphous magnetic fibers. The fluid mechanical and hemodynamic properties and the efficiency of the energy transmission system were evaluated in acute animal experiments using healthy adult goats. This vibrating electromagnetic artificial heart (AH) could generate more than 10 L/min as output volume, with 10 Hz vibration using 20 volts as supplied voltage. The total efficiency of the percutaneous energy transmission system was 76%, and temperature increases were within the acceptable range, suggesting the usefulness of our newly developed implantable VAS. PMID:8572972

  12. Electromagnetically levitated vibration isolation system for the manufacturing process of silicon monocrystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemitsu, Yoichi; Watanabe, Katsuhide; Yano, Kenichi; Mizuno, Takayuki

    1994-01-01

    This paper introduces a study on an Electromagnetically Levitated Vibration Isolation System (ELVIS) for isolation control of large-scale vibration. This system features no mechanical contact between the isolation table and the installation floor, using a total of four electromagnetic actuators which generate magnetic levitation force in the vertical and horizontal directions. The configuration of the magnet for the vertical direction is designed to prevent any generation of restoring vibratory force in the horizontal direction. The isolation system is set so that vibration control effects due to small earthquakes can be regulated to below 5(gal) versus horizontal vibration levels of the installation floor of up t 25(gal), and those in the horizontal relative displacement of up to 30 (mm) between the floor and levitated isolation table. In particular, studies on the relative displacement between the installation floor and the levitated isolation table have been made for vibration control in the horizontal direction. In case of small-scale earthquakes (Taft wave scaled: max. 25 gal), the present system has been confirmed to achieve a vibration isolation to a level below 5 gal. The vibration transmission ratio of below 1/10 has been achieved versus continuous micro-vibration (approx. one gal) in the horizontal direction on the installation floor.

  13. Feasibility of coded vibration in a vibro-ultrasound system for tissue elasticity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinxin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Li, Tianjie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The ability of various methods for elasticity measurement and imaging is hampered by the vibration amplitude on biological tissues. Based on the inference that coded excitation will improve the performance of the cross-correlation function of the tissue displacement waves, the idea of exerting encoded external vibration on tested samples for measuring its elasticity is proposed. It was implemented by integrating a programmable vibration generation function into a customized vibro-ultrasound system to generate Barker coded vibration for elasticity measurement. Experiments were conducted on silicone phantoms and porcine muscles. The results showed that coded excitation of the vibration enhanced the accuracy and robustness of the elasticity measurement especially in low signal-to-noise ratio scenarios. In the phantom study, the measured shear modulus values with coded vibration had an R(2 )= 0.993 linear correlation to that of referenced indentation, while for single-cycle pulse the R(2) decreased to 0.987. In porcine muscle study, the coded vibration also obtained a shear modulus value which is more accurate than the single-cycle pulse by 0.16 kPa and 0.33 kPa at two different depths. These results demonstrated the feasibility and potentiality of the coded vibration for enhancing the quality of elasticity measurement and imaging. PMID:27475130

  14. Nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by vibrating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, J. C.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of the generation of sum- and difference-frequency waves produced via the scattering of an acoustic wave by an obstacle whose surface vibrates harmonically was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical approach involved solving the nonlinear wave equation, subject to appropriate boundary conditions, by the use of a perturbation expansion of the fields and a Green's function method. In addition to ordinary rigid-body scattering, Censor predicted nongrowing waves at frequencies equal to the sum and to the difference of the frequencies of the primary waves. The solution to the nonlinear wave equation also yields scattered waves at the sum and difference frequencies. However, the nonlinearity of the medium causes these waves to grow with increasing distance from the scatter's surface and, after a very small distance, dominate those predicted by Censor. The simple-source formulation of the second-order nonlinear wave equation for a lossless fluid medium has been derived for arbitrary primary wave fields. This equation was used to solve the problem of nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by a vibrating obstacle for three geometries: (1) a plane-wave scattering by a vibrating plane, (2) cylindrical-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder, and (3) plane-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder. Successful experimental validation of the theory was inhibited by previously unexpected levels of nonlinearity in the hydrophones used. Such high levels of hydrophone nonlinearity appeared in hydrophones that, by their geometry of construction, were expected to be fairly linear.

  15. Model for simulating scorpion substrate vibration and detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, B. A.; Aibinu, A. M.; Joseph, E.; Salau, H. B.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Scorpion stings are vital health issues which requires prompt attention to minimize the pain inflicted on victims and avert death. A possible solution in averting the sting is the capability of detecting its presence earlier before it stings. Scorpion like other arthropods have a specific kind of movement pattern called substrate vibration, which generates a specific signal that is used in recognizing and locating mates and preys. This paper aims at developing an intelligent scorpion detection system using vibration frequency detection technique. A six step model for simulating scorpion substrate vibration and detection has been proposed. The surrounding vibrating signal is acquired and passed through a band pass filter. The resulting signal is model using autoregressive modeling technique. Resulting co-efficients are further analyzed for activity detection. The frequency response of scorpion activities for mating behaviour was simulated, detected analysed using MATLAB environment. The resulting coefficients was also compared and analysed. Results obtained shows that the proposed technique is appropriate for model and simulating scorpion substrate vibration and detection system.

  16. Investigation of Gas Holdup in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Elbing, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic fuels are part of the solution to the world's energy crisis and climate change. Liquefaction of coal during the Fischer-Tropsch process in a bubble column reactor (BCR) is a key step in production of synthetic fuel. It is known from the 1960's that vibration improves mass transfer in bubble column. The current study experimentally investigates the effect that vibration frequency and amplitude has on gas holdup and bubble size distribution within a bubble column. Air (disperse phase) was injected into water (continuous phase) through a needle shape injector near the bottom of the column, which was open to atmospheric pressure. The air volumetric flow rate was measured with a variable area flow meter. Vibrations were generated with a custom-made shaker table, which oscillated the entire column with independently specified amplitude and frequency (0-30 Hz). Geometric dependencies can be investigated with four cast acrylic columns with aspect ratios ranging from 4.36 to 24, and injector needle internal diameters between 0.32 and 1.59 mm. The gas holdup within the column was measured with a flow visualization system, and a PIV system was used to measure phase velocities. Preliminary results for the non-vibrating and vibrating cases will be presented.

  17. Vibration-induced changes in EMG during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Sabine M P; Swinnen, Stephan P; Desloovere, Kaat; Duysens, Jacques

    2003-03-01

    The present study was set up to examine the contribution of Ia afferent input in the generation of electromyographic (EMG) activity. Subjects walked blindfolded along a walkway while tendon vibration was applied continuously to a leg muscle. The effects of vibration were measured on mean EMG activity in stance and swing phase. The results show that vibration of the quadriceps femoris (Q) at the knee and of biceps femoris (BF) at the knee enhanced the EMG activity of these muscles and this occurred mainly in the stance phase of walking. These results suggest involvement of Ia afferent input of Q and BF in EMG activation during stance. In contrast, vibration of muscles at the ankle and hip had no significant effect on burst amplitude. Additionally, the onset time of tibialis anterior was measured to look at timing of phase transitions. Only vibration of quadriceps femoris resulted in an earlier onset of tibialis anterior within the gait cycle, suggesting involvement of these Ia afferents in the triggering of phase transitions. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest involvement of Ia afferent input in the control of muscle activity during locomotion in humans. A limited role in timing of phase transitions is proposed as well. PMID:12626612

  18. A power flow method for evaluating vibration from underground railways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2006-06-01

    One of the major sources of ground-borne vibration is the running of trains in underground railway tunnels. Vibration is generated at the wheel-rail interface, from where it propagates through the tunnel and surrounding soil into nearby buildings. An understanding of the dynamic interfaces between track, tunnel and soil is essential before engineering solutions to the vibration problem can be found. A new method has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of vibration countermeasures. The method is based on calculating the mean power flow from the tunnel, paying attention to that part of the power which radiates upwards to places where buildings' foundations are expected to be found. The mean power is calculated for an infinite train moving through the tunnel with a constant velocity. An elegant mathematical expression for the mean power flow is derived, which can be used with any underground-tunnel model. To evaluate the effect of vibration countermeasures and track properties on power flow, a comprehensive three-dimensional analytical model is used. It consists of Euler-Bernoulli beams to account for the rails and the track slab. These are coupled in the wavenumber-frequency domain to a thin shell representing the tunnel embedded within an infinite continuum, with a cylindrical cavity representing the surrounding soil.

  19. Acoustic and Vibration Environment for Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.

    2007-01-01

    A launch-induced acoustic environment represents a dynamic load on the exposed facilities and ground support equipment (GSE) in the form of random pressures fluctuating around the ambient atmospheric pressure. In response to these fluctuating pressures, structural vibrations are generated and transmitted throughout the structure and to the equipment items supported by the structure. Certain equipment items are also excited by the direct acoustic input as well as by the vibration transmitted through the supporting structure. This paper presents the predicted acoustic and vibration environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. The predicted acoustic environment depicted in this paper was calculated by scaling the statistically processed measured data available from Saturn V launches to the anticipated environment of the CLV launch. The scaling was accomplished by using the 5-segment Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) engine parameters. Derivation of vibration environment for various Mobile Launcher (ML) structures throughout the base and tower was accomplished by scaling the Saturn V vibration environment.

  20. Vibrationally Driven Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction by Bromine Radical in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Shalowski, Michael A.; Crim, F. Fleming

    2013-06-01

    Previously, we have shown that preparing reactants in specific vibrational states can affect the product state distribution and branching ratios in gas phase reactions. In the solution phase, however, no vibrational mediation study has been reported to date. In this work, we present our first attempt of vibrationally mediated bimolecular reaction in solution. Hydrogen abstraction from a solvent by a bromine radical can be a good candidate to test the effect of vibrational excitation on reaction dynamics because this reaction is highly endothermic and thus we can suppress any thermally initiated reaction in our experiment. Br radical quickly forms CT (charge transfer) complex with solvent molecule once it is generated from photolysis of a bromine source. The CT complex strongly absorbs visible light, which allows us to use electronic transient absorption for tracking Br radical population. For this experiment, we photolyze bromoform solution in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent with 267 nm to generate Br radical and excite the C-H stretch overtone of DMSO with 1700 nm a few hundred femtoseconds after the photolysis. Then, we monitor the population of Br-DMSO complex with 400 nm as a function of delay time between two pump beams and probe beam. As a preliminary result, we observed the enhancement of loss of Br-DMSO complex population due to the vibrational excitation. We think that increased loss of Br-DMSO complex is attributed to more loss of Br radical that abstracts hydrogen from DMSO and it is the vibrational excitation that promotes the reaction. To make a clear conclusion, we will next utilize infrared probing to directly detect HBr product formation.

  1. Noise and vibration ride comfort criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    Two of the most important factors, namely, vibration and noise, were studied to (1) determine whether composite or separate noise and vibration criteria are needed for the prediction of ride quality, (2) determine a noise correction for the previously-defined vibration criteria of the ride quality model, (3) assess whether these noise corrections depend on the nature of the vibration stimuli, i.e., deterministic as opposed to random, and (4) specify noise-vibration criteria for this combined environment. The stimuli for the study consisted of octave bands of noise centered at 500 or 2,000 Hz and vertical vibrations composed of either 5 Hz sinusoidal vibration or random vibrations centered at 5 Hz and with a 5 Hz bandwidth. The noise stimuli were presented at levels ranging from ambient to 95 dB(A) and the vibrations at levels ranging from 0.02 to 0.13g rms.

  2. Calibration of Sound and Vibration Sensors and Vibration Testing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklich, H.

    2004-08-01

    SPEKTRA is a manufacturer of high quality calibration systems for sound and vibration. Under license No DKD-K-27801, a calibration lab was established at SPEKTRA to provide a calibration service. The paper gives a summary of 4 years experience in the calibration of vibration Sensors, measuring systems and vibration test equipment in the industrial field. In practice calibration is often treated as an unpleasant job that is solved by handing out a "Calibration certificate of every part of the system" to the Quality Manager. The paper comes to the conclusion that calibration can help to minimize costs and risks if the customer has basic knowledge in international standards, the used test equipment and the special requirements for testing with this configuration. It is not enough to calibrate one sen- sor of a system in a standard range. The requirements for calibration should be defined individually for every testing system and application.

  3. Calibration of sound and vibration sensors and vibration testing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklich, Holger

    2004-08-01

    SPEKTRA is a manufacturer of high quality calibration systems for sound and vibration. Under license No DKD-K-27801, a calibration lab was established at SPEKTRA to provide a calibration service. The paper gives a summary of 4 years experience in the calibration of vibration Sensors, measuring systems and vibration test equipment in the industrial field. In practice calibration is often treated as an unpleasant job that is solved by handing out a “Calibration certificate of every part of the system” to the Quality Manager. The paper comes to the conclusion that calibration can help to minimize costs and risks if the customer has basic knowledge in international standards, the used test equipment and the special requirements for testing with this configuration. It is not enough to calibrate one sensor of a system in a standard range. The requirements for calibration should be defined individually for every testing system and application.

  4. Enhanced shock and vibration isolator for the attenuation of low-frequency vibration and high-frequency pyroshock loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae-Hung; Youn, Se-Hyun; Jeong, Ho-Kyung; Jang, Young-Soon

    2011-11-01

    Launch vehicles, satellites and aircrafts often experience harsh vibration and pyroshock loads during the flight including maneuvering and separation events, which may cause the malfunction of equipped electronic devices. Furthermore, this minor malfunction can generate catastrophic failure of the whole mission. To prevent malfunction of the electronic devices from severe shock and vibration loads, elastomeric isolators are commonly applied between the electronic device and the equipment bay structure in the aerospace fields. However, this rubber type elastomeric material is vulnerable to the low-frequency vibration load which involves large amount of displacement due to its low stiffness. Recently, the present authors proposed new type of isolator, called as pseudoelastic hybrid mesh isolator. This talk introduces the key features of this new pseudoelastic hybrid mesh isolator which shows better isolation performance throughout all frequency range than conventional isolators.

  5. Enhanced shock and vibration isolator for the attenuation of low-frequency vibration and high-frequency pyroshock loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae-Hung; Youn, Se-Hyun; Jeong, Ho-Kyung; Jang, Young-Soon

    2012-04-01

    Launch vehicles, satellites and aircrafts often experience harsh vibration and pyroshock loads during the flight including maneuvering and separation events, which may cause the malfunction of equipped electronic devices. Furthermore, this minor malfunction can generate catastrophic failure of the whole mission. To prevent malfunction of the electronic devices from severe shock and vibration loads, elastomeric isolators are commonly applied between the electronic device and the equipment bay structure in the aerospace fields. However, this rubber type elastomeric material is vulnerable to the low-frequency vibration load which involves large amount of displacement due to its low stiffness. Recently, the present authors proposed new type of isolator, called as pseudoelastic hybrid mesh isolator. This talk introduces the key features of this new pseudoelastic hybrid mesh isolator which shows better isolation performance throughout all frequency range than conventional isolators.

  6. Vibrations to Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillitto, Winifred

    1977-01-01

    Presented is the design of an electrical analogue of the simple pendulum--a one-dimensional oscillator resonating within a frequency range which can be generated and observed with readily available instruments. One possible study sequence is outlined. (Author/MA)

  7. Non-centrosymmetric Y(HCOO)3 · 2 H2O crystal. A new inorganic material for Raman lasers with large frequency shift of three promoting vibration modes of its [O-CH-O]- formate anions: effective high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes generation and cascaded self-frequency [(3)(SRS) (2)(SHG, SFM)] and [(2)(SHG, SFM) (3)(SRS)] conversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminskii, A. A.; Bohatý, L.; Becker, P.; Eichler, H. J.; Hanuza, J.; Maczka, M.; Ueda, K.; Takaichi, K.; Rhee, H.; Gad, G. M. A.

    2004-11-01

    Efficient multi-phonon steady-state stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) was excited in the novel (3)-active crystal of orthorhombic yttrium formate dihydrate, Y(HCOO)3 . 2 H2O, at room temperature under picosecond laser pumping in the visible and near-IR regions. Besides high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes generation in this non-centrosymmetric crystal, several cascaded second ((2))- and third (χ(3))-order nonlinear interactions were observed under 1 μm pumping. Among them are self-frequency χ(2) χ(3) conversion effects by simultaneous second harmonic generation (SHG) and SRS, as well as χ(3) χ(2) lasing action by successive SRS + SHG and SRS + SFM (sum-frequency mixing). All the recorded Raman-induced lasing wavelengths were identified and attributed to the SRS-promoting optical vibration modes wSRS1 1395 cm-1, wSRS2 1377 cm-1 and wSRS3 2895 cm-1 of the [O-HC-O]- ionic groups of the crystal. The measured large Raman frequency shifts and estimated moderately high steady-state Raman gain coefficient for the first Stokes generation (gSt1-1ssR ≥ 7.5 cm GW-1) in the visible of the first SRS-promoting mode, as well as the fact that it is easy to grow large crystals of Y(HCOO)3 . 2 H2O make this material attractive for a number of new applications in modern quantum electronics and nonlinear optics. Y(HCOO)3 . 2 H2O offers the largest Raman frequency shifts among all known SRS-active inorganic crystals.

  8. Jamming in Vibrated Granular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian

    2009-03-01

    Granular materials exist all around us, from avalanches in nature to the mixing of pharmaceuticals, yet the behavior of these``fluids'' is poorly understood. Their flow can be characterized by the continuous forming and breaking of a strong force network resisting flow. This jamming/unjamming behavior is typical of a variety of systems, including granular flows, and is influenced by factors such as grain packing fraction, applied shear stress, and the random kinetic energy of the particles. I'll present experiments on quasi-static shear and free-surface granular flows under the influence of external vibrations. By using photoelastic grains, we are able to measure both particle trajectories and the local force network in these 2D flows. We find through particle tracking that dense granular flow is composed of comparable contributions from the mean flow, affine, and non-affine deformations. During shear, sufficient external vibration weakens the strong force network and reduces the amount of flow driven by sidewalls. In a rotating drum geometry, large vibrations induce failure as might be expected, while small vibration leads to strengthening of the pile. The avalanching behavior is also strongly history dependent, as evident when the rotating drum is driven in an oscillatory motion, and we find that sufficient vibration erases the memory of the pile. These results point to the central role of the mobilization of friction in quasi-static granular flow.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy of a transient species through time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy: The vinyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Letendre, Laura; Liu, Dean-Kuo; Pibel, Charles D.; Halpern, Joshua B.; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2000-06-01

    An approach for detecting the vibrational spectrum of transient species is demonstrated on the vinyl radical. Photodissociation of carefully chosen precursors at selected photolysis wavelengths produce highly vibrationally excited radicals. Infrared (IR) emission from these radicals is then measured by time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy with nanosecond time resolution. All nine vibrational bands of the vinyl radical, generated from four different precursors, are obtained and reported here for the first time. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Railway cuttings and embankments: Experimental and numerical studies of ground vibration.

    PubMed

    Kouroussis, Georges; Connolly, David P; Olivier, Bryan; Laghrouche, Omar; Costa, Pedro Alves

    2016-07-01

    Railway track support conditions affect ground-borne vibration generation and propagation. Therefore this paper presents a combined experimental and numerical study into high speed rail vibrations for tracks on three types of support: a cutting, an embankment and an at grade section. Firstly, an experimental campaign is undertaken where vibrations and in-situ soil properties are measured at three Belgian rail sites. A finite element model is then developed to recreate the complex ground topology at each site. A validation is performed and it is found that although the at-grade and embankment cases show a correlation with the experimental results, the cutting case is more challenging to replicate. Despite this, each site is then analysed to determine the effect of earthworks profile on ground vibrations, with both the near and far fields being investigated. It is found that different earthwork profiles generate strongly differing ground-borne vibration characteristics, with the embankment profile generating lower vibration levels in comparison to the cutting and at-grade cases. Therefore it is concluded that it is important to consider earthwork profiles when undertaking vibration assessments. PMID:26994799

  11. Railway cuttings and embankments: Experimental and numerical studies of ground vibration.

    PubMed

    Kouroussis, Georges; Connolly, David P; Olivier, Bryan; Laghrouche, Omar; Costa, Pedro Alves

    2016-07-01

    Railway track support conditions affect ground-borne vibration generation and propagation. Therefore this paper presents a combined experimental and numerical study into high speed rail vibrations for tracks on three types of support: a cutting, an embankment and an at grade section. Firstly, an experimental campaign is undertaken where vibrations and in-situ soil properties are measured at three Belgian rail sites. A finite element model is then developed to recreate the complex ground topology at each site. A validation is performed and it is found that although the at-grade and embankment cases show a correlation with the experimental results, the cutting case is more challenging to replicate. Despite this, each site is then analysed to determine the effect of earthworks profile on ground vibrations, with both the near and far fields being investigated. It is found that different earthwork profiles generate strongly differing ground-borne vibration characteristics, with the embankment profile generating lower vibration levels in comparison to the cutting and at-grade cases. Therefore it is concluded that it is important to consider earthwork profiles when undertaking vibration assessments.

  12. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  13. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-10-13

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed. The month of June, 2004 was primarily occupied with the writing of the Phase I Final Report, the sole deliverable of Phase I, which will be submitted in the next quarter. Redesign of the laboratory prototype and design of the downhole (Phase II) prototype was begun.

  14. Handheld vibration effects shoulder motion.

    PubMed

    Tripp, B L; Eberman, L E; Dwelly, P M

    2009-12-01

    We explored effects of handheld vibration on glenohumeral motion in competitive overhead-throwing athletes. We used a randomized, blinded pre-test post-test cross-over design. Each arm of each subject experienced 2 conditions (1-control, 1-experimental), each with pre-test and post-test measures; the order of which was randomized. Participants included Division-I baseball and softball players (n=35: age=20+/-2 yr, height=178+/-9 cm, mass=84+/-12 kg, years of sport participation=13+/-4 yrs). During the experimental condition, participants held a vibrating (2.2 mm, 15 Hz, 20 s), 2.55 kg (5.62 lbs) Mini-VibraFlex dumbbell (Orthometric, New York, NY) in neutral glenohumeral rotation. During the control condition, participants held the still dumbbell (0 mm, 0 Hz, 20 s). Participants rested one min after each trial (3). We used a digital protractor to assess range of motion bilaterally, employing a standard technique for measuring maximal internal (IR) and external rotation (ER). Repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated that range of dominant IR increased 6.8% ( P=0.001, ES=0.16) after handheld vibration. Handheld vibration did not affect range of dominant ER ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.20), non-dominant IR ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.41), or non-dominant ER ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.05). Short bouts of handheld vibration increased dominant IR in collegiate baseball and softball athletes. These results suggest that handheld vibration may help maintain glenohumeral IR that is vital to the healthy and competitive throwing shoulder.

  15. Transferability of anharmonic force fields in simulations of molecular vibrations.

    PubMed

    Parchanský, Václav; Bour, Petr

    2010-07-28

    Accurate simulations of vibrational molecular spectra require precise molecular force fields, at least with cubic and quartic anharmonic corrections beyond the harmonic limits. Generation of such force field terms becomes computationally prohibitive for larger molecules. In this work, an alternate possibility is explored, where approximate anharmonic force field components are obtained from molecular fragments. Transferability properties of the cubic and incomplete quartic fields are discussed and tested on model oligoproline molecules. Automatic transfer schemes including cubic, two and three atomic quartic force constants are developed and implemented. The results indicate that the main vibrational interactions in molecules are local and the anharmonic constants are mostly well amendable to the transfer. Exact anharmonic normal mode force fields of larger molecules compared very well to those obtained from smaller molecular parts. The most important changes in vibrational spectra caused by the anharmonic interactions could be reproduced with two and three atomic force field terms. The transfer scheme thus provides molecular anharmonic force fields without a significant loss of accuracy and brings significant savings of computer time and memory needed to generate molecular vibrational energies and spectra.

  16. Passive Micro Vibration Isolator Utilizing Flux Pinning Effect for Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuma; Sakai, Shin-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Information related to the origin of space and evolution of galaxy can be obtained using the observation satellites. In recent years, high pointing accuracy is demanded for getting more detailed data about distant stars and galaxies. As a result, vibration isolators that consist of a main structure and a TTM (Tip Tilt Mirror) have been adopted for observation satellites. However, cutting the low frequency vibrations off passively with the conventional methods is difficult. A vibration isolator that uses pinning effect is proposed for solving this problem. The pinning effect is acquired by cooling the type-II superconductor below the critical temperature and it generates a pinning force to maintain the relative distance and attitude between a type- II superconductor and a material that generates magnetic flux. The mission part and the bus part of the satellite are equipped with superconductors and permanent magnets and these parts perform short distance formation flight by applying the effect. This method can cut vibrations from low to high frequency bands off passively. In addition, Meissner effect can prevent collision of the mission and bus parts. In order to investigate the performance of this system, experiments and simulations are carried out and the results are discussed.

  17. Laser Doppler vibration testing: Final report. [Under difficult conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Assa, A.S.; Mannara, S.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report summarizes work under EPRI project RP1855-2 conducted toward the objective of developing utility applications for a noncontacting laser Doppler vibration (LDV) measurement instrument. As part of the program, a dual beam laser doppler system was designed and fabricated in-house for the measurement of torsional vibrations of shafts. Laboratory tests were performed with this instrument to evaluate various signal processing approaches, and characterize the LDV performance with different laser powers and on several surface roughnesses. A factory test simulating field conditions was conducted on a full-size large steam turbine-generator rotor. The test was successful with the accuracy and linearity of the laser system within 10% of a reference measurement. Following the work on the dual beam system, work was directed toward field test evaluations of a portable reference beam laser doppler vibrometer. A main objective was to see if the LDV could perform satisfactorily under the rigors of a utility environment. Successful vibration measurements were taken on turbine steam leads at 1000/sup 0/F (without requiring unit shutdown), on heat exchanger tubes inside an operating boiler, from a rotating shaft, and from a black carbon collector brush at 500 volts. In the final test at United Illuminating Co., vibration data were obtained without unit shutdown from the generator neutral isophase bus lines with 13,000 amps of current in the line.

  18. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  19. Innovative Techniques Simplify Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the early years of development, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers encountered challenges related to components in the space shuttle main engine. To assess the problems, they evaluated the effects of vibration and oscillation. To enhance the method of vibration signal analysis, Marshall awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to AI Signal Research, Inc. (ASRI), in Huntsville, Alabama. ASRI developed a software package called PC-SIGNAL that NASA now employs on a daily basis, and in 2009, the PKP-Module won Marshall s Software of the Year award. The technology is also used in many industries: aircraft and helicopter, rocket engine manufacturing, transportation, and nuclear power."

  20. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations.

  1. The vibrations of hand bells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelby, S. D.; Middleton, R. P.

    1980-09-01

    In spite of the fact that the bell is one of the oldest and simplest of all musical instruments, the manner in which bells produce their characteristic sound is little studied. With the aid of relatively simple techniques, however, it is possible to provide an effective and informative demonstration of the ways in which bells vibrate. The theoretical predictions made regarding the modes of vibration can be verified and applied to the problem of eliminating 'warble'-the undesirable periodic variation of amplitude of the sound produced by the bell.

  2. Localized vibrations of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, A. V.; Kivshar, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Vibrational modes of graphene nanoribbons are studied. It is demonstrated that in an unstretched graphene nanoribbon, localized vibrations (in the form of breathers) can occur only at the edges. The largest number of localized edge oscillations is expected for the nanoribbons with the armchair structure. Stretching of a nanoribbon can lead to the appearance of new types of strongly localized oscillations. When a nanoribbon is stretched, in its oscillatory spectrum a frequency gap appears in which the frequencies of the localized modes are located. An armchair nanoribbon can support localized modes only at its edges, while a highly stretched zigzag nanoribbon can support them both at the edges and inside the nanoribbon.

  3. Tuning vibrational mode localization with frequency windowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaolu; Talbot, Justin J.; Steele, Ryan P.

    2016-09-01

    Local-mode coordinates have previously been shown to be an effective starting point for anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy calculations. This general approach borrows techniques from localized-orbital machinery in electronic structure theory and generates a new set of spatially localized vibrational modes. These modes exhibit a well-behaved spatial decay of anharmonic mode couplings, which, in turn, allows for a systematic, a priori truncation of couplings and increased computational efficiency. Fully localized modes, however, have been found to lead to unintuitive mixtures of characteristic motions, such as stretches and bends, and accordingly large bilinear couplings. In this work, a very simple, tunable localization frequency window is introduced, in order to realize the transition from normal modes to fully localized modes. Partial localization can be achieved by localizing only pairs of modes within this traveling frequency window, which allows for intuitive interpretation of modes. The optimal window size is suggested to be a few hundreds of wave numbers, based on small- to medium-sized test systems, including water clusters and polypeptides. The new sets of partially localized coordinates retain their spatial coupling decay behavior while providing a reduced number of potential energy evaluations for convergence of anharmonic spectra.

  4. Multiple cell configuration electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Anthony; Bressers, Scott; Priya, Shashank

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports the design of an electromagnetic vibration energy harvester that doubles the magnitude of output power generated by the prior four-bar magnet configuration. This enhancement was achieved with minor increase in volume by 23% and mass by 30%. The new 'double cell' design utilizes an additional pair of magnets to create a secondary air gap, or cell, for a second coil to vibrate within. To further reduce the dimensions of the device, two coils were attached to one common cantilever beam. These unique features lead to improvements of 66% in output power per unit volume (power density) and 27% increase in output power per unit volume and mass (specific power density), from 0.1 to 0.17 mW cm-3 and 0.41 to 0.51 mW cm-3 kg-1 respectively. Using the ANSYS multiphysics analysis, it was determined that for the double cell harvester, adding one additional pair of magnets created a small magnetic gradient between air gaps of 0.001 T which is insignificant in terms of electromagnetic damping. An analytical model was developed to optimize the magnitude of transformation factor and magnetic field gradient within the gap.

  5. Remote Electromagnetic Vibration of Steerable Needles for Imaging in Power Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cabreros, Sarah S.; Jimenez, Nina M.; Greer, Joseph D.; Adebar, Troy K.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    Robotic needle steering systems for minimally invasive medical procedures require complementary medical imaging systems to track the needles in real time. Ultrasound is a promising imaging modality because it offers relatively low-cost, real-time imaging of the needle. Previous methods applied vibration to the base of the needle using a voice coil actuator, in order to make the needle visible in power Doppler ultrasound. We propose a new method for needle tip vibration, using electromagnetic actuation of small permanent magnets placed inside the needle to improve needle tip visibility in power Doppler imaging. Robotic needle insertion experiments using artificial tissue and ex vivo porcine liver showed that the electromagnetic tip vibration method can generate a stronger Doppler response compared to the previous base vibration method, resulting in better imaging at greater needle depth in tissue. It also eliminates previous issues with vibration damping along the shaft of the needle. PMID:26413379

  6. Spectroscopic Imaging of Deep Tissue through Photoacoustic Detection of Molecular Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Rajian, Justin R.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    The quantized vibration of chemical bonds provides a way of imaging target molecules in a complex tissue environment. Photoacoustic detection of harmonic vibrational transitions provides an approach to visualize tissue content beyond the ballistic photon regime. This method involves pulsed laser excitation of overtone transitions in target molecules inside a tissue. Fast relaxation of the vibrational energy into heat results in a local temperature rise on the order of mK and a subsequent generation of acoustic waves detectable with an ultrasonic transducer. In this perspective, we review recent advances that demonstrate the advantages of vibration-based photoacoustic imaging and illustrate its potential in diagnosing cardiovascular plaques. An outlook into future development of vibrational photoacoustic endoscopy and tomography is provided. PMID:24073304

  7. Vibrational effects on surface energies and band gaps in hexagonal and cubic ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Edgar A.; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.

    2016-07-01

    Surface energies of hexagonal and cubic water ice are calculated using first-principles quantum mechanical methods, including an accurate description of anharmonic nuclear vibrations. We consider two proton-orderings of the hexagonal and cubic ice basal surfaces and three proton-orderings of hexagonal ice prism surfaces, finding that vibrations reduce the surface energies by more than 10%. We compare our vibrational densities of states to recent sum frequency generation absorption measurements and identify surface proton-orderings of experimental ice samples and the origins of characteristic absorption peaks. We also calculate zero point quantum vibrational corrections to the surface electronic band gaps, which range from -1.2 eV for the cubic ice basal surface up to -1.4 eV for the hexagonal ice prism surface. The vibrational corrections to the surface band gaps are up to 12% smaller than for bulk ice.

  8. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R.

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  9. Period of vibration of axially vibrating truly nonlinear rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cveticanin, L.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the axial vibration of a muscle whose fibers are parallel to the direction of muscle compression is investigated. The model is a clamped-free rod with a strongly nonlinear elastic property. Axial vibration is described by a nonlinear partial differential equation. A solution of the equation is constructed for special initial conditions by using the method of separation of variables. The partial differential equation is separated into two uncoupled strongly nonlinear second order differential equations. Both equations, with displacement function and with time function are exactly determined. Exact solutions are given in the form of inverse incomplete and inverse complete Beta function. Using boundary and initial conditions, the frequency of vibration is obtained. It has to be mentioned that the determined frequency represents the exact analytic description for the axially vibrating truly nonlinear clamped-free rod. The procedure suggested in this paper is applied for calculation of the frequency of the longissimus dorsi muscle of a cow. The influence of elasticity order and elasticity coefficient on the frequency property is tested.

  10. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies of adsorbates on Pt(111): Studies of CO at high pressures and temperatures, coadsorbed with olefins and its role as a poison in ethylene hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Kyle Yi

    2000-12-31

    High pressure high temperature CO adsorption and coadsorption with ethylene and propylene on Pt(111) was monitored in situ with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). At high pressures and high temperatures, CO dissociates on a Pt(111) surface to form carbon. At 400 torr CO pressure and 673K, CO modifies the Pt(111) surface through a carbonyl intermediate, and dissociates to leave carbon on the surface. SFG was used to follow the CO peak evolution from monolayer adsorption in ultra high vacuum (UHV) to 400 torr CO pressure. At this high pressure, a temperature dependence study from room temperature to 823K was carried out. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to identify carbon on the surface CO coadsorption with ethylene and CO coadsorption with propylene studies were carried out with 2-IR 1-visible SFG. With this setup, two spectral ranges covering the C-H stretch range and the CO stretch range can be monitored simultaneously. The coadsorption study with ethylene reveals that after 5L ethylene exposure on a Pt(111) surface to form ethylidyne , CO at high pressures cannot completely displace the ethylidyne from the surface. Instead, CO first adsorbs on defect sites at low pressures and then competes with ethylidyne for terrace sites at high pressures. Propylene coadsorption with CO at similar conditions shows that propylidyne undergoes conformation changes with increased CO pressure and at 1 torr, is absent from the Pt(111) surface. Experiments on CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation was carried by 2-IR 1-visible SFG. At 1 torr CO,10 torr ethylene and 100 torr hydrogen, CO was found to block active sites necessary for ethylene hydrogenation, Above 425K, CO desorbs from the surface to allow ethylene hydrogenation to occur. The gas phase species were monitored by gas chromatography.

  11. Vibration analysis by time-average holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprahamian, R.; Evensen, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Method photographs vibration modes as high as 100 kHz. Technique also measures vibration decay and damping characteristics. Compensation techniques for structural size limitations and for background noise excitations are discussed.

  12. Soil chemical insights provided through vibrational spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrational spectroscopy techniques provide a powerful approach to study environmental materials and processes. These multifunctional analysis tools can be used to probe molecular vibrations of solid, liquid, and gaseous samples for characterizing materials, elucidating reaction mechanisms, and exam...

  13. Correlation of operating parameters on turbine shaft vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar; Rajora, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    The new generation of condition monitoring and diagnostics system plays an important role in efficient functioning of power plants. In most of the rotating machine, defects can be detected by such a system much before dangerous situation occurs. It allows the efficient use of stationary on-line continuous monitoring system for condition monitoring and diagnostics as well. Condition monitoring of turbine shaft can not only reduce expenses of maintenance of turbo generator of power plants but also prevents likely shutdown of plant, thereby increases plant load factor. Turbo visionary parameters are essential part of health diagnosis system of turbo generator. Particularly steam pressure, steam temperature and lube oil temperature are important parameters to monitor because they are having much influence on turbine shaft vibration and also governing systems are available for change values of those parameters. This paper includes influence of turbo visionary parameters i.e., steam temperature, steam pressure, lube oil temperature, turbine speed and load on turbine shaft vibration at turbo generator at 195 MW unit-6,Kota Super Thermal Power Station by measuring vibration amplitude and analyze them in MATLAB.

  14. Vibration dampers for cryogenic turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Olan, Emmanuel; Ibrahim, Azman Syed; Kascak, Albert F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of effective and reliable minimum-weight and minimum-envelope vibration dampers for cryogenic turbines. To meet this objective, a high speed test rig was designed and fabricated, which is currently used to test a curved beam type damper. The operation, capacity, structural characteristics, measurement system, and safety features of the cryogenic damper test rig are discussed.

  15. Vibration analysis utilizing Mossbauer effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roughton, N. A.

    1967-01-01

    Measuring instrument analyzes mechanical vibrations in transducers at amplitudes in the range of a few to 100 angstroms. This instrument utilizes the Mossbauer effect, the phenomenon of the recoil-free emission and resonant absorption of nuclear gamma rays in solids.

  16. "Three-dimensional" vibration fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Simple cube-shaped fixture reduces vibration-test time to one-third required previously. Three units are supported at once. During one run each unit is tested along one of axes. Units are repositioned on second run for tests along different axes. Three runs complete test; fixture can be set up to test small, lightweight high-production units.

  17. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  18. Hydrogen rotation-vibration oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1974-01-29

    A laser system is described wherein molecular species of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes are induced to oscillate on rotational-vibrational levels by subjecting the hydrogen to a transverse beam of electrons of a narrowly defined energy between about 1 and 5 eV, thereby producing high intensity and high energy output. (Official Gazette)

  19. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-10-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  20. Vibrational soliton: an experimental overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.

    1986-03-08

    To date the most convincing evidence of vibrational solitons in biopolymers has been found in two very disparate systems: Davydov-like excitations in hydrogen-bonded linear chains (acetanilide and N-methylacetamide) which are not biopolymers but plausible structural paradigms for biopolymers, and longitudinal accoustic modes of possibly nonlinear character in biologically viable DNA. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Spectral compressor vibration analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, M.L.

    1982-02-01

    Studies at GAT have verified that the spectral distribution of energy in gaseous diffusion compressor vibrations contains information pertinent to the state of the compressor's ''health.'' Based on that conclusion, vibration analysis capabilities were included in the CUP computer data acquisition system. In order for that information to be used for diagnosis of incipient failure mechanisms, however, spectral features must be empirically associated with actual malfunctions and validated statistically as diagnostic symptoms. When the system was acquired, indicators were generally unknown except for those associated with unbalance, misalignment, 00 secondary surge and severe resonant blade vibrations. Others must be developed as in-service malfunctions occur. The power spectral density function (PSDF) has historically been used to compute vibration spectra. Accurate, high-resolution power density spectra require long data-acquisition periods which is inconsistent with frequent examinations of all up-rated compressors. Detection of gross spectral changes indicative of a need for detailed analyses has been accomplished at a rate of less than 1 minute per compressor. An optimum analytical sequence will be based on trade offs. Work is in progress to identify additional malfunction indicators and investigate tools other than the PSDF to provide faster diagnoses. 6 figs.

  2. The broadband dynamic vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. B.; Nissen, J.-C.

    1982-08-01

    The limited effectiveness of the linear passive dynamic vibration absorber is described. This is followed by an analysis producing the response of a primary system when a non-linear softening Belleville spring is used in the absorber. It is shown that the suppression bandwidth can be doubled by this means.

  3. Vibrating Beam With Spatially Periodic Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of vibrations of simply supported beam, bending stiffness varying about steady value, sinusoidally with position along length. Problem of practical importance because related to vibrations of twisted-pair electric-power transmission lines. Twists promote nonuniform shedding of vortexes and prevents resonant accumulation of vibrational energy from wind.

  4. 21 CFR 890.5975 - Therapeutic vibrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Therapeutic vibrator. 890.5975 Section 890.5975...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5975 Therapeutic vibrator. (a) Identification. A therapeutic vibrator is an electrically powered device intended for...

  5. 14 CFR 27.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vibration. 27.251 Section 27.251... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 27.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  6. 49 CFR 178.608 - Vibration standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration standard. 178.608 Section 178.608... Packagings and Packages § 178.608 Vibration standard. (a) Each packaging must be capable of withstanding, without rupture or leakage, the vibration test procedure outlined in this section. (b) Test method....

  7. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  8. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  9. 14 CFR 27.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration. 27.251 Section 27.251... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 27.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  10. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine vibration. 27.907 Section 27.907... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 27.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b) The addition of...

  11. 14 CFR 29.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration. 29.251 Section 29.251... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 29.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  12. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample...

  13. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine vibration. 27.907 Section 27.907... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 27.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b) The addition of...

  14. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Testing of Large Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1)...

  15. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  16. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  17. 14 CFR 29.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vibration. 29.251 Section 29.251... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 29.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  18. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample...

  19. 14 CFR 27.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration. 27.251 Section 27.251... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 27.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  20. 14 CFR 29.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vibration. 29.251 Section 29.251... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 29.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  1. 14 CFR 29.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration. 29.251 Section 29.251... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 29.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  2. 49 CFR 178.608 - Vibration standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vibration standard. 178.608 Section 178.608... Packagings and Packages § 178.608 Vibration standard. (a) Each packaging must be capable of withstanding, without rupture or leakage, the vibration test procedure outlined in this section. (b) Test method....

  3. 33 CFR 159.103 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vibration test. 159.103 Section...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.103 Vibration test. The device... subjected to a sinusoidal vibration for a period of 12 hours, 4 hours in each of the x, y, and z planes,...

  4. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample...

  5. 33 CFR 159.103 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vibration test. 159.103 Section...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.103 Vibration test. The device... subjected to a sinusoidal vibration for a period of 12 hours, 4 hours in each of the x, y, and z planes,...

  6. 14 CFR 27.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vibration. 27.251 Section 27.251... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 27.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  7. 14 CFR 29.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 29.251 Section 29.251... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 29.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  8. 14 CFR 27.251 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 27.251 Section 27.251... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Miscellaneous Flight Requirements § 27.251 Vibration. Each part of the rotorcraft must be free from excessive vibration under each appropriate speed and...

  9. 49 CFR 178.608 - Vibration standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vibration standard. 178.608 Section 178.608... Testing of Non-bulk Packagings and Packages § 178.608 Vibration standard. (a) Each packaging must be capable of withstanding, without rupture or leakage, the vibration test procedure outlined in this...

  10. Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

    2012-09-17

    Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

  11. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  12. 33 CFR 159.103 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vibration test. 159.103 Section...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.103 Vibration test. The device... subjected to a sinusoidal vibration for a period of 12 hours, 4 hours in each of the x, y, and z planes,...

  13. 49 CFR 178.608 - Vibration standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration standard. 178.608 Section 178.608... Packagings and Packages § 178.608 Vibration standard. (a) Each packaging must be capable of withstanding, without rupture or leakage, the vibration test procedure outlined in this section. (b) Test method....

  14. 49 CFR 178.608 - Vibration standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration standard. 178.608 Section 178.608... Packagings and Packages § 178.608 Vibration standard. (a) Each packaging must be capable of withstanding, without rupture or leakage, the vibration test procedure outlined in this section. (b) Test method....

  15. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample...

  16. Actively Controlled Magnetic Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinky, Carlos M.; Logsdon, Kirk A.; Wbomski, Joseph F.; Brown, Gerald V.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype magnetic suspension system with active control isolates object from vibrations in all six degrees of freedom at frequencies as low as 0.01 Hz. Designed specifically to protect instruments aboard spacecraft by suppressing vibrations to microgravity levels; basic control approach used for such terrestrial uses as suppression of shocks and other vibrations in trucks and railroad cars.

  17. Marangoni convection and thermo-vibrational convection in two-layer liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. S.; Wang, A.; Zhou, J. Y.; Polezhaev, V. I.; Fedyushkin, A.; Yaremchuk, V. P.

    The onset-instability and the generation of Marangoni convection and thermolvibrational convection induced simultaneously by thermocapillary force and high-frequency vibration in two-layer systems are investigated theoretically and numerically The effect of high-frequency translational harmonic vibrations on the onset of Marangoni convection in the system of two liquid layer with a non-deformable interface bounded by upper and lower solid walls maintained at constant temperatures is studied by using the methods of the linear stability analysis and the averaged convection equations The Krylov-Bogolyubov averaging method is applied to the generalized heat transport equation and Navier-Stokes equation with the Boussinesq approximation on the assumption that the vibration frequency is high and the velocity amplitude is finite A spectral numerical method Tau-Chebychev was used to resolve the eigenvalue problem for the linearized governing equations together with its boundary conditions of the two-layer Marangoni system with vibration In a two-layer Marangoni system with vibration the convection arises due to vibration and temperature dependence of the interfacial tension and their contributions are estimated by two important non-dimension parameters the vibration Rayleigh number Ra V and the Marangoni number Ma At onset of convection these parameters correspond to the critical values Ra V C Ma C with the critical temperature difference T C and the critical vibration amplitudes and frequency In this study we found some

  18. Vibration isolation using six degree-of-freedom quasi-zero stiffness magnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao; Cazzolato, Benjamin; Robertson, William S. P.; Zander, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    In laboratories and high-tech manufacturing applications, passive vibration isolators are often used to isolate vibration sensitive equipment from ground-borne vibrations. However, in traditional passive isolation devices, where the payload weight is supported by elastic structures with finite stiffness, a design trade-off between the load capacity and the vibration isolation performance is unavoidable. Low stiffness springs are often required to achieve vibration isolation, whilst high stiffness is desired for supporting payload weight. In this paper, a novel design of a six degree of freedom (six-dof) vibration isolator is presented, as well as the control algorithms necessary for stabilising the passively unstable maglev system. The system applies magnetic levitation as the payload support mechanism, which realises inherent quasi-zero stiffness levitation in the vertical direction, and zero stiffness in the other five dofs. While providing near zero stiffness in multiple dofs, the design is also able to generate static magnetic forces to support the payload weight. This negates the trade-off between load capacity and vibration isolation that often exists in traditional isolator designs. The paper firstly presents the novel design concept of the isolator and associated theories, followed by the mechanical and control system designs. Experimental results are then presented to demonstrate the vibration isolation performance of the proposed system in all six directions.

  19. Three-axis vibration measurement by using a grating-interferometric vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, So; Aihara, Ryo; Kim, Woo Jae; Shimizu, Yuki; Gao, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Three-axis vibration measurement of the linear air-bearing stage demonstrated by utilizing the method of the multi-axis laser interferometer is discussed. In order to detect the X-Y-Z directional vibration of the positioning stage table simultaneously, two-dimensional XY gratings are utilized as the scale grating and the reference grating of the interferometer. The X- and Y-directional positive and negative first-order diffracted beams are superimposed to generate the interference signals on the photodetectors. When the multi-axis vibration is applied to the scale grating, the intensities of the interference signals in X- and Y-directions varied corresponding to the vibration of the scale grating. Consequently, three-axis vibrations of the scale grating can be calculated by processing the X- and Y-directional positive and negative first-order interference signals. In this paper, a three-axis vibrometer based on the grating-interferometer has been developed for measurement of the positioning stage table vibration. The detection method of the vibration based on the Doppler frequency shift has been demonstrated. As an application of the multi-axis grating-interferometric vibrometer, multi-axis vibrations of the linear air-bearing stage are measured by using the developed vibrometer.

  20. Shear modulus estimation with vibrating needle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Insana, Michael

    2010-06-01

    An ultrasonic shear wave imaging technique is being developed for estimating the complex shear modulus of biphasic hydropolymers including soft biological tissues. A needle placed in the medium is vibrated along its axis to generate harmonic shear waves. Doppler pulses synchronously track particle motion to estimate shear wave propagation speed. Velocity estimation is improved by implementing a k-lag phase estimator. Fitting shear-wave speed estimates to the predicted dispersion relation curves obtained from two rheological models, we estimate the elastic and viscous components of the complex shear modulus. The dispersion equation estimated using the standard linear solid-body (Zener) model is compared with that from the Kelvin-Voigt model to estimate moduli in gelatin gels in the 50 to 450 Hz shear wave frequency bandwidth. Both models give comparable estimates that agree with independent shear rheometer measurements obtained at lower strain rates. PMID:20529711

  1. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppart, Stephen A. (Inventor); Marks, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of examining a sample, which includes: exposing a reference to a first set of electromagnetic radiation, to form a second set of electromagnetic radiation scattered from the reference; exposing a sample to a third set of electromagnetic radiation to form a fourth set of electromagnetic radiation scattered from the sample; and interfering the second set of electromagnetic radiation and the fourth set of electromagnetic radiation. The first set and the third set of electromagnetic radiation are generated from a source; at least a portion of the second set of electromagnetic radiation is of a frequency different from that of the first set of electromagnetic radiation; and at least a portion of the fourth set of electromagnetic radiation is of a frequency different from that of the third set of electromagnetic radiation.

  2. [Vibration hazards in quarry workers].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, H; Miyao, M; Nakagawa, T; Yamada, S; Kobayashi, F; Ono, Y; Iwata, M; Hisanaga, N; Momoi, N

    1984-03-01

    Vibration hazards were surveyed in a population of quarry workers using chipping hammers and to a lesser extent, rock drills. Sixty-nine male quarry workers, aged 49.1 +/- 8.7 and exposed to vibration for 16.4 +/- 5.1 years, were surveyed in 1981-82. They were exposed to vibration for about 2-4 hours per days, mainly under a piece-work pay system. They had a high prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon (36.2%) and numbness in upper extremities (53.6%). It is considered that the high prevalence was mainly due to large vibration levels in chipping hammers and rock drills and long daily exposure time. The attacks of Raynaud's phenomenon were found predominantly in the left hand, which held chisels, whereas the restriction of motion in the elbow was predominantly in the right arm which pushed chipping hammers. The same 49 male quarry workers in this population were also surveyed in 1976-77 and the prevalence of their complaints between 1976-77 and 1981-82 was compared. The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon was the same, but the frequency of the attacks increased between the two periods. The prevalence of other complaints such as numbness, pain and chills in the upper extremities also increased. Between 1976-77 and 1981-82, the prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon, numbness, and pain in the upper extremities increased in the population of quarriers exposed to vibration for above 2.6 hours per day and 200 days per year, or 600 hours per year. On the other hand, the prevalence of these complaints mostly decreased in the population of quarriers with less exposure.

  3. Causes and Characteristics of the Electromagnetic Vibration of a Capacitor Motor under Load Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsuka, Isao; Tsuboi, Kazuo

    The capacitor motors (CRMs) are widely used to drive industrial equipment and electric home appliances. Recently, the reduction of the vibration and noise of CRMs has become increasingly important from the standpoint of environmental improvement. However, electromagnetic vibration of CRMs under load has not been analyzed sufficiently. The present paper theoretically and experimentally discusses the causes and characteristics of CRM electromagnetic vibration under load. The primary conclusions are as follows: (1) The general formula for dominant electromagnetic vibration caused by electromagnetic force wave was derived, including the influences not only of a backward magnetic field but also of magnetic saturation. (2) The dominant electromagnetic vibration of CRMs was theoretically attributed to three types of electromagnetic force waves. Two types of electromagnetic force wave are generated by the interaction of two forward magnetic fluxes, such as those of a three-phase squirrel-cage induction motor, and the other type of electromagnetic force wave is generated under the influence of a backward magnetic flux. (3) The characteristics of dominant electromagnetic vibration depending on load and running capacitor were classified theoretically and experimentally into three types based on the characteristics of the electromagnetic force wave and equivalent circuit current. (4) The influences of magnetic saturation in dominant electromagnetic vibration were verified experimentally and their causes were clarified theoretically in relation to electromagnetic force waves.

  4. Vibration energy harvesting using Galfenol-based transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbyuk, Viktor

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the novel design of Galfenol based vibration energy harvester is presented. The device uses Galfenol rod diameter 6.35 mm and length 50mm, polycrystalline, production grade, manufactured by FSZM process by ETREMA Product Inc. For experimental study of the harvester, the test rig was developed. It was found by experiment that for given frequency of external excitation there exist optimal values of bias and pre-stress which maximize generated voltage and harvested power. Under optimized operational conditions and external excitations with frequency 50Hz the designed transducer generates about 10 V and harvests about 0,45 W power. Within the running conditions, the Galfenol rod power density was estimated to 340mW/cm3. The obtained results show high practical potential of Galfenol based sensors for vibration-to-electrical energy conversion, structural health monitoring, etc.

  5. Non-equilibrium Casimir force between vibrating plates.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed. PMID:23326401

  6. Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping

    DOEpatents

    Rich, Joseph W.; Homicz, Gregory F.; Bergman, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

  7. Variational study on the vibrational level structure and vibrational level mixing of highly vibrationally excited S₀ D₂CO.

    PubMed

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C; Rashev, Vladimir

    2012-11-01

    We perform converged high precision variational calculations to determine the frequencies of a large number of vibrational levels in S(0) D(2)CO, extending from low to very high excess vibrational energies. For the calculations we use our specific vibrational method (recently employed for studies on H(2)CO), consisting of a combination of a search/selection algorithm and a Lanczos iteration procedure. Using the same method we perform large scale converged calculations on the vibrational level spectral structure and fragmentation at selected highly excited overtone states, up to excess vibrational energies of ∼17,000 cm(-1), in order to study the characteristics of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR), vibrational level density and mode selectivity. PMID:22750345

  8. Tactile perception of skin and skin cream by friction induced vibrations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyang; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Skin cream smooths, softens, and moistens skin by altering surface roughness and tribological properties of skin. Sliding generates vibrations that activate mechanoreceptors located in skin. The brain interprets tactile information to identify skin feel. Understanding the tactile sensing mechanisms of skin with and without cream treatment is important to numerous applications including cosmetics, textiles, and robotics sensors. In this study, frequency spectra of friction force and friction induced vibration signals were carried out to investigate tactile perception by an artificial finger sliding on skin. The influence of normal load, velocity, and cream treatment time were studied. Coherence between friction force and vibration signals were found. The amplitude of vibration decreased after cream treatment, leading to smoother perception. Increasing normal load or velocity between contacting surfaces generated a smoother perception with cream treatment, but rougher perception without treatment. As cream treatment time increases, skin becomes smoother. The related mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Tactile perception of skin and skin cream by friction induced vibrations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyang; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Skin cream smooths, softens, and moistens skin by altering surface roughness and tribological properties of skin. Sliding generates vibrations that activate mechanoreceptors located in skin. The brain interprets tactile information to identify skin feel. Understanding the tactile sensing mechanisms of skin with and without cream treatment is important to numerous applications including cosmetics, textiles, and robotics sensors. In this study, frequency spectra of friction force and friction induced vibration signals were carried out to investigate tactile perception by an artificial finger sliding on skin. The influence of normal load, velocity, and cream treatment time were studied. Coherence between friction force and vibration signals were found. The amplitude of vibration decreased after cream treatment, leading to smoother perception. Increasing normal load or velocity between contacting surfaces generated a smoother perception with cream treatment, but rougher perception without treatment. As cream treatment time increases, skin becomes smoother. The related mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27474814

  10. Whole-body vibration perception thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, K. C.; Griffin, M. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory experiments concerned with perception thresholds for whole-body vibration. The nature of absolute perception thresholds is discussed and a method of determining vibration thresholds, based upon signal detection theory, is proposed. Thresholds of subjects exposed to x-, y- and z-axis sinusoidal vibration were determined for sitting and standing subjects (from 2 to 100 Hz). Perception thresholds have also been determined for supine subjects exposed to vertical ( x-axis) sinusoidal vibration (10-63 Hz). In additional experiments the effects of complex (e.g., random) vibration and the effects of duration on the perception thresholds were investigated. The relation between perception thresholds and vibration levels, said by subjects to be unacceptable if they occurred in their own homes, was investigated as well as the effects of subjects' personality and the visual and acoustic conditions in the laboratory. For the vertical vibration of seated subjects no significant differences were found between the responses of male and female subjects. Significant differences were found between perception thresholds for sitting and standing postures. The median threshold was approximately 0·01 m/s 2 r.m.s. between 2 and 100 Hz. Perception thresholds for x-axis and y-axis vibration were not significantly different in either sitting or standing subjects but significant differences in thresholds were found between sitting and standing positions for both x-axis and y-axis vibration. Subjects tended to be more sensitive to vibration when lying than when sitting or standing. The results suggested that the perception of random vibrations can be predicted from a knowledge of the perception of its component vibrations. The number of cycles of vibration did not affect perception thresholds for vibration durations of more than about 0·25 s. Some assessments suggested that vibration at more than twice the perception threshold may not

  11. Vibrations of Railroad Due to The Passage of The Underground Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konowrocki, Robert; Bajer, Czesław

    2010-03-01

    In the paper we present results of vibration measurements in the train and on the base of the railroad in tunnels of Warsaw Underground. Measurements were performed at straight and curved sections of the track. The paper is focused on the influence of the lateral slip in rail/wheel contact zone on the generation of vibrations and a noise. Vibrations were analyzed in terms of accelerations, velocities or displacements as a function of time and frequency. Results ware compared with the experiment of rolling of the wheel with lateral sleep. In both cases we observed double periodic oscillations.

  12. Ultrafast measurements of vibrational relaxation in the conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jon-Paul R.; Lidzey, David G.; Phillips, P. Jonathan; Carder, Damian A.; Fox, A. Mark

    2004-10-01

    We report the resonant pump-probe measurements used to study the dynamics of molecular vibrations in the conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctlyfluorene) (PFO). Free-electron-laser excited, pump-probe measurements on a drop-cast polymer film yield the lifetime of a series of different infrared active, high frequency vibrational modes at 5K. A general trend of decreasing lifetime with increasing frequency of the vibrational mode seems consistent with an enhanced density of accepting states for high frequency modes. Our measurements provide an insight into the dissipation of energy in conjugated polymers, and have implications for exciton generation and dissociation mechanisms in organic optoelectronic devices.

  13. Laser-Doppler vibrating tube densimeter for measurements at high temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Aida, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Ai; Akutsu, Makoto; Ono, Takumi; Kanno, Akihiro; Hoshina, Taka-aki; Ota, Masaki; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2007-11-01

    A laser-Doppler vibrometer was used to measure the vibration of a vibrating tube densimeter for measuring P-V-T data at high temperatures and pressures. The apparatus developed allowed the control of the residence time of the sample so that decomposition at high temperatures could be minimized. A function generator and piezoelectric crystal was used to excite the U-shaped tube in one of its normal modes of vibration. Densities of methanol-water mixtures are reported for at 673 K and 40 MPa with an uncertainty of 0.009 g/cm3.

  14. Laser-Doppler vibrating tube densimeter for measurements at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Ai; Akutsu, Makoto; Ono, Takumi; Kanno, Akihiro; Hoshina, Taka-aki; Ota, Masaki; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L. Jr.; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2007-11-15

    A laser-Doppler vibrometer was used to measure the vibration of a vibrating tube densimeter for measuring P-V-T data at high temperatures and pressures. The apparatus developed allowed the control of the residence time of the sample so that decomposition at high temperatures could be minimized. A function generator and piezoelectric crystal was used to excite the U-shaped tube in one of its normal modes of vibration. Densities of methanol-water mixtures are reported for at 673 K and 40 MPa with an uncertainty of 0.009 g/cm{sup 3}.

  15. Laser-Doppler vibrating tube densimeter for measurements at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Ai; Akutsu, Makoto; Ono, Takumi; Kanno, Akihiro; Hoshina, Taka-aki; Ota, Masaki; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L.; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2007-11-01

    A laser-Doppler vibrometer was used to measure the vibration of a vibrating tube densimeter for measuring P-V-T data at high temperatures and pressures. The apparatus developed allowed the control of the residence time of the sample so that decomposition at high temperatures could be minimized. A function generator and piezoelectric crystal was used to excite the U-shaped tube in one of its normal modes of vibration. Densities of methanol-water mixtures are reported for at 673K and 40MPa with an uncertainty of 0.009g /cm3.

  16. The effects of sound level and vibration magnitude on the relative discomfort of noise and vibration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    The relative discomfort caused by noise and vibration, how this depends on the level of noise and the magnitude of vibration, and whether the noise and vibration are presented simultaneously or sequentially has been investigated in a laboratory study with 20 subjects. Noise and vertical vibration were reproduced with all 49 combinations of 7 levels of noise and 7 magnitudes of vibration to allow the discomfort caused by one of the stimuli to be judged relative to the other stimulus using magnitude estimation. In four sessions, subjects judged noise relative to vibration and vibration relative to noise, with both simultaneous and sequential presentations of the stimuli. The equivalence of noise and vibration was not greatly dependent on whether the stimuli were simultaneous or sequential, but highly dependent on whether noise was judged relative to vibration or vibration was judged relative to noise. When judging noise, higher magnitude vibrations appeared to mask the discomfort caused by low levels of noise. When judging vibration, higher level noises appeared to mask the discomfort caused by low magnitudes of vibration. The judgment of vibration discomfort was more influenced by noise than the judgment of noise discomfort was influenced by vibration.

  17. Examining surface and bulk structures using combined nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Jie; Khmaladze, Alexander; Liu, Yuwei; Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2011-06-15

    We combined sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy in one system to examine both surface and bulk structures of materials with the same geometry and without the need to move the sample. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) thin films were tested before and after plasma treatment. The sensitivities of SFG and CARS were tested by varying polymer film thickness and using a lipid monolayer. PMID:21685990

  18. Rim-spoke composite flywheels: Stress and vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Kiraly, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Elementary relations are described to determine the material utilization efficiency of a thin wall rim composite flywheel over other configurations. An algorithm is generated for the automatic selection of the optimum composite material for a given thin rim flywheel environment. Subsequently, the computer program NASTRAN is used to perform a detailed stress and vibration analysis of thin wall cylindrical shell rim spoke, single rim and multirim composite flywheels for a specific application.

  19. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  20. Seminar on Understanding Digital Control and Analysis in Vibration Test Systems, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A number of techniques for dealing with important technical aspects of the random vibration control problem are described. These include the generation of pseudo-random and true random noise, the control spectrum estimation problem, the accuracy/speed tradeoff, and control correction strategies. System hardware, the operator-system interface, safety features, and operational capabilities of sophisticated digital random vibration control systems are also discussed.

  1. A review of vibration problems in power station boiler feed pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, David

    1994-01-01

    Boiler feed pump reliability and availability is recognized as important to the overall efficiency of power generation. Vibration monitoring is often used as a part of planned maintenance. This paper reviews a number of different types of boiler feed pump vibration problems describing some methods of solution in the process. It is hoped that this review may assist both designers and users faced with similar problems.

  2. Training Data Optimized and Conditioned to Learn Characteristic Patterns of Vibrating Blisks and Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we have been training artificial neural networks to interpret the characteristic patterns (see the leftmost image) generated from electronic holograms of vibrating structures. These patterns not only visualize the vibration properties of structures, but small changes in the patterns can indicate structural changes, cracking, or damage. Neural networks detect these small changes well. Our objective has been to adapt the neural-network, electronic-holography combination for inspecting components in Glenn's Spin Rig.

  3. Vibration on board and health effects.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Anker; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2014-01-01

    There is only limited knowledge of the exposure to vibrations of ships' crews and their risk of vibration-induced health effects. Exposure to hand-arm vibrations from the use of vibrating tools at sea does not differ from that in the land-based trades. However, in contrast to most other work places, seafarers are also exposed to vibrations to the feet when standing on vibrating surfaces on board. Anecdotal reports have related the development of "white feet" to local exposure to vibration, e.g. in mining, but this connection has not been investigated in the maritime setting. As known from studies of the health consequences of whole body vibrations in land-transportation, such exposure at sea may affect ships' passengers and crews. While the relation of back disorders to high levels of whole body vibration has been demonstrated among e.g. tractor drivers, there are no reported epidemiological evidence for such relation among seafarers except for fishermen, who, however, are also exposed to additional recognised physical risk factors at work. The assessment and reduction of vibrations by naval architects relates to technical implications of this impact for the ships' construction, but has limited value for the estimation of health risks because they express the vibration intensity differently that it is done in a medical context. PMID:25231326

  4. Membrane Vibration Analysis Above the Nyquist Limit with Fluorescence Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for generating photogrammetric targets by projecting an array of laser beams onto a membrane doped with fluorescent laser dye has recently been developed. In this paper we review this new fluorescence based technique, then proceed to show how it can be used for dynamic measurements, and how a short pulsed (10 ns) laser allows the measurement of vibration modes at frequencies several times the sampling frequency. In addition, we present experimental results showing the determination of fundamental and harmonic vibration modes of a drum style dye-doped polymer membrane tautly mounted on a 12-inch circular hoop and excited with 30 Hz and 62 Hz sinusoidal acoustic waves. The projected laser dot pattern was generated by passing the beam from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser though a diffractive optical element, and the resulting fluorescence was imaged with three digital video cameras, all of which were synchronized with a pulse and delay generator. Although the video cameras are capable of 240 Hz frame rates, the laser s output was limited to 30 Hz and below. Consequently, aliasing techniques were used to allow the measurement of vibration modes up to 186 Hz with a Nyquist limit of less than 15 Hz.

  5. Multiple Rabi Splittings under Ultrastrong Vibrational Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jino; Chervy, Thibault; Shalabney, Atef; Devaux, Eloïse; Hiura, Hidefumi; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W.

    2016-10-01

    From the high vibrational dipolar strength offered by molecular liquids, we demonstrate that a molecular vibration can be ultrastrongly coupled to multiple IR cavity modes, with Rabi splittings reaching 24% of the vibration frequencies. As a proof of the ultrastrong coupling regime, our experimental data unambiguously reveal the contributions to the polaritonic dynamics coming from the antiresonant terms in the interaction energy and from the dipolar self-energy of the molecular vibrations themselves. In particular, we measure the opening of a genuine vibrational polaritonic band gap of ca. 60 meV. We also demonstrate that the multimode splitting effect defines a whole vibrational ladder of heavy polaritonic states perfectly resolved. These findings reveal the broad possibilities in the vibrational ultrastrong coupling regime which impact both the optical and the molecular properties of such coupled systems, in particular, in the context of mode-selective chemistry.

  6. (abstract) Vibration Damping of the Cassini Spacecraft Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergen, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Cassini will be protected during launch ascent through the atmosphere by a lightweight aluminum payload fairing (PLF). As a result of the extreme noise levels generated by the powerful Titan IV at liftoff, and the acoustic transparency of the PLF, Cassini is predicted to experience severe acoustic levels. Furthermore, the high acoustic levels, coupled with the size and configuration of the spacecraft, will induce intense random vibration on the structure and critical spacecraft components. Efforts to mitigate the vibroacoustic environment by modifying the spacecraft structure were pursued. Preliminary studies indicated that a structural damping treatment using viscoelastic materials (VEMs) represented a viable technique of reducing vibration with minimum impact on weight, cost, and redesign. Tuned Vibration Absorbers (TVAs) - compact, single degree-of-freedom mechanical oscillators in which a VEM serves as the spring and damping element - will be used also. The operating principles, design, and installation of the TVAs are described, the test program is outlined, and test results are presented which show that significant vibration attenuation was achieved.

  7. [Biomechanical study of lumbar spine under different vibration conditions].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Pin; Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Gong, He; Wang, Lizhen; Fan, Yubo

    2015-02-01

    We observed the effect of vibration parameters on lumbar spine under different vibration conditions using finite element analysis method in our laboratory. In this study, the CT-images of L1-L5 segments were obtained. All images were used to develop 3D geometrical model using the Mimics10. 01 (Materialise, Belgium). Then it was modified using Geomagic Studio12. 0 (Raindrop Geomagic Inc. USA). Finite element (FE) mesh model was generated by Hypermesh11. 0 (Altair Engineering, Inc. USA) and Abaqus. Abaqus was used to calculate the stress distribution of L1-L5 under different vibration conditions. It was found that in a vibration cycle, tensile stress was occurred on lumbar vertebra mainly. Stress distributed evenly and stress concentration occurred on the left rear side of the upper endplate. The stress had no obvious changes under different frequencies, but the stress was higher when amplitude was greater. In conclusion, frequency and amplitude parameters have little effect on the stress distribution in vertebra. The stress magnitude is positively correlated with the amplitude. PMID:25997265

  8. Delayed-feedback vibration absorbers to enhance energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Ayhan S.; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-02-01

    Recovering energy from ambient vibrations has recently been a popular research topic. This article is conceived as a concept study that explores new directions to enhance the performance of such energy harvesting devices from base excitation. The main idea revolves around the introduction of delayed feedback sensitization (or tuning) of an active vibration absorber setup. To clarify the concept, the Delayed Resonator theory is reviewed and its suitability for energy harvesting purposes is studied. It is recognized that an actively tuned and purely resonant absorber is infeasible for such applications. The focus is then shifted to alternative tuning schemes that deviate from resonance conditions. Also called Delayed Feedback Vibration Absorbers, these devices may indeed provide significant enhancements in energy harvesting capacity. Analytical developments are presented to study energy generation and consumption characteristics. Effects of excitation frequency and absorber damping are investigated. The influences of time-delayed feedback on the stability and the transient performance of the system are also treated. The analysis starts from a stand-alone absorber, emulating seismic mass type harvesters. The work is then extended to vibration control applications, where an absorber/harvester is coupled with a primary structure. The results are demonstrated with numerical simulations on a case study.

  9. Intermediate vibrational coordinate localization with harmonic coupling constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.

    2016-05-01

    Optimized normal coordinates can significantly improve the speed and accuracy of vibrational frequency calculations. However, over-localization can occur when using unconstrained spatial localization techniques. The unintuitive mixtures of stretching and bending coordinates that result can make interpreting spectra more difficult and also cause artificial increases in mode-coupling during anharmonic calculations. Combining spatial localization with a constraint on the coupling between modes can be used to generate coordinates with properties in-between the normal and fully localized schemes. These modes preserve the diagonal nature of the mass-weighted Hessian matrix to within a specified tolerance and are found to prevent contamination between the stretching and bending vibrations of the molecules studied without a priori classification of the different types of vibration present. Relaxing the constraint can also be used to identify which normal modes form specific groups of localized modes. The new coordinates are found to center on more spatially delocalized functional groups than their fully localized counterparts and can be used to tune the degree of vibrational correlation energy during anharmonic calculations.

  10. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  11. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  12. [Biomechanical study of lumbar spine under different vibration conditions].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Pin; Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Gong, He; Wang, Lizhen; Fan, Yubo

    2015-02-01

    We observed the effect of vibration parameters on lumbar spine under different vibration conditions using finite element analysis method in our laboratory. In this study, the CT-images of L1-L5 segments were obtained. All images were used to develop 3D geometrical model using the Mimics10. 01 (Materialise, Belgium). Then it was modified using Geomagic Studio12. 0 (Raindrop Geomagic Inc. USA). Finite element (FE) mesh model was generated by Hypermesh11. 0 (Altair Engineering, Inc. USA) and Abaqus. Abaqus was used to calculate the stress distribution of L1-L5 under different vibration conditions. It was found that in a vibration cycle, tensile stress was occurred on lumbar vertebra mainly. Stress distributed evenly and stress concentration occurred on the left rear side of the upper endplate. The stress had no obvious changes under different frequencies, but the stress was higher when amplitude was greater. In conclusion, frequency and amplitude parameters have little effect on the stress distribution in vertebra. The stress magnitude is positively correlated with the amplitude.

  13. A technique for the vibration signal analysis in vehicle diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    The method of utilising signals of vibration acceleration in the on-line and off-line diagnostics of mechanical defects of internal combustion engines is presented in the paper. The monitored vibration signals of the spark ignition (SI) engine in various maintenance states of the valve system were investigated. The suggested technique is based on mathematical methods of the lower triangular-orthogonal (LQ) factorisation and the singular value decomposition (SVD) of observation subspaces computed on a vibration time series after their angular resampling without any transformations in the frequency domain. The applied algorithm of data processing filters excessive information and allows the selection of diagnostic features (essential from the maintenance point of view) and generates the empirical model and matrix residuals assessed in the no-fault state as being 'zero'. Then, statistical feature vectors, for which the averaged successive singular values of the residuals of the observation subspaces of the vibration signals were assumed as components, were analysed. As a result of this procedure the vectors of lower dimensions reduced to components, allowing the classification of observations within all defined classes, were obtained. On the basis of these vectors a scalar measure - sensitive to the kind of defect - was proposed and verified.

  14. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brønsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level.

  15. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  16. Torsional vibration isolator and method

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.A.; Durrett, V.D.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a multicylinder internal combustion engine having a rotatable crankshaft and a rotatable flywheel which together define an inertial system rotating about a predetermined axis of rotation. An improvement is described here which facilitates avoiding destructive effects on the crankshaft of stress induced by torsional vibration. The method comprises an elastomeric annulus coupling means operatively interposed between the crankshaft and flywheel for coupling the crankshaft and flywheel together for rotation of the flywheel with the crankshaft. The coupling means has a torsional spring rate of less than 20,000 in lb/radian effective to permit substantial angular displacement between the flywheel and the crankshaft for isolating the rotating inertia of the flywheel from the rotating inertia of the crankshaft after engine startup. The coupling means avoids dampening while preventing torsional vibration from being transferred between the flywheel and the crankshaft.

  17. Vibrational energy transfer in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.; Adelman, Steven A.

    A review of several of the available theories of vibrational energy transfer (VET) in the gas and liquid phases is presented. First the classical theory of gas phase VET mainly due to Landau and Teller, to Jackson and Mott and to Zener is developed in some detail. Next the Schwartz-Slawsky-Herzfeld theory, a framework for analysing VET data based on the classical theory, is outlined. Experimental tests of the classical theory and theoretical critiques of its assumptions are then described. Next a brief review of the modern ab-initio quantum approach to gas phase VET rates, taking as an example the work of Banks, Clary and Werner, is given. Theories of VET at elevated densities are then discussed. The isolated binary collision model is reviewed and a new molecular approach to the density, temperature and isotope dependences of vibrational energy relaxation rates, due to Adelman and co-workers, is outlined.

  18. Vibrational damping of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    The purpose of this research was to develop new methods of vibrational damping in polymeric composite materials along with expanding the knowledge of currently used vibrational damping methods. A new barrier layer technique that dramatically increased damping in viscoelastic damping materials that interacted with the composite resin was created. A method for testing the shear strength of damping materials cocured in composites was developed. Directional damping materials, where the loss factor and modulus could be tailored by changing the angle, were produced and investigated. The addition of particles between composite prepreg layers to increase damping was studied. Electroviscoelastic materials that drastically changed properties such as loss factor and modulus with an applied voltage were manufactured and tested.

  19. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-01-09

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program entails modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. The project continues to advance, but is behind the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. The test bench for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5) has been designed and constructed. The design of the full-scale laboratory prototype and associated test equipment is complete and the components are out for manufacture. Barring any unforeseen difficulties, laboratory testing should be complete by the end of March, as currently scheduled. We anticipate the expenses through March to be approximately equal to those budgeted for Phase I.

  20. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Vibration Absorber using Shape Memory Alloy (NiTi) Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V. Raj; Kumar, M. B. Bharathi Raj; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2011-10-20

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) springs have been used as actuators in many applications although their use in the vibration control area is very recent. Since shape memory alloys differ from conventional alloy materials in many ways, the traditional design approach for springs is not completely suitable for designing SMA springs. Some vibration control concepts utilizing unique characteristics of SMA's will be presented in this paper.A dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is developed for attenuation of vibration in a cantilever beam. The design procedure of the DVA is presented. The system consists of a cantilever beam which is considered to generate the real-time vibration using shaker. A SMA spring is used with a mass attached to its end. The stiffness of the SMA spring is dynamically varied in such a way to attenuate the vibration. Both simulation and experimentation are carried out using PID controller. The experiments were carried out by interfacing the experimental setup with a computer using LabVIEW software, Data acquisition and control are implemented using a PCI data acquisition card. Standard PID controllers have been used to control the vibration of the beam. Experimental results are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers designed and the usefulness of the proposed test platform by exciting the structure at resonance. In experimental setup, an accelerometer is used to measure the vibration which is fed to computer and correspondingly the SMA spring is actuated to change its stiffness to control the vibration. The results obtained illustrate that the developed DVA using SMA actuator is very effective in reducing structural response and have great potential to be an active vibration control medium.