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Sample records for generation sfq vibrational

  1. An SFQ-based high-performance packet switch for next-generation high-end routers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorozu, S.; Kameda, Y.; Tahara, S.

    2001-08-01

    Switching throughput capacities of over 10 Tbps will be required of high-end systems on the backbones of nationwide telecommunications networks within the next decade. However conventional technologies cannot accommodate such capacities. Superconducting single flux quantum (SFQ) technology is a promising approach because of its ultra-low power consumption and ultra-high speed characteristics. We have proposed an opto-electronic-SFQ hybrid switching system. This system is separated into three functions: SFQ packet switching, high-performance CMOS control, and optical transmission. The packet switch is an improved Batcher-Banyan switch that uses a time-shifted internal speedup unit, and shuffle and grouping exchange schemes. Simulation showed good scalability; no conventional router could ever attain this capacity. We report on the numerical analysis and architectural-level design results for this packet switch.

  2. Sum frequency generation (SFQ) vibrational spectroscopy studies of combustion reactions on platinum single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gaughan, Jessica S.

    2004-01-15

    We have studied the dissociation of CO catalyzed by platinum single crystals. At 40 torr of CO, the Pt(111) crystal dissociates CO at 673 K. Under the same conditions, Pt(100) dissociates CO at 500 K, and Pt(557) dissociates CO at 548 K. Hence, the CO dissociation reaction is a structure sensitive reaction. SFG was used to monitor the CO top site resonance as the platinum crystals were heated to the dissociation temperature when exposed to 40 torr of CO. In all three systems, the CO resonance shifts to lower frequency as the platinum crystal is heated. However, the frequency of the CO resonance at the dissociation frequency is lower on the (100) and (111) crystal faces than on the Pt(557) crystal. We believe that the (111) and (100) crystal faces must undergo roughening to expose step or kink sites in order to facilitate the dissociation reaction. This is supported by UHV studies of CO dissociation catalyzed by platinum crystals. These studies observe dissociation only when step or kink sites are present. Since the Pt(111) surface is very stable, it needs to be heated to 673 K to produce the low coordination number sites needed for CO dissociation. Since the Pt(100) surface easily reconstructs, it is able to form the active sites for CO dissociation at relatively low temperatures. The SFG spectra support our conclusion that the CO molecules are sitting on low coordination number platinum atoms at the dissociation temperature. Since the Pt(557) surface already has step sites, the dissociation reaction can take place without further roughening of the surface. The CO resonance on the (557) crystal face at the dissociation temperature is at a very similar frequency to CO molecules adsorbed on only the step sites of the crystal. Further studies showed that the dissociation reaction takes place on the (557) surface at CO pressures as low as 1 torr. At 1 torr of CO, the carbon deposition rate is 1.0 x 10-2 ML minute-1. A series of experiments at CO pressures ranging from 5 to 20 torr leads to a 0.8 order dependence of the dissociation reaction on CO pressure.

  3. A Report on Stochastic Fairness Queueing (SFQ) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denny, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed an improved queueing algorithm, known as Stochastic Fairness Queueing (SFQ), for best-effort traffic (i.e., traffic that does not require any guaranteed service). SFQ is a probablistic variant of strict fair queueing where instead of a single queue being allocated per flow, a fixed number of queues are used and a hash function maps the IP source and destination to a particular queue. A seed to the hash function is also perturbed occasionally to help distribute the flows amongst different queues when more than one flow maps to the same queue during the lifetime of the flow. SFQ provides 'fair' access by trying to ensure that each flow from source to destination host obtains equal access to the available bandwidth. This report covers a series of experiments performed on DARTnet evaluating the behavior and performance of SFQ against a FIFO queueing discipline. These experiments were designed to show SFQ's advantages and performance, and include tests demonstrating: Fair utilization of available resources; Starvation prevention; Graceful degradation under overload conditions; and Resource usage. In general, the experiments do show that SFQ is better than FIFO queueing at allocating bandwidth equally among a set of flows. SFQ also prevents a stream from dominating the available bandwidth, which seems to be a tendency with FIFO queueing (i.e., if a flow demands more than its share of the available bandwidth, with FIFO queueing that stream receives a disproportionate amount when compared to flows demanding less than their share). Furthermore, SFQ seems to reward 'nice' users of the network by providing a lower variance in delay and more throughput when their resource demand is less than their available share. Both SFQ and FIFO queueing seem to degrade fairly well as the network becomes saturated and to recover well as the network becomes less congested. Not unexpectedly, FIFO queueing is a little more efficient than SFQ-the delays are

  4. Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-11-28

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

  5. Design and Demonstration of a 4×4 SFQ Network Switch Prototype System and 10-Gbps Bit-Error-Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Yoshihito; Yorozu, Shinichi

    We developed a 4×4 SFQ network switch prototype system and demonstrated its operation at 10Gbps. The system's core is composed of two SFQ chips: a 4×4 switch and a 6-channel voltage driver. The 4×4 switch chip contained both a switch fabric (i. e. a data path) and a switch scheduler (i. e. a controller). Both chips were attached to a multichip-module (MCM) carrier, which was then installed in a cryocooled system with 32 10-Gbps ports. Each chip contained about 2100 Josephson junctions on a 5-mm×5-mm die. An NEC standard 2.5-kA/cm2 fabrication process was used for the switch chip. We increased the critical current density to 10kA/cm2 for the driver chip to improve speed while maintaining wide bias margins. MCM implementation enabled us to use a hybrid critical current density technology. Voltage pulses were transferred between two chips through passive transmission lines on the MCM carrier. The cryocooled system was cooled down to about 4K using a two-stage 1-W cryocooler. We correctly operated the whole system at 10Gbps. The switch scheduler, which is driven by an on-chip clock generator, operated at 40GHz. The speed gap between SFQ and room temperature devices was filled by on-chip SFQ FIFO buffers or shift registers. We measured the bit error rate at 10Gbps and found that it was on the order of 10-13 for the 4×4 SFQ switch fabric. In addition, using semiconductor interface circuitry, we built a four-port SFQ Ethernet switch. All the components except for a compressor were installed in a standard 19-inch rack, filling a space 21 U (933.5mm or 36.75 inches) in height. After four personal computers (PCs) were connected to the switch, we have successfully transferred video data between them.

  6. A behavioral-level HDL description of SFQ logic circuits for quantitative performance analysis of large-scale SFQ digital systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, F.; Yoshikawa, N.; Tanaka, M.; Fujimaki, A.; Takai, Y.

    2003-10-01

    Recently many single flux quantum (SFQ) logic circuits containing several thousands of Josephson junctions have been designed successfully by using digital domain simulation based on the hard ware description language (HDL). In the present HDL-based design of SFQ circuits, a structure-level HDL description has been used, where circuits are made up of basic gate cells. However, in order to analyze large-scale SFQ digital systems, such as a microprocessor, more higher-level circuit abstraction is necessary to reduce the circuit simulation time. In this paper we have investigated the way to describe functionality of the large-scale SFQ digital circuits by a behavior-level HDL description. In this method, the functionality and the timing of the circuit block is defined directly by describing their behavior by the HDL. Using this method, we can dramatically reduce the simulation time of large-scale SFQ digital circuits.

  7. 40-GHz operation of a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) 4 × 4 switch scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Y.; Yorozu, S.; Hashimoto, Y.; Terai, H.; Fujimaki, A.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2006-10-01

    We designed a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) scheduler for a 4 × 4 network switch. It receives requests serially and arbitrates them. Fair scheduling is achieved by using a round-robin priority pointer at each output port. The pointer is updated so that the input port that was granted permission has the lowest priority in the next scheduling cycle. We divided the scheduler into sub-blocks, which were separately designed. The sub-blocks, which have asynchronous interfaces, were then connected with passive transmission lines. Ladder-type on-chip clock generators were included in the circuit for high-speed operation. Using logic simulation, we verified the scheduler test circuit. The scheduler test circuit was composed of about 3000 Josephson junctions. We tested the scheduler circuit at high speed and confirmed correct operations at over 40 GHz.

  8. Vibration generation in a pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabzev, S. V.; Veprik, A. M.; Vilenchik, H. S.; Pundak, N.

    2009-01-01

    The cold head of a pulse tube refrigerator does not contain moving parts, therefore, is traditionally thought of as producing low vibration and having extended lifespan. Thus, such cryogenic engines are especially attractive for use in vibration-sensitive instrumentation, such as scanning electron microscopes, superconductive quantum interference devices, etc. However, even relatively low-level vibration of a pulse tube, resulting from oscillation of a gas pressure, may be excessive for the above vibration-sensitive OEM instrumentation. By making use of the finite element analysis and the full-scale experimentation, the authors identify the sources of a pulse tube vibration.

  9. Rapid hyperspectral, vibrationally resonant sum-frequency generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanninen, Adam M.; Potma, Eric O.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the development and application of a laser-scanning, nonlinear optical microscope capable of generating vibrationally resonant images based on sum-frequency generation (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or third-order sum-frequency generation (TSFG). The combination of these three modalities allows vibrationally sensitive imaging of both χ (2) and χ (3)-active structures in biological tissues, addressing both Raman-active as well as IR-allowed vibrational modes. We show the practical utility of these vibrationally sensitive modalities by imaging collagen I rich tissues.

  10. Vibration analysis of a hydro generator for different operating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haţiegan, C.; Pădureanu, I.; Jurcu, M.; Nedeloni, M. D.; Hamat, C. O.; Chioncel, C. P.; Trocaru, S.; Vasile, O.; Bădescu, O.; Micliuc, D.; (Filip Nedeloni, L.; Băra, A.; (Barboni Haţiegan, L.

    2017-01-01

    Based on experimental measurements, this paper presents the vibration analysis of a hydro generator that equips a Kaplan hydraulic turbine of a Hydropower plant in Romania. This analysis means vibrations measurement to different operating regimes of the hydro generator respectively before installing it and into operation, namely putting off load mode (unexcited and excited) respectively putting on load mode. By comparing, through the experimental results obtained before and after the operation of hydro aggregates are observed vibrations improvements.

  11. Unbalanced rock mass vibration generator and its bench testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalkin, LA; Azarov, AV; Serdyukov, AS

    2017-02-01

    This work presents an unbalanced borehole vibration source with the pneumatic actuator to affect the rock mass bottomhole zone in the seismic frequency range. The modulus-type source consists of the vibration generator with automatic step regulation of static moment, clamping node and built-in pneumatic device to transfer equipment in uncased boreholes. There are test results on the source prototype, amplitude and frequency characteristics and spectral content of the source signal.

  12. Use of chaotic and random vibrations to generate high frequency test inputs: Part 2, Chaotic vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper and a companion paper show that the traditional limits on amplitude and frequency that can be generated in a laboratory test on a vibration exciter can be substantially extended. This is accomplished by attaching a device to the shaker that permits controlled metal to metal impacts that generate a high acceleration, high frequency environment on a test surface. A companion paper derives some of the mechanical relations for the system. This paper shows that a sinusoidal shaker input can be used to excite deterministic chaotic dynamics of the system yielding a random vibration environment on the test surface, or a random motion of the shaker can be used to generate a random vibration environment on the test surface. Numerical examples are presented to show the kind of environments that can be generated in this system. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Dynamic Loads Generation for Multi-Point Vibration Excitation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    A random-force method has been developed to predict dynamic loads produced by rocket-engine random vibrations for new rocket-engine designs. The method develops random forces at multiple excitation points based on random vibration environments scaled from accelerometer data obtained during hot-fire tests of existing rocket engines. This random-force method applies random forces to the model and creates expected dynamic response in a manner that simulates the way the operating engine applies self-generated random vibration forces (random pressure acting on an area) with the resulting responses that we measure with accelerometers. This innovation includes the methodology (implementation sequence), the computer code, two methods to generate the random-force vibration spectra, and two methods to reduce some of the inherent conservatism in the dynamic loads. This methodology would be implemented to generate the random-force spectra at excitation nodes without requiring the use of artificial boundary conditions in a finite element model. More accurate random dynamic loads than those predicted by current industry methods can then be generated using the random force spectra. The scaling method used to develop the initial power spectral density (PSD) environments for deriving the random forces for the rocket engine case is based on the Barrett Criteria developed at Marshall Space Flight Center in 1963. This invention approach can be applied in the aerospace, automotive, and other industries to obtain reliable dynamic loads and responses from a finite element model for any structure subject to multipoint random vibration excitations.

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of vibration, generated by monorail trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Samuil A.; Makhortykh, Sergey A.; Kostarev, Stanislav A.

    2002-11-01

    Monorail transport as all other city transport vehicles is the source of high noise and vibration levels. It is less widespread than cars or underground transport but its influence in modern cities enhances. Now in Moscow the first monorail road with trains on tires is designed, therefore the problem of vibration and noise assessments and prediction of its impact on the residential region appears. To assess the levels of generated vibration a physical model of interaction in the system wagon-tire-road coating-viaduct-soil has been proposed and then numerically analyzed. The model is based on the known from publications facts of automobile transport vibration and our own practice concerning underground trains vibration generation. To verify computer simulation results and adjust model parameters the series of measurements of noise and vibration near experimental monorail road was carried out. In the report the results of calculations and measurements will be presented and some outcomes of possible acoustical ecologic situation near monorail roads will be proposed.

  15. Capacitance-Based Frequency Adjustment of Micro Piezoelectric Vibration Generator

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinhua; He, Qing; Li, Hong; Chu, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Micro piezoelectric vibration generator has a wide application in the field of microelectronics. Its natural frequency is unchanged after being manufactured. However, resonance cannot occur when the natural frequencies of a piezoelectric generator and the source of vibration frequency are not consistent. Output voltage of the piezoelectric generator will sharply decline. It cannot normally supply power for electronic devices. In order to make the natural frequency of the generator approach the frequency of vibration source, the capacitance FM technology is adopted in this paper. Different capacitance FM schemes are designed by different locations of the adjustment layer. The corresponding capacitance FM models have been established. Characteristic and effect of the capacitance FM have been simulated by the FM model. Experimental results show that the natural frequency of the generator could vary from 46.5 Hz to 42.4 Hz when the bypass capacitance value increases from 0 nF to 30 nF. The natural frequency of a piezoelectric vibration generator could be continuously adjusted by this method. PMID:25133237

  16. Capacitance-based frequency adjustment of micro piezoelectric vibration generator.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinhua; He, Qing; Li, Hong; Chu, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Micro piezoelectric vibration generator has a wide application in the field of microelectronics. Its natural frequency is unchanged after being manufactured. However, resonance cannot occur when the natural frequencies of a piezoelectric generator and the source of vibration frequency are not consistent. Output voltage of the piezoelectric generator will sharply decline. It cannot normally supply power for electronic devices. In order to make the natural frequency of the generator approach the frequency of vibration source, the capacitance FM technology is adopted in this paper. Different capacitance FM schemes are designed by different locations of the adjustment layer. The corresponding capacitance FM models have been established. Characteristic and effect of the capacitance FM have been simulated by the FM model. Experimental results show that the natural frequency of the generator could vary from 46.5 Hz to 42.4 Hz when the bypass capacitance value increases from 0 nF to 30 nF. The natural frequency of a piezoelectric vibration generator could be continuously adjusted by this method.

  17. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Sexual Function Questionnaire (SFQ) into Brazilian Portuguese.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Clara de Oliveira; Rocha, Gibsi Possapp; Marques, Tiago Reis; Howes, Oliver; Smith, Shubulade; Monteiro, Ricardo Tavares; Zorzetti, Roberta; Spanemberg, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with psychotic illness. This article describes the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Sexual Function Questionnaire (SFQ) into Brazilian Portuguese. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation followed the guidelines for adapting self-report instruments proposed by the Task Force of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Briefly, ISPOR steps include: preparation, forward translation, reconciliation, back-translation, back-translation review, harmonization, cognitive debriefing, review of cognitive debriefing and finalization, before proofreading and final version. The original authors authorized the translation and participated in the study. There was good agreement between translations and between the back-translation and the original English version of the SFQ. The final version was prepared with certificated evaluators in the original language and in Portuguese. Few changes were necessary to the new version in Portuguese. The translated and adapted Brazilian Portuguese version of the SFQ is reliable and semantically equivalent to the original version. Studies on psychotropic-related sexual dysfunction may now test the validity of the instrument and can investigate sexual dysfunction in Portuguese-speaking patients.

  18. Generation of three-mode nonclassical vibrational states of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Ba An; Truong Minh Duc

    2002-12-01

    We propose using eight lasers with appropriate orientations and conditions to generate stable trio coherent states of an ion in a three-dimensional isotropic trap. Seven lasers whose orientations are important should be detuned to the third lower sideband of the ion vibrational motion. The eighth laser whose direction is not important should be in resonance with the ionic transition.

  19. Vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy using inverted visible pulses.

    PubMed

    Weeraman, Champika; Mitchell, Steven A; Lausten, Rune; Johnston, Linda J; Stolow, Albert

    2010-05-24

    We present a broadband vibrational sum frequency generation (BB-VSFG) scheme using a novel ps visible pulse shape. We generate the fs IR pulse via standard procedures and simultaneously generate an 'inverted' time-asymmetric narrowband ps visible pulse via second harmonic generation in the pump depletion regime using a very long nonlinear crystal which has high group velocity mismatch (LiNbO3). The 'inverted' ps pulse shape minimally samples the instantaneous nonresonant response but maximally samples the resonant response, maintaining high spectral resolution. We experimentally demonstrate this scheme, presenting SFG spectra of canonical organic monolayer systems in the C-H stretch region (2800-3000 cm(-1)).

  20. Study of micro piezoelectric vibration generator with added mass and capacitance suitable for broadband vibration

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qing Mao, Xinhua Chu, Dongliang

    2015-07-15

    This study proposes an optimized frequency adjustment method that uses a micro-cantilever beam-based piezoelectric vibration generator based on a combination of added mass and capacitance. The most important concept of the proposed method is that the frequency adjustment process is divided into two steps: the first is a rough adjustment step that changes the size of the mass added at the end of cantilever to adjust the frequency in a large-scale and discontinuous manner; the second step is a continuous but short-range frequency adjustment via the adjustable added capacitance. Experimental results show that when the initial natural frequency of a micro piezoelectric vibration generator is 69.8 Hz, then this natural frequency can be adjusted to any value in the range from 54.2 Hz to 42.1 Hz using the combination of the added mass and the capacitance. This method simply and effectively matches a piezoelectric vibration generator’s natural frequency to the vibration source frequency.

  1. Vibration power generator for a linear MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan

    2010-10-01

    The paper describes the structure and the results of numerical calculations and experimental tests of a newly developed vibration power generator for a linear magnetorheological (MR) damper. The generator consists of permanent magnets and coil with foil winding. The device produces electrical energy according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. This energy is applied to vary the damping characteristics of the MR damper attached to the generator by the input current produced by the device. The objective of the numerical calculations was to determine the magnetic field distribution in the generator as well as the electric potential and current density in the generator's coil during the idle run and under the load applied to the MR damper control coil. The results of the calculations were used during the design and manufacturing stages of the device. The objective of the experimental tests carried out on a dynamic testing machine was to evaluate the generator's efficiency and to compare the experimental and predicted data. The experimental results demonstrate that the engineered device enables a change in the kinetic energy of the reciprocal motion of the MR damper which leads to variations in the damping characteristics. That is why the generator may be used to build up MR damper based vibration control systems which require no external power.

  2. Piezoelectric power generation using friction-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, Chiharu; Matsumoto, Aya; Nagamine, Takuo; Sasaki, Shinya

    2017-06-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of power generation by using friction-induced vibration with a piezoelectric element, we performed experiments and numerical analysis. In the experiments, the generated power in the piezoelectric element and the displacement of an oscillator were measured by a newly developed apparatus that embodied a single-degree-of-freedom (1-DOF) system with friction. In the numerical analysis, an analytical model of a 1-DOF system with friction and piezoelectric element was proposed to simulate the experiments. The experimental results demonstrated that the power of a few microwatts was generated by sliding between a steel ball and a steel plate lubricated with glycerol. In this study, a maximum power of approximately 10 μW was generated at a driving velocity of 40 mm s-1 and a normal load of 15 N. The numerical results demonstrated good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. This implies that this analytical model can be applied to optimize the oscillator design in piezoelectric power generation using friction-induced vibration.

  3. Virtual Reality of Sound Generated from Vibrating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S. J.; SONG, J. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The advancement of virtual reality (VR) technology in cyberspace is amazing, but its development is mainly concentrated on the visual part. In this paper, the development of VR technology to produce sound based on the exact physics is studied. Our main concern is on the sound generated from vibrating structures. This may be useful, for example, in apprehending sound field characteristics of an aircraft cabin in design stage. To calculate sound pressure from curved surface of a structure, a new integration scheme is developed in boundary element method. Several example problems are solved to confirm our integration scheme. The pressure distributions on a uniformly driven sphere and cylinders are computed and compared with analytic solutions, and radiation efficiency of a vibrating plate under one-dimensional flow is also calculated. Also, to realize sound through computer simulation, two concepts, "structure-oriented analysis" and "human-oriented analysis", are proposed. Using these concepts, virtual sound field of an aircraft cabin is created.

  4. Generation of Vibrationally Excited HCP from a Stable Synthetic Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Alexander W.; Jiang, Jun; Erickson, Trevor J.; Womack, Carrie; Nava, Matthew; Cummins, Christopher; Field, Robert W.

    2015-06-01

    HCP belongs to a class of reactive small molecules with much interest to spectroscopists. It bears certain similarities to HCN, including a strong {A}(bent) - {X}(linear) ultraviolet transition, associated with the HCP-HPC isomerization pathway. HCP has traditionally been generated by the in situ reaction of PH_3 and acetylene. In this talk, we will discuss a recently developed synthetic precursor molecule, 1,1-((triphenylphosphoranylidene)methyl)-9,10-phosphanoanthracene. At temperatures above 200 degrees Celsius, this precursor is thought to release HCP in a vibrationally excited state. We will present preliminary spectra on this system obtained by LIF and chirped pulse millimeter wave spectroscopy.

  5. Generation of Vibrational Entangled Coherent States of Two Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hua; Jiang, Yun-Kun; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Ye, Sai-Yun

    2005-10-01

    We propose a scheme for the generation of entangled coherent states for the center-of-mass and relative vibrational modes of two trapped ions. In the scheme the ions are simultaneously illuminated by a single standing-wave laser tuned to the carrier. The scheme allows the production of an entangled coherent states with a considerably high speed as long as a laser field of sufficiently high intensity is available. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 10225421 and the Funds from Fuzhou University

  6. Generation of driving profile on a multi-axial vibration table for vibration fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan-Jung; Kang, Yeon June; Lee, Bong-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    A multi-axial simulation table (MAST) is widely used for vibration fatigue testing; it reliably reproduces the operational multi-axial motion of a specimen. The main concern in this multi-axial testing is to determine the driving profile because this profile guarantees the service life cycle of a specimen. This paper presents a method for generating a driving profile using a combination of measured acceleration responses under special events. To explain this method clearly, vehicle components are selected as target components, and the corresponding driving profile of each component is derived using the proposed method.

  7. The Sexual Function Questionnaire's Medical Impact Scale (SFQ-MIS): validation among a sample of first-time mothers.

    PubMed

    Jawed-Wessel, Sofia; Schick, Vanessa; Herbenick, Debby

    2013-11-01

    Changes in sexual function can be difficult to capture, especially when an attempt is made to assess the effects of pregnancy or childbirth on the sexual function of first-time mothers. Commonly used sexual function measures are limited and fail to account for pregnancy or birth in assessment of function. The purpose of this study was to explore the utility of the Sexual Function Questionnaire Medical Impact Scale (SFQ-MIS) in assessing impact of childbirth on sexual function among first-time mothers with infants aged one year or younger. A total of 255 women completed a cross-sectional, web-based survey. Exploratory factor analysis was utilized to assess the factor structure of the SFQ-MIS scores in this sample. Variations in SFQ-MIS scores based upon participant characteristics were conducted to further evaluate the SFQ-MIS scores. SFQ-MIS score was the primary measure of interest. Factors related to pregnancy and childbirth, such as mode of delivery, infant date of birth, last menstrual period, need for an episiotomy or perineal stitches, breastfeeding status, and score on the Perceived Stress Scale, were also assessed in order to further evaluate the validity and predictive capacity of the SFQ-MIS. Results indicated one factor that accounted for 58.27% of the variance in impact on sexual function due to childbirth. Cronbach's α coefficient for all five items was acceptable (0.82). Women who were breastfeeding (P<0.05), those who had received perineal stitches after a vaginal delivery (P<0.05), and those who reported no sexual activity in the past month (P < 0.001) experienced significantly greater impact than those who were not breastfeeding, those who had not required stitches, and those who had been sexually active in the past month. The SFQ-MIS appears to be a useful and valid indicator of changes in sexual function following childbirth, such as those related to arousal, desire, and orgasm. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  8. Cross-Propagation Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Chen, Shun-li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-fei

    2016-02-27

    Here we report the theory formulation and the experiment realization of sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the cross-propagation (XP) geometry or configuration. In the XP geometry, the visible and the infrared (IR) beams in the SFG experiment are delivered to the same location on the surface from visible and IR incident planes perpendicular to each other, avoiding the requirement to have windows or optics to be transparent to both the visible and IR frequencies. Therefore, the XP geometry is applicable to study surfaces in the enclosed vacuum or high pressure chambers with far infrared (FIR) frequencies that can directly access the metal oxide and other lower frequency surface modes, with much broader selection of visible and IR transparent window materials.

  9. 4-bit Bipolar Triangle Voltage Waveform Generator Using Single-Flux-Quantum Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tomoki; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Maezawa, Masaaki; Mizugaki, Yoshinao

    SFQ digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are one of the candidates for AC voltage standards. We have proposed SFQ-DACs based on frequency modulation (FM). Bipolar output is required for applications of AC voltage standards, while our previous SFQ-DACs generated only positive voltages. In this paper, we present our design of a 4-bit bipolar triangle voltage waveform generator comprising an SFQ-DAC. The waveform generator has two output ports. Synthesized half-period waveforms are alternately generated in one of the output ports. The bipolar output is realized by observing the differential voltage between the ports. We confirmed a 72-μVPP bipolar triangle voltage waveform at the frequency of 35.7 Hz.

  10. Vibration reduction using command generation in formation flying satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biediger, Erika A. Ooten

    The precise control of spacecraft with flexible appendages is extremely difficult. The complexity of this task is magnified many times when several flexible spacecraft must be controlled precisely and collaboratively, as in formation flying. Formation flying requires a group of spacecraft to fly in a desired trajectory while maintaining both relative positions and velocities with respect to each other. This work enhances two current state-of-the-art formation flying algorithms, specifically leader-follower and virtual-structure architectures. First, a flexible satellite model is integrated into each of these architectures. Second, input shaping is used to generate the satellites' desired trajectories, thereby enhancing the performance of the system. This dissertation addresses key issues regarding the application of command generation techniques to flexible satellites controlled with formation flying control architectures. The temporal tracking and the trajectory tracking of each architecture are examined as well as the vibration characteristics of the formation satellites. Design procedures for applying trajectory shaping for the leader-follower and virtual-structure architecture are developed. Experiments performed on a flexible satellite testbed verify key simulated results.

  11. Function generator for synthesizing complex vibration mode patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, E. C.; Hagood, G. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A simple highly flexible device for synthesizing complex vibration mode patterns is described. These mode patterns can be used to identify vibration mode data. This device sums selected sine and cosine functions and then plots the sum against a linear function.

  12. Investigating buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the studies of buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Both buried solid/liquid and solid/solid interfaces involving polymeric materials are discussed. SFG studies of polymer/water interfaces show that different polymers exhibit varied surface restructuring behavior in water, indicating the importance of probing polymer/water interfaces in situ. SFG has also been applied to the investigation of interfaces between polymers and other liquids. It has been found that molecular interactions at such polymer/liquid interfaces dictate interfacial polymer structures. The molecular structures of silane molecules, which are widely used as adhesion promoters, have been investigated using SFG at buried polymer/silane and polymer/polymer interfaces, providing molecular-level understanding of polymer adhesion promotion. The molecular structures of polymer/solid interfaces have been examined using SFG with several different experimental geometries. These results have provided molecular-level information about polymer friction, adhesion, interfacial chemical reactions, interfacial electronic properties, and the structure of layer-by-layer deposited polymers. Such research has demonstrated that SFG is a powerful tool to probe buried interfaces involving polymeric materials, which are difficult to study by conventional surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:21113334

  13. Design and demonstration of high-functionality logic cells for miniaturization of SFQ switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Kameda, Y.; Yorozu, S.; Miyahara, K.

    2007-10-01

    We newly miniaturized single-flux-quantum (SFQ) switch circuits for realizing a large-scale switch. A problem in our conventional design is a large size of circuits, because they consist of combine primitive-function logic cells, such as AND, NOT, and so on. To solve this problem, we investigated an approach that uses high-functionality logic cells. As the first step in such a design approach, we designed a new 2:1 multiplexer (MUX) cell, which is a key component in switches. The main features of the MUX cell include nondestructive operation, timing-free inputs, and compatibility with our standard cell library "CONNECT". We significantly miniaturized the MUX by 67% in comparison to our conventional MUX circuit, which was implemented by combining primitive-function cells. We also designed a 2 × 2 switch using the MUX cell. In comparison to our conventional 2 × 2 switch, the circuit size, the number of Josephson junctions, and the power consumption were reduced by 27%, 30%, and 38%, respectively. The 2 × 2 switch operated at 40 GHz with a bias margin of ±6%.

  14. Automatic Generation of Analytic Equations for Vibrational and Rovibrational Constants from Fourth-Order Vibrational Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.; Stanton, John F.

    2014-06-01

    The derivation of analytic expressions for vibrational and rovibrational constants, for example the anharmonicity constants χij and the vibration-rotation interaction constants α^B_r, from second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) can be accomplished with pen and paper and some practice. However, the corresponding quantities from fourth-order perturbation theory (VPT4) are considerably more complex, with the only known derivations by hand extensively using many layers of complicated intermediates and for rotational quantities requiring specialization to orthorhombic cases or the form of Watson's reduced Hamiltonian. We present an automatic computer program for generating these expressions with full generality based on the adaptation of an existing numerical program based on the sum-over-states representation of the energy to a computer algebra context. The measures taken to produce well-simplified and factored expressions in an efficient manner are discussed, as well as the framework for automatically checking the correctness of the generated equations.

  15. Thermally induced vibrations due to internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandino, Joseph Robert

    Virtually all previous research on thermally induced vibrations has investigated vibrations caused by surface heating. This is the first detailed study of a thermally induced vibration caused by surface cooling. The phenomenon is shown to be driven by thermal moments. The thermal moments are caused by convection because the vibrations occur in air but not in a vacuum. A mathematical model was developed to predict the thermal-structural behavior of an internally heated beam. The convection heat transfer for a vibrating beam is complex. In most cases it is neither completely natural nor completely forced convection. The convection heat transfer is a mix of both components. The convection is further complicated by the transition of the airflow along the beam from laminar to turbulent flow. An experimental heat transfer investigation was conducted to determine expressions for the natural and forced convection as functions of both position along the beam and velocity. The results from the model were verified using experimental data for an internally heated beam undergoing thermally induced vibrations. The model was shown to predict the steady-state temperatures accurately. The model adequately predicted the steady-state displacements, although it predicted the displacement histories with some error. The analysis showed that the thermal and structural problems are coupled by the forced convection. Once initiated, the amplitude of the vibration increases until the amplitude is such that the heat removed by convection balances the internal heating. The steady-state amplitude is not affected by the initial displacement of the beam. Thermally induced vibrations of internally heated beams belong to the class of vibrations called self-sustaining oscillations.

  16. Vibrational Scattering Anisotropy Generated by Multichannel Quantum Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Miron, Catalin; Kimberg, Victor; Morin, Paul; Nicolas, Christophe; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gavrilyuk, Sergey; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-08-27

    Based on angularly and vibrationally resolved electron spectroscopy measurements in acetylene, we report the first observation of anomalously strong vibrational anisotropy of resonant Auger scattering through the C 1s{yields}{pi}{sup *} excited state. We provide a theoretical model explaining the new phenomenon by three coexisting interference effects: (i) interference between resonant and direct photoionization channels, (ii) interference of the scattering channels through the core-excited bending states with orthogonal orientation of the molecular orbitals, (iii) scattering through two wells of the double-well bending mode potential. The interplay of nuclear and electronic motions offers in this case a new type of nuclear wave packet interferometry sensitive to the anisotropy of nuclear dynamics: whether which-path information is available or not depends on the final vibrational state serving for path selection.

  17. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John; Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids like water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (>20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  18. Ground vibration generated by trains in underground tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, J. A.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2006-07-01

    A popular method used to reduce vibration transmitted from underground railways into nearby buildings is floating-slab track, whereby a concrete slab supporting the two rails is mounted on rubber bearings or steel springs to isolate it from the tunnel invert. This paper adds a track model to a previously developed three-dimensional tunnel model in order to assess the effectiveness of floating-slab track. A slab beam coupled to the tunnel in the wavenumber domain, with the slab bearings represented by an elastic layer, is examined first. A second beam representing the two rails together is then coupled to the slab, and axle masses representing a train are added to the rail beam. Power-spectral densities and RMS levels of soil vibration due to random roughness-displacement excitation between the masses and the rail beam are calculated. Analytical techniques are used to minimise the computational requirements of the model. The results demonstrate the inadequacy of simple mass-spring and Winkler-beam models with rigid foundations for the assessment of the vibration-isolation performance of railway track. They suggest that the achievable insertion loss is modest and that floating the track slab may in fact cause increased transmission of vibration under certain conditions.

  19. Energy harvesting from wood floor vibration using a piezoelectric generator

    Treesearch

    Jiangming Kan; Robert J. Ross; Xiping Wang; Wenbin Li

    2017-01-01

    Vibration can occur in wood floor systems as a consequence of a variety of human activities, ranging from common daily movements associated with individuals living in homes to high-intensity activities associated with sporting events that are held in large sports arenas. For example, the potential for harvesting energy from a wooden floor system in public buildings...

  20. U-shape magnetostrictive vibration based power generator for universal use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, T.

    2016-04-01

    Vibrational power generator extracts electrical energy from ambient vibration. Author invented novel configuration using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beams of iron-gallium alloy and magnetic material, and features high efficiency, high robustness, and low electrical impedance. In this paper, author proposes U-shape generator for universal use. It consists of the parallel beams and fixed and free end beams forming U-shape frame flexibly modified for variety of mechanical input. Miniature U-shape prototype using Fe-Ga rod 6 by 0.5 by 13 mm3 exhibited average power of 3.7 mW under vibration of 166 Hz and 2.5 G. L-shape type was demonstrated to generate electromotive force by two directional vibrations. In switch type, maximum energy of 0.7 mJ was retrieved by one pushing force. The performances are sufficient to drive wireless module for heath monitoring and remote control.

  1. Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E

    2013-12-13

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  2. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E.

    2013-12-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  3. Role of structural noise in aircraft pressure cockpit from vibration action of new-generation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of new-generation aircraft engines is transitioning from a bypass ratio of 4-6 to an increased ratio of 8-12. This is leading to substantial broadening of the vibration spectrum of engines with a shift to the low-frequency range due to decreased rotation speed of the fan rotor, in turn requiring new solutions to decrease structural noise from engine vibrations to ensure comfort in the cockpits and cabins of aircraft.

  4. Numerical analysis of the fluidelastic vibration of a steam generator tube with loose supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The vibration and wear of U-tubes has been observed in PWR steam generators, especially in the U-bend region where the tubes experience two-phase cross-flow. In this region the tubes are supported by anti-vibration bars (AVBs); however, clearances can exist between the tubes and AVBs so that flow-induced vibration can cause impacting and sliding to occur between the two components, leading to fretting wear. A method is described for analyzing the impacting behaviour of a steam generator tube which has one or more loose supports and is fluidelastically unstable. The method uses a fluidelastic instability model to predict the damping (positive or negative) of all the modes of vibration of the tube and uses this information in a nonlinear transient analysis computer code, which includes the effects of impacting at loose supports. A comparison is made between numerical predictions and experimental results obtained from a cantilever tube array in cross-fly. The predicted changes in frequency of vibration with flow velocity agree well with the experimental values, giving some confidence in the accuracy of the method. The method is then used to analyze the fluid-elastic vibration of a steam generator U-tube with a single loose AVB support point.

  5. Ground Vibration Generated by a Load Moving Along a Railway Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHENG, X.; JONES, C. J. C.; PETYT, M.

    1999-11-01

    The propagation of vibration generated by a harmonic or a constant load moving along a layered beam resting on the layered half-space is investigated theoretically in this paper. The solution to this problem can be used to study the ground vibration generated by the motion of a train axle load on a railway track. In this application, the ground is modelled as a number of parallel viscoelastic layers overlying an elastic half-space or a rigid foundation. The track, including the rails, rail pad, sleepers and ballast, is modelled as an infinite, layered beam structure. The modal nature of propagation in the ground for a chosen set of ground parameters is discussed and the results of the model are presented showing the characteristics of the vibration generated by a constant load and an oscillatory load at speeds below, near to, and above the lowest ground wave speed.

  6. High-order harmonic generation of CO2 with different vibrational modes in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hui; Zhang, Hong-Dan; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Hai-Feng; Pan, Xue-Fei; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2016-11-01

    We apply the strong-field Lewenstein model to demonstrate the high-order harmonic generation of CO2 with three vibrational modes (balance vibration, bending vibration, and stretching vibration) driven by an intense laser field. The results show that the intensity of harmonic spectra is sensitive to molecular vibrational modes, and the high harmonic efficiency with stretching vibrational mode is the strongest. The underlying physical mechanism of the harmonic emission can be well explained by the corresponding ionization yield and the time-frequency analysis. Finally, we demonstrate the attosecond pulse generation with different vibrational modes and an isolated attosecond pulse with a duration of about 112 as is generated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61575077, 11271158, and 11574117).

  7. Vibrational Coupling at the Topmost Surface of Water Revealed by Heterodyne-Detected Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yudai; Nojima, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2017-03-15

    Unraveling vibrational coupling is the key to consistently interpret vibrational spectra of complex molecular systems. The vibrational spectrum of the water surface heavily suffers from vibrational coupling, which hinders complete understanding of the molecular structure and dynamics of the water surface. Here we apply heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation spectroscopy to the water surface and accomplish the assignment of a weak vibrational band located at the lower energy side of the free OH stretch. We find that this band is due to a combination mode of the hydrogen-bonded OH stretch and a low-frequency intermolecular vibration, and this combination band appears in the surface vibrational spectrum through anharmonic vibrational coupling that takes place exclusively at the topmost surface.

  8. Performance of improved magnetostrictive vibrational power generator, simple and high power output for practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Toshiyuki

    2015-05-07

    Vibration based power generation technology is utilized effectively in various fields. Author has invented novel vibrational power generation device using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beam structure consisting of a rod of iron-gallium alloy wound with coil and yoke accompanied with permanent magnet. When bending force is applied on the tip of the device, the magnetization inside the rod varies with induced stress due to the inverse magnetostrictive effect. In vibration, the time variation of the magnetization generates voltage on the wound coil. The magnetostrictive type is advantageous over conventional such using piezoelectric or moving magnet types in high efficiency and high robustness, and low electrical impedance. Here, author has established device configuration, simple, rigid, and high power output endurable for practical applications. In addition, the improved device is lower cost using less volume of Fe-Ga and permanent magnet compared to our conventional, and its assembly by soldering is easy and fast suitable for mass production. Average power of 3 mW/cm{sup 3} under resonant vibration of 212 Hz and 1.2 G was obtained in miniature prototype using Fe-Ga rod of 2 × 0.5× 7 mm{sup 3}. Furthermore, the damping effect was observed, which demonstrates high energy conversion of the generator.

  9. Use of chaotic and random vibrations to generate high frequency test inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D. L.; Paez, T. L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper and a companion paper show the traditional limits on amplitude and frequency that can be generated in a laboratory test on a vibration exciter can be substantially extended. This is accomplished by attaching a device to the shaker that permits controlled metal to metal impacts that generate high frequency, high acceleration environment on a test surface. A companion paper (Reference 1) shows that a sinusoidal or random shaker input can be used to generate a random vibration environment on the test surface. This paper derives the three response components that occur on the test surface due to an impact on the bottom surface and the base driven response from the shaker input. These response components are used to generate impulse response functions and frequency response functions which are used in the companion paper to derive power spectral density functions for the overall response. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Characterization of Ribavirin Aerosol With Small Particle Aerosol Generator and Vibrating Mesh Micropump Aerosol Technologies.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Brian K; Betit, Peter; Fink, James B; Pereira, Luis M; Arnold, John

    2016-05-01

    Ribavirin is an antiviral drug that can be administered by inhalation. Despite advancements in the oral delivery of this medication, there has been a renewed interested in delivering ribavirin via the pulmonary system. Although data are not conclusive that inhaled ribavirin improves outcomes, we set out to determine whether delivery by a newer generation nebulizer, the vibrating mesh micropump, was as effective as the recommended small-particle aerosol generator system. We compared the physicochemical makeup and concentrations of ribavirin before and after nebulization with 0.9% NaCl and sterile water. An Andersen cascade impactor was used to determine particle size distribution and mass median aerodynamic diameter, and an absolute filter was used to measure total aerosol emitted output and inhaled dose during mechanical ventilation and spontaneous breathing. Ribavirin was analyzed and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection. Ribavirin was found to be stable in both 0.9% aqueous NaCl and sterile water with an r(2) value of 0.96 and identical coefficients of variation with no difference in drug concentration before and after nebulization with the vibrating mesh micropump. The small-particle aerosol generator produced a smaller mass median aerodynamic diameter (1.84 μm) than the vibrating mesh micropump (3.63 μm, P = .02); however, there was no significant difference in the proportion of drug mass in the 0.7-4.7-μm particle range. Total drug delivery was similar with the small-particle aerosol generator and vibrating mesh micropump in both spontaneously breathing (P = .77) and mechanical ventilation (P = .48) models. The vibrating mesh micropump nebulizer may provide an effective alternative to the small-particle aerosol generator in administration of ribavirin using NaCl or sterile water, both on and off the ventilator. Further clinical studies are needed to compare efficacy. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus

  11. Quantitative Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Surfaces and Interfaces: Lineshape, Polarization and Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Velarde, Luis; Gan, Wei; Fu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) can provide detailed information and understanding of molecular vibrational spectroscopy, orientational and conformational structure, and interactions of molecular surfaces and interfaces, through quantitative measurement and analysis. In this review, we present the current status and discuss the main developments on the measurement of intrinsic SFG spectral lineshape, formulations for polarization measurement and orientation analysis of the SFG-VS spectra. The main focus is to present a coherent formulation and discuss the main concepts or issues that can help to make SFG-VS a quantitative analytical and research tool in revealing the chemistry and physics of complex molecular surface and interface.

  12. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; ...

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signaturesmore » in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.« less

  13. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  14. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  15. Vibrational Spectra and Adsorption of Trisiloxane Superspreading Surfactant at Air/Water Interface Studied with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun; Wu, Dan; Wen, Jia; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hong-fei

    2008-08-01

    The C-H stretch vibrational spectra of the trisiloxane superspreading surfactant Silwet L-77 ((CH3)3Si-O-Si(CH3)(C3H6)(OCH2CH2)7-8OCH3)-O-Si(CH3)3) at the air/water interface are measured with the surface Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (SFG-VS). The spectra are dominated with the features from the -Si-CH3 groups around 2905 cm-1 (symmetric stretch or SS mode) and 2957 cm-1 (mostly the asymmetric stretch or AS mode), and with the weak but apparent contribution from the -O-CH2- groups around 2880 cm-1 (symmetric stretch or SS mode). Comparison of the polarization dependent SFG spectra below and above the critical aggregate or micelle concentration (CAC) indicates that the molecular orientation of the C-H related molecular groups remained unchanged at different surface densities of the Silwet L-77 surfactant. The SFG-VS adsorption isotherm suggested that there was no sign of Silwet L-77 bilayer structure formation at the air/water interface. The Gibbs adsorption free energy of the Silwet surfactant to the air/water interface is -42.2±0.8kcal/mol, indicating the unusually strong adsorption ability of the Silwet L-77 superspreading surfactant.

  16. Wide operation frequency band magnetostrictive vibration power generator using nonlinear spring constant by permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumachi, S.; Ueno, T.

    2016-04-01

    We study magnetostrictive vibration based power generator using iron-gallium alloy (Galfenol). The generator is advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric material in the point of high efficiency highly robust and low electrical impedance. Generally, the generator exhibits maximum power when its resonant frequency matches the frequency of ambient vibration. In other words, the mismatch of these frequencies results in significant decrease of the output. One solution is making the spring characteristics nonlinear using magnetic force, which distorts the resonant peak toward higher or lower frequency side. In this paper, vibrational generator consisting of Galfenol plate of 6 by 0.5 by 13 mm wound with coil and U shape-frame accompanied with plates and pair of permanent magnets was investigated. The experimental results show that lean of resonant peak appears attributed on the non-linear spring characteristics, and half bandwidth with magnets is 1.2 times larger than that without. It was also demonstrated that the addition of proof mass is effective to increase the sensitivity but also the bandwidth. The generator with generating power of sub mW order is useful for power source of wireless heath monitoring for bridge and factory machine.

  17. Analyses of Acoustic Streaming Generated by Four Ultrasonic Vibrators in a Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Masafumi

    2004-05-01

    When ultrasonic waves are applied, the heat transfer at a heated surface in water increases markedly. The origin of this increase in heat transfer is thought to be due to the agitation effect from the microjets of cavitation and from acoustic streaming. The method in which four vibrators are used has the ability of further enhancing heat transfer. This paper presents the method using four vibrators to eject an acoustic stream jet at a selected position in the vessel. Analyses of this method are performed to establish it theoretically and to compare with an experiment previously conducted. The analyses shown in this research indicate that the aspects of acoustic streaming generated by the four vibrators in the vessel can be correctly predicted and provide a foundation for the development of using this method for the enhancement of heat transfer.

  18. Vibration effect on cross-flow and co-flow focusing mechanism for droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Microbubbles are widely used in many industries such as water treatment, drug coating, and ultrasonic contrast agents. Cross-flow focusing and co-flow focusing are considered basic mechanisms used for microbubble generation. Typically, to achieve micron-sized droplets requires structure dimensions in the same order of magnitude of the desired droplet sizes. In this paper we report a method of applying an external vibration to a cross-flow and co-flow focusing structure, which allows for smaller droplets to be generated. The junction dimension was 700×400 μm, and the channel width was 800 μm. The two assumed fluids are selected in a way that the Capillary number is high (Ca>10) to make use of necking effect occurred in the downstream. Linear vibration was exerted on the microchannel structure in the direction of central flow. A 2D structure was simulated using finite element software, and the numerical approach was then verified by comparing the experimental data of a typical cross-flow focusing structure taken from our previous study with the corresponding simulation assuming the same parameters. The results show that although the droplet generation regime depends on flow ratio (Qa/Qw) and vibration parameter (ampl×freq), Capillary number also has a significant effect on the regime. Briefly, applying a low-cost linear vibration to the conventional flow focusing structures can be used as an accurate controlling technique for increasing the chance of droplet generation. In fact, vibration motion can change the flow regime and breakup mechanism. It can also change the breakup point at which the droplets are formed.

  19. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Shota Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  20. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-01

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  1. Two methods for damping torsional vibrations in DFIG-based wind generators using power converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuyi; Lu, Yupu; Xie, Da; Yu, Songtao; Wu, Wangping

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes novel damping control algorithms by using static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) and energy storage system (ESS) to damp torsional vibrations in doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind turbine systems. It first analyses the operating characteristics of STATCOM and ESS for regulating power variations to increase grid voltage stability. Then, new control strategies for STATCOM and ESS are introduced to damp the vibrations. It is followed by illustration of their effectiveness to damp the drive train torsional vibrations of wind turbines, which can be caused by grid disturbances, such as voltage sags and frequency fluctuations. Results suggest that STATCOM is a promising technology to mitigate the torsional vibrations caused by grid voltage sags. By contrast, the ESS connected to the point of common coupling (PCC) of wind turbine systems shows even obvious advantages because of its capability of absorbing/releasing both active and reactive power. It can thus be concluded that STATCOM is useful for stabilizing power system voltage fluctuations, and ESS is more effective both in regulating PCC voltage fluctuations and damping torsional vibrations caused by grid voltage frequency fluctuations.

  2. Anisotropic Formation of Quantum Turbulence Generated by a Vibrating Wire in Superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, H.; Ogawa, K.; Chiba, Y.; Obara, K.; Ishikawa, O.

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the formation of quantum turbulence in superfluid 4He, we have studied the emission of vortex rings with a ring size of larger than 38 μm in diameter from turbulence generated by a vibrating wire. The emission rate of vortex rings from a turbulent region remains low until the beginning of high-rate emissions, suggesting that some of the vortex lines produced by the wire combine to form a vortex tangle, until an equilibrium is established between the rate of vortex line combination with the tangle and dissociation. The formation times of equilibrium turbulence are proportional to ɛ^{-1.2} and ɛ^{-0.6} in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the vibrating direction of the generator, respectively, indicating the anisotropic formation of turbulence. Here, ɛ is the generation power of the turbulence. This power dependence may be associated with the characteristics of quantum turbulence with a constant energy flux.

  3. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  4. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Montanini, Roberto Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-28

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d{sub 31} mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  5. Comprehensive assessments of long-term sleep habits in epidemiological study: Validity and reliability of sleep factors questionnaire (SFQ) among Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Fu, Wen-Xue; Wang, Xin; Deng, Qin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Lin-Yan; Zhao, Hao; Fan, Wen-Yan; Huang, Shao-Xin

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiological studies suggested that poor sleep is a potentially novel risk factor for several health outcomes currently; however, there are no validated questionnaires that can systematically measure sleep parameters within these studies. We evaluated the reliability and validity of 17-item sleep factors questionnaire (SFQ), which was developed to comprehensively assess long-term sleep habits for the Jiujiang Breast Cancer Study (JBCS), Jiujiang, China. The participants included 100 women aged 18-74years, who were randomly selected from the JBCS project, and completed a SFQ at baseline and again 1year later, and 4 quarterly 30 consecutive days (a total of 120days) sleep diaries over this same year. Reliability was tested by comparing the 2 SFQs; validity by comparing the average measures between the SFQ and the 4 sleep diaries. Validity analysis showed moderate correlation (γ=0.41) for sleep duration with the adjusted concordance correlation coefficient (CCCadj) of 0.54; the weighted κ statistics indicated an excellent agreement for night/shift work and sleep medication use; fair-to-moderate for sleep quality, light at night (LAN), nighttime sleeping with light on, sleep noise and nap time; slight-to-fair for sleep quality and nighttime wakings frequency. Reliability analysis showed excellent correlation for night/shift work and sleep medication use; fair-to-moderate for LAN, nighttime wakings frequency, insomnia frequency, sleep noise and nap time; but slight-to-fair for insomnia frequency and nighttime sleeping with light on; the CCCadj for sleep duration was 0.61. The SFQ showed reasonable reliability and validity for sleep assessments in most domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Generation of longitudinal vibrations in piano strings: From physics to sound synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Balázs; Sujbert, László

    2005-04-01

    Longitudinal vibration of piano strings greatly contributes to the distinctive character of low piano notes. In this paper a simplified modal model is developed, which describes the generation of phantom partials and longitudinal free modes jointly. The model is based on the simplification that the coupling from the transverse vibration to the longitudinal polarization is unidirectional. The modal formulation makes it possible to predict the prominent components of longitudinal vibration as a function of transverse modal frequencies. This provides a qualitative insight into the generation of longitudinal vibration, while the model is still capable of explaining the empirical results of earlier works. The semi-quantitative agreement with measurement results implies that the main source of phantom partials is the transverse to longitudinal coupling, while the string termination and the longitudinal to transverse coupling have only small influence. The results suggest that the longitudinal component of the tone can be treated as a quasi-harmonic spectrum with formantlike peaks at the longitudinal modal frequencies. The model is further simplified and applied for the real-time synthesis of piano sound with convincing sonic results. .

  7. Broadband and three-dimensional vibration energy harvesting by a non-linear magnetoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiming; Chen, Jun; Li, Xiaoshi; Li, Jun; Liu, Jun; Awais, Qasim; Yang, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Vibration, widely existing in an ambient environment with a variety of forms and wide-range of scales, recently becomes an attractive target for energy harvesting. However, its time-varying directions and frequencies render a lack of effective energy technology to scavenge it. Here, we report a rationally designed nonlinear magnetoelectric generator for broadband and multi-directional vibration energy harvesting. By using a stabilized three-dimensional (3D) magnetic interaction and spring force, the device working bandwidth was largely broadened, which was demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically. The multidirectional vibration energy harvesting was enabled by three identical suspended springs with equal intersection angles, which are all connected to a cylindrical magnet. Numerical simulations and experimental results show that the nonlinear harvester can sustain large-amplitude oscillations over a wide frequency range, and it can generate power efficiently in an arbitrary direction. Moreover, the experimental data suggest that the proposed nonlinear energy harvester has the potential to scavenge vibrational energy over a broad range of ambient frequencies in 3D space.

  8. Numerical study of liquid-hydrogen droplet generation from a vibrating orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Celik, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2005-08-01

    Atomic hydrogen propellant feed systems for far-future spacecraft may utilize solid-hydrogen particle carriers for atomic species that undergo recombination to create hot rocket exhaust. Such technology will require the development of particle generation techniques. One such technique could involve the production of hydrogen droplets from a vibrating orifice that would then freeze in cryogenic helium vapor. Among other quantities, the shape and size of the droplet are of particular interest. The present paper addresses this problem within the framework of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows, in order to unravel the basic mechanisms of droplet formation with a view to control them. Surface tension, one of the most important mechanisms to determine droplet shape, is modeled as the source term in the momentum equation. Droplet shape is tracked using a volume-of-fluid approach. A dynamic meshing technique is employed to accommodate the vibration of the generator orifice. Numerically predicted droplet shapes show satisfactory agreement with photographs of droplets generated in experiments. A parametric study is carried out to understand the influence of injection velocity, nozzle vibrational frequency, and amplitude on the droplet shape and size. The computational model provides a definitive qualitative picture of the evolution of droplet shape as a function of the operating parameters. It is observed that, primarily, the orifice vibrational frequency affects the shape, the vibrational amplitude affects the time until droplet detachment from the orifice, and the injection velocity affects the size. However, it does not mean that, for example, there is no secondary effect of amplitude on shape or size.

  9. Effect of material constants on power output in piezoelectric vibration-based generators.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Mihara, Kensuke; Yoshimura, Tomohiro; Hoshina, Takuya; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2011-09-01

    A possible power output estimation based on material constants in piezoelectric vibration-based generators is proposed. A modified equivalent circuit model of the generator was built and was validated by the measurement results in the generator fabricated using potassium sodium niobate-based and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. Subsequently, generators with the same structure using other PZT-based and bismuth-layered structure ferroelectrics ceramics were fabricated and tested. The power outputs of these generators were expressed as a linear functions of the term composed of electromechanical coupling coefficients k(sys)(2) and mechanical quality factors Q*(m) of the generator. The relationship between device constants (k(sys)(2) and Q*(m)) and material constants (k(31)(2) and Q(m)) was clarified. Estimation of the power output using material constants is demonstrated and the appropriate piezoelectric material for the generator is suggested.

  10. A piezoelectric pulse generator for low frequency non-harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a new piezoelectric prototype for pulse generation by energy harvesting from low frequency non-harmonic vibration. The pulse generator presented here consists of two parts: the electromechanical part and the load circuit. A metal rolling rod is used as the proof mass, moving along the substrate to achieve both actuating of the piezoelectric cantilever by magnetic coupling and self-synchronous switching of the circuit. By using this new approach, the energy from the piezoelectric transduction mechanism is regulated simultaneously when it is extracted. This allows a series of tuneable pulses to be generated, which can be applied to self-powered RF wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes.

  11. Forces exciting generation roll at rotor vibrations when rotor-to-stator rubbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatokhin, V. F.

    2017-07-01

    The consequences of emergencies of turbosets for different application are revealed, the cause of forced shutdown and even catastrophic destructions of which many researchers consider the rotor-to-stator rubbing and development—to a greater or lesser extent—of the phenomena of the rotor generation roll over the stator. The synchronous or asynchronous generation roll is determined by the rotor precession direction, coinciding or not coinciding with the self-rotation direction of the rotor. Asynchronous generation roll is the most dangerous form of the rotor-stator contact interaction with the vibrations with rubbing. The basic equations of rotor vibrations are presented: symmetric rotor fixed on two supports and that fixed on several supports after abrupt imbalance with and without rotor coming in contact with a flexible stator. The vibration process is considered as the rotor motion in a backlash with subsequent contact with the stator, loss of contact, or development of generation roll. The latter essentially depends on the properties of the "rotor-support-stator" dynamic system. The stator stiffness characteristic is specified in "force-deformation" coordinates that make it possible to take into account damping in the supports and power loss in the stator. The diagram of elastic-damping device was presented, which makes it possible to ensure a certain level of power loss at the stator displacements. The exciting forces promoting development of self-exciting vibrations of the rotor in the form of asynchronous generation roll were compared with the exciting forces of oil film of sliding bearings and forces of aerodynamic excitation in the turbine flow path and sealings. For the rotor systems of high and medium pressure of a 300 MW capacity turboset, the simulation results of the process of development of asynchronous generation roll at the vibrations with rubbing were revealed, and the basic characteristics of development of generation roll in a span between

  12. Intense-field molecular spectroscopy: Vibrational and rotational effects in harmonic generation by H+2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubanel, E. E.; Zuo, T.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    1994-05-01

    We present results of a complete treatment of electronic, vibrational, and rotational motion in numerical calculation of harmonic generation (HG) of 1064-nm laser radiation by the H+2 molecular ion for intensities 1013<=I<=1014 W/cm2. We show that efficient HG can be enhanced by suppression of photodissociation, a phenomenon which results from vibrational trapping in laser-field-induced potential wells. The HG spectra exhibit peaks clustered around even and odd harmonic orders. All peaks can be assigned to Raman-like transitions between dressed eigenstates of the field-molecule system. Rotational excitation is shown to compete with HG. Thus harmonic generation and photon scattering in molecules holds the promise of a potential diagnostic for molecular stabilization by intense laser fields.

  13. Generation of higher harmonics in longitudinal vibration of beams with breathing cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, D.; Pieczonka, L.; Hiwarkar, V.; Staszewski, W. J.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    Classical nonlinear vibration methods used for structural damage detection are often based on higher- and sub-harmonic generation. However, nonlinearities arising from sources other than damage - e.g. boundary conditions or a measurement chain - are a primary concern in these methods. This paper focuses on localisation of damage-related nonlinearities based on higher harmonic generation. Numerical and experimental investigations in longitudinal vibration of beams with breathing cracks are presented. Numerical modelling is performed using a two-dimensional finite element approach. Different crack depths, locations and boundary conditions are investigated. The results demonstrate that nonlinearities in cracked beams are particularly strong in the vicinity of damage, allowing not only for damage localisation but also for separation of crack induced nonlinearity from other sources of nonlinearities.

  14. Vibration Testing of the Pluto/New Horizons Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Charles D. Griffin

    2006-06-01

    The Radioisotopic Thermal Generator (RTG) for the Pluto/New Horizons spacecraft was subjected to a flight dynamic acceptance test to demonstrate that it would perform successfully following launch. Seven RTGs of this type had been assembled and tested at Mound, Ohio from 1984 to 1997. This paper chronicles major events in establishing a new vibration test laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory and the nineteen days of dynamic testing.

  15. Age effects on reflex and postural responses to propriomuscular inputs generated by tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Quoniam, C; Hay, L; Roll, J P; Harlay, F

    1995-05-01

    The effects of aging on two sensorimotor levels of propriomuscular function were investigated in a young (20- to 44-year-old) and an elderly (60- to 86-year-old) population by eliciting segmental reflex and postural responses via the same muscle spindle inflow generated by applying the same pattern of tendon vibration. The latency and amplitude of the reflex responses to vibration (tonic vibration reflex) of the biceps and triceps brachii did not depend on the subjects' age. No major age-related changes were observed in the deep reflexes of the lower limbs. The postural responses to the same vibratory stimulation applied to both the soleus or the tibialis anterior muscles (vibration-induced falling) did not show any changes in latency depending on either age or the visual conditions, whereas the intensity of these responses decreased both with age and when the use of vision was possible. Our results suggest that the two levels at which the same propriomuscular messages were processed are differentially affected by aging. The lower reflex level does not undergo any noticeable impairment, whereas the higher postural control level deteriorates in the elderly, which might be partly responsible for the balance problems which tend to occur more frequently with advancing age.

  16. Chiral Vibrational Structures of Proteins at Interfaces Probed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent development of chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and its applications to study chiral vibrational structures at interfaces. This review summarizes observations of chiral SFG signals from various molecular systems and describes the molecular origins of chiral SFG response. It focuses on the chiral vibrational structures of proteins and presents the chiral SFG spectra of proteins at interfaces in the C-H stretch, amide I, and N-H stretch regions. In particular, a combination of chiral amide I and N-H stretches of the peptide backbone provides highly characteristic vibrational signatures, unique to various secondary structures, which demonstrate the capacity of chiral SFG spectroscopy to distinguish protein secondary structures at interfaces. On the basis of these recent developments, we further discuss the advantages of chiral SFG spectroscopy and its potential application in various fields of science and technology. We conclude that chiral SFG spectroscopy can be a new approach to probe chiral vibrational structures of protein at interfaces, providing structural and dynamic information to study in situ and in real time protein structures and dynamics at interfaces. PMID:22272140

  17. Chiral vibrational structures of proteins at interfaces probed by sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent development of chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and its applications to study chiral vibrational structures at interfaces. This review summarizes observations of chiral SFG signals from various molecular systems and describes the molecular origins of chiral SFG response. It focuses on the chiral vibrational structures of proteins and presents the chiral SFG spectra of proteins at interfaces in the C-H stretch, amide I, and N-H stretch regions. In particular, a combination of chiral amide I and N-H stretches of the peptide backbone provides highly characteristic vibrational signatures, unique to various secondary structures, which demonstrate the capacity of chiral SFG spectroscopy to distinguish protein secondary structures at interfaces. On the basis of these recent developments, we further discuss the advantages of chiral SFG spectroscopy and its potential application in various fields of science and technology. We conclude that chiral SFG spectroscopy can be a new approach to probe chiral vibrational structures of protein at interfaces, providing structural and dynamic information to study in situ and in real time protein structures and dynamics at interfaces.

  18. Application of cyclic coherence function to bearing fault detection in a wind turbine generator under electromagnetic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Wei; Ding, Xian; Zhang, Yangyang; Liu, Yibing; Ma, Zhiyong; Kusiak, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    In a wind turbine generator, there is an intrinsic electromagnetic vibration originated from an alternating magnetic field acting on a low stiffness stator, which modulates vibration signals of the generator and impedes fault feature extraction of bearings. When defects arise in a bearing, the statistics of the vibration signal are periodic and this phenomenon is described as cyclostationarity. Correspondingly, cyclostationary analysis enables finding the degree of cyclostationarity representing potential fault modulation information. In this paper, the electromagnetic vibration acting as a disturbance source for fault feature extraction is deduced. Additionally, the spectral correlation density and cyclic coherence function used for vibration analysis are estimated. A real 2 MW wind turbine generator with a faulty bearing was tested and the vibration signals were analyzed separately using conventional demodulation analysis, cyclic coherence function, complex wavelet transform and spectral kurtosis. The analysis results have demonstrated that the cyclic coherence function can detect the fault feature of inner race successfully, while the feature is concealed by intensive electromagnetic vibration in the other three methods. The disassembled bearing of the wind turbine generator illustrates the effectiveness of the analysis result, and precautionary measures for protecting bearings in generators are suggested.

  19. Structural vibration control by tuned mass damper using central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Hongu, Junichi

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a new control method for active mass dampers using a Central Pattern Generator in vibration mitigation. The active mass dampers (or active dynamic absorbers) have been applied to structural vibration control of high-rise buildings, bridges and so on. In this case, the mass of the active mass damper must oscillate in an appropriate phase in relation to the control object, and generally, the damper has been designed by linear control theory as pole placement method, optimal control method or H infinity control method, and all the rest. On the other hand, on walking of animate beings like mammals or insects, both side feet have appropriate phase relations; moreover, it is possible to keep moving on irregular ground. That is, algorithms for the walking would be embedded into the animate beings to control the complicated and redundant bodies with ease and robustness. In biological study, the Central Pattern Generators in bodies playing a significant role in the walking have been learned over the last few decades, and some studies said that some animate beings are able to control their feet by using the generators without their brains in the walking. Moreover, mathematical models of the pattern generators have been proposed, and some researchers have been studying to realize walking of biped-robots using the pattern generators embedded in a computer. In this study, the algorithm is installed into a controller for the active mass damper; furthermore, validation of the controller is performed by numerical simulation.

  20. Over-the-road shock and vibration testing of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert heat generated by radioactive decay into electricity through the use of thermocouples. The RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance, which make them particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). To meet these regulations, a RTG Transportation System (RTGTS) that fully complies with 10 CFR 71 has been developed, which protects RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock, vibration, and heat). To ensure the protection of RTGs from shock and vibration loadings during transport, extensive over-the-road testing was conducted on the RTG`S to obtain real-time recordings of accelerations of the air-ride suspension system trailer floor, packaging, and support structure. This paper provides an overview of the RTG`S, a discussion of the shock and vibration testing, and a comparison of the test results to the specified shock response spectra and power spectral density acceleration criteria.

  1. Hair cell force generation does not amplify or tune vibrations within the chicken basilar papilla.

    PubMed

    Xia, Anping; Liu, Xiaofang; Raphael, Patrick D; Applegate, Brian E; Oghalai, John S

    2016-10-31

    Frequency tuning within the auditory papilla of most non-mammalian species is electrical, deriving from ion-channel resonance within their sensory hair cells. In contrast, tuning within the mammalian cochlea is mechanical, stemming from active mechanisms within outer hair cells that amplify the basilar membrane travelling wave. Interestingly, hair cells in the avian basilar papilla demonstrate both electrical resonance and force-generation, making it unclear which mechanism creates sharp frequency tuning. Here, we measured sound-induced vibrations within the apical half of the chicken basilar papilla in vivo and found broadly-tuned travelling waves that were not amplified. However, distortion products were found in live but not dead chickens. These findings support the idea that avian hair cells do produce force, but that their effects on vibration are small and do not sharpen tuning. Therefore, frequency tuning within the apical avian basilar papilla is not mechanical, and likely derives from hair cell electrical resonance.

  2. Hair cell force generation does not amplify or tune vibrations within the chicken basilar papilla

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Anping; Liu, Xiaofang; Raphael, Patrick D.; Applegate, Brian E.; Oghalai, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency tuning within the auditory papilla of most non-mammalian species is electrical, deriving from ion-channel resonance within their sensory hair cells. In contrast, tuning within the mammalian cochlea is mechanical, stemming from active mechanisms within outer hair cells that amplify the basilar membrane travelling wave. Interestingly, hair cells in the avian basilar papilla demonstrate both electrical resonance and force-generation, making it unclear which mechanism creates sharp frequency tuning. Here, we measured sound-induced vibrations within the apical half of the chicken basilar papilla in vivo and found broadly-tuned travelling waves that were not amplified. However, distortion products were found in live but not dead chickens. These findings support the idea that avian hair cells do produce force, but that their effects on vibration are small and do not sharpen tuning. Therefore, frequency tuning within the apical avian basilar papilla is not mechanical, and likely derives from hair cell electrical resonance. PMID:27796310

  3. The influence of vibrations on time reference signals generated using quartz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumea, Andrei; Marcu, Alina; Plotog, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    32.768 kHz low frequency crystals are found in a large part of today's embedded systems that use microcontrollers especially in battery supplied applications which need low power consumption1]. Their main role is to offer a stable time reference. There are situations in which time measurement is needed when the system works in a mechanically unstable environment (cars, industrial equipment). The paper presents the studies done on the behavior of 32.768 kHz quartz crystals that are part of embedded systems which operate in a vibrating environment, in terms of period and long-time jitter of the generated time reference signal. The investigations of this effect were done using a test bench especially designed for this purpose which can measure the presented parameters determined by controlled mechanical stimulus (waveform, amplitude and frequency of the vibrations).

  4. Automatic generation of force fields and property surfaces for use in variational vibrational calculations of anharmonic vibrational energies and zero-point vibrational averaged properties.

    PubMed

    Kongsted, Jacob; Christiansen, Ove

    2006-09-28

    An automatic and general procedure for the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the energy and general property surfaces for molecular systems is developed and implemented. General expressions for an n-mode representation are derived, where the n-mode representation includes only the couplings between n or less degrees of freedom. The general expressions are specialized to derivative force fields and property surfaces, and a scheme for calculation of the numerical derivatives is implemented. The implementation is interfaced to electronic structure programs and may be used for both ground and excited electronic states. The implementation is done in the context of a vibrational structure program and can be used in combination with vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF), vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), vibrational Moller-Plesset, and vibrational coupled cluster calculations of anharmonic wave functions and calculation of vibrational averaged properties at the VSCF and VCI levels. Sample calculations are presented for fundamental vibrational energies and vibrationally averaged dipole moments and frequency dependent polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of water and formaldehyde.

  5. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibration in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

    2004-03-26

    OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by

  6. Proteins at interfaces probed by chiral vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Elsa C Y; Wang, Zhuguang; Fu, Li

    2015-02-19

    Characterizations of protein structures at interfaces are important in solving an array of fundamental and engineering problems, including understanding transmembrane signal transduction and molecular transport processes and development of biomaterials to meet the needs of biomedical and energy research. However, in situ and real-time characterization of protein secondary structures is challenging because it requires physical methods that are selective to both interface and secondary structures. Here, we summarize recent experimental developments in our laboratory of chiral vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) for analyzing protein structures at interfaces. We showed that chiral SFG provides vibrational optical signatures of the peptide N-H stretch and amide I modes that can distinguish various protein secondary structures. Using these signatures, we further applied chiral SFG to probe orientations and folding kinetics of proteins at interfaces. Our results show that chiral SFG is a background-free, label-free, in situ, and real-time vibrational method for studying proteins at interfaces. This recent progress demonstrates the potential of chiral SFG in solving problems related to proteins and other chiral biopolymers at interfaces.

  7. Study on direct sound reduction structure for reducing noise generated by vibrating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, M.; Kim, Y. S.

    2013-05-01

    A direct sound reduction structure is proposed as a new method for reducing noise generated by vibrating solids. The proposed method involves directly attaching a hard sound absorbing material with a honeycomb structure to the surfaces of vibrating solids to provide a moderate amount of back air space. Using a one-dimensional acoustic-field model, the fundamental sound reduction characteristics are investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the effectiveness of the proposed concept is verified. In the theoretical analysis, an analytical model with a sinusoidally excited rigid-frame sound reduction structure is considered. In the experiments, a one-dimensional acoustic tube is used to determine the sound reduction ratios for both stationary excitation and non-stationary impulsive excitation as a function of frequency. Furthermore, in order to verify the practical usefulness of this approach, an experimental study on sound reduction in a three-dimensional acoustic field is carried out using either a rigid piston plate surrounded by a baffle or a flexible flat plate with different vibration modes as vibrating bases. The results indicate that the sound reduction ratio has a quasi-periodic form that depends on the thickness of the back air space and the sound frequency, and a sound pressure reduction of approximately 80 percent (-14 dB) is observed around the minima. In addition, the average reduction in the frequency range 0.5-5 kHz is approximately 40 percent (-4.4 dB). The results obtained in this study are expected to act as useful indices for designing a nearly optimum sound reduction structure if the target frequency is known in advance.

  8. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    SciTech Connect

    Kosch, Sebastian E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca; Ashgriz, Nasser E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca

    2015-04-15

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  9. First-Principles Framework to Compute Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectra of Semiconductors and Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Quan; Galli, Giulia

    2015-12-01

    We present a first-principles framework to compute sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectra of semiconductors and insulators. The method is based on density functional theory and the use of maximally localized Wannier functions to compute the response to electric fields, and it includes the effect of electric field gradients at surfaces. In addition, it includes quadrupole contributions to SFG spectra, thus enabling the verification of the dipole approximation, whose validity determines the surface specificity of SFG spectroscopy. We compute the SFG spectra of ice Ih basal surfaces and identify which spectra components are affected by bulk contributions. Our results are in good agreement with experiments at low temperature.

  10. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Sebastian; Ashgriz, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  11. First-principles framework to compute sum-frequency generation vibrational spectra of semiconductors and insulators.

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Quan; Galli, Giulia

    2015-12-11

    We present a first-principles framework to compute sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectra of semiconductors and insulators. The method is based on density functional theory and the use of maximally localized Wannier functions to compute the response to electric fields, and it includes the effect of electric field gradients at surfaces. In addition, it includes quadrupole contributions to SFG spectra, thus enabling the verification of the dipole approximation, whose validity determines the surface specificity of SFG spectroscopy. We compute the SFG spectra of ice Ih basal surfaces and identify which spectra components are affected by bulk contributions. Our results are in good agreement with experiments at low temperature.

  12. The Generation Of Quantum Turbulence In 3He-B By A Vibrating Grid At Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Matthews, C. J.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Zaki, K.

    2006-09-07

    We have measured the onset of quantum turbulence generated by a vibrating grid resonator in 3He-B. Our measurements were carried out in the low temperature regime where the normal fluid component is very dilute and can be described as a gas of ballistic quasiparticles. Consequently, the normal fluid component can not participate in turbulence generation. We have measured the onset of turbulence from the grid motion using two nearby vibrating wire resonators. The vibrating wires show a reduction in thermal quasiparticle damping due to Andreev reflection in the surrounding turbulent velocity field. Our measurements reveal a transition in the transient behavior of the onset of the vorticity signal at the vibrating wire resonators as a function of the grid velocity.

  13. Generation of highly vibrationally excited H2 and detection by 2+1 resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Daniel C.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1990-02-01

    We report the first detection by optical means of highly vibrationally excited H2 X1Σ+g(vx=6-11). Vibrationally excited H2 was generated using a recently discovered hot-wire effect in H2 gas, and was detected in 40 bands with 2+1 resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization via the EF state (vEF=0-14). Rotational temperatures are in the range 200-650 K, well below that required for thermal excitation of the observed vibrational levels.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy at interfaces by IR-VIS sum-frequency generation using CLIO FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Peremans, A.; Tadjeddine, A.; Wan Quan, Z.

    1995-12-31

    IR-vis sum-frequency generation (SFG) has developed into a versatile technique for probing the vibrational structure of interfaces. To overcome the limited spectral range accessible by benchtop IR lasers, we have developed an SFG spectrometer that makes use of the broad band tuneable infrared beam provided by the CLIO-FEL. We will evaluate the gain in sensitivity of the FEL-SFG spectrometer in comparison to that of benchtop lasers, taking account of the surface damage by laser heating. Thereafter, we review the different research projects undertaken using this facility: (1) The interface selectivity of SFG makes it particularly suitable for probing buried liquid/solid interface. We took advantage of the spectrometer sensitivity to monitor the electrochemical deposition of hydrogen on platinum single crystals at under- and overpotential (2) Because of its sensitivity to the molecular symmetry, SFG allows probing the conformation of self assembled monolayers deposited on metals. We discuss SFG spectra of {omega}(4-nitroanilino)-dodecane adsorbed on polycrystalline gold and silver films; in the 1550 - 900 cm{sup -1} spectral range. (3) We have undertaken a spectroscopic approach for the investigation of polymer films adhesion on glass. Polyurethane/glass interface is investigated in the 2200 - 1600 cin{sup -1} spectral region. (4) The use of the CLIO FEL allows probing of the vibrational dynamics of the prominent IR active vibrations between 1500 and 500 cm{sup -1} of fullerene epitaxial films. These modes are modified upon charge transfer from the substrate to the C{sub 60} molecules. Preliminary SFG spectra of C{sub 60}/Ag interface are presented. (5) Site specific detection of CO adsorption and CO + O coadsorption on Pd(111) are studied.

  15. Revealing structural properties of the marine nanolayer from vibrational sum frequency generation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laß, K.; Friedrichs, G.

    2011-08-01

    Natural nanolayers originating from sea surface and subsurface water samples collected in the Baltic Sea have been investigated using surface-sensitive vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Distinct spectral signatures of CH and OH bond stretch vibrations have been detected at wavenumbers ranging from 2700 to 3900 cm-1. Measured water-air interface spectra as well as observed signal intensity trends are discussed in terms of composition and structure of the natural organic nanolayer. Reasoning was based on the comparison with reference spectra, spectral trends inferred from previous VSFG studies, reported average composition of dissolved organic matter in seawater, and simplified assumption that surfactants can be classified as soluble (wet) and insoluble (dry) surfactants. Wet surfactants have been found to be dominant, and often lipid-like compounds form a very dense surfactant nanolayer. Supported by comparison spectra of xanthan gum solutions, the observed VSFG spectral signatures were tentatively assigned to lipopolysaccharides or other lipid-like compounds embedded in colloidal matrices of polymeric material. In addition, VSFG spectra of a polluted harbor water sample and a water sample covered with diesel oil are reported.

  16. Highly vibrationally excited CO generated in a low-temperature chemical reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jans, E.; Frederickson, K.; Yurkovich, M.; Musci, B.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A chemical flow reactor is used to study the vibrational population distribution of CO produced by a reaction between carbon vapor generated in an arc discharge and molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate formation of highly vibrationally excited CO, up to vibrational level v = 14, at low temperatures, T = 400-450 K, with population inversion at v = 4-7, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of reaction enthalpy. The results show feasibility of development of a new CO chemical laser using carbon vapor and oxygen as reactants.

  17. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  18. Vibrationally resonant sum-frequency generation microscopy with a solid immersion lens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Seong; Lee, Sang-Won; Hsu, Julie; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    We use a hemispheric sapphire lens in combination with an off-axis parabolic mirror to demonstrate high-resolution vibrationally resonant sum-frequency generation (VR-SFG) microscopy in the mid-infrared range. With the sapphire lens as an immersed solid medium, the numerical aperture (NA) of the parabolic mirror objective is enhanced by a factor of 1.72, from 0.42 to 0.72, close to the theoretical value of 1.76 ( = nsapphire). The measured lateral resolution is as high as 0.64 μm. We show the practical utility of the sapphire immersion lens by imaging collagen-rich tissues with and without the solid immersion lens. PMID:25071953

  19. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20–26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected. PMID:25608712

  20. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-02-22

    Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

  1. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20-26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected.

  2. Mixed Polarization Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectra of Organic Semiconducting Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Patrick; Sohrabpour, Zahara; Massari, Aaron M.

    2014-06-01

    The buried interface of an organic semiconductor at the dielectric has a large on influence on the function of organic field effect transistors (OFETs). The use of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) to obtain structural and orientational information on the buried interfaces of organic thin films has historically been complicated by the signals from other interfaces in the system. A thin film of N,N'-Dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) was deposited on a SiO2 dielectric to simulate the interfaces found in OFETs. We will show how probing the sample with a varying mixture of linear polarizations in the experimental setup can deconvolute contributions to the overall signal from multiple interfaces.

  3. Design and analysis of a plane vibration-based electromagnetic generator using a magnetic spring and ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siqi; Li, Decai

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a plane vibration-based electromagnetic generator that is capable of converting low-frequency vibration energy into electrical energy. A magnetic spring is formed by a magnetic attractive force between fixed and movable permanent magnets. The ferrofluid is employed on the bottom of the movable permanent magnet to suspend it and reduce the mechanical damping as a fluid lubricant. When the electromagnetic generator with a ferrofluid of 0.3 g was operated under a resonance condition, the output power reached 0.27 mW, and the power density of the electromagnetic generator was 5.68 µW/cm2. The electromagnetic generator was also used to harvest energy from human motion. The measured average load powers of the electromagnetic generator from human waist motion were 0.835 mW and 1.3 mW during walking and jogging, respectively.

  4. Interfacial Processes in Model Lithium Ion Systems Probed with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, Bruno G.; Garcia Rey, Natalia; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy was used to probe electrochemical processes taking place at the interface between metal anodes and the liquid phase in model lithium ion systems. Lithium ion batteries have been extensively studied and characterized by numerous techniques. However, the mechanisms behind many properties are still unclear due to the lack of techniques that can directly probe them in situ. The formation of the electrode passivating layer known as solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) is one such example. During the first charging cycle of a battery, some of the electrolyte undergoes reduction at the electrode surface forming an electrically isolating barrier that prevents the subsequent reduction of more electrolyte molecules. The SFG selection rules suppress signals from molecules in centrosymmetric environments such as electrolyte layers, so SFG is a selective probe of interfacial environments such as the SEI. In this study, ethylene carbonate's (EC) response to potential cycling was observed. EC is commonly used as a high permittivity solvent in batteries and is widely believed to be the main component of the SEI in its reduced form, lithium ethylene dicarbonyl. EC's carbonyl stretch (1850 cm-1) was measured in conjunction with cyclic voltammetry experiments. The SFG intensity showed remarkable agreement with the changing potential, as seen in the figure below. The shoulders on each side of the peaks in (a) are especially interesting, as they correspond to the potentials where lithium metal is oxidized and reduced. Vibrational modes found at 1300-1400 cm-1, usually assigned to the reduced form of EC, are also being studied in order to provide more information on the nature of the SEI.

  5. Vibrating-mesh nebulization of liposomes generated using an ethanol-based proliposome technology.

    PubMed

    Elhissi, Abdelbary; Gill, Hardyal; Ahmed, Waqar; Taylor, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    This is the first study that evaluates the influence of the compartmental design of the micropump Aeroneb Go nebulizer and the viscosity of a proliposome hydration medium on vibrating-mesh aerosolization of liposomes. Ethanol-based proliposomes comprising soya phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol (1:1 mole ratio) were hydrated by using isotonic NaCl (0.9%) or sucrose (9.25%) solutions to generate liposomes that entrapped approximately 61% of the hydrophilic drug, salbutamol sulphate. Liposomes were aerosolized by the nebulizer to a two-stage impinger. For both formulations, the aerosol mass output was higher than the phospholipid output, indicating some accumulation of large liposomes or liposome aggregate within the nebulizer. Using NaCl (0.9%) solution as the dispersion medium, aerosol droplet size was much smaller and aerosol mass and phospholipid outputs were higher. This was attributed to the lower viscosity of the NaCl solution, resulting in a reduced retention of the aerosols in the "trap" of the nebulizer. For the entrapped salbutamol sulphate, although the "fine particle fraction" was relatively high (57.44%), size reduction of the liposomes during nebulization caused marked losses of the drug originally entrapped. Overall, liposomes generated from proliposomes when using this nebulizer showed high nebulization output and small droplet size. However, further work is required to reduce the losses of the originally entrapped drug from liposomes.

  6. Next-Generation Modeling, Analysis, and Testing of the Vibration of Mistuned Bladed Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-21

    key mistuning phenomena were examined through vibration testing of blisks (single-piece bladed disks). New methods were developed for identifying...examined through vibration testing of blisks (single-piece bladed disks). New methods were developed for identifying blade mistuning parameters from test...identification methods for mis- tuned systems " To advance the state of the art in blisk vibration testing, with particular attention to the precise

  7. Influence of water depth on the sound generated by air-bubble vibration in the water musical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Yoshito; Nakazono, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a water musical instrument that generates sound by the falling of water drops within resonance tubes. The instrument can give people who hear it the healing effect inherent in the sound of water. The sound produced by falling water drops arises from air- bubble vibrations. To investigate the impact of water depth on the air-bubble vibrations, we conducted experiments at varying values of water pressure and nozzle shape. We found that air-bubble vibration frequency does not change at a water depth of 50 mm or greater. Between 35 and 40 mm, however, the frequency decreases. At water depths of 30 mm or below, the air-bubble vibration frequency increases. In our tests, we varied the nozzle diameter from 2 to 4 mm. In addition, we discovered that the time taken for air-bubble vibration to start after the water drops start falling is constant at water depths of 40 mm or greater, but slower at depths below 40 mm.

  8. Operational Safety Assessment of Turbo Generators with Wavelet Rényi Entropy from Sensor-Dependent Vibration Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals’ wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance. PMID:25894934

  9. Structure and orientation of interfacial proteins determined by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy: method and application.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuji; Wei, Feng; Li, Hongchun; Tian, Kangzhen; Luo, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In situ and real-time characterization of molecular structures and orientation of proteins at interfaces is essential to understand the nature of interfacial protein interaction. Such work will undoubtedly provide important clues to control biointerface in a desired manner. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study the interfacial structures and interactions at the molecular level. This paper first systematically introduced the methods for the calculation of the Raman polarizability tensor, infrared transition dipole moment, and SFG molecular hyperpolarizability tensor elements of proteins/peptides with the secondary structures of α-helix, 310-helix, antiparallel β-sheet, and parallel β-sheet, as well as the methodology to determine the orientation of interfacial protein secondary structures using SFG amide I spectra. After that, recent progresses on the determination of protein structure and orientation at different interfaces by SFG-VS were then reviewed, which provides a molecular-level understanding of the structures and interactions of interfacial proteins, specially understanding the nature of driving force behind such interactions. Although this review has focused on analysis of amide I spectra, it will be expected to offer a basic idea for the spectral analysis of amide III SFG signals and other complicated molecular systems such as RNA and DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantification of multiple fault parameters in flexible turbo-generator systems with incomplete rundown vibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Mohit; Tiwari, Rajiv

    2013-12-01

    A turbo-generator system of the modern rotating machinery consists of the driver and driven shafts, which are coupled through flexible couplings and mounted on flexible bearings. Dynamic characterisation of vital machine elements of such rotating machinery is a challenging problem for reliable and accurate response predictions. In this paper, a key intention is to estimate the bearing and coupling dynamic parameters along with residual unbalances at predefined planes, and the misalignment forces and moments at the coupling based on the rundown vibration data. To tackle a practical difficulty of limited measurements and a numerical difficulty of the conventional dynamic condensation in the development of identification algorithm, a novel condensation technique has been implemented especially to overcome measurement of transverse rotational DOFs. Numerical examples are also presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The measurement noise has been added in numerically simulated responses that are used in the present algorithm to identify the parameters and it is found to be robust. Modelling errors of few physical parameters are also considered and estimates are found to be very good.

  11. Characterization of starch polymorphic structures using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingyan; Lee, Christopher; Kim, Seong H; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2014-02-20

    The polymorphic structures of starch were characterized with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. The noncentrosymmetry requirement of SFG spectroscopy allows for the detection of the ordered domains without spectral interferences from the amorphous phase and also the distinction of the symmetric elements among crystalline polymorphs. The V-type amylose was SFG-inactive due to the antiparallel packing of single helices in crystal unit cells, whereas the A- and B-type starches showed strong SFG peaks at 2904 cm(-1) and 2952-2968 cm(-1), which were assigned to CH stretching of the axial methine group in the ring and CH2 stretching of the exocyclic CH2OH side group, respectively. The CH2/CH intensity ratios of the A- and B-type starches are significantly different, indicating that the conformation of hydroxymethyl groups in these two polymorphs may be different. Cyclodextrin inclusion complexes were also analyzed as a comparison to the V-type amylose and showed that the head-to-tail and head-to-head stacking patterns of cyclodextrin molecules govern their SFG signals and peak positions. Although the molecular packing is different between V-type amylose and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes, both crystals show the annihilation of SFG signals when the functional group dipoles are arranged pointing in opposite directions.

  12. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Gruenbaum, S. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-11-14

    Understanding the structure of water near cell membranes is crucial for characterizing water-mediated events such as molecular transport. To obtain structural information of water near a membrane, it is useful to have a surface-selective technique that can probe only interfacial water molecules. One such technique is vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. As model systems for studying membrane headgroup/water interactions, in this paper we consider lipid and surfactant monolayers on water. We adopt a theoretical approach combining molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive VSFG to investigate water structure near these interfaces. Our simulated spectra are in qualitative agreement with experiments and reveal orientational ordering of interfacial water molecules near cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic interfaces. OH bonds of water molecules point toward an anionic interface leading to a positive VSFG peak, whereas the water hydrogen atoms point away from a cationic interface leading to a negative VSFG peak. Coexistence of these two interfacial water species is observed near interfaces between water and mixtures of cationic and anionic lipids, as indicated by the presence of both negative and positive peaks in their VSFG spectra. In the case of a zwitterionic interface, OH orientation is toward the interface on the average, resulting in a positive VSFG peak.

  13. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  14. Insight from Laboratory Experiments on the Generation of Granular Flows on the Flanks of Vibrated Pyroclastic Cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Romano, G. P.; Ventura, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out laboratory experiments to study the generation of granular flows on the slopes of pyroclastic cones that are experiencing volcanic tremor or tectonic earthquakes. These experiments are inspired by the occurrence of granular flows on the flanks of Mount Vesuvius during its 1944 eruption. Our laboratory model consists of sand cones built around a vibrating tube which represents a volcanic conduit with erupting magma inside. A video camera allows the study of the granular flow inception, movement and deposition. Although the collapse of the entire cone is obtained at a specific resonance frequency, individual granular flows can be generated by all the vibration frequencies and all the vibration amplitudes that our experimental apparatus has allowed us to adopt. We believe that this is due to the fact that the energy threshold to generate the flows is small in value. Therefore, if this is true in nature as well, shaken pyroclastic cones are always potentially dangerous because they can easily generate flows that can strike the surrounding areas.

  15. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Uvan Catton; Vijay K. Dhir; Deepanjan Mitra; Omar Alquaddoomi; Pierangelo Adinolfi

    2004-04-06

    Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers.

  16. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration in a Langmuir monolayer with high-resolution spectra and ultrafast vibrational dynamics in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, Luis; Wang, Hong-fei

    2013-08-01

    While in principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurements should generate identical information for a given molecular system, the inhomogeneous character of surface vibrations in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies has only been studied with time-domain SFG-VS by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, this due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough lineshape. Here, with the recently developed high-resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS) technique, we show that the inhomogeneous lineshape can be obtained in the frequency-domain for the anchoring CN stretch of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface, and that an excellent agreement with the time-domain SFG free-induction-decay can be established. We found that the 8CB CN stretch spectrum consists of a single peak centered at 2234.00 ± 0.01 cm-1 with a total linewidth of 10.9 ± 0.3 cm-1 at half maximum. The Lorentzian contribution accounts only for 4.7 ± 0.4 cm-1 to this width and the Gaussian (inhomogeneous) broadening for as much as 8.1 ± 0.2 cm-1. Polarization analysis of the -CN spectra showed that the -CN group is tilted 57° ± 2° from the surface normal. The large heterogeneity in the -CN spectrum is tentatively attributed to the -CN group interactions with the interfacial water molecules penetrated/accommodated into the 8CB monolayer, a unique phenomenon for the nCB Langmuir monolayers reported previously.

  17. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration in a Langmuir monolayer with high-resolution spectra and ultrafast vibrational dynamics in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-08-28

    Even though in principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurement should generate identical information for a given molecular system, inhomogeneous character of surface vibrations in the sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies has only been studied with the time-domain SFGVS by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough line shape. Here with recently developed high-resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS) we show that the inhomogeneous line shape can be obtained in the frequency-domain, for the anchoring CN stretch of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface, and that an excellent agreement with the time-domain SFG free-induction-decay (FID) results can be established. We found that the 8CB CN stretch spectrum consists of a single peak centered at 2234.00 + * 0.01 cm-1 with a total line width of 10.9 + - 0.3 cm-1 at half maximum. The Lorentzian contribution accounts only for 4:7 + -0:4 cm-1 to this width and the Gaussian (inhomogeneous) broadening for as much as 8:1+*0:2 cm-1. Polarization analysis of the -CN spectra showed that the -CN group is tilted 57 + - 2 degrees from the surface normal. The large heterogeneity in the -CN spectrum is tentatively attributed to the -CN group interactions with the interfacial water molecules penetrated/accomodated into the 8CB monolayer, a unique phenomenon for the nCB Langmuir monolayers reported previously.

  18. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wibowo, Zakaria, Lambang, Lullus Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-03-29

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  19. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, Zakaria, Lambang, Lullus; Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-03-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  20. Effect of Ca(2+) to Sphingomyelin Investigated by Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rong-Juan; Lin, Lu; Li, Yi-Yi; Liu, Ming-Hua; Guo, Yuan; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-05-23

    The interactions between Ca(2+) ions and sphingomyelin play crucial roles in a wide range of cellular activities. However, little is known about the molecular details of the interactions at interfaces. In this work, we investigated the interactions between Ca(2+) ions and egg sphingomyelin (ESM) Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface by subwavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). We show that Ca(2+) ions can induce ordering of the acyl chains in the ESM monolayer. An analysis of the one alkyl-chain-deuterated ESM revealed that the Ca(2+) ions do not affect the N-linked saturated fatty acid chain, although they make the sphingosine backbone become ordered. Further analysis of the SFG-VS spectra shows that the interactions between ESM and Ca(2+) ions make the orientation of the methyl group at the end of sphingosine backbone change from pointing downward to pointing upward. Moreover, a large blue shift of the phosphate group at the CaCl2 solution interface indicates, to our knowledge, new cation binding modes. Such binding causes the phosphate moiety to dehydrate, resulting in the conformation change of the phosphate moiety. Based on these results, we propose the molecular mechanism that Ca(2+) ions can bind to the phosphate group and subsequently destroy the intramolecular hydrogen bond between the 3-hydroxyl group and the phosphate oxygen, which results in an ordering change of the sphingosine backbone. These findings illustrate the potential application of HR-BB-SFG-VS to investigate lipid-cation interactions and the calcium channel modulated by lipid domain formation through slight structural changes in the membrane lipid. It will also shed light on the interactions of complex molecules at surfaces and interfaces. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin Yu, Qiangmo; Zhao, Jiangxin; Zhao, Nian; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Qiu, Jing

    2014-09-21

    To scavenge energy from ambient vibrations with arbitrary in-plane motion directions and over a wide frequency range, a novel electromagnetic vibration energy harvester is designed and optimized. In the harvester, a circular cross-section elastic rod, not a traditional thin cantilever beam, is used to extract ambient vibration energy because of its capability to collect vibration from arbitrary in-plane motion directions. The magnetic interaction between magnets and the iron core contributes to a nonlinear oscillation of the rod with increased frequency bandwidth. The influences of the structure configurations on the electrical output and the working bandwidth of the harvester are investigated using Ansoft's Maxwell 3D to achieve optimal performance. The experimental results show that the harvester is sensitive to vibrations from arbitrary in-plane directions and it exhibits a bandwidth of 5.7 Hz and a maximum power of 13.4 mW at an acceleration of 0.6 g (with g=9.8 ms⁻²).

  2. ENIDINE: Vibration and seismic isolation technologies for power generation station applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zemanek, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    ENIDINE Inc. is a world leader in the design and manufacture of shock and vibration mounts. Founded in 1966, the company has two manufacturing facilities, employs over 300 people and supports a worldwide network of distributors and representatives. ENIDINE Inc. is part of the ENIDINE Corporate Group which owns a number of companies that design and manufacture Hydraulic/Pneumatic cylinders, Electromechanical devices, Hydraulic Control Valves and a number of Industrial Distribution companies throughout Europe. In total, the ENIDINE Corporate Group has over 900 employees with annual sales of over $100 million. ENIDINE shock and vibration mounts are used to isolate the vibration of missiles from their guidance systems, pumps from hospital operating equipment and off shore oil rigs, from the shock energy of waves in the North Sea. ENIDINE products can be found on all Boeing and McDonnell Douglas aircraft, as well as many electronic and weapons systems on board Navy ships.

  3. Fabrication and performance evaluation of a metal-based bimorph piezoelectric MEMS generator for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Lin, Shun-Chiu; Wu, Wen-Jong

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a bimorph microelectromechanical system (MEMS) generator for vibration energy harvesting. The bimorph generator is in cantilever beam structure formed by laminating two lead zirconate titanate thick-film layers on both sides of a stainless steel substrate. Aiming to scavenge vibration energy efficiently from the environment and transform into useful electrical energy, the two piezoelectric layers on the device can be poled for serial and parallel connections to enhance the output voltage or output current respectively. In addition, a tungsten proof mass is bonded at the tip of the device to adjust the resonance frequency. The experimental result shows superior performance the generator. At the 0.5 g base excitation acceleration level, the devices pooled for serial connection and the device poled for parallel connection possess an open-circuit output voltage of 11.6 VP-P and 20.1 VP-P, respectively. The device poled for parallel connection reaches a maximum power output of 423 μW and an output voltage of 15.2 VP-P at an excitation frequency of 143.4 Hz and an externally applied based excitation acceleration of 1.5 g, whereas the device poled serial connection achieves a maximum power output of 413 μW and an output voltage of 33.0 VP-P at an excitation frequency of 140.8 Hz and an externally applied base excitation acceleration of 1.5 g. To demonstrate the feasibility of the MEMS generator for real applications, we finished the demonstration of a self-powered Bluetooth low energy wireless temperature sensor sending readings to a smartphone with only the power from the MEMS generator harvesting from vibration.

  4. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  5. Simulated vibrational sum frequency generation from a multilayer thin film system with two active interfaces.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel B; Massari, Aaron M

    2013-04-21

    In the field of surface-specific vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFG) on organic thin films, optical interferences combined with the two-interface problem presents a challenge in terms of qualitative assessment of the data and quantitative modeling. The difficulty is amplified when considering systems comprised of more than a single material thin film layer. Recently, in our lab we have developed a generalized model that describes thin film interference in interface-specific nonlinear optical spectroscopies from arbitrary multilayer systems. Here, we apply the model to simulate VSFG spectra from the simplest multilayer: a system of two thin films, one of which is an organic small molecule and the other is a dielectric layer on a semiconductor substrate system where we idealize that the organic interfaces are equally VSFG active. Specifically, we consider the molecule N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) deposited on a silicon wafer with a thermally grown oxide dielectric. We present results for the four polarization experiments that sample the nonzero nonlinear susceptibility elements of macroscopically centrosymmetric materials (ssp, sps, pss, and ppp) and in two mIR frequency windows (the imide carbonyl stretches around 1680 cm(-1) and the alkyl stretches around 2900 cm(-1)) as a function of both thin film thicknesses with fixed input beam angles. We use frequency dependent refractive indices for all materials. The goal is to illustrate some of the intricacies contained in the intensity data of such systems. Of particular interest is the effect of the relative polar orientation of modes at the interfaces and the possibility of designing a system where the collected signal is exclusively attributable to a single interface. Our calculations indicate that in order to unambiguously identify the relative polar orientation one must experimentally vary an additional system parameter such as thin film thickness or input beam angle

  6. Membrane orientation of MSI-78 measured by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2011-06-21

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) selectively disrupt bacterial cell membranes to kill bacteria whereas they either do not or weakly interact with mammalian cells. The orientations of AMPs in lipid bilayers mimicking bacterial and mammalian cell membranes are related to their antimicrobial activity and selectivity. To understand the role of AMP-lipid interactions in the functional properties of AMPs better, we determined the membrane orientation of an AMP (MSI-78 or pexiganan) in various model membranes using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. A solid-supported single 1,2-dipalmitoyl-an-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG) bilayer or 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (POPG) bilayer was used as a model bacterial cell membrane. A supported 1,2-dipalmitoyl-an-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer or a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer was used as a model mammalian cell membrane. Our SFG results indicate that the helical MSI-78 molecules are associated with the bilayer surface with ∼70° deviation from the bilayer normal in the negatively charged gel-phase DPPG bilayer at 400 nM peptide concentration. However, when the concentration was increased to 600 nM, MSI-78 molecules changed their orientation to make a 25° tilt from the lipid bilayer normal whereas multiple orientations were observed for an even higher peptide concentration in agreement with toroidal-type pore formation as reported in a previous solid-state NMR study. In contrary, no interaction between MSI-78 and a zwitterionic DPPC bilayer was observed even at a much higher peptide concentration (∼12,000 nM). These results demonstrate that SFG can provide insights into the antibacterial activity and selectivity of MSI-78. Interestingly, the peptide exhibits a concentration-dependent membrane orientation in the lamellar-phase POPG bilayer and was also found to induce toroidal-type pore formation. The deduced lipid flip

  7. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships.

  8. Binding of Na+ and K+ to the Headgroup of Palmitic Acid Monolayers Studied by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zishuai; Allen, Heather C.

    2012-06-01

    Alkali cations are critical in biological systems due to their electrical interaction with cell membranes. While Na+ and K+ share similar chemical and physical properties, they can exhibit differences when interacting with biological membranes. These phenomena may be modeled using a Langmuir monolayer of surfactant on alkali chloride solutions. Vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy is an interface specific technique that is widely employed to study molecular organization at surfaces and interfaces. VSFG spectroscopy was used to probe the CO2- vibrational mode for the carboxylic acid headgroup of palmitic acid (PA) spread on the surface of NaCl and KCl solutions in the vibrational region between 1400 and 1500 cm-1. The ability of Na+ and K+ to bind with the carboxylic headgroup of PA is revealed by observing peak positions (˜1410 cm-1 and ˜1470 cm-1) and relative intensity for the CO2- peaks. These results are compared and discussed with perspective toward elucidating interfacial PA headgroup organization. The time evolution for the PA CO2- peaks is also monitored after monolayer spreading via VSFG and these results are presented as well.

  9. Poly(L-proline) II helix propensities in poly(L-lysine) dendrigraft generations from vibrational Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Christian; Kapitán, Josef; Collet, Hélène; Commeyras, Auguste; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D

    2009-06-08

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA), measured as small circularly polarized components in Raman scattering from chiral molecules, was applied to study the backbone conformations of the first five generations of poly(L-lysine) dendrigrafts (DGLs) in water. Generation 1 was found to support predominantly the poly(L-proline) II (PPII) conformation, the amount of which steadily decreased with increasing generation, with a concomitant increase in other backbone conformations. This behavior may be due to increasing crowding of the lysine side chains, together with suppression of backbone hydration, with increasing branching. In contrast, the ROA spectra of a series of linear poly(L-lysine)s in water show little change with increasing molecular weight. Our results may have implications for the nonimmunogenic properties of DGLs.

  10. From Conventional to Phase-Sensitive Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy: Probing Water Organization at Aqueous Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Dominique; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2012-10-18

    Elucidation of water organization at aqueous interfaces has remained a challenging problem. Conventional vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy and its most recent extension, phase-sensitive VSFG (PS-VSFG), have emerged as powerful experimental methods for unraveling structural information at various aqueous interfaces. In this Perspective, we briefly describe the two possible VSFG detection modes, and we point out features that make these methods highly suited to address questions about water organization at air/aqueous interfaces. Several important aqueous interfacial systems are discussed to illustrate the versatility of these methods. Remaining challenges and exciting prospective directions are also presented.

  11. Generation of mechanical vibrations in metal samples by the use of the pinch effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskiy, O. A.; Skvortsov, O. B.; Stashenko, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    The article presents the recent research in electrodynamic processes for metal samples exposed to current pulses. The pinch effect and the skin effect cause the vibration of the metal rods. The results of these studies show how current and magnetic field interact with material samples of gold, silver and copper. The analysis allowed establishing the dependences of peak acceleration on current density and conductor diameter. The dependencies can be used in metal workings and for nondestructive testing.

  12. Nonequilibrium vibrational excitation of OH radicals generated during multibubble cavitation in water.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Abdoul Aziz; Pflieger, Rachel; Siboulet, Bertrand; Molina, John; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2012-05-24

    The sonoluminescence (SL) spectra of OH(A(2)Σ(+)) excited state produced during the sonolysis of water sparged with argon were measured and analyzed at various ultrasonic frequencies (20, 204, 362, 609, and 1057 kHz) in order to determine the intrabubble conditions created by multibubble cavitation. The relative populations of the OH(A(2)Σ(+)) v' = 1-4 vibrational states as well as the vibronic temperatures (T(v), T(e)) have been calculated after deconvolution of the SL spectra. The results of this study provide evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation during sonolysis of water in the presence of argon. At low ultrasonic frequency (20 kHz), a weakly excited plasma with Brau vibrational distribution is formed (T(e) ~ 0.7 eV and T(v) ~ 5000 K). By contrast, at high-frequency ultrasound, the plasma inside the collapsing bubbles exhibits Treanor behavior typical for strong vibrational excitation. The T(e) and T(v) values increase with ultrasonic frequency, reaching T(e) ~ 1 eV and T(v) ~ 9800 K at 1057 kHz.

  13. Comparative study of direct and phase-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Pool, Ruben E; Versluis, Jan; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa

    2011-12-29

    As a surface-specific technique, vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) is used in a wide range of applications where soft matter or solid interfaces are to be probed on a molecular level through their vibrational modes. In recent years, phase-specific sum-frequency generation (PS-SFG, also known as heterodyne-detected SFG) spectroscopy has been increasingly replacing its predecessor (direct SFG, also known as homodyne SFG) as the experimental technique of choice for characterizing interfacial structure. The technique enables phase sensitive measurements, allowing for the determination of the real and imaginary parts of the interfacial vibrational response function and thereby the unambiguous identification of molecular orientation. This phase-sensitivity requires, however, a complete understanding of the complex optical properties of the sample and of their effect on the signal. These optical properties significantly influence the raw spectral data from which the real and imaginary parts of the second-order susceptibility are retrieved. We show that it is essential to correct the data appropriately to infer the true molecular response. The current study presents a detailed description of the physical contributions to the phase-resolved spectrum, allowing a direct comparison between the phase-resolved spectrum and that obtained using the well-understood direct detection method in a step-by-step data analysis process. In addition to phase sensitivity, PS-SFG has been shown to increase the sensitivity compared to traditional (direct) SFG spectroscopy. We present a quantitative comparison between theoretical limits of the signal-to-noise ratio of both techniques, which shows that for many systems the signal-to-noise ratio is very similar for direct- and phase-specific SFG signals. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Resolving Two Closely Overlapping -CN Vibrations and Structure in the Langmuir Monolayer of the Long-Chain Nonadecanenitrile by Polarization Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2012-01-10

    Polarization sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (SFG-VS) reveals that there are two distinctively different but closely overlapping -CN vibrations at 2244.5 cm{sup -1} and 2251.1 cm{sup -1}, respectively, in the Langmuir monolayer of the long-chain nonadecanenitrile (C18CN, CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}CN, or C18CN)at the air/water interface. The blue shifted -CN groups at 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is about 1.8 times broader than that of the 2244.5 cm{sup -1}. Both the spectral shift and spectral width are consistent with the picture that this blue shifted peak corresponds to the solvated -CN group; while the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak is the signature of the less solvated -CN group. Polarization dependence of these two peaks further suggest that the -CN group corresponding to the 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is tilted with an average angle of 50{sup o} from interface normal, where that to the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak is tilted with an angle around 67{sup o}. The relative population for the -CN groups corresponding to the 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is about three times of that of the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak. These results suggest that the -CN head groups in the C18CN Langmuir monolayer are not aligned uniformly at slightly different depth, in order to avoid the strong repulsive forces between the strong -CN dipoles. The SFG-VS spectra of the O-H stretches at C18CN Langmuir monolayer is similar to those of the 4''-n-pentyl-4-cyano-p-terphenyl (5CT) monolayer, indicating complete exclusion of the water molecules from the C18CN Langmuir monolayer, but significantly different from those of the 4''-n-octyl-4-p-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) monolayer, as well as those of the air/acetonitrile aqueous solution interface. Different from previous held understandings, these results suggest that the structure of the insoluble long-chain C18CN Langmuir monolayer is significantly different from that of the Gibbs adsorption layer of the short chain soluble acetonitrile or propanenitrile aqueous

  15. Vibrations Generated by Several Nickel-titanium Endodontic File Systems during Canal Shaping in an Ex Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Min; Kim, Jin-Woo; Park, Se-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Mo; Kwak, Sang Won; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the vibration generated by several nickel-titanium (NiTi) file systems and transmitted to teeth under 2 different motions (continuous rotation motion and reciprocating motion). Sixty J-shaped resin blocks (Endo Training Bloc-J; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) were trimmed to a root-shaped form and divided into 2 groups according to the types of electric motors: WaveOne motor (WOM, Dentsply Maillefer) and X-Smart Plus motor (XSM, Dentsply Maillefer). Each group was further subdivided into 3 subgroups (n = 10 each) according to the designated file systems: ProTaper Next (PTN, Dentsply Maillefer), ProTaper Universal (PTU, Dentsply Maillefer), and WaveOne (WOP, Dentsply Maillefer) systems. Vibration was measured during the pecking motion using an accelerometer attached to a predetermined consistent position. The average vibration values were subjected to 2-way analysis of variance as well as the t test and Duncan test for post hoc comparison at the 95% confidence interval. Both motor types and instrument types produced significantly different ranges of average vibrations. Regardless of the instrument types, the WOM group generated greater vibration than the XSM group (P < .05). Although PTN and PTU did not show significant differences, the WOP group showed significantly greater vibration than the other groups regardless of motor types (P < .05). Under the limitations of this study design, the reciprocating NiTi file system may generate greater vibration than the continuous rotation NiTi file systems. The motor type also has a significant effect to amplify the vibrations. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. N-H stretching modes around 3300 wavenumber from peptide backbones observed by chiral sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the molecular origin of the chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) signals of proteins and peptides at interfaces in the N-H stretching vibrational region. The N-H stretching can be a probe for investigating structural and functional properties of proteins, but remains technically difficult to analyze due to the overlapping with the O-H stretching of water molecules. Chiral SFG spectroscopy offers unique tools to study the N-H stretching from proteins at interfaces without interference from the water background. However, the molecular origin of the N-H stretching signals of proteins is still unclear. This work provides a justification of the origin of chiral N-H signals by analyzing the vibrational frequencies, examining chiral SFG theory, studying proton (hydrogen/deuterium) exchange kinetics, and performing optical control experiments. The results demonstrate that the chiral N-H stretching signals at ~3300 cm(-1) originate from the amide group of the protein backbones. This chiral N-H stretching signal offers an in situ, real-time, and background-free probe for interrogating the protein structures and dynamics at interfaces at the molecular level.

  17. Bisulfate (HSO4-) Dehydration at the Vapor/solution Interface Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubb, Aaron M.; Allen, Heather C.

    2012-06-01

    With perspective towards atmospheric chemistry, ion behavior at vapor/solution interfaces has important implications for understanding aqueous aerosols as reactions at this interface control the growth and uptake of the aerosol. Sulfate species are a major ionic component of aqueous acidic tropospheric aerosols with bisulfate (HSO4-) being the major sulfate species at pH values lower than 2. The application of inherently interface specific spectroscopic methods such as vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) allows for resolution of interfacial chemical species versus the bulk species facilitating a clearer understanding of chemical phenomena taking place at vapor/solution interfaces. Here we present VSFG results on the effects that cation identity have toward the molecular environment experienced by bisulfate anions residing within the vapor/solution interface for aqueous H2SO4, Na2SO4, and MgSO4 solutions. By probing the ν{SS}-SO3 vibrational mode of interfacial bisulfate anions directly we are able to elucidate the influence that Na+ and Mg2+ ions have toward bisulfate hydration within the interface. Our results indicate that Na+ and Mg2+ perturb the hydration of interfacial bisulfate anions but do not form ion-pair complexes. Mg2+ is found to exhibit a larger net influence on bisulfate hydration relative to Na+.

  18. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  19. Vocal development during postnatal growth and ear morphology in a shrew that generates seismic vibrations, Diplomesodon pulchellum.

    PubMed

    Zaytseva, Alexandra S; Volodin, Ilya A; Mason, Matthew J; Frey, Roland; Fritsch, Guido; Ilchenko, Olga G; Volodina, Elena V

    2015-09-01

    The ability of adult and subadult piebald shrews (Diplomesodon pulchellum) to produce 160Hz seismic waves is potentially reflected in their vocal ontogeny and ear morphology. In this study, the ontogeny of call variables and body traits was examined in 11 litters of piebald shrews, in two-day intervals from birth to 22 days (subadult), and ear structure was investigated in two specimens using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Across ages, the call fundamental frequency (f0) was stable in squeaks and clicks and increased steadily in screeches, representing an unusual, non-descending ontogenetic pathway of f0. The rate of the deep sinusoidal modulation (pulse rate) of screeches increased from 75Hz at 3-4 days to 138Hz at 21-22 days, probably relating to ontogenetic changes in contraction rates of the same muscles which are responsible for generating seismic vibrations. The ear reconstructions revealed that the morphologies of the middle and inner ears of the piebald shrew are very similar to those of the common shrew (Sorex araneus) and the lesser white-toothed shrew (Crocidura suaveolens), which are not known to produce seismic signals. These results suggest that piebald shrews use a mechanism other than hearing for perceiving seismic vibrations.

  20. Quantification of crystalline cellulose in lignocellulosic biomass using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy and comparison with other analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Barnette, Anna L; Lee, Christopher; Bradley, Laura C; Schreiner, Edward P; Park, Yong Bum; Shin, Heenae; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Park, Sunkyu; Kim, Seong H

    2012-07-01

    The non-centrosymmetry requirement of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy allows the detection and quantification of crystalline cellulose in lignocellulose biomass without spectral interferences from hemicelluloses and lignin. This paper shows a correlation between the amount of crystalline cellulose in biomass and the SFG signal intensity. Model biomass samples were prepared by mixing commercially available cellulose, xylan, and lignin to defined concentrations. The SFG signal intensity was found sensitive to a wide range of crystallinity, but varied non-linearly with the mass fraction of cellulose in the samples. This might be due to the matrix effects such as light scattering and absorption by xylan and lignin, as well as the non-linear density dependence of the SFG process itself. Comparison with other techniques such as XRD, FT-Raman, FT-IR and NMR demonstrate that SFG can be a complementary and sensitive tool to assess crystalline cellulose in biomass.

  1. Effect of nanoscale geometry on molecular conformation: vibrational sum-frequency generation of alkanethiols on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weeraman, Champika; Yatawara, Achani K; Bordenyuk, Andrey N; Benderskii, Alexander V

    2006-11-08

    Vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy was used to study the nanoscale geometric effects on molecular conformation of dodecanethiol ligand on gold nanoparticles of varying size between 1.8 and 23 nm. By analyzing the CH3 and CH2 stretch transitions of dodecanethiol using the spectroscopic propensity rules for the SFG process, we observe the increase of the gauche defects in the alkyl chain of the ligand on the nanoparticle surface when the curvature approaches the size of the molecule ( approximately 1.6 nm). In contrast, linear infrared absorption and Raman spectra, governed by different selection rules, do not allow observation of the size-dependent conformational changes. The results are understood in terms of the geometric packing effect, where the curvature of the nanoparticle surface results in the increased conical volume available for the alkyl chain.

  2. Elucidation of molecular structures at buried polymer interfaces and biological interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Myers, John; Chen, Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been developed into an important technique to study surfaces and interfaces. It can probe buried interfaces in situ and provide molecular level structural information such as the presence of various chemical moieties, quantitative molecular functional group orientation, and time dependent kinetics or dynamics at such interfaces. This paper focuses on these three most important advantages of SFG and reviews some of the recent progress in SFG studies on interfaces related to polymer materials and biomolecules. The results discussed here demonstrate that SFG can provide important molecular structural information of buried interfaces in situ and in real time, which is difficult to obtain by other surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:23710244

  3. In Situ Molecular Level Studies on Membrane Related Peptides and Proteins in Real Time Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shuji; Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study the molecular structures of surfaces and interfaces in different chemical environments. This review summarizes recent SFG studies on hybrid bilayer membranes and substrate-supported lipid monolayers and bilayers, the interaction between peptides/proteins and lipid monolayers/bilayers, and bilayer perturbation induced by peptides/proteins. To demonstrate the ability of SFG to determine the orientations of various secondary structures, studies on the interaction between different peptides/proteins (melittin, G proteins, almethicin, and tachyplesin I) and lipid bilayers are discussed. Molecular level details revealed by SFG in these studies show that SFG can provide a unique understanding on the interactions between a lipid monolayer/bilayer and peptides/proteins in real time, in situ and without any exogenous labeling. PMID:19306928

  4. Broadband Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy of High-Frequency Vibrations of Water Molecules at Silica Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaienko, Oleksandr; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Sil, Devika; Borguet, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Building on our discovery of a method to extend noncollinear optical parametric amplification to a broad class of materials, we developed one of the first sources generating ultrabroadband infrared pulses with bandwidths Δν > 2500 cm-1 in the near-IR (λ = 1.1-1.6 μm) and Δν > 1000 cm-1 in the mid-IR (λ = 1.7-3.5 μm; ν = 2800-6000 cm-1). The ultra-broadband IR source enabled surface-sensitive sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of mineral-water interfaces crucial in many natural and man-made processes such as ion exchange in geochemical environments and oil extraction from tar sands. This novel ultrabroadband IR source allowed the acquisition of SFG spectra of water OH stretch (spanning 3000-3800 cm-1) from mineral surfaces without tuning the IR frequency, in 60 sec or less. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the broadband-IR SFG setup allowed the extension of SFG spectroscopy of interfacial hydroxyls at mineral/water surfaces to the low cross-section vibrational modes found in the high frequency range (4000-7000 cm-1). We performed, what we believe to be, the first surface-specific vibrational SFG spectroscopic measurements of the stretch+bend combination band, νcomb = νOH+δHOH of liquid water at silica surfaces near 5200 cm-1. SFG of the νcomb mode allows in-situ probing of surface-bound, e.g., SiOH, and H-OH hydroxyls separately. This provides access to the interfacial water bending mode δ (near 1600 cm-1), which has not been observed directly in SFG. O. Isaienko and E. Borguet Opt. Express 16(6), 3949-3954 March 2008. O. Isaienko and E. Borguet Opt. Express 20(1), 547-561 January 2012. O. Isaienko, S. Nihonyanagi, D. Sil and E. Borguet (in preparation).}.

  5. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Vicente J.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Callahan, John

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical RPS launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources was designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  6. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Callahan, John

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical radioisotope power system (RPS) launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources were designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  7. Soliton microdynamics of the generation of new-type nonlinear surface vibrations, dissociation, and surfing diffusion in diatomic crystals of the uranium nitride type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, O. A.; Semenov, V. A.; Orlov, A. V.; Sudarev, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The microdynamics of large-amplitude nonlinear vibrations of uranium nitride diatomic lattices has been investigated using the computer simulation and neutron scattering methods at temperatures T = 600-2500°C near the thresholds of the dissociation and destruction of the reactor fuel materials. It has been found using the computer simulation that, in the spectral gap between the frequency bands of acoustic and optical phonons in crystals with an open surface, there are resonances of new-type harmonic surface vibrations and a gap-filling band of their genetic successors, i.e., nonlinear surface vibrations. Experimental measurements of the slow neutron scattering spectra of uranium nitride on the DIN-2PI neutron spectrometer have revealed resonances and bands of these surface vibrations in the spectral gap, as well as higher optical vibration overtones. It has been shown that the solitons and bisolitons initiate the formation and collapse of dynamic pores with the generation of surface vibrations at the boundaries of the cavities, evaporation of atoms and atomic clusters, formation of cracks, and destruction of the material. It has been demonstrated that the mass transfer of nitrogen in cracks and along grain boundaries can occur through the revealed microdynamics mechanism of the surfing diffusion of light nitrogen atoms at large-amplitude soliton waves propagating in the stabilizing sublattice of heavy uranium atoms and in the nitrogen sublattice.

  8. Generation 6 Li-Ion Cell Vibration Testing at ABSL Space Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defer, M.; Borthomieu, Y.; Ligneel, E.; Badet, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the design of Saft's Generation6 Li-Ion cell, the main challenges in the course of the development, the main BOL characteristics and performances achieved during the development program. Finally, it also describes how this cell fits in Saft's battery range and the benefits of it.

  9. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-21

    In this report, we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm(-1) resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra of the -CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral line shapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt line shape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall line shape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ± 0.02 cm(-1) peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm(-1) and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm(-1), respectively, for the -CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm(-1) agrees quantitatively with a Voigt line shape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm(-1) and an inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm(-1). These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the line shapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  10. Molecular interactions of organic molecules at the air/water interface investigated by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenting; Ye, Shuji

    2017-02-08

    The molecular structure and dynamics of organic molecules at the aqueous interface have attracted a number of investigations owing to their importance and specific nature. However, there are relatively few studies on the direct characterization of the molecular interactions at the air/water interface because they are extremely difficult to measure in experiments. In this study, we use dibutyl ester molecules (R1CO2R2O2CR1) as a model of organic molecules, and investigate their molecular structure and interactions using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecular interactions can be estimated by measuring the intensity ratio of the symmetric stretching (ν1) and Fermi resonant bands (2ν2) of methyl groups. Here, dibutyl ester molecules are widely used as plasticizers in polymers to improve the properties of the plastics and polymers. It is found that the orientation angles of the tailed methyl groups at the air/water interface decrease from 34° to 19° when the chain length of R2 increases from 0 to 8. The total intermolecular interactions of the dibutyl ester molecules decrease as the chain length of R2 increases because the van der Waals interactions between the hydrocarbon chains increase, while the hydrogen bond interactions between the carbonyl group and water molecules decrease. Our study demonstrates the stability of ester-based plasticizers in polymers can be well predicted from the intensity ratio of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands of methyl group. Such an intensity ratio can be thus used as an effective vibrational optical ruler for characterizing molecular interactions between plasticizers and polymers.

  11. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL VIBRATION GENERATED IN OSCILLATING/VIBRATORY PLATFORM ON THE CONCENTRATION OF PLASMA BIOMARKERS AND ON THE WEIGHT IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Frederico, Éric Heleno Freire Ferreira; de Sá-Caputo, Danúbia da Cunha; Moreira-Marconi, Eloá; Guimarães, Carlos Alberto Sampaio; Cardoso, André Luiz Bandeira Dionísio; Dionello, Carla da Fontoura; Morel, Danielle Soares; Sousa-Gonçalves, Cintia Renata; Paineiras-Domingos, Laisa Liana; Cavalcanti, Rebeca Graça Costa; Asad, Nasser Ribeiro; Marin, Pedro Jesus; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: Whole body vibration (WBV) exercise has been used in health sciences. Authors have reported that changes on the concentration of plasma biomarkers could be associated with the WBV effects. The aim of this investigation is to assess the consequences of exposition of 25 Hz mechanical vibration generated in oscillating/vibratory platform (OVP) on the concentration of some plasma biomarkers and on the weight of rats. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were divided into two groups. The animals of the Experimental Group (EG) were submitted to vibration (25 Hz) generated in an OVP with four bouts of 30 seconds with rest time of 60 seconds between the bouts. This procedure was performed daily for 12 days. The animals of the control group (CG) were not exposed to vibration. Results: Our findings show that the WBV exercise at 25 Hz was not capable to alter significantly (p<0.05) the weight of the rats. A significant alteration in the concentrations of amylase was found. Conclusion: Our results indicate a modulation of the WBV exercise with vibration of 25 Hz of frequency (i) in the pathways related to the weight and (ii) in the concentration of some biomarkers, such as amylase. PMID:28740944

  12. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL VIBRATION GENERATED IN OSCILLATING/VIBRATORY PLATFORM ON THE CONCENTRATION OF PLASMA BIOMARKERS AND ON THE WEIGHT IN RATS.

    PubMed

    Frederico, Éric Heleno Freire Ferreira; de Sá-Caputo, Danúbia da Cunha; Moreira-Marconi, Eloá; Guimarães, Carlos Alberto Sampaio; Cardoso, André Luiz Bandeira Dionísio; Dionello, Carla da Fontoura; Morel, Danielle Soares; Sousa-Gonçalves, Cintia Renata; Paineiras-Domingos, Laisa Liana; Cavalcanti, Rebeca Graça Costa; Asad, Nasser Ribeiro; Marin, Pedro Jesus; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) exercise has been used in health sciences. Authors have reported that changes on the concentration of plasma biomarkers could be associated with the WBV effects. The aim of this investigation is to assess the consequences of exposition of 25 Hz mechanical vibration generated in oscillating/vibratory platform (OVP) on the concentration of some plasma biomarkers and on the weight of rats. Wistar rats were divided into two groups. The animals of the Experimental Group (EG) were submitted to vibration (25 Hz) generated in an OVP with four bouts of 30 seconds with rest time of 60 seconds between the bouts. This procedure was performed daily for 12 days. The animals of the control group (CG) were not exposed to vibration. Our findings show that the WBV exercise at 25 Hz was not capable to alter significantly (p<0.05) the weight of the rats. A significant alteration in the concentrations of amylase was found. Our results indicate a modulation of the WBV exercise with vibration of 25 Hz of frequency (i) in the pathways related to the weight and (ii) in the concentration of some biomarkers, such as amylase.

  13. Power links with Ireland -- Excitation of turbine-generator shaft torsional vibrations by variable frequency currents superimposed on DC currents in asynchronous HVDC links

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J.; Tay, B.W.; Kok, K.L.

    1995-08-01

    The paper describes an in-depth analysis of excitation of shaft torsional vibrations in steam-turbine-generator-exciter shafts in close proximity to HVDC converter stations by variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC currents in asynchronous Links. It extends earlier work to include an in depth analysis of system scaling factors for harmonic currents impressed on generators in Northern Ireland by an inverter and to investigate the phenomena for possible torsional vibrations in the generators by the Link. Frequencies at which shaft torsional vibrations would be excited by modulation product harmonics in 50Hz/50Hz asynchronous Links as a function of deviation in system frequency is reviewed. Relative noncharacteristic current levels for 50Hz/50Hz connectors are illustrated assuming ripple currents at the inverter which gives realistic harmonic voltages in a twelve-pulse bridge. The paper then shows that torques in machines in multi-machine networks may be estimated by proportioning HVDC link harmonic disturbance current appropriately to each machine at risk. It is concluded that variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC current in asynchronous links can excite sympathetic torsional vibrations in turbine-generator-exciter shafts.

  14. A narrow amide I vibrational band observed by sum frequency generation spectroscopy reveals highly ordered structures of a biofilm protein at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuguang; Morales-Acosta, M Daniela; Li, Shanghao; Liu, Wei; Kanai, Tapan; Liu, Yuting; Chen, Ya-Na; Walker, Frederick J; Ahn, Charles H; Leblanc, Roger M; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2016-02-18

    We characterized BslA, a bacterial biofilm protein, at the air/water interface using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and observed one of the sharpest amide I bands ever reported. Combining methods of surface pressure measurements, thin film X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, we showed extremely ordered BslA at the interface.

  15. Vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopic study of crystalline cellulose in biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong H.; Lee, Christopher M.; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Yong Bum; Xi, Xiaoning

    2013-09-01

    The noncentrosymmetry requirement of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy allows selective detection of crystalline cellulose in plant cell walls and lignocellulose biomass without spectral interferences from hemicelluloses and lignin. In addition, the phase synchronization requirement of the SFG process allows noninvasive investigation of spatial arrangement of crystalline cellulose microfibrils in the sample. This paper reviews how these principles are applied to reveal structural information of crystalline cellulose in plant cell walls and biomass.

  16. Tube vibration in a half-scale sector model of a helical tube steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Wambsganss, M. W.

    1983-12-01

    This paper presents the experimental technique and results of tests on a half-scale sector model of a steam generator helical coil tube bank. A series of tests was performed: (1) bench tests of a single helical tube in air; (2) tests of the sector model in air; (3) tests of the sector model in stationary water to determine natural frequencies and damping; (4) tests in flow. The experimental results reveal the general characteristics of the sector model and provide the information for the design evaluation of a helical tube array to avoid detrimental fluidelastic instability.

  17. Molecular interactions of proteins and peptides at interfaces studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuwei; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2012-01-31

    Interfacial peptides and proteins are critical in many biological processes and thus are of interest to various research fields. To study these processes, surface sensitive techniques are required to completely describe different interfacial interactions intrinsic to many complicated processes. Sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been developed into a powerful tool to investigate these interactions and mechanisms of a variety of interfacial peptides and proteins. It has been shown that SFG has intrinsic surface sensitivity and the ability to acquire conformation, orientation, and ordering information about these systems. This paper reviews recent studies on peptide/protein-substrate interactions, peptide/protein-membrane interactions, and protein complexes at interfaces and demonstrates the ability of SFG on unveiling the molecular pictures of complicated interfacial biological processes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Orientation determination of interfacial bent α-helical structures using Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan

    2015-02-01

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) has been shown to be a powerful and versatile technique in studies of proteins/peptides at surfaces and interfaces. Recently SFG was successfully applied in studies of interfacial macro-molecules with increasing size and complexity. In this report we continued to employ bond additivity model and group theory to demonstrate the importance of both the inter-helical tilt angle and the lengths of the helical segments assembling the structures being studies. Specifically, a newly improved SFG data analysis of multiple α-helical structures on melittin was used to interpret the SFG experimental observation and also verified the findings with the recent insights brought by other spectroscopic techniques.

  19. Photodissociation yield spectroscopy of vinyl bromide cation generated by mass-analyzed threshold ionization: Vibrational spectroscopy and decay dynamics in the B ˜ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mina; Kim, Myung Soo

    2007-04-01

    A new technique [mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI)-photodissociation yield spectroscopy] to probe bound excited states of a cation was developed, which measures photodissociation yield of the cation generated by mass-analyzed threshold ionization. A vibrational spectrum of vinyl bromide cation in the B ˜ state was obtained using this technique. Optical resolution in the low vibrational energy range of the spectrum was far better than in conventional MATI spectra. The origin of the B ˜ state was found at 2.2578±0.0003eV above the first ionization onset. Almost complete vibrational assignment was possible for peaks appearing in the spectrum. Analysis of time-of-flight profiles of C2H3+ product ion obtained with different laser polarization angles suggested that photoexcited vinyl bromide cation remained in the B ˜ state for several hundred picoseconds prior to internal conversion to the ground state and dissociation therein.

  20. Accurate line shapes from sub-1 cm(-1) resolution sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of α-pinene at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, Amanda L; Velarde, Luis; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian T; Negre, Christian F A; Ebben, Carlena J; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin L; Thomson, Regan J; Batista, Victor S; Wang, Hong-Fei; Geiger, Franz M

    2015-02-26

    Despite the importance of terpenes in biology, the environment, and catalysis, their vibrational spectra remain unassigned. Here, we present subwavenumber high-resolution broad-band sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene that reveal 10 peaks in the C-H stretching region at room temperature. The high spectral resolution resulted in spectra with more and better resolved spectral features than those of the Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra in the bulk condensed phase and those of the conventional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule on a surface. Experiment and simulation show the spectral line shapes with HR-BB-SFG to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 ps are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations. Phase-resolved spectra provided their orientational information. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time domain vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules at molecular surfaces or interfaces.

  1. Vibrational Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy at the Water/Lipid Interface: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuki; Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-01-01

    The sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectrum from the water/[1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine] (DMPC) interface in the OH stretching mode region of water is simulated and shows three spectral peaks which are assigned to different environment. The weak 3590cm−1 peak is attributed to a few water molecules coupled to the glycerol backbone of DMCP. The 3470cm−1 feature comes from the top water layer adjacent to the hydrophilic head-group of DMPC. The 3290cm−1 peak arises from the near-bulk water nonadjacent to DMPC. The stretching mode corresponding to the 3290cm−1 peak is strongly coupled with the neighboring water molecules. In contrast, the 3470cm−1 mode is decoupled from the surrounding water molecules, and the orientation of water is governed by DMPC. This decoupling explains the slow relaxation dynamics of water measured in the time-resolved SFG experiment. Despite the similarity of the SFG spectra, the peak origins of water/lipid and water/vapor interfaces are different. PMID:20394423

  2. In Situ Potentiodynamic Analysis of the Electrolyte/Silicon Electrodes Interface Reactions - A Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Han, Hui-Ling; Ross, Philip N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2015-12-11

    The key factor in long-term use of batteries is the formation of an electrically insulating solid layer that allows lithium ion transport but stops further electrolyte redox reactions on the electrode surface, hence solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). In this paper, we have studied a common electrolyte, 1.0 M LiPF6/ethylene carbonate (EC)/diethyl carbonate (DEC), reduction products on crystalline silicon (Si) electrodes in a lithium (Li) half-cell system under reaction conditions. We employed in situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) with interface sensitivity in order to probe the molecular composition of the SEI surface species under various applied potentials where electrolyte reduction is expected. We found that, with a Si(100)-hydrogen terminated wafer, a Si-ethoxy (Si-OC2H5) surface intermediate forms due to DEC decomposition. Our results suggest that the SEI surface composition varies depending on the termination of Si surface, i.e., the acidity of the Si surface. We provide the evidence of specific chemical composition of the SEI on the anode surface under reaction conditions. This supports an electrochemical electrolyte reduction mechanism in which the reduction of the DEC molecule to an ethoxy moiety plays a key role. Finally, these findings shed new light on the formation mechanism of SEI on Si anodes in particular and on SEI formation in general.

  3. In Situ Potentiodynamic Analysis of the Electrolyte/Silicon Electrodes Interface Reactions - A Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Han, Hui-Ling; Ross, Philip N.; ...

    2015-12-11

    The key factor in long-term use of batteries is the formation of an electrically insulating solid layer that allows lithium ion transport but stops further electrolyte redox reactions on the electrode surface, hence solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). In this paper, we have studied a common electrolyte, 1.0 M LiPF6/ethylene carbonate (EC)/diethyl carbonate (DEC), reduction products on crystalline silicon (Si) electrodes in a lithium (Li) half-cell system under reaction conditions. We employed in situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) with interface sensitivity in order to probe the molecular composition of the SEI surface species under various applied potentials where electrolytemore » reduction is expected. We found that, with a Si(100)-hydrogen terminated wafer, a Si-ethoxy (Si-OC2H5) surface intermediate forms due to DEC decomposition. Our results suggest that the SEI surface composition varies depending on the termination of Si surface, i.e., the acidity of the Si surface. We provide the evidence of specific chemical composition of the SEI on the anode surface under reaction conditions. This supports an electrochemical electrolyte reduction mechanism in which the reduction of the DEC molecule to an ethoxy moiety plays a key role. Finally, these findings shed new light on the formation mechanism of SEI on Si anodes in particular and on SEI formation in general.« less

  4. New Insights from Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy into the Interactions of Islet Amyloid Polypeptides with Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Batista, Victor S.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of amyloid polypeptides on membrane surfaces have gained increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have revealed that membranes can catalyze protein aggregation and that the early products of amyloid aggregation can disrupt membrane integrity, increasing water permeability and inducing ion cytotoxicity. Nonetheless, probing aggregation of amyloid proteins on membrane surfaces is challenging. Surface-specific methods are required to discriminate contributions of aggregates at the membrane interface from those in the bulk phase and to characterize protein secondary structures in situ and in real time without the use of perturbing spectroscopic labels. Here, we review the most recent applications of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy applied in conjunction with computational modeling techniques, a joint experimental and computational methodology that has provided valuable insights into the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) on membrane surfaces. These applications show that SFG can provide detailed information about structures, kinetics, and orientation of IAPP during interfacial aggregation, relevant to the molecular mechanisms of type II diabetes. These recent advances demonstrate the promise of SFG as a new approach for studying amyloid diseases at the molecular level and for the rational drug design targeting early aggregation products on membrane surfaces. PMID:26697504

  5. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  6. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, David J.; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  7. Multimodal Broadband Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation (MM-BB-V-SFG) Spectrometer and Microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Huang, Shixin; Kim, Seong H

    2016-01-14

    A broadband sum frequency generation (BB-SFG) spectrometer with multimodal (MM) capabilities was constructed, which could be routinely reconfigured for tabletop experiments in reflection, transmission, and total internal reflection (TIR) geometries, as well as microscopic imaging. The system was constructed using a Ti:sapphire amplifier (800 nm, pulse width = 85 fs, repetition rate = 2 kHz), an optical parameter amplification (OPA) system for production of broadband IR pulses tunable between 1000 and 4000 cm(-1), and two Fabry-Pérot etalons arranged in series for production of narrowband 800 nm pulses. The key feature allowing the MM operation was the nearly collinear alignment of the visible (fixed, 800 nm) and infrared (tunable, 1000-4000 cm(-1)) pulses which were spatially separated. Physical insights discussed in this paper include the comparison of spectral bandwidth produced with 40 and 85 fs pump beams, the improvement of spectral resolution using etalons, the SFG probe volume in bulk analysis, the normalization of SFG signals, the stitching of multiple spectral segments, and the operation in different modes for air/liquid and adsorbate/solid interfaces, bulk samples, as well as spectral imaging combined with principle component analysis (PCA). The SFG spectral features obtained with the MM-BB-SFG system were compared with those obtained with picosecond-scanning-SFG system and high-resolution BB-SFG system (HR-BB-SFG) for dimethyl sulfoxide, α-pinene, and various samples containing cellulose (purified commercial products, Cladophora cell wall, cotton and flax fibers, and onion epidermis cell wall).

  8. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shunli; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-01-21

    In this report we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm-1 resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (HR-BB-SFG-VS) of the –CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4’-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows for the first time the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral lineshapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity SFG-VS spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt lineshape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall lineshape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ±0.02 cm-1 peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm-1 and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm-1, respectively, for the –CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm-1 agrees quantitatively with a Voigt lineshape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm-1 and a inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm-1. These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the lineshapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  9. Vibrational sum-frequency generation activity of a 2,4-dinitrophenyl phospholipid hybrid bilayer: retrieving orientational parameters from a DFT analysis of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Lis, Dan; Guthmuller, Julien; Champagne, Benoît; Humbert, Christophe; Busson, Bertrand; Peremans, André; Cecchet, Francesca

    2013-04-15

    The vibrational nonlinear activity of films of 2,4-dinitrophenyl phospholipid (DNP) at the solid interface is measured by sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG). Hybrid bilayers are formed by a Langmuir-Schaefer approach in which the lipid layer is physisorbed on top of a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol on Pt with the polar heads pointing out from the surface. The SFG response is investigated in two vibrational frequency domains, namely, 3050-2750 and 1375-1240 cm(-1). The first region probes the CH stretching modes of DNP films, and the latter explores the vibrational nonlinear activity of the 2,4-dinitroaniline moiety of the polar head of the lipid. Analysis of the CH stretching vibrations suggests substantial conformational order of the aliphatic chains with only a few gauche defects. To reliably assign the detected SFG signals to specific molecular vibrations, DFT calculations of the IR and Raman activities of molecular models are performed and compared to experimental solid-state spectra. This allows unambiguous assignment of the observed SFG vibrations to molecular modes localized on the 2,4-dinitroaniline moiety of the polar head of DNP. Then, SFG spectra of DNP in the 1375-1240 cm(-1) frequency range are simulated and compared with experimental ones, and thus the 1,4-axis of the 2,4-dinitrophenyl head is estimated to have tilt and rotation angles of 45±5° and 0±30°, respectively. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Simulation study on nitrogen vibrational and translational temperature in air breakdown plasma generated by 110 GHz focused microwave pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    We report a simulation study on nitrogen vibrational and translational temperature in 3 μs pulse 110 GHz microwave air breakdown at pressure from 1 Torr to 100 Torr. The one-dimensional model is based on a self-consistent solution to Helmholtz equation for microwave field, electron density equation, and the average energy equation for electrons, nitrogen vibrational, and translational degrees. The breakdown threshold is calculated from the transmitted microwave profile, and it agrees well with that from experiment. The spatio-temporal characteristics of vibrational and translational temperature are shown, and the peak values at the end of pulse are compared to the results fitted from optical emission spectroscopy. The dependences of vibrational and translational temperature on normalized microwave fields and gas pressure are investigated, and the underlying mechanisms are unveiled.

  11. Experimental determination of lateral vibration of the 708 MVA Westinghouse vertical hydro generators at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.L.

    1981-09-01

    The damped rotor bearing system of large vertical shaft systems presents special problems for high speed storage installations. The results of the first test of its kind have given experimental data contributing to this technology. Synchronous and non-synchronous vibrations were found to contribute to runout loading. Measurements on the pivot pad hydrodynamic bearings gave stiffness characteristics. Measurements showed that balancing the rotor reduced vibration levels. 1 ref.

  12. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kweskin, Sasha Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non

  13. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  14. Interfacial properties of avian stratum corneum monolayers investigated by Brewster angle microscopy and vibrational sum frequency generation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ellen M; Champagne, Alex M; Williams, Joseph B; Allen, Heather C

    2017-08-12

    The outermost layer of skin, the stratum corneum (SC), contains a complex mixture of lipids, which controls the rate of cutaneous water loss (CWL) in reptiles, mammals, and birds. However, the molecular structure of SC lipids and how molecular configurations influence CWL is poorly understood. Here, the organization and structure of SC lipids extracted from birds were investigated by means of Langmuir films. Properties of lipids from the SC of arid and semi-arid adapted larks, known to have a low CWL, were compared with lipids extracted from the SC of mesic lark species with higher CWL to gain insight into how structure impacts CWL. Film properties were probed with surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG). Results indicate organization and ordering of SC lipids in the arid-adapted hoopoe lark was vastly different from all other species, forming a miscible, rigid monolayer, whereas monolayers from semi-arid and mesic species were immiscible and disordered. Probing of interfacial water structure reveals that film morphology determines organization of water molecules near the monolayer; monolayers with a porous morphology had an increased population of water molecules that are weakly hydrogen-bonded. In general, CWL appears related to the miscibility and ordering of lipid components within the SC, as well as the ability of these lipids to interact with water molecules. From a broader perspective, CWL in larks appears linked to both the SC lipid composition and the aridity of the species' environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Theoretical Investigation of C-H Vibrational Spectroscopy. 2. Unified Assignment Method of IR, Raman, and Sum Frequency Generation Spectra of Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2017-09-14

    Using the flexible and polarizable model in the preceding paper, we performed comprehensive analysis of C-H stretching vibrations of ethanol and partially deuterated ones by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The overlapping band structures of the C-H stretching region including (i) methyl and methylene, (ii) the number of modes with Fermi resonances, and (iii) different trans/gauche conformers are disentangled by various analysis methods, such as isotope exchange, empirical potential parameter shift analysis, and separate calculations of conformers. The present analysis with MD simulation revealed unified assignment of infrared, Raman, and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra. The analysis confirmed that the different conformers have significant influence on the assignment of CH2 vibrations. Band components and their signs in the imaginary χ((2)) spectra of SFG under various polarizations are also understood from the common assignment with the infrared and Raman spectra.

  16. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  17. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  18. Unified treatment and measurement of the spectral resolution and temporal effects in frequency-resolved sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-14

    The emergence of sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BBSFG-VS) [Velarde et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 241102] has offered new opportunities in obtaining and understanding the spectral lineshape and temporal effects on the surface vibrational spectroscopy. Particularly, the high accuracy in the HR-BBSFG-VS spectral lineshape measurement provides detailed information on the complex coherent vibrational dynamics through spectral measurement. Here we present a unified formalism of the theoretical and experimental approaches for obtaining the accurate lineshape of the SFG response, and then present a analysis on the higher and lower spectral resolution SFG spectra as well as their temporal effects of the cholesterol molecules at the air/water interface. With the high spectral resolution and accurate lineshape, it is shown that the parameters from the sub-wavenumber resolution SFG spectra can be used not only to understand but also to quantitatively reproduce the temporal effects in the lower resolution SFG measurement. These not only provide a unified picture in understanding both the frequency-domain and the time-domain SFG response of the complex molecular interface, but also provide novel experimental approaches that can directly measure them.

  19. Effects of plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides on bacterial cellulose structure studied with vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Crystallinity and ordering were assessed as the intensity of SFG signals in the CH/CH2 stretch vibration region (and confirmed by XRD), while Iα content was assessed by the relative intensity of the OH stretch vibration at 3240 cm(-1). A key finding is that the presence of xyloglucan in the culture medium greatly reduced Iα allomorph content but with a relatively small effect on cellulose crystallinity, whereas xylan resulted in a larger decrease in crystallinity with a relatively small decrease in the Iα fraction. Arabinoxylan and various pectins had much weaker effects on cellulose structure as assessed by SFG and XRD. Homogalacturonan with calcium ion reduced the SFG signal, evidently by changing the ordering of cellulose microfibrils. We propose that the distinct effects of matrix polysaccharides on cellulose crystal structure result, at least in part, from selective interactions of the backbone and side chains of matrix polysaccharides with cellulose chains during the formation of the microfibril.

  20. The Decay of Quantum Turbulence Generated by a Vibrating Grid at Low Temperatures in Superfluid 3He-B

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Matthews, C. J.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Zaki, K.

    2006-09-07

    We describe measurements of the decay of quantum turbulence produced by a vibrating grid in superfluid 3He-B at low temperatures. Two nearby NbTi vibrating wire resonators at different distances from the grid are used to detect the turbulence via a reduction in the quasiparticle damping owing to Andreev reflection by the flow around the vortex lines. The decay time constant of this turbulence, after stopping the grid motion, is longer at the wire furthest from the grid. This suggests that either the tangle evolves and moves away from the grid once the grid motion has been stopped, or that there is a faster decay mechanism in operation close to the grid.

  1. Power-Generation Characteristics After Vibration and Thermal Stresses of Thermoelectric Unicouples with CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kwang Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok; Kim, Kyung-Hun; Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Lee, Soonil; Hwang, Hae Jin

    2015-06-01

    Reliability tests for thermoelectric unicouples were carried out to investigate the adhesion properties of CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces. The n-type In0.25 Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 and p-type In0.25Co3FeSb12 bulks were prepared for fabricating a thermoelectric unicouple (one p- n couple) by an induction melting and a spark plasma sintering process. Mo-Cu alloy was selected as an electrode for the unicouples due to its high melting temperature and proper work function value. Many thermoelectric unicouples with the CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces were fabricated with the proper brazing materials by means of a repeated firing process. Reliability of the unicouples with the interfaces was evaluated by a vibration test and a thermal cycling test. After the thermal cycling and vibration tests, the power-generation characteristics of the unicouples were compared with the unicouples before the tests. Even after the vibration test, electrical power with a power density of 0.5 W/cm2 was generated. The Ti-interlayer is considered as a possible candidate for making a reliable unicouple with high adhesion strength. With the thermal cycling test, the resistance of the unicouple increased and the electrical power from the unicouple decreased. A failure mode by the thermal cycling test was ascribed to a complex effect of micro-cracks originated from the thermal stress and oxidation problem of the thermoelectric materials; that is, a thick oxide layer more than 300 μm was detected after a high-temperature durability test of n-type In0.25Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 material at 773 K in air for 7 days.

  2. Extending the Local Mode Hamiltonian Into the Condensed Phase: Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation to Study the Benzene-Air Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Britta; Sibert, Edwin

    2017-06-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an important role in understanding many chemical process; they also contain molecular configurations and vibrations that are unique compared to those seen in the bulk and gas phases. Sum frequency generated (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy provides an incredibly detailed picture of these interfaces. In particular, the CH stretch region of the spectrum contains an extensive degree of information about the molecular vibrations and arrangements at the surface or interface. The presence of a strong bandwidth SFG signal for the benzene/air interface has generated controversy since it was discovered; since benzene is centrosymmetric, no SFG signal is expected. It has been hypothesized that this signal is primarily a result of bulk contributions that results from electric quadrupole transitions. Our work focuses on testing this conclusion by calculating a theoretical VSF spectrum from pure surface contributions using a mixed quantum/classical local mode Hamiltonian. We take as a starting point our local mode CH/OH stretch Hamiltonian, that was previously used to study alkylbenzenes, benzene-(H_2O)_n, and DPOE-water clusters, and extend it to the condensed phase by including shifts in the intensities and frequencies as a function of the environment. This environment is modeled using a SAPT-based force-field that accurately reproduces the quadrupole for the benzene dimer. A series of independent time-dependent trajectories are used to obtain an ensemble of surface configurations and calculate the appropriate correlation functions. These correlations functions allow us to determine the origins of the VSF signal. Our talk will focus on the challenges of extending our local mode Hamiltonian into the condensed phase.

  3. Experimental study on effect of micro textured surfaces generated by ultrasonic vibration assisted face turning on friction and wear performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, S.; Hosseinabadi, H. Nouri; Sajjady, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic vibration-assisted turning process (UVAT) is one of the effective methods in improving the tribological properties. In this research, the effect of different machining parameters such as cutting speed and feed rate as well as the effect of three vibration modes of one-dimensional (LVT), elliptical (EVT), and three-dimensional (3D-VT) on the tribological properties is examined. In order to validate the results of UVAT process, conventional face-turning operation was performed as well. Wear and friction tests were performed using pin-on-disk wear and friction machine with identical vertical load and sliding speed. The results of the tests show that the surfaces upon which micro-dimples have been created by UVAT processes reduce the average friction coefficient, wear rate and adhesion between pin and samples surface compared with conventional machined surfaces. Compared with conventional face-turning surfaces, average friction coefficient of the surfaces face-turned by LVT, EVT, and 3D-VT processes, show a maximum decrease of 13%, 18%, and 21% respectively. Moreover, compared with CT process, because of the unique features of UVAT process in creating micro-dimples, the contact between chrome steel pin and the sample surface decreases; this in turn leads to further reduction in wear rate for the processes of LVT, EVT, and 3D-VT respectively.

  4. 2D heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation study on the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of H{sub 2}O and HOD water at charged interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichi; Singh, Prashant C.; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectroscopy is applied to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of water at positively charged aqueous interfaces, and 2D HD-VSFG spectra of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/water interfaces in the whole hydrogen-bonded OH stretch region (3000 cm{sup −1} ≤ ω{sub pump} ≤ 3600 cm{sup −1}) are measured. 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/isotopically diluted water (HOD-D{sub 2}O) interface exhibits a diagonally elongated bleaching lobe immediately after excitation, which becomes round with a time constant of ∼0.3 ps due to spectral diffusion. In contrast, 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface at 0.0 ps clearly shows two diagonal peaks and their cross peaks in the bleaching region, corresponding to the double peaks observed at 3230 cm{sup −1} and 3420 cm{sup −1} in the steady-state HD-VSFG spectrum. Horizontal slices of the 2D spectrum show that the relative intensity of the two peaks of the bleaching at the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface gradually change with the change of the pump frequency. We simulate the pump-frequency dependence of the bleaching feature using a model that takes account of the Fermi resonance and inhomogeneity of the OH stretch vibration, and the simulated spectra reproduce the essential features of the 2D HD-VSFG spectra of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface. The present study demonstrates that heterodyne detection of the time-resolved VSFG is critically important for studying the ultrafast dynamics of water interfaces and for unveiling the underlying mechanism.

  5. Intrinsic chirality and prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-limonene interfaces: spectral signatures with interference chiral sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhe-Hao; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2014-09-01

    We report in this work detailed measurements of the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050 cm(-1)) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the RS racemic mixture (50/50 equal amount mixture), show that the corresponding molecular groups of the R and S enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit a spectral signature from the chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and a spectral signature from the prochiral response of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-(+)-limonene to S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and disappears for the RS racemic mixture surface. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and also surprisingly remains the same for the RS racemic mixture surface. Therefore, the structures of the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the liquid interfaces are nevertheless not mirror images to each other, even though the corresponding groups have the same tilt angle from the interfacial normal, i.e., the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the surface are diastereomeric instead of enantiomeric. These results provide detailed information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces and demonstrate the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as a unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  6. Vibrational Dynamics of Interfacial Water by Free Induction Decay Sum Frequency Generation (FID-SFG) at the Al2O3(1120)/H2O Interface.

    PubMed

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Borguet, Eric

    2014-02-06

    The dephasing dynamics of a vibrational coherence may reveal the interactions of chemical functional groups with their environment. To investigate this process at a surface, we employ free induction decay sum frequency generation (FID-SFG) to measure the time that it takes for free OH stretch oscillators at the charged (pH ≈ 13, KOH) interface of alumina/water (Al2O3/H2O) to lose their collective coherence. By employing noncollinear optical parametric amplification (NOPA) technology and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy, we showed that the single free OH peak actually corresponds to two distinct oscillators oriented opposite to each other and measured the total dephasing time, T2, of the free OH stretch modes at the Al2O3/H2O interface with a sub-40 fs temporal resolution. Our results suggested that the free OH oscillators associated with interfacial water dephase on the time scale of 89.4 ± 6.9 fs, whereas the homogeneous dephasing of interfacial alumina hydroxyls is an order of magnitude slower.

  7. A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide.

    PubMed

    York, Roger L; Holinga, George J; Guyer, Dean R; McCrea, Keith R; Ward, Robert S; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2008-09-01

    We describe a new optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that employs lithium thioindate, LiInS2 (LIS), to create tunable infrared light between 1500 cm(-1) and 2000 cm(-1). The OPA based on LIS described within provides intense infrared light with a good beam profile relative to similar OPAs built on silver gallium sulfide, AgGaS2 (AGS), or silver gallium selenide, AgGaSe2 (AGSe). We have used the new LIS OPA to perform surface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I vibrational mode of a model peptide at the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d8-PS)-phosphate buffered saline interface. This model polypeptide (which is known to be an alpha-helix in the bulk solution under the high ionic strength conditions employed here) contains hydrophobic leucyl (L) residues and hydrophilic lysyl (K) residues, with sequence Ac-LKKLLKLLKKLLKL-NH2. The amide I mode at the d8-PS-buffer interface was found to be centered around 1655 cm(-1). This can be interpreted as the peptide having maintained its alpha-helical structure when adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface, although other interpretations are discussed.

  8. A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the Amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide

    SciTech Connect

    York, Roger L.; Holinga, George J.; Guyer, Dean R.; McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-05-03

    We describe a new optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that employs lithium thioindate, LiInS{sub 2} (LIS), to create tunable infrared light between 1500 cm{sup -1} and 2000 cm{sup -1}. The OPA based on LIS described within provides intense infrared light with a good beam profile relative to similar OPAs built on silver gallium sulfide, AgGaS{sub 2} (AGS), or silver gallium selenide, AgGaSe{sub 2} (AGSe). We have used the new LIS OPA to perform surface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I vibrational mode of a model peptide at the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d{sub 8}-PS)-phosphate buffered saline interface. This model polypeptide (which is known to be an ?-helix in the bulk solution under the high ionic strength conditions employed here) contains hydrophobic leucyl (L) residues and hydrophilic lysyl (K) residues, with sequence Ac-LKKLLKLLKKLLKL-NH{sub 2}. The amide I mode at the d{sub 8}-PS-buffer interface was found to be centered around 1655 cm{sup -1}. This can be interpreted as the peptide having maintained its {alpha}-helical structure when adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface, although other interpretations are discussed.

  9. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for complex molecular surfaces and interfaces: Spectral lineshape measurement and analysis plus some controversial issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-12-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) was first developed in the 1980s and it has been proven a uniquely sensitive and surface/interface selective spectroscopic probe for characterization of the structure, conformation and dynamics of molecular surfaces and interfaces. In recent years, there has been significant progress in the development of methodology and instrumentation in the SFG-VS toolbox that has significantly broadened the application to complex molecular surfaces and interfaces. In this review, after presenting a unified view on the theory and methodology focusing on the SFG-VS spectral lineshape, as well as the new opportunities in SFG-VS applications with such developments, some of the controversial issues that have been puzzling the community are to be discussed. The aim of this review is to present to the researchers and students interested in molecular surfaces and interfacial sciences up-to-date perspectives complementary to the existing textbooks and reviews on SFG-VS.

  10. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for complex molecular surfaces and interfaces: Spectral lineshape measurement and analysis plus some controversial issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-12-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) was first developed in the 1980s and it has been proven a uniquely sensitive and surface/interface selective spectroscopic probe for characterization of the structure, conformation and dynamics of molecular surfaces and interfaces. In recent years, there have been many progresses in the development of methodology and instrumentation in the SFG-VS toolbox that have significantly broadened the application to complex molecular surfaces and interfaces. In this review, after presenting a unified view on the theory and methodology focusing on the SFG-VS spectral lineshape, as well as the new opportunities in SFG-VS applications with such developments, some of the controversial issues that have been puzzling the community are discussed. The aim of this review is to present to the researchers and students interested in molecular surfaces and interfacial sciences up-to-date perspectives complementary to the existing textbooks and reviews on SFG-VS.

  11. Novel SiO2-deposited CaF2 substrate for vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) measurements of chemisorbed monolayers in an aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Padermshoke, Adchara; Konishi, Shouta; Ara, Masato; Tada, Hirokazu; Ishibashi, Taka-Aki

    2012-06-01

    A novel SiO(2)-deposited CaF(2) (SiO(2)/CaF(2)) substrate for measuring vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectra of silane-based chemisorbed monolayers in aqueous media has been developed. The substrate is suitable for silanization and transparent over a broad range of the infrared (IR) probe. The present work demonstrates the practical application of the SiO(2)/CaF(2) substrate and, to our knowledge, the first SFG spectrum at the solid/water interface of a silanized monolayer observed over the IR fingerprint region (1780-1400 cm(-1)) using a back-side probing geometry. This new substrate can be very useful for SFG studies of various chemisorbed organic molecules, particularly biological compounds, in aqueous environments.

  12. Study of vibrations produced by a vibrating beam used for vibrating concretes. [and their transmission to human operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silas, C.; Brindeu, L.; Grosanu, I.; Cioara, T.

    1974-01-01

    For compacting concretes in building, vibrating beams are used. The vibrations are generated by inertial vibrators, and the beam is normally displaced by the operator by means of a handle that is elastically fastened to the beam by means of rubber pads. Considered are vibrations transmitted to the operator, taking into account the beam's shock vibration motions. The steady state motion of a dynamic beam pattern is studied, and results of experimental tests with existing equipment are presented.

  13. Development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2014-03-01

    The performance of high precision payloads on board a satellite is extremely sensitive to vibration. Although vibration environment of a satellite on orbit is very gentle compared to the launch environment, even a low amplitude vibration disturbances generated by reaction wheel assembly, cryocoolers, etc may cause serious problems in performing tasks such as capturing high resolution images. The most commonly taken approach to protect sensitive payloads from performance degrading vibration is application of vibration isolator. In this paper, development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration is discussed. Firstly, single axis vibration isolator is developed by adapting three parameter model using bellows and viscous fluid. The isolation performance of the developed single axis isolator is evaluated by measuring force transmissibility. The measured transmissibility shows that both the low Q-factor (about 2) and the high roll-off rate (about -40 dB/dec) are achieved with the developed isolator. Then, six single axis isolators are combined to form Stewart platform in cubic configuration to provide multi-axis vibration isolation. The isolation performance of the developed multi-axis isolator is evaluated using a simple prototype reaction wheel model in which wheel imbalance is the major source of vibration. The transmitted force without vibration isolator is measured and compared with the transmitted force with vibration isolator. More than 20 dB reduction of the X and Y direction (radial direction of flywheel) disturbance is observed for rotating wheel speed of 100 Hz and higher.

  14. Catalyzed hydrogenation of nitrogen and ethylene on metal (Fe, Pt) single crystal surfaces and effects of coadsorption: A sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Westerberg, Staffan Per Gustav

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure catalytic reactions and associated processes, such as adsorption have been studied on a molecular level on single crystal surfaces. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy together with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Gas Chromatography (GC) were used to investigate the nature of species on catalytic surfaces and to measure the catalytic reaction rates. Special attention has been directed at studying high-pressure reactions and in particular, ammonia synthesis in order to identify reaction intermediates and the influence of adsorbates on the surface during reaction conditions. The adsorption of gases N2, H2, O2 and NH3 that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH2 (~3325 cm-1) and NH (~3235 cm-1) under high pressure of ammonia (200 Torr) on the clean Fe(111) surface. Addition of 0.5 Torr of oxygen to 200 Torr of ammonia does not significantly change the bonding of dissociation intermediates to the surface. However, it leads to a phase change of nearly 180° between the resonant and non-resonant second order non-linear susceptibility of the surface, demonstrated by the reversal of the SFG spectral features. Heating the surface in the presence of 200 Torr ammonia and 0.5 Torr oxygen reduces the oxygen coverage, which can be seen from the SFG spectra as another relative phase change of 180°. The reduction of the oxide is also supported by Auger electron spectroscopy. The result suggests that the phase change of the spectral features could serve as a sensitive indicator of the chemical environment of the adsorbates.

  15. Observation of the interference between the intramolecular IR-visible and visible-IR processes in the doubly resonant sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G adsorbed at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Deng, Gang-Hua; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hong-fei

    2009-05-28

    Using the picosecond visible light at 532.1 nm and infrared light at 2800-3100 cm(-1), we observed the interference between the intramolecular IR-visible and visible-IR processes in the doubly resonant sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G adsorbed at the air/water interface. The interference phenomenon exists for both the C-H stretching vibrations in the 2800-3100 cm(-1) region and the skeleton vibrations in the 1450-1700 cm(-1) region. The relative strength of the visible-IR process at different wavelengths is the result of the electronic structure of the molecule. This is the first direct observation of the visible-IR sum frequency generation process in the electronically excited state of a model molecular system.

  16. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  17. The Role of Electrode-Catalyst Interactions in Enabling Efficient CO2 Reduction with Mo(bpy)(CO)4 As Revealed by Vibrational Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neri, Gaia; Donaldson, Paul M; Cowan, Alexander J

    2017-10-04

    Group 6 metal carbonyl complexes ([M(bpy)(CO)4], M = Cr, Mo, W) are potentially promising CO2 reduction electrocatalysts. However, catalytic activity onsets at prohibitively negative potentials and is highly dependent on the nature of the working electrode. Here we report in situ vibrational SFG (VSFG) measurements of the electrocatalyst [Mo(bpy)(CO)4] at platinum and gold electrodes. The greatly improved onset potential for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction at gold electrodes is due to the formation of the catalytically active species [Mo(bpy)(CO)3](2-) via a second pathway at more positive potentials, likely avoiding the need for the generation of [Mo(bpy)(CO)4](2-). VSFG studies demonstrate that the strength of the interaction between initially generated [Mo(bpy)(CO)4](•-) and the electrode is critical in enabling the formation of the active catalyst via the low energy pathway. By careful control of electrode material, solvent and electrolyte salt, it should therefore be possible to attain levels of activity with group 6 complexes equivalent to their much more widely studied group 7 analogues.

  18. Anomalous effective polarity of an air/liquid-mixture interface: a heterodyne-detected electronic and vibrational sum frequency generation study.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sudip Kumar; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-10-07

    We study the effective polarity of an air/liquid-mixture interface by using interface-selective heterodyne-detected electronic sum frequency generation (HD-ESFG) and vibrational sum frequency generation (HD-VSFG) spectroscopies. With water and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) chosen as two components of the liquid mixture, the bulk polarity of the mixture is controlled nearly arbitrarily by the mixing ratio. The effective polarity of the air/mixture interface is evaluated by HD-ESFG with a surface-active solvatochromic molecule used as a polarity indicator. Surprisingly, the interfacial effective polarity of the air/mixture interface increases significantly, when the bulk polarity of the mixture decreases (i.e. when the fraction of DMF increases). Judging from the hydrogen-bond structure at the air/mixture interface clarified by HD-VSFG, this anomalous change of the interfacial effective polarity is attributed to the interface-specific solvation structure around the indicator molecule at the air/mixture interface.

  19. Hydrogenation of the alpha,beta-Unsaturated Aldehydes Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde, and Prenal over Pt Single Crystals: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, C.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-11-26

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the surface reaction intermediates during the hydrogenation of three {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal, over Pt(111) at Torr pressures (1 Torr aldehyde, 100 Torr hydrogen) in the temperature range of 295K to 415K. SFG-VS data showed that acrolein has mixed adsorption species of {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-trans, {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-cis as well as highly coordinated {eta}{sub 3} or {eta}{sub 4} species. Crotonaldehyde adsorbed to Pt(111) as {eta}{sub 2} surface intermediates. SFG-VS during prenal hydrogenation also suggested the presence of the {eta}{sub 2} adsorption species, and became more highly coordinated as the temperature was raised to 415K, in agreement with its enhanced C=O hydrogenation. The effect of catalyst surface structure was clarified by carrying out the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over both Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals while acquiring the SFG-VS spectra in situ. Both the kinetics and SFG-VS showed little structure sensitivity. Pt(100) generated more decarbonylation 'cracking' product while Pt(111) had a higher selectivity for the formation of the desired unsaturated alcohol, crotylalcohol.

  20. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  1. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  2. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  3. Vibration isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on vibration isolation are presented. Techniques to control and isolate centrifuge disturbances were identified. Topics covered include: disturbance sources in the microgravity environment; microgravity assessment criteria; life sciences centrifuge; flight support equipment for launch; active vibration isolation system; active balancing system; and fuzzy logic control.

  4. Two dimensional spatial coherence of the natural vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle generated during voluntary contractions.

    PubMed

    Archer, Akibi; Sabra, Karim G

    2010-01-01

    Surface mechanomyograms (S-MMGs) are recorded from low frequency (〈100 Hz) mechanical oscillations that are naturally generated by skeletal muscle during voluntary contractions. This study investigates a method to determine the propagation directionality of the S-MMG waves. A 3×5 grid of skin mounted accelerometers was mounted on the biceps brachii muscle during submaximal voluntary contractions. This method resulted in findings that the propagation directionality of the S-MMGs are frequency dependent. At high frequencies (>25 Hz), high spatial coherence values were only measured for sensor pairs aligned along the proximal to distal (i.e. longitudinal) orientation, thus indicating that coherent S-MMG were mainly propagating along the muscle fibers direction of the biceps brachii at those frequencies. On the other hand, at lower frequencies (〈25 Hz), the S-MMG spatial coherence values did not exhibit a specific directionality. This method provides results that have an important implication of finding the average phase velocity of the propagating S-MMG wave, which can be used to determine viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles.

  5. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-01-01

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  6. Studies of Heterogeneously Catalyzed Liquid-Phase Alcohol Oxidation on Platinum bySum-frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Reaction Rate Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Christopher

    2014-05-15

    Compared to many branches of chemistry, the molecular level study of catalytically active surfaces is young. Only with the invention of ultrahigh vacuum technology in the past half century has it been possible to carry out experiments that yield useful molecular information about the reactive occurrences at a surface. The reason is two-fold: low pressure is necessary to keep a surface clean for an amount of time long enough to perform an experiment, and most atomic scale techniques that are surface speci c (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, etc.) cannot be used at ambient pressures, because electrons, which act as chemical probes in these techniques, are easily scattered by molecules. Sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is one technique that can provide molecular level information from the surface without the necessity for high vacuum. Since the advent of SFG as a surface spectroscopic tool it has proved its worth in the studies of surface catalyzed reactions in the gas phase, with numerous reactions in the gas phase having been investigated on a multitude of surfaces. However, in situ SFG characterization of catalysis at the solid-liquid interface has yet to be thoroughly pursued despite the broad interest in the use of heterogeneous catalysts in the liquid phase as replacements for homogeneous counterparts. This work describes an attempt to move in that direction, applying SFG to study the solid-liquid interface under conditions of catalytic alcohol oxidation on platinum.

  7. Dependence of antimicrobial selectivity and potency on oligomer structure investigated using substrate supported lipid bilayers and sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Avery, Christopher W; Som, Abhigyan; Xu, Yongjiang; Tew, Gregory N; Chen, Zhan

    2009-10-15

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study interactions between solid-supported lipid bilayers mimicking microbial and erythrocyte cellular membranes and synthetic antimicrobial arylamide oligomers named 2, 3, and 4, designed with the facial amphiphilicity common to naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. The three compounds have the same backbone structure but varied side chains. The inherent interfacial sensitivity of SFG allowed for simultaneous monitoring of lipid ordering in the individual bilayer leaflets and orientation of 2, 3, and 4 upon interaction with the bilayer. Critical concentrations at which the inner leaflet is disrupted were determined for each oligomer. Spectral evidence of the oligomers' interaction with the bilayer below the critical concentrations was also found. Oligomers 2 and 3 tilted toward the bilayer surface normal, in agreement with previous experimental and simulation results. These oligomers selectively interact with microbial membrane models over erythrocyte membrane models, correlating well to previously published SFG studies on antimicrobial oligomer 1. It was shown that the oligomers interact with the lipid bilayers differently, indicating their different activity and selectivity. This research further shows that SFG is a particularly useful technique for the investigation of interaction mechanisms between cell membranes and membrane-active molecules. Additionally, SFG provides details of the specific interactions between these novel antimicrobials and lipid bilayers.

  8. Experimental evidence for an optical interference model for vibrational sum frequency generation on multilayer organic thin film systems. I. Electric dipole approximation.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel B; Massari, Aaron M

    2015-01-14

    In the field of vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFG) applied to organic thin film systems, a significant challenge to data analysis is in the accurate description of optical interference effects. Herein, we provide experimental evidence that a model recently developed in our lab provides an accurate description of this phenomenon. We studied the organic small molecule N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide vapor deposited as a thickness gradient on silicon wafer substrates with two oxide thicknesses and two surface preps. VSFG data were obtained using the ssp and the sps polarization combinations in the imide carbonyl stretching region as a function of organic thickness. In this first of two reports, the data are modeled and interpreted within the ubiquitous electric dipole approximation for VSFG. The intrinsic sample responses are parameterized during the fitting routines while optical interference effects are simply calculated from the model using known refractive indices, thin film thicknesses, and beam angles. The results indicate that the thin film model provides a good description of optical interferences, indicating that interfacial terms are significant. Inconsistencies between the fitting results within the bounds of the electric dipole response motivate deliberation for additional effects to be considered in the second report.

  9. Experimental evidence for an optical interference model for vibrational sum frequency generation on multilayer organic thin film systems. II. Consideration for higher order terms.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel B; Massari, Aaron M

    2015-01-14

    The generalized optical interference model for interfacial contributions to vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopic signals from organic thin film systems is extended to include a description of optical interferences contained in the thin film bulk response. This is based on electric quadrupolar interactions with the input fields and includes a discussion on possible contribution from the electric quadrupolar polarization. VSFG data from the first of this two part report are analyzed and include effects from higher order responses, for both bulk and higher order interfacial terms. The results indicate that although it is capable of capturing many of the data features, the electric dipole treatment is likely not a complete description of the VSFG intensity data from this system. An analysis based on the signs of the resulting response amplitudes is used to deduce the relative magnitude of the electric dipole and higher order interfacial terms. It is found that the buried interface is closer to satisfying the electric dipole approximation, consistent with smaller field gradients due to closer index matching between the organic thin film and substrate relative to air. The procedure outlined in this work allows for the difficult task of deducing a physical picture of average molecular orientation at the buried interface of a multilayer organic thin film system while including higher order effects.

  10. Experimental evidence for an optical interference model for vibrational sum frequency generation on multilayer organic thin film systems. I. Electric dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    O’Brien, Daniel B.; Massari, Aaron M.

    2015-01-14

    In the field of vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFG) applied to organic thin film systems, a significant challenge to data analysis is in the accurate description of optical interference effects. Herein, we provide experimental evidence that a model recently developed in our lab provides an accurate description of this phenomenon. We studied the organic small molecule N,N′-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide vapor deposited as a thickness gradient on silicon wafer substrates with two oxide thicknesses and two surface preps. VSFG data were obtained using the ssp and the sps polarization combinations in the imide carbonyl stretching region as a function of organic thickness. In this first of two reports, the data are modeled and interpreted within the ubiquitous electric dipole approximation for VSFG. The intrinsic sample responses are parameterized during the fitting routines while optical interference effects are simply calculated from the model using known refractive indices, thin film thicknesses, and beam angles. The results indicate that the thin film model provides a good description of optical interferences, indicating that interfacial terms are significant. Inconsistencies between the fitting results within the bounds of the electric dipole response motivate deliberation for additional effects to be considered in the second report.

  11. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  12. Probing crystal structure and mesoscale assembly of cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls, tunicate tests, and bacterial films using vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Yong Bum; Kim, Seong H

    2014-06-14

    This study reports that the noncentrosymmetry and phase synchronization requirements of the sum frequency generation (SFG) process can be used to distinguish the three-dimensional organization of crystalline cellulose distributed in amorphous matrices. Crystalline cellulose is produced as microfibrils with a few nanometer diameters by plants, tunicates, and bacteria. Crystalline cellulose microfibrils are embedded in wall matrix polymers and assembled into hierarchical structures that are precisely designed for specific biological and mechanical functions. The cellulose microfibril assemblies inside cell walls are extremely difficult to probe. The comparison of vibrational SFG spectra of uniaxially-aligned and disordered films of cellulose Iβ nanocrystals revealed that the spectral features cannot be fully explained with the crystallographic unit structure of cellulose. The overall SFG intensity, the alkyl peak shape, and the alkyl/hydroxyl intensity ratio are sensitive to the lateral packing and net directionality of the cellulose microfibrils within the SFG coherence length scale. It was also found that the OH SFG stretch peaks could be deconvoluted to find the polymorphic crystal structures of cellulose (Iα and Iβ). These findings were used to investigate the cellulose crystal structure and mesoscale cellulose microfibril packing in intact plant cell walls, tunicate tests, and bacterial films.

  13. Fluorinated End-Groups in Electrolytes Induce Ordered Electrolyte/Anode Interface Even at Open-Circuit Potential as Revealed by Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Han, Hui-Ling; Ralston, Walter T.; ...

    2017-05-12

    Fluorine-based additives have a tremendously beneficial effect on the performance of lithium-ion batteries, yet the origin of this phenomenon is unclear. This study shows that the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the anode surface in the first five charge/discharge cycles is affected by the stereochemistry of the electrolyte molecules on the anode surface starting at open-circuit potential (OCP). This study shows an anode-specific model system, the reduction of 1,2-diethoxy ethane with lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, as a salt on an amorphous silicon anode, and compares the electrochemical response and SEI formation to its fluorinated version, bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy) ethane (BTFEOE), by summore » frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions. The SFG results suggest that the —CF3 end-groups of the linear ether BTFEOE change their adsorption orientation on the a-Si surface at OCP, leading to a better protective layer. Finally, supporting evidence from ex situ scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling measurements shows that the fluorinated ether, BTFEOE, yields a smooth SEI on the a-Si surface and enables lithium ions to intercalate deeper into the a-Si bulk.« less

  14. Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ankur; SenGupta, Sumana; Kumar, Awadhesh; Choudhury, Sipra; Naik, Prakash D.

    2016-08-01

    The structure and orientation of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate [PF3(C2F5)3], commonly known as [bmim][fap], have been investigated at the air-[bmim][fap] and air-water interfaces, employing vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. The VSFG spectra in the CH stretch region suggest presence of the [bmim] cation at the interfaces. Studies reveal that the butyl chain protrudes out into air, and the imidazolium ring lies almost planar to the interface. The CH stretch intensities get enhanced at the air-water interface, mainly because of polar orientation of imidazolium cation induced by interfacial water molecules. The OH stretch intensities are also enhanced at the air-water interface due to polar orientation of interfacial water molecules induced by [bmim][fap]. The Brewster angle microscopy suggests self aggregation of [bmim][fap] in the presence of water, and the aggregation becomes extensive showing dense surface domains with time. However, the surface pressure is almost unaffected due to aggregation.

  15. Entropically mediated polyolefin blend segregation at buried sapphire and air interfaces investigated by infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kweskin, S J; Komvopoulos, K; Somorjai, G A

    2005-12-15

    The segregation behavior of binary polymer blends at hydrophilic solid sapphire and air interfaces was investigated by infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. SFG spectra were collected from a bulk miscible blend consisting of identical molecular weight (approximately 54,000) and similar surface free energy (29-35 dyn/cm) components of atactic polypropylene (aPP) and aspecific poly(ethylene-co-propylene) rubber (aEPR). Characteristic CH resonances of the blend were contrasted with those of the individual components at both buried (sapphire/polymer) and free (air/polymer) interfaces. Preferential segregation of the aPP component was observed after annealing at both air/polymer and sapphire/polymer interfaces. SFG spectra revealed ordering of the polymer backbone segments with the methylene (CH2) groups perpendicular to the surface at the sapphire interface and the methyl (CH3) groups upright at the air interface. The SFG results indicate that the surface composition can be determined from the peak intensities that are characteristic of each component and that conformational entropy played a likely role in surface segregation. aPP occupied a smaller free volume at the surface because of a statistically smaller segment length (aPP is more flexible and has a shorter length). In addition, the high density of the ordered CH3 side branches enhanced the surface activity by allowing the long-chain backbone segments of aPP to order at the surface.

  16. Probing water and biomolecules at the air-water interface with a broad bandwidth vibrational sum frequency generation spectrometer from 3800 to 900 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Liu, Jian; Fu, Li; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2009-05-01

    We have built a broad bandwidth vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectrometer that can provide high-quality spectra over the range of 3800 to 900 cm(-1). The spectrometer contains a commercial Ti:sapphire based 6 W regenerative amplifier as the master light source, a home-built pulse shaper to produce a narrow bandwidth 800 nm beam, a commercial optical parametric amplifier to generate a broad bandwidth femtosecond infrared (IR) pulse, and a detection system with a monochromator and a charge-coupled device (CCD). We applied this spectrometer to obtain VSFG spectra of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface in the O-H stretching region (3800-3000 cm(-1)), the C-H stretching region (3100-2700 cm(-1)), the C-D stretching region (2300-2000 cm(-1)), the C=O stretching region (1800-1700 cm(-1)), and the PO(2)(-) symmetric stretching region (1200-1000 cm(-1)). We also obtained the VSFG spectrum of neat water in the O-H stretching region (3800-3000 cm(-1)) and the VSFG spectrum of a protein, alpha-synuclein, in the amide I region (1700-1600 cm(-1)) at the air-water interface. The spectrometer can provide a VSFG spectrum in the O-H stretching region (3800-3000 cm(-1)) without scanning the IR frequency. This feature will be useful in probing water dynamics at interfaces because the free OH and H-bonded OH can be investigated simultaneously. We have also provided instrumental details and discussed further improvements that should be beneficial to other researchers interested in setting up VSFG instrumentation.

  17. Vibrational Diver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Victor; Ivanova, Alevtina; Schipitsyn, Vitalii; Stambouli, Moncef

    2014-10-01

    The paper is concerned with dynamics of light solid in cavity with liquid subjected to rotational vibration in the external force field. New vibrational phenomenon - diving of a light cylinder to the cavity bottom is found. The experimental investigation of a horizontal annulus with a partition has shown that under vibration a light body situated in the upper part of the layer is displaced in a threshold manner some distance away from the boundary. In this case the body executes symmetric tangential oscillations. An increase of the vibration intensity leads to a tangential displacement of the body near the external boundary. This displacement is caused by the tangential component of the vibrational lift force, which appears as soon as the oscillations lose symmetry. In this case the trajectory of the body oscillatory motion has the form of a loop. The tangential lift force makes stable the position of the body on the inclined section of the layer and even in its lower part. A theoretical interpretation has been proposed, which explains stabilization of a quasi-equilibrium state of a light body near the cavity bottom in the framework of vibrational hydromechanics.

  18. Validation of Spectra and Phase in Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy through Internal Heterodyne Phase-Resolved Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Chen, Shunli; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-03-03

    Reliably determination of the spectral features and their phases in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for surfaces with closely overlapping peaks has been a standing issue. Here we present two approaches towards resolving such issue. The first utilizes the high resolution and accurate lineshape from the recently developed sub-wavenumber high resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS), from which the detail spectral parameters, including relative spectral phases, of overlapping peaks can be determined through reliable spectral fitting. These results are further validated by using the second method that utilizes the azimuthal angle phase dependence of the z-cut α-quartz crystal, a common phase standard, through the spectral interference between the SFG fields of the quartz surface, as the internal phase reference, and the adsorbed molecular layer. Even though this approach is limited to molecular layers that can be transferred or deposited onto the quartz surface, it is simple and straightforward, as it requires only an internal phase standard with a single measurement that is free of phase drifts. More importantly, it provides unambiguous SFG spectral phase information of such surfaces. Using this method, the absolute phase of the molecular susceptibility tensors of the CH3, CH2 and chiral C-H groups in different Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) molecular monolayers and drop-cast peptide films are determined. These two approaches are fully consistent with and complement to each other, making both easily applicable tools in SFG-VS studies. More importantly, as the HR-BB-SFG-VS technique can be easily applied to various surfaces and interfaces, such validation of the spectral and phase information from HR-BB-SFG-VS measurement demonstrates it as one most promising tool for interrogating the detailed structure and interactions of complex molecular interfaces.

  19. Generating Good Vibrations for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Glenn

    1982-01-01

    Describes four functions served by student attitudes (instrumental, ego-defensive, value expressive, and knowledge) and discusses various ways to foster positive attitudes including using principles of cognitive dissonance. Also discusses various types of attitude measures. (SK)

  20. Computer Architecture for Energy Efficient SFQ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-27

    current density, a packing density of 10 5 junctions / cm 2 , that the wafers through which the TSVs pass have been thinned to 100 m and that via...material would have to be deposited to the full Si wafer thickness of 100 m, leading to issues with film stress and extremely long polish times for...quantizing inductance. These parameter values for the via diameter and spacing are quite reasonable for interfacing with solder bumps . For the case

  1. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  2. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  3. Vibration absorber modeling for handheld machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Mustafa, Mohd Muhyiddin; Jamil, Jazli Firdaus; Salim, Mohd Azli; Ramli, Faiz Redza

    2015-05-01

    Handheld machine tools produce continuous vibration to the users during operation. This vibration causes harmful effects to the health of users for repeated operations in a long period of time. In this paper, a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is designed and modeled to reduce the vibration generated by the handheld machine tool. Several designs and models of vibration absorbers with various stiffness properties are simulated, tested and optimized in order to diminish the vibration. Ordinary differential equation is used to derive and formulate the vibration phenomena in the machine tool with and without the DVA. The final transfer function of the DVA is later analyzed using commercial available mathematical software. The DVA with optimum properties of mass and stiffness is developed and applied on the actual handheld machine tool. The performance of the DVA is experimentally tested and validated by the final result of vibration reduction.

  4. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  5. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  6. Discomfort criteria for single-axis vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations were conducted to determine the fundamental relationships governing human subjective discomfort response to single-axis vibrations. The axes investigated were vertical, lateral, longitudinal, roll, and pitch, and the vibrations used were both sinusoidal and random in nature. Results of these investigations provided the basis for: (1) development of a scale of passenger discomfort that is common to all axes of vibration; and (2) generation of discomfort criteria for each axis of each axis and for both types of vibration. Furthermore, empirical equations describing discomfort responses within each axis of vibration are included.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  8. Effect of vibration on dispersal of Cladosporium cladosporioides bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Uk

    2010-05-01

    The vibration of fungal cultures was evaluated to determine its potential effect on the dispersal of airborne fungal microorganisms suspected of being pathogens. An artificial vibration system, which simulates the actual environmental vibration of fungal structures, was designed and constructed for this purpose. Experiments featured the use of low-frequency vibrations similar to those induced by earthquakes. Within the range of conditions tested, the vibration of fungal cultures was found to affect the airflow-driven generation of bioaerosols.

  9. Vibrational coherent quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Paternostro, M.; Kim, M.S.; Knight, P.L.

    2005-02-01

    A long-lived coherent state and nonlinear interaction have been experimentally demonstrated for the vibrational mode of a trapped ion. We propose an implementation of quantum computation using coherent states of the vibrational modes of trapped ions. Differently from earlier experiments, we consider a far-off resonance for the interaction between external fields and the ion in a bidimensional trap. By appropriate choices of the detunings between the external fields, the adiabatic elimination of the ionic excited level from the Hamiltonian of the system allows for beam splitting between orthogonal vibrational modes, production of coherent states, and nonlinear interactions of various kinds. In particular, this model enables the generation of the four coherent Bell states. Furthermore, all the necessary operations for quantum computation, such as preparation of qubits and one-qubit and controlled two-qubit operations, are possible. The detection of the state of a vibrational mode in a Bell state is made possible by the combination of resonant and off-resonant interactions between the ion and some external fields. We show that our read-out scheme provides highly efficient discrimination between all the four Bell states. We extend this to a quantum register composed of many individually trapped ions. In this case, operations on two remote qubits are possible through a cavity mode. We emphasize that our remote-qubit operation scheme does not require a high-quality factor resonator: the cavity field acts as a catalyst for the gate operation.

  10. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  11. Good Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) sponsorship from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, assisted MetroLaser, of Irvine, California, in the development of a self-aligned laser vibrometer system. VibroMet, capable of measuring surface vibrations in a variety of industries, provides information on the structural integrity and acoustical characteristics of manufactured products. This low-cost, easy-to-use sensor performs vibration measurement from distances of up to three meters without the need for adjustment. The laser beam is simply pointed at the target and the system then uses a compact laser diode to illuminate the surface and to subsequently analyze the reflected light. The motion of the surface results in a Doppler shift that is measured with very high precision. VibroMet is considered one of the many behind-the-scenes tools that can be relied on to assure the quality, reliability and safety of everything from airplane panels to disk brakes

  12. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  13. Vibration syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alice M.; Goda, D. F

    1970-01-01

    Stewart, Alice M., and Goda, D. F. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 19-27. Vibration syndrome. Raynaud's phenomenon, or the finger blanching of men who work with vibrating tools, is undoubtedly due to vasospasm. Nevertheless the abnormal element in the situation is not a series of traumatized nerve endings but a deposition of callus under the palmar surfaces of fingers and thumbs. This deposition is a late consequence of the most distinctive, but not necessarily the most painful, of the numerous effects incurred as a result of the tool speed being completely out of the control of the operator and of the tool/component rebound being only partially under his control. The replacement of soft finger pads by rigid callus is also the only consequence of hard manual work to show how necessary it is for a structure like a finger–which is largely composed of bones, joints, tendons, and skin–to have a reservoir, the equivalent of a blood-filled sponge, between every joint to accommodate any sudden reduction in blood volume, or indeed any sudden increase in the volume of blood held in the arteries and veins relative to the amount held in the capillaries. It is still a moot point whether users of vibrating tools have more arm complaints of a serious nature than other manual workers. They do, however, have a multiplicity of aches and pains, ascribable to various causes including tool speed and tool/component rebound, which are in toto very sensitive to such things as blunt impacts, hard components, heavy tools, awkward jobs, and inept handling of tools, whether the ineptness be due to inexperience or to advancing age. Users of vibrating tools have more pain in the hands and wrists than in the elbows and shoulders, but the pain tends to persist longer in the latter sites than in the former sites. PMID:5418915

  14. Reduced elbow extension torque during vibrations.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Coza, Aurel; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-08-31

    Impact sports and vibration platforms trigger vibrations within soft tissues and the skeleton. Although the long-term effects of vibrations on the body have been studied extensively, the acute effects of vibrations are little understood. This study determined the influence of acute vibrations at different frequencies and elbow angles on maximal isometric elbow extension torque and muscle activity. Vibrations were generated by a pneumatic vibrator attached to the lever of a dynamometer, and were applied on the forearm of 15 healthy female subjects. The subjects were instructed to push maximally against the lever at three different elbow angles, while extension torque and muscle activity were quantified and compared between vibration and non-vibration (control) conditions. A change in vibration frequency had no significant effects on torque and muscle activity although vibrations in general decreased the maximal extension torque relative to the control by 1.8% (±5.7%, p>0.05), 7.4% (±7.9%, p<0.01), and 5.0% (±8.2%, p<0.01) at elbow angles of 60°, 90°, and 120°, respectively. Electromyographic activity increased significantly between ∼30% and 40% in both triceps and biceps with vibrations. It is speculated that a similar increase in muscle activity between agonist and antagonist, in combination with an unequal increase in muscle moment arms about the elbow joint, limit the maximal extension torque during exposure to vibrations. This study showed that maximal extension torque decreased during vibration exposure while muscle activity increased and suggests that vibrations may be counterproductive during activities requiring maximal strength but potentially beneficial for strength training.

  15. vapor phase lubrication of SiO2 surfaces via adsorption of short chain linear alcohols & a sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy study of crystalline cellulose in biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnette, Anna Lorraine

    . This study is important because in the ambient, water molecules are always present. In order to fully understand how the n-alcohol molecules interact with the SiO2 surfaces under co-adsorption conditions with water molecules, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy are performed to understand the thickness, composition, and structure of the binary adsorbate layer on SiO2 in the absence of sliding. These studies show that the water and n-alcohol molecules form a bi-layer structure with the water molecules adsorbed to the SiO2 surface and the n-alcohol molecules adsorbed on top of the water molecules. Once water is adsorbed to the SiO 2 surface it is difficult to remove. So, the effectiveness of adsorbed n-pentanol molecules in humid environment in lubricating a MEMS sidewall friction tribometer is investigated. This study demonstrates that an environment containing 50% P/Psat n-pentanol can lubricate these MEMS up to a relative humidity of 25% without device failure. Above this, too much water is adsorbed to the SiO2 surface which inhibits device operation. Thus, although adsorbed water is considered detrimental to SiO2 surfaces during sliding contact, its effect can be offset using n-pentanol VPL. Cellulose is considered the most abundant naturally occurring polymer on earth. Because of this, many applications in the biofuels and pharmaceutical industries are under evaluation. Despite studies dating back to the 1940s, the structures of cellulose in its naturally occurring form (I) as well as fabricated polymorphs (II and III) are not completely agreed upon in the literature. Conventional spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and solid-state 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are widely utilized in pursuit of understanding the structure of cellulose. Three of these techniques, FTIR, Raman

  16. Support Effects in Catalysis Studied by in-situ Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and in-situ X-Ray Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Griffin John

    Kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst. In order to establish a paradigm for metal-support interactions using colloidally synthesized Pt nanoparticles the ability of the organic capping agent to inhibit reactivity and interaction with the support must first be assessed. Pt nanoparticles capped by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), and those from which the PVP is removed by UV light exposure, are investigated for two reactions, the hydrogenation of ethylene and the oxidation of methanol. It is shown that prior to PVP removal the particles are moderately active for both reactions. Following removal, the activity for the two reactions diverges, the ethylene hydrogenation rate increases 10-fold, while the methanol oxidation rate decreases 3-fold. To better understand this effect the capping agent prior to, and the residual carbon remaining after UV treatment are probed by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. Prior to removal no major differences are observed when the particles are exposed to alternating H2 and O2 environments. When the PVP is removed, carbonaceous fragments remain on the surface that dynamically restructure in H2 and O2. These fragments create a tightly bound shell in an oxygen environment and a porous coating of hydrogenated carbon in the hydrogen environment. Reaction rate measurements of thermally cleaned PVP and oleic acid capped particles show this effect to be independent of cleaning method or capping agent. In all this demonstrates the ability of the capping agent to mediate nanoparticle catalysis

  17. Development of vibrating insoles.

    PubMed

    Hijmans, Juha M; Geertzen, Jan H B; Schokker, Bart; Postema, Klaas

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the development of vibrating insoles. Insoles, providing a subsensory mechanical noise signal to the plantar side of the feet, may improve balance in healthy young and older people and in patients with stroke or diabetic neuropathy. This study describes the requirements for the tactors, (tactile actuators) insole material and noise generator. A search for the components of vibrating insoles providing mechanical noise to the plantar side of the feet was performed. The mechanical noise signal should be provided by tactors built in an insole or shoe and should obtain an input signal from a noise generator and an amplifier. Possible tactors are electromechanical tactors, a piezo actuator or the VBW32 skin transducer. The Minirator MR1 of NTI, a portable MP3 player or a custom-made noise generator can provide these tactors with input. The tactors can be built in foam, silicone or cork insoles. In conclusion, a C2 electromechanical tactor, a piezo actuator or the VBW32 skin transducer, activated by a custom-made noise generator, built in a cork insole covered with a leather layer seems the ideal solution.

  18. Vibrational energy relaxation of large-amplitude vibrations in liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baofeng; Stratt, Richard M

    2012-07-14

    Given the limited intermolecular spaces available in dense liquids, the large amplitudes of highly excited, low frequency vibrational modes pose an interesting dilemma for large molecules in solution. We carry out molecular dynamics calculations of the lowest frequency ("warping") mode of perylene dissolved in liquid argon, and demonstrate that vibrational excitation of this mode should cause identifiable changes in local solvation shell structure. But while the same kinds of solvent structural rearrangements can cause the non-equilibrium relaxation dynamics of highly excited diatomic rotors in liquids to differ substantially from equilibrium dynamics, our simulations also indicate that the non-equilibrium vibrational energy relaxation of large-amplitude vibrational overtones in liquids should show no such deviations from linear response. This observation seems to be a generic feature of large-moment-arm vibrational degrees of freedom and is therefore probably not specific to our choice of model system: The lowest frequency (largest amplitude) cases probably dissipate energy too quickly and the higher frequency (more slowly relaxing) cases most likely have solvent displacements too small to generate significant nonlinearities in simple nonpolar solvents. Vibrational kinetic energy relaxation, in particular, seems to be especially and surprisingly linear.

  19. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-01-01

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N2, H2, O2 and NH3 that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH2 (~3325 cm-1) and NH (~3235 cm-1) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH2, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH2 signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H2O and D2O, the only spectral feature was in the range of

  20. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to the

  1. Computer animation of modal and transient vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    An interactive computer graphics processor is described that is capable of generating input to animate modal and transient vibrations of finite element models on an interactive graphics system. The results from NASTRAN can be postprocessed such that a three dimensional wire-frame picture, in perspective, of the finite element mesh is drawn on the graphics display. Modal vibrations of any mode shape or transient motions over any range of steps can be animated. The finite element mesh can be color-coded by any component of displacement. Viewing parameters and the rate of vibration of the finite element model can be interactively updated while the structure is vibrating.

  2. Vibration Induced Microfluidic Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate rapid generation of micron aerosol droplets in a microfluidic device in which a fluid drop is exposed to surface vibration as it sits atop a piezoelectric substrate. Little, however, is understood about the processes by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory and numerical modelling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Droplets form due to the axisymmetric break-up of cylindrical liquid jets ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. Their 10 μm size correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a viscous-capillary dominant force balance and confirmed through a numerical solution. With the exception of drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension, the free surface is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency despite the surface vibration frequency being several orders larger. This is contrary to common assumptions used in deriving subharmonic models resulting in a Mathieu equation, which has commonly led to spurious predictions in the droplet size.

  3. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  4. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  5. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  6. Ultrasound vibrometry using orthogonal- frequency-based vibration pulses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2013-11-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals, the amplitudes of which increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses.

  7. Ultrasound Vibrometry Using Orthogonal Frequency Based Vibration Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W.; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals of which the amplitudes increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses. PMID:24158291

  8. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchet, F.; Lis, D.; Caudano, Y.; Mani, A. A.; Peremans, A.; Champagne, B.; Guthmuller, J.

    2012-03-01

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  9. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Cecchet, F; Lis, D; Caudano, Y; Mani, A A; Peremans, A; Champagne, B; Guthmuller, J

    2012-03-28

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  10. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  11. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  12. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  13. Quantum Mechanical Calculations of Vibrational Sum-Frequency-Generation (SFG) Spectra of Cellulose: Dependence of the CH and OH Peak Intensity on the Polarity of Cellulose Chains within the SFG Coherence Domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher M; Chen, Xing; Weiss, Philip A; Jensen, Lasse; Kim, Seong H

    2017-01-05

    Vibrational sum-frequency-generation (SFG) spectroscopy is capable of selectively detecting crystalline biopolymers interspersed in amorphous polymer matrices. However, the spectral interpretation is difficult due to the lack of knowledge on how spatial arrangements of crystalline segments influence SFG spectra features. Here we report time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations of cellulose crystallites in intimate contact with two different polarities: parallel versus antiparallel. TD-DFT calculations reveal that the CH/OH intensity ratio is very sensitive to the polarity of the crystallite packing. Theoretical calculations of hyperpolarizability tensors (βabc) clearly show the dependence of SFG intensities on the polarity of crystallite packing within the SFG coherence length, which provides the basis for interpretation of the empirically observed SFG features of native cellulose in biological systems.

  14. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  15. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  16. Vibration-based photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Rajian, Justin R.; Wang, Pu; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging employing molecular overtone vibration as contrast mechanism opens a new avenue for deep tissue imaging with chemical bond selectivity. Here, we demonstrate vibration-based photoacoustic tomography with an imaging depth on the centimeter scale. To provide sufficient pulse energy at the overtone transition wavelengths, we constructed a compact, barium nitrite crystal-based Raman laser for excitation of 2nd overtone of C-H bond. Using a 5-ns Nd:YAG laser as pumping source, up to 105 mJ pulse energy at 1197 nm was generated. Vibrational photoacoutic spectroscopy and tomography of phantom (polyethylene tube) immersed in whole milk was performed. With a pulse energy of 47 mJ on the milk surface, up to 2.5 cm penetration depth was reached with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.

  17. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  18. Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Nonlinear Vibrational Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Boik, John; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging with spectroscopic vibrational contrast is a label-free solution for visualizing, identifying, and quantifying a wide range of biomolecular compounds in biological materials. Both linear and nonlinear vibrational microscopy techniques derive their imaging contrast from infrared active or Raman allowed molecular transitions, which provide a rich palette for interrogating chemical and structural details of the sample. Yet nonlinear optical methods, which include both second-order sum-frequency generation (SFG) and third-order coherent Raman scattering (CRS) techniques, offer several improved imaging capabilities over their linear precursors. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy features unprecedented vibrational imaging speeds, provides strategies for higher spatial resolution, and gives access to additional molecular parameters. These advances have turned vibrational microscopy into a premier tool for chemically dissecting live cells and tissues. This review discusses the molecular contrast of SFG and CRS microscopy and highlights several of the advanced imaging capabilities that have impacted biological and biomedical research. PMID:23245525

  19. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Diana Christine

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  20. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  1. Control System Damps Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopf, E. H., Jr.; Brown, T. K.; Marsh, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    New control system damps vibrations in rotating equipment with help of phase-locked-loop techniques. Vibrational modes are controlled by applying suitable currents to drive motor. Control signals are derived from sensors mounted on equipment.

  2. Vibration energy harvester optimization using artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Z.; Ondrusek, C.; Kurfurst, J.; Singule, V.

    2011-06-01

    This paper deals with an optimization study of a vibration energy harvester. This harvester can be used as autonomous source of electrical energy for remote or wireless applications, which are placed in environment excited by ambient mechanical vibrations. The ambient energy of vibrations is usually on very low level but the harvester can be used as alternative source of energy for electronic devices with an expected low level of power consumption of several mW. The optimized design of the vibration energy harvester was based on previous development and the sensitivity of harvester design was improved for effective harvesting from mechanical vibrations in aeronautic applications. The vibration energy harvester is a mechatronic system which generates electrical energy from ambient vibrations due to precision tuning up generator parameters. The optimization study for maximization of harvested power or minimization of volume and weight are the main goals of our development. The optimization study of such complex device is complicated therefore artificial intelligence methods can be used for tuning up optimal harvester parameters.

  3. Vibration Testing of Stirling Power Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Bill; Goodnight, Thomas; McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Schreiber, Jeff; Samorezov, Sergey

    2003-01-01

    to supply on- board electric spacecraft power for future NASA Deep-Space Missions, performing as an attractive alternative to Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). Usage of the Stirling technology is also being considered as the electric power source for future Mars rovers, whose mission profiles may exclude the use of photovoltaic power systems (such as exploring at high Martian latitudes or for missions of lengthy durations). GRC s Thermo-Mechanical Systems Branch (5490) provides Stirling technology expertise under a Space Act Agreement with the DOE. Additional vibration testing, by GRC s Structural Systems Dynamics Branch (7733, is planned to continue to demonstrate the Stirling power system s vibration capability as its technology and flight system designs progress.

  4. Vibration Testing of Stirling Power Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Bill; Goodnight, Thomas; McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Schreiber, Jeff; Samorezov, Sergey

    2003-01-01

    to supply on- board electric spacecraft power for future NASA Deep-Space Missions, performing as an attractive alternative to Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). Usage of the Stirling technology is also being considered as the electric power source for future Mars rovers, whose mission profiles may exclude the use of photovoltaic power systems (such as exploring at high Martian latitudes or for missions of lengthy durations). GRC s Thermo-Mechanical Systems Branch (5490) provides Stirling technology expertise under a Space Act Agreement with the DOE. Additional vibration testing, by GRC s Structural Systems Dynamics Branch (7733, is planned to continue to demonstrate the Stirling power system s vibration capability as its technology and flight system designs progress.

  5. Ross ice shelf vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, P. D.; Diez, A.; Gerstoft, P.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Wiens, D. A.; Aster, R. C.; Nyblade, A.

    2015-09-01

    Broadband seismic stations were deployed across the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS) in November 2014 to study ocean gravity wave-induced vibrations. Initial data from three stations 100 km from the RIS front and within 10 km of each other show both dispersed infragravity (IG) wave and ocean swell-generated signals resulting from waves that originate in the North Pacific. Spectral levels from 0.001 to 10 Hz have the highest accelerations in the IG band (0.0025-0.03 Hz). Polarization analyses indicate complex frequency-dependent particle motions, with energy in several frequency bands having distinctly different propagation characteristics. The dominant IG band signals exhibit predominantly horizontal propagation from the north. Particle motion analyses indicate retrograde elliptical particle motions in the IG band, consistent with these signals propagating as Rayleigh-Lamb (flexural) waves in the ice shelf/water cavity system that are excited by ocean wave interactions nearer the shelf front.

  6. Hermetically sealed vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, D. G.

    1969-01-01

    Simple fluidic vibration damper for installation at each pivotal mounting between gimbals isolates inertial measuring units from external vibration and other disruptive forces. Installation between each of the three gimbal axes can dampen vibration and shock in any direction while permitting free rotation of the gimbals.

  7. Tunable Passive Vibration Suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boechler, Nicholas (Inventor); Dillon, Robert Peter (Inventor); Daraio, Chiara (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor); Borgonia, John Paul C. (Inventor); Kahn, Daniel Louis (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus and method for vibration suppression using a granular particle chain. The granular particle chain is statically compressed and the end particles of the chain are attached to a payload and vibration source. The properties of the granular particles along with the amount of static compression are chosen to provide desired filtering of vibrations.

  8. C-130J Human Vibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Organisation DSTO-TR-1756 ABSTRACT Human exposure to whole - body vibration (WBV) has been associated with a variety of changes in health...1.2.1 Whole - body Vibration (WBV) ................................................................... 3 1.2.2 Local vibration ...amplitude transmissibility VDV vibration dose value VWF vibration -induced white finger WBV whole body vibration DSTO-TR-1756 1 1. Introduction

  9. What is limiting low-temperature atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}? A vibrational sum-frequency generation study

    SciTech Connect

    Vandalon, V. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl; Kessels, W. M. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl

    2016-01-04

    The surface reactions during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} from Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 2}O have been studied with broadband sum-frequency generation to reveal what is limiting the growth at low temperatures. The –CH{sub 3} surface coverage was measured for temperatures between 100 and 300 °C and the absolute reaction cross sections, describing the reaction kinetics, were determined for both half-cycles. It was found that –CH{sub 3} groups persisted on the surface after saturation of the H{sub 2}O half-cycle. From a direct correlation with the growth per cycle, it was established that the reduced reactivity of H{sub 2}O towards –CH{sub 3} is the dominant factor limiting the ALD process at low temperatures.

  10. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered.

  11. Statistical quality control through overall vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnero, M. a. Carmen; González-Palma, Rafael; Almorza, David; Mayorga, Pedro; López-Escobar, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The present study introduces the concept of statistical quality control in automotive wheel bearings manufacturing processes. Defects on products under analysis can have a direct influence on passengers' safety and comfort. At present, the use of vibration analysis on machine tools for quality control purposes is not very extensive in manufacturing facilities. Noise and vibration are common quality problems in bearings. These failure modes likely occur under certain operating conditions and do not require high vibration amplitudes but relate to certain vibration frequencies. The vibration frequencies are affected by the type of surface problems (chattering) of ball races that are generated through grinding processes. The purpose of this paper is to identify grinding process variables that affect the quality of bearings by using statistical principles in the field of machine tools. In addition, an evaluation of the quality results of the finished parts under different combinations of process variables is assessed. This paper intends to establish the foundations to predict the quality of the products through the analysis of self-induced vibrations during the contact between the grinding wheel and the parts. To achieve this goal, the overall self-induced vibration readings under different combinations of process variables are analysed using statistical tools. The analysis of data and design of experiments follows a classical approach, considering all potential interactions between variables. The analysis of data is conducted through analysis of variance (ANOVA) for data sets that meet normality and homoscedasticity criteria. This paper utilizes different statistical tools to support the conclusions such as chi squared, Shapiro-Wilks, symmetry, Kurtosis, Cochran, Hartlett, and Hartley and Krushal-Wallis. The analysis presented is the starting point to extend the use of predictive techniques (vibration analysis) for quality control. This paper demonstrates the existence

  12. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    SciTech Connect

    Galchev, Tzeno; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The

  13. Hybrid isolation of micro vibrations induced by reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-02-01

    As the technology for precision satellite payloads continues to advance, the requirements for the pointing stability of the satellites are becoming extremely high. In many situations, even small amplitude disturbances generated by the onboard components may cause serious degradation in the performance of high precision payloads. In such situations, vibration isolators can be installed to reduce the vibration transmission. In this work, a hybrid vibration isolator comprising passive and active components is proposed to provide an effective solution to the vibration problems caused by the reaction wheel disturbances. Firstly, mathematical modeling and experimental study of a single axis vibration isolator having high damping and high roll-off rate for the high frequency region and active components that enhance isolation performance for narrow frequency bands are presented. This concept is then extended to multi-axis by forming Stewart platform and the performance is experimentally verified. The tests on a flexible testbed show effective vibration isolation by the proposed vibration isolator.

  14. Eggshell Cutter Using Ultrasonic Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hikaru

    2003-05-01

    An eggshell cutting apparatus which utilizes ultrasonic vibration was developed, replacing the conventional apparatus which uses an air cutter, to cut eggshells at the blunt end of eggs. Two ultrasonic vibration sources were used: one with longitudinal vibration only and the other with torsional vibration plus longitudinal vibration. Eggshell cutting experiments using these vibration sources were conducted. The eggshell cutting time sharply decreased with increasing longitudinal vibration amplitude as well as increasing input power. When the source with torsional vibration plus longitudinal vibration was used and the amplitude of longitudinal vibration was 12 μm or less, the torsional vibration was effective for cutting eggshells. Furthermore, at the same input power, the eggshell cutting time by the source with longitudinal vibration only was shorter than that by the source with torsional vibration plus longitudinal vibration. When an egg was cut using the apparatus, there was essentially no cutting noise and the cut surface was smooth.

  15. Vibration and noise analysis of a gear transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Qian, W.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive procedure to predict both the vibration and noise generated by a gear transmission system under normal operating conditions. The gearbox vibrations were obtained from both numerical simulation and experimental studies using a gear noise test rig. In addition, the noise generated by the gearbox vibrations was recorded during the experimental testing. A numerical method was used to develop linear relationships between the gearbox vibration and the generated noise. The hypercoherence function is introduced to correlate the nonlinear relationship between the fundamental noise frequency and its harmonics. A numerical procedure was developed using both the linear and nonlinear relationships generated from the experimental data to predict noise resulting from the gearbox vibrations. The application of this methodology is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and experimental results from the gear noise test rig.

  16. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehman, E. C.; Rossman, P. J.; Kruse, S. A.; Sahakian, A. V.; Glaser, K. J.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  17. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Ehman, E C; Rossman, P J; Kruse, S A; Sahakian, A V; Glaser, K J

    2008-02-21

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  18. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography

    PubMed Central

    Ehman, E C; Rossman, P J; Kruse, S A; Sahakian, A V; Glaser, K J

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure, and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast, and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values, and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans. PMID:18263949

  19. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  20. Plants respond to leaf vibrations caused by insect herbivore chewing.

    PubMed

    Appel, H M; Cocroft, R B

    2014-08-01

    Plant germination and growth can be influenced by sound, but the ecological significance of these responses is unclear. We asked whether acoustic energy generated by the feeding of insect herbivores was detected by plants. We report that the vibrations caused by insect feeding can elicit chemical defenses. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) rosettes pre-treated with the vibrations caused by caterpillar feeding had higher levels of glucosinolate and anthocyanin defenses when subsequently fed upon by Pieris rapae (L.) caterpillars than did untreated plants. The plants also discriminated between the vibrations caused by chewing and those caused by wind or insect song. Plants thus respond to herbivore-generated vibrations in a selective and ecologically meaningful way. A vibration signaling pathway would complement the known signaling pathways that rely on volatile, electrical, or phloem-borne signals. We suggest that vibration may represent a new long distance signaling mechanism in plant-insect interactions that contributes to systemic induction of chemical defenses.

  1. Substrate Vibrations during Courtship in Three Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Valerio; Anfora, Gianfranco; Virant-Doberlet, Meta

    2013-01-01

    While a plethora of studies have focused on the role of visual, chemical and near-field airborne signals in courtship of Drosophila fruit flies, the existence of substrate-borne vibrational signals has been almost completely overlooked. Here we describe substrate vibrations generated during courtship in three species of the D. melanogaster group, from the allegedly mute species D. suzukii, its sister species D. biarmipes, and from D. melanogaster. In all species, we recorded several types of substrate vibrations which were generated by locomotion, abdominal vibrations and most likely through the activity of thoracic wing muscles. In D. melanogaster and D. suzukii, all substrate vibrations described in intact males were also recorded in males with amputated wings. Evidence suggests that vibrational signalling may be widespread among Drosophila species, and fruit flies may provide an ideal model to study various aspects of this widespread form of animal communication. PMID:24260459

  2. Prediction of Ground Vibration from Freight Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Block, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    Heavy freight trains emit ground vibration with predominant frequency components in the range 4-30 Hz. If the amplitude is sufficient, this may be felt by lineside residents, giving rise to disturbance and concern over possible damage to their property. In order to establish the influence of parameters of the track and rolling stock and thereby enable the design of a low vibration railway, a theoretical model of both the generation and propagation of vibration is required. The vibration is generated as a combination of the effects of dynamic forces, due to the unevenness of the track, and the effects of the track deformation under successive axle loads. A prediction scheme, which combines these effects, has been produced. A vehicle model is used to predict the dynamic forces at the wheels. This includes the non-linear effects of friction damped suspensions. The loaded track profile is measured by using a track recording coach. The dynamic loading and the effects of the moving axles are combined in a track response model. The predicted track vibration is compared to measurements. The transfer functions from the track to a point in the ground can be calculated by using a coupled track and a three-dimensional layered ground model. The propagation effects of the ground layers are important but the computation of the transfer function from each sleeper, which would be required for a phase coherent summation of the vibration in the ground, would be prohibitive. A compromise summation is used and results are compared with measurements.

  3. Application of ultrasonics to nonintrusive vibration measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K. )

    1993-11-01

    This paper outlines a nonintrusive vibration measurement method using standard off-the-shelf commercial ultrasonic instruments designed for flaw detections, together with digital signal analysis techniques. This method was incorporated into a commercial package designed for nonintrusive check valve monitoring and has been extensively tested in both the laboratory and the field. It can detect valve disk flutter as small as 0.02-in. (0.50 mm) peak-to-peak, without disassembly of the valve. In simulated tests, it quantitatively measured, remotely and nonintrusively, stationary vibration amplitudes as small as 0.0001 in. (0.0025 mm). Other potential applications include in-service vibration monitoring of internal components of nuclear reactors, steam generators, heat exchangers, pumps and valves, and in the laboratory or in the field, when the vibration frequency is too low for accelerometers and the strain is too low for strain gages.

  4. Long-range vibration sensor based on correlation analysis of optical frequency-domain reflectometry signals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Han, Qun; Meng, Zhuo; Chen, Hongxin

    2012-12-17

    We present a novel method to achieve a space-resolved long- range vibration detection system based on the correlation analysis of the optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) signals. By performing two separate measurements of the vibrated and non-vibrated states on a test fiber, the vibration frequency and position of a vibration event can be obtained by analyzing the cross-correlation between beat signals of the vibrated and non-vibrated states in a spatial domain, where the beat signals are generated from interferences between local Rayleigh backscattering signals of the test fiber and local light oscillator. Using the proposed technique, we constructed a standard single-mode fiber based vibration sensor that can have a dynamic range of 12 km and a measurable vibration frequency up to 2 kHz with a spatial resolution of 5 m. Moreover, preliminarily investigation results of two vibration events located at different positions along the test fiber are also reported.

  5. Good or bad vibrations? Impacts of anthropogenic vibration on the marine epibenthos.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Louise; Elliott, Michael

    2017-04-03

    Anthropogenic activities directly contacting the seabed, such as drilling and pile-driving, produce a significant vibration likely to impact benthic invertebrates. As with terrestrial organisms, vibration may be used by marine species for the detection of biotic and abiotic cues, yet the significance of this and the sensitivities to vibration are previously undocumented for many marine species. Exposure to additional vibration may elicit behavioral or physiological change, or even physical damage at high amplitudes or particular frequencies, although this is poorly studied in underwater noise research. Here we review studies regarding the sensitivities and responses of marine invertebrates to substrate-borne vibration. This includes information related to vibrations produced by those construction activities directly impacting the seabed, such as pile-driving. This shows the extent to which species are able to detect vibration and respond to anthropogenically-produced vibrations, although the short and long-term implications of this are not known. As such it is especially important that the sensitivities of these species are further understood, given that noise and energy-generating human impacts on the marine environment are only likely to increase and that there are now legal instruments requiring such effects to be monitored and controlled.

  6. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  7. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  8. Adaptive vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Sam; Ward, John; Davidson, Josh

    2007-04-01

    By scavenging energy from their local environment, portable electronic devices such as mobile phones, radios and wireless sensors can achieve greater run-times with potentially lower weight. Vibration energy harvesting is one such approach where energy from parasitic vibrations can be converted into electrical energy, through the use of piezoelectric and electromagnetic transducers. Parasitic vibrations come from a range of sources such as wind, seismic forces and traffic. Existing approaches to vibration energy harvesting typically utilise a rectifier circuit, which is tuned to the resonant frequency of the harvesting structure and the dominant frequency of vibration. We have developed a novel approach to vibration energy harvesting, including adaption to non-periodic vibrations so as to extract the maximum amount of vibration energy available. Experimental results of an experimental apparatus using off-the-shelf transducer (i.e. speaker coil) show mechanical vibration to electrical energy conversion efficiencies of 27 - 34%. However, simulations of a more electro-mechanical efficient and lightly damped transducer show conversion efficiencies in excess of 80%.

  9. Broadband vibration energy harvester utilizing three out-of-plane modes of one vibrating body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Shi-Baek; Jang, Seon-Jun; Kim, In-Ho; Choi, Yong Je

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concept, design equation, and realization of a broadband electromagnetic vibrational energy harvester. The spatial vibrating system in the proposed harvester is arranged to have three out-of-plane vibration modes. We devise the design method for its three natural frequencies and accompanying modes and apply it to the broadband energy harvesting by locating three frequencies close to each other. The numerical simulation and the experimental results show that it satisfies the designated frequencies as well as the enhanced bandwidth for power generation.

  10. Integrated predictive maintenance program vibration and lube oil analysis: Part I - history and the vibration program

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, H.

    1996-12-01

    This paper is the first of two papers which describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machines at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The organization has recently been restructured and significant benefits have been realized by the interaction, or {open_quotes}synergy{close_quotes} between the Vibration Program and the Lube Oil Analysis Program. This paper starts with the oldest part of the program - the Vibration Program and discusses the evolution of the program to its current state. The {open_quotes}Vibration{close_quotes} view of the combined program is then presented.

  11. Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-09-17

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

  12. Vibration dissipation mount for motors or the like

    DOEpatents

    Small, Thomas R.

    1987-01-01

    A vibration dissipation mount which permits the mounting of a motor, generator, or the like such that the rotatable shaft thereof passes through the mount and the mount permits the dissipation of self-induced and otherwise induced vibrations wherein the mount comprises a pair of plates having complementary concave and convex surfaces, a semi-resilient material being disposed therebetween.

  13. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  14. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOEpatents

    Cericola, Fred; Doggett, James W.; Ernest, Terry L.; Priddy, Tommy G.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  15. [Vibration on agricultural tractors].

    PubMed

    Peretti, Alessandro; Delvecchio, Simone; Bonomini, Francesco; di Bisceglie, Anita Pasqua; Colosio, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    In the article, details related to the diffusion of agricultural tractors in Italy are given and considerations about the effects of vibration on operators, the sources of vibration and suggestions to reduce them are presented. The acceleration values observed in Italy amongst 244 tractors and levels of worker exposure are shown by means of histograms. The relevant data variability is discussed.

  16. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.; Priddy, T.G.

    1990-03-21

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis. 1 fig.

  17. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.

    1991-08-27

    An apparatus is discussed for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 {degrees} around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  18. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches.

  20. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  1. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  2. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  3. Vibration in textile mills.

    PubMed

    Sorainen, E

    1988-12-01

    The vibration in nine halls of the six weaving mills was measured in 1978-80. The measurements were taken at regular intervals in the working area of the weavers, which was the wooden support attached to the machine or the floor of the textile mill. The accelerometer was mounted with screws onto the working area, and all vibration samples were analyzed immediately, in situ. The vibration of the floor was tangent to or exceeded slightly the "reduced comfort boundary" specified in International Standard ISO 2631/1 (1985) only in the areas where the floor was not against the ground. The greatest amount of vibration occurred on the supports which had been attached to the machines. On these supports the vibration in places exceeded the "fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary."

  4. GPM Vibration Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Vibration testing of the horizontal axis of the spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Goddard The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) that will provide next-generation global observations of precipitation from space. GPM will study global rain, snow and ice to better understand our climate, weather, and hydrometeorological processes. As of Novermber 2013 the GPM Core Observatory is in the final stages of testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The satellite will be flown to Japan in the fall of 2013 and launched into orbit on an HII-A rocket in early 2014. For more on the GPM mission, visit gpm.gsfc.nasa.gov/. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Airfoil Vibration Dampers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Airfoil Vibration Damper program has consisted of an analysis phase and a testing phase. During the analysis phase, a state-of-the-art computer code was developed, which can be used to guide designers in the placement and sizing of friction dampers. The use of this computer code was demonstrated by performing representative analyses on turbine blades from the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) and High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The testing phase of the program consisted of performing friction damping tests on two different cantilever beams. Data from these tests provided an empirical check on the accuracy of the computer code developed in the analysis phase. Results of the analysis and testing showed that the computer code can accurately predict the performance of friction dampers. In addition, a valuable set of friction damping data was generated, which can be used to aid in the design of friction dampers, as well as provide benchmark test cases for future code developers.

  6. Liquid-filled type vibration damping structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tabata, T.

    1987-06-16

    A liquid-filled type vibration damping structure is described comprising: a liquid-filled vibration isolator having (a) first and second frames respectively mounted on a vibration source and on the side of a vehicle body; (b) resilient member connected between the first and second frames; (c) a diaphragm secured to the first frame; (d) a baffle member secured onto the first frame and dividing an internal space surrounded by the resilient member, the diaphragm, and the second frame into first and second liquid chambers, the baffle member further having a hole and a first aperture for communicating the first and second liquid chambers with each other; (e) a holder cooperating with the baffle member to form therebetween an orifice portion communicated with the hole of the baffle member and having at least one aperture aligned with the first aperture of the baffle member; (f) a movable plate held by at least the holder between the apertures of the holder and the baffle member and moved with respect to the baffle member by the liquid flow through the apertures of the holder and the baffle member; and (g) at least one mass body attached into the resilient member to reduce the resilient coefficient. The structure further comprising: a bracket member for mounting the vibration isolator onto the vibration source at a predetermined angle of inclination with respect to the direction of vibration from the source; and the angle is sufficient to suppress the generation of a liquid column resonance peak.

  7. Wireless vibration sensor using frequency modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minhyuck; Yoon, Hwan-Sik; Kim, Sehun; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, wireless strain sensors have received attention as an efficient method to measure response of a structure in a remote location. Wireless sensors developed for remote measurement include RF wireless sensor modules and microstrip antenna-based sensors. In this paper, a simple wireless vibration sensor based on a piezoelectric sensor and the Frequency Modulation (FM) technique is developed for remote measurement of vibrating structures. The piezoelectric sensor can generate a voltage signal proportional to dynamic strain of the host structure. The voltage signal is then frequency modulated and transmitted wirelessly to a remote station by a simple FM transmitter circuit. Finally, the received signal is demodulated by a conventional FM radio circuit, and the vibration measurement data can be recovered. Since this type of wireless sensor employs a simple FM circuit, they do not require any wireless data transmission protocols allowing a low-cost wireless sensor in compact format. The proposed concept of the wireless vibration measurement is experimentally verified by measuring vibration of an aluminum cantilever beam. The proposed sensor could potentially be an efficient and cost effective method for measuring vibration of remote structures for dynamic testing or structural health monitoring.

  8. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B.; Stanton, Tasha R.; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one’s own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both ‘upward-downward’ and ‘towards-away from the elbow’ planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a ‘telescoping’ effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length. PMID:27305112

  9. Directional motion of liquid under mechanical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costalonga, Maxime; Brunet, Philippe; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    When a liquid is submitted to mechanical vibrations, steady flows or motion can be generated by non-linear effects. One example is the steady acoustic streaming one can observe when an acoustic wave propagates in a fluid. At the scale of a droplet, steady motion of the whole amount of liquid can arise from zero-mean periodic forcing. As It has been observed by Brunet et al. (PRL 2007), a drop can climb an inclined surface when submitted to vertical vibrations above a threshold in acceleration. Later, Noblin et al. (PRL 2009) showed the velocity and the direction of motion of a sessile drop submitted to both horizontal and vertical vibrations can be tuned by the phase shift between these two excitations. Here we present an experimental study of the mean motion of a sessile drop under slanted vibrations, focusing on the effects of drop properties, as well as the inclination angle of the axis of vibrations. It is shown that the volume and viscosity strongly affect the drop mean velocity, and can even change the direction of its motion. In the case of a low viscous drop, gravity can become significant and be modulated by the inclination of the axis of vibrations. Contact line dynamic during the drop oscillations is also investigated.

  10. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B; Stanton, Tasha R; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one's own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both 'upward-downward' and 'towards-away from the elbow' planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a 'telescoping' effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length.

  11. Laser vibrometry measurements of rotating blade vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, A.K.; Kadambi, J.R.; Quinn, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    One of the most important design factors in modern turbomachinery is the vibration of turbomachinery blading. There is a need for developing an in-service, noncontacting, noninterfering method for the measurement and monitoring of gas turbine, jet engine, and steam turbine blade vibrations and stresses. Such a technique would also be useful for monitoring rotating helicopter blades. In the power generation industry, blade failures can result in millions of dollars of downtime. The measurement of blade vibrations and dynamic stresses is an important guide for preventive maintenance, which can be a major contributor to the availability of steam turbine, gas turbine, and helicopter operations. An experiment is designed to verify the feasibility of such a vibration monitoring system using the reference beam on-axis laser-Doppler technique. The experimental setup consists of two flat, cantilever blades mounted on a hub attached to the shaft of a dc motor. The motor rests on a linear bearing permitting motion only in the direction of the motor shaft. The motor and blade assembly is then excited via an electrodynamic shaker at the first natural frequency of the blades. The resulting blade vibration is then detected using a laser vibrometer. The vibration frequencies and amplitudes of the two rotating blades are successfully measured.

  12. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2015-03-01

    We have recently found that a long length of fiber of up to 1 km terminated with an in-fiber cavity structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 2 kHz. We want to determine whether the sensor (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to maintenance cost. The sensor may also help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that requires the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Acoustic vibration monitoring may need sensing at even higher frequencies (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed longgauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  13. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2014-11-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 1 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large reenforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  14. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 2 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  15. Reduction of friction using piezoelectrically excited ultrasonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littmann, Walter; Storck, Heiner; Wallaschek, Joerg

    2001-07-01

    Piezoelectric materials are an important class of smart materials for the generation of mechanical ultrasonic vibrations. In industrial applications (for example ultrasonic cutting) the frictional contact of the vibrating tool with the workpiece is of special importance. A common observation at the contact zone is that frictional forces can be significantly reduced by superposition of ultrasonic vibrations. In this report we present a theoretical explanation for the reduction of friction. A basic system, consisting of a longitudinal ultrasonic vibrator sliding on a plane, is investigated. It is shown that a modification of Coulomb's friction law can be applied to this kind of vibrating friction contact. The macroscopically observed friction-force with ultrasonic vibration depends on the sliding velocity and the velocity of vibration: For sliding velocities higher than the vibration-amplitude the frictional force is not changed by vibration. But for small sliding velocities the friction-coefficient is significantly reduced and almost approaches zero for very slow sliding-velocity. The theoretical results were confirmed systematically by experimental investigations done on a specially designed test-rig. Energy considerations are used to calculate the ultrasonic energy which is required to achieve a prescribed reduction of the frictional forces. The model is also used for sensing the vibration-amplitude as well as the sliding-velocity without an additional sensor.

  16. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. PMID:27516544

  17. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity.

  18. Vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers: an overview-Part 2: vibration response, fretting-wear, guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Taylor, C. E.

    2003-11-01

    Design guidelines were developed to prevent tube failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. An overview of vibration analysis procedures and recommended design guidelines is presented in this paper. This paper pertains to liquid, gas and two-phase heat exchangers such as nuclear steam generators, reboilers, coolers, service water heat exchangers, condensers, and moisture-separator-reheaters. Part 2 of this paper covers forced vibration excitation mechanisms, vibration response prediction, resulting damage assessment, and acceptance criteria.

  19. Reactor vibration reduction based on giant magnetostrictive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongge, Yan; Weiying, Liu; Yuechao, Wu; Menghua, Duan; Xiaohong, Zhang; Lihua, Zhu; Ling, Weng; Ying, Sun

    2017-05-01

    The vibration of reactors not only produces noise pollution, but also affects the safe operation of reactors. Giant magnetostrictive materials can generate huge expansion and shrinkage deformation in a magnetic field. With the principle of mutual offset between the giant magnetostrictive force produced by the giant magnetostrictive material and the original vibration force of the reactor, the vibration of the reactor can be reduced. In this paper, magnetization and magnetostriction characteristics in silicon steel and the giant magnetostrictive material are measured, respectively. According to the presented magneto-mechanical coupling model including the electromagnetic force and the magnetostrictive force, reactor vibration is calculated. By comparing the vibration of the reactor with different inserted materials in the air gaps between the reactor cores, the vibration reduction effectiveness of the giant magnetostrictive material is validated.

  20. Compact Active Vibration Control System for a Flexible Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A diamond-shaped actuator for a flexible panel has an inter-digitated electrode (IDE) and a piezoelectric wafer portion positioned therebetween. The IDE and/or the wafer portion are diamond-shaped. Point sensors are positioned with respect to the actuator and measure vibration. The actuator generates and transmits a cancelling force to the panel in response to an output signal from a controller, which is calculated using a signal describing the vibration. A method for controlling vibration in a flexible panel includes connecting a diamond-shaped actuator to the flexible panel, and then connecting a point sensor to each actuator. Vibration is measured via the point sensor. The controller calculates a proportional output voltage signal from the measured vibration, and transmits the output signal to the actuator to substantially cancel the vibration in proximity to each actuator.

  1. Male courtship vibrations delay predatory behaviour in female spiders.

    PubMed

    Wignall, Anne E; Herberstein, Marie E

    2013-12-19

    During courtship, individuals transfer information about identity, mating status and quality. However, male web-building spiders face a significant problem: how to begin courting female spiders without being mistaken for prey? Male Argiope spiders generate distinctive courtship vibrations (shudders) when entering a female's web. We tested whether courtship shudders delay female predatory behaviour, even when live prey is present in the web. We presented a live cricket to females during playbacks of shudder vibrations, or white noise, and compared female responses to a control in which we presented a live cricket with no playback vibrations. Females were much slower to respond to crickets during playback of shudder vibrations. Shudder vibrations also delayed female predatory behaviour in a related spider species, showing that these vibrations do not simply function for species identity. These results suggest that male web-building spiders employ a phylogenetically conserved vibratory signal to ameliorate the risk of pre-copulatory cannibalism.

  2. Vibrations and structureborne noise in space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.; Lyrintzis, C. S.; Bofilios, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to predict vibrations and structureborne noise generation of cylindrical and rectangular acoustic enclosures. These models are then used to determine structural vibration levels and interior noise to random point input forces. The guidelines developed could provide preliminary information on acoustical and vibrational environments in space station habitability modules under orbital operations. The structural models include single wall monocoque shell, double wall shell, stiffened orthotropic shell, descretely stiffened flat panels, and a coupled system composed of a cantilever beam structure and a stiffened sidewall. Aluminum and fiber reinforced composite materials are considered for single and double wall shells. The end caps of the cylindrical enclosures are modeled either as single or double wall circular plates. Sound generation in the interior space is calculated by coupling the structural vibrations to the acoustic field in the enclosure. Modal methods and transfer matrix techniques are used to obtain structural vibrations. Parametric studies are performed to determine the sensitivity of interior noise environment to changes in input, geometric and structural conditions.

  3. Vibration suppression of advanced space cryocoolers: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    2003-07-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for precision space instruments by providing cryogenic temperatures for sensitive infrared, gamma-ray, and x-ray detectors. However, the vibration generated by the cryocooler's refrigeration compressor has long been identified as a critical integration issue. The key sensitivity is the extent to which the cooler's vibration harmonics excite spacecraft resonances and prevent on-board sensors from achieving their operational goals with respect to resolution and pointing accuracy. To reduce the cryocooler's vibration signature to acceptable levels, a variety of active vibration suppression technologies have been developed and implemented over the past 15 years. At this point, nearly all space cryocoolers have active vibration suppression systems built into their drive electronics that reduce the peak unbalanced forces to less than 1% of their original levels. Typical systems of today individually control the vibration in each of the cryocoolers lowest drive harmonics, with some controlling as many as 16 harmonics. A second vibration issue associated with cryocoolers is surviving launch. Here the same pistons and coldfingers that generate vibration during operation are often the most critical elements in terms of surviving high input acceleration levels. Since electrical power is generally not available during launch, passive vibration suppression technologies have been developed. Common vibration damping techniques include electrodynamic braking via shorted motor coils and the use of particle dampers on sensitive cryogenic elements. This paper provides an overview of the vibration characteristics of typical linear-drive space cryocoolers, outlines their history of development, and presents typical performance of the various active and passive vibration suppression systems being used.

  4. Nonequilibrium population of the first vibrational level of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) molecules in O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O gas flow at the output of chemical singlet-oxygen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zagidullin, M V

    2010-11-13

    The concentrations of electron-excited particles have been determined by measuring the absolute spectral irradiance in the range of 600 - 800 nm of O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O gas mixture at the output of a chemical singlet-oxygen generator (SOG). A nonequilibrium population of the first vibrational level of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) molecules has been clearly observed and found to depend on the water vapour content. In correspondence with the results of these measurements and according to the analysis of kinetics processes in the O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O mixture, the maximum number of vibrational quanta generated in the O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) + O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) {yields} O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) + O{sub 2}({sup 3{Sigma}}) reaction is 0.05 {+-} 0.03. It is concluded that the vibrational population of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) at the output of the SOG used in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser is close to thermal equilibrium value. (active media)

  5. The structure of oleamide films at the aluminum/oil interface and aluminum/air interface studied by Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS).

    PubMed

    Casford, Michael T L; Davies, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    The structure of oleamide (cis-9-octadecenamide) films on aluminum has been investigated by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Three different film deposition strategies were investigated: (i) films formed by equilibrium adsorption from oleamide solutions in oil, (ii) Langmuir-Blodgett films cast at 1 and 25 mN m(-1), (iii) thick spin-cast films. Both L-B and spin-cast films were examined in air and under oil. The adsorbate formed in the 1 mN m(-1) film in air showed little orientational order. For this film, the spectroscopic results and the ellipsometric thickness point to a relatively conformationally disordered monolayer that is oriented principally in the plane of the interface. Direct adsorption to the metal interface from oil results in SFG spectra of oleamide that are comparable to those observed for the 1 mN m(-1) L-B film in air. In contrast, SFG and RAIRS results for the 25 mN m(-1) film in air and SFG spectra of the spin-cast film in air both show strong conformational ordering and orientational alignment normal to the interface. The 25 mN m(-1) film has an ellipsometric thickness almost twice that of the 1 mN m(-1) L-B film. Taken in combination with the spectroscopic results, this is indicative of a well packed monolayer in air in which the hydrocarbon chain is in an essentially defect-free extended conformation with the methyl terminus oriented away from the surface. A similar structure is also deduced for the surface of the spin-cast film in air. Upon immersion of the 25 mN m(-1) L-B film in oil the SFG spectra show that this film rapidly adopts a relatively disordered structure similar to that seen for the 1 mN m(-1) L-B film in air. Immersion of the spin-cast film in oil results in the gradual disordering of the amide film over a period of several days until the observed spectra become essentially identical to those observed for direct adsorption of oleamide from oil.

  6. In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-06-30

    Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The α-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the

  7. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  8. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  9. Vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-03-01

    Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic glucocorticoid with potent anti-inflammatory activity that has been used effectively in the treatment of chronic asthma. The present work reports a vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate and gives proposed molecular assignments on the basis of ab initio calculations using BLYP density functional theory with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Several spectral features and band intensities are explained. This study generated a library of information that can be employed to aid the process monitoring of fluticasone propionate.

  10. System characterization in nonlinear random vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Linear structural models are frequently used for structural system characterization and analysis. In most situations they can provide satisfactory results, but under some circumstances they are insufficient for system definition. The present investigation proposes a model for nonlinear structure characterization, and demonstrates how the functions describing the model can be identified using a random vibration experiment. Further, it is shown that the model is sufficient to completely characterize the stationary random vibration response of a structure that has a harmonic frequency generating form of nonlinearity. An analytical example is presented to demonstrate the plausibility of the model.

  11. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  12. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  13. Calculating impedance vibrator antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminov, S. I.

    2017-07-01

    The technique of analytical reversal of a hypersingular equation is used to solve the equation of an impedance vibrator antenna. A numerical method for solving the equation is developed, and its efficiency is demonstrated.

  14. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  15. Vibrating-traction method for mechanical joint distraction.

    PubMed

    Minagi, S; Sakiya, M; Sato, T; Matsunaga, T; Natsuaki, N

    2000-08-01

    Mechanical static traction has been adopted as one of the treatment procedures for joint diseases and fractures. The effect of mechanical vibration on the mechanical traction of the temporomandibular joint was studied in six human subjects. A mechanical traction force of 2000 gf was applied as a dynamic traction force with mechanical vibration or as a static traction force. The dynamic traction force with vibration was applied for 5 min to the right temporomandibular joint using a vibrating-traction apparatus which generated mechanical vibrations of 1000, 3000 or 4000 Hz. Application of a static traction force for 5 min was used as a control condition. Vertical condylar displacement was mathematically evaluated from the deviation of the mandible using Eddy current displacement sensors which were attached to the maxillary dental arch. Among the three vibration frequencies, 3000 Hz resulted in the maximum vertical condylar displacement for all six subjects, showing the mean condylar displacement of 668+/-242 microm. In contrast, vibrations of 1000 and 4000 Hz showed a smaller traction effect. Application of the static traction force for 5 min resulted in a mean vertical condylar displacement of 5.7+/-4.9 microm, showing almost no traction effect to the joint. From the results of this study, it was revealed that vibrating traction could distract a joint more effectively than could static traction and that the traction force necessary for effective vibrating traction was less than that for static traction.

  16. Resolving problems of high vibration in hydroelectric machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, D. )

    1993-08-01

    High vibrations in hydroelectric machinery often will necessitate derating of a unit's capacity so that it remains in acceptable operating condition. Such was the case at B.C. Hydro's 700-MW Peace Canyon Generating Station. At this station, a 175-MW turbine-generator experienced high stator split-phase currents on cold starts and high turbine bearing vibration at high loads. The vibration, measured at 24 mils (0.024 inch) peak to peak, exceeded the as-set turbine bearing clearance of 14 mils (0.014-inch) diametrical. Consequently, the utility derated the machine by 25 MW for a period of approximately seven months. B.C. Hydro contacted Powertech Labs Inc., the utility's applied technology subsidiary, and assigned the task of resolving the problem and restoring the unit to design capacity. Using vibration amplitude and phase vibrations as functions of the unit's rotational speed and load, Powertech investigators concluded that the problem of high vibrations on both the generator and turbine bearings were the result of mechanical unbalance on the generator, an enlarged turbine bearing clearance, and a hydraulic unbalance on the Francis turbine. The first step Powertech investigators took to improve the vibration readings on the generator and turbine was to [open quotes]compromise balance[close quotes] the generator. In this approach, the machine is mechanically unbalanced to counter magnetic unbalance. With the generator unbalance corrected, Powertech investigators recommended that the turbine bearing be inspected and reset to the design clearance of 14 mils (0.014 inch) diametrical. Resetting of the bearing resulted in significantly lower turbine vibration readings at high loads (less than 10 mils).

  17. Development of active vibration isolation system for precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Z.; Lin, W. J.; Yang, G. L.

    2010-03-01

    It is a common understanding by manufacturers of precision machines that vibrations are a potentially disastrous threat to precision and throughput. To satisfy the quest for more stable processes and tighter critical dimension control in the microelectronics manufacturing industry, active vibration control becomes increasingly important for high-precision equipment developers. This paper introduced the development of an active vibration isolation system for precision machines. Innovative mechatronic approaches are investigated that can effectively suppress both environmental and payload-generated vibration. In this system, accelerometers are used as the feedback sensor, voice coil motors are used to generate the counter force, and a TI DSP controller is used to couple sensor measurements to actuator forces via specially designed control algorithms in real-time to counteract the vibration disturbances. Experimental results by using the developed AVI prototype showed promising performance on vibration attenuation. It demonstrated a reduction of the settling time from 2s to 0.1s under impulsive disturbances; and a vibration attenuation level of more than 20dB for harmonic disturbances. The technology can be used to suppress vibration for a wide range of precision machines to achieve fast settling time and higher accuracy.

  18. Development of active vibration isolation system for precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Z.; Lin, W. J.; Yang, G. L.

    2009-12-01

    It is a common understanding by manufacturers of precision machines that vibrations are a potentially disastrous threat to precision and throughput. To satisfy the quest for more stable processes and tighter critical dimension control in the microelectronics manufacturing industry, active vibration control becomes increasingly important for high-precision equipment developers. This paper introduced the development of an active vibration isolation system for precision machines. Innovative mechatronic approaches are investigated that can effectively suppress both environmental and payload-generated vibration. In this system, accelerometers are used as the feedback sensor, voice coil motors are used to generate the counter force, and a TI DSP controller is used to couple sensor measurements to actuator forces via specially designed control algorithms in real-time to counteract the vibration disturbances. Experimental results by using the developed AVI prototype showed promising performance on vibration attenuation. It demonstrated a reduction of the settling time from 2s to 0.1s under impulsive disturbances; and a vibration attenuation level of more than 20dB for harmonic disturbances. The technology can be used to suppress vibration for a wide range of precision machines to achieve fast settling time and higher accuracy.

  19. Mechanical vibration to electrical energy converter

    DOEpatents

    Kellogg, Rick Allen; Brotz, Jay Kristoffer

    2009-03-03

    Electromechanical devices that generate an electrical signal in response to an external source of mechanical vibrations can operate as a sensor of vibrations and as an energy harvester for converting mechanical vibration to electrical energy. The devices incorporate a magnet that is movable through a gap in a ferromagnetic circuit, wherein a coil is wound around a portion of the ferromagnetic circuit. A flexible coupling is used to attach the magnet to a frame for providing alignment of the magnet as it moves or oscillates through the gap in the ferromagnetic circuit. The motion of the magnet can be constrained to occur within a substantially linear range of magnetostatic force that develops due to the motion of the magnet. The devices can have ferromagnetic circuits with multiple arms, an array of magnets having alternating polarity and, encompass micro-electromechanical (MEM) devices.

  20. Vibration and structureborne noise in space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical models and computer programs for structural response calculations under action of mechanical point loads were developed for single wall shells (composite or aluminum), double wall shells (composite or aluminum), and single wall or double wall circular plates (aluminum). The design configuration of the habitability modules of the space station concept are expected to be discretely stiffened cylindrical shells with truncated cone type end caps or flat but stiffened circular end plates. Analytical formulations and response calculations were performed for the case where the stiffened shell is represented by an orthotropic shell model. The natural frequencies can be calculated. For application to low frequency (below 1000Hz) vibrations and noise generation, such a model might be adequate to evaluate vibration and noise transmission characteristics of space station habitability modules. Parametric studies are now being performed to assess interior noise environment inside a habitability module to mechanically induced vibrations.

  1. Sensorimotor control during peripheral muscle vibration: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jean-Alexandre; Normand, Martin C; Boisseau, Éric; Descarreaux, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether the application of vibration on a postural lower limb muscle altered the sensorimotor control of its joint as measured by isometric force production parameters and to compare present findings with previous work conducted on trunk muscle. Twenty healthy adults were asked to reproduce submaximal isometric plantar flexion under 3 different conditions: no vibration and vibration frequencies of 30 and 80 Hz on the soleus muscle. Time to peak torque, variable error, as well as constant error and absolute error in peak torque were calculated and compared across conditions. Under vibration, participants were significantly less accurate in the force reproduction task, as they mainly undershot the target torque. Applying an 80-Hz vibration resulted in a significantly higher negative constant error than lower-frequency vibration (30 Hz) or no-vibration condition. Decreases in isometric force production accuracy under vibration influence were also observed in a previous study conducted on trunk muscle. However, no difference in constant error was found between 30- and 80-Hz vibration conditions. The results suggest that acute soleus muscle vibration interferes with plantar flexion torque generation by distorting proprioceptive information, leading to decreases in accuracy of a force reproduction task. Similar results in an isometric trunk extension force reproduction task were found with vibration applied on erector spinae muscle. However, high-frequency vibration applied on soleus muscle elicited higher force reproduction errors than low-frequency stimulation. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  3. Optimum power and efficiency of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters with sinusoidal and random vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, M.; Elfrink, R.; Jambunathan, M.; de Nooijer, C.; Wang, Z.; Rovers, M.; Vullers, R.; van Schaijk, R.

    2012-10-01

    Assuming a sinusoidal vibration as input, an inertial piezoelectric harvester designed for maximum efficiency of the electromechanical energy conversion does not always lead to maximum power generation. In this case, what can be gained by optimizing the efficiency of the device? Detailing an answer to this question is the backbone of this paper. It is shown that, while the maximum efficiency operating condition does not always lead to maximum power generation, it corresponds always to maximum power per square unit deflection of the piezoelectric harvester. This understanding allows better optimization of the generated power when the deflection of the device is limited by hard stops. This is illustrated by experimental measurements on vacuum-packaged MEMS harvesters based on AlN as piezoelectric material. The results obtained for a sinusoidal vibration are extended to random vibrations. In this case, we demonstrate that the optimum generated power is directly proportional to the efficiency of the harvester, thus answering the initial question. For both types of studied vibrations, simple closed-form formulas describing the generated power and efficiency in optimum operating conditions are elaborated. These formulas are based on parameters that are easily measured or modeled. Therefore, they are useful performance metrics for existing piezoelectric harvesters.

  4. Vibrational dephasing in matter-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembold, A.; Schütz, G.; Röpke, R.; Chang, W. T.; Hwang, I. S.; Günther, A.; Stibor, A.

    2017-03-01

    Matter-wave interferometry is a highly sensitive tool to measure small perturbations in a quantum system. This property allows the creation of precision sensors for dephasing mechanisms such as mechanical vibrations. They are a challenge for phase measurements under perturbing conditions that cannot be perfectly decoupled from the interferometer, e.g. for mobile interferometric devices or vibrations with a broad frequency range. Here, we demonstrate a method based on second-order correlation theory in combination with Fourier analysis, to use an electron interferometer as a sensor that precisely characterizes the mechanical vibration spectrum of the interferometer. Using the high spatial and temporal single-particle resolution of a delay line detector, the data allows to reveal the original contrast and spatial periodicity of the interference pattern from ‘washed-out’ matter-wave interferograms that have been vibrationally disturbed in the frequency region between 100 and 1000 Hz. Other than with electromagnetic dephasing, due to excitations of higher harmonics and additional frequencies induced from the environment, the parts in the setup oscillate with frequencies that can be different to the applied ones. The developed numerical search algorithm is capable to determine those unknown oscillations and corresponding amplitudes. The technique can identify vibrational dephasing and decrease damping and shielding requirements in electron, ion, neutron, atom and molecule interferometers that generate a spatial fringe pattern on the detector plane.

  5. Vibration damping of the Cassini spacecraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergen, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Cassini is a large robotic spacecraft currently under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) whose interplanetary scientific mission is to explore Saturn, its ring, and its moons. Cassini is scheduled to launch on a Titan IV rocket with a Centaur upper stage booster, and will be protected during ascent through the atmosphere by a lightweight aluminum payload fairing (PLF). As a result of the extreme noise levels generated by the powerful Titan IV at liftoff, and the acoustic transparency of the PLF, Cassini is predicted to experience sever acoustic levels. Furthermore, the high acoustic levels, coupled with the size and configuration of the spacecraft, will induce unacceptable random vibration levels on the structure and critical spacecraft components. Studies showed that the use of Tuned Vibration Absorbers (TVAs) would be effective in reducing vibration. A series of reverberant acoustic tests were performed on a partial development test model (DTM) of Cassini to evaluate the effectiveness of TVAs in reducing the structural vibration. The test results showed that significant vibration attenuation was achieved.

  6. Active vibration control using DEAP actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Jones, Richard W.

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) is a new type of smart material, which has the potential to be used to provide effective actuation for a wide range of applications. The properties of DEAP material place it somewhere between those of piezoceramics and shape memory alloys. Of the range of DEAP-based actuators that have been developed those having a cylindrical configuration are among the most promising. This contribution introduces the use of a tubular type DEAP actuator for active vibration control purposes. Initially the DEAP-based tubular actuator to be used in this study, produced by Danfoss PolyPower A/S, is introduced along with the static and dynamic characteristics. Secondly an electromechanical model of the tubular actuator is briefly reviewed and its ability to model the actuator's hysteresis characteristics for a range of periodic input signals at different frequencies demonstrated. The model will be used to provide hysteresis compensation in future vibration isolation studies. Experimental active vibration control using the actuator is then examined, specifically active vibration isolation of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground vibration'. An adaptive feedforward control strategy is used to achieve this. The ability of the tubular actuator to reject both tonal and broadband random vibratory disturbances is then demonstrated.

  7. Effects of ultrasonic vibrations in micro-groove turning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Guo, Ping; Ehmann, Kornel F; Li, Yingguang

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic vibration cutting is an efficient cutting process for mechanical micro-machining. This process can generate intricate surface textures with different geometric characteristics. Micro-grooves/micro-channels are among the most frequently encountered micro-structures and, as such, are the focus of this paper. The effectiveness of both the linear and ultrasonic elliptical vibration-assisted machining technique in micro-groove turning is analyzed and discussed in the paper. The paper first investigates the mechanisms of micro-groove generation induced by the linear and elliptical vibration modes. A simplified cutting force analysis method is given to compare the effectiveness of the two modes in micro-groove turning. The surface roughness of the generated micro-grooves is analyzed next and theoretical expressions are given for the two cases. Finally, micro-groove turning experiments are conducted to compare the influences of the two vibration modes on the cutting forces and the surface roughness. The experimental results show that linear vibration-assisted micro-groove turning leads to better surface roughness as compared to the elliptical vibration-assisted case, while elliptical vibration-assisted micro-groove turning shows advantages in terms of decreasing the cutting forces.

  8. Low-frequency vibration control of floating slab tracks using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyang; Yang, Jizhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Longqing; Cai, Chengbiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to effectively and robustly suppress the low-frequency vibrations of floating slab tracks (FSTs) using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). First, the optimal locations where the DVAs are attached are determined by modal analysis with a finite element model of the FST. Further, by identifying the equivalent mass of the concerned modes, the optimal stiffness and damping coefficient of each DVA are obtained to minimise the resonant vibration amplitudes based on fixed-point theory. Finally, a three-dimensional coupled dynamic model of a metro vehicle and the FST with the DVAs is developed based on the nonlinear Hertzian contact theory and the modified Kalker linear creep theory. The track irregularities are included and generated by means of a time-frequency transformation technique. The effect of the DVAs on the vibration absorption of the FST subjected to the vehicle dynamic loads is evaluated with the help of the insertion loss in one-third octave frequency bands. The sensitivities of the mass ratio of DVAs and the damping ratio of steel-springs under the floating slab are discussed as well, which provided engineers with the DVA's adjustable room for vibration mitigation. The numerical results show that the proposed DVAs could effectively suppress low-frequency vibrations of the FST when tuned correctly and attached properly. The insertion loss due to the attachment of DVAs increases as the mass ratio increases, whereas it decreases with the increase in the damping ratio of steel-springs.

  9. The Physics of Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippard, A. B.

    1989-11-01

    The study of vibration in physical systems is an important part of almost all fields in physics and engineering. This work, originally published in two volumes, examines the classical aspects in Part I and the quantum oscillator in Part II. The classical linear vibrator is treated first and the underlying unity of all linear oscillations in electrical, mechanical and acoustic systems is emphasized. Following this the book turns to the treatment of nonlinear vibrations, a field with which engineers and physicists are generally less familiar. In Part II the emphasis turns to quantum systems, that is those systems which can only be adequately described by quantum mechanics. The treatment concentrates on vibrations in atoms and molecules and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The similarities of classical and quantum methods are stressed and the limits of the classical treatment are examined. Throughout the book, each phenomenon discussed is illustrated with many examples and theory and experiment are compared. Although the reader may find that the physics discussed is demanding and the concepts are subtle in places, all mathematics used is familiar to both engineers and experimental scientists. Although not a textbook this is a useful introduction to the more advanced mathematical treatment of vibrations as it bridges the gap between the basic principles and more specialized concepts. It will be of great interest to advanced undergraduates and postgraduates as well as applied mathematicians, physicists and engineers in university and industry.

  10. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  11. Adaptive control system for vibration harmonics of cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baoyu; Wu, Yinong

    2013-06-01

    Vibration disturbances generated by cryocooler, representing in a series of harmonics, are critical issue in practical application. A control system including electronic circuit and mechanical actuator has been developed to attenuate the vibration. The control algorithm executes as a series of adaptive narrowband notch filters to reduce corresponding harmonics. The algorithm does not require actuator transfer function, thus ensure its adaptiveness. Using this algorithm, all the vibration harmonics of cryocooler were attenuated by a factor of more than 45.9 dB, i.e., the residual vibration force was reduced from 20.1Nrms to 0.102Nrms over the 300 Hz control bandwidth, the converging time is only less than 20 seconds, and the power consumption of mechanical actuator is less than half a watt. The vibration control system has achieved the general requirement of Infrared application.

  12. Analysis of real-time vibration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, a few structures have been instrumented to provide continuous vibration data in real time, recording not only large-amplitude motions generated by extreme loads, but also small-amplitude motions generated by ambient loads. The main objective in continuous recording is to track any changes in structural characteristics, and to detect damage after an extreme event, such as an earthquake or explosion. The Fourier-based spectral analysis methods have been the primary tool to analyze vibration data from structures. In general, such methods do not work well for real-time data, because real-time data are mainly composed of ambient vibrations with very low amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios. The long duration, linearity, and the stationarity of ambient data, however, allow us to utilize statistical signal processing tools, which can compensate for the adverse effects of low amplitudes and high noise. The analysis of real-time data requires tools and techniques that can be applied in real-time; i.e., data are processed and analyzed while being acquired. This paper presents some of the basic tools and techniques for processing and analyzing real-time vibration data. The topics discussed include utilization of running time windows, tracking mean and mean-square values, filtering, system identification, and damage detection.

  13. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  14. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  15. Vibration control of ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, J.-U.

    2011-09-01

    MPIA is the PI institute of the MCAO-supported Fizeau imager LINC-NIRVANA at the LBT, and a partner of the E-ELT first light NIR imager MICADO (both SCAO and MCAO assisted). LINC-NIRVANA is a true pathfinder for future ELT-AO imagers both in terms of size and technology. I will present our vibration control strategies, involving accelerometer based real-time vibration measurements, feedforward and feedback optical path control, predictive filtering, vibration sensitive active control of actuators, and the development of a dynamical model of the entire telescope. Our experiences, made with LINC-NIRVANA, will be fed into the MICADO structural AO design to reach highest on-sky sensitivity.

  16. Experience of an assessment of the vertical Francis hydroturbines vibration state at heads from 40 to 300 m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, E.; Zaharov, A.; Ilin, S.; Kuznetsov, I.; Nikiforov, A.

    2016-11-01

    The article covers a choice of main vibration parameter at an assessment of a vibration state of vertical Francis hydroturbines. At present time vibration velocity and vibration displacement are adopted as main parameters of non-rotating parts vibration in the international standard ISO 10816-5:2000 «Mechanical vibration — Evaluation of machine vibration by measurements on non-rotating parts — Part 5: Machine sets in hydraulic power generating and pumping plants» (further ISO 10816-5:2000). The hydraulic turbines refer to the slow-speed machines with rotation speed from 60 to 600 rpm (∼ 1 - 10 Hz). So maximum vibration displacements and dynamic stresses in hydraulic turbines supporting parts are in low-frequency region of vibration spectrum. In this report comparative data of hydro units supporting parts vibration velocity and vibration displacement measurements are presented. Using these data assessment of hydro units vibration state has been done. It is shown that the assessment of a hydro unit vibration state using parameter "vibration displacement" corresponds to the fundamental principles of operational reliability and fatigue strength of hydro units supporting parts. It is noted that when hydro units operate at small and partial loads with high low-frequency unsteady flow (f < frot) we have the smallest vibration velocity and the greatest vibration displacement of hydro units supporting parts. Specialists of LMZ (Saint-Petersburg) have developed Russian standard RD 24.023.117-88 «Vibration measurement and evaluation vibration state of vertical hydraulic turbines» which was published in 1989. In this document vibration displacement was considered as a main parameter. Evaluation of turbine vibration was performed according to the effecrive value of turbine supporting parts vibration displacement.

  17. Tool-specific performance of vibration-reducing gloves for attenuating palm-transmitted vibrations in three orthogonal directions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Peterson, Donald R.; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Warren, Christopher; Asaki, Takafumi; Kudernatsch, Simon; Brammer, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been increasingly used to help reduce vibration exposure, but it remains unclear how effective these gloves are. The purpose of this study was to estimate tool-specific performances of VR gloves for reducing the vibrations transmitted to the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions (3-D) in an attempt to assess glove effectiveness and aid in the appropriate selection of these gloves. Four typical VR gloves were considered in this study, two of which can be classified as anti-vibration (AV) gloves according to the current AV glove test standard. The average transmissibility spectrum of each glove in each direction was synthesized based on spectra measured in this study and other spectra collected from reported studies. More than seventy vibration spectra of various tools or machines were considered in the estimations, which were also measured in this study or collected from reported studies. The glove performance assessments were based on the percent reduction of frequency-weighted acceleration as is required in the current standard for assessing the risk of vibration exposures. The estimated tool-specific vibration reductions of the gloves indicate that the VR gloves could slightly reduce (<5%) or marginally amplify (<10%) the vibrations generated from low-frequency (<25 Hz) tools or those vibrating primarily along the axis of the tool handle. With other tools, the VR gloves could reduce palm-transmitted vibrations in the range of 5%–58%, primarily depending on the specific tool and its vibration spectra in the three directions. The two AV gloves were not more effective than the other gloves with some of the tools considered in this study. The implications of the results are discussed. Relevance to industry Hand-transmitted vibration exposure may cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves are considered as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. This study provides useful information

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  19. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  20. Vibrational structure theory: new vibrational wave function methods for calculation of anharmonic vibrational energies and vibrational contributions to molecular properties.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ove

    2007-06-21

    A number of recently developed theoretical methods for the calculation of vibrational energies and wave functions are reviewed. Methods for constructing the appropriate quantum mechanical Hamilton operator are briefly described before reviewing a particular branch of theoretical methods for solving the nuclear Schrödinger equation. The main focus is on wave function methods using the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) as starting point, and includes vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), vibrational Møller-Plesset (VMP) theory, and vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) theory. The convergence of the different methods towards the full vibrational configuration interaction (FVCI) result is discussed. Finally, newly developed vibrational response methods for calculation of vibrational contributions to properties, energies, and transition probabilities are discussed.

  1. Human discomfort response to noise combined with vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted (1) to determine the effects of combined environmental noise and vertical vibration upon human subjective discomfort response, (2) to develop a model for the prediction of passenger discomfort response to the combined environment, and (3) to develop a set of noise-vibration curves for use as criteria in ride quality design. Subjects were exposed to parametric combinations of noise and vibrations through the use of a realistic laboratory simulator. Results indicated that accurate prediction of passenger ride comfort requires knowledge of both the level and frequency content of the noise and vibration components of a ride environment as well as knowledge of the interactive effects of combined noise and vibration. A design tool in the form of an empirical model of passenger discomfort response to combined noise and vertical vibration was developed and illustrated by several computational examples. Finally, a set of noise-vibration criteria curves were generated to illustrate the fundamental design trade-off possible between passenger discomfort and the noise-vibration levels that produce the discomfort.

  2. Oscillation of the lung by chest-wall vibration.

    PubMed

    Binks, A P; Bloch-Salisbury, E; Banzett, R B; Schwartzstein, R M

    2001-07-01

    Vibration of the thoracic surface has been shown to modify the drive to breathe and the sensation of dyspnea. It has been suggested that respiratory muscle afferents generate these effects. The possibility that the consequences of chest-wall vibration also involve intra-pulmonary afferents led us to investigate whether such vibration reaches the airways. Two vibratory stimuli were independently applied to four chest-wall sites and two control sites on eight healthy subjects. During separate breath holds, the vibrator was held on each site while subjects periodically opened and closed the pharynx. Airway pressure (P(AW)) was measured at the mouth. Spectral analysis of P(AW) showed pressure oscillations occurred at the same frequency as that of the vibrators when the pharynx was open; oscillation amplitude was vastly reduced when the pharynx was closed. Oscillation amplitude was also significantly larger during vibration at greater amplitude. These data demonstrate that vibration over the chest-wall vibrates the lung and could potentially excite intrapulmonary receptors.

  3. Jet formation at interaction of a vibrating plate with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V. A.; Kopysov, S. P.; Tonkov, L. Y.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the mechanism of jet formation on liquid surface near the edge of a vibrating plate that is partially immersed in the liquid. Under the conditions of resonant bending vibrations, the vibrating plate excites capillary waves in the form of Faraday ripples on the surface of the liquid layer wetting the plate surface. Two-dimensional capillary waves also appear on the curved surface of the liquid near the edges of the vibrating plate. The vibrations of the plate area generate hydrodynamic pressure on the liquid surface, which initiates surface eddy flows. At a certain position of the vibrating plate in the liquid, capillary oscillations in the form of standing waves appear along the boundary of the wetting layer of the liquid, directly under the free edge of the plate. The vibrations of the plate edge modulate the standing waves in the transverse direction, which results in the periodic variation of the surface curvature of the wetting liquid layer, from negative to positive values. The inertia forces, periodically varying with the frequency of the plate vibrations, combined with the Laplace pressure, in the excited standing capillary waves on the surface flow under the plate edge, initiates the periodic ejection of particles of the liquid forming a jet.

  4. Tool-specific performance of vibration-reducing gloves for attenuating palm-transmitted vibrations in three orthogonal directions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; Peterson, Donald R; Xu, Xueyan S; McDowell, Thomas W; Warren, Christopher; Asaki, Takafumi; Kudernatsch, Simon; Brammer, Antony

    2014-11-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been increasingly used to help reduce vibration exposure, but it remains unclear how effective these gloves are. The purpose of this study was to estimate tool-specific performances of VR gloves for reducing the vibrations transmitted to the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions (3-D) in an attempt to assess glove effectiveness and aid in the appropriate selection of these gloves. Four typical VR gloves were considered in this study, two of which can be classified as anti-vibration (AV) gloves according to the current AV glove test standard. The average transmissibility spectrum of each glove in each direction was synthesized based on spectra measured in this study and other spectra collected from reported studies. More than seventy vibration spectra of various tools or machines were considered in the estimations, which were also measured in this study or collected from reported studies. The glove performance assessments were based on the percent reduction of frequency-weighted acceleration as is required in the current standard for assessing the risk of vibration exposures. The estimated tool-specific vibration reductions of the gloves indicate that the VR gloves could slightly reduce (<5%) or marginally amplify (<10%) the vibrations generated from low-frequency (<25 Hz) tools or those vibrating primarily along the axis of the tool handle. With other tools, the VR gloves could reduce palm-transmitted vibrations in the range of 5%-58%, primarily depending on the specific tool and its vibration spectra in the three directions. The two AV gloves were not more effective than the other gloves with some of the tools considered in this study. The implications of the results are discussed.

  5. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  6. Molecular histopathology by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-07-01

    A rapid label-free approach for molecular histopathology is presented and reviewed. Broadband vibrational spectra are generated by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging (NIVI), a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)- based technique that uses interferometry and signal processing approaches to acquire Raman-like profiles with suppression of the non-resonant background. This allows for the generation of images that provide contrast based on quantitative chemical composition with high spatial and spectral resolution. Algorithms are demonstrated for reducing the diagnostic spectral information into color-coded composite images for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in skin, as well as differentiating normal from abnormal tissue in a pre-clinical tumor model for human breast cancer. This technology and methodology could result in an alternative method to the traditional histological staining and subjective interpretation procedure currently used in the diagnosis of disease, and has the potential for future in vivo molecular histopathology.

  7. Gerotor and bearing system for whirling mass orbital vibrator

    DOEpatents

    Brett, James Ford; Westermark, Robert Victor; Turner, Jr., Joey Earl; Lovin, Samuel Scott; Cole, Jack Howard; Myers, Will

    2007-02-27

    A gerotor and bearing apparatus for a whirling mass orbital vibrator which generates vibration in a borehole. The apparatus includes a gerotor with an inner gear rotated by a shaft having one less lobe than an outer gear. A whirling mass is attached to the shaft. At least one bearing is attached to the shaft so that the bearing engages at least one sleeve. A mechanism is provided to rotate the inner gear, the mass and the bearing in a selected rotational direction in order to cause the mass, the inner gear, and the bearing to backwards whirl in an opposite rotational direction. The backwards whirling mass creates seismic vibrations.

  8. Vibrational Photoacoustic Tomography: Chemical Imaging beyond the Ballistic Regime

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Proof-of-concept of vibrational photoacoustic tomography is demonstrated with a homebuilt Raman laser generating greater than 100 mJ of energy per pulse at 1197 nm wavelength. We employed this system for excitation of second overtone transition of C-H bonds. Vibrational photoacoustic signal from C-H rich polyethylene tube phantom placed under 3 cm thick chicken breast tissue was obtained with a signal to noise ratio of 2.5. Further, we recorded photoacoustic image of a polyethylene ring placed under 5 mm chicken tissue with excellent contrast. This development opens new opportunities of performing label free vibrational imaging in the deep tissue regime. PMID:24224071

  9. Vibrational Photoacoustic Tomography: Chemical Imaging beyond the Ballistic Regime.

    PubMed

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-10-03

    Proof-of-concept of vibrational photoacoustic tomography is demonstrated with a homebuilt Raman laser generating greater than 100 mJ of energy per pulse at 1197 nm wavelength. We employed this system for excitation of second overtone transition of C-H bonds. Vibrational photoacoustic signal from C-H rich polyethylene tube phantom placed under 3 cm thick chicken breast tissue was obtained with a signal to noise ratio of 2.5. Further, we recorded photoacoustic image of a polyethylene ring placed under 5 mm chicken tissue with excellent contrast. This development opens new opportunities of performing label free vibrational imaging in the deep tissue regime.

  10. DOE/ANL/HTRI heat exchanger tube vibration data bank

    SciTech Connect

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1980-02-01

    Development of a new heat exchanger tube vibration data bank at Argonne National Laboratory is described. Comprehensive case histories on heat exchangers that have experienced tube-vibration problems and units that have been trouble-free are accumulated and this information is rendered available for evaluation, improvement, and development of vibration-prediction methods and design guidelines. Discussions include difficulties in generating a data bank, data form development, and solicitation efforts. Also included are 15 case histories upon which the data bank will be built. As new case histories are received, they will be assembled and published as addenda to this report.

  11. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; CAP,JEROME S.; TOGAMI,THOMAS C.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD,JAMES RONALD

    1999-11-11

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented.

  12. Vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.

    1987-10-01

    Experiments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft and observations made by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) have provided evidence for the existence of energetic particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere of Jupiter from the magnetosphere. This auroral precipitation has been shown to generate large ionization and dissociation rates, to excite auroral emissions, and also to vibrationally excite molecular hydrogen. A theoretical model of vibrationally excited H2 in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter is presented in this paper. Models are considered for both the auroral region and also for lower latitudes, where H2 is vibrationally excited owing to processes associated with the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation.

  13. Toral lateral line units of goldfish, Carassius auratus, are sensitive to the position and vibration direction of a vibrating sphere.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gunnar; Klein, Adrian; Mogdans, Joachim; Bleckmann, Horst

    2012-09-01

    We recorded the responses of lateral line units in the midbrain torus semicircularis of goldfish, Carassius auratus, to a 50-Hz vibrating sphere and determined the unit's spatial receptive fields for various distances between fish and sphere and for different directions of sphere vibration. All but one unit responded to the vibrating sphere with an increase in discharge rate. Only a proportion (25%) of the units exhibited phase-locked responses. Receptive fields were narrow or broad and contained one, two or more areas of increased discharge rate. The data show that the receptive fields of toral lateral line units are in many respects similar to those of brainstem units but differ from those of afferent nerve fibres. The responses of primary afferents represent the pressure gradient pattern generated by a vibrating sphere and provide information about sphere location and vibration direction. Across the array of lateral line neuromasts, the fish brain in principle can derive this information. Nevertheless, toral units tuned to a distinct sphere location or sensitive to a distinct sphere vibration direction were not found. Therefore, it is conceivable that the torus semicircularis uses a population code to determine spatial location and vibration direction of a vibrating sphere.

  14. C0 Vibrational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Craig D.; Johnson, Todd; Martens, Mike; Syphers, Mike; McCrory, E.; McGee, Mike; Reilly, Rob; /Fermilab

    1999-08-01

    This is an attempt to document some of the measurements and analysis relating to the modulation of the spill due to the vibration of the magnets in the new C0 area. Not all of the relevant graphs were saved at the time, however an attempt has been made to show representative illustrations albeit not in the proper chronological order.

  15. Friction induced rail vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralov, Ivan; Sinapov, Petko; Nedelchev, Krasimir; Ignatov, Ignat

    2012-11-01

    A model of rail, considered as multiple supported beam, subjected on friction induced vibration is studied in this work using FEM. The model is presented as continuous system and the mass and elastic properties of a real object are taken into account. The friction forces are nonlinear functions of the relative velocity during slipping. The problem is solved using Matlab Simulink.

  16. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  17. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  18. Polyatomic molecule vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Polyatomic molecule vibrations are analyzed as harmonic vibrations along normal coordinates. The energy eigenvalues are found for linear and nonlinear symmetric triatomic molecules for valence bond models of the potential function with arbitrary coupling coefficients; such models can usually be fitted to observed energy levels with reasonably good accuracy. Approximate normal coordinates for the H2O molecule are discussed. Degenerate vibrational modes such as occur in CO2 are analyzed and expressions for Fermi resonance between close-lying states of the same symmetry are developed. The bending modes of linear triatomic molecules are expressed in terms of Laguerre polynomials in cylindrical coordinates as well as in terms of Hermite polynomials in Cartesian coordinates. The effects of large-amplitude bending such as occur in the C3 molecule are analyzed, along with anharmonic effects, which split the usually degenerate bending mode energy levels. Finally, the vibrational frequencies, degeneracies, and symmetry properties of XY3, X2Y2, and XY4 type molecules are discussed.

  19. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  20. Engine-Vibration Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolmei, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed circuit would monitor vibration spectrum of engines under test or in service. It could detect subtle out-of-specification conditions and could be programed to shut down engine if an out-of-limits condition develops. Possible uses of monitor are in bench testing automobiles and outboard motors and as a safety device in very critical engine applications.

  1. Pickin’ Up Good Vibrations

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Jeremy C.

    2017-03-14

    Although conformational change has long been recognized as critical to protein function, whether the same goes for equilibrium dynamical fluctuations has been the subject of myriad squabbles. There are also those who rigidly deny any dynamical effects, those who claim fluctuations drive functional conformational change, while those who claim to have snared exquisitely evolved function-channeling vibrations.

  2. Simulation of Satellite Vibration Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettacchioli, Alain

    2014-06-01

    During every mechanical qualification test of satellites on vibrator, we systematically notice beating phenomena that appear every time we cross a mode's frequency. There could lead to an over-qualification of the tested specimen when the beating reaches a maximum and a under-qualification when the beating passes by a minimum. On a satellite, three lateral modes raise such a problem in a recurring way: the first structure mode (between 10 and 15 hertz) and the two tanks modes (between 35 and 50 hertz).To step forward in the resolution of this problem, we are developing a simulator which is based on the identification of the responses of the accelerometers that are fixed on the satellite and on the shaker slip table. The estimated transfer functions then allow to reconstruct at once the sensors response and the drive which generated them.For the simulation, we do not select all the sensors but only those on the slip table and those used to limit the input level (notching). We may also add those which were close to generate a notching.To perform its calculations, the simulator reproduces on one hand the unity amplitude signal (cola) which serves as frequency reference for the sweep achievement (generally 3 octaves per minute from 5 to 100 and even 150 Hertz), and on the other hand, the vibrator control loop. The drive amplitude is calculated at each cola's period by taking into account a compression factor. The control applied through the amplifier to the shaker coil is the product of this amplitude by the cola. The simulated measurements are updated at each sampling period thanks to the propagation of the identified model. The superposition of these curves on those supplied by real sensors during the tests allows to validate the simulation.Thereby, it seems possible to actively control the beatings thanks to a real-time corrector which uses these identifications.

  3. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Rocha, Rodney

    1989-01-01

    An analytical model of the feedback control system which estimates the voltage generated by the piezoelectric sensor as a function of the dynamic stress at the sensor location and the force exerted by the driver piezoelectric as a function of signal gain is developed. The analytical results are compared to measured results for a cantilever beam excited to vibrate in its first natural mode. The estimated increase in the first mode damping factor is in good agreement with the measured results.

  4. Robot vibration control using inertial damping forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Han; Book, Wayne J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper concerns the suppression of the vibration of a large flexible robot by inertial forces of a small robot which is located at the tip of the large robot. A controller for generating damping forces to a large robot is designed based on the two time scale model. The controller does not need to calculate the quasi-steady variables and is efficient in computation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the inertial forces and the controller designed.

  5. Robot vibration control using inertial damping forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Han; Book, Wayne J.

    1989-01-01

    The suppression is examined of the vibration of a large flexible robot by inertial forces of a small robot which is located at the tip of the large robot. A controller for generating damping forces to a large robot is designed based on the two time scale mode. The controller does not need to calculate the quasi-steady state variables and is efficient in computation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the inertial forces and the controller designed.

  6. Vibration and acoustic testing of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft are subjected to a variety of dynamics environments, which may include: quasi-static, vibration and acoustic loads at launch: pyrotechnic shocks generated by separation mechanisms; on orbit jitter; and sometimes, planetary landing loads. There is a trend in the aerospace industry to rely more on structural analyses and less on testing to simulate these environments, because dynamics testing of spacecraft is time consuming, risky and expensive.

  7. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration.

    PubMed

    Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Noise and vibration control for HVAC and piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yerges, J.F.; Yerges, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    This article offers engineering advice on how to avoid noise and vibration problems through good mechanical engineering design and strategic communication with other members of the construction team. The design of ducted HVAC systems must address six distinct but related issues--airborne equipment noise, equipment vibration, ductborne fan noise, duct breakout noise, flow generated noise, and ductborne crosstalk. Each and every one of these issues must be addressed, or the design will fail.

  9. Active vibration control of a plate using vibration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizuka, T.; Nakano, K.

    2016-09-01

    Minimization of the squared transverse velocity at a measurement point does not guarantee the global vibration reduction for the whole structure, and the control result is dependent on the measurement point. Flexibility of the sensor placement is usually limited in practice. If the measurement point is near the nodal line of the mode, this mode cannot be decreased effectively and even increased by the control force. This study investigates the control method with the error criterion being the sum of the squared vibration velocity and the squared vibration gradients (spatial gradients) at a measurement point. Since the spatial distributions of the vibration velocity and its gradients are different, the aforementioned problem caused by the nodal line are mitigated. The numerical examples indicate that the performance of the control including the vibration gradients is less dependent on the measurement point, and this method achieves a better global vibration reduction, than the conventional method, i.e., minimization of the squared vibration velocity.

  10. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  11. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it

  12. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  13. Experimental implementation of analog-to-digital converter based on the reversible ripple counter

    SciTech Connect

    Filippenko, L.V.; Kaplunenko, V.K.; Khabipov, M.I.; Vystavkin, A.N. ); Koshelets, V.P.; Likharev, K.K.; Mukhanov, O.A.; Rylov, S.V.; Semenov, V.K. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on A/D converter which includes a comparator, reversible binary counter with DC outputs designed, fabricated and tested. The comparator generates two trains of the SFQ pulses in response to increasing or decreasing of the input signal. The pulses are transferred through SFQ transmission lines to the adding and diminishing inputs of a reversible counter. The reversible counter has been realized by supplementing to the usual counter the SFQ transmission lines, splitters, and confluence elements for sending diminish pulses directly to each bit. Non-destructive read-out of the counter contents is carried out by SFQ/DC converters connected to each counter bit.

  14. Vibrational molecular modulation in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu Wei; Chen, Wei-Jan; Kung, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    Detailed numerical modeling of using the vibrational coherence of H2 for molecular modulation is presented. The focus of the calculation is on a strongly driven system aimed at producing many sidebands in the presence of Doppler broadening and the effects of collisions at room temperature. It is shown that Dicke narrowing that reduces the Doppler width plays a critical role in high order sideband generation in room temperature H2 . In addition, the calculation shows that generation of many sidebands favors the phased state as has been reported in all gas phase experiments and is primarily a consequence of the Stark shifts that result from the applied high intensities. The influence of self-focusing in the gas medium that has been conjectured in previous studies is only secondary. The numerical results agree with experimental data obtained in our laboratory, where we have succeeded in generating collinearly propagating Raman sidebands with wavelengths that range from 2216nm in the infrared to 133nm in the vacuum ultraviolet. The frequencies covered by these sidebands span over four octaves for a total of more than 70600cm-1 in the optical region of the spectrum.

  15. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  16. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, Basil A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration.

  17. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1987-07-07

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  18. Free vibrations of delaminated beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, M.-H. H.; Grady, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Free vibration of laminated composite beams is studied. The effect of interply delaminations on natural frequencies and mode shapes is evaluated both analytically and experimentally. A generalized vibrational principle is used to formulate the equation of motion and associated boundary conditions for the free vibration of a composite beam with a delamination of arbitrary size and location. The effect of coupling between longitudinal vibration and bending vibration is considered. This coupling effect is shown to significantly affect the calculated natural frequencies and mode shapes of the delaminated beam.

  19. Railway ground vibrations induced by wheel and rail singular defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroussis, Georges; Connolly, David P.; Alexandrou, Georgios; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2015-10-01

    Railway local irregularities are a growing source of ground-borne vibration and can cause negative environmental impacts, particularly in urban areas. Therefore, this paper analyses the effect of railway track singular defects (discontinuities) on ground vibration generation and propagation. A vehicle/track/soil numerical railway model is presented, capable of accurately predicting vibration levels. The prediction model is composed of a multibody vehicle model, a flexible track model and a finite/infinite element soil model. Firstly, analysis is undertaken to assess the ability of wheel/rail contact models to accurately simulate the force generation at the wheel/rail contact, in the presence of a singular defect. It is found that, although linear contact models are sufficient for modelling ground vibration on smooth tracks, when singular defects are present higher accuracy wheel/rail models are required. Furthermore, it is found that the variation in wheel/rail force during the singular defect contact depends on the track flexibility, and thus requires a fully coupled vehicle/track/foundation model. Next, a parametric study of ground vibrations generated by singular rail and wheel defects is undertaken. Six shapes of discontinuity are modelled, representing various defect types such as transition zones, switches, crossings, rail joints and wheel flats. The vehicle is modelled as an AM96 train set and it is found that ground vibration levels are highly sensitive to defect height, length and shape.

  20. Effect of grease type on abnormal vibration of ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Takayoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Igarashib, Teruo

    2003-12-01

    The abnormal vibration of ball bearings lubricated with grease was studied. The test bearings were lubricated with three types of grease: Li soap/silicone oil grease, Na soap/mineral oil grease and Li soap/mineral oil grease. In the experiments, the axial-loaded ball bearings were operated at a constant rotational speed, and the vibration and the outer ring temperatures of the test bearings were measured. In addition, the shear stress and shear rate of the greases were measured by a rheometer. The experimental results showed that the abnormal vibration occurs on the test bearings lubricated with all three types of grease. Based on the experimental results, the generating mechanisms of the abnormal vibrations were discussed. From the discussions, it seems reasonable to conclude: (1) Li soap/silicone oil grease and Na soap/mineral oil grease both have a negative damping moment characteristic. The abnormal vibrations of the ball bearings lubricated with these greases are generated by the negative damping moment. (2) The abnormal vibration of the ball bearings lubricated with Li soap/mineral oil grease is generated by the decreasing positive damping moment of the grease due to the rising temperature.

  1. Low-energy electron attachment and detachment in vibrationally excited oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Anokhin, E. M.

    2009-11-01

    Three-body electron attachment to O2 molecules and electron detachment from O_{2}^{-} ions have been theoretically studied in vibrationally excited oxygen and O2-containing mixtures. Assuming that electron attachment and detachment proceed via the formation of vibrationally excited temporary O_{2}^{-} ions, the rates of these processes were determined on the basis of the statistical approach for the vibrational transfer and relaxation in collisions between O_{2}^{-} ions and O2 molecules. The calculated attachment and detachment rate constants turned out to agree well with available measurements in unexcited oxygen. This method was extended to calculate attachment and detachment rates in vibrationally excited oxygen. It was shown that the effect of vibrational excitation on electron detachment is profound, whereas attachment of low-energy electrons to vibrationally excited O2 is inefficient. The calculated vibrational distribution of stable O_{2}^{-} ions turned out to be non-equilibrium in an excited gas and the effective vibrational temperature of the ions was much lower than the vibrational temperature of molecules. An analytical method was suggested to determine this distribution and the effective vibrational temperature. The calculated rate constants were used to simulate the formation and decay of an electron-beam-generated plasma in N2 : O2 mixtures at elevated vibrational temperatures. The calculations showed that vibrational excitation of molecules leads to orders of magnitude increase in the plasma density and in the plasma lifetime, in agreement with available observations.

  2. Vibration-reducing gloves: transmissibility at the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Thomas W.; Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves are commonly used as a means to help control exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations generated by powered hand tools. The objective of this study was to characterise the vibration transmissibility spectra and frequency-weighted vibration transmissibility of VR gloves at the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions. Seven adult males participated in the evaluation of seven glove models using a three-dimensional hand–arm vibration test system. Three levels of hand coupling force were applied in the experiment. This study found that, in general, VR gloves are most effective at reducing vibrations transmitted to the palm along the forearm direction. Gloves that are found to be superior at reducing vibrations in the forearm direction may not be more effective in the other directions when compared with other VR gloves. This casts doubts on the validity of the standardised glove screening test. Practitioner Summary This study used human subjects to measure three-dimensional vibration transmissibility of vibration-reducing gloves at the palm and identified their vibration attenuation characteristics. This study found the gloves to be most effective at reducing vibrations along the forearm direction. These gloves did not effectively attenuate vibration along the handle axial direction. PMID:24160755

  3. Vibration-reducing gloves: transmissibility at the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Thomas W; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves are commonly used as a means to help control exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations generated by powered hand tools. The objective of this study was to characterise the vibration transmissibility spectra and frequency-weighted vibration transmissibility of VR gloves at the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions. Seven adult males participated in the evaluation of seven glove models using a three-dimensional hand-arm vibration test system. Three levels of hand coupling force were applied in the experiment. This study found that, in general, VR gloves are most effective at reducing vibrations transmitted to the palm along the forearm direction. Gloves that are found to be superior at reducing vibrations in the forearm direction may not be more effective in the other directions when compared with other VR gloves. This casts doubts on the validity of the standardised glove screening test. Practitioner Summary: This study used human subjects to measure three-dimensional vibration transmissibility of vibration-reducing gloves at the palm and identified their vibration attenuation characteristics. This study found the gloves to be most effective at reducing vibrations along the forearm direction. These gloves did not effectively attenuate vibration along the handle axial direction.

  4. Payload vibration isolation in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Richard M.

    1990-01-01

    Many in-space research experiments require the microgravity environment attainable near the center of mass of the Space Station. Disturbances to the structure surrounding an experiment may lead to vibration levels that will degrade the microgravity environment and undermine the experiment's validity. In-flight disturbances will include vibration transmission from nearby equipment and excitation from crew activity. Isolation of these vibration-sensitive experiments is required. Analytical and experimental work accomplished to develop a payload (experiment) isolation system for use in space is described. The isolation scheme allows the payload to float freely within a prescribed boundary while being kept centered with forces generated by small jets of air. The vibration criterion was a maximum payload acceleration of 10 micro-g's (9.81x10(exp -5)m/s(exp 2), independent of frequency. An experimental setup, composed of a cart supported by air bearings on a flat granite slab, was designed and constructed to simulate the microgravity environment in the horizontal plane. Experimental results demonstrate that the air jet control system can effectively manage payload oscillatory response. An analytical model was developed and verified by comparing predicted and measured payload response. The mathematical model, which includes payload dynamics, control logic, and air jet forces, is used to investigate payload response to disturbances likely to be present in the Space Station.

  5. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  6. Animal Communications Through Seismic Vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Peggy

    2001-05-02

    Substrate vibration has been important to animals as a channel of communication for millions of years, but our literature on vibration in this context of biologically relevant information is only decades old. The jaw mechanism of the earliest land vertebrates allowed them to perceive substrate vibrations as their heads lay on the ground long before airborne sounds could be heard. Although the exact mechanism of vibration production and the precise nature of the wave produced are not always understood, recent development of affordable instrumentation to detect and measure vibrations has allowed researchers to answer increasingly sophisticated questions about how animals send and receive vibration signals. We now know that vibration provides information used in predator defense, prey detection, recruitment to food, mate choice, intrasexual competition, and maternal/brood social interactions in a variety of insect orders, spiders, crabs, scorpions, chameleons, frogs, golden moles, mole rats, kangaroos rats, wallabies, elephants and bison.

  7. Rheology of vibrated granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesgen de Richter, Sebastien; Hanotin, Caroline; Gaudel, Naima; Louvet, Nicolas; Marchal, Philippe; Jenny, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    In this work we investigate in details the flow behaviour of dense vibrated gravitational suspensions. We study the rheology in the stationary state by using a stress imposed rheometer (spectroscopy mechanics) coupled with a vibration cell, we show that applying well-controlled mechanical vibrations allows the control of the suspension viscosity by suppressing the apparent yield stress which is largely the cause of flow jamming. We show that the rheology in the stationary state is controlled by the competition between the reorganization time induced by the flow and the internal reorganization time induced by vibrations. We discuss the influence of particles size, suspending fluid viscosity and vibration parameters and demonstrate that the grains dynamics is controlled by the ratio between the lubrication stress and the granular pressure. This work evidences the major role played by the vibration induced lubrication stress on the liquefaction of vibrated granular suspensions.

  8. Multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies stress impact on human femur computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Bertram; Yeoh, Han Teik

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body vibration training using single-frequency methods has been reported to improve bone mineral density. However, the intensities can exceed safe levels and have drawn unfavorable comments from subjects. In a previous article, whole-body vibration training using multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies (MVDMVF) was reported. This article presents the computational simulation evaluation of stress dispersion on a femur with and without the MVDMVF input. A model of bone femur was developed from a computed tomography image of the lower limb with Mimics software from Materialise (Plymouth, Michigan). We analyzed the mesh model in COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL, Inc; Burlington, Massachusetts) with and without MVDMVF input, with constraints and load applied to the femur model. We compared the results with published joint stresses during walking, jogging, and stair-climbing and descending and with standard vibration exposure limits. Results showed stress levels on the femur are significantly higher with MVDMVF input than without. The stress levels were within the published levels during walking and stair-climbing and descending but below the stress levels during jogging. Our computational results demonstrate that MVDMVF generates stress level equivalent to the level during walking and stair-climbing. This evidence suggests that MVDMVF is safe for prolonged use in subjects with osteoporosis who ambulate independently.

  9. Maladie des vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shixin (Cindy); House, Ronald A.

    2017-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Permettre aux médecins de famille de comprendre l’épidémiologie, la pathogenèse, les symptômes, le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la maladie des vibrations, une maladie professionnelle importante et courante au Canada. Sources d’information Une recherche a été effectuée sur MEDLINE afin de relever les recherches et comptes rendus portant sur la maladie des vibrations. Une recherche a été effectuée sur Google dans le but d’obtenir la littérature grise qui convient au contexte canadien. D’autres références ont été tirées des articles relevés. Message principal La maladie des vibrations est une maladie professionnelle répandue touchant les travailleurs de diverses industries qui utilisent des outils vibrants. La maladie est cependant sous-diagnostiquée au Canada. Elle compte 3 éléments : vasculaire, sous la forme d’un phénomène de Raynaud secondaire; neurosensoriel; et musculosquelettique. Aux stades les plus avancés, la maladie des vibrations entraîne une invalidité importante et une piètre qualité de vie. Son diagnostic exige une anamnèse minutieuse, en particulier des antécédents professionnels, un examen physique, des analyses de laboratoire afin d’éliminer les autres diagnostics, et la recommandation en médecine du travail aux fins d’investigations plus poussées. La prise en charge consiste à réduire l’exposition aux vibrations, éviter les températures froides, abandonner le tabac et administrer des médicaments. Conclusion Pour assurer un diagnostic rapide de la maladie des vibrations et améliorer le pronostic et la qualité de vie, les médecins de famille devraient connaître cette maladie professionnelle courante, et pouvoir obtenir les détails pertinents durant l’anamnèse, recommander les patients aux cliniques de médecine du travail et débuter les demandes d’indemnisation de manière appropriée. PMID:28292812

  10. Anti-correlated vibrations drive fast non-adiabatic light harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, David

    2015-03-01

    We have recently shown that intramolecular vibrations shared across pigments can drive electronic energy transfer beyond the Born-Oppenheimer framework developed by Forster. The key features of this mechanism are a small change in vibrational equilibrium (less than the zero point amplitude) upon electronic excitation of the pigments and vibrational resonance with the adiabatic electronic energy gap. For identical pigments, delocalized, anti-correlated vibrations increase the speed of energy transfer. The same anti-correlated vibrations are excited by an electronically enhanced Raman process on the ground electronic state of photosynthetic antennas, and these vibrational wavepackets generate all of the reported signatures of photosynthetic energy transfer in femtosecond two-dimensional Fourier transform spectra. The talk will discuss how these results are generalized for differences between donor and acceptor and for multiple vibrations. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0258.

  11. Optimization design of high power ultrasonic circular ring radiator in coupled vibration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Lin, Shuyu; Hu, Wenxu

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a new high power ultrasonic (HPU) radiator, which consists of a transducer, an ultrasonic horn, and a metal circular ring. Both the transducer and horn in longitudinal vibrations are used to drive a metal circular ring in a radial-axial coupled vibration. This coupled vibration cannot only generate ultrasound in both the radial and axial directions, but also focus the ultrasound inside the circular ring. Except for the radial-axial coupled vibration mode, the third longitudinal harmonic vibration mode with relative large vibration amplitude is also detected, which can be used as another operation mode. Overall, the HPU with these two vibration modes should have good potential to be applied in liquid processing, such as sonochemistry, ultrasonic cleaning, and Chinese herbal medicine extraction.

  12. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  13. Vibration-Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of structures analyzed interactively. Interactive steadystate vibration-response program, VIBRA, developed. Frequency-response analyses commonly used in evaluating dynamic behaviors of structures subjected to cyclic external forces. VIBRA calculates frequency response using modalsuperposition approach. Method applicable to single or multiple forces applied to linear, proportionally damped structure in which damping is viscous or structural. VIBRA written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution.

  14. Vibration-induced droplet atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan

    The atomization of liquid drops is investigated experimentally using laser vibrometry, high-speed imaging, and particle tracking techniques. The spray is generated by a novel vibration-induced droplet atomization (VIDA) process in which a sessile drop is atomized by an underlying vibrating thin metal diaphragm, resulting in rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the free surface of the primary drop. Under some conditions, the primary drop can be atomized extremely rapidly by a bursting-like mechanism (e.g., a 0.1 ml water drop can be atomized in 0.4 seconds). The present research has focused on four major areas: global characteristics of VIDA process, instability modes and free surface dynamics of the forced drop, mechanisms of the interface breakup, and parametric characterization of the ensuing spray. Prior to atomization, the drop free surface undergoes three transitions: from axisymmetric standing waves to azimuthal waves, to a newly-observed lattice mode, and to a disordered pre-ejection state. The droplet ejection results from localized collapse of surface troughs and initiation and ultimate breakup of momentary liquid spikes. Breakup begins with capillary pinch-off from spike tips and can be followed by additional pinching of liquid droplets. For a relatively low-viscosity liquid, e.g., water, a capillary-wave instability of the spike is observed in some cases, while for a very viscous liquid, e.g., a glycerin/water solution, the first breakup occurs near the stem of the spike, with or without subsequent breakup of the detached, elongated thread. Different mechanisms dominating the primary breakup of the spike are operative in the low- and high-viscosity ejection regimes. When ejection of the secondary droplets is triggered, the evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary drop and the vibrating diaphragm. Due to these dynamics, the process can be either self-intensifying or self-decaying. The resulting VIDA spray

  15. Vibrational stability of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangfan; Wang, Biao

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP) models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D) materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202). This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC), defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D) materials.

  16. Vibration isolation mounting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Sam D. (Inventor); Bastin, Paul H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system is disclosed for mounting a vibration producing device onto a spacecraft structure and also for isolating the vibration forces thereof from the structure. The system includes a mount on which the device is securely mounted and inner and outer rings. The rings and mount are concentrically positioned. The system includes a base (secured to the structure) and a set of links which are interconnected by a set of torsion bars which allow and resist relative rotational movement therebetween. The set of links are also rotatably connected to a set of brackets which are rigidly connected to the outer ring. Damped leaf springs interconnect the inner and outer rings and the mount allow relative translational movement therebetween in X and Y directions. The links, brackets and base are interconnected and configured so that they allow and resist translational movement of the device in the Z direction so that in combination with the springs they provide absorption of vibrational energy produced by the device in all three dimensions while providing rotational stiffness about all three axes to prevent undesired rotational motions.

  17. Vibration attenuation of conductive beams by inducing eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irazu, L.; Elejabarrieta, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    The increasing requirements for structural vibration control in many industries, require innovative attenuation techniques. In this work, the phenomenon of eddy currents is proposed to reduce the vibration of conductive and non-magnetic beam-like structures without modifying the system, neither the weight nor the stiffness. The motion of a conductive material in a stationary magnetic field induces eddy currents, which in turn generate a repulsive force and attenuate the vibration. In this study, the vibrational response of a thin aluminium beam under a partial and stationary magnetic field is analysed. The influence of the eddy currents is experimentally studied in the bandwidth from 0 to 1 kHz and a preliminary numerical model is proposed. The results show the vibration of all the length of the beam can be attenuated by inducing eddy currents, whereas the natural frequencies of the system remain unmodified. The attenuation of the vibration is more remarkable at low frequencies and when the position of the magnetic field coincides with a maximum vibration of a mode.

  18. A Novel Wireless and Temperature-Compensated SAW Vibration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-01-01

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration. A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit. High vibration sensitivity of ∼10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements. PMID:25372617

  19. A novel wireless and temperature-compensated SAW vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-11-03

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  20. On the rejection of vibrations in adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradore, Riccardo; Pettazzi, Lorenzo; Fedrigo, Enrico; Clare, Richard

    2012-07-01

    In modern adaptive optics systems, lightly damped sinusoidal oscillations resulting from telescope structural vibrations have a significant deleterious impact on the quality of the image collected at the detector plane. Such oscillations are often at frequencies beyond the bandwidth of the wave-front controller that therefore is either incapable of rejecting them or might even amplify their detrimental impact on the overall AO performance. A technique for the rejection of periodic disturbances acting at the output of unknown plants, which has been recently presented in literature, has been adapted to the problem of rejecting vibrations in AO loops. The proposed methodology aims at estimating phase and amplitude of the harmonic disturbance together with the response of the unknown plant at the frequency of vibration. On the basis of such estimates, a control signal is generated to cancel out the periodic perturbation. Additionally, the algorithm can be easily extended to cope with unexpected time variations of the vibrations frequency by adding a frequency tracking module based either on a simple PLL architecture or on a classical extended Kalman filter. Oversampling can be also easily introduced to efficiently correct for vibrations approaching the sampling frequency. The approach presented in this contribution is compared against a different algorithm for vibration rejection available in literature, in order to identify drawbacks and advantages. Finally, the performance of the proposed vibration cancellation technique has been tested in realistic scenarios defined exploiting tip/tilt measurements from MACAO and NACO

  1. Substrate-borne vibrations induce behavioral responses in the leaf-dwelling cerambycid, Paraglenea fortunei.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Remi; Hosoda, Naoe; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Takanashi, Takuma

    2014-12-01

    Many insects utilize substrate-borne vibrations as a source of information for recognizing mates or predators. Among various substrates, plant leaves are commonly used for transmitting and receiving vibrational information. However, little is known about the utilization of vibrations by leaf-dwelling insects, especially coleopteran beetles. We conducted two experiments to examine the response of the leaf-dwelling cerambycid beetle, Paraglenea fortunei, to substrate-borne vibrations. We recorded and analyzed vibrations of host plant leaves from four different sources: wind (0.5 m/s), a beetle during landing, a walking beetle, and a beetle walking in the wind (0.5 m/s). We then measured the behavioral thresholds, the lowest amplitudes that induce behavioral responses, from beetles walking and resting on horizontal and vertical substrates with pulsed vibrations ranging from 20 Hz to 1 kHz. The vibrational characteristics of biotic and abiotic stimuli clearly differed. Beetle-generated vibrations (landing, walking, and walking in the wind) were broadly high in the low-frequency components above ∼30 Hz, while wind-generated vibrations showed a dominant peak at ∼30 Hz and a steep decrease thereafter. Among four situations, beetles walking on horizontal substrates showed lowest thresholds to vibrations of 75-500 Hz, which are characteristic of beetle-generated vibrations. Given that P. fortunei beetles are found on horizontal leaf surfaces of the host plant, vibrations transmitted though horizontal substrates may induce a strong freeze response in walking beetles to detect conspecifics or heterospecifics. Our findings provide evidence that leaf-dwelling beetles can discriminate among biotic and abiotic factors via differences in vibrational characteristics.

  2. Reference Excitation Unit for Micro-Vibration Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veal, Dan; Hughes, Ben; Wagner, Mark

    2012-07-01

    The verification of hardware, in particular with respect to micro-vibration requirements, is challenging for both numerical simulation and experimental methodology. A commonly used test approach is to measure the interface reaction forces, torques, accelerations, velocities or displacements in all six degrees of freedom generated by the unit under test. In Europe, several test facilities exist to measure these generated micro-vibration forces based on dynamometer, pendulum and reverse pendulum principles. All these facilities and test setups need to be validated and calibrated with traceability to recognized international standards to ensure validity of the measurement results. Ideally, inter-facility comparisons would be conducted with identical excitation input signals and identical boundary conditions to increase confidence in the validity of the measurement produced by different facilities. To facilitate this requirement, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) - the UK’s national measurement institute, is developing a reference vibration excitation unit that will be capable of generating vibrations, linear or angular, of known amplitude and direction traceable to international standards. This activity is funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) in the frame of a Technology Research Study. This paper covers the design of the unit and how the vibrations generated will be traceable to international standards.

  3. Hydrofoil vibration and noise reduction with leading edge isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brungart, Timothy A.; Myer, Eric C.; Capone, Dean E.; Campbell, Robert L.

    2005-09-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration and noise from hydrofoils subject to unsteady hydrodynamic loads was demonstrated experimentally. Unsteady loads are generated when hydrofoils interact with approach-flow disturbances such as hull boundary layer turbulence or wakes from upstream rotors. Since the unsteady loads are known to be concentrated in the vicinity of the leading edge, a single stage vibration isolation mount was incorporated into a hydrofoil at its 20% chord location to inhibit the leading edge-generated unsteady loads from being transmitted to the remainder of the foil and any structures coupled to it. The hydrofoil was tested in a water tunnel facility with a wake generator placed upstream to produce the approach-flow disturbances. The reduction in the loading on the portion of the hydrofoil isolated from the leading edge was inferred from vibration measurements. Reductions of 5 to 10 dB were demonstrated.

  4. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  5. Intracellular recording from a spider vibration receptor.

    PubMed

    Gingl, Ewald; Burger, Anna-M; Barth, Friedrich G

    2006-05-01

    The present study introduces a new preparation of a spider vibration receptor that allows intracellular recording of responses to natural mechanical or electrical stimulation of the associated mechanoreceptor cells. The spider vibration receptor is a lyriform slit sense organ made up of 21 cuticular slits located on the distal end of the metatarsus of each walking leg. The organ is stimulated when the tarsus receives substrate vibrations, which it transmits to the organ's cuticular structures, reducing the displacement to about one tenth due to geometrical reasons. Current clamp recording was used to record action potentials generated by electrical or mechanical stimuli. Square pulse stimulation identified two groups of sensory cells, the first being single-spike cells which generated only one or two action potentials and the second being multi-spike cells which produced bursts of action potentials. When the more natural mechanical sinusoidal stimulation was applied, differences in adaptation rate between the two cell types remained. In agreement with prior extracellular recordings, both cell types showed a decrease in the threshold tarsus deflection with increasing stimulus frequency. Off-responses to mechanical stimuli have also been seen in the metatarsal organ for the first time.

  6. Natural vibration dynamics of Rainbow Bridge, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Wood, J. R.; Doyle, S.; Stanfield, E.; White, B.

    2015-12-01

    We measured resonant frequencies of Rainbow Bridge, Utah, one of the world's longest rock spans, during a field experiment recording ambient vibration data. Measurements were generated over 20 hours on March 23-24, 2015 using two broadband three-component seismometers placed on the bridge, and compared to concurrent data from nearby reference stations 20 and 220 m distant. We identified seven distinct modes of vibration for Rainbow Bridge between 1 and 6 Hz. Data for each resonant frequency was then analyzed to determine the frequency-dependent polarization vector in an attempt to clarify mode shapes; e.g. the fundamental mode represents out-of-plane horizontal flexure. We compared experimental data to results of 3D numerical modal analysis, using a new photogrammetric model of Rainbow Bridge generated in this study imported into COMSOL Multiphysics. Results compare well with measured data for seven of the first eight modeled modes, matching vibrational frequencies and polarization orientations generally within 10%. Only predicted mode 6 was not explicitly apparent in our experimental data. Large site-to-reference spectral ratios resolved from experimental data indicate high amplification on the bridge as compared to nearby bedrock.

  7. Hardware and circuit design of a vibrational cleaner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fhong Soon, Chin; Thong, Kok Tung; Sek Tee, Kian; Nayan, Nafarizal; Khairul Ahmad, Mohd; Nurashikin Nordin, Anis

    2016-11-01

    Microtissue can be grown on soft substrates of hydrogel or liquid crystal gel. These gels are adherent to the microtissues and they may interfere fluorescence imaging as background noise due to their absorbance property. A microfluidic vibrational cleaner with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip platform was proposed and developed to remove the residual gel of liquid crystal adhered to the microtissues. The microtissues were placed in a microfluidic chip attaching to a microfluidic vibrational platform. In the system design, two motorised vibrators vibrating attached to a microfluidic platform and generating vibration signals at 148 Hz and 0.89 Grms to clean the microtissues. The acceleration of the vibration increased gradually from 0 to 0.96 Grms when the duty cycle of PWM pulses increased from 50 - 90%. It dropped slightly to 0.89 Grms at 100% duty cycle. Irrigation water valve was designed to control the fluid flow from water pump during cleaning process. Water pumps were included to flush the channels of the microfluidic device. The signals in controlling the pump, motor and valve were linearly proportional to the duty cycles of the pulse width modulation signals generated from a microcontroller.

  8. Flow-Induced Vibration of Circular Cylindrical Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shoei-Sheng

    1985-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration is a term to denote those phenomena associated with the response of structures placed in or conveying fluid flow. More specifically, the terra covers those cases in which an interaction develops between fluid-dynamic forces and the inertia, damping or elastic forces in the structures. The study of these phenomena draws on three disciplines: (1) structural mechanics, (2) mechanical vibration, and (3) fluid dynamics. The vibration of circular cylinders subject to flow has been known to man since ancient times; the vibration of a wire at its natural frequency in response to vortex shedding was known in ancient Greece as aeolian tones. But systematic studies of the problem were not made until a century ago when Strouhal established the relationship between vortex shedding frequency and flow velocity for a given cylinder diameter. The early research in this area has beer summarized by Zdravkovich (1985) and Goldstein (1965). Flow-induced structural vibration has been experienced in numerous fields, including the aerospace industry, power generation/transmission (turbine blades, heat exchanger tubes, nuclear reactor components), civil engineering (bridges, building, smoke stacks), and undersea technology. The problems have usually been encountered or created accidentally through improper design. In most cases, a structural or mechanical component, designed to meet specific objectives, develops problems when the undesired effects of flow field have not been accounted for in the design. When a flow-induced vibration problem is noted in the design stage, the engineer has different options to eliminate the detrimental vibration. Unfortunately, in many situations, the problems occur after the components are already in operation; the "fix" usually is very costly. Flow-induced vibration comprises complex and diverse phenomena; subcritical vibration of nuclear fuel assemblies, galloping of transmission lines, flutter of pipes conveying fluid, and whirling

  9. The CFVib Experiment: Control of Fluids in Microgravity with Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J.; Sánchez, P. Salgado; Tinao, I.; Porter, J.; Ezquerro, J. M.

    2017-08-01

    The Control of Fluids in Microgravity with Vibrations (CFVib) experiment was selected for the 2016 Fly Your Thesis! programme as part of the 65th ESA Parabolic Flight Campaign. The aim of the project is to observe the potentially complex behaviour of vibrated liquids in weightless environments and to investigate the extent to which small-amplitude vibrations can be used to influence and control this behaviour. Piezoelectric materials are used to generate high-frequency vibrations to drive surface waves and large-scale reorientation of the interface. The theory of vibroequilibria, which treats the quasi-stationary surface configurations achieved by this reorientation, was used to predict interesting parameter regimes and interpret fluid behaviour. Here we describe the scientific motivation, objectives, and design of the experiment.

  10. Broadband nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy by shaping a coherent fiber supercontinuum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; King, Matthew D.; Tu, Haohua; Zhao, Youbo; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been widely applied in different fields due to its label-free chemical-sensing capability. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) provides stronger signal and faster acquisition than spontaneous Raman scattering, making it especially suitable for molecular imaging. Coherently-controlled single-beam CARS simplifies the conventional multi-beam setup, but the vibrational bandwidth and non-trivial spectrum retrieval have been limiting factors. In this work, a coherent supercontinuum generated in an all-normal-dispersion nonlinear fiber is phase-shaped within a narrow bandwidth for broadband vibrational spectroscopy. The Raman spectra can be directly retrieved from the CARS measurements, covering the fingerprint regime up to 1750 cm−1. The retrieved spectra of several chemical species agree with their spontaneous Raman data. The compact fiber supercontinuum source offers broad vibrational bandwidth with high stability and sufficient power, showing the potential for spectroscopic imaging in a wide range of applications. PMID:23571917

  11. Piezoelectric actuator design for MR elastography: implementation and vibration issues.

    PubMed

    Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Chan, Yum Ji; Janssen, Henning; Hamed, Abbi; Young, Ian; Lamperth, Michael

    2011-09-01

    MR elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique for tumor diagnosis. MRE actuation devices require precise mechanical design and radiofrequency engineering to achieve the required mechanical vibration performance and MR compatibility. A method of designing a general-purpose, compact and inexpensive MRE actuator is presented. It comprises piezoelectric bimorphs arranged in a resonant structure designed to operate at its resonant frequency for maximum vibration amplitude. An analytical model was established to understand the device vibration characteristics. The model-predicted performance was validated in experiments, showing its accuracy in predicting the actuator resonant frequency with an error < 4%. The device MRI compatibility was shown to cause minimal interference to a 1.5 tesla MRI scanner, with maximum signal-to-noise ratio reduction of 7.8% and generated artefact of 7.9 mm in MR images. A piezoelectric MRE actuator is proposed, and its implementation, vibration issues and future work are discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Vibrational resistance to vehicle motion due to road unevenness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blekhman, I.; Kremer, E.

    2017-09-01

    The subject of this study is the effect of road unevenness on the dynamics of the averaged longitudinal motion of a vehicle. These phenomena are considered in this work with the help of a minimal model which enables us to understand the mechanism of interaction between the longitudinal motion and the vertical vibrations excited by road unevenness. The analysis of this model is fulfilled in a frame of the concept of vibrational mechanics. This makes it possible to present the final result for averaged motion as a standard equation of the longitudinal vehicle with additional ;vibrational;, i.e. vibration-generated, slow force. This representation makes an investigation of the vehicle behavior on the road with unevenness especially transparent. Some features of this behavior are considered. Particularly, the possibility of a Sommerfeld effect sticking at a critical velocity during increasing power) is analyzed.

  13. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  14. Transportation Shock and Vibration Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Maheras, Steven J.; Lahti, Erik A.; Ross, Steven B.

    2013-06-06

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT-13OR08220112, "Report Documenting Experimental Activities." The purpose of this report is to document the results of a literature review conducted of studies related to the vibration and shock associated with the normal conditions of transport for rail shipments of used nuclear fuel from commercial light-water reactors. As discussed in Adkins (2013), the objective of this report is to determine if adequate data exist that would enable the impacts of the shock and vibration associated with the normal conditions of transport on commercial light-water reactor used nuclear fuel shipped in current generation rail transportation casks to be realistically modeled.

  15. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  16. Temperature field in rubber vibration isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhadi, M. Issa

    1985-02-01

    The temperature field inside a vibrating rubber solid cylinder is investigated. The rubber cylinder, a specimen of a vibration isolator rubber (Neoprene GR), is subjected to a repeatedly cyclic compressive force by means of an electrodynamic shaker. In the experimental investigation the temperatures at 16 different locations inside the cylinder have been measured by means of copper-constantan thermocouples. After the estimation of the heat generated per unit volume per unit time with the help of the estimated damping and stiffness coefficients of rubber, one can attempt the solution of the heat conduction equation describing the temperature field inside the rubber specimen. The values of the temperature found from the analytical investigation compare fairly well with the experimental measurements.

  17. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  18. Vibrational averages along thermal lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of vibrational quantum and thermal expectation values of physical properties from first principles. Thermal lines are introduced: these are lines in configuration space parametrized by temperature, such that the value of any physical property along them is approximately equal to the vibrational average of that property. The number of sampling points needed to explore the vibrational phase space is reduced by up to an order of magnitude when the full vibrational density is replaced by thermal lines. Calculations of the vibrational averages of several properties and systems are reported, namely, the internal energy and the electronic band gap of diamond and silicon, and the chemical shielding tensor of L-alanine. Thermal lines pave the way for complex calculations of vibrational averages, including large systems and methods beyond semilocal density functional theory.

  19. Trunk isometric force production parameters during erector spinae muscle vibration at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vibration is known to alter proprioceptive afferents and create a tonic vibration reflex. The control of force and its variability are often considered determinants of motor performance and neuromuscular control. However, the effect of vibration on paraspinal muscle control and force production remains to be determined. Methods Twenty-one healthy adults were asked to perform isometric trunk flexion and extension torque at 60% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction, under three different vibration conditions: no vibration, vibration frequencies of 30 Hz and 80 Hz. Eighteen isometric contractions were performed under each condition without any feedback. Mechanical vibrations were applied bilaterally over the lumbar erector spinae muscles while participants were in neutral standing position. Time to peak torque (TPT), variable error (VE) as well as constant error (CE) and absolute error (AE) in peak torque were calculated and compared between conditions. Results The main finding suggests that erector spinae muscle vibration significantly decreases the accuracy in a trunk extension isometric force reproduction task. There was no difference between both vibration frequencies with regard to force production parameters. Antagonist muscles do not seem to be directly affected by vibration stimulation when performing a trunk isometric task. Conclusions The results suggest that acute erector spinae muscle vibration interferes with torque generation sequence of the trunk by distorting proprioceptive information in healthy participants. PMID:23919578

  20. Stroboscopic Interferometer for Measuring Mirror Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Robers, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Stroboscopic interferometry is a technique for measuring the modes of vibration of mirrors that are lightweight and, therefore, unavoidably flexible. The technique was conceived especially for modal characterization of lightweight focusing mirror segments to be deployed in outer space; however, the technique can be applied to lightweight mirrors designed for use on Earth as well as the modal investigation of other optical and mechanical structures. To determine the modal structure of vibration of a mirror, it is necessary to excite the mirror by applying a force that varies periodically with time at a controllable frequency. The excitation can utilize sinusoidal, square, triangular, or even asynchronous waveforms. Because vibrational modes occur at specific resonant frequencies, it is necessary to perform synchronous measurements and sweep the frequency to locate the significant resonant modes. For a given mode it is possible to step the phase of data acquisition in order to capture the modal behavior over a single cycle of the resonant frequency. In order to measure interferometrically the vibrational response of the mirror at a given frequency, an interferometer must be suitably aligned with the mirror and adjustably phase-locked with the excitation signal. As in conventional stroboscopic photography, the basic idea in stroboscopic interferometry is to capture an image of the shape of a moving object (in this case, the vibrating mirror) at a specified instant of time in the vibration cycle. Adjusting the phase difference over a full cycle causes the interference fringes to vary over the full range of motion for the mode at the excitation frequency. The interference-fringe pattern is recorded as a function of the phase difference, and, from the resulting data, the surface shape of the mirror for the given mode is extracted. In addition to the interferometer and the mirror to be tested, the equipment needed for stroboscopic interferometry includes an arbitrary

  1. DEAP-based energy harvesting using vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffstadt, Thorben; Heinze, Robert; Wahl, Tim; Kameier, Frank; Maas, Jürgen

    2014-03-01

    Generators based on dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAP) convert mechanical strain energy into electrical field energy. In order to harvest renewable energy from ambient sources adequate generator setups have to be developed. Thus, in this contribution a DEAP generator is presented which uses periodic vortex induced vibration of a circular cylinder as excitation mechanism, by which e.g. Flow energy of a wind or water current can be converted. For this purpose a novel generator design consisting of a cylinder that is elastically mounted on DEAP material is presented. Since the effect of vortex induced vibrations depends on the stiffness and damping of the utilized generator's eigenmode, a method to adapt both via the electrostatic pressure and energy conversion is proposed. After the validation of the general functionality of the novel generator design, analyses concerning the control of the overall harvester are carried out.

  2. A new approach for vibration control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An approach for augmenting vibration damping characteristics in space structures with large panels is presented. It is based on generation of bending moments rather than forces. The moments are generated using bimetallic strips, suitably mounted at selected stations on both sides of the large panels, under the influence of differential solar heating, giving rise to thermal gradients and stresses. The collocated angular velocity sensors are utilized in conjunction with mini-servos to regulate the control moments by flipping the bimetallic strips. A simple computation of the rate of dissipation of vibrational energy is undertaken to assess the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  3. Computer analysis of railcar vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlaminck, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models and techniques for calculating railcar vibrations are discussed along with criteria for vehicle ride optimization. The effect on vibration of car body structural dynamics, suspension system parameters, vehicle geometry, and wheel and rail excitation are presented. Ride quality vibration data collected on the state-of-the-art car and standard light rail vehicle is compared to computer predictions. The results show that computer analysis of the vehicle can be performed for relatively low cost in short periods of time. The analysis permits optimization of the design as it progresses and minimizes the possibility of excessive vibration on production vehicles.

  4. Vibrational autoionization in polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S T

    2005-01-01

    The vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg states of small polyatomic molecules provide a fascinating laboratory in which to study fundamental nonadiabatic processes. In this review, recent results on the vibrational mode dependence of vibrational autoionization are discussed. In general, autoionization rates depend strongly on the character of the normal mode driving the process and on the electronic character of the Rydberg electron. Although quantitative calculations based on multichannel quantum defect theory are available for some polyatomic molecules, including H3, only qualitative information exists for most molecules. This review shows how qualitative information, such as Walsh diagrams along different normal coordinates of the molecule, can provide insight into the vibrational autoionization rates.

  5. Vibration detection and discrimination in the masked birch caterpillar (Drepana arcuata).

    PubMed

    Guedes, R N C; Matheson, S M; Frei, B; Smith, M L; Yack, J E

    2012-05-01

    Leaf-borne vibrations are potentially important to caterpillars for communication and risk assessment. Yet, little is known about the vibratory environment of caterpillars, or how they detect and discriminate between vibrations from relevant and non-relevant sources. We measured the vibratory ‘landscape’ of the territorial masked birch caterpillar Drepana arcuata (Drepanidae), and assessed its ability to detect and respond to vibrations generated by conspecific and predatory intruders, wind and rain. Residents of leaf shelters were shown to respond to low amplitude vibrations generated by a crawling conspecific intruder, since removal of the vibrations through leaf incision prevented the resident’s response. Residents did not respond to large amplitude, low frequency disturbances caused by wind and rain alone, but did respond to approaching conspecifics under windy conditions, indicating an ability to discriminate between these sources. Residents also responded differently in the presence of vibrations generated by approaching predators (Podisus) and conspecifics. An analysis of vibration characteristics suggests that despite significant overlap between vibrations from different sources, there are differences in frequency and amplitude characteristics that caterpillars may use to discriminate between sources. Caterpillars live in a vibration-rich environment that we argue forms a prominent part of the sensory world of substrate bound holometabolous larvae.

  6. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  7. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2004-03-26

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) processes are "coherent," but the phase of the anti-Stokes radiation is lost by most incoherent spectroscopic CARS measurements. We propose a Raman microscopy imaging method called nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging, which measures Raman spectra by obtaining the temporal anti-Stokes signal through nonlinear interferometry. With a more complete knowledge of the anti-Stokes signal, we show through simulations that a high-resolution Raman spectrum can be obtained of a molecule in a single pulse using broad band radiation. This could be useful for identifying the three-dimensional spatial distribution of molecular species in tissue.

  8. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  9. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  10. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  11. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Quan

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  13. Airflow energy harvesters of metal-based PZT thin films by self-excited vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, E.; Tsujiura, Y.; Kurokawa, F.; Hida, H.; Kanno, I.

    2014-11-01

    We developed self-excited vibration energy harvesters of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) thin films using airflow. To enhance the self-excited vibration, we used 30-μm-thick stainless steel (SS304) foils as base cantilevers on which PZT thin films were deposited by rf-magnetron sputtering. To compensate for the initial bending of PZT/SS304 unimorph cantilever due to the thermal stress, we deposited counter PZT thin films on the back of the SS304 cantilever. We evaluated power-generation performance and vibration mode of the energy harvester in the airflow. When the angle of attack (AOA) was 20° to 30°, large vibration was generated at wind speeds over 8 m/s. By FFT analysis, we confirmed that stable self-excited vibration was generated. At the AOA of 30°, the output power reached 19 μW at wind speeds of 12 m/s.

  14. Development of Vibrational Culture Model Mimicking Vocal Fold Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongjoo; Lim, Jae-Yol; Kwon, Soonjo

    2016-10-01

    The vocal folds (VFs) are connective tissues with complex matrix structures that provide the required mechanical properties for voice generation. VF injury leads to changes in tissue structure and properties, resulting in reduced voice quality. However, injury-induced biochemical changes and repair in scarred VF tissues have not been well characterized to date. To treat scarred VFs, it is essential to understand how physiological characteristics of VFs tissue change in response to external perturbation. In this study, we designed a simple vibrational culture model to mimic vibratory microenvironments observed in vivo. This model consists of a flexible culture plate, three linear actuators, a stereo splitter, and a function generator. Human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) monolayers were established on the flexible membrane, to which normal phonatory vibrations were delivered from linear actuators and a function generator. The hVFF monolayers were exposed to the vibrational stresses at a frequency of 205 Hz for 2, 6, and 10 h with maximum displacement of 47.1 μm, followed by a 6 h rest. We then observed the changes in cell morphology, cell viability, and gene expression related to extracellular matrix components. In our dynamic culture device mimicking normal phonatory frequencies, cell proliferation increased and expression of hyaluronic acid synthase 2 was downregulated in response to vibrational stresses. The results presented herein will be useful for evaluating cellular responses following VF injuries in the presence or absence of vibrational stresses.

  15. Ball bearing vibrations amplitude modeling and test comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, Richard A., III; Bailey, Dave

    1995-01-01

    Bearings generate disturbances that, when combined with structural gains of a momentum wheel, contribute to induced vibration in the wheel. The frequencies generated by a ball bearing are defined by the bearing's geometry and defects. The amplitudes at these frequencies are dependent upon the actual geometry variations from perfection; therefore, a geometrically perfect bearing will produce no amplitudes at the kinematic frequencies that the design generates. Because perfect geometry can only be approached, emitted vibrations do occur. The most significant vibration is at the spin frequency and can be balanced out in the build process. Other frequencies' amplitudes, however, cannot be balanced out. Momentum wheels are usually the single largest source of vibrations in a spacecraft and can contribute to pointing inaccuracies if emitted vibrations ring the structure or are in the high-gain bandwidth of a sensitive pointing control loop. It is therefore important to be able to provide an a priori knowledge of possible amplitudes that are singular in source or are a result of interacting defects that do not reveal themselves in normal frequency prediction equations. This paper will describe the computer model that provides for the incorporation of bearing geometry errors and then develops an estimation of actual amplitudes and frequencies. Test results were correlated with the model. A momentum wheel was producing an unacceptable 74 Hz amplitude. The model was used to simulate geometry errors and proved successful in identifying a cause that was verified when the parts were inspected.

  16. Melt Stirring by Horizontal Crucible Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. F.; Elwell, D.; Feigelson, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Horizontal vibration suggested as technique for more effective stirring of melts in crystal-growth apparatus. Vibrational technique may replace accelerated crucible rotation. Potential superiority of vibrational technique shown by preliminary experiments in which ink stirred into water.

  17. Train-induced field vibration measurements of ground and over-track buildings.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chao; Wang, Yimin; Moore, James A; Sanayei, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Transit-oriented development, such as metro depot and over-track building complexes, has expanded rapidly over the last 5years in China. Over-track building construction has the advantage of comprehensive utilization of land resources, ease of commuting to work, and provide funds for subway construction. But the high frequency of subway operations into and out of the depots can generate excessive vibrations that transmit into the over track buildings, radiate noise within the buildings, hamper the operation of vibration sensitive equipment, and adversely affect the living quality of the building occupants. Field measurements of vibration during subway operations were conducted at Shenzhen, China, a city of 10.62 million people in southern China. Considering the metro depot train testing line and throat area train lines were the main vibration sources, vibration data were captured in five measurement setups. The train-induced vibrations were obtained and compared with limitation of FTA criteria. The structure-radiated noise was calculated using measured vibration levels. The vertical vibration energy directly passed through the columns on both sides of track into the platform, amplifying vibration on the platform by up to 6dB greater than ground levels at testing line area. Vibration amplification around the natural frequency in the vertical direction of over-track building made the peak values of indoor floor vibration about 16dB greater than outdoor platform vibration. We recommend to carefully examining design of new over-track buildings within 40m on the platform over the throat area to avoid excessive vertical vibrations and noise. For both buildings, the measured vertical vibrations were less than the FTA limit. However, it is demonstrated that the traffic-induced high-frequency noise has the potential to annoy occupants on the upper floors.

  18. Vibration Analysis by Speckle Interferometry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The vibrational modes of complex systems can be visualized with high sensitivity by laser light speckle interferometry. Electronic speckle pattern...interferometry (ESPI), in contrast to holography, does not use photo-chemical storage media but shows a live image of the vibrational modes created by

  19. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  20. [Vibrations in deafness and psychosis].

    PubMed

    Gayda, M; Vacola, G

    1988-01-01

    Vibratory transmission is one of the first principles ofthe verbo-tonal method for the deaf child. Besides wrist vibrators, vibrating floor is a useful aid in communication with the autistic child. Complementary to oral or sign language, vibratory communication is full of possibilities in child deafness and psychosis.

  1. Fundamental Study on the Effect of High Frequency Vibration on Ride Comfort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Chizuru; Shimamune, Ryohei; Watanabe, Ken; Suzuki, Erimitsu

    To develop a more suitable method of evaluating ride comfort of high speed trains, a fundamental study was conducted on sensitivity of passengers to various frequencies of vibration with respect to ride comfort. Experiments were performed on 55 subjects using an electrodynamic vibration system that can generate vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 80 Hz in the vertical direction. Results of experiments indicated that the subjects tend to experience greater discomfort when exposed to high frequency vibrations than that presumed by the conventional Japanese ride comfort assessment method, the "Ride Comfort Level."

  2. Free Vibration of Uncertain Unsymmetrically Laminated Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Goyal, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation and Stochastic FEA are used to predict randomness in the free vibration response of thin unsymmetrically laminated beams. For the present study, it is assumed that randomness in the response is only caused by uncertainties in the ply orientations. The ply orientations may become random or uncertain during the manufacturing process. A new 16-dof beam element, based on the first-order shear deformation beam theory, is used to study the stochastic nature of the natural frequencies. Using variational principles, the element stiffness matrix and mass matrix are obtained through analytical integration. Using a random sequence a large data set is generated, containing possible random ply-orientations. This data is assumed to be symmetric. The stochastic-based finite element model for free vibrations predicts the relation between the randomness in fundamental natural frequencies and the randomness in ply-orientation. The sensitivity derivatives are calculated numerically through an exact formulation. The squared fundamental natural frequencies are expressed in terms of deterministic and probabilistic quantities, allowing to determine how sensitive they are to variations in ply angles. The predicted mean-valued fundamental natural frequency squared and the variance of the present model are in good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulation. Results, also, show that variations between plus or minus 5 degrees in ply-angles can affect free vibration response of unsymmetrically and symmetrically laminated beams.

  3. The Vibration Ring. Phase 1; [Seedling Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Krantz, Timothy L.; Delap, Damon C.; Stringer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The vibration ring was conceived as a driveline damping device to prevent structure-borne noise in machines. It has the appearance of a metal ring, and can be installed between any two driveline components like an ordinary mechanical spacer. Damping is achieved using a ring-shaped piezoelectric stack that is poled in the axial direction and connected to an electrical shunt circuit. Surrounding the stack is a metal structure, called the compression cage, which squeezes the stack along its poled axis when excited by radial driveline forces. The stack in turn generates electrical energy, which is either dissipated or harvested using the shunt circuit. Removing energy from the system creates a net damping effect. The vibration ring is much stiffer than traditional damping devices, which allows it to be used in a driveline without disrupting normal operation. In phase 1 of this NASA Seedling Fund project, a combination of design and analysis was used to examine the feasibility of this concept. Several designs were evaluated using solid modeling, finite element analysis, and by creating prototype hardware. Then an analytical model representing the coupled electromechanical response was formulated in closed form. The model was exercised parametrically to examine the stiffness and loss factor spectra of the vibration ring, as well as simulate its damping effect in the context of a simplified driveline model. The results of this work showed that this is a viable mechanism for driveline damping, and provided several lessons for continued development.

  4. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  5. The origins of vibration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimarogonas, A. D.

    1990-07-01

    The Ionian School of natural philosophy introduced the scientific method of dealing with natural phenomena and the rigorous proofs for abstract propositions. Vibration theory was initiated by the Pythagoreans in the fifth century BC, in association with the theory of music and the theory of acoustics. They observed the natural frequency of vibrating systems and proved that it is a system property and that it does not depend on the excitation. Pythagoreans determined the fundamental natural frequencies of several simple systems, such as vibrating strings, pipes, vessels and circular plates. Aristoteles and the Peripatetic School founded mechanics and developed a fundamental understanding of statics and dynamics. In Alexandrian times there were substantial engineering developments in the field of vibration. The pendulum as a vibration, and probably time, measuring device was known in antiquity, and was further developed by the end of the first millennium AD.

  6. Vibration analysis using digital correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Lehner, David L.; Dudderar, T. Dixon; Matthys, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a computer-based optical method for locating the positions of nodes and antinodes in vibrating members. Structured light patterns are projected at an angle onto the vibrating surface using a 35 mm slide projector. The vibrating surface and the projected images are captured in a time averaged photograph which is subsequently digitized. The inherent fringe patterns are filtered to determine amplitudes of vibration, and computer programs are used to compare the time averaged images to images recorded prior to excitation to locate nodes and antinodes. Some of the influences of pattern regularity on digital correlation are demonstrated, and a speckle-based method for determining the mode shapes and the amplitudes of vibration with variable sensitivity is suggested.

  7. Low Cost Digital Vibration Meter.

    PubMed

    Payne, W Vance; Geist, Jon

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the development of a low cost, digital Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) vibration meter that reports an approximation to the RMS acceleration of the vibration to which the vibration meter is subjected. The major mechanical element of this vibration meter is a cantilever beam, which is on the order of 500 µm in length, with a piezoresistor deposited at its base. Vibration of the device in the plane perpendicular to the cantilever beam causes it to bend, which produces a measurable change in the resistance of a piezoresistor. These changes in resistance along with a unique signal-processing scheme are used to determine an approximation to the RMS acceleration sensed by the device.

  8. Vibrational transfer functions for complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, P. A.; Berry, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of effects of vibrational multiple frequency forcing functions is discussed. Computer program for developing vibrational transfer functions is described. Possible applications of computer program are enumerated.

  9. Pseudo-vibration sensitivities for commercial laser vibrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter; Rothberg, Steven J.

    2011-10-01

    Pseudo-vibration sensitivities in laser vibrometry are the consequence of measurement noise generated by surface motions other than that on-axis with the incident laser beam(s), such as transverse and tilt vibrations or rotation. Concentrating solely on commercial laser vibrometers to maximise value to the vibrometer user, this paper quantifies pseudo-vibration sensitivities for five single beam instruments (for translational vibration measurement) and two parallel beam instruments (for angular vibration measurement) across a range of surface treatments and roughnesses. Transverse, tilt and rotation sensitivities are quantified for the single beam instruments. In-plane rotation, rotation and tilt sensitivities are quantified for the parallel beam instruments. Estimates of sensitivities for parallel beam instruments based on related quantifications for single beam instruments are shown to offer order-of-magnitude agreement. Further confirmation is provided of the benefits of smaller laser beams for measurements on tilting or rotating surfaces and of larger beams for measurements on surfaces with transverse motion. For rotor vibration applications, lower sensitivities are found for a focus location on the shaft rotation axis rather than its surface. Based on experimental evidence, refinements to the test methods are suggested with a view towards the formation of a Standard. These comprise placing limits on surface flatness and rotor out-of-roundness, inclusion of agreed ranges for target displacement amplitude and rotor diameter, and acknowledgement of the importance of focus location for rotation sensitivities.

  10. Blasting vibrations control: The shortcomings of traditional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillaume, P.M.; Kiszlo, M.; Bernard, T.

    1996-12-31

    In the context of its studies for the French ministry of the environment and for the French national coal board, INERIS (the French institute for the industrial environment and hazards, formerly CERCHAR) has made a complete critical survey of the methods generally used to reduce the levels of blasting vibrations. It is generally acknowledged that the main parameter to control vibrations is the so-called instantaneous charge, or charge per delay. This should be reduced as much as possible in order to diminish vibration levels. On account of this, the use of a new generation of blasting devices, such as non-electric detonators or electronic sequential timers has been developed since the seventies. INERIS has collected data from about 900 blasts in 2 quarries and 3 open pit mines. These data include input parameters such as borehole diameter, burden, spacing, charge per hole, charge per delay, total fired charge, etc ... They also include output measurements, such as vibration peak particle velocities, and main frequencies. These data have been analyzed with the help of multi variable statistical tools. Blasting tests were undertaken to evaluate new methods of vibrations control, such as the superposition of vibration signals. These methods appear to be accurate in many critical cases, but certainly would be highly improved with a better accuracy of firing delays. The development of electronic detonators seems to be the way of the future for a better blasting control.

  11. Influence of liquid-surface vibration on sonochemiluminescence intensity.

    PubMed

    Tuziuti, Toru; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Towata, Atsuya

    2010-07-15

    The influence of surface vibrations on the intensity of sonochemiluminescence (SCL) produced by pulsed ultrasound with a frequency of 151 kHz is investigated through optical measurement of the vibration amplitude. Pulsed ultrasound inhibits the generation of large degassing bubbles that scatter sound waves, thereby restricting the effective spatial region for sonochemical reactions. The vibration amplitude of the liquid surface becomes gradually significant with pulsed ultrasound as the power applied to the transducer increases. At this time, the SCL intensity increases and then decreases after displaying a peak because the resonance of standing wave cannot be maintained stably by the surface vibration. The SCL intensity during high-amplitude pulsing becomes almost zero if the distance between the highest position of the liquid surface and its position in the absence of ultrasound becomes close to larger than one-quarter of the ultrasound wavelength. This condition for the liquid surface vibration provides a limit for establishment of a resonant standing wave that is effective for sonochemical reaction. Adding particles provides nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles, thereby inhibiting the vibration of the surface of the upper liquid level. The SCL intensity is enhanced by the addition of alumina particles under pulsed excitation at relatively low applied powers.

  12. Numerical analysis of strongly nonlinear extensional vibrations in elastic rods.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of transduction, nondestructive testing, and nonlinear acoustic characterization, this article presents the analysis of strongly nonlinear vibrations by means of an original numerical algorithm. In acoustic and transducer applications in extreme working conditions, such as the ones induced by the generation of high-power ultrasound, the analysis of nonlinear ultrasonic vibrations is fundamental. Also, the excitation and analysis of nonlinear vibrations is an emergent technique in nonlinear characterization for damage detection. A third-order evolution equation is derived and numerically solved for extensional waves in isotropic dissipative media. A nine-constant theory of elasticity for isotropic solids is constructed, and the nonlinearity parameters corresponding to extensional waves are proposed. The nonlinear differential equation is solved by using a new numerical algorithm working in the time domain. The finite-difference numerical method proposed is implicit and only requires the solution of a linear set of equations at each time step. The model allows the analysis of strongly nonlinear, one-dimensional vibrations and can be used for prediction as well as characterization. Vibration waveforms are calculated at different points, and results are compared for different excitation levels and boundary conditions. Amplitude distributions along the rod axis for every harmonic component also are evaluated. Special attention is given to the study of high-amplitude damping of vibrations by means of several simulations. Simulations are performed for amplitudes ranging from linear to nonlinear and weak shock.

  13. Characterization of a novel instrument for vibration exercise.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Rabotti, C; Mischi, M

    2012-01-01

    Vibration exercise (VE) has been suggested as an effective option to improve muscle strength and power performance. Several studies link the effects of vibration training to enhanced neuromuscular stimulation and typically to involuntary reflex mechanisms. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear and information for the most appropriate vibration training protocols is limited. This study proposes to realize a new vibration exercise system for the biceps brachii. Amplitude, frequency, and baseline of the vibrating load, which is generated by an electromechanical actuator, can be adjusted dynamically by a feedback control loop. A second-order model is employed to identify the relation between the mechanical load and the input voltage driving the actuator. An adaptive normalized least mean square algorithm is proposed to remove the motion artifacts from the measured electromyography (EMG) data. Our results show a high correlation (0.99) between the second-order model fit and the measured data, permitting accurate control on the supplied load for vibrations up to 80 Hz. Furthermore, preliminary validation with 4 volunteers showed an excellent performance in the motion artifact removal, enabling reliable evaluation of the neuromuscular activation.

  14. Reed vibration in lingual organ pipes without the resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, András; Angster, Judit; Pitsch, Stephan; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2003-02-01

    Vibrations of plucked and blown reeds of lingual organ pipes without the resonators have been investigated. Three rather surprising phenomena are observed: the frequency of the reed plucked by hand is shifted upwards for large-amplitude plucking, the blown frequency is significantly higher than the plucked one, and peaks halfway between the harmonics of the fundamental frequency appear in the spectrum of the reed velocity. The dependence of the plucked frequency on the length of the reed reveals that the vibrating length at small vibrations is 3 mm shorter than the apparent free length. The frequency shift for large-amplitude plucking is explained by the periodic change of the vibrating length during the oscillation. Reed vibrations of the blown pipe can be described by a physical model based on the assumption of air flow between the reed and the shallot. Aerodynamic effects may generate and sustain the oscillation of the reed without acoustic feedback. The appearance of subharmonics is explained by taking into account the periodic modulation of the stress in the reed material by the sound field. Therefore, a parametric instability appears in the differential equation of vibration, leading to the appearance of subharmonics.

  15. Numerical modelling of longitudinal vibrations of a sucker rod string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shardakov, I. N.; Wasserman, I. N.

    2010-03-01

    A new technique for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a sucker rod string used in the oil well industry is presented. The main difficulty in the numerical calculation of the examined structure is a multivalued velocity—force relation determined by Coulomb's friction and by loads generated during operation of pump valves. Both the monotonic and nonmonotonic velocity—force relations are considered. A quasi-variational inequality formulation of the problem is proposed. The solution of the inequality amounts to finding the minimum of a convex nonsmooth functional at each time step by means of the Newmark difference time scheme, successive iterations and finite element discretization. The problem of functional minimization is reduced to construction of a sequence of smooth nonlinear programming problems by introducing the auxiliary variables and applying the augmented Lagrangian method. The proposed approach is used to study the longitudinal vibrations of sucker rod strings under near-real conditions. In such systems the most commonly occurring vibration modes are the stick-slip vibrations and the vibrations with natural force excited twice a cycle. The nonmonotonic character of the friction law leads to intensification of these vibrations. In the case of nonmonotonic friction law the stick-slip vibrations can occur even under the action of constant external forces.

  16. Detecting small surface vibrations by passive electro-optical illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoni, Matthew; Pereira, Wellesley; Weber, Reed A.; Garcia-Cervera, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    We have performed research to understand the feasibility of using signals received by EOIR sensors to detect small vibrations in surfaces illuminated by sunlight. The vibration models consider buildings with vibrating roofs, as well as ground vibrations due to buried structures. For the surface buildings, we investigated two approaches. One involved treating the roof as an elastic medium subject to deformation resulting in a PDE whose solution describes the fluctuation in the surface's normal direction vector. The second approach treated the roof as a rigid mass subject to motion in six degrees of freedom, while modeling the dynamics of the building's frame, and tuning the parameters to result in resonant frequencies similar to real buildings (~3-7 Hz). We applied the appropriate physical models of reflected and scattered light to various surfaces, specular (insulator or conductor), rough but still reflective, or diffusely scattering (Lambertian). Matlab code was developed to perform numerical simulations of any system configuration described above and easily add new models. The main engine of the code is a signal calculator and analyzer that sums the total intensity of received light over a "scene" with a variety of surface materials, orientations, polarization (if any), and other parameters. A resulting signal versus time is generated that may be analyzed in order to: 1) optimize sensitivity, or 2) detect the vibration signature of a structure of interest. The results of this study will enable scientists/engineers to optimize signal detection, possibly from space, for passive exploitation of scattered light modulated by vibrating surfaces.

  17. Acoustic Levitation Transportation of Small Objects Using a Ring-type Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gilles P. L.; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Adamowski, Julio C.; Silva, Eḿílio C. N.

    A new device for noncontact transportation of small solid objects is presented here. Ultrasonic flexural vibrations are generated along the ring shaped vibrator using two Langevin transducers and by using a reflector parallel to the vibrator, small particles are trapped at the nodal points of the resulting acoustic standing wave. The particles are then moved by generating a traveling wave along the vibrator, which can be done by modulating the vibration amplitude of the transducers. The working principle of the traveling wave along the vibrator has been modeled by the superposition of two orthogonal standing waves, and the position of the particles can be predicted by using finite element analysis of the vibrator and the resulting acoustic field. A prototype consisting of a 3 mm thick, 220 mm long, 50 mm wide and 52 mm radius aluminum ring-type vibrator and a reflector of the same length and width was built and small polystyrene spheres have been successfully transported along the straight parts of the vibrator.

  18. Noninvasive monitoring of vocal fold vertical vibration using the acoustic Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chao; Jiang, Jack J; Wu, Dan; Liu, Xiaojun; Chodara, Ann

    2012-11-01

    To validate a proposed method of noninvasively monitoring vocal fold vertical vibration through utilization of the acoustic Doppler effect and the waveguide property of the vocal tract. Validation case-control study. In this device, an ultrasound beam is generated and directed into the mouth. The vocal tract, acting as a natural waveguide, guides the ultrasound beam toward the vibrating vocal folds. The vertical velocity of vocal fold vibration is then recovered from the Doppler frequency of the reflected ultrasound. One subject (age 32, male) was studied and measurements were taken under three modes of vocal fold vibration: breathing (no vibration), whispering (irregular vibration), and normal phonation (regular vibration). The peak-to-peak amplitude of the measured velocity of vocal fold vertical vibration was about 0.16 m/s, and the fundamental frequency was 172 Hz; the extracted velocity information showed a reasonable waveform and value in comparison with the previous studies. In all three modes of phonation, the Doppler frequencies derived from the reflected ultrasound corresponded with the vertical velocity of vocal fold vibration as expected. The proposed method can accurately represent the characteristics of different phonation modes such as no phonation, whisper and normal phonation. The proposed device could be used in daily monitoring and assessment of vocal function and vocal fold vibration. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept.

  20. Two-photon vibrational excitation of air by long-wave infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Peñano, J.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort long-wave infrared (LWIR) laser pulses can resonantly excite vibrations in N2 and O2 through a two-photon transition. The absorptive vibrational component of the ultrafast optical nonlinearity grows in time, starting smaller than but quickly surpassing the electronic, rotational, and vibrational refractive components. The growth of the vibrational component results in a novel mechanism of third-harmonic generation, providing an additional two-photon excitation channel, fundamental + third harmonic. The original and emergent two-photon excitations drive the resonance exactly out of phase, causing spatial decay of the absorptive vibrational nonlinearity. This nearly eliminates two-photon vibrational absorption. Here we present simulations and analytical calculations demonstrating how these processes modify the ultrafast optical nonlinearity in air. The results reveal nonlinear optical phenomena unique to the LWIR regime of ultrashort pulse propagation in the atmosphere.

  1. Synchrotron-derived vibrational data confirm unprotonated oxo ligan in myoglobin compound II.

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Sage, J. T.; Northeastern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Recent structural investigations have generated uncertainty regarding the protonation state of the exogenous oxo ligand in ferryl derivatives of several heme proteins. We used nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to reveal the complete spectrum of Fe-ligand modes for compound II of myoglobin. Comparison with vibrational DFT predictions allows us to identify vibrations involving FeO tilting, coupled with stretching of the Fe-N bonds to the heme, and stretching of the proximal Fe-His bond, in addition to the previously observed Fe-O stretching vibration. Additional calculations, coupled with measurements on the hydroxyl derivative of metmyoglobin, reveal vibrational signatures for the putative protonated ferryl species. These include a 33 cm{sup -1} splitting of the FeO tilting modes due to the asymmetrically placed proton, as well as a 250 cm{sup -1} decrease of the Fe-O stretching frequency. The vibrational data suggest a fully deprotonated oxo ligand in compound II.

  2. On the control of vibrations using synchrophasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dench, M. R.; Brennan, M. J.; Ferguson, N. S.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the application of a technique, known as synchrophasing, to the control of machinery vibration. It is applicable to machinery installations, in which several synchronous machines, such as those driven by electrical motors, are fitted to an isolated common structure known as a machinery raft. To reduce the vibration transmitted to the host structure to which the machinery raft is attached, the phase of the electrical supply to the motors is adjusted so that the net transmitted force to the host structure is minimised. It is shown that while this is relatively simple for an installation consisting of two machines, it is more complicated for installations in which there are more than two machines, because of the interaction between the forces generated by each machine. The development of a synchrophasing scheme, which has been applied to propeller aircraft, and is known as Propeller Signature Theory (PST) is discussed. It is shown both theoretically and experimentally, that this is an efficient way of controlling the phase of multiple machines. It is also shown that synchrophasing is a worthwhile vibration control technique, which has the potential to suppress vibration transmitted to the host structure by up to 20 dB at certain frequencies. Although the principle of synchronisation has been demonstrated on a one-dimensional structure, it is believed that this captures the key features of the approach. However, it should be realised that the mode-shapes of a machinery raft may be more complex than that of a one-dimensional structure and this may need to be taken into account in a real application.

  3. Orbiting droplets on a vibrated bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampara, Naresh; Burger, Loic; Gilet, Tristan; Microfluidics, university of liege Team

    2015-11-01

    A millimeter-sized oil droplet can bounce on a vertically vibrated liquid bath for unlimited time. It may couple to the surface wave it emits; leading to horizontal self-propulsion called walking. When several walkers coexist close to one another, they either repel or attract each other, in response to the superposition of the waves they generate. Attraction leads to various bound states, including droplets that orbit around each other. We have experimentally investigated the variety of quantized orbital motions exhibited by two, three and more identical walkers, as a function of forcing acceleration. Each motion is quantified in terms of droplet and wave energy.

  4. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed.

  5. Vibration properties of and power harvested by a system of electromagnetic vibration energy harvesters that have electrical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Christopher G.

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the vibration and dynamic response of a system of coupled electromagnetic vibration energy harvesting devices that each consist of a proof mass, elastic structure, electromagnetic generator, and energy harvesting circuit with inductance, resistance, and capacitance. The governing equations for the coupled electromechanical system are derived using Newtonian mechanics and Kirchhoff circuit laws for an arbitrary number of these subsystems. The equations are cast in matrix operator form to expose the device's vibration properties. The device's complex-valued eigenvalues and eigenvectors are related to physical characteristics of its vibration. Because the electrical circuit has dynamics, these devices have more natural frequencies than typical electromagnetic vibration energy harvesters that have purely resistive circuits. Closed-form expressions for the steady state dynamic response and average power harvested are derived for devices with a single subsystem. Example numerical results for single and double subsystem devices show that the natural frequencies and vibration modes obtained from the eigenvalue problem agree with the resonance locations and response amplitudes obtained independently from forced response calculations. This agreement demonstrates the usefulness of solving eigenvalue problems for these devices. The average power harvested by the device differs substantially at each resonance. Devices with multiple subsystems have multiple modes where large amounts of power are harvested.

  6. Deviations of frequency and the mode of vibration of commercially available whole-body vibration training devices.

    PubMed

    Kaeding, T S

    2015-06-01

    Research in the field of whole body vibration (WBV) training and the use of it in practice might be hindered by the fact that WBV training devices generate and transmit frequencies and/or modes of vibration which are different to preset adjustments. This research project shall clarify how exact WBV devices apply the by manufacturer information promised preset frequency and mode of vibration. Nine professional devices for WBV training were tested by means of a tri-axial accelerometer. The accelerations of each device were recorded under different settings with a tri-axial accelerometer. Beneath the measurement of different combinations of preset frequency and amplitude the repeatability across 3 successive measurements with the same preset conditions and one measurement under loaded condition were carried out. With 3 exceptions (both Board 3000 & srt medical PRO) we did not find noteworthy divergences between preset and actual applied frequencies. In these 3 devices we found divergences near -25%. Loading the devices did not affect the applied frequency or mode of vibration. There were no important divergences measurable for the applied frequency and mode of vibration regarding repeatability. The results of our measurements cannot be generalized as we only measured one respectively at most two devices of one model in terms of a random sample. Based on these results we strongly recommend that user in practice and research should analyse their WBV training devices regarding applied frequency and mode of vibration.

  7. An electromagnetic inerter-based vibration suppression device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Clare, L. R.; Neild, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.; Inman, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how an inerter-based device for structural vibration suppression can be realized using an electromagnetic transducer such as a linear motor. When the motor shaft moves, a difference of voltage is generated across the transducer coil. The voltage difference is proportional to the relative velocity between its two terminals. The electromagnetic transducer will exert a force proportional to current following the Lorentz principle if the circuit is closed around the transducer coil. If an electronic circuit consisting of a capacitor, an inductance and a resistance with the appropriate configuration is connected, the resulting force reflected back into the mechanical domain is equivalent to that achieved by a mechanical inerter-based device. The proposed configuration is easy to implement and very versatile, provided a high quality conversion system with negligible losses. With the use of electromagnetic devices, a new generation of vibration absorbers can be realized, for example in the electrical domain it would be relatively uncomplicated to synthesize multi-frequency or real time tunable vibration absorbers by adding electrical components in parallel. In addition by using resistance emulators in the electrical circuits, part of the absorbed vibration energy can be converted into usable power. Here an electromagnetic tuned inerter damper (E-TID) is tested experimentally using real time dynamic substructuring. A voltage compensation unit was developed in order to compensate for coil losses. This voltage compensation unit requires power, which is acquired through harvesting from the vibration energy using a resistance emulator. A power balance analysis was developed in order to ensure the device can be self sufficient. Promising experimental results, using this approach, have been obtained and are presented in this paper. The ultimate goal of this research is the development of autonomous electromagnetic vibration absorbers, able to harvest energy

  8. Refocusing vibrating targets in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Santhanam, Balu; Pepin, Matthew; Atwood, Tom; Hayat, Majeed M.

    2012-06-01

    In synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) returned signals, ground-target vibrations introduce a phase modulation that is linearly proportional to the vibration displacement. Such modulation, termed the micro-Doppler effect, introduces ghost targets along the azimuth direction in reconstructed SAR images that prevents SAR from forming focused images of the vibrating targets. Recently, a discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) based method was developed to estimate the vibration frequencies and instantaneous vibration accelerations of the vibrating targets from SAR returned signals. In this paper, a demodulation-based algorithm is proposed to reconstruct focused SAR images of vibrating targets by exploiting the estimation results of the DFrFT-based vibration estimation method. For a single-component harmonic vibration, the history of the vibration displacement is first estimated from the estimated vibration frequency and the instantaneous vibration accelerations. Then a reference signal whose phase is modulated by the estimated vibration displacement with a delay of 180 degree is constructed. After that, the SAR phase history from the vibration target is multiplied by the reference signal and the vibration-induced phase modulation is canceled. Finally, the SAR image containing the re-focused vibration target is obtained by applying the 2-D Fourier transform to the demodulated SAR phase history. This algorithm is applied to simulated SAR data and successfully reconstructs the SAR image containing the re-focused vibrating target.

  9. Effect of Slot Combination and Skewed Slot on Electromagnetic Vibration of Capacitor Motor under Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsuka, Isao; Tsuboi, Kazuo

    The capacitor motor (CRM) is widely used to drive industrial equipments and electric home appliances. Recently, the reduction in the vibration and noise of the CRM has become increasingly important from the standpoint of environmental improvement. However, the electromagnetic vibration of the CRM under load has not been analyzed sufficiently. Therefore, we have studied the electromagnetic vibration of CRM for the purpose of reducing it. In a previous paper, the relationships for a backward magnetic field, the equivalent circuit current, and the vibration of the CRM were clarified. The present paper theoretically and experimentally discusses the effect of the slot combination and skewed slot on the electromagnetic vibration of CRM under load. The primary conclusions are as follows: (1) In the case of 4-pole and 6-pole CRMs, the dominant electromagnetic vibration of CRMs was theoretically attributed to three types of electromagnetic force waves. Two types of electromagnetic force waves are generated: one wave is generated by the interaction of two forward magnetic fluxes, such as those of a three-phase squirrel-cage induction motor, and the other wave is generated under the influence of a backward magnetic flux. (2) The characteristics of dominant electromagnetic vibration depending on load and running capacitor were classified theoretically and experimentally into three types based on the characteristics of the electromagnetic force wave and equivalent circuit current. (3) The influences of magnetic saturation in dominant electromagnetic vibration were verified experimentally and their causes were clarified theoretically in relation to electromagnetic force waves.

  10. Membrane-type vibrational energy harvester based on a multi-layered piezoelectric membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Seunghwan; Kim, Jonghun; Park, Suk-in; Jang, Cheol-Yong; Jeong, Hakgeun

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we fabricated a membrane-type vibrational energy harvester by using a conventional micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) method. The membrane-type vibrational energy harvester consists of a multi-layered diaphragm for stable and flexible vibration, a piezoelectric ZnO film for responding to the vibrational energy and for generating electric power, and a vibrator connected to the bottom of multi-layered diaphragm for enhancing the vibrational displacement of the diaphragm. First, we characterized the quality of a ZnO film through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed a preferred c-axis orientation, a hexagonal rod shape and a quite smooth surface. After the membrane-type vibrational energy harvester had been fabricated, we integrated it into a printing circuit board to realize piezoelectric generation and confirm its performance. Finally, under vibrational motion, we obtained a useful output voltage of 400 mV, and we estimated that the energy harvester generated an actual output voltage of about 200 uV.

  11. Suppression of rotary unbalance spin-up vibration using passive and semi-active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begg, Colin Duncan

    Rotating machine unbalance can be the source of unwanted vibrations in many mechanical systems. One problematic form of unbalance force is generated by machine start-up or shut-down. Start-up/shut-down unbalance induces a harmonic excitation force with a varying frequency that is directly proportional to rotor speed, and an amplitude that is proportional to the square of the frequency. When the frequency of a start-up/shut-down unbalance approaches or passes a system resonant frequency, large amplitude vibrations can occur. These vibrations generate greater than normal system operating forces, which could accelerate cumulative part wear and damage internal components. Such degradation could significantly reduce a mechanical system's life. This thesis presents a passive and a semi-active control method for the suppression of vibrations caused by unbalance spin-up excitation (focusing on the start-up scenario) in a mechanical structure. Both methods employ dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). A passive control method using dual mechanical DVAs has been previously proposed (Bursal, 1995). As a basis for design, Bursal (1995) made a conjecture that shaping the system's frequency response function (FRF) by using DVAs to provide a low, flattened, FRF curve over the excitation spin-up frequency range, would minimize the structural vibration response for an unbalance spin-up event. Although the method has been shown to be effective for a few sets of conditions, the conjecture of using steady-state-based FRF-Shaping to suppress transient responses (spin-up unbalance generates a transient response) has not been substantiated. This thesis validates the dual absorber design conjecture and provides additional information regarding the optimal design of such a system. The parametric studies compare the performances between an optimal design (minimum peak response) and the FRF-Shaping design. It is shown that the performances of the two designs are similar for very slow spin

  12. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2017-01-04

    Vibrational spectroscopy has continued use as a powerful tool to characterize ionic liquids since the literature on room temperature molten salts experienced the rapid increase in number of publications in the 1990's. In the past years, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies have provided insights on ionic interactions and the resulting liquid structure in ionic liquids. A large body of information is now available concerning vibrational spectra of ionic liquids made of many different combinations of anions and cations, but reviews on this literature are scarce. This review is an attempt at filling this gap. Some basic care needed while recording IR or Raman spectra of ionic liquids is explained. We have reviewed the conceptual basis of theoretical frameworks which have been used to interpret vibrational spectra of ionic liquids, helping the reader to distinguish the scope of application of different methods of calculation. Vibrational frequencies observed in IR and Raman spectra of ionic liquids based on different anions and cations are discussed and eventual disagreements between different sources are critically reviewed. The aim is that the reader can use this information while assigning vibrational spectra of an ionic liquid containing another particular combination of anions and cations. Different applications of IR and Raman spectroscopies are given for both pure ionic liquids and solutions. Further issues addressed in this review are the intermolecular vibrations that are more directly probed by the low-frequency range of IR and Raman spectra and the applications of vibrational spectroscopy in studying phase transitions of ionic liquids.

  13. Vibration budget for observatory equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Thompson, Hugh

    2015-07-01

    Vibration from equipment mounted on the telescope and in summit support buildings has been a source of performance degradation at existing astronomical observatories, particularly for adaptive optics performance. Rather than relying only on best practices to minimize vibration, we present here a vibration budget that specifies allowable force levels from each source of vibration in the observatory (e.g., pumps, chillers, cryocoolers, etc.). This design tool helps ensure that the total optical performance degradation due to vibration is less than the corresponding error budget allocation and is also useful in design trade-offs, specifying isolation requirements for equipment, and tightening or widening individual equipment vibration specifications as necessary. The vibration budget relies on model-based analysis of the optical consequences that result from forces applied at different locations and frequencies, including both image jitter and primary mirror segment motion. We develop this tool here for the Thirty Meter Telescope but hope that this approach will be broadly useful to other observatories, not only in the design phase, but for verification and operations as well.

  14. Vibration control of rotor shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.

    1985-01-01

    Suppression of flexural forced vibration or the self-excited vibration of a rotating shaft system not by passive elements but by active elements is described. The distinctive feature of this method is not to dissipate the vibration energy but to provide the force cancelling the vibration displacement and the vibration velocity through the bearing housing in rotation. Therefore the bearings of this kind are appropriately named Active Control Bearings. A simple rotor system having one disk at the center of the span on flexible supports is investigated in this paper. The actuators of the electrodynamic transducer are inserted in the sections of the bearing housing. First, applying the optimal regulator of optimal control theory, the flexural vibration control of the rotating shaft and the vibration control of support systems are performed by the optimal state feedback system using these actuators. Next, the quasi-modal control based on a modal analysis is applied to this rotor system. This quasi-modal control system is constructed by means of optimal velocity feedback loops. The differences between optimal control and quasi-modal control are discussed and their merits and demerits are made clear. Finally, the experiments are described concerning only the optimal regulator method.

  15. Gap junctional communication in osteocytes is amplified by low intensity vibrations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uzer, Gunes; Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Ian, Cheng; Thompson, William R; Rubin, Janet; Chan, Meilin E; Judex, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism by which cells sense high-frequency mechanical signals of small magnitude is unknown. During exposure to vibrations, cell populations within a bone are subjected not only to acceleratory motions but also to fluid shear as a result of fluid-cell interactions. We explored displacements of the cell nucleus during exposure to vibrations with a finite element (FE) model and tested in vitro whether vibrations can affect osteocyte communication independent of fluid shear. Osteocyte like MLO-Y4 cells were subjected to vibrations at acceleration magnitudes of 0.15 g and 1 g and frequencies of 30 Hz and 100 Hz. Gap junctional intracellular communication (GJIC) in response to these four individual vibration regimes was investigated. The FE model demonstrated that vibration induced dynamic accelerations caused larger relative nuclear displacement than fluid shear. Across the four regimes, vibrations significantly increased GJIC between osteocytes by 25%. Enhanced GJIC was independent of vibration induced fluid shear; there were no differences in GJIC between the four different vibration regimes even though differences in fluid shear generated by the four regimes varied 23-fold. Vibration induced increases in GJIC were not associated with altered connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA or protein levels, but were dependent on Akt activation. Combined, the in silico and in vitro experiments suggest that externally applied vibrations caused nuclear motions and that large differences in fluid shear did not influence nuclear motion (<1%) or GJIC, perhaps indicating that vibration induced nuclear motions may directly increase GJIC. Whether the increase in GJIC is instrumental in modulating anabolic and anti-catabolic processes associated with the application of vibrations remains to be determined.

  16. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-04

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of vibrations on surface roughness formed during precision boring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzeniewski, Dariusz; Znojkiewicz, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis of vibrations on surface roughness generated during boring with the application of the conventional boring tool and one with the damper is presented. The experiments included the measurement of vibration accelerations carried out with the piezoelectric sensor, as well as the evaluation of surface roughness parameters after each machining pass. The obtained results reveal that in the investigated range, no stability loss was found. Furthermore, the growth of the rotational speed induces the increase of vibration level, as well as the growth of the differences between the vibration values generated during boring with the conventional tool and one equipped with damper. Vibrations have also the direct influence on the machined surface roughness. In case of the tool equipped with the damper, the tool's overhang L had more intense influence than rotational speed n. However, for the conventional boring tool this dependency was unequivocal.

  18. Adaptive vibration control using a virtual-vibration-absorber controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shang-Teh; Shao, Ying-Jhe

    2007-09-01

    A control algorithm emulating a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is developed for a flexible structure subject to harmonic disturbances of uncertain frequency. The virtual vibration absorber is mathematically equivalent to a passive DVA, but its stiffness, inertia and damping coefficient are adjustable by software. Stiffness of the virtual spring is tuned according to the phase difference between the acceleration of the primary body and the displacement of the virtual mass. The adaptation algorithm consists of a phase detector with a low-pass filter, similar to that found in a phase-locked loop. Both undamped and damped vibration absorbers are developed; the former has the advantage of cleaner vibration neutralization while the latter has a smoother stiffness adaptation. Adaptation rate of the virtual stiffness is analyzed in detail. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by simulations and real-time experiments.

  19. Vibrational Autodetachment in Nitroalkane Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Christopher L.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2010-06-01

    Nitroalkanes have electron affinities ge 1370 cm-1, well below the excitation energies for CH stretching modes, with the excess charge localized on the nitro group. Upon absorption of an IR photon in a CH stretching vibrational mode, the absorbed energy is redistributed in the molecule. If enough energy is transferred to the NO2 stretching/wagging modes, the excess electron residing on the nitro group is emitted. Vibrational autodetachment (VAD) spectra encode information regarding intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) processes leading up to electron emission. We present VAD photoelectron spectroscopy of polyatomic molecular anions and discuss how a VAD photoelectron spectrum can be modeled.

  20. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOEpatents

    Obermeyer, Franklin D.; Middlebrooks, Willis B.; DeMario, Edmund E.

    1994-01-01

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube.