Science.gov

Sample records for generational comparison revised

  1. Revision and product generation software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed revision and product generation (RevPG) software for updating digital line graph (DLG) data and producing maps from such data. This software is based on ARC/INFO, a geographic information system from Environmental Systems Resource Institute (ESRI). RevPG consists of ARC/INFO Arc Macro Language (AML) programs, C routines, and interface menus that permit operators to collect vector data using aerial images, to symbolize the data on-screen, and to produce plots and color-separated files for use in printing maps.

  2. Revision and Product Generation Software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed revision and product generation (RevPG) software for updating digital line graph (DLG) data and producing maps from such data. This software is based on ARC/INFO, a geographic information system from Environmental Systems Resource Institute (ESRI). RevPG consists of ARC/INFO Arc Macro Language (AML) programs, C routines, and interface menus that permit operators to collect vector data using aerial images, to symbolize the data onscreen, and to produce plots and color-separated files for use in printing maps.

  3. Revised evaluation of steam generator testing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A scoping evaluation was made of various facility alternatives for test of LMFBR prototype steam generators and models. Recommendations are given for modifications to EBR-II and SCTI (Sodium Components Test Installation) for prototype SG testing, and for few-tube model testing. (DLC)

  4. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  5. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  6. A comparison of Monte Carlo generators

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz

    2015-05-15

    A comparison of GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE, and NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generators is presented using a set of four observables: protons multiplicity, total visible energy, most energetic proton momentum, and π{sup +} two-dimensional energy vs cosine distribution.

  7. 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2G RLV). Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlock, Steve; Sides, Steve; Kmiec, Tom; Arbogast, Tim; Mayers, Tom; Doehnert, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This is a revised final report and addresses all of the work performed on this program. Specifically, it covers vehicle architecture background, definition of six baseline engine cycles, reliability baseline (space shuttle main engine QRAS), and component level reliability/performance/cost for the six baseline cycles, and selection of 3 cycles for further study. This report further addresses technology improvement selection and component level reliability/performance/cost for the three cycles selected for further study, as well as risk reduction plans, and recommendation for future studies.

  8. Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision2)

    SciTech Connect

    Waste Management Group

    2006-11-29

    These guidelines describe procedures to comply with all Federal and State laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) policy applicable to State-regulated medical and unregulated, but biohazardous, waste (medical/biohazardous waste). These guidelines apply to all LBNL personnel who: (1) generate and/or store medical/biohazardous waste, (2) supervise personnel who generate medical/biohazardous waste, or (3) manage a medical/biohazardous waste pickup location. Personnel generating biohazardous waste at the Joint Genome Institute/Production Genomics Facility (JGI/PGF) are referred to the guidelines contained in Section 9. Section 9 is the only part of these guidelines that apply to JGI/PGF. Medical/biohazardous waste referred to in this Web site includes biohazardous, sharps, pathological and liquid waste. Procedures for proper storage and disposal are summarized in the Solid Medical/Biohazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Chart. Contact the Waste Management Group at 486-7663 if you have any questions regarding medical/biohazardous waste management.

  9. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  10. Medium-term follow-up of 92 femoral component revisions using a third-generation cementing technique

    PubMed Central

    Te Stroet, Martijn A J; Rijnen, Wim H C; Gardeniers, Jean W M; Van Kampen, Albert; Schreurs, B Willem

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Very little has been published on the outcome of femoral cemented revisions using a third-generation cementing technique. We report the medium-term outcome of a consecutive series of patients treated in this way. Patients and methods — This study included 92 consecutive cemented femoral revisions performed in our department with a third-generation cementing technique and without instrumented bone impaction grafting between 1996 and 2007. The average age of the patients at revision was 66 (25–92) years. None of the patients were lost to follow-up. At review in December 2013, 55 patients were still alive and had a non-re-revised femoral revision component in situ after a mean follow-up of 11 (5–17) years. Results — The mean preoperative Harris hip score was 50, and improved to 73 at final follow-up. 2 patients died shortly after the revision surgery. 1 stem was re-revised for aseptic loosening; this was also the only case with radiolucent lines in all 7 Gruen zones. A femoral reoperation was performed in 19 hips during follow-up, and in 14 of these 19 reoperations the femoral component was re-revised. Survivorship at 10 years, with femoral re-revision for any reason as the endpoint, was 86% (95% CI: 77–92). However, excluding 8 patients with reinfections after septic index revisions and 1 with hematogenous spread of infection from the survival analysis, the adjusted survival for re-revision for any reason at 10 years was 92% (95% CI: 83–96). With re-revision for aseptic loosening as endpoint, the survival at 10 years was 99% (CI: 90–100). Interpretation — Femoral component revision with a third-generation cemented stem results in acceptable survival after medium-term follow-up. We recommend the use of this technique in femoral revisions with limited loss of bone stock. PMID:26569495

  11. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

    2008-07-31

    DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

  12. Gamma probe-guided surgery for revision thyroidectomy: in comparison with conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Erbil, Y; Barbaros, U; Deveci, U; Kaya, H; Bozbora, A; Ozbey, N; Adalet, I; Ozarmagan, S

    2005-01-01

    Reoperative thyroid surgery may be required in patients who undergo any procedure less than total or near total thyroidectomy. The aim of this study was to investigate advantages of gamma-probe guided revision thyroidectomy (GGRT) over conventional revision thyroidectomy (CRT) in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). GGRT was assessed according to the TSH values, complication rates and the incidence of carcinoma in residual thyroid tissue. In this randomised prospective clinical trial, 25 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma who had previously undergone surgery for benign multinodular goiter were included in the study. GGRT was performed in 11 (44%) patients (Group 1) and CRT in 14 (65%) (Group 2). The intraoperative mean ratio of thyroid activity to background activity (T/B) was detected as 5.1 +/- 1.4 and the mean ratio of thyroid bed activity to background activity after excision (Tbed/B) was 1.3 +/- 0.3, (p < 0.01). Although the incidence of carcinoma in residual thyroid tissue was higher in group 1 (4/11) in comparison to group 2 (1/14), it was not statistically significant. The elevation of the TSH concentration at the first post-operative month was significantly higher in group 1 in comparison with group 2 (18 +/- 25 5 +/- 3 mlU/l), (p < 0.02). These results indicate that intraoperative gamma probe application may be beneficial to detect and remove residual thyroid tissue in revision thyroidectomy.

  13. Second-generation central receiver technology comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, P. C.; Becker, M.

    Fifteen years of solar thermal technology development have produced a considerable amount of knowledge relating to the production of electricity from central receiver power plants. This body of knowledge is under examination by researchers from the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany for the purpose of defining the next generation central receiver electricity producers. This second generation power plant is expected to represent a significant step towards commercialization of these systems. During the course of the study, specific activities needed to realize this next-step technology are being defined. The study is an international team effort. Under the International Energy Agency Small Solar Power Systems project, researchers from DLR, Interatom, Sandia National Laboratories, and Bechtel have designed a study in which technologies relating to existing systems are quantified, logical next-step systems are characterized, and future potential advances are identified. The receiver concepts under investigation are: salt-in-tube, volumetric, and direct absorption. Two plant performance levels are examined, 30 and 100 MW(sub e). Each concept is applied with common capacity factors, solar multiples, and types and sizes of heliostats at each performance level. Availability and uncertainty analyses are also performed. Annual energy production figures are calculated using the SOLERGY computer code. Capital and Operation and Maintenance cost methodologies are mutually agreed upon in order that levelized energy cost calculations will be consistent for each power plant. During the course of this effort, further potential advances in central receiver technology have continued to become apparent. These possible areas for improvement will be described. An additional comparison is being made between central receivers and trough-based systems.

  14. The Revised Sunspot Record in Comparison to Cosmogenic Radionuclide-Based Solar Activity Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Herbst, Konstantin; Nilsson, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Recent revisions in the sunspot records illustrate the challenges related to obtaining a 400-year-long observational record of past solar-activity changes. Cosmogenic radionuclides offer the possibility of obtaining an alternative and completely independent record of solar variability. Here, we illustrate that these records offer great potential for quantitative solar-activity reconstructions far back into the past, and we provide updated radionuclide-based solar-activity reconstructions for the past 2000 years. However, cosmogenic-radionuclide records are also influenced by processes independent of solar activity, leading to the need for critical assessment and correction for the non-solar influences. Independent of these uncertainties, we show a very good agreement between the revised sunspot records and the 10Be records from Antarctica and, in particular, the 14C-based solar-activity reconstructions. This comparison offers the potential of identifying remaining non-solar processes in the radionuclide-based solar-activity reconstructions, but it also helps identifying remaining biases in the recently revised sunspot records.

  15. Radiological Assessment of Steam Generator Removal and Replacement: Update and Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenes, G. R.; Mueller, M. A.; McCormack, W. D.

    1980-12-01

    A previous analysis of the radiological impact of removing and replacing corroded steam generators has been updated based on experience gained during steam generator repairs at Surry Unit 2. Some estimates of occupational doses involved in the operation have been revised but are not significantly different from the earlier estimates. Estimates of occupational doses and radioactive effluents for new tasks have been added. Health physics concerns that arose at Surry included the number of persons involved in the operation, tne training of workers, the handling of quantitites.of low-level waste, and the application of the ALARA principle. A review of these problem areas may help in the planning of other similar operations. A variety of processes could be used to decontaminate steam generators. Research is needed to assess these techniques and their associated occupational doses and waste volumes. Contaminated steam generators can be stored or disposed of after removal without significant radiological problems. Onsite storage and intact shipment have the least impact. In-placing retubing, an alternative to steam generator removal, results in occupational doses and effluents similar to those from removal, but prior decontamination of the channel head is needed. The retubing option should be assessed further.

  16. Comparison of State Unemployment Insurance Laws. Comparison Revision, Number 1, August 6, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Unemployment Insurance Service.

    To inform the public about details of the employment security program and how it functions, this comparison of state unemployment insurance laws is presented. The report is based primarily on an analysis of state statutes. It examines state by state the types of workers and employers that are covered under the state law, the methods of financing…

  17. Performance comparison of Next Generation sequencing platforms.

    PubMed

    Erguner, Bekir; Ustek, Duran; Sagiroglu, Mahmut S

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation DNA Sequencing technologies offer ultra high sequencing throughput for very low prices. The increase in throughput and diminished costs open up new research areas. Moreover, number of clinicians utilizing DNA sequencing keeps growing. One of the main concern for researchers and clinicians who are adopting these platforms is their sequencing accuracy. We compared three of the most commonly used Next Generation Sequencing platforms; Ion Torrent from Life Technologies, GS FLX+ from Roche and HiSeq 2000 from Illumina.

  18. Revised Estimates of Hikurangi Slow Slip Using FEM-Generated Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Wallace, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) occur along nearly the entire Hikurangi subduction margin adjacent to the North Island, New Zealand. The occurrence of both shallow and deep SSEs and the change in locking behavior observed along the Hikurangi Margin provide a unique opportunity to examine the factors controlling both seismic and aseismic behavior. It is therefore critical that our slip estimates are as accurate as possible. Existing SSE slip estimates use geodetic data in conjunction with an elastic half-space dislocation model to infer the slip distributions for these events. Two recent developments provide the potential to obtain more accurate estimates for these events, however. First, a New Zealand-wide seismic velocity model (Eberhart-Phillips et al., 2010) allows us to accurately represent the effects of complex variations in elastic properties. Second, a revised interface geometry has just been developed (Williams et al., 2013), allowing us to represent more accurately the interface on which the events are assumed to occur. We use the finite element code PyLith to generate Green's functions for the entire Hikurangi interface, and we then use these in place of the elastic half-space Green's functions used previously. We do our work in two stages. In the first stage, we replace the existing geometry for the Hikurangi interface with the new geometry, thus allowing us to isolate the changes due purely to the revised geometry. In the second phase, we use the FEM-generated Green's functions in the DEFNODE inversion program, which allows us to isolate the changes that are due to changes in the assumed elastic properties. In this initial work, we apply the method to two Hikurangi SSEs: one deep event and one shallow one. The differences observed for these two events will allow us to evaluate the relative importance of interface geometry and assumed elastic structure for future SSE slip inversions.

  19. Comparison of Self-Scoring Error Rate for SDS (Self Directed Search) (1970) and the Revised SDS (1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Gary E.; And Others

    A comparison of Self-Scoring Error Rate for Self Directed Search (SDS) and the revised SDS is presented. The subjects were college freshmen and sophomores who participated in career planning as a part of their orientation program, and a career workshop. Subjects, N=190 on first study and N=84 on second study, were then randomly assigned to the SDS…

  20. Westinghouse Hanford Company plan for certifying newly generated contact -- handled transuranic waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.M.; Backlund, E.G.

    1995-09-01

    All transuranic (TRU) waste generators are required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A to package their TRU waste in order to comply wit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) -- Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) or keep non-certifiable containers segregated. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Transuranic Waste Certification Plan was developed to ensure that TRU newly generated waste at WHC meets the DOE Order 5820.2A and the WHC-WAC which includes the State of Washington Department of Ecology -- Washington Administrative Code (DOE-WAC). The metho used at WHC to package TRU waste are described in sufficient detail to meet the regulations. This document is organized to provide a brief overview of waste generation operations at WHC. The methods used to implement this plan are discussed briefly along with the responsibilities and authorities of applicable organizations. This plan describes how WHC complies with all applicable regulations and requirements set forth in the latest approved revision of WHC-EP-0063-4.

  1. Comparison of Medium Frequency Burst Generation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J. W.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Yoon, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Auroral Medium Frequency (MF) burst is a naturally occurring spontaneous impulsive radio emission observed at ground level between 800 and 4500 kHz. MF burst has been shown to be associated with auroral substorm onset, commonly observed coincidentally with auroral roar and hiss, with typical durations of a few minutes, amplitudes of ~10-14 V^2 /m^2 Hz, and measured to be left hand polarized. Despite several suggested theories, the exact generation mechanism for MF burst still remains a mystery. Recent experimental findings combined with a discussion of normal wave modes available in the auroral ionosphere allow us to constrain potential modes of generation. Normal modes available in the auroral ionosphere (Omega_ce = ~800-1600 kHz, omega_pe = ~100-6000 kHz between 100 and 1000 km altitude) include R-X, L-O, Z (L-X), Langmuir-upper hybrid, electron cyclotron, electron acoustic, and electron cyclotron sound. Each mode is considered in light of experimental evidence, including accessibility to the L-O mode for propagation to ground with left hand polarization, and requirements for excitation by an auroral electron beam (100-10s of keV). A linear mode conversion process is also preferred over non-linear due to their inefficiency. Specific scenarios include: mode conversion of Langmuir waves at a range of altitudes on either the top or bottom side F-region, short wavelength (thermal branch) Langmuir waves, electron acoustic waves, electron cyclotron sound waves, direct generation of the L mode, and refraction and conversion of Z / upper hybrid waves - similar to that of auroral roar.

  2. Size Comparison: Three Generations of Mars Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Full-scale models of three generations of NASA Mars rovers show the increase in size from the Sojourner rover of the Mars Pathfinder project that landed on Mars in 1997 (center), to the twin Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity that landed in 2004 (left), to the Mars Science Laboratory rover for a mission to land in 2010 (right).

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover is about 9 feet wide, 10 feet long (not counting its robotic arm) and 7 feet tall.

    This image was taken in May 2008 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which has built the real Mars rovers and managed the rover missions for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  3. Comparison of next-generation sequencing systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Li, Yinhu; Li, Siliang; Hu, Ni; He, Yimin; Pong, Ray; Lin, Danni; Lu, Lihua; Law, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    With fast development and wide applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, genomic sequence information is within reach to aid the achievement of goals to decode life mysteries, make better crops, detect pathogens, and improve life qualities. NGS systems are typically represented by SOLiD/Ion Torrent PGM from Life Sciences, Genome Analyzer/HiSeq 2000/MiSeq from Illumina, and GS FLX Titanium/GS Junior from Roche. Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI), which possesses the world's biggest sequencing capacity, has multiple NGS systems including 137 HiSeq 2000, 27 SOLiD, one Ion Torrent PGM, one MiSeq, and one 454 sequencer. We have accumulated extensive experience in sample handling, sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. In this paper, technologies of these systems are reviewed, and first-hand data from extensive experience is summarized and analyzed to discuss the advantages and specifics associated with each sequencing system. At last, applications of NGS are summarized.

  4. 78 FR 48503 - Proposed Revision to Missiles Generated by Extreme Winds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... extreme winds. The revision also incorporates guidance on regulatory treatment of nonsafety systems. DATES... Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition.'' This revision incorporates guidance and... Power Plants,'' and Interim Staff Guidance DC/COL- ISG-024, ``Implementation of Regulatory Guide...

  5. Revising Item Responses in Computerized Adaptive Tests: A Comparison of Three Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocking, Martha L.

    1997-01-01

    Investigated three models that permit restricted examinee control over revising previous answers in the context of adaptive testing, using simulation. Two models permitting item revisions worked well in preserving test fairness and accuracy, and one model may preserve some cognitive processing styles developed by examinees for a linear testing…

  6. NFPA, 1996 revisions to National Electrical Code, NFPA 110, and NFPA 99 that affect on-site power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.S.; Bell, J.; Whittall, H.

    1995-12-31

    The three most important NFPA standards for the on-site power industry are: NFPA 70-The National Electrical Code, NFPA 110 Emergency and Standby Power Systems and NFPA 99-Health Care Facilities. This paper will cover the important revisions affecting on-site power generation systems for the 1996 editions. Each of the three authors is a member of one or more of the technical committees that have responsibility for writing these standards.

  7. ORIGEN2: a revised and updated version of the Oak Ridge isotope generation and depletion code

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.

    1980-07-01

    ORIGEN2 is a versatile point depletion and decay computer code for use in simulating nuclear fuel cycles and calculating the nuclide compositions of materials contained therein. This code represents a revision and update of the original ORIGEN computer code which has been distributed world-wide beginning in the early 1970s. The purpose of this report is to give a summary description of a revised and updated version of the original ORIGEN computer code, which has been designated ORIGEN2. A detailed description of the computer code ORIGEN2 is presented. The methods used by ORIGEN2 to solve the nuclear depletion and decay equations are included. Input information necessary to use ORIGEN2 that has not been documented in supporting reports is documented.

  8. On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

    1991-08-22

    In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Comparison of different simulation methods for multiplane computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpfe, Thomas; Hudelist, Florian; Waddie, Andrew J.; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tunnermann, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    Computer generated holograms (CGH) are used to transform an incoming light distribution into a desired output. Recently multi plane CGHs became of interest since they allow the combination of some well known design methods for thin CGHs with unique properties of thick holograms. Iterative methods like the iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) require an operator that transforms a required optical function into an actual physical structure (e.g. a height structure). Commonly the thin element approximation (TEA) is used for this purpose. Together with the angular spectrum of plane waves (APSW) it has also been successfully used in the case of multi plane CGHs. Of course, due to the approximations inherent in TEA, it can only be applied above a certain feature size. In this contribution we want to give a first comparison of the TEA & ASPW approach with simulation results from the Fourier modal method (FMM) for the example of one dimensional, pattern generating, multi plane CGH.

  10. A statistical review of the oxygen data from the gas generation tests supporting the revision of the 9975 SARP

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.B.

    2000-01-20

    The Chemical and Hydrogen Technology Section (CHT) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has conducted a series of gas generation tests in support of the revision of the safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) for the 9975 container, developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Packaging and Transportation Group of SRTC is coordinating the revision to this SARP. A Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan directing this work was issued by CHT in February 1999. Initially, the primary interest in this testing was hydrogen generation. From these ``gas generation tests can be tracked in real-time by measuring the pressure of a sealed container of the materials being studied. Because multiple gas phase reactions are produced in the radiation field of the sample, material pressure measurements do not necessarily define the quantity of H{sub 2} generated. However, the change in total molecules of gas can be calculated using the ideal gas law from the pressure measurement, known container volume and sample temperature. A measurement of the actual headspace gases must be completed to calculate the H{sub 2} generation rate for a particular sample.'' As the results from these tests were reviewed, however, questions arose regarding the oxygen in the headspace gases. Specifically, do the data from some tests indicate that oxygen was generated for those tests? And do the data for other tests indicate that the oxygen was depleted for them? A statistical analysis of the oxygen data derived from these tests is provided in this report to help answer these questions.

  11. Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Gary E. Rochau and Thurlow W.H. Caffey, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0740; Bahram Nassersharif and Gabe V. Garcia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001; Russell P. Jedlicka, Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001

    2003-05-01

    OAK B204 Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003. A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The technique is 100% volumetric, and may find smaller defects, more rapidly, and less expensively than present methods. The project described in this report was a joint development effort between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) funded by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the project was to research, design, and develop a new concept utilizing a continuous wave radar to detect defects inside metallic tubes and in particular nuclear plant steam generator tubing. The project was divided into four parallel tracks: computational modeling, experimental prototyping, thermo-mechanical design, and signal detection and analysis.

  12. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Halsey, William; Hayner, George; Katoh, Yutai; Klett, James William; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Stoller, Roger E; Wilson, Dane F

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  13. TWO MEASURES FOR CROSS-CULTURAL RESEARCH ON MORALITY: COMPARISON AND REVISION.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Li, Sisi

    2015-08-01

    The current research assessed the reliability and validity of two Western measures of morality in a Chinese sample, namely the Community, Autonomy, and Divinity Scale (CADS) and the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ). Questionnaires were administered to 274 Chinese participants in Northern China (M age = 25.4 yr., SD = 8.50; 86% women). Confirmatory factor analysis using a structural equation model was conducted to evaluate the construct validity of the two scales. The results indicated a reasonable model fit of both the CADS and the MFQ after certain modifications. The revised versions of both measures had good internal consistency reliabilities. Correlation analysis indicated moderate correlations between the dimensions of the two scales. Regarding the content of morality, Chinese people endorsed more of the traditional ethics and foundations than people from Western cultures in other studies. In addition, participants who reported a religious affiliation scored higher on the Divinity subscale compared to those who claimed to be atheists.

  14. Comparison of two CDMAM generations with respect to dose sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Kaar, Marcus; Floor, Marianne; van der Burght, Roeland; Semturs, Friedrich; Figl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    A contrast-detail phantom like the CDMAM phantom (Artinis Medical Systems, Zetten, NL) is suggested by the 'European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening' to evaluate image quality of digital mammography systems. In a recent paper the commonly used CDMAM 3.4 was evaluated according to its dose sensitivity in comparison to other phantoms. The successor phantom (CDMAM 4.0) features other disc diameters and thicknesses that were adapted to be more closely to the image quality which can be found in modern mammography systems. It seems to be obvious to compare this two generations of phantoms with respect to a potential improvement. The time-current product was varied within a range of clinically used values (40-160 mAs). Image evaluation was performed using the automatic evaluation software provided by Artinis. The relative dose sensitivity was compared in dependence of different diameters. Additionally, the IQFinv parameter, which averages over the diameters was computed to get a more global conclusion. We found that the dose is of a considerable smoother dependence with the CMDAM 4.0 phantom. Also the IQFinv parameter shows a more linear behaviour than with the CDMAM 3.4. As the automatic evaluation shows different results on the two phantoms, conversion factors from automatic to human readouts have to be adapted consequently.

  15. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Ludlow, Andrew T.; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library’s heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality. PMID:27048884

  16. The DOBIS and Washington Library Network Systems: A Comparison for the British Columbia Library Network. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoffner, Ralph M.; Madden, Mary A.

    This study compares the three versions of DOBIS (Dartmunder Bibliothekssystem) that are currently running in Canada and the Washington Library Network (WLN) systems in order to determine which one is the most appropriate to replicate in support of the British Columbia Library Network (BCLN). Comparisons of systems costs and operating features, the…

  17. [Revision of the medical malpractice law? Malpractice in an international comparison].

    PubMed

    Deutsch, E

    1998-10-01

    An international comparison shows that the German criminal law is severe on physicians. In the majority of the other countries the doctor is just liable for criminal or gross negligence. There are some countries where lack of informed consent leads to a special criminal action. The comparative law shows us that it is better to keep the current criminal law.

  18. Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S.; Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

  19. A comparison of new and revised Rorschach measures of schizophrenic functioning in a Serbian clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Dzamonja-Ignjatovic, Tamara; Smith, Bruce L; Djuric Jocic, Dragana; Milanovic, Marko

    2013-01-01

    We empirically evaluated indexes derived from the Rorschach Comprehensive System (CS) and the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS) that are used for the assessment of psychotic functioning in schizophrenia. We compared the Perceptual Thinking Index (PTI) and the Ego Impairment Index (EII-2) with their revised versions: Thought and Perception Composite (TP-Comp) and EII-3. We evaluated their predictive validity for differentiating schizophrenic from nonschizophrenic patients in a Serbian sample. The sample consisted of 211 (109 men and 102 women, 18-50 years old) inpatients in Serbia who were divided into 2 groups: schizophrenic (100) and nonschizophrenic (111). Test administration, coding, and form quality classification followed CS guidelines. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the new indexes TP-Comp and EII-3 have slightly better predictive power than their counterparts, PTI and EII-2, in identification of schizophrenia, and that TP-Comp performed better than other indexes, although all 4 indexes were successful in differentiating these groups. The results supported the use of TP-Comp in diagnosis of schizophrenia and generally provided evidence for the utility of the Rorschach in evaluating psychosis and for its use in a cross-national context. PMID:23844937

  20. Guide for preparing and maintaining generator group pollution prevention program documentation. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, B.C.

    1994-11-30

    The Hanford Pollution Prevention (P2) program is an organized, comprehensive, and continual effort to: systematically reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary wastes; conserve resources; and prevent or minimize pollutant releases to all environmental media from all Hanford Site activities. The program has been developed to meet waste minimization and pollution Prevention public law requirements, federal and state regulations, and US Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. The Hanford P2 program is implemented through the sitewide, contractor, and generator group programs.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.E. Mizia; W.E. Windes; W.R. Corwin; T.D. Burchell; C.E. Duty; Y. Katoh; J.W. Klett; T.E. McGreevy; R.K. Nanstad; W. Ren; P.L. Rittenhouse; L.L. Snead; R.W. Swindeman; D.F. Wlson

    2007-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Some of the general and administrative aspects of the R&D Plan include: • Expand American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards in support of the NGNP Materials R&D Program. • Define and develop inspection needs and the procedures for those inspections. • Support selected university materials related R&D activities that would be of direct benefit to the NGNP Project. • Support international materials related collaboration activities through the DOE sponsored Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Materials and Components (M&C) Project Management Board (PMB). • Support document review activities through the Materials Review Committee (MRC) or other suitable forum.

  2. BAE/Orion Hybrid Electric Buses at New York City Transit: A Generational Comparison (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, R.

    2008-03-01

    Paper describes the evaluation of hybrid-electric transit buses purchased by New York City Transit (NYCT) in an order group of 200 (Gen II) and compares their performance to those of similar hybrid-electric transit buses purchased by NYCT in an order group of 125 (Gen I).

  3. CAP: A Computer Code for Generating Tabular Thermodynamic Functions from NASA Lewis Coefficients. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    2002-01-01

    For several decades the NASA Glenn Research Center has been providing a file of thermodynamic data for use in several computer programs. These data are in the form of least-squares coefficients that have been calculated from tabular thermodynamic data by means of the NASA Properties and Coefficients (PAC) program. The source thermodynamic data are obtained from the literature or from standard compilations. Most gas-phase thermodynamic functions are calculated by the authors from molecular constant data using ideal gas partition functions. The Coefficients and Properties (CAP) program described in this report permits the generation of tabulated thermodynamic functions from the NASA least-squares coefficients. CAP provides considerable flexibility in the output format, the number of temperatures to be tabulated, and the energy units of the calculated properties. This report provides a detailed description of input preparation, examples of input and output for several species, and a listing of all species in the current NASA Glenn thermodynamic data file.

  4. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, Curt; Ghan, Steven J.; Walton, John J.; Weissman, Paul R.

    1989-01-01

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of nuclear winter; GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of asteroid/comet winter, however, are more severe than in nuclear winter because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a patchy sense.

  5. Satisfaction, Challenges, and Interaction in Online Education: A Generational Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yousef, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    Problem: Research suggests that multiple generations of students (predominantly Generation X and millennials) are concurrently enrolled in online classes and that the number of online students continues to grow. The problem investigated in this study was to identify the level of satisfaction as well as the preferences of students from Generation X…

  6. Revising and assessing explanatory models in a high school genetics class: A comparison of unsuccessful and successful performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Susan K.; Stewart, Jim

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we describe the model-revising problem-solving strategies of two groups of students (one successful, one unsuccessful) as they worked (in a genetics course we developed) to revise Mendel's simple dominance model to explain the inheritance of a trait expressed in any of four variations. The two groups described in this paper were chosen with the intent that the strategies that they employed be used to inform the design of model-based instruction. Differences were found in the groups' abilities to recognize anomalous data, use existing models as templates for revisions, and assess revised models.

  7. Patient Demographics and Surgical Characteristics in ACL Revision: A Comparison of French, Norwergian, and North American Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Robert A.; Trojani, Christophe; Granan, Lars-Petter; Neyret, Philippe; Colombet, Philippe; Engebretsen, Lars; Wright, Rick W.; Kaeding, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this paper is to compare patient factors, intra-operative findings, and surgical techniques between patients followed in large cohorts in France, Norway, and North America. Methods Data collected on 2286 patients undergoing revision ACLR were obtained. These data included 1216 patients enrolled in the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) in North America, 793 patients undergoing revision ACLR and recorded in the Norwegian Knee Ligament Registry (NKLR), and 277 patients recorded in the revision ACL database of the Société Française d’Arthroscopie (SFA) in France. Data collected from each database included patient demographics (age, sex, height, and weight), graft choice and reason for failure of the primary ACLR, time from primary to revision ACLR, pre-revision patient-reported outcome scores (KOOS, subjective IKDC), associated intra-articular findings and treatments at revision, and graft choice for revision reconstruction. Results Patient demographics in the three databases were relatively similar. Graft choice for primary and revision ACLR varied significantly, with more allografts used in the MARS cohort. Hamstring autograft was favored in the NKRL, while BTB autograft was most common in the SFA cohort. Reasons for failure of the primary ACLR were comparable, with recurrent trauma noted in 46 to 56% of patients in each of the three cohorts. Technical error was cited in 44 to 51% of patients in the MARS and SFA cohorts, but was not clearly elucidated in the NKLR cohort. Biologic failure of the primary graft was more common in the MARS cohort. Differences in associated intra-articular findings were noted at the time of revision ACLR, with significantly more high grade cartilage lesions noted in the MARS group. Conclusions Significant differences exist between patient populations followed in revision ACL cohorts throughout the world that should be considered when applying findings from such cohorts to different patient populations. PMID

  8. Revising and Assessing Explanatory Models in a High School Genetics Class: A Comparison of Unsuccessful and Successful Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan K.; Stewart, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Describes the model-revising problem-solving strategies of two groups of students (one successful, one unsuccessful) as they worked in a genetics course to revise Mendel's simple dominance model to explain the inheritance of a trait expressed in any of four variations. Finds differences in the groups' abilities to recognize anomalous data, use…

  9. Results of a Second-generation Constrained Condylar Prosthesis in Complex Primary and Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Mean 5.5-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chen-Yi; Xue, De-Ting; Jiang, Shuai; He, Rong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of second-generation constrained condylar knee (CCK) prostheses has not been widely studied. This retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a second-generation CCK prosthesis for complex primary or revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods: In total, 51 consecutive TKAs (47 patients) were performed between June 2003 and June 2013 using second-generation modular CCK prostheses. The follow-up was conducted at 3rd day, 1st, 6th, and 12th months postoperatively and later annually. Anteroposterior (AP), lateral, skyline, and long-standing AP radiographs of the affected knees were taken. The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Knee Score, the Knee Society Knee Score (KSKS), the Knee Society Function Score (KSFS), and range of motion (ROM) were also recorded. Heteroscedastic two-tailed Student's t-tests were used to compare the HSS score and the Knee Society score between primary and revision TKAs. A value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Four knees (two patients) were lost to follow-up, and 47 knees (31 primary TKAs and 16 revision TKAs) had a mean follow-up time of 5.5 years. The mean HSS score improved from 51.1 ± 15.0 preoperatively to 85.3 ± 8.4 points at the final follow-up (P < 0.05). Similar results were observed in terms of the KSKS and KSFS, which improved from 26.0 ± 13.0 to 80.0 ± 12.2 and from 40.0 ± 15.0 to 85.0 ± 9.3 points, respectively (P < 0.05). No significant difference in the HSS, KSKS, KSFS, or ROM was found between primary and revision TKAs (P > 0.05). Two complications were observed in the revision TKA group (one intraoperative distal femur fracture and one recurrence of infection) while one complication (infection) was observed in the primary TKA group. No prosthesis loosening, joint dislocation, patella problems, tibial fracture, or nerve injury were observed. Radiolucent lines were observed in 4% of the knees without progressive

  10. Solar thermal bowl concepts and economic comparisons for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Brown, D.R.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Allemann, R.T.; Coomes, E.P.; Craig, S.N.; Drost, M.K.; Humphreys, K.K.; Nomura, K.K.

    1988-04-01

    This study is aimed at providing a relative comparison of the thermodynamic and economic performance in electric applications for fixed mirror distributed focus (FMDF) solar thermal concepts which have been studied and developed in the DOE solar thermal program. Following the completion of earlier systems comparison studies in the late 1970's there have been a number of years of progress in solar thermal technology. This progress includes developing new solar components, improving component and system design details, constructing working systems, and collecting operating data on the systems. This study povides an update of the expected performance and cost of the major components, and an overall system energy cost for the FMDDF concepts evaluated. The projections in this study are for the late 1990's and are based on the potential capabilities that might be achieved with further technology development.

  11. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  12. Student Loan Debt Literacy: A Comparison of First-Generation and Continuing-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jason; Mueller, John A.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written about the increasing debt burden that college students incur, little research examines student's perceptions of debt. This study sought to determine if student loan debt literacy differs by generation status (first-generation and continuing-generation). The data for this study was collected from a sample of 156…

  13. A Comparison of Three Computer-Generated Feedback Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, David R.

    This study explores a relatively new area of computer research, i.e., utilization of computer-generated feedback based upon the knowledge gained in both written and computer-based instruction. One hundred and twenty-six freshmen and sophomore college students from a variety of academic majors volunteered for this study. The instructional materials…

  14. Generating DEM from LIDAR data - comparison of available software tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzeniowska, K.; Lacka, M.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years many software tools and applications have appeared that offer procedures, scripts and algorithms to process and visualize ALS data. This variety of software tools and of "point cloud" processing methods contributed to the aim of this study: to assess algorithms available in various software tools that are used to classify LIDAR "point cloud" data, through a careful examination of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) generated from LIDAR data on a base of these algorithms. The works focused on the most important available software tools: both commercial and open source ones. Two sites in a mountain area were selected for the study. The area of each site is 0.645 sq km. DEMs generated with analysed software tools ware compared with a reference dataset, generated using manual methods to eliminate non ground points. Surfaces were analysed using raster analysis. Minimum, maximum and mean differences between reference DEM and DEMs generated with analysed software tools were calculated, together with Root Mean Square Error. Differences between DEMs were also examined visually using transects along the grid axes in the test sites.

  15. Comparison of the original and revised structures of the Health Promotion Model in predicting construction workers' use of hearing protection.

    PubMed

    Ronis, David L; Hong, OiSaeng; Lusk, Sally L

    2006-02-01

    Pender's health promotion model (HPM) has been revised, including substantial changes in its structure. The purpose of this study was to compare the fit and predictive usefulness of the original and revised structures of the HPM as applied to the use of hearing protection devices by 703 construction workers. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the two alternative forms of the model. Both forms of the model fit well, with the revised structure having a better fit and explaining more of the variance in use of hearing protection (28% vs. 18%). Results support the revised structure of the health promotion model (HPM) over the original form, and indicate it may be useful in understanding and predicting use of hearing protection.

  16. Comparison of the original and revised structures of the Health Promotion Model in predicting construction workers' use of hearing protection.

    PubMed

    Ronis, David L; Hong, OiSaeng; Lusk, Sally L

    2006-02-01

    Pender's health promotion model (HPM) has been revised, including substantial changes in its structure. The purpose of this study was to compare the fit and predictive usefulness of the original and revised structures of the HPM as applied to the use of hearing protection devices by 703 construction workers. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the two alternative forms of the model. Both forms of the model fit well, with the revised structure having a better fit and explaining more of the variance in use of hearing protection (28% vs. 18%). Results support the revised structure of the health promotion model (HPM) over the original form, and indicate it may be useful in understanding and predicting use of hearing protection. PMID:16404731

  17. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-15

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π{sup 0} vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of ν{sub µ} charged current interactions.

  18. A comparison of functional outcomes in patients undergoing revision arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears with and without arthroscopic suprascapular nerve release

    PubMed Central

    Savoie, Felix H; Zunkiewicz, Mark; Field, Larry D; Replogle, William H; O’Brien, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare functional outcomes in patients undergoing revision repair of massive rotator cuff tears (retracted medial to the glenoid) with Goutallier Grade 4 atrophy and concomitant release of the suprascapular nerve to a similar group of patients with Grade 3 atrophy undergoing revision rotator cuff repair (RTCR) without nerve release. We hypothesized that patients undergoing nerve release would have more favorable functional outcomes as measured by the Modified University of California at Los Angeles shoulder rating scale (UCLA). Patients and methods Twenty-two patients underwent revision repair of massive rotator cuff tears with release of the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular notch. We compared total preoperative, postoperative, and change in UCLA score in these patients to a similar group of 22 patients undergoing revision RTCR without suprascapular nerve release. Additionally, UCLA subscores between the two groups were compared preoperatively and at final follow-up. Results The average preoperative UCLA score in the nerve-release group was 7.91, and final follow-up average was 27.86; average 3.05 grades of strength were recovered. In the comparison group, average preoperative UCLA score was 11.77, and final follow-up average was 29.09; average 1.32 grades of strength were recovered. The average preoperative UCLA score was significantly worse in the nerve-release group (P=0.007). The average postoperative UCLA score was not significantly different (P=0.590) between the groups, indicating a better improvement in the nerve-release group with significantly greater improvement in active forward flexion, strength, and pain relief. Conclusion Patients who underwent concomitant release of the suprascapular nerve during revision RTCR had greater overall improvement as noted in pain relief, active forward flexion, and strength, than a comparable group without nerve release. PMID:27799834

  19. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation: Comparison between Primary and Revision Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moo Sung; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery with a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is an important minimally invasive fusion technique for the lumbar spine. Lumbar spine reoperation is challenging and is thought to have greater complication risks. The purpose of this study was to compare MIS TLIF with unilateral screw fixation perioperative results between primary and revision surgeries. This was a prospective study that included 46 patients who underwent MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw. The patients were divided into two groups, primary and revision MIS TLIF, to compare perioperative results and complications. The two groups were similar in age, sex, and level of operation, and were not significantly different in the length of follow-up or clinical results. Although dural tears were more common with the revision group (primary 1; revision 4), operation time, blood loss, total perioperative complication, and fusion rates were not significantly different between the two groups. Both groups showed substantial improvements in VAS and ODI scores one year after surgical treatment. Revision MIS TLIF performed by an experienced surgeon does not necessarily increase the risk of perioperative complication compared with primary surgery. MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation is a valuable option for revision lumbar surgery. PMID:24949483

  20. Experimental comparison of PV-smoothing controllers using distributed generators

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi; Morino, Kimio; Hawkins, John N.; Arellano, Brian; Shinji, Takao; Ogata, Takao; Tadokoro, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    The power output variability of photovoltaic systems can affect local electrical grids in locations with high renewable energy penetrations or weak distribution or transmission systems. In those rare cases, quick controllable generators (e.g., energy storage systems) or loads can counteract the destabilizing effects by compensating for the power fluctuations. Previously, control algorithms for coordinated and uncoordinated operation of a small natural gas engine-generator (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output were optimized using MATLAB/Simulink simulations. The simulations demonstrated that a traditional generation resource such as a natural gas genset in combination with a battery would smooth the photovoltaic output while using a smaller battery state of charge (SOC) range and extending the life of the battery. This paper reports on the experimental implementation of the coordinated and uncoordinated controllers to verify the simulations and determine the differences in the controllers. The experiments were performed with the PNM PV and energy storage Prosperity site and a gas engine-generator located at the Aperture Center at Mesa Del Sol in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two field demonstrations were performed to compare the different PV smoothing control algorithms: (1) implementing the coordinated and uncoordinated controls while switching off a subsection of the PV array at precise times on successive clear days, and (2) comparing the results of the battery and genset outputs for the coordinated control on a high variability day with simulations of the coordinated and uncoordinated controls. It was found that for certain PV power profiles the SOC range of the battery may be larger with the coordinated control, but the total amp-hours through the battery-which approximates battery wear-will always be smaller with the coordinated control.

  1. Visualizing Revision: Leveraging Student-Generated Between-Draft Diagramming Data in Support of Academic Writing Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmanson, Justin; Kennett, Katrina; Magnifico, Alecia; McCarthey, Sarah; Searsmith, Duane; Cope, Bill; Kalantzis, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Once writers complete a first draft, they are often encouraged to evaluate their writing and prioritize what to revise. Yet, this process can be both daunting and difficult. This study looks at how students used a semantic concept mapping tool to re-present the content and organization of their initial draft of an informational text. We examine…

  2. Comparison of open and percutaneous lumbar pedicle screw revision rate using 3-D image guidance and intraoperative CT.

    PubMed

    Santos, Edward Rainier G; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Yson, Sharon C; Polly, David W

    2015-02-01

    Complications arising from a malpositioned screw can be both devastating and costly. The incidence of neurologic injury secondary to a malpositioned screw is reported to be as high as 7% to 12%. The advancement of image-guided technology has allowed surgeons to place screws more accurately and confirm correct placement prior to leaving the operating room. Only a small number of studies have examined image-guided pedicle screw accuracy in terms of intraoperative revision and reoperation rates. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraoperative revision and return to surgery rates for navigated lumbar pedicle screws and to compare navigated open and percutaneous techniques. The authors reviewed 199 cases of 3-dimensional image-guided lumbar pedicle screw instrumentation from November 2006 to December 2011. Screw or K-wire removal, repositioning, or eventual abandonment of insertion were noted. Chi-square test was used to determine statistical significance in rates between the 2 groups (alpha=0.05). The authors also noted return to surgery secondary to complications from a malpositioned screw. The overall intraoperative revision rate of navigated lumbar pedicle screws was 4.6%. There were significantly more revisions in the percutaneously inserted screws (7.5%) than with the open technique (2.7%) (P=.0004). If K-wire revisions are excluded, there was no statistically significant difference in intraoperative revision rates between the percutaneous and open groups (2.1% vs 2.7%, respectively) (P=.0004). No patients underwent reoperation for a malpositioned screw. This technology has virtually eliminated the need for reoperation for screw malposition. It may suggest a more cost-effective way of preventing neurovascular injuries and revision surgeries.

  3. Comparison of the Minnesota Percepto-Diagnostic Test-Revised and Bender-Gestalt in Predicting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Gerald B.; Vance, Booney

    1993-01-01

    Investigated whether Minnesota Percepto-Diagnostic Test-Revised (MPD-R) or Bender-Gestalt Test (BG) would more accurately predict achievement at first-, third-, and fifth-grade levels. Administered both tests to 84 children in counterbalanced order. Results indicated that MPD-R was better predictor of achievement than BG, especially at first- and…

  4. Different Moves, Similar Outcomes: A Comparison of Chinese and Swedish Preschool Teacher Education Programmes and the Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vong, Keang-ieng Peggy; Hu, Bi Ying; Xia, Yan-ping

    2015-01-01

    A Chinese and a Swedish preschool teacher education programme were examined in search for commonalities and differences of the curriculum decision-making considerations involved in the respective programme revision process. Findings include: (1) the two programmes have shifted orientations and become similar, yet there was no fundamental…

  5. New Generation of Catalogues for the New Generation of Users: A Comparison of Six Library Catalogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercun, Tanja; Zumer, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the problems and issues faced by online library catalogues. It aims to establish how libraries have undertaken the mission of developing the next generation catalogues and how they compare to new tools such as Amazon. Design/methodology/approach: An expert study was carried out in January…

  6. Zum Ausgleich von generativer und energetischer Sprachbetrachtung (A Comparison of the "Generative" and "Energetic" Views of Language)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgerber, Leo

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of two basic conceptions: Wilhelm von Humboldt's idea of language as energeia'' existing within and without man, and Noam Chomsky's idea of language generated by the speaker according to an innate apparatus. Revised version of lectures presented at the University of Bonn, West Germany in August 1971. (RS)

  7. A comparison between different fractal grid generation methods coupled with lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, D.; Donno, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a comparison of three different grids generated with a fractal method and used for fluid dynamic simulations through a kinetic approach. We start from the theoretical element definition and we introduce some optimizations in order to fulfil requirements. The study is performed with analysing results both in terms of friction factor at different Reynolds regimes and streamlines paths.

  8. Comparison of Subconjunctival Mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil Injection for Needle Revision of Early Failed Trabeculectomy Blebs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Miaomiao; Tao, Yuan; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. To compare the efficacy of needle revision with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC) on dysfunctional filtration blebs shortly after trabeculectomy. Methods. It is a prospective randomized study comparing needle revision augmented with MMC or 5-FU for failed trabeculectomy blebs. Results. To date 71 patients (75 eyes) have been enrolled, 40 eyes in the MMC group and 35 in the 5-FU group. 68 patients (72 eyes) have completed 12-month follow-up, 38 eyes in the MMC group and 34 in the 5-FU group. The mean IOP before and that after needle revision in the MMC group were 26.5 ± 4.3 mmHg and 11.3 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.05), and in the 5-FU group were 27.1 ± 3.8 mmHg and 10.9 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.05). At 12-month follow-up, complete success rates were 57.5% for MMC group and 34.3% for 5-FU group (P = 0.042; log-rank test) and 75% and 60% (P = 0.145; log-rank test), respectively, for the qualified success. Complication rates between the two groups were not statistically different (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Needle revision and subconjunctival MMC injection were more effective than needling and subconjunctival 5-FU injection for early dysfunctional filtration blebs after trabeculectomies. PMID:26989499

  9. Comparison of classical diagnostic criteria and Chinese revised diagnostic criteria for fever of unknown origin in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia-Jun; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Shi, Zheng-Yu; Sun, Qiu; Xin, Xiao-Juan; Zhao, Jin-Qiu; Yin, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever of unknown origin (FUO) has always been a challenging problem for physicians since it was first reported half a century ago. This study aimed to investigate the clinical features of FUO and to compare the clinical significance of the classical diagnostic criteria and the Chinese revised diagnostic criteria of FUO. Methods We retrospectively collected a series of 140 patients admitted to our hospital between September 2011 and June 2013 because of prolonged febrile illnesses (lasting at least 2 weeks, temperature ≥38.5°C) without diagnosis and categorized them into two groups according to the Chinese revised diagnostic criteria (group A) and classical diagnostic criteria (group B) for FUO. The A group included patients presenting with fever persisting between 2 and 3 weeks with the diagnosis remaining uncertain after three outpatient visits or at least 3 days of hospital investigation. The B group included patients presenting with fever persisting for more than 3 weeks with no established diagnosis after 1 week of hospital investigation. The general conditions, etiologies, definite diagnosis times, and diagnostic methods of the two groups were compared. Results There were no significant differences in the general conditions, etiologies, definite diagnosis times, and diagnostic methods between the Chinese revised diagnostic criteria and classical diagnostic criteria. Conclusion Both the examined FUO diagnostic criteria are suitable for clinical practice in this region. PMID:27785042

  10. Comparison of measured and calculated sound pressure levels around a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Willshire, William L., Jr.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a large number of simultaneous acoustic measurements around a large horizontal axis downwind configuration wind turbine generator. In addition, comparisons are made between measurements and calculations of both the discrete frequency rotational harmonics and the broad band noise components. Sound pressure time histories and noise radiation patterns as well as narrow band and broadband noise spectra are presented for a range of operating conditions. The data are useful for purposes of environmental impact assessment.

  11. Technique for the comparison of light spectra from natural and laboratory generated lightning current arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchard, D.; Clark, D.; Carr, D.; Haddad, A.

    2016-08-01

    A technique was developed for the comparison of observed emission spectra from lightning current arcs generated through self-breakdown in air and the use of two types of initiation wire, aluminum bronze and nichrome, against previously published spectra of natural lightning events. A spectrograph system was used in which the wavelength of light emitted by the lightning arc was analyzed to derive elemental interactions. A lightning impulse of up to 100 kA was applied to a two hemispherical tungsten electrode configuration which allowed the effect of the lightning current and lightning arc length to be investigated. A natural lightning reference spectrum was reconstructed from literature, and generated lightning spectra were obtained from self-breakdown across a 14.0 mm air gap and triggered along initiation wires of length up to 72.4 mm. A comparison of the spectra showed that the generated lightning arc induced via self-breakdown produced a very similar spectrum to that of natural lightning, with the addition of only a few lines from the tungsten electrodes. A comparison of the results from the aluminum bronze initiation wire showed several more lines, whereas results from the nichrome initiation wire differed greatly across large parts of the spectrum. This work highlights the potential use for spectrographic techniques in the study of lightning interactions with surrounding media and materials, and in natural phenomena such as recently observed ball lightning.

  12. A Comparison of Forecast Error Generators for Modeling Wind and Load Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Diao, Ruisheng; Hafen, Ryan P.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2013-12-18

    This paper presents four algorithms to generate random forecast error time series, including a truncated-normal distribution model, a state-space based Markov model, a seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model, and a stochastic-optimization based model. The error time series are used to create real-time (RT), hour-ahead (HA), and day-ahead (DA) wind and load forecast time series that statistically match historically observed forecasting data sets, used for variable generation integration studies. A comparison is made using historical DA load forecast and actual load values to generate new sets of DA forecasts with similar stoical forecast error characteristics. This paper discusses and compares the capabilities of each algorithm to preserve the characteristics of the historical forecast data sets.

  13. Comparison of Single Event Transients Generated by Short Pulsed X-Rays, Lasers and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoza, David; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Tockstein, Michael A.; Brewe, Dale L.; Wells, Nathan P.; Koga, Rokutaro; Gaab, K. M.; Lotshaw, William T.; Moss, Steven C.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the transients generated by pulsed x-rays, heavy ions, and different laser wavelengths in a Si p-i-n photodiode. We compare the charge collected by all of the excitation methods to determine the equivalent LET for pulsed x-rays relative to heavy ions. Our comparisons show that pulsed x-rays from synchrotron sources can generate a large range of equivalent LET and generate transients similar to those excited by laser pulses and heavy ion strikes. We also look at how the pulse width of the transients changes for the different excitation methods. We show that the charge collected with pulsed x-rays is greater than expected as the x-ray photon energy increases. Combined with their capability of focusing to small spot sizes and of penetrating metallization, pulsed x-rays are a promising new tool for high resolution screening of SEE susceptibility

  14. A Comparison of Forecast Error Generators for Modeling Wind and Load Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Diao, Ruisheng; Hafen, Ryan P.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2013-07-25

    This paper presents four algorithms to generate random forecast error time series. The performance of four algorithms is compared. The error time series are used to create real-time (RT), hour-ahead (HA), and day-ahead (DA) wind and load forecast time series that statistically match historically observed forecasting data sets used in power grid operation to study the net load balancing need in variable generation integration studies. The four algorithms are truncated-normal distribution models, state-space based Markov models, seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, and a stochastic-optimization based approach. The comparison is made using historical DA load forecast and actual load values to generate new sets of DA forecasts with similar stoical forecast error characteristics (i.e., mean, standard deviation, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation). The results show that all methods generate satisfactory results. One method may preserve one or two required statistical characteristics better the other methods, but may not preserve other statistical characteristics as well compared with the other methods. Because the wind and load forecast error generators are used in wind integration studies to produce wind and load forecasts time series for stochastic planning processes, it is sometimes critical to use multiple methods to generate the error time series to obtain a statistically robust result. Therefore, this paper discusses and compares the capabilities of each algorithm to preserve the characteristics of the historical forecast data sets.

  15. Guidelines for generators to meet HWHF acceptance requirements for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Berkeley Lab. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides performance standards that one, as a generator of hazardous chemical, radioactive, or mixed wastes at the Berkeley Lab, must meet to manage their waste to protect Berkeley Lab staff and the environment, comply with waste regulations and ensure the continued safe operation of the workplace, have the waste transferred to the correct Waste Handling Facility, and enable the Environment, Health and Safety (EH and S) Division to properly pick up, manage, and ultimately send the waste off site for recycling, treatment, or disposal. If one uses and generates any of these wastes, one must establish a Satellite Accumulation Area and follow the guidelines in the appropriate section of this document. Topics include minimization of wastes, characterization of the wastes, containers, segregation, labeling, empty containers, and spill cleanup and reporting.

  16. Acetabular revision with impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component: comparison of the Kaplan-Meier analysis to the competing risk analysis in 62 revisions with 25 to 30 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Te Stroet, M A J; Keurentjes, J C; Rijnen, W H C; Gardeniers, J W M; Verdonschot, N; Slooff, T J J H; Schreurs, B W

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of 62 consecutive acetabular revisions using impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component in 58 patients (13 men and 45 women) after a mean follow-up of 27 years (25 to 30). All patients were prospectively followed. The mean age at revision was 59.2 years (23 to 82). We performed Kaplan-Meier (KM) analysis and also a Competing Risk (CR) analysis because with long-term follow-up, the presence of a competing event (i.e. death) prevents the occurrence of the endpoint of re-revision. A total of 48 patients (52 hips) had died or had been re-revised at final review in March 2011. None of the deaths were related to the surgery. The mean Harris hip score of the ten surviving hips in ten patients was 76 points (45 to 99). The KM survivorship at 25 years for the endpoint 're-revision for any reason' was 58.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38 to 73) and for 're-revision for aseptic loosening' 72.1% (95% CI 51 to 85). With the CR analysis we calculated the KM analysis overestimates the failure rate with respectively 74% and 93% for these endpoints. The current study shows that acetabular impaction bone grafting revisions provide good clinical results at over 25 years.

  17. Generative Topographic Mapping (GTM): Universal Tool for Data Visualization, Structure-Activity Modeling and Dataset Comparison.

    PubMed

    Kireeva, N; Baskin, I I; Gaspar, H A; Horvath, D; Marcou, G; Varnek, A

    2012-04-01

    Here, the utility of Generative Topographic Maps (GTM) for data visualization, structure-activity modeling and database comparison is evaluated, on hand of subsets of the Database of Useful Decoys (DUD). Unlike other popular dimensionality reduction approaches like Principal Component Analysis, Sammon Mapping or Self-Organizing Maps, the great advantage of GTMs is providing data probability distribution functions (PDF), both in the high-dimensional space defined by molecular descriptors and in 2D latent space. PDFs for the molecules of different activity classes were successfully used to build classification models in the framework of the Bayesian approach. Because PDFs are represented by a mixture of Gaussian functions, the Bhattacharyya kernel has been proposed as a measure of the overlap of datasets, which leads to an elegant method of global comparison of chemical libraries.

  18. Assessment of the Technical Maturity of Generation IV Concepts for Test or Demonstration Reactor Applications, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans David

    2015-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study the suitability of different advanced reactor concepts to support materials irradiations (i.e. a test reactor) or to demonstrate an advanced power plant/fuel cycle concept (demonstration reactor). As part of the study, an assessment of the technical maturity of the individual concepts was undertaken to see which, if any, can support near-term deployment. A Working Group composed of the authors of this document performed the maturity assessment using the Technical Readiness Levels as defined in DOE’s Technology Readiness Guide . One representative design was selected for assessment from of each of the six Generation-IV reactor types: gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Background information was obtained from previous detailed evaluations such as the Generation-IV Roadmap but other technical references were also used including consultations with concept proponents and subject matter experts. Outside of Generation IV activity in which the US is a party, non-U.S. experience or data sources were generally not factored into the evaluations as one cannot assume that this data is easily available or of sufficient quality to be used for licensing a US facility. The Working Group established the scope of the assessment (which systems and subsystems needed to be considered), adapted a specific technology readiness scale, and scored each system through discussions designed to achieve internal consistency across concepts. In general, the Working Group sought to determine which of the reactor options have sufficient maturity to serve either the test or demonstration reactor missions.

  19. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical waste to LBL`s Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). Hazardous chemical waste is a necessary byproduct of LBL`s research and technical support activities. This waste must be handled properly if LBL is to operate safely and provide adequate protection to staff and the environment. These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of hazardous chemical waste, can meet LBL`s acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical waste.

  20. Dynamite: a flexible code generating language for dynamic programming methods used in sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Birney, E; Durbin, R

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a code generating language, called Dynamite, specialised for the production and subsequent manipulation of complex dynamic programming methods for biological sequence comparison. From a relatively simple text definition file Dynamite will produce a variety of implementations of a dynamic programming method, including database searches and linear space alignments. The speed of the generated code is comparable to hand written code, and the additional flexibility has proved invaluable in designing and testing new algorithms. An innovation is a flexible labelling system, which can be used to annotate the original sequences with biological information. We illustrate the Dynamite syntax and flexibility by showing definitions for dynamic programming routines (i) to align two protein sequences under the assumption that they are both poly-topic transmembrane proteins, with the simultaneous assignment of transmembrane helices and (ii) to align protein information to genomic DNA, allowing for introns and sequencing error.

  1. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL`s Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL`s acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

  2. An Algorithm to Generate Deep-Layer Temperatures from Microwave Satellite Observations for the Purpose of Monitoring Climate Change. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Fleming, Henry E.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for generating deep-layer mean temperatures from satellite-observed microwave observations is presented. Unlike traditional temperature retrieval methods, this algorithm does not require a first guess temperature of the ambient atmosphere. By eliminating the first guess a potentially systematic source of error has been removed. The algorithm is expected to yield long-term records that are suitable for detecting small changes in climate. The atmospheric contribution to the deep-layer mean temperature is given by the averaging kernel. The algorithm computes the coefficients that will best approximate a desired averaging kernel from a linear combination of the satellite radiometer's weighting functions. The coefficients are then applied to the measurements to yield the deep-layer mean temperature. Three constraints were used in deriving the algorithm: (1) the sum of the coefficients must be one, (2) the noise of the product is minimized, and (3) the shape of the approximated averaging kernel is well-behaved. Note that a trade-off between constraints 2 and 3 is unavoidable. The algorithm can also be used to combine measurements from a future sensor (i.e., the 20-channel Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)) to yield the same averaging kernel as that based on an earlier sensor (i.e., the 4-channel Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU)). This will allow a time series of deep-layer mean temperatures based on MSU measurements to be continued with AMSU measurements. The AMSU is expected to replace the MSU in 1996.

  3. Revised Comparisons of Simulated Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Projected Demands in 2046, Pueblo Reservoir, Southeastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, Roderick F.; Miller, Lisa D.

    2009-01-01

    Pueblo Reservoir is one of southeastern Colorado's most valuable water resources. The reservoir provides irrigation, municipal, and industrial water to various entities throughout the region. The reservoir also provides flood control, recreational activities, sport fishing, and wildlife enhancement to the region. The Southern Delivery System (SDS) project is a regional water-delivery project that has been proposed to provide a safe, reliable, and sustainable water supply through the foreseeable future (2046) for Colorado Springs, Fountain, Security, and Pueblo West. Discussions with the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Geological Survey led to a cooperative agreement to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality of Pueblo Reservoir. This work has been completed and described in a previously published report, U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2008-5056. Additionally, there was a need to make comparisons of simulated hydrodynamics and water quality for projected demands associated with the various Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) alternatives and plans by Pueblo West to discharge treated wastewater into the reservoir. Wastewater plans by Pueblo West are fully independent of the SDS project. This report compares simulated hydrodynamics and water quality for projected demands in Pueblo Reservoir resulting from changes in inflow and water quality entering the reservoir, and from changes to withdrawals from the reservoir as projected for the year 2046. Four of the seven EIS alternatives were selected for scenario simulations. The four U.S. Geological Survey simulation scenarios were the No Action scenario (EIS Alternative 1), the Downstream Diversion scenario (EIS Alternative 2), the Upstream Return-Flow scenario (EIS Alternative 4), and the Upstream Diversion scenario (EIS Alternative 7). Additionally, the results of an Existing Conditions scenario (year 2006 demand conditions) were compared to the No Action scenario (projected demands in

  4. Ethical Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Mary Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the dilemma of how to respond to student papers advancing morally repugnant positions. Advocates conceptualizing writing as an ethical act and connecting ethics and revision. Describes briefly how three such student papers were handled. (SR)

  5. Comparison of the dipolar magnetic field generated by two Ising-like models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peqini, Klaudio; Duka, Bejo

    2015-04-01

    We consider two Ising-like models named respectively the "domino" model and the Rikitake disk dynamo model. Both models are based on some collective interactions that can generate a dipolar magnetic field which reproduces the well-known features of the geomagnetic field: the reversals and secular variation (SV). The first model considers the resultant dipolar magnetic field as formed by the superposition of the magnetic fields generated by the dynamo elements called macrospins, while the second one, starting from the two-disk dynamo action, takes in consideration the collective interactions of several disk dynamo elements. We will apply two versions of each model: the short-range and the long-range coupled dynamo elements. We will study the statistical properties of the time series generated by the simulation of all models. The comparison of these results with the paleomagnetic data series and long series of SV enables us to conclude which of these Ising-like models better match with the geomagnetic field time series. Key words: geomagnetic field, domino model, Rikitake disk dynamo, dipolar moment

  6. Pain and Function Recovery Trajectories following Revision Hip Arthroplasty: Short-Term Changes and Comparison with Primary Hip Arthroplasty in the ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Michael R.; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients report similar or better pain and function before revision hip arthroplasty than before primary arthroplasty but worse results are reported after revision surgery than after primary surgery. The trajectory of post-operative recovery during the first months and any differences by type of surgery have received little attention. We explored the trajectories of change in pain and function after revision hip arthroplasty to 12-months post-operatively and compare them with those observed after primary hip arthroplasty. Methods This study is a prospective cohort study of patients undergoing primary (n = 80 with 92% for an indication of osteoarthritis) and revision (n = 43) hip arthroplasties. WOMAC pain and function scores and walking speed were collected pre-operatively, at 3 and 12-months post-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used to chart and compare the trajectories of change (0–3 months and 3–12 months) between types of surgery. Results The improvements in pain and function following revision arthroplasty occurred within the first 3-months with no evidence of further change beyond this initial period. While the pattern of recovery was similar to the one observed after primary arthroplasty, improvements in the first 3-months were smaller after revision compared to primary arthroplasty. Patients listed for revision surgery reported lower pre-operative pain levels but similar post-operative levels compared to those undergoing primary surgery. At 12-months post-operation patients who underwent a revision arthroplasty had not reached the same level of function achieved by those who underwent primary arthroplasty. Conclusion The post-operative improvements in pain and function are larger following primary hip arthroplasty than following revision hip arthroplasty. Irrespectively of surgery type, most of the improvements occur in the first three post-operative months. More research is required to identify whether the recovery

  7. Do initial conditions matter? A comparison of model climatologies generated from different initial states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Cohen, C.; Wu, P.

    1981-01-01

    A coarse mesh (8 by 10) 7 layer global climate model was used to compute 15 months of meteorological history in two perpetual January experiments on a water planet (without continents) with a zonally symmetric climatological January sea surface temperature field. In the first of the two water planet experiments the initial atmospheric state was a set of zonal mean values of specific humidity, temperature, and wind at each latitude. In the second experiment the model was initialized with globally uniform mean values of specific humidity and temperature on each sigma level surface, constant surface pressure (1010 mb), and zero wind everywhere. A comparison was made of the mean January climatic states generated by the two water planet experiments. The first two months of each 15 January run were discarded, and 13 month averages were computed from months 3 through 15.

  8. Comparison of petroleum generation kinetics by isothermal hydrous and nonisothermal open-system pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Ruble, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    This study compares kinetic parameters determined by open-system pyrolysis and hydrous pyrolysis using aliquots of source rocks containing different kerogen types. Kinetic parameters derived from these two pyrolysis methods not only differ in the conditions employed and products generated, but also in the derivation of the kinetic parameters (i.e., isothermal linear regression and non-isothermal nonlinear regression). Results of this comparative study show that there is no correlation between kinetic parameters derived from hydrous pyrolysis and open-system pyrolysis. Hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters determine narrow oil windows that occur over a wide range of temperatures and depths depending in part on the organic-sulfur content of the original kerogen. Conversely, open-system kinetic parameters determine broad oil windows that show no significant differences with kerogen types or their organic-sulfur contents. Comparisons of the kinetic parameters in a hypothetical thermal-burial history (2.5 ??C/my) show open-system kinetic parameters significantly underestimate the extent and timing of oil generation for Type-US kerogen and significantly overestimate the extent and timing of petroleum formation for Type-I kerogen compared to hydrous pyrolysis kinetic parameters. These hypothetical differences determined by the kinetic parameters are supported by natural thermal-burial histories for the Naokelekan source rock (Type-IIS kerogen) in the Zagros basin of Iraq and for the Green River Formation (Type-I kerogen) in the Uinta basin of Utah. Differences in extent and timing of oil generation determined by open-system pyrolysis and hydrous pyrolysis can be attributed to the former not adequately simulating natural oil generation conditions, products, and mechanisms.

  9. Molecular characterization and comparison of shale oils generated by different pyrolysis methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Jin, Jang Mi; Kim, Sunghwan

    2012-01-01

    Shale oils generated using different laboratory pyrolysis methods have been studied using standard oil characterization methods as well as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric photoionization (APPI) to assess differences in molecular composition. The pyrolysis oils were generated from samples of the Mahogany zone oil shale of the Eocene Green River Formation collected from outcrops in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, using three pyrolysis systems under conditions relevant to surface and in situ retorting approaches. Significant variations were observed in the shale oils, particularly the degree of conjugation of the constituent molecules and the distribution of nitrogen-containing compound classes. Comparison of FT-ICR MS results to other oil characteristics, such as specific gravity; saturate, aromatic, resin, asphaltene (SARA) distribution; and carbon number distribution determined by gas chromatography, indicated correspondence between higher average double bond equivalence (DBE) values and increasing asphaltene content. The results show that, based on the shale oil DBE distributions, highly conjugated species are enriched in samples produced under low pressure, high temperature conditions, and under high pressure, moderate temperature conditions in the presence of water. We also report, for the first time in any petroleum-like substance, the presence of N4 class compounds based on FT-ICR MS data. Using double bond equivalence and carbon number distributions, structures for the N4 class and other nitrogen-containing compounds are proposed.

  10. Biomechanical comparison of the human cadaveric pelvis with a fourth generation composite model.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Brandon L; Attia, Tarik; Backstein, David; Safir, Oleg; Willett, Thomas L; Kuzyk, Paul R T

    2016-02-29

    The use of cadavers for orthopaedic biomechanics research is well established, but presents difficulties to researchers in terms of cost, biosafety, availability, and ease of use. High fidelity composite models of human bone have been developed for use in biomechanical studies. While several studies have utilized composite models of the human pelvis for testing orthopaedic reconstruction techniques, few biomechanical comparisons of the properties of cadaveric and composite pelves exist. The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of cadaveric pelves to those of the 4th generation composite model. An Instron ElectroPuls E10000 mechanical testing machine was used to load specimens with orientation, boundary conditions and degrees of freedom that approximated those occurring during the single legged phase of walking, including hip abductor force. Each specimen was instrumented with strain gauge rosettes. Overall specimen stiffness and principal strains were calculated from the test data. Composite specimens showed significantly higher overall stiffness and slightly less overall variability between specimens (composite K=1448±54N/m, cadaver K=832±62N/m; p<0.0001). Strains measured at specific sites in the composite models and cadavers were similar (but did differ) only when the applied load was scaled to overall construct stiffness. This finding regarding strain distribution and the difference in overall stiffness must be accounted for when using these composite models for biomechanics research. Altering the cortical wall thickness or tuning the elastic moduli of the composite material may improve future generations of the composite model.

  11. Next-Generation Mitogenomics: A Comparison of Approaches Applied to Caecilian Amphibian Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Simon T; Briscoe, Andrew G; Wilkinson, Mark; Waeschenbach, Andrea; San Mauro, Diego; Day, Julia J; Littlewood, D Tim J; Foster, Peter G; Nussbaum, Ronald A; Gower, David J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences are being generated with increasing speed due to the advances of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and associated analytical tools. However, detailed comparisons to explore the utility of alternative NGS approaches applied to the same taxa have not been undertaken. We compared a 'traditional' Sanger sequencing method with two NGS approaches (shotgun sequencing and non-indexed, multiplex amplicon sequencing) on four different sequencing platforms (Illumina's HiSeq and MiSeq, Roche's 454 GS FLX, and Life Technologies' Ion Torrent) to produce seven (near-) complete mitogenomes from six species that form a small radiation of caecilian amphibians from the Seychelles. The fastest, most accurate method of obtaining mitogenome sequences that we tested was direct sequencing of genomic DNA (shotgun sequencing) using the MiSeq platform. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses using seven different partitioning strategies were unable to resolve compellingly all phylogenetic relationships among the Seychelles caecilian species, indicating the need for additional data in this case.

  12. Next-Generation Mitogenomics: A Comparison of Approaches Applied to Caecilian Amphibian Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Simon T; Briscoe, Andrew G; Wilkinson, Mark; Waeschenbach, Andrea; San Mauro, Diego; Day, Julia J; Littlewood, D Tim J; Foster, Peter G; Nussbaum, Ronald A; Gower, David J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences are being generated with increasing speed due to the advances of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and associated analytical tools. However, detailed comparisons to explore the utility of alternative NGS approaches applied to the same taxa have not been undertaken. We compared a 'traditional' Sanger sequencing method with two NGS approaches (shotgun sequencing and non-indexed, multiplex amplicon sequencing) on four different sequencing platforms (Illumina's HiSeq and MiSeq, Roche's 454 GS FLX, and Life Technologies' Ion Torrent) to produce seven (near-) complete mitogenomes from six species that form a small radiation of caecilian amphibians from the Seychelles. The fastest, most accurate method of obtaining mitogenome sequences that we tested was direct sequencing of genomic DNA (shotgun sequencing) using the MiSeq platform. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses using seven different partitioning strategies were unable to resolve compellingly all phylogenetic relationships among the Seychelles caecilian species, indicating the need for additional data in this case. PMID:27280454

  13. Next-Generation Mitogenomics: A Comparison of Approaches Applied to Caecilian Amphibian Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, Simon T.; Briscoe, Andrew G.; Wilkinson, Mark; Waeschenbach, Andrea; San Mauro, Diego; Day, Julia J.; Littlewood, D. Tim J.; Foster, Peter G.; Nussbaum, Ronald A.; Gower, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences are being generated with increasing speed due to the advances of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and associated analytical tools. However, detailed comparisons to explore the utility of alternative NGS approaches applied to the same taxa have not been undertaken. We compared a ‘traditional’ Sanger sequencing method with two NGS approaches (shotgun sequencing and non-indexed, multiplex amplicon sequencing) on four different sequencing platforms (Illumina’s HiSeq and MiSeq, Roche’s 454 GS FLX, and Life Technologies’ Ion Torrent) to produce seven (near-) complete mitogenomes from six species that form a small radiation of caecilian amphibians from the Seychelles. The fastest, most accurate method of obtaining mitogenome sequences that we tested was direct sequencing of genomic DNA (shotgun sequencing) using the MiSeq platform. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses using seven different partitioning strategies were unable to resolve compellingly all phylogenetic relationships among the Seychelles caecilian species, indicating the need for additional data in this case. PMID:27280454

  14. Analysis and Comparison of Clothoid and Dubins Algorithms for UAV Trajectory Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Nuaimi, Mohanad

    The differences between two types of pose-based UAV path generation methods clothoid and Dubins are analyzed in this thesis. The Dubins path is a combination of circular arcs and straight line segments; therefore its curvature will exhibit sudden jumps between constant values. The resulting path will have a minimum length if turns are performed at the minimum possible turn radius. The clothoid path consists of a similar combination of arcs and segments but the difference is that the clothoid arcs have a linearly variable curvature and are generated based on Fresnel integrals. Geometrically, the generation of the clothoid arc starts with a large curvature that decreases to zero. The clothoid path results are longer than the Dubins path between the same two poses and for the same minimum turn radius. These two algorithms are the focus of this research because of their geometrical simplicity, flexibility, and low computational requirements. The comparison between clothoid and Dubins algorithms relies on extensive simulation results collected using an ad-hoc developed automated data acquisition tool within the WVU UAV simulation environment. The model of a small jet engine UAV has been used for this purpose. The experimental design considers several primary factors, such as different trajectory tracking control laws, normal and abnormal flight conditions, relative configuration of poses, and wind and turbulence. A total of five different controllers have been considered, three conventional with fixed parameters and two adaptive. The abnormal flight conditions include locked or damaged actuators (stabilator, aileron, or rudder) and sensor bias affecting roll, pitch, or yaw rate gyros that are used in the feedback control loop. The relative configuration of consecutive poses is considered in terms of heading (required turn angle) and relative location of start and end points (position quadrant). Wind and turbulence effects were analyzed for different wind speed and

  15. Student Growth from Service-Learning: A Comparison of First-Generation and Non-First-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelco, Lynn E.; Ball, Christopher T.; Lockeman, Kelly S.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of service-learning courses on student growth was compared for 321 first-generation and 782 non-first-generation undergraduate students at a large urban university. Student growth encompassed both academic and professional skill development. The majority of students reported significant academic and professional development after…

  16. Comparison of joint angles and electromyographic activity of the lower extremities during standing with wearing standard and revised high-heeled shoes: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Lee, Suk Min

    2016-04-29

    Revised high-heeled shoes (HHSs) were designed to improve the shortcomings of standard HHSs. This study was conducted to compare revised and standard HHSs with regard to joint angles and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lower extremities during standing. The participants were five healthy young women. Data regarding joint angles and EMG activity of the lower extremities were obtained under three conditions: barefoot, when wearing revised HHSs, and when wearing standard HHSs. Lower extremity joint angles in the three dimensional plane were confirmed using a VICON motion capture system. EMG activity of the lower extremities was measured using active bipolar surface EMG. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance by rank applied to analyze differences during three standing conditions. Compared with the barefoot condition, the standard HHSs condition was more different than the revised HHSs condition with regard to lower extremity joint angles during standing. EMG activity of the lower extremities was different for the revised HHSs condition, but the differences among the three conditions were not significant. Wearing revised HHSs may positively impact joint angles and EMG activity of the lower extremities by improving body alignment while standing. PMID:27163313

  17. Intrinsic Radiation Source Generation with the ISC Package: Data Comparisons and Benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Clell J. Jr.

    2012-04-26

    The characterization of radioactive emissions from unstable isotopes (intrinsic radiation) is necessary for shielding and radiological-dose calculations from radioactive materials. While most radiation transport codes, e.g., MCNP [X-5 Monte Carlo Team, 2003], provide the capability to input user prescribed source definitions, such as radioactive emissions, they do not provide the capability to calculate the correct radioactive-source definition given the material compositions. Special modifications to MCNP have been developed in the past to allow the user to specify an intrinsic source, but these modification have not been implemented into the primary source base [Estes et al., 1988]. To facilitate the description of the intrinsic radiation source from a material with a specific composition, the Intrinsic Source Constructor library (LIBISC) and MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor (MISC) utility have been written. The combination of LIBISC and MISC will be herein referred to as the ISC package. LIBISC is a statically linkable C++ library that provides the necessary functionality to construct the intrinsic-radiation source generated by a material. Furthermore, LIBISC provides the ability use different particle-emission databases, radioactive-decay databases, and natural-abundance databases allowing the user flexibility in the specification of the source, if one database is preferred over others. LIBISC also provides functionality for aging materials and producing a thick-target bremsstrahlung photon source approximation from the electron emissions. The MISC utility links to LIBISC and facilitates the description of intrinsic-radiation sources into a format directly usable with the MCNP transport code. Through a series of input keywords and arguments the MISC user can specify the material, age the material if desired, and produce a source description of the radioactive emissions from the material in an MCNP readable format. Further details of using the MISC utility can

  18. Integrated Space Transportation Plan: Defining Technology Requirements and Next Generation Launch Systems to Meet Commercial and Government Needs. Revision 20 Oct. 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidoff, Larry D.; Reichert, Jack M.

    1999-01-01

    NASA continues to focus on improving safety and reliability while reducing the annual cost of meeting human space flight and unique ISS and exploration needs. NASA's Space Transportation Architecture Study (STAS) Phase 2 in early 1998 focused on space transportation options. Subsequently, NASA directed parallel industry and government teams to conduct the Integrated Space Transportation Plan effort (STAS Phase 3). The objective of ISTP was to develop technology requirements, roadmaps, and risk reduction portfolio that considered expanded definition of "clean-sheet" and Shuttle-derived second generation ETO transportation systems in support of a 2005 RLV competition for NASA missions beginning 2010. NASA provided top-level requirements for improvements in safety, reliability, and cost and a set of design reference missions representing NASA ISS, human exploration, commercial, and other civil and government needs. This paper addresses the challenges of meeting NASA's objectives while servicing the varied market segments represented in the ISTP design reference missions and provides a summary of technology development needs and candidate system concepts. A comparison of driving requirements, architectures and technology needs is discussed and descriptions of viable Shuttle-derived and next generation systems to meet the market needs are presented.

  19. Applicability Comparison of Methods for Acid Generation Assessment of Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Yim, Giljae; Cheong, Youngwook

    2014-05-01

    Minerals including various forms of sulfur could generate AMD (Acid Mine Drainage) or ARD (Acid Rock Drainage), which can have serious effects on the ecosystem and even on human when exposed to air and/or water. To minimize the hazards by acid drainage, it is necessary to assess in advance the acid generation possibility of rocks and estimate the amount of acid generation. Because of its relatively simple and effective experiment procedure, the method of combining the results of ABA (Acid Base Accounting) and NAG (Net Acid Generation) tests have been commonly used in determining acid drainage conditions. The simplicity and effectiveness of the above method however, are derived from massive assumptions of simplified chemical reactions and this often leads to results of classifying the samples as UC (Uncertain) which would then require additional experimental or field data to reclassify them properly. This paper therefore, attempts to find the reasons that cause samples to be classified as UC and suggest new series of experiments where samples can be reclassified appropriately. Study precedents on evaluating potential acid generation and neutralization capacity were reviewed and as a result three individual experiments were selected in the light of applicability and compatibility of minimizing unnecessary influence among other experiments. The proposed experiments include sulfur speciation, ABCC (Acid Buffering Characteristic Curve), and Modified NAG which are all improved versions of existing experiments of Total S, ANC (Acid Neutralizing Capacity), and NAG respectively. To assure the applicability of the experiments, 36 samples from 19 sites with diverse geologies, field properties, and weathering conditions were collected. The samples were then subject to existing experiments and as a result, 14 samples which either were classified as UC or could be used as a comparison group had been selected. Afterwards, the selected samples were used to conduct the suggested

  20. Comparison of the risk of revision in cementless total hip arthroplasty with ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma B; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings were introduced in total hip arthroplasty (THA) to reduce problems related to polyethylene wear. We compared the 9-year revision risk for cementless CoC THA and for cementless metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA. Patients and methods In this prospective, population-based study from the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry, we identified all the primary cementless THAs that had been performed from 2002 through 2009 (n = 25,656). Of these, 1,773 THAs with CoC bearings and 9,323 THAs with MoP bearings were included in the study. To estimate the relative risk (RR) of revision, we used regression with the pseudo-value approach and treated death as a competing risk. Results 444 revisions were identified: 4.0% for CoC THA (71 of 1,773) and 4.0% for MoP THA (373 of 9,323). No statistically significant difference in the risk of revision for any reason was found for CoC and MoP bearings after 9 years of follow-up (adjusted RR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.72–2.4). Revision rates due to component failure were 0.5% (n = 8) for CoC bearings and 0.1% (n = 6) for MoP bearings (p < 0.001). 6 patients with CoC bearings (0.34%) underwent revision due to ceramic fracture. Interpretation When compared to the “standard” MoP bearings, CoC THA had a 33% higher (though not statistically significantly higher) risk of revision for any reason at 9 years. PMID:25637339

  1. Effectiveness comparison of partially executed t-way test suite based generated by existing strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Rozmie R.; Ahmad, Mohd Zamri Zahir; Ali, Mohd Shaiful Aziz Rashid; Zakaria, Hasneeza Liza; Rahman, Md. Mostafijur

    2015-05-01

    Consuming 40 to 50 percent of software development cost, software testing is one of the most resource consuming activities in software development lifecycle. To ensure an acceptable level of quality and reliability of a typical software product, it is desirable to test every possible combination of input data under various configurations. Due to combinatorial explosion problem, considering all exhaustive testing is practically impossible. Resource constraints, costing factors as well as strict time-to-market deadlines are amongst the main factors that inhibit such consideration. Earlier work suggests that sampling strategy (i.e. based on t-way parameter interaction or called as t-way testing) can be effective to reduce number of test cases without effecting the fault detection capability. However, for a very large system, even t-way strategy will produce a large test suite that need to be executed. In the end, only part of the planned test suite can be executed in order to meet the aforementioned constraints. Here, there is a need for test engineers to measure the effectiveness of partially executed test suite in order for them to assess the risk they have to take. Motivated by the abovementioned problem, this paper presents the effectiveness comparison of partially executed t-way test suite generated by existing strategies using tuples coverage method. Here, test engineers can predict the effectiveness of the testing process if only part of the original test cases is executed.

  2. Comparison of large central and small decentralized power generation in India

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This reports evaluates two options for providing reliable power to rural areas in India. The benefits and costs are compared for biomass based distributed generation (DG) systems versus a 1200-MW central grid coal-fired power plant. The biomass based DG systems are examined both as alternatives to grid extension and as supplements to central grid power. The benefits are divided into three categories: those associated with providing reliable power from any source, those associated specifically with biomass based DG technology, and benefits of a central grid coal plant. The report compares the estimated delivered costs of electricity from the DG systems to those of the central plant. The analysis includes estimates for a central grid coal plant and four potential DG system technologies: Stirling engines, direct-fired combustion turbines, fuel cells, and biomass integrated gasification combined cycles. The report also discusses issues affecting India`s rural electricity demand, including economic development, power reliability, and environmental concerns. The results of the costs of electricity comparison between the biomass DG systems and the coal-fired central grid station demonstrated that the DG technologies may be able to produce very competitively priced electricity by the start of the next century. The use of DG technology may provide a practical means of addressing many rural electricity issues that India will face in the future. Biomass DG technologies in particular offer unique advantages for the environment and for economic development that will make them especially attractive. 58 refs., 31 figs.

  3. COMPARISON OF PULMONARY RESPONSES TO AUTOMOBILE-GENERATED AND NIST STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMPARISON OF PULMONARY RESPONSES TO AUTOMOBILE-GENERATED AND NIST STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS IN MICE. P. Singh1, C.A.J. Dick2, J. Richards3, M.J. Daniels3, and M.I. Gilmour3. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC, 2UNC, Chapel Hill, NC and 3 USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, (ETD,...

  4. A Comparison of Family Care Responsibilities of First-Generation and Non-First-Generation Female Administrators in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seay, Sandra E.

    2010-01-01

    Greater numbers of women are entering and working in higher education. Some of these women are the first in their families to attain academic degrees. They are known as first-generation students, and the care of children and others is often responsible for their withdrawal from academic study. This study addressed the void of information…

  5. Generation of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle Aerodynamic Data Book and Comparison To Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Steven X.; Krist, Steven E.; Compton, William B.

    2011-01-01

    A 3.5-year effort to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle (AIX FTV) is described in this paper. The AIX FTV was designed to be representative of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). While there are several differences in the outer mold line from the current revision of the CLV, the overall length, mass distribution, and flight systems of the two vehicles are very similar. This paper briefly touches on each of the aerodynamic databases developed in the program, describing the methodology employed, experimental and computational contributions to the generation of the databases, and how well the databases and underlying computations compare to actual flight test results.

  6. Comparison of Gross Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Hydroelectric Reservoirs in Brazil with Thermopower Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogerio, J. P.; Dos Santos, M. A.; Matvienko, B.; dos Santos, E.; Rocha, C. H.; Sikar, E.; Junior, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Widespread interest in human impacts on the Earth has prompted much questioning in fields of concern to the general public. One of these issues is the extent of the impacts on the environment caused by hydro-based power generation, once viewed as a clean energy source. From the early 1990s onwards, papers and studies have been challenging this assumption through claims that hydroelectric dams also emit greenhouse gases, generated by the decomposition of biomass flooded by filling these reservoirs. Like as other freshwater bodies, hydroelectric reservoirs produce gases underwater by biology decomposition of organic matter. Some of these biogenic gases are effective in terms of Global Warming. The decomposition is mainly due by anaerobically regime, emitting methane (CH4), nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). This paper compare results obtained from gross greenhouse fluxes in Brazilian hydropower reservoirs with thermo power plants using different types of fuels and technology. Measurements were carried in the Manso, Serra da Mesa, Corumbá, Itumbiara, Estreito, Furnas and Peixoto reservoirs, located in Cerrado biome and in Funil reservoir located at Atlantic forest biome with well defined climatologically regimes. Fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane in each of the reservoirs selected, whether through bubbles and/or diffusive exchange between water and atmosphere, were assessed by sampling. The intensity of emissions has a great variability and some environmental factors could be responsible for these variations. Factors that influence the emissions could be the water and air temperature, depth, wind velocity, sunlight, physical and chemical parameters of water, the composition of underwater biomass and the operational regime of the reservoir. Based in this calculations is possible to conclude that the large amount of hydro-power studied is better than thermopower source in terms of atmospheric greenhouse emissions. The comparisons between the reservoirs studied

  7. Seismic generated infrasounds on Telluric Planets: Modeling and comparisons between Earth, Venus and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, P. H.; Rolland, L.; Karakostas, F. G.; Garcia, R.; Mimoun, D.; Banerdt, W. B.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Earth, Venus and Mars are all planets in which infrasounds can propagate and interact with the solid surface. This leads to infrasound generation for internal sources (e.g. quakes) and to seismic waves generations for atmospheric sources (e.g. meteor, impactor explosions, boundary layer turbulences). Both the atmospheric profile, surface density, atmospheric wind and viscous/attenuation processes are however greatly different, including major differences between Mars/Venus and Earth due to the CO2 molecular relaxation. We present modeling results and compare the seismic/acoustic coupling strength for Earth, Mars and Venus. This modeling is made through normal modes modelling for models integrating the interior, atmosphere, both with realistic attenuation (intrinsic Q for solid part, viscosity and molecular relaxation for the atmosphere). We complete these modeling, made for spherical structure, by integration of wind, assuming the later to be homogeneous at the scale of the infrasound wavelength. This allows us to compute either the Seismic normal modes (e.g. Rayleigh surface waves), or the acoustic or the atmospheric gravity modes. Comparisons are done, for either a seismic source or an atmospheric source, on the amplitude of expected signals as a function of distance and frequency. Effects of local time are integrated in the modeling. We illustrate the Rayleigh waves modelling by Earth data (for large quakes and volcanoes eruptions). For Venus, very large coupling can occur at resonance frequencies between the solid part and atmospheric part of the planet through infrasounds/Rayleigh waves coupling. If the atmosphere reduced the Q (quality coefficient) of Rayleigh waves in general, the atmosphere at these resonance soffers better propagation than Venus crust and increases their Q. For Mars, Rayleigh waves excitations by atmospheric burst is shown and discussed for the typical yield of impacts. The new data of the Nasa INSIGHT mission which carry both seismic and

  8. Reliability and Validity of the Computerized Revised Token Test: Comparison of Reading and Listening Versions in Persons with and without Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Malcolm R.; Pratt, Sheila R.; Szuminsky, Neil; Sung, Jee Eun; Fossett, Tepanta R. D.; Fassbinder, Wiltrud; Lim, Kyoung Yuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the reliability and validity of intermodality associations and differences in persons with aphasia (PWA) and healthy controls (HC) on a computerized listening and 3 reading versions of the Revised Token Test (RTT; McNeil & Prescott, 1978). Method: Thirty PWA and 30 HC completed the test versions, including a…

  9. Performance on the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Test Battery-Children's Revision: A Comparison of Children with and without Significant WISC-R VIQ-PIQ Discrepancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilger, J. W.; Geary, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Compared the performance of 56 children on the 11 subscales of the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery-Children's Revision. Results revealed significant differences on Receptive Speech and Expressive Language subscales, suggesting a possible differential sensitivity of the children's Luria-Nebraska to verbal and nonverbal cognitive deficits.…

  10. Comparison of the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition, in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grondhuis, Sabrina Nicole; Mulick, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A review of hospital records was conducted for children evaluated for autism spectrum disorders who completed both the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R) and Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition (SB5). Participants were between 3 and 12 years of age. Diagnoses were autistic disorder (n = 26, 55%) and pervasive…

  11. Comparison of the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children--revised in rural Native American and white children.

    PubMed

    Whorton, J E; Morgan, R L

    1990-02-01

    The Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI) and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Revised (WISC--R) were administered to 46 Native American and white students who were suspected by their classroom teachers of having learning handicaps. Pearson correlations between these sets of IQs ranged from .42 (TONI and WISC--R Performance) to .89 (WISC--R Verbal and Full Scale).

  12. Comparison of Clinical Efficacy Between Modular Cementless Stem Prostheses and Coated Cementless Long-Stem Prostheses on Bone Defect in Hip Revision Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibin; Chen, Fang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the clinical efficacy of modular cementless stem and coated cementless long-stem prostheses in hip revision arthroplasty. Material/Methods Sixty-five patients with complete hip revision surgery data during January 2005 to March 2015 were selected from the People’s Hospital of Linyi City and randomly divided into a S-ROM group (implanted with cementless modular stem prostheses, n=32) and a SLR-PLUS group (implanted with cementless coated long-stem prostheses, n=33). Harris score was used to evaluate the hip function of the patients in order to measure the clinical efficacy of the prostheses in total hip arthroplasty. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs and lateral pelvic radiographs were taken and each patient’s hip arthroplasty condition was recorded. Kaplan-Meier method was applied to compare the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate between the 2 prostheses and log-rank method was used to inspect the statistical data. Results The Harris scores of both the S-ROM group and the SLR-PLUS group were significantly higher at 12 months after the operation than those before the operation (both P<0.05). The Harris scores of the patients with type I/II bone defects in the S-ROM group were not significantly different from those of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group at all time points (all P>0.05), while the Harris scores of the patients with type IIIA/IIIB in the S-ROM group were both significantly higher than those of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the operation (all P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate between the type I/II patients in the S-ROM group (92.31%) and the patients of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group (85.71%) (P>0.05). However, the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate of the type IIIA/IIIB patients in the S-ROM group (89.47%) was significantly different from the patients of the same types in

  13. Validation of a Brief Quantitative Measure of Autistic Traits: Comparison of the Social Responsiveness Scale with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, John N.; Davis, Sandra A.; Todd, Richard D.; Schindler, Matthew K.; Gross, Maggie M.; Brophy, Susan L.; Metzger, Lisa M.; Shoushtari, Christiana S.; Splinter, Reagan; Reich, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    A study compared the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised in 61 children (ages 4-16) with autism. Correlations between the test scores for DSM-IV criterion sets were on the order of 0.7. SRS scores were unrelated to I.Q. and exhibited inter-rater reliability on the order of 0.8. (Contains references.)…

  14. Efficient Signal Processing in Random Networks that Generate Variability: A Comparison of Internally Generated and Externally Induced Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Nishikawa, Isao; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Toyoizumi, Taro

    Source of cortical variability and its influence on signal processing remain an open question. We address the latter, by studying two types of balanced randomly connected networks of quadratic I-F neurons, with irregular spontaneous activity: (a) a deterministic network with strong connections generating noise by chaotic dynamics (b) a stochastic network with weak connections receiving noisy input. They are analytically tractable in the limit of large network-size and channel time-constant. Despite different sources of noise, spontaneous activity of these networks are identical unless majority of neurons are simultaneously recorded. However, the two networks show remarkably different sensitivity to external stimuli. In the former, input reverberates internally and can be read out over long time, but in the latter, inputs rapidly decay. This is further enhanced with activity-dependent plasticity at input synapses producing marked difference in decoding inputs from neural activity. We show, this leads to distinct performance of the two networks to integrate temporally separate signals from multiple sources, with the deterministic chaotic network activity serving as reservoir for Monte Carlo sampling to perform near optimal Bayesian integration, unlike its stochastic counterpart.

  15. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  16. Parametric vs. non-parametric daily weather generator: validation and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, Martin

    2016-04-01

    As the climate models (GCMs and RCMs) fail to satisfactorily reproduce the real-world surface weather regime, various statistical methods are applied to downscale GCM/RCM outputs into site-specific weather series. The stochastic weather generators are among the most favourite downscaling methods capable to produce realistic (observed like) meteorological inputs for agrological, hydrological and other impact models used in assessing sensitivity of various ecosystems to climate change/variability. To name their advantages, the generators may (i) produce arbitrarily long multi-variate synthetic weather series representing both present and changed climates (in the latter case, the generators are commonly modified by GCM/RCM-based climate change scenarios), (ii) be run in various time steps and for multiple weather variables (the generators reproduce the correlations among variables), (iii) be interpolated (and run also for sites where no weather data are available to calibrate the generator). This contribution will compare two stochastic daily weather generators in terms of their ability to reproduce various features of the daily weather series. M&Rfi is a parametric generator: Markov chain model is used to model precipitation occurrence, precipitation amount is modelled by the Gamma distribution, and the 1st order autoregressive model is used to generate non-precipitation surface weather variables. The non-parametric GoMeZ generator is based on the nearest neighbours resampling technique making no assumption on the distribution of the variables being generated. Various settings of both weather generators will be assumed in the present validation tests. The generators will be validated in terms of (a) extreme temperature and precipitation characteristics (annual and 30 years extremes and maxima of duration of hot/cold/dry/wet spells); (b) selected validation statistics developed within the frame of VALUE project. The tests will be based on observational weather series

  17. A Language-Related Comparison of Generation 1.5 and L1 Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolan, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    "Generation 1.5" is a term being used to describe a type of second language (L2) long-term U.S. resident who may demonstrate persistent language-related challenges (Roberge, Siegel, & Harklau, 2009). Among the difficulties commonly noted with Generation 1.5 students are problems in controlling the academic register expected in…

  18. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of

  19. Comparison of Head Center Position and Screw Fixation Options Between a Jumbo Cup and an Offset Center of Rotation Cup in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Ahmad; Black, Brandon J; Fay, Brian D; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Jumbo acetabular cups are commonly used in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A straightforward reaming technique is used which is similar to primary THA. However, jumbo cups may also be associated with hip center elevation, limited screw fixation options, and anterior soft tissue impingement. A partially truncated hemispherical shell was designed with an offset center of rotation, thick superior rim, and beveled anterior and superior rims as an alternative to a conventional jumbo cup. A three dimensional computer simulation was used to assess head center position and safe screw trajectories. Results of this in vitro study indicate that a modified hemispherical implant geometry can reduce head center elevation while permitting favorable screw fixation trajectories into the pelvis in comparison to a conventional jumbo cup.

  20. Change in Women's Perceptions of Parental Child Rearing Attitudes in Turkey: A Three Generation Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sever, Leyla

    1989-01-01

    Found significant differences across generations in perceptions of child rearing practices, attitudes, and beliefs. Found a decreasing emphasis on authoritarian control and an increasing emphasis on encouraging independence, open expression, and expression of affect. (PCB)

  1. A comparison of expert systems and neural networks applications in power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.; Mejia-Lavalle, M.

    1994-12-31

    Two application systems, Tube Failure Diagnosis (TFD) and Electric Generator Failure Diagnosis (EGFD), are discussed in the paper. The TFD system was built using two different approaches: one with rule-chaining search algorithms and the other with a new neural network paradigm. The EGFD system combines the two artificial intelligence approaches: rule-chaining and neural networks. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the two technologies, as applied to power generation applications, is included.

  2. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures.

  3. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C W; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  4. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  5. Comparison of UVA-induced ROS and sunscreen nanoparticle-generated ROS in human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cenchao; Turney, Terence W; Piva, Terrence J; Feltis, Bryce N; Wright, Paul F A

    2014-05-01

    Oxidative damage to cells and tissues from free radicals induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can be attenuated by sunscreen components, such as ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs). Although it is known that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by cells upon exposure to ZnO and TiO2 NPs, it is unknown to what extent the amount generated is altered with UV co-exposure. As it is a critical component for determining the relative risk of these NPs when used in sunscreen formulations, we have investigated ROS generation by these NPs in human THP-1 monocyte immune cells following UVA co-exposure. Whilst the applied UVA dose (6.7 J cm(-2)) did not alter cell viability after 24 h, it induced significant ROS production - causing a 7-fold increase in intracellular peroxide and 3.3-fold increase in mitochondrial superoxide levels after 1 h. However, co-exposure to NPs and UVA generated the same or less ROS than with UVA exposure alone, with the exception of anatase TiO2, which showed significantly increased levels. These findings indicate that ROS generation from nanosunscreens is, in most cases, an insignificant contributor to the overall risk associated with oxidative stress from UVA exposure itself.

  6. Comparison of beam generation techniques using a phase only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Clark, Thomas W; Offer, Rachel F; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Arnold, Aidan S; Radwell, Neal

    2016-03-21

    Whether in art or for QR codes, images have proven to be both powerful and efficient carriers of information. Spatial light modulators allow an unprecedented level of control over the generation of optical fields by using digital holograms. There is no unique way of obtaining a desired light pattern however, leaving many competing methods for hologram generation. In this paper, we test six hologram generation techniques in the creation of a variety of modes as well as a photographic image: rating the methods according to obtained mode quality and power. All techniques compensate for a non-uniform mode profile of the input laser and incorporate amplitude scaling. We find that all methods perform well and stress the importance of appropriate spatial filtering. We expect these results to be of interest to those working in the contexts of microscopy, optical trapping or quantum image creation. PMID:27136818

  7. Validation of a brief quantitative measure of autistic traits: comparison of the social responsiveness scale with the autism diagnostic interview-revised.

    PubMed

    Constantino, John N; Davis, Sandra A; Todd, Richard D; Schindler, Matthew K; Gross, Maggie M; Brophy, Susan L; Metzger, Lisa M; Shoushtari, Christiana S; Splinter, Reagan; Reich, Wendy

    2003-08-01

    Studies of the broader autism phenotype, and of subtle changes in autism symptoms over time, have been compromised by a lack of established quantitative assessment tools. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS-formerly known as the Social Reciprocity Scale) is a new instrument that can be completed by parents and/or teachers in 15-20 minutes. We compared the SRS with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) in 61 child psychiatric patients. Correlations between SRS scores and ADI-R algorithm scores for DSM-IV criterion sets were on the order of 0.7. SRS scores were unrelated to I.Q. and exhibited inter-rater reliability on the order of 0.8. The SRS is a valid quantitative measure of autistic traits, feasible for use in clinical settings and for large-scale research studies of autism spectrum conditions. PMID:12959421

  8. Comparison of the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition, in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Grondhuis, Sabrina Nicole; Mulick, James A

    2013-01-01

    A review of hospital records was conducted for children evaluated for autism spectrum disorders who completed both the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R) and Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition (SB5). Participants were between 3 and 12 years of age. Diagnoses were autistic disorder (n  =  26, 55%) and pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (n  =  21, 45%). Analysis showed that the full sample received significantly higher scores on the Leiter-R than SB5 (mean discrepancy of 20.91 points), specific diagnosis was not a significant factor, and younger children had a larger discrepancy between tests. These analyses strongly suggest that the Leiter-R and the SB5 may not be equivalent measures of intellectual functioning in children with autism spectrum disorders, and that use of one or the other exclusively could lead to misclassification of intellectual capacity.

  9. Generative Perspectives on Language Acquisition: Empirical Findings, Theoretical Considerations, and Crosslinguistic Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clahsen, Harald, Ed.

    The collection of essays and studies concerning generative grammar and first and second language acquisition includes: "The Optional-Infinitive Stage in Child English: Evidence from Negation" (Tony Harris, Ken Wexler); "Towards a Structure-Building Model of Acquisition" (Andrew Radford); "The Underspecification of Functional Categories in Early…

  10. COMPARISON OF MERCURY CAPTURE EFFICIENCIES OF THREE DIFFERENT IN SITU GENERATED SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three different sorbent materials (Ti, Si and Ca based) were compared for their mercury capture efficiencies in an entrained flow reactor. Agglomerated particles with a high specific surface area were generated in situ by injecting gas phase sorbent precursors into a high tempera...

  11. Comparison of Hemispheric Activation during Mental Word and Rhyme Generation Using Transcranial Doppler Sonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krach, Soren; Hartje, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The Wada test is at present the method of choice for preoperative assessment of patients who require surgery close to cortical language areas. It is, however, an invasive test with an attached morbidity risk. By now, an alternative to the Wada test is to combine a lexical word generation paradigm with non-invasive imaging techniques. However,…

  12. A Comparison of Diary Method Variations for Enlightening Form Generation in the Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babapour, Maral; Rehammar, Bjorn; Rahe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents two studies in which an empirical approach was taken to understand and explain form generation and decisions taken in the design process. In particular, the activities addressing aesthetic aspects when exteriorising form ideas in the design process have been the focus of the present study. Diary methods were the starting point…

  13. Bringing Next-Generation Sequencing into the Classroom through a Comparison of Molecular Biology Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, Bethany; Zimmer, Erin; Pyatt, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of next-generation (NextGen) sequencing technologies has revolutionized genomic research and medicine, the incorporation of these topics into the classroom is challenging, given an implied high degree of technical complexity. We developed an easy-to-implement, interactive classroom activity investigating the similarities…

  14. Aging of retrieved gel breast implants: a comparison between two product generations.

    PubMed

    Bodin, F; Jung, C; Dieval, F; Chakfe, N; Wisniewski, S; Bruant Rodier, C; Heim, F

    2015-06-01

    In order to get a marketing authorization, breast implants (BI) must meet a number of standard requirements. French and European standards ISO 14607 list a number of official tests to be performed before an implant can be used clinically. However, the BI material characteristics evolution over implantation time remains a research field which is unexplored. The goal of the present study is to compare the mechanical ageing of two breast implant generations and assess if the use of one generation rather than the other is advantageous in terms of durability. For that purpose, 21 explanted BI were analyzed in terms of biomechanical characteristics and compared. Twelve BI were textured anatomic specimens of 5th generation and 10 BI were round textured specimens of 4th generation. All the specimens were produced by the same manufacturer. Implantation time ranged from 3 to 130 months. Both the shell and the gel of every specimen were analyzed. Results show that the mechanical properties go down with the implantation time for all the implants. Moreover, the shell of round implants appear to be less resistant than the shell of anatomic specimens with 25% lower rupture forces. With regard to the gel, whatever the specimen, results show that the properties change with implantation time. The color changes from transparent to milky to finally become yellow, while the cohesion goes down especially for the round specimens. Globally, the study brings out that BI get degraded with implantation time and provides information which could help predicting the durability of the implant. PMID:25746931

  15. Comparison of attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer veterinary faculty and residents.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lisa M; Trower, Cathy A; Tan, Rachael J B; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing work and lifestyle issues and feedback preferences. In addition, the survey included an open-ended question on non-monetary rewards for hard work. Thirty-eight of 48 faculty members (79%) and 45 of 54 house officers (83%) completed the survey. Among faculty, there were no significant differences between the Generation X and Baby Boomer subgroups or between genders. More faculty than house officers responded that delayed gratification is acceptable (p = 0.03) and that it is difficult to balance home and work life (p < 0.001). Compared to faculty, house officers preferred more frequent (p = 0.03) and critical (p = 0.02) feedback. The most common responses to the question on effective non-monetary rewards for hard work, from both faculty and house officers, were recognition and time off. No attitudinal differences were detected between generations within the faculty group, but a number of significant differences emerged between faculty and house officers. Increased awareness of the importance of balance and rewards for hard work, as well as modification of feedback styles, may be beneficial in teaching and mentoring current and future generations.

  16. Comparison of Attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer Veterinary Faculty and Residents

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Lisa M.; Trower, Cathy A.; Tan, Rachael J.B.; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing work and lifestyle issues and feedback preferences. In addition, the survey included an open-ended question on non-monetary rewards for hard work. Thirty-eight of 48 faculty members (79%) and 45 of 54 house officers (83%) completed the survey. Among faculty, there were no significant differences between the Generation X and Baby Boomer subgroups or between genders. More faculty than house officers responded that delayed gratification is acceptable (p =0.03 and that it is difficult to balance home and work life (p < 0.001). Compared to faculty, house officers preferred more frequent (p =0.03) and critical (p = 0.02) feedback. The most common responses to the question on effective non-monetary rewards for hard work, from both faculty and house officers, were recognition and time off. No attitudinal differences were detected between generations within the faculty group, but a number of significant differences emerged between faculty and house officers. Increased awareness of the importance of balance and rewards for hard work, as well as modification of feedback styles, may be beneficial in teaching and mentoring current and future generations. PMID:19436000

  17. A comparison of FreeSurfer-generated data with and without manual intervention

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Christopher S.; Ramprashad, Avinash; Thompson, Carlie; Botti, Jo-Anna; Coman, Ioana L.; Kates, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examined whether FreeSurfer—generated data differed between a fully—automated, unedited pipeline and an edited pipeline that included the application of control points to correct errors in white matter segmentation. In a sample of 30 individuals, we compared the summary statistics of surface area, white matter volumes, and cortical thickness derived from edited and unedited datasets for the 34 regions of interest (ROIs) that FreeSurfer (FS) generates. To determine whether applying control points would alter the detection of significant differences between patient and typical groups, effect sizes between edited and unedited conditions in individuals with the genetic disorder, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) were compared to neurotypical controls. Analyses were conducted with data that were generated from both a 1.5 tesla and a 3 tesla scanner. For 1.5 tesla data, mean area, volume, and thickness measures did not differ significantly between edited and unedited regions, with the exception of rostral anterior cingulate thickness, lateral orbitofrontal white matter, superior parietal white matter, and precentral gyral thickness. Results were similar for surface area and white matter volumes generated from the 3 tesla scanner. For cortical thickness measures however, seven edited ROI measures, primarily in frontal and temporal regions, differed significantly from their unedited counterparts, and three additional ROI measures approached significance. Mean effect sizes for edited ROIs did not differ from most unedited ROIs for either 1.5 or 3 tesla data. Taken together, these results suggest that although the application of control points may increase the validity of intensity normalization and, ultimately, segmentation, it may not affect the final, extracted metrics that FS generates. Potential exceptions to and limitations of these conclusions are discussed. PMID:26539075

  18. A revised land surface parameterization (SiB2) for atmospheric GCMs. Part II: The generation of global fields of terrestrial biophysical parameters from satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, P.J.; Tucker, C.J.; Collatz, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    The global parameter fields used in the revised Simple Biosphere Model (SiB2) of Sellers et al. are reviewed. The most important innovation over the earlier SiB1 parameter set of Dorman and Sellers is the use of satellite data to specify the time-varying phenological properties of FPAR, leaf area index, and canopy greenness fraction. This was done by processing a monthly 1{degrees} normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) dataset obtained from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer red and near-infrared data. Corrections were applied to the source NDVI dataset to account for (1) obvious anomalies in the data time series, (2) the effect of variations in solar zenith angle, (3) data dropouts in cold regions where a temperature threshold procedure designed to screen for clouds also eliminated cold land surface points, and (4) persistent cloud cover in the Tropics. An outline of the procedures for calculating the land surface parameters form the corrected NDVI dataset is given, and a brief description is provided of sourcematerial, mainly derived form in situ observations, that was used in addition to the NDVI data. The datasets summarized in this paper should be superior to prescriptions currently used in most land surface parameterizations in that the spatial and temporal dynamics of key land surface parameters, in particular those related to vegetation, are obtained directly from a consistent set of global-scale observations instead of being inferred from a variety of survey-based land-cover classification. 55 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Comparison of GPU and FPGA hardware for HWIL scene generation and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eales, Craig R.; Swierkowski, Leszek

    2009-05-01

    Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation is becoming increasingly important for cost-effective testing of imaging infrared systems. DSTO is developing real-time scene generation and image processing capabilities within its HWIL simulation programs, based on the application of COTS desktop PCs equipped with Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards, and including limited use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). GPUs and FPGAs are high-performance parallel computing machines but are fundamentally different types of hardware. To determine which hardware type should be used to implement a real-time solution of a given application, a methodology is required to expose the concurrency within the problem and to structure the problem in a way that can be mapped to the hardware types. In this paper we use parallel programming patterns to compare the architectures of recent generation GPUs and FPGAs. We demonstrate the decomposition of a parallel application and its implementation on GPU and FPGA hardware and present preliminary results.

  20. Comparison of different simulation methods for effective medium computer generated holograms.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Wiebke; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-05-20

    The arrangement of binary subwavelength structures is a promising alternative to the conventional multiheight level technique to generate computer generated holograms (CGHs). However, the current heuristic design approach leads to a slight mismatch between the target signal and experimental data. To evaluate this deviation, a diffractive beam splitter design is investigated rigorously using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Since the use of a rigorous Maxwell-equation solver like FDTD requires a massive computational effort, an alternative scalar approach, a fast Fourier transform beam propagation method (FFT-BPM), is investigated with a substantial higher computing speed, showing still a good agreement with the FDTD simulation and experimental data. Therefore, an implementation of this scalar approach into the CGH design process offers the possibility to significantly increase the accuracy. PMID:23736461

  1. Comparison of rainfall sampling schemes using a calibrated stochastic rainfall generator

    SciTech Connect

    Welles, E.

    1994-12-31

    Accurate rainfall measurements are critical to river flow predictions. Areal and gauge rainfall measurements create different descriptions of the same storms. The purpose of this study is to characterize those differences. A stochastic rainfall generator was calibrated using an automatic search algorithm. Statistics describing several rainfall characteristics of interest were used in the error function. The calibrated model was then used to generate storms which were exhaustively sampled, sparsely sampled and sampled areally with 4 x 4 km grids. The sparsely sampled rainfall was also kriged to 4 x 4 km blocks. The differences between the four schemes were characterized by comparing statistics computed from each of the sampling methods. The possibility of predicting areal statistics from gauge statistics was explored. It was found that areally measured storms appeared to move more slowly, appeared larger, appeared less intense and have shallower intensity gradients.

  2. Comparison and Co-Registration of Dems Generated from HiRISE and Ctx Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiran; Wu, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Images from two sensors, the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and the Context Camera (CTX), both on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), were used to generate high-quality DEMs (Digital Elevation Models) of the Martian surface. However, there were discrepancies between the DEMs generated from the images acquired by these two sensors due to various reasons, such as variations in boresight alignment between the two sensors during the flight in the complex environment. This paper presents a systematic investigation of the discrepancies between the DEMs generated from the HiRISE and CTX images. A combined adjustment algorithm is presented for the co-registration of HiRISE and CTX DEMs. Experimental analysis was carried out using the HiRISE and CTX images collected at the Mars Rover landing site and several other typical regions. The results indicated that there were systematic offsets between the HiRISE and CTX DEMs in the longitude and latitude directions. However, the offset in the altitude was less obvious. After combined adjustment, the offsets were eliminated and the HiRISE and CTX DEMs were co-registered to each other. The presented research is of significance for the synergistic use of HiRISE and CTX images for precision Mars topographic mapping.

  3. T-wave generation and propagation: a comparison between data and spectral element modeling.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Guillaume; Guennou, Claude; Guillon, Laurent; Mazoyer, Camille; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2013-10-01

    T-waves are underwater acoustic waves generated by earthquakes. Modeling of their generation and propagation is a challenging problem. Using a spectral element code-SPECFEM2D, this paper presents the first realistic simulations of T-waves taking into account major aspects of this phenomenon: The radiation pattern of the source, the propagation of seismic waves in the crust, the seismic to acoustic conversion on a non-planar seafloor, and the propagation of acoustic waves in the water column. The simulated signals are compared with data from the mid-Atlantic Ridge recorded by an array of hydrophones. The crust/water interface is defined by the seafloor bathymetry. Different combinations of water sound-speed profiles and sub-seafloor seismic velocities, and frequency content of the source are tested. The relative amplitudes, main arrival-times, and durations of simulated T-phases are in good agreement with the observed data; differences in the spectrograms and early arrivals are likely due to too simplistic source signals and environmental model. These examples demonstrate the abilities of the SPECFEM2D code for modeling earthquake generated T-waves. PMID:24116530

  4. T-wave generation and propagation: a comparison between data and spectral element modeling.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Guillaume; Guennou, Claude; Guillon, Laurent; Mazoyer, Camille; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2013-10-01

    T-waves are underwater acoustic waves generated by earthquakes. Modeling of their generation and propagation is a challenging problem. Using a spectral element code-SPECFEM2D, this paper presents the first realistic simulations of T-waves taking into account major aspects of this phenomenon: The radiation pattern of the source, the propagation of seismic waves in the crust, the seismic to acoustic conversion on a non-planar seafloor, and the propagation of acoustic waves in the water column. The simulated signals are compared with data from the mid-Atlantic Ridge recorded by an array of hydrophones. The crust/water interface is defined by the seafloor bathymetry. Different combinations of water sound-speed profiles and sub-seafloor seismic velocities, and frequency content of the source are tested. The relative amplitudes, main arrival-times, and durations of simulated T-phases are in good agreement with the observed data; differences in the spectrograms and early arrivals are likely due to too simplistic source signals and environmental model. These examples demonstrate the abilities of the SPECFEM2D code for modeling earthquake generated T-waves.

  5. Comparison of the optoacoustic signal generation efficiency of different nanoparticular contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bost, Wolfgang; Lemor, Robert; Fournelle, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Optoacoustic imaging represents a new modality that allows noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging with optical contrast and acoustical resolution. Whereas structural or functional imaging applications such as imaging of vasculature do not require contrast enhancing agents, nanoprobes with defined biochemical binding behavior are needed for molecular imaging tasks. Since the contrast of this modality is based on the local optical absorption coefficient, all particle or molecule types that show significant absorption cross sections in the spectral range of the laser wavelength used for signal generation are suitable contrast agents. Currently, several particle types such as gold nanospheres, nanoshells, nanorods, or polymer particles are used as optoacoustic contrast agents. These particles have specific advantages with respect to their absorption properties, or in terms of biologically relevant features (biodegradability, binding to molecular markers). In the present study, a comparative analysis of the signal generation efficiency of gold nanorods, polymeric particles, and magnetite particles using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser for signal generation is described. PMID:23207315

  6. Comparison of the optoacoustic signal generation efficiency of different nanoparticular contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bost, Wolfgang; Lemor, Robert; Fournelle, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Optoacoustic imaging represents a new modality that allows noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging with optical contrast and acoustical resolution. Whereas structural or functional imaging applications such as imaging of vasculature do not require contrast enhancing agents, nanoprobes with defined biochemical binding behavior are needed for molecular imaging tasks. Since the contrast of this modality is based on the local optical absorption coefficient, all particle or molecule types that show significant absorption cross sections in the spectral range of the laser wavelength used for signal generation are suitable contrast agents. Currently, several particle types such as gold nanospheres, nanoshells, nanorods, or polymer particles are used as optoacoustic contrast agents. These particles have specific advantages with respect to their absorption properties, or in terms of biologically relevant features (biodegradability, binding to molecular markers). In the present study, a comparative analysis of the signal generation efficiency of gold nanorods, polymeric particles, and magnetite particles using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser for signal generation is described.

  7. A comparison between automatically generated linear and parabolic tetrahedra when used to mesh a human femur.

    PubMed

    Polgar, K; Viceconti, M; O'Connor, J J

    2001-01-01

    Finite element models of bone segments generated from computed tomography data using automatic mesh generation algorithms are becoming common not only in research but also in clinical applications such as computer aided orthopaedic surgery. Especially in the case of the latter application, the models cannot be verified against an experimental measurement, therefore their inherent accuracy should be well known before drawing conclusions based on the calculated results. This study was carried out to assess the performance of tetrahedral solid finite elements with linear and quadratic displacement functions when they are used to mesh the human femur in conjunction with automatic mesh generator methods. Ten-node quadratic tetrahedra (T10) having parabolic displacement functions were compared with four-node linear tetrahedron elements (T4) on the basis of accuracy and central processing unit (CPU) time. From the analyses of 11 finite element meshes, it was concluded that linear tetrahedral elements should be avoided and quadratic tetrahedral elements ought to be chosen for the purposes of finite element analysis of the human femur. When incremental loading and iterative solution is necessary, the coarsest possible T10 mesh compatible with accuracy is needed to minimize computer capacity and CPU time.

  8. Comparison of Two Methods for Composite Score Generation in Dry Eye Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    See, Craig; Bilonick, Richard A.; Feuer, William; Galor, Anat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare two methods of composite score generation in dry eye syndrome (DES). Methods. Male patients seen in the Miami Veterans Affairs eye clinic with normal eyelid, corneal, and conjunctival anatomy were recruited to participate in the study. Patients filled out the Dry Eye Questionnaire 5 (DEQ5) and underwent measurement of tear film parameters. DES severity scores were generated by independent component analysis (ICA) and latent class analysis (LCA). Results. A total of 247 men were included in the study. Mean age was 69 years (SD 9). Using ICA analysis, osmolarity was found to carry the largest weight, followed by eyelid vascularity and meibomian orifice plugging. Conjunctival injection and tear breakup time (TBUT) carried the lowest weights. Using LCA analysis, TBUT was found to be best at discriminating healthy from diseased eyes, followed closely by Schirmer's test. DEQ5, eyelid vascularity, and conjunctival injection were the poorest at discrimination. The adjusted correlation coefficient between the two generated composite scores was 0.63, indicating that the shared variance was less than 40%. Conclusions. Both ICA and LCA produced composite scores for dry eye severity, with weak to moderate agreement; however, agreement for the relative importance of single diagnostic tests was poor between the two methods. PMID:23942971

  9. The Padua Inventory: Do Revisions Need Revision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonner, Sascha; Ecker, Willi; Leonhart, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties, factorial structure, and validity of the Padua Inventory-Washington State University Revision and of the Padua Inventory-Revised in a large sample of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 228) and with anxiety disorders and/or depression (n = 213). The…

  10. Comparison of CAGE and RNA-seq transcriptome profiling using clonally amplified and single-molecule next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kawaji, Hideya; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kaiho, Ai; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Shin, Jay W; Kojima-Ishiyama, Miki; Kawano, Mitsuoki; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Ninomiya-Fukuda, Noriko; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Noma, Shohei; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Carninci, Piero

    2014-04-01

    CAGE (cap analysis gene expression) and RNA-seq are two major technologies used to identify transcript abundances as well as structures. They measure expression by sequencing from either the 5' end of capped molecules (CAGE) or tags randomly distributed along the length of a transcript (RNA-seq). Library protocols for clonally amplified (Illumina, SOLiD, 454 Life Sciences [Roche], Ion Torrent), second-generation sequencing platforms typically employ PCR preamplification prior to clonal amplification, while third-generation, single-molecule sequencers can sequence unamplified libraries. Although these transcriptome profiling platforms have been demonstrated to be individually reproducible, no systematic comparison has been carried out between them. Here we compare CAGE, using both second- and third-generation sequencers, and RNA-seq, using a second-generation sequencer based on a panel of RNA mixtures from two human cell lines to examine power in the discrimination of biological states, detection of differentially expressed genes, linearity of measurements, and quantification reproducibility. We found that the quantified levels of gene expression are largely comparable across platforms and conclude that CAGE and RNA-seq are complementary technologies that can be used to improve incomplete gene models. We also found systematic bias in the second- and third-generation platforms, which is likely due to steps such as linker ligation, cleavage by restriction enzymes, and PCR amplification. This study provides a perspective on the performance of these platforms, which will be a baseline in the design of further experiments to tackle complex transcriptomes uncovered in a wide range of cell types.

  11. Comparison of normalization methods for construction of large, multiplex amplicon pools for next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Kirk; Sahl, Jason W; Castoe, Todd A; Wagner, Brandie D; Pollock, David D; Spear, John R

    2010-06-01

    Constructing mixtures of tagged or bar-coded DNAs for sequencing is an important requirement for the efficient use of next-generation sequencers in applications where limited sequence data are required per sample. There are many applications in which next-generation sequencing can be used effectively to sequence large mixed samples; an example is the characterization of microbial communities where generation sequencers. However, the cost savings for efficient utilization of sequence capacity is realized only if the production and management costs associated with construction of multiplex pools are also scalable. One critical step in multiplex pool construction is the normalization process, whereby equimolar amounts of each amplicon are mixed. Here we compare three approaches (spectroscopy, size-restricted spectroscopy, and quantitative binding) for normalization of large, multiplex amplicon pools for performance and efficiency. We found that the quantitative binding approach was superior and represents an efficient scalable process for construction of very large, multiplex pools with hundreds and perhaps thousands of individual amplicons included. We demonstrate the increased sequence diversity identified with higher throughput. Massively parallel sequencing can dramatically accelerate microbial ecology studies by allowing appropriate replication of sequence acquisition to account for temporal and spatial variations. Further, population studies to examine genetic variation, which require even lower levels of sequencing, should be possible where thousands of individual bar-coded amplicons are examined in parallel. PMID:20418443

  12. A comparison of HYSPLIT backward trajectories generated from two GDAS datasets.

    PubMed

    Su, Lin; Yuan, Zibing; Fung, Jimmy C H; Lau, Alexis K H

    2015-02-15

    The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is widely used to generate backward trajectories in given starting locations. However, differences exist between trajectories generated from the model with different input datasets. In this study, backward trajectories in Hong Kong in the entire year of 2011 are derived by HYSPLIT model. Two sets of Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) output data associated with different horizontal and vertical resolutions (GDAS1 and GDAS0P5) are used as drivers in an attempt to quantify the differences between the results and discover the underlying reasons responsible for discrepancy. The results reveal that the significant differences between back trajectories generated from the two GDAS datasets can be mainly attributed to different vertical velocity calculation methods due to the absence of vertical velocity in GDAS0P5 dataset. The HYSPLIT trajectories are also sensitive to the horizontal and vertical resolutions of the input meteorological data, but to lesser extents. Results of cluster analysis indicate that when the air mass is from the north, northeast, or west with a long-to-medium range, the HYSPLIT backward trajectories are sensitive to the vertical advection calculation method and data resolution, whereas when the air mass is from the south or southwest with a long range, the trajectories are more likely to remain unchanged with the shifting of vertical velocity or data resolution. By comparing the vertical velocities with the observations and the performance in retrieving PM contributions from different directions, we conclude that GDAS1 dataset is more plausible in backward trajectory analysis in the Pearl River Delta.

  13. Magma generation on Mars - Amounts, rates, and comparisons with earth, moon, and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Schneid, Byron D.

    1991-01-01

    Total extrusive and intrusive magma generated on Mars over the last approximately 3.8 billion years is estimated at 654 x 10 exp 6 cubic kilometers, or 0.17 cubic kilometers per year, substantially less than rates for earth (26 to 34 cu/km yr) and Venus (less than 20 cu/km yr) but much more than for the moon (0.025 cu/km yr). When scaled to earth's mass the Martian rate is much smaller than that for earth or Venus and slightly smaller than for the moon.

  14. Economic comparison of clean coal generating technologies with natural gas-combined cycle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sebesta, J.J.; Hoskins, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that there are four combustion technologies upon which U.S. electric utilities are expected to rely for the majority of their future power generating needs. These technologies are pulverized coal- fired combustion (PC); coal-fired fluidized bed combustion (AFBC); coal gasification, combined cycle systems (CGCC); and natural gas-fired combined cycle systems (NGCC). The engineering and economic parameters which affect the choice of a technology include capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, fuel costs, construction schedule, process risk, environmental and site impacts, fuel efficiency and flexibility, plant availability, capacity factors, timing of startup, and the importance of utility economic and financial factors.

  15. Comparison of two total energy systems for a diesel power generation plant. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, V. W.

    1979-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations, as well as the associated costs for two total energy systems for a diesel power generation plant are compared. Both systems utilize waste heat from engine cooling water and waste heat from exhaust gases. Pressurized water heat recovery system is simple in nature and requires no engine modifications, but operates at lower temperature ranges. On the other hand, a two-phase ebullient system operates the engine at constant temperature, provides higher temperature water or steam to the load, but is more expensive.

  16. Comparison of surface freshwater fluxes from different climate forecasts produced through different ensemble generation schemes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Vanya; Hense, Andreas; Wahl, Sabrina; Brune, Sebastian; Baehr, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    The decadal variability and its predictability of the surface net freshwater fluxes is compared in a set of retrospective predictions, all using the same model setup, and only differing in the implemented ocean initialisation method and ensemble generation method. The basic aim is to deduce the differences between the initialization/ensemble generation methods in view of the uncertainty of the verifying observational data sets. The analysis will give an approximation of the uncertainties of the net freshwater fluxes, which up to now appear to be one of the most uncertain products in observational data and model outputs. All ensemble generation methods are implemented into the MPI-ESM earth system model in the framework of the ongoing MiKlip project (www.fona-miklip.de). Hindcast experiments are initialised annually between 2000-2004, and from each start year 10 ensemble members are initialized for 5 years each. Four different ensemble generation methods are compared: (i) a method based on the Anomaly Transform method (Romanova and Hense, 2015) in which the initial oceanic perturbations represent orthogonal and balanced anomaly structures in space and time and between the variables taken from a control run, (ii) one-day-lagged ocean states from the MPI-ESM-LR baseline system (iii) one-day-lagged of ocean and atmospheric states with preceding full-field nudging to re-analysis in both the atmospheric and the oceanic component of the system - the baseline one MPI-ESM-LR system, (iv) an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) implemented into oceanic part of MPI-ESM (Brune et al. 2015), assimilating monthly subsurface oceanic temperature and salinity (EN3) using the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework (PDAF). The hindcasts are evaluated probabilistically using fresh water flux data sets from four different reanalysis data sets: MERRA, NCEP-R1, GFDL ocean reanalysis and GECCO2. The assessments show no clear differences in the evaluations scores on regional scales. However, on the

  17. Radcalc for windows benchmark study: A comparison of software results with Rocky Flats hydrogen gas generation data

    SciTech Connect

    MCFADDEN, J.G.

    1999-07-19

    Radcalc for Windows Version 2.01 is a user-friendly software program developed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations for the U.S. Department of Energy (McFadden et al. 1998). It is used for transportation and packaging applications in the shipment of radioactive waste materials. Among its applications are the classification of waste per the US. Department of Transportation regulations, the calculation of decay heat and daughter products, and the calculation of the radiolytic production of hydrogen gas. The Radcalc program has been extensively tested and validated (Green et al. 1995, McFadden et al. 1998) by comparison of each Radcalc algorithm to hand calculations. An opportunity to benchmark Radcalc hydrogen gas generation calculations to experimental data arose when the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) Residue Stabilization Program collected hydrogen gas generation data to determine compliance with requirements for shipment of waste in the TRUPACT-II (Schierloh 1998). The residue/waste drums tested at RFETS contain contaminated, solid, inorganic materials in polyethylene bags. The contamination is predominantly due to plutonium and americium isotopes. The information provided by Schierloh (1 998) of RFETS includes decay heat, hydrogen gas generation rates, calculated G{sub eff} values, and waste material type, making the experimental data ideal for benchmarking Radcalc. The following sections discuss the RFETS data and the Radcalc cases modeled with the data. Results are tabulated and also provided graphically.

  18. Comparison of Replication-Competent, First Generation, and Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Eric A.; Nehete, Pramod N.; Buchl, Stephanie S.; Senac, Julien S.; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    All studies using human serotype 5 Adenovirus (Ad) vectors must address two major obstacles: safety and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies. Helper-Dependent (HD) Ads have been proposed as alternative vectors for gene therapy and vaccine development because they have an improved safety profile. To evaluate the potential of HD-Ad vaccines, we compared replication-competent (RC), first-generation (FG) and HD vectors for their ability to induce immune responses in mice. We show that RC-Ad5 and HD-Ad5 vectors generate stronger immune responses than FG-Ad5 vectors. HD-Ad5 vectors gave lower side effects than RC or FG-Ad, producing lower levels of tissue damage and anti-Ad T cell responses. Also, HD vectors have the benefit of being packaged by all subgroup C serotype helper viruses. We found that HD serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6 induce anti-HIV responses equivalently. By using these HD serotypes in heterologous succession we showed that HD vectors can be used to significantly boost anti-HIV immune responses in mice and in FG-Ad5-immune macaques. Since HD vectors have been show to have an increased safety profile, do not possess any Ad genes, can be packaged by multiple serotype helper viruses, and elicit strong anti-HIV immune responses, they warrant further investigation as alternatives to FG vectors as gene-based vaccines. PMID:19333387

  19. Comparison of cost- and energy-efficient signal modulations for next generation passive optical networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, J L; Grobe, K; Sanchez, C; Giacoumidis, E; Griesser, H

    2015-11-01

    Extensive numerical investigations are undertaken to analyze and compare, for the first time, the performance, techno-economy, and power consumption of three-level electrical Duobinary, optical Duobinary, and PAM-4 modulation formats as candidates for high-speed next-generation PONs supporting downstream 40 Gb/s per wavelength signal transmission over standard SMFs in C-band. Optimization of transceiver bandwidths are undertaken to show the feasibility of utilizing low-cost and band-limited components to support next-generation PON transmissions. The effect of electro-absorption modulator chirp is examined for electrical Duobinary and PAM-4. Electrical Duobinary and optical Duobinary are power-efficient schemes for smaller transmission distances of 10 km SMFs and optical Duobinary offers the best receiver sensitivity albeit with a relatively high transceiver cost. PAM-4 shows the best power budget and cost-efficiency for larger distances of around 20 km, although it consumes more power. Electrical Duobinary shows the best trade-off between performance, cost and power dissipation.

  20. MOX and MOX with 237Np/241Am Inert Fission Gas Generation Comparison in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. Robel; W. J. Carmack; D. J. Utterbeck

    2006-06-01

    The treatment of spent fuel produced in nuclear power generation is one of the most important issues to both the nuclear community and the general public. One of the viable options to long-term geological disposal of spent fuel is to extract plutonium, minor actinides (MA), and potentially long-lived fission products from the spent fuel and transmute them into short-lived or stable radionuclides in currently operating light-water reactors (LWR), thus reducing the radiological toxicity of the nuclear waste stream. One of the challenges is to demonstrate that the burnup-dependent characteristic differences between Reactor-Grade Mixed Oxide (RG-MOX) fuel and RG-MOX fuel with MA Np-237 and Am 241 are minimal, particularly, the inert gas generation rate, such that the commercial MOX fuel experience base is applicable. Under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), developmental fuel specimens in experimental assembly LWR-2 are being tested in the northwest (NW) I-24 irradiation position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment uses MOX fuel test hardware, and contains capsules with MOX fuel consisting of mixed oxide manufactured fuel using reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) and mixed oxide manufactured fuel using RG-Pu with added Np/Am. This study will compare the fuel neutronics depletion characteristics of Case-1 RG-MOX and Case-2 RG-MOX with Np/Am.

  1. Amino acids generated from hydrated Titan tholins: Comparison with Miller-Urey electric discharge products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaves, H. James; Neish, Catherine; Callahan, Michael P.; Parker, Eric; Fernández, Facundo M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2014-07-01

    Various analogues of Titan haze particles (termed ‘tholins’) have been made in the laboratory. In certain geologic environments on Titan, these haze particles may come into contact with aqueous ammonia (NH3) solutions, hydrolyzing them into molecules of astrobiological interest. A Titan tholin analogue hydrolyzed in aqueous NH3 at room temperature for 2.5 years was analyzed for amino acids using highly sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-FD/ToF-MS) analysis after derivatization with a fluorescent tag. We compare here the amino acids produced from this reaction sequence with those generated from room temperature Miller-Urey (MU) type electric discharge reactions. We find that most of the amino acids detected in low temperature MU CH4/N2/H2O electric discharge reactions are generated in Titan simulation reactions, as well as in previous simulations of Triton chemistry. This argues that many processes provide very similar mixtures of amino acids, and possibly other types of organic compounds, in disparate environments, regardless of the order of hydration. Although it is unknown how life began, it is likely that given reducing conditions, similar materials were available throughout the early Solar System and throughout the universe to facilitate chemical evolution.

  2. Automatic GROMACS topology generation and comparisons of force fields for solvation free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-22

    Free energy calculation has long been an important goal for molecular dynamics simulation and force field development, but historically it has been challenged by limited performance, accuracy, and creation of topologies for arbitrary small molecules. This has made it difficult to systematically compare different sets of parameters to improve existing force fields, but in the past few years several authors have developed increasingly automated procedures to generate parameters for force fields such as Amber, CHARMM, and OPLS. Here, we present a new framework that enables fully automated generation of GROMACS topologies for any of these force fields and an automated setup for parallel adaptive optimization of high-throughput free energy calculation by adjusting lambda point placement on the fly. As a small example of this automated pipeline, we have calculated solvation free energies of 50 different small molecules using the GAFF, OPLS-AA, and CGenFF force fields and four different water models, and by including the often neglected polarization costs, we show that the common charge models are somewhat underpolarized.

  3. Amino Acids Generated from Hydrated Titan Tholins: Comparison with Miller-Urey Electric Discharge Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaves, H. James, II; Neish, Catherine; Callahan, Michael P.; Parker, Eric; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    Various analogues of Titan haze particles (termed tholins) have been made in the laboratory. In certain geologic environments on Titan, these haze particles may come into contact with aqueous ammonia (NH3) solutions, hydrolyzing them into molecules of astrobiological interest. A Titan tholin analogue hydrolyzed in aqueous NH3 at room temperature for 2.5 years was analyzed for amino acids using highly sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-FDToF-MS) analysis after derivatization with a fluorescent tag. We compare here the amino acids produced from this reaction sequence with those generated from room temperature Miller-Urey (MU) type electric discharge reactions. We find that most of the amino acids detected in low temperature MU CH4N2H2O electric discharge reactions are generated in Titan simulation reactions, as well as in previous simulations of Triton chemistry. This argues that many processes provide very similar mixtures of amino acids, and possibly other types of organic compounds, in disparate environments, regardless of the order of hydration. Although it is unknown how life began, it is likely that given reducing conditions, similar materials were available throughout the early Solar System and throughout the universe to facilitate chemical evolution.

  4. Comparison of Sample Preparation Methods Used for the Next-Generation Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrea D; Christianson, Sara; Knox, Natalie C; Mabon, Philip; Wolfe, Joyce; Van Domselaar, Gary; Graham, Morag R; Sharma, Meenu K

    2016-01-01

    The advent and widespread application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to the study of microbial genomes has led to a substantial increase in the number of studies in which whole genome sequencing (WGS) is applied to the analysis of microbial genomic epidemiology. However, microorganisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) present unique problems for sequencing and downstream analysis based on their unique physiology and the composition of their genomes. In this study, we compare the quality of sequence data generated using the Nextera and TruSeq isolate preparation kits for library construction prior to Illumina sequencing-by-synthesis. Our results confirm that MTB NGS data quality is highly dependent on the purity of the DNA sample submitted for sequencing and its guanine-cytosine content (or GC-content). Our data additionally demonstrate that the choice of library preparation method plays an important role in mitigating downstream sequencing quality issues. Importantly for MTB, the Illumina TruSeq library preparation kit produces more uniform data quality than the Nextera XT method, regardless of the quality of the input DNA. Furthermore, specific genomic sequence motifs are commonly missed by the Nextera XT method, as are regions of especially high GC-content relative to the rest of the MTB genome. As coverage bias is highly undesirable, this study illustrates the importance of appropriate protocol selection when performing NGS studies in order to ensure that sound inferences can be made regarding mycobacterial genomes. PMID:26849565

  5. Paralleled comparison of vectors for the generation of CAR-T cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Di-Yuan; Huang, Yong; Li, Dan; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-09-01

    T-lymphocytes genetically engineered with the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-T) have shown great therapeutic potential in cancer treatment. A variety of preclinical researches and clinical trials of CAR-T therapy have been carried out to lay the foundation for future clinical application. In these researches, several gene-transfer methods were used to deliver CARs or other genes into T-lymphocytes, equipping CAR-modified T cells with a property of recognizing and attacking antigen-expressing tumor cells in a major histocompatibility complex-independent manner. Here, we summarize the gene-transfer vectors commonly used in the generation of CAR-T cell, including retrovirus vectors, lentivirus vectors, the transposon/transposase system, the plasmid-based system, and the messenger RNA electroporation system. The following aspects were compared in parallel: efficiency of gene transfer, the integration methods in the modified T cells, foreground of scale-up production, and application and development in clinical trials. These aspects should be taken into account to generate the optimal CAR-gene vector that may be suitable for future clinical application. PMID:27333595

  6. Calibration of Kinect for Xbox One and Comparison between the Two Generations of Microsoft Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Diana; Pinto, Livio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the videogame industry has been characterized by a great boost in gesture recognition and motion tracking, following the increasing request of creating immersive game experiences. The Microsoft Kinect sensor allows acquiring RGB, IR and depth images with a high frame rate. Because of the complementary nature of the information provided, it has proved an attractive resource for researchers with very different backgrounds. In summer 2014, Microsoft launched a new generation of Kinect on the market, based on time-of-flight technology. This paper proposes a calibration of Kinect for Xbox One imaging sensors, focusing on the depth camera. The mathematical model that describes the error committed by the sensor as a function of the distance between the sensor itself and the object has been estimated. All the analyses presented here have been conducted for both generations of Kinect, in order to quantify the improvements that characterize every single imaging sensor. Experimental results show that the quality of the delivered model improved applying the proposed calibration procedure, which is applicable to both point clouds and the mesh model created with the Microsoft Fusion Libraries. PMID:26528979

  7. Calibration of Kinect for Xbox One and Comparison between the Two Generations of Microsoft Sensors.

    PubMed

    Pagliari, Diana; Pinto, Livio

    2015-10-30

    In recent years, the videogame industry has been characterized by a great boost in gesture recognition and motion tracking, following the increasing request of creating immersive game experiences. The Microsoft Kinect sensor allows acquiring RGB, IR and depth images with a high frame rate. Because of the complementary nature of the information provided, it has proved an attractive resource for researchers with very different backgrounds. In summer 2014, Microsoft launched a new generation of Kinect on the market, based on time-of-flight technology. This paper proposes a calibration of Kinect for Xbox One imaging sensors, focusing on the depth camera. The mathematical model that describes the error committed by the sensor as a function of the distance between the sensor itself and the object has been estimated. All the analyses presented here have been conducted for both generations of Kinect, in order to quantify the improvements that characterize every single imaging sensor. Experimental results show that the quality of the delivered model improved applying the proposed calibration procedure, which is applicable to both point clouds and the mesh model created with the Microsoft Fusion Libraries.

  8. Quantitative comparison of initial soil erosion processes and runoff generation in Spanish and German vineyards.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo Comino, J; Iserloh, T; Lassu, T; Cerdà, A; Keestra, S D; Prosdocimi, M; Brings, C; Marzen, M; Ramos, M C; Senciales, J M; Ruiz Sinoga, J D; Seeger, M; Ries, J B

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to enable a quantitative comparison of initial soil erosion processes in European vineyards using the same methodology and equipment. The study was conducted in four viticultural areas with different characteristics (Valencia and Málaga in Spain, Ruwer-Mosel valley and Saar-Mosel valley in Germany). Old and young vineyards, with conventional and ecological planting and management systems were compared. The same portable rainfall simulator with identical rainfall intensity (40mmh(-1)) and sampling intervals (30min of test duration, collecting the samples at 5-min-intervals) was used over a circular test plot with 0.28m(2). The results of 83 simulations have been analysed and correlation coefficients were calculated for each study area to identify the relationship between environmental plot characteristics, soil texture, soil erosion, runoff and infiltration. The results allow for identification of the main factors related to soil properties, topography and management, which control soil erosion processes in vineyards. The most important factors influencing soil erosion and runoff were the vegetation cover for the ecological German vineyards (with 97.6±8% infiltration coefficients) and stone cover, soil moisture and slope steepness for the conventional land uses. PMID:27265730

  9. Quantitative comparison of initial soil erosion processes and runoff generation in Spanish and German vineyards.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo Comino, J; Iserloh, T; Lassu, T; Cerdà, A; Keestra, S D; Prosdocimi, M; Brings, C; Marzen, M; Ramos, M C; Senciales, J M; Ruiz Sinoga, J D; Seeger, M; Ries, J B

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to enable a quantitative comparison of initial soil erosion processes in European vineyards using the same methodology and equipment. The study was conducted in four viticultural areas with different characteristics (Valencia and Málaga in Spain, Ruwer-Mosel valley and Saar-Mosel valley in Germany). Old and young vineyards, with conventional and ecological planting and management systems were compared. The same portable rainfall simulator with identical rainfall intensity (40mmh(-1)) and sampling intervals (30min of test duration, collecting the samples at 5-min-intervals) was used over a circular test plot with 0.28m(2). The results of 83 simulations have been analysed and correlation coefficients were calculated for each study area to identify the relationship between environmental plot characteristics, soil texture, soil erosion, runoff and infiltration. The results allow for identification of the main factors related to soil properties, topography and management, which control soil erosion processes in vineyards. The most important factors influencing soil erosion and runoff were the vegetation cover for the ecological German vineyards (with 97.6±8% infiltration coefficients) and stone cover, soil moisture and slope steepness for the conventional land uses.

  10. Comparison of hybrid and pure Monte Carlo shower generators on an event by event basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Drescher, H.-J.; Farrar, G.

    SENECA is a hybrid air shower simulation written by H. Drescher that utilizes both Monte Carlo simulation and cascade equations. By using the cascade equations only in the high energy portion of the shower, where they are extremely accurate, SENECA is able to utilize the advantages in speed from the cascade equations yet still produce complete, three dimensional particle distributions at ground level. We present a comparison, on an event by event basis, of SENECA and CORSIKA, a well trusted MC simulation. By using the same first interaction in both SENECA and CORSIKA, the effect of the cascade equations can be studied within a single shower, rather than averages over many showers. Our study shows that for showers produced in this manner, SENECA agrees with CORSIKA to a very high accuracy as to densities, energies, and timing information for individual species of ground-level particles from both iron and proton primaries with energies between 1EeV and 100EeV. Used properly, SENECA produces ground particle distributions virtually indistinguishable from those of CORSIKA in a fraction of the time. For example, for a shower induced by a 40 EeV proton simulated with 10-6 thinning, SENECA is 10 times faster than CORSIKA.

  11. Development and Comparison of Techniques for Generating Permeability Maps using Independent Experimental Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingerl, Ferdinand; Romanenko, Konstantin; Pini, Ronny; Balcom, Bruce; Benson, Sally

    2014-05-01

    We have developed and evaluated methods for creating voxel-based 3D permeability maps of a heterogeneous sandstone sample using independent experimental data from single phase flow (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI) and two-phase flow (X-ray Computed Tomography, CT) measurements. Fluid velocities computed from the generated permeability maps using computational fluid dynamics simulations fit measured velocities very well and significantly outperform empirical porosity-permeability relations, such as the Kozeny-Carman equation. Acquiring images on the meso-scale from porous rocks using MRI has till recently been a great challenge, due to short spin relaxation times and large field gradients within the sample. The combination of the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme with three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE) - a technique recently developed at the UNB MRI Center - can overcome these challenges and enables obtaining quantitative 3 dimensional maps of porosities and fluid velocities. Using porosity and (single-phase) velocity maps from MRI and (multi-phase) saturation maps from CT measurements, we employed three different techniques to obtain permeability maps. In the first approach, we applied the Kozeny-Carman relationship to porosities measured using MRI. In the second approach, we computed permeabilities using a J-Leverett scaling method, which is based on saturation maps obtained from N2-H2O multi-phase experiments. The third set of permeabilities was generated using a new inverse iterative-updating technique, which is based on porosities and measured velocities obtained in single-phase flow experiments. The resulting three permeability maps provided then input for computational fluid dynamics simulations - employing the Stanford CFD code AD-GPRS - to generate velocity maps, which were compared to velocity maps measured by MRI. The J-Leveret scaling method and the iterative-updating method

  12. Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2003-12-18

    For better or worse, natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants being built across the United States. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plants accounted for 96% of the total generating capacity added in the US between 1999 and 2002--138 GW out of a total of 144 GW. Looking ahead, the EIA expects that gas-fired technology will account for 61% of the 355 GW new generating capacity projected to come on-line in the US up to 2025, increasing the nationwide market share of gas-fired generation from 18% in 2002 to 22% in 2025. While the data are specific to the US, natural gas-fired generation is making similar advances in other countries as well. Regardless of the explanation for (or interpretation of) the empirical findings, however, the basic implications remain the same: one should not blindly rely on gas price forecasts when comparing fixed-price renewable with variable-price gas-fired generation contracts. If there is a cost to hedging, gas price forecasts do not capture and account for it. Alternatively, if the forecasts are at risk of being biased or out of tune with the market, then one certainly would not want to use them as the basis for resource comparisons or investment decisions if a more certain source of data (forwards) existed. Accordingly, assuming that long-term price stability is valued, the most appropriate way to compare the levelized cost of these resources in both cases would be to use forward natural gas price data--i.e. prices that can be locked in to create price certainty--as opposed to uncertain natural gas price forecasts. This article suggests that had utilities and analysts in the US done so over the sample period from November 2000 to November 2003, they would have found gas-fired generation to be at least 0.3-0.6 cents/kWh more expensive (on a levelized cost basis) than otherwise thought. With some renewable resources, in particular wind

  13. Comparison of functional MRI image realignment tools using a computer-generated phantom.

    PubMed

    Morgan, V L; Pickens, D R; Hartmann, S L; Price, R R

    2001-09-01

    This study discusses the development of a computer-generated phantom to compare the effects of image realignment programs on functional MRI (fMRI) pixel activation. The phantom is a whole-head MRI volume with added random noise, activation, and motion. It allows simulation of realistic head motions with controlled areas of activation. Without motion, the phantom shows the effects of realignment on motion-free data sets. Prior to realignment, the phantom illustrates some activation corruption due to motion. Finally, three widely used realignment packages are examined. The results showed that the most accurate algorithms are able to increase specificity through accurate realignment while maintaining sensitivity through effective resampling techniques. In fact, accurate realignment alone is not a powerful indicator of the most effective algorithm in terms of true activation.

  14. Comparison between landfill gas and waste incineration for power generation in Astana, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Inglezakis, Vassilis J; Rojas-Solórzano, Luis; Kim, Jong; Aitbekova, Aisulu; Ismailova, Aizada

    2015-05-01

    The city of Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan, which has a population of 804,474, and has been experiencing rapid growth over the last 15 years, generates approximately 1.39 kg capita(-1) day(-1) of municipal solid waste (MSW). Nearly 700 tonnes of MSW are collected daily, of which 97% is disposed of at landfills. The newest landfill was built using modern technologies, including a landfill gas (LFG) collection system.The rapid growth of Astana demands more energy on its path to development, and the viability analysis of MSW to generate electricity is imperative. This paper presents a technical-economic pre-feasibility study comparing landfill including LFG utilization and waste incineration (WI) to produce electricity. The performance of LFG with a reciprocating engine and WI with steam turbine power technologies were compared through corresponding greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction, cost of energy production (CEP), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) from the analyses. Results demonstrate that in the city of Astana, WI has the potential to reduce more than 200,000 tonnes of GHG per year, while LFG could reduce slightly less than 40,000 tonnes. LFG offers a CEP 5.7% larger than WI, while the latter presents a BCR two times higher than LFG. WI technology analysis depicts a NPV exceeding 280% of the equity, while for LFG, the NPV is less than the equity, which indicates an expected remarkable financial return for the WI technology and a marginal and risky scenario for the LFG technology. Only existing landfill facilities with a LFG collection system in place may turn LFG into a viable project.

  15. Comparison between landfill gas and waste incineration for power generation in Astana, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Inglezakis, Vassilis J; Rojas-Solórzano, Luis; Kim, Jong; Aitbekova, Aisulu; Ismailova, Aizada

    2015-05-01

    The city of Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan, which has a population of 804,474, and has been experiencing rapid growth over the last 15 years, generates approximately 1.39 kg capita(-1) day(-1) of municipal solid waste (MSW). Nearly 700 tonnes of MSW are collected daily, of which 97% is disposed of at landfills. The newest landfill was built using modern technologies, including a landfill gas (LFG) collection system.The rapid growth of Astana demands more energy on its path to development, and the viability analysis of MSW to generate electricity is imperative. This paper presents a technical-economic pre-feasibility study comparing landfill including LFG utilization and waste incineration (WI) to produce electricity. The performance of LFG with a reciprocating engine and WI with steam turbine power technologies were compared through corresponding greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction, cost of energy production (CEP), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) from the analyses. Results demonstrate that in the city of Astana, WI has the potential to reduce more than 200,000 tonnes of GHG per year, while LFG could reduce slightly less than 40,000 tonnes. LFG offers a CEP 5.7% larger than WI, while the latter presents a BCR two times higher than LFG. WI technology analysis depicts a NPV exceeding 280% of the equity, while for LFG, the NPV is less than the equity, which indicates an expected remarkable financial return for the WI technology and a marginal and risky scenario for the LFG technology. Only existing landfill facilities with a LFG collection system in place may turn LFG into a viable project. PMID:25819927

  16. Comparison of hospital room surface disinfection using a novel ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) generator.

    PubMed

    Jelden, Katelyn C; Gibbs, Shawn G; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L; Iwen, Peter C; Schmid, Kendra K; Lowe, John J

    2016-09-01

    The estimated 721,800 hospital acquired infections per year in the United States have necessitated development of novel environmental decontamination technologies such as ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI). This study evaluated the efficacy of a novel, portable UVGI generator (the TORCH, ChlorDiSys Solutions, Inc., Lebanon, NJ) to disinfect surface coupons composed of plastic from a bedrail, stainless steel, chrome-plated light switch cover, and a porcelain tile that were inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). Each surface type was placed at 6 different sites within a hospital room and treated by 10-min ultraviolet-C (UVC) exposures using the TORCH with doses ranging from 0-688 mJ/cm(2) between sites. Organism reductions were compared with untreated surface coupons as controls. Overall, UVGI significantly reduced MRSA by an average of 4.6 log10 (GSD: 1.7 log10, 77% inactivation, p < 0.0001) and VRE by an average of 3.9 log10 (GSD: 1.7 log10, 65% inactivation, p < 0.0001). MRSA on bedrail was reduced significantly (p < 0.0001) less than on other surfaces, while VRE was reduced significantly less on chrome (p = 0.0004) and stainless steel (p = 0.0012) than porcelain tile. Organisms out of direct line of sight of the UVC generator were reduced significantly less (p < 0.0001) than those directly in line of sight. UVGI was found an effective method to inactivate nosocomial pathogens on surfaces evaluated within the hospital environment in direct line of sight of UVGI treatment with variation between organism and surface types. PMID:27028152

  17. Comparison of hospital room surface disinfection using a novel ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) generator.

    PubMed

    Jelden, Katelyn C; Gibbs, Shawn G; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L; Iwen, Peter C; Schmid, Kendra K; Lowe, John J

    2016-09-01

    The estimated 721,800 hospital acquired infections per year in the United States have necessitated development of novel environmental decontamination technologies such as ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI). This study evaluated the efficacy of a novel, portable UVGI generator (the TORCH, ChlorDiSys Solutions, Inc., Lebanon, NJ) to disinfect surface coupons composed of plastic from a bedrail, stainless steel, chrome-plated light switch cover, and a porcelain tile that were inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). Each surface type was placed at 6 different sites within a hospital room and treated by 10-min ultraviolet-C (UVC) exposures using the TORCH with doses ranging from 0-688 mJ/cm(2) between sites. Organism reductions were compared with untreated surface coupons as controls. Overall, UVGI significantly reduced MRSA by an average of 4.6 log10 (GSD: 1.7 log10, 77% inactivation, p < 0.0001) and VRE by an average of 3.9 log10 (GSD: 1.7 log10, 65% inactivation, p < 0.0001). MRSA on bedrail was reduced significantly (p < 0.0001) less than on other surfaces, while VRE was reduced significantly less on chrome (p = 0.0004) and stainless steel (p = 0.0012) than porcelain tile. Organisms out of direct line of sight of the UVC generator were reduced significantly less (p < 0.0001) than those directly in line of sight. UVGI was found an effective method to inactivate nosocomial pathogens on surfaces evaluated within the hospital environment in direct line of sight of UVGI treatment with variation between organism and surface types.

  18. Computational comparison of mediated current generation capacity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in photosynthetic and respiratory growth modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses many potential advantages to be exploited as a biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. In the present study, we performed computational studies based on flux balance analysis (FBA) to probe the maximum potential of C. reinhardtii for current output and identify the metabolic mechanisms supporting a high current generation in three different cultivation conditions, i.e., heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth. The results showed that flux balance limitations allow the highest current output for C. reinhardtii in the mixotrophic growth mode (2.368 A/gDW), followed by heterotrophic growth (1.141 A/gDW) and photoautotrophic growth the lowest (0.7035 A/gDW). The significantly higher mediated electron transfer (MET) rate in the mixotrophic mode is in complete contrast to previous findings for a photosynthetic cyanobacterium, and was attributed to the fact that for C. reinhardtii the photophosphorylation improved the efficiency of converting the acetate into biomass and NADH production. Overall, the cytosolic NADH-dependent current production was mainly associated with five reactions in both mixotrophic and photoautotrophic nutritional modes, whereas four reactions participated in the heterotrophic mode. The mixotrophic and photoautotrophic metabolisms were alike and shared the same set of reactions for maximizing current production, whereas in the heterotrophic mode, the current production was additionally contributed by the metabolic activities in the two organelles: glyoxysome and chloroplast. In conclusion, C. reinhardtii has a potential to be exploited in MFCs of MET mode to produce a high current output. PMID:24875305

  19. Molecular characterization and comparison of shale oils generated by different pyrolysis methods using FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jin, J.M.; Kim, S.; Birdwell, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT ICR-MS) was applied in the analysis of shale oils generated using two different pyrolysis systems under laboratory conditions meant to simulate surface and in situ oil shale retorting. Significant variations were observed in the shale oils, particularly the degree of conjugation of the constituent molecules. Comparison of FT ICR-MS results to standard oil characterization methods (API gravity, SARA fractionation, gas chromatography-flame ionization detection) indicated correspondence between the average Double Bond Equivalence (DBE) and asphaltene content. The results show that, based on the average DBE values and DBE distributions of the shale oils examined, highly conjugated species are enriched in samples produced under low pressure, high temperature conditions and in the presence of water.

  20. Comparison of pretreatment methods for rye straw in the second generation biorefinery: effect on cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin recovery.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cantu, Lilia; Schreiber, Andreas; Schütt, Fokko; Saake, Bodo; Kirsch, Christian; Smirnova, Irina

    2013-08-01

    The increasing interest in lignocellulose-based biorefineries boosts the further development of the needed pretreatment methods for preprocessing biomass. There are a large number of different processes that are being investigated; however research is made mostly based on different types of biomass with the same pretreatment or several modifications of the same process for a given type of biomass. In this work a comparison of promising chemical pretreatments using the same biomass was performed. Organosolv (OS), Steam (SE) and Liquid-Hot-Water (LHW) processes were used for the pretreatment of rye straw and the treated solids further enzymatically hydrolyzed. Best results for carbohydrate and lignin yield were found for the OS pretreatment followed close by the LHW and SE with similar results. All of the processes showed satisfactory performance for the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for application in the second generation biorefinery.

  1. Exploiting the Optical Quadratic Nonlinearity of Zinc-Blende Semiconductors for Guided-Wave Terahertz Generation: A Material Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherchi, Matteo; Taormina, Alberto; Busacca, Alessandro C.; Oliveri, Roberto L.; Bivona, Saverio; Cino, Alfonso C.; Stivala, Salvatore; Sanseverino, Stefano Riva; Leone, Claudio

    2010-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis and comparison of dielectric waveguides made of CdTe, GaP, GaAs and InP for modal phase matched optical difference frequency generation (DFG) in the terahertz domain. From the form of the DFG equations, we derived the definition of a very general figure of merit (FOM). In turn, this FOM enabled us to compare different configurations, by taking into account linear and nonlinear susceptibility dispersion, terahertz absorption, and a rigorous evaluation of the waveguide modes properties. The most efficient waveguides found with this procedure are predicted to approach the quantum efficiency limit with input optical power in the order of kWs.

  2. A Comparison of the Safety Analysis Process and the Generation IV Proliferation Resistance/Physical Protection Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Bjornard; M. D. Zentner

    2006-05-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a vehicle for the cooperative international development of future nuclear energy systems. The Generation IV program has established primary objectives in the areas of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP). In order to help meet the latter objective a program was launched in December 2002 to develop a rigorous means to assess nuclear energy systems with respect to PR&PP. The study of Physical Protection of a facility is a relatively well established methodology, but an approach to evaluate the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear fuel cycle is not. This paper will examine the Proliferation Resistance (PR) evaluation methodology being developed by the PR group, which is largely a new approach and compare it to generally accepted nuclear facility safety evaluation methodologies. Safety evaluation methods have been the subjects of decades of development and use. Further, safety design and analysis is fairly broadly understood, as well as being the subject of federally mandated procedures and requirements. It is therefore extremely instructive to compare and contrast the proposed new PR evaluation methodology process with that used in safety analysis. By so doing, instructive and useful conclusions can be derived from the comparison that will help to strengthen the PR methodological approach as it is developed further. From the comparison made in this paper it is evident that there are very strong parallels between the two processes. Most importantly, it is clear that the proliferation resistance aspects of nuclear energy systems are best considered beginning at the very outset of the design process. Only in this way can the designer identify and cost effectively incorporate intrinsic features that might be difficult to implement at some later stage. Also, just like safety, the process to implement proliferation resistance should be a dynamic

  3. Combining real-time PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing to provide quantitative comparisons of fungal aerosol populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Lang-Yona, Naama; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Rudich, Yinon; Peccia, Jordan

    2014-02-01

    We examined fungal communities associated with the PM10 mass of Rehovot, Israel outdoor air samples collected in the spring and fall seasons. Fungal communities were described by 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the fungal ribosomal RNA encoding gene. To allow for a more quantitative comparison of fungal exposure in humans, the relative abundance values of specific taxa were transformed to absolute concentrations through multiplying these values by the sample's total fungal spore concentration (derived from universal fungal qPCR). Next, the sequencing-based absolute concentrations for Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. were compared to taxon-specific qPCR concentrations for A. alternata, C. cladosporioides, E. nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. derived from the same spring and fall aerosol samples. Results of these comparisons showed that the absolute concentration values generated from pyrosequencing were strongly associated with the concentration values derived from taxon-specific qPCR (for all four species, p < 0.005, all R > 0.70). The correlation coefficients were greater for species present in higher concentrations. Our microbial aerosol population analyses demonstrated that fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was higher in the spring compared to the fall (p = 0.02), and principal coordinate analysis showed distinct seasonal differences in taxa distribution (ANOSIM p = 0.004). Among genera containing allergenic and/or pathogenic species, the absolute concentrations of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Cladosporium were greater in the fall, while Cryptococcus, Penicillium, and Ulocladium concentrations were greater in the spring. The transformation of pyrosequencing fungal population relative abundance data to absolute concentrations can improve next-generation DNA sequencing-based quantitative aerosol exposure

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing of Aquatic Oligochaetes: Comparison of Experimental Communities

    PubMed Central

    Vivien, Régis; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Pawlowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic oligochaetes are a common group of freshwater benthic invertebrates known to be very sensitive to environmental changes and currently used as bioindicators in some countries. However, more extensive application of oligochaetes for assessing the ecological quality of sediments in watercourses and lakes would require overcoming the difficulties related to morphology-based identification of oligochaetes species. This study tested the Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) of a standard cytochrome c oxydase I (COI) barcode as a tool for the rapid assessment of oligochaete diversity in environmental samples, based on mixed specimen samples. To know the composition of each sample we Sanger sequenced every specimen present in these samples. Our study showed that a large majority of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit) could be detected by NGS analyses. We also observed congruence between the NGS and specimen abundance data for several but not all OTUs. Because the differences in sequence abundance data were consistent across samples, we exploited these variations to empirically design correction factors. We showed that such factors increased the congruence between the values of oligochaetes-based indices inferred from the NGS and the Sanger-sequenced specimen data. The validation of these correction factors by further experimental studies will be needed for the adaptation and use of NGS technology in biomonitoring studies based on oligochaete communities. PMID:26866802

  5. Comparison of Frameworks for Next Generation Multiphase Flow Solver, MFIX: A Group Decision-Making Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, Aytekin; Pannala, Sreekanth; Syamlal, M; O'Brien, T. J.; Gel, Esma

    2007-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have emerged as a powerful tool for understanding multiphase flows that occur in a wide range of engineering applications and natural processes. A multiphase CFD code called MFIX has been under development at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) since the 1980s for modeling multiphase flows that occur in fossil fuel reactors. CFD codes such as MFIX are equipped with a number of numerical algorithms to solve a large set of coupled partial differential equations over three-dimensional grids consisting of hundreds of thousands of cells on parallel computers. Currently, the next generation version of MFIX is under development with the goal of building a multiphase problem solving environment (PSE) that would facilitate the simple reuse of modern software components by application scientists. Several open-source frameworks were evaluated to identify the best-suited framework for the multiphase PSE. There are many requirements for the multiphase PSE, and each of these open-source frameworks offers functionalities that satisfy the requirements to varying extents. Therefore, matching the requirements and the functionalities is not a simple task and requires a systematic and quantitative decision making procedure. We present a multi-criteria decision making approach to determining a major system design decision, and demonstrate its application on the framework selection problem.

  6. Systems performance comparison of three all-optical generation schemes for quasi-Nyquist WDM.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Arthur James; Xie, Yiwei; Zhu, Chen

    2015-08-24

    Orthogonal time division multiplexing (OrthTDM) interleaves sinc-shaped pulses to form a high baud-rate signal, with a rectangular spectrum suitable for multiplexing into a Nyquist WDM (N-WDM)-like signal. The problem with generating sinc-shaped pulses is that they theoretically have infinite durations, and even if time bounded for practical implementation, they still require a filter with a long impulse response, hence a large physical size. Previously a method of creating chirped-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) pulses with a chirped arrayed waveguide (AWG) filter, then converting them into interleaved quasi-sinc pulses using dispersive fiber (DF), has been proposed. This produces a signal with a wider spectrum than the equivalent N-WDM signal. We show that a modification to the scheme enables the spectral extent to be reduced for the same data rate. We then analyse the key factors in designing an OrthTDM transmitter, and relate these to the performance of a N-WDM system. We show that the modified transmitter reduces the required guard band between the N-WDM channels. We also simulate a simpler scheme using an unchirped finite-impulse response filter of similar size, which directly creates truncated-sinc pulses without needing a DF. This gives better system performance than either chirped scheme.

  7. Numerical simulation of convectively generated gravity waves in West Africa and comparisons with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, P.; Blanc, E.

    2012-04-01

    Convective clouds in the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone) are a major source of nonstationary gravity waves, that propagate to the stratosphere and result in upward displacements at low levels, which induces new convection. Simulations of wind fields are performed by the mesoscale meteorological model WRF (Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting) over a period of 2 days during active thunderstorm days. Simulations are carried out in a domain covering the ITCZ in West Africa using 2 nested grids with horizontal grid spacing of 27 and 9 km respectively. Simulations are driven by ECMWF winds (defined by 91 levels from surface to 80 km), using 100 levels from surface to 50 Pa and a sponge layer above 45 km. The waves characteristics are compared to observations at the CTBT (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) infrasound station in Ivory Coast. The aim of this study is to further understand the mechanisms of wave generation by deep convection and propagation to the stratosphere. In a second part, we also study the effects of gravity waves on the dynamics of the tropical atmosphere and perform sensitivity simulations to the top height of the model.

  8. Comparison of syncytiotrophoblast generated from human embryonic stem cells and from term placentas

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, Shinichiro; Alexenko, Andrei P.; Amita, Mitsuyoshi; Yang, Ying; Schust, Danny J.; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, R. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) readily commit to the trophoblast lineage after exposure to bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) and two small compounds, an activin A signaling inhibitor and a FGF2 signaling inhibitor (BMP4/A83-01/PD173074; BAP treatment). During differentiation, areas emerge within the colonies with the biochemical and morphological features of syncytiotrophoblast (STB). Relatively pure fractions of mononucleated cytotrophoblast (CTB) and larger syncytial sheets displaying the expected markers of STB can be obtained by differential filtration of dispersed colonies through nylon strainers. RNA-seq analysis of these fractions has allowed them to be compared with cytotrophoblasts isolated from term placentas before and after such cells had formed syncytia. Although it is clear from extensive gene marker analysis that both ESC- and placenta-derived syncytial cells are trophoblast, each with the potential to transport a wide range of solutes and synthesize placental hormones, their transcriptome profiles are sufficiently dissimilar to suggest that the two cell types have distinct pedigrees and represent functionally different kinds of STB. We propose that the STB generated from human ESCs represents the primitive syncytium encountered in early pregnancy soon after the human trophoblast invades into the uterine wall. PMID:27051068

  9. Mutation based treatment recommendations from next generation sequencing data: a comparison of web tools

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaymin M.; Knopf, Joshua; Reiner, Eric; Bossuyt, Veerle; Epstein, Lianne; DiGiovanna, Michael; Chung, Gina; Silber, Andrea; Sanft, Tara; Hofstatter, Erin; Mougalian, Sarah; Abu-Khalaf, Maysa; Platt, James; Shi, Weiwei; Gershkovich, Peter; Hatzis, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of complex cancer genome data, generated by tumor target profiling platforms, is key for the success of personalized cancer therapy. How to draw therapeutic conclusions from tumor profiling results is not standardized and may vary among commercial and academically-affiliated recommendation tools. We performed targeted sequencing of 315 genes from 75 metastatic breast cancer biopsies using the FoundationOne assay. Results were run through 4 different web tools including the Drug-Gene Interaction Database (DGidb), My Cancer Genome (MCG), Personalized Cancer Therapy (PCT), and cBioPortal, for drug and clinical trial recommendations. These recommendations were compared amongst each other and to those provided by FoundationOne. The identification of a gene as targetable varied across the different recommendation sources. Only 33% of cases had 4 or more sources recommend the same drug for at least one of the usually several altered genes found in tumor biopsies. These results indicate further development and standardization of broadly applicable software tools that assist in our therapeutic interpretation of genomic data is needed. Existing algorithms for data acquisition, integration and interpretation will likely need to incorporate artificial intelligence tools to improve both content and real-time status. PMID:26980737

  10. Comparison of three generations of ActiGraph™ activity monitors in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    ROBUSTO, KRISTI M.; TROST, STEWART G.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated agreement among three generations of ActiGraph™ accelerometers in children and adolescents. Participants (N=29, mean age = 14.2 ± 3.0 y) completed two laboratory-based activity sessions, each lasting 60 minutes. During each session, participants concurrently wore three different models of the ActiGraph accelerometers (GT1M, GT3X, GT3X+). Agreement among the three models for vertical axis (VA) counts, vector magnitude (VM) counts, and time spent in MVPA was evaluated by calculating ICCs and Bland-Altman plots. The ICCs for total VA counts, total VM counts, and estimated MVPA were 0.994 (95% C.I. = 0.989 – 0.996), 0.981 (95% C.I.= 0.969 – 0.989), and 0.996 (95% C.I.= 0.989 – 0.998), respectively. Inter-monitor differences for total VA and VM counts ranged from 0.3% to 1.5%, while inter-monitor differences for estimated MVPA were equal to or close to zero. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that there is strong agreement between the GT1M, GT3X and GT3X+ activity monitors, thus making it acceptable for researchers and practitioners to use different ActiGraph™ models within a given study. PMID:22857599

  11. Comparison of syncytiotrophoblast generated from human embryonic stem cells and from term placentas.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Shinichiro; Alexenko, Andrei P; Amita, Mitsuyoshi; Yang, Ying; Schust, Danny J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, R Michael

    2016-05-10

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) readily commit to the trophoblast lineage after exposure to bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) and two small compounds, an activin A signaling inhibitor and a FGF2 signaling inhibitor (BMP4/A83-01/PD173074; BAP treatment). During differentiation, areas emerge within the colonies with the biochemical and morphological features of syncytiotrophoblast (STB). Relatively pure fractions of mononucleated cytotrophoblast (CTB) and larger syncytial sheets displaying the expected markers of STB can be obtained by differential filtration of dispersed colonies through nylon strainers. RNA-seq analysis of these fractions has allowed them to be compared with cytotrophoblasts isolated from term placentas before and after such cells had formed syncytia. Although it is clear from extensive gene marker analysis that both ESC- and placenta-derived syncytial cells are trophoblast, each with the potential to transport a wide range of solutes and synthesize placental hormones, their transcriptome profiles are sufficiently dissimilar to suggest that the two cell types have distinct pedigrees and represent functionally different kinds of STB. We propose that the STB generated from human ESCs represents the primitive syncytium encountered in early pregnancy soon after the human trophoblast invades into the uterine wall. PMID:27051068

  12. RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2009-04-15

    In the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), hydrogen is produced continuously by interaction of the radiation in the tank with water in the waste. Consequently, the vapor spaces of the tanks are purged to prevent the accumulation of H{sub 2} and possible formation of a flammable mixture in a tank. Personnel at SRS have developed an empirical model to predict the rate of H{sub 2} formation in a tank. The basis of this model is the prediction of the G value for H{sub 2} production. This G value is the number of H{sub 2} molecules produced per 100 eV of radiolytic energy absorbed by the waste. Based on experimental studies it was found that the G value for H{sub 2} production from beta radiation and from gamma radiation were essentially equal. The G value for H{sub 2} production from alpha radiation was somewhat higher. Thus, the model has two equations, one for beta/gamma radiation and one for alpha radiation. Experimental studies have also indicated that both G values are decreased by the presence of nitrate and nitrite ions in the waste. These are the main scavengers for the precursors of H{sub 2} in the waste; thus the equations that were developed predict G values for hydrogen production as a function of the concentrations of these two ions in waste. Knowing the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads in the waste allows one to predict the total generation rate for hydrogen in a tank. With this prediction a ventilation rate can be established for each tank to ensure that a flammable mixture is not formed in the vapor space in a tank. Recently personnel at Hanford have developed a slightly different model for predicting hydrogen G values. Their model includes the same precursor for H{sub 2} as the SRS model but also includes an additional precursor not in the SRS model. Including the second precursor for H{sub 2} leads to different empirical equations for predicting the G values for H{sub 2} as a function of the nitrate and nitrite concentrations in

  13. Next-Generation Sequencing of Aquatic Oligochaetes: Comparison of Experimental Communities.

    PubMed

    Vivien, Régis; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Pawlowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic oligochaetes are a common group of freshwater benthic invertebrates known to be very sensitive to environmental changes and currently used as bioindicators in some countries. However, more extensive application of oligochaetes for assessing the ecological quality of sediments in watercourses and lakes would require overcoming the difficulties related to morphology-based identification of oligochaetes species. This study tested the Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) of a standard cytochrome c oxydase I (COI) barcode as a tool for the rapid assessment of oligochaete diversity in environmental samples, based on mixed specimen samples. To know the composition of each sample we Sanger sequenced every specimen present in these samples. Our study showed that a large majority of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit) could be detected by NGS analyses. We also observed congruence between the NGS and specimen abundance data for several but not all OTUs. Because the differences in sequence abundance data were consistent across samples, we exploited these variations to empirically design correction factors. We showed that such factors increased the congruence between the values of oligochaetes-based indices inferred from the NGS and the Sanger-sequenced specimen data. The validation of these correction factors by further experimental studies will be needed for the adaptation and use of NGS technology in biomonitoring studies based on oligochaete communities. PMID:26866802

  14. HLA genotyping in the clinical laboratory: comparison of next-generation sequencing methods.

    PubMed

    Profaizer, T; Lázár-Molnár, E; Close, D W; Delgado, J C; Kumánovics, A

    2016-07-01

    Implementation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical lab brings new challenges to the laboratories performing this testing. With the advent of commercially available HLA-NGS typing kits, labs must make numerous decisions concerning capital equipment and address labor considerations. Therefore, careful and unbiased evaluation of available methods is imperative. In this report, we compared our in-house developed HLA NGS typing with two commercially available kits from Illumina and Omixon using 10 International Histocompatibility Working Group (IHWG) and 36 clinical samples. Although all three methods employ long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and have been developed on the Illumina MiSeq platform, the methodologies for library preparation show significant variations. There was 100% typing concordance between all three methods at the first field when a HLA type could be assigned. Overall, HLA typing by NGS using in-house or commercially available methods is now feasible in clinical laboratories. However, technical variables such as hands-on time and indexing strategies are sufficiently different among these approaches to impact the workflow of the clinical laboratory. PMID:27524804

  15. User's guide for the Data Analysis, Retrieval, and Tabulation System (DARTS), revised edition: A mainframe computer code for generating cross-tabulation reports

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.

    1990-10-01

    A computer system unknown as the Data Analysis, Retrieval, and Tabulation System (DARTS) was developed by the Energy Systems Division at Argonne National Laboratory to generate tables of descriptive statistics derived from analyses of housing and energy data sources. Through a simple input command, the user can request the preparation of a hierarchical table based on any combination of several hundred of the most commonly analyzed variables. The system was written in the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) language and designed for use on a large-scale IBM mainframe computer.

  16. Revision Rhinoplasty: What Can We Learn from Error Patterns? An Analysis of Revision Surgery.

    PubMed

    East, Charles; Kwame, Ivor; Hannan, Saiful Alam

    2016-08-01

    Of the many challenges in rhinoplasty, achieving a satisfactory outcome at the first operation is important. There are multiple reasons for secondary surgery, and generally revisions can be broadly classified into minor (often one area of deficit) or a total redo. Understanding the common technical reasons for failure in primary surgery by analyzing the deformities has resulted in various error patterns emerging. Understanding these patterns means we can modify techniques in primary surgery to reduce the incidence of revision. This article describes our prospective revision rhinoplasty experience over 5 and then 2 years, highlighting the main error patterns encountered. We also describe a stepwise analysis of four frequently encountered key problem areas alongside techniques to address them and offer pearls to help prevent further revision. Comparison of two cohorts of patients from a teaching hospital setting and private practice with the same operating surgeon indicates an increasing tendency to the open approach for revisions. The re-revision rates for these groups are 15.7 and 9%, respectively. Revision rhinoplasty is a difficult operation to perform to the satisfaction of both the surgeon and the patient. Understanding the common technical reasons for failure in primary surgery by fully analyzing the deformities means we can modify techniques in primary surgery to reduce the incidence of revision. PMID:27494585

  17. Fiscal year 1992 program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program was established in 1990 to provide for resolution of a major safety issue identified for 23 of the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. This safety issue involves flammable gas mixtures, consisting mainly of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and that are generated and periodically released in concentrations that nitrogen, exceed the lower flamability limit. Initial activities of the program have been directed at tank 241-SY-101 because it exhibits the largest risk. Activities conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1991 included waste sampling, waste sample analysis, development of tank models, conducting laboratory tests with synthetic wastes, upgrading of tank instrumentation and ventilation systems, evaluation of new methods for characterizing waste, and development of remedial actions. In addition to the work being conducted to resolve the flammable gas issue, programs have been established (Gasper and Reep 1992) to develop corrective actions for high priority safety issues associated with potential explosive mixtures of ferrocyanides in tanks, potential organic-nitrate reactions in tanks, and for the continued cooling for heat generation in tank 106{degrees}C. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief description of the FY 1992 priorities, logic, work breakdown structure (WBS), and task descriptions for the Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program.

  18. Comparison of Commercially Available Target Enrichment Methods for Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bodi, K.; Perera, A. G.; Adams, P. S.; Bintzler, D.; Dewar, K.; Grove, D. S.; Kieleczawa, J.; Lyons, R. H.; Neubert, T. A.; Noll, A. C.; Singh, S.; Steen, R.; Zianni, M.

    2013-01-01

    Isolating high-priority segments of genomes greatly enhances the efficiency of next-generation sequencing (NGS) by allowing researchers to focus on their regions of interest. For the 2010–11 DNA Sequencing Research Group (DSRG) study, we compared outcomes from two leading companies, Agilent Technologies (Santa Clara, CA, USA) and Roche NimbleGen (Madison, WI, USA), which offer custom-targeted genomic enrichment methods. Both companies were provided with the same genomic sample and challenged to capture identical genomic locations for DNA NGS. The target region totaled 3.5 Mb and included 31 individual genes and a 2-Mb contiguous interval. Each company was asked to design its best assay, perform the capture in replicates, and return the captured material to the DSRG-participating laboratories. Sequencing was performed in two different laboratories on Genome Analyzer IIx systems (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). Sequencing data were analyzed for sensitivity, specificity, and coverage of the desired regions. The success of the enrichment was highly dependent on the design of the capture probes. Overall, coverage variability was higher for the Agilent samples. As variant discovery is the ultimate goal for a typical targeted sequencing project, we compared samples for their ability to sequence single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as a test of the ability to capture both chromosomes from the sample. In the targeted regions, we detected 2546 SNPs with the NimbleGen samples and 2071 with Agilent's. When limited to the regions that both companies included as baits, the number of SNPs was ∼1000 for each, with Agilent and NimbleGen finding a small number of unique SNPs not found by the other. PMID:23814499

  19. Comparison of vapor sampling system (VSS) and in situ vapor sampling (ISVS) methods on Tanks C-107, BY-108, and S-102. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-08-01

    This report discusses comparison tests for two methods of collecting vapor samples from the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank headspaces. The two sampling methods compared are the truck-mounted vapor sampling system (VSS) and the cart-mounted in-situ vapor sampling (ISVS). Three tanks were sampled by both the VSS and ISVS methods from the same access risers within the same 8-hour period. These tanks have diverse headspace compositions and they represent the highest known level of several key vapor analytes.

  20. Comparison of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) concentrations generated by an electrically heated cigarette smoking system and a conventional cigarette.

    PubMed

    Tricker, Anthony R; Schorp, Matthias K; Urban, Hans-Jörg; Leyden, Donald; Hagedorn, Heinz-Werner; Engl, Johannes; Urban, Michael; Riedel, Kirsten; Gilch, Gerhard; Janket, Dinamis; Scherer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Smoking conventional lit-end cigarettes results in exposure of nonsmokers to potentially harmful cigarette smoke constituents present in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) generated by sidestream smoke emissions and exhaled mainstream smoke. ETS constituent concentrations generated by a conventional lit-end cigarette and a newly developed electrically heated cigarette smoking system (EHCSS) that produces only mainstream smoke and no sidestream smoke emissions were investigated in simulated "office" and "hospitality" environments with different levels of baseline indoor air quality. Smoking the EHCSS (International Organisation for Standardization yields: 5 mg tar, 0.3 mg nicotine, and 0.6 mg carbon monoxide) in simulated indoor environments resulted in significant reductions in ETS constituent concentrations compared to when smoking a representative lit-end cigarette (Marlboro: 6 mg tar, 0.5 mg nicotine, and 7 mg carbon monoxide). In direct comparisons, 24 of 29 measured smoke constituents (83%) showed mean reductions of greater than 90%, and 5 smoke constituents (17%) showed mean reductions between 80% and 90%. Gas-vapor phase ETS markers (nicotine and 3-ethenylpyridine) were reduced by an average of 97% (range 94-99%). Total respirable suspended particles, determined by online particle measurements and as gravimetric respirable suspended particles, were reduced by 90% (range 82-100%). The mean and standard deviation of the reduction of all constituents was 94 +/- 4%, indicating that smoking the new EHCSS in simulated "office" and "hospitality" indoor environments resulted in substantial reductions of ETS constituents in indoor air. PMID:18951229

  1. Clinical analysis of 670 cases in two trials of the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Lymphoma Cooperative Group subtyped according to the Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms: a comparison with the Working Formulation.

    PubMed

    Pittaluga, S; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Noordijk, E M; De Wolf-Peeters, C

    1996-05-15

    In the Working Formulation (WF), non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are grouped according to their clinical behavior. These disorders are listed as entities defined by morphology, phenotype, and cytogenetics in the proposed Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL), the clinical relevance of which is still debated. We analyzed 670 NHL cases included in two randomized clinical trials (EORTC 20855 WF-intermediate/high-grade and 20856 WF-low-grade malignancy) with histologic material available for review. Based on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, 77% of cases could be subtyped. Immunophenotyping was considered to be mandatory only in diagnosing T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Of 522 cases subtyped, 11% were mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 5% were marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (MZBCL), 46% were follicle center lymphoma, and 32% were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Statistical analysis and comparisons between classifications were made only within each trial and treatment group. MCL and MZBCL were characterized by a shorter median survival (3.4 and 4.1 years, respectively) in comparison with low- and intermediate-grade WF groups (> 9.3 and 5.8 years, respectively). In terms of progression-free survival, MCL showed a behavior similar to the low-grade group, with frequent relapses. Follicle center cell lymphomas behaved as low-grade lymphomas as defined by the WF and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas as the WF-intermediate grade group. Because several NHL entities have a clinical behavior of their own, their recognition by the REAL classification offers clinicians additional information that is not obtained when the WF is used. PMID:8639796

  2. Clinical analysis of 670 cases in two trials of the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Lymphoma Cooperative Group subtyped according to the Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms: a comparison with the Working Formulation.

    PubMed

    Pittaluga, S; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Noordijk, E M; De Wolf-Peeters, C

    1996-05-15

    In the Working Formulation (WF), non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are grouped according to their clinical behavior. These disorders are listed as entities defined by morphology, phenotype, and cytogenetics in the proposed Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL), the clinical relevance of which is still debated. We analyzed 670 NHL cases included in two randomized clinical trials (EORTC 20855 WF-intermediate/high-grade and 20856 WF-low-grade malignancy) with histologic material available for review. Based on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, 77% of cases could be subtyped. Immunophenotyping was considered to be mandatory only in diagnosing T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Of 522 cases subtyped, 11% were mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 5% were marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (MZBCL), 46% were follicle center lymphoma, and 32% were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Statistical analysis and comparisons between classifications were made only within each trial and treatment group. MCL and MZBCL were characterized by a shorter median survival (3.4 and 4.1 years, respectively) in comparison with low- and intermediate-grade WF groups (> 9.3 and 5.8 years, respectively). In terms of progression-free survival, MCL showed a behavior similar to the low-grade group, with frequent relapses. Follicle center cell lymphomas behaved as low-grade lymphomas as defined by the WF and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas as the WF-intermediate grade group. Because several NHL entities have a clinical behavior of their own, their recognition by the REAL classification offers clinicians additional information that is not obtained when the WF is used.

  3. Performance of dose calculation algorithms from three generations in lung SBRT: comparison with full Monte Carlo-based dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Jarkko J; Kapanen, Mika K; Hyödynmaa, Simo J; Wigren, Tuija K; Pitkänen, Maunu A

    2014-01-01

    threshold criteria showed larger discrepancies. The TPS algorithm comparison results showed large dose discrepancies in the PTV mean dose (D50%), nearly 60%, for the PBC algorithm, and differences of nearly 20% for the AAA, occurring also in the small PTV size range. This work suggests the application of independent plan verification, when the AAA or the AXB algorithm are utilized in lung SBRT having PTVs smaller than 20-25 cc. The calculated data from this study can be used in converting the SBRT protocols based on type 'a' and/or type 'b' algorithms for the most recent generation type 'c' algorithms, such as the AXB algorithm. PMID:24710454

  4. Equal sensitivity of the new generation QuantiFERON-TB Gold plus in direct comparison with the previous test version QuantiFERON-TB Gold IT.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, H; Avsar, K; Göres, R; Mavi, S-C; Hofmann-Thiel, S

    2016-08-01

    QuantiFERON-TB Gold IT analyses interferon-γ release from CD4(+) T cells after stimulation with specific tuberculosis (TB) antigens. Its sensitivity is approximately 80% for active TB. A new test generation (QFTGplus) also analyses the response of CD8(+) T cells. We investigated both test generations in a direct head-to-head comparison in a German pulmonary hospital. Sensitivity rates for active TB were identical, no matter whether diagnosis was bacteriologically confirmed or not.

  5. How to improve the performances of Fecal Immunological Tests (FIT): Need for standardization of the sampling and pre-analytical phases and revision of the procedures for comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Rapi, Stefano; Rubeca, Tiziana; Fraser, Callum G

    2015-01-01

    Lack of reference materials and standard procedures, on faecal tests leads to major problems in harmonisation of methods and do not allow the comparison of outcome data. In particular the absence of standardisation of pre-analytical characteristic was noted for faecal test methods for haemoglobin since different manufacturers have developed different sampling procedures and report units. Moreover the physical characteristics of the faecal specimen and the designs of specimen collection devices do not allow analysis of samples on different systems in consequence, faecal tests cannot be compared using standard evaluation protocols. To improve the harmonization of results generated using different analytical systems and the overall performances of test on faecal materials we propose the introduction of standard procedures for sampling and pre-analytical phase and the adoption of specific procedures based on the use of artificial biological samples for comparison of methods. Harmonization of sampling devices with the use of a standard design for pickers and a standard ratio between analyte and buffer for different manufacturers represent a mandatory step in the roadmap for harmonization of clinical laboratory measurement on faecal materials and can allow a significant standardisation of results generated by different devices.The creation of specific protocols for the evaluation and comparison of analytical methods for analyse of faeces could lead to a significant improvement in the performance of methods and systems. PMID:24855037

  6. Comparison of hepatocellular carcinoma miRNA expression profiling as evaluated by next generation sequencing and microarray.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiki; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Okada, Rina; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Enomoto, Masaru; Tamori, Akihiro; Kawada, Norifumi; Taguchi, Y-h; Azuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiling has proven useful in diagnosing and understanding the development and progression of several diseases. Microarray is the standard method for analyzing miRNA expression profiles; however, it has several disadvantages, including its limited detection of miRNAs. In recent years, advances in genome sequencing have led to the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, which significantly advance genome sequencing speed and discovery. In this study, we compared the expression profiles obtained by next generation sequencing (NGS) with the profiles created using microarray to assess if NGS could produce a more accurate and complete miRNA profile. Total RNA from 14 hepatocellular carcinoma tumors (HCC) and 6 matched non-tumor control tissues were sequenced with Illumina MiSeq 50-bp single-end reads. Micro RNA expression profiles were estimated using miRDeep2 software. As a comparison, miRNA expression profiles for 11 out of 14 HCCs were also established by microarray (Agilent human microRNA microarray). The average total sequencing exceeded 2.2 million reads per sample and of those reads, approximately 57% mapped to the human genome. The average correlation for miRNA expression between microarray and NGS and subtraction were 0.613 and 0.587, respectively, while miRNA expression between technical replicates was 0.976. The diagnostic accuracy of HCC, p-value, and AUC were 90.0%, 7.22×10(-4), and 0.92, respectively. In summary, NGS created an miRNA expression profile that was reproducible and comparable to that produced by microarray. Moreover, NGS discovered novel miRNAs that were otherwise undetectable by microarray. We believe that miRNA expression profiling by NGS can be a useful diagnostic tool applicable to multiple fields of medicine.

  7. Comparison of atmospheric-pressure helium and argon plasmas generated by capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.-Z.; Lim, J.-P.; Kang, Jung G.; Uhm, Han S.

    2006-09-15

    In this paper, the electrical discharge characteristics of plasmas generated in coaxial cylindrical electrodes capacitively powered by a radio-frequency power supply at atmospheric pressure are investigated with respect to helium and argon gases. The electrical discharge parameters, voltage (V), current (I), and power (P), are measured for both helium and argon plasmas, and the electron temperatures and electron densities for them are evaluated by means of the equivalent circuit model and the power balance equation. By comparison of the discharge characteristics of the helium and argon plasmas, it is found that the discrepant macroscopic characteristics of helium and argon plasma, viz., current and voltage characteristics and current and power characteristics, are owed to their own intrinsic microscopic parameters of the helium and argon atoms, such as the first excited energy, the ionization energy, the total cross section, and the atom mass. Furthermore, the influences of the additive gas, oxygen gas, on the electrical discharge characteristics are also investigated in the helium and argon plasmas, which are closely related to the electron temperature of plasmas.

  8. Generation and Comparison of Tls and SFM Based 3d Models of Solid Shapes in Hydromechanic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Schneider, D.; Strauß, B.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of a current study at the Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Technical Hydromechanics at TU Dresden is to develop a new injection method for quick and economic sealing of dikes or dike bodies, based on a new synthetic material. To validate the technique, an artificial part of a sand dike was built in an experimental hall. The synthetic material was injected, which afterwards spreads in the inside of the dike. After the material was fully solidified, the surrounding sand was removed with an excavator. In this paper, two methods, which applied terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and structure from motion (SfM) respectively, for the acquisition of a 3D point cloud of the remaining shapes are described and compared. Combining with advanced software packages, a triangulated 3D model was generated and subsequently the volume of vertical sections of the shape were calculated. As the calculation of the volume revealed differences between the TLS and the SfM 3D model, a thorough qualitative comparison of the two models will be presented as well as a detailed accuracy assessment. The main influence of the accuracy is caused by generalisation in case of gaps due to occlusions in the 3D point cloud. Therefore, improvements for the data acquisition with TLS and SfM for such kind of objects are suggested in the paper.

  9. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo. Fungal infection was induced by using two strains of fungi: aspergillus fumigatus and candida albicans. The infected corneas were imaged in fresh condition by both modalities sequentially and their images were analyzed. Both RCM and TPSHGM could detect both fungal strains within the cornea based on morphology: aspergillus fumigatus had distinctive filamentous structures, and candida albicans had round structures superficially and elongated structures in the corneal stroma. These imaging results were confirmed by histology. Comparison between RCM and TPSHGM showed several characteristics. Although RCM and TPSHGM images had good correlation each other, their images were slightly different due to difference in contrast mechanism. RCM had relatively low image contrast with the infected turbid corneas due to high background signal. TPSHGM visualized cells and collagen in the cornea clearly compared to RCM, but used higher laser power to compensate low autofluorescence. Since these two modalities provide complementary information, combination of RCM and TPSHGM would be useful for fungal keratitis detection by compensating their weaknesses each other. PMID:26977371

  10. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo. Fungal infection was induced by using two strains of fungi: aspergillus fumigatus and candida albicans. The infected corneas were imaged in fresh condition by both modalities sequentially and their images were analyzed. Both RCM and TPSHGM could detect both fungal strains within the cornea based on morphology: aspergillus fumigatus had distinctive filamentous structures, and candida albicans had round structures superficially and elongated structures in the corneal stroma. These imaging results were confirmed by histology. Comparison between RCM and TPSHGM showed several characteristics. Although RCM and TPSHGM images had good correlation each other, their images were slightly different due to difference in contrast mechanism. RCM had relatively low image contrast with the infected turbid corneas due to high background signal. TPSHGM visualized cells and collagen in the cornea clearly compared to RCM, but used higher laser power to compensate low autofluorescence. Since these two modalities provide complementary information, combination of RCM and TPSHGM would be useful for fungal keratitis detection by compensating their weaknesses each other. PMID:26977371

  11. Automated generation of IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses: Comparison of different planning strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Voet, Peter W. J.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses.Methods: All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT{sub remove}) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT{sub cut}). Plans with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated.Results: Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT{sub cut} significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT{sub remove}. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V{sub 60Gy} reduced by 17.5%{+-} 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p= 0.036) and rectum D{sub mean} by 9.4%{+-} 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p= 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V{sub 60Gy} by another 4.6%{+-} 4.9% (p= 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT{sub cut} plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V{sub 60Gy} was 37.3%{+-} 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p= 0.012) for 15 directions.Conclusions: iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRT{sub cut} strategy) significantly improved OAR

  12. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  13. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  14. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E. Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W.; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80–90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  15. Comparison of laser generation in thermally bonded and unbonded Er3+,Yb3+:glass/Co2+:MgAl2O4 microchip lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghachem, Nabil; Mlynczak, Jaroslaw

    2015-08-01

    Pulse laser generation in several Er3+,Yb3+:glasses thermally bonded with Co2+:MgAl2O4 was achieved. Peak power in the range of 1.83-7.68 kW with pulse duration between 2.9 and 4.2 ns and energy up to 24 μJ was obtained. The output characteristics for different transmissions of the output couplers were investigated. To show the improvements gained by the thermal bonding procedure, a comparison of thermally bonded and unbonded samples was done in terms of generation efficiency, peak power, beam quality, generated spectra and pulse to pulse jitter.

  16. Merlin C. Wittrock and the Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krathwohl, David R.; Anderson, Lorin W.

    2010-01-01

    Merl Wittrock, a cognitive psychologist who had proposed a generative model of learning, was an essential member of the group that over a period of 5 years revised the "Taxonomy of Educational Objectives," originally published in 1956. This article describes the development of that 2001 revision (Anderson and Krathwohl, Editors) and Merl's…

  17. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, David A; Jodoin, Vincent J

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  18. The Generative Temporality of Teaching under Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eacott, Scott; Hodges, Kimbalee

    2014-01-01

    What we have come to understand as education has a temporal dimension: the school year, progression based on time, timetables, and so on. Similarly, our understanding of teaching is framed by temporality, primarily through salary structures and an implicit coupling of performance with time in the field. We argue that this underlying generative…

  19. Performance comparisons between PCA-EA-LBG and PCA-LBG-EA approaches in VQ codebook generation for image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jinn-Tsong; Chou, Ping-Yi; Chou, Jyh-Horng

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to generate vector quantisation (VQ) codebooks by integrating principle component analysis (PCA) algorithm, Linde-Buzo-Gray (LBG) algorithm, and evolutionary algorithms (EAs). The EAs include genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimisation (PSO), honey bee mating optimisation (HBMO), and firefly algorithm (FF). The study is to provide performance comparisons between PCA-EA-LBG and PCA-LBG-EA approaches. The PCA-EA-LBG approaches contain PCA-GA-LBG, PCA-PSO-LBG, PCA-HBMO-LBG, and PCA-FF-LBG, while the PCA-LBG-EA approaches contain PCA-LBG, PCA-LBG-GA, PCA-LBG-PSO, PCA-LBG-HBMO, and PCA-LBG-FF. All training vectors of test images are grouped according to PCA. The PCA-EA-LBG used the vectors grouped by PCA as initial individuals, and the best solution gained by the EAs was given for LBG to discover a codebook. The PCA-LBG approach is to use the PCA to select vectors as initial individuals for LBG to find a codebook. The PCA-LBG-EA used the final result of PCA-LBG as an initial individual for EAs to find a codebook. The search schemes in PCA-EA-LBG first used global search and then applied local search skill, while in PCA-LBG-EA first used local search and then employed global search skill. The results verify that the PCA-EA-LBG indeed gain superior results compared to the PCA-LBG-EA, because the PCA-EA-LBG explores a global area to find a solution, and then exploits a better one from the local area of the solution. Furthermore the proposed PCA-EA-LBG approaches in designing VQ codebooks outperform existing approaches shown in the literature.

  20. Comparison of Retention Factors between First-Generation and Second- and Third-Generation College Students and Development of the Likelihood of Success Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gerri Brown

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the retention factors between first-generation college students and second- and third-generation college students in the postsecondary educational setting. This study examined the differences in the preselected retention factors: faculty-student interaction, college mentor, academic support, residential…

  1. Perceived Stress, Mindfulness and Sense of Coherence: A Comparison between First Generation and Non-First Generation Clinical Psychology Doctoral Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hover, Paige Amber

    2014-01-01

    This study compared first generation and non-first generation doctoral students' levels of perceived stress, sense of coherence, and mindfulness. These variables were assessed both separately for each trainee group and in hypothesized relationships with each other. In addition, moderator analyses were conducted to assess whether key relationships…

  2. Revising the White Racial Consciousness Development Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Min; Puig, Ana; Pasquarella-Daley, Lauren; Denny, George; Rai, Ann Allen; Dallape, Aprille; Parker, Woodrow Max

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the revision of the White Racial Consciousness Development Scale (D. Claney & W. M. Parker, 1989). A multistage approach including item generation, item refinement and selection, and evaluation of score validity and reliability was used to test construction and validation. Implications for theory, practice, and future…

  3. Scar revision - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery to revise scars is done while the patient is awake, sleeping (sedated), or deep asleep and pain-free (local anesthesia or general anesthesia). Massive injuries (such as burns) can cause loss of a large area of ...

  4. A universal algorithm for an improved finite element mesh generation Mesh quality assessment in comparison to former automated mesh-generators and an analytic model.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Jan; Rodt, Thomas; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Forster, Jan; Brand, Gerd; Samii, Madjid

    2005-06-01

    The FE-modeling of complex anatomical structures is not solved satisfyingly so far. Voxel-based as opposed to contour-based algorithms allow an automated mesh generation based on the image data. Nonetheless their geometric precision is limited. We developed an automated mesh-generator that combines the advantages of voxel-based generation with improved representation of the geometry by displacement of nodes on the object-surface. Models of an artificial 3D-pipe-section and a skullbase were generated with different mesh-densities using the newly developed geometric, unsmoothed and smoothed voxel generators. Compared to the analytic calculation of the 3D-pipe-section model the normalized RMS error of the surface stress was 0.173-0.647 for the unsmoothed voxel models, 0.111-0.616 for the smoothed voxel models with small volume error and 0.126-0.273 for the geometric models. The highest element-energy error as a criterion for the mesh quality was 2.61x10(-2) N mm, 2.46x10(-2) N mm and 1.81x10(-2) N mm for unsmoothed, smoothed and geometric voxel models, respectively. The geometric model of the 3D-skullbase resulted in the lowest element-energy error and volume error. This algorithm also allowed the best representation of anatomical details. The presented geometric mesh-generator is universally applicable and allows an automated and accurate modeling by combining the advantages of the voxel-technique and of improved surface-modeling.

  5. Medical and biohazardous waste generator`s guide: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Guide describes the procedures required to comply with all federal and state laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) policy applicable to medical and biohazardous waste. The members of the LBL Biological Safety Subcommittee participated in writing these policies and procedures. The procedures and policies in this Guide apply to LBL personnel who work with infectious agents or potentially infectious agents, publicly perceived infectious items or materials (e.g., medical gloves, culture dishes), and sharps (e.g., needles, syringes, razor blades). If medical or biohazardous waste is contaminated or mixed with a hazardous chemical or material, with a radioactive material, or with both, the waste will be handled in accordance with the applicable federal and State of California laws and regulations for hazardous, radioactive, or mixed waste.

  6. GLM Proxy Data Generation: Methods for Stroke/Pulse Level Inter-Comparison of Ground-Based Lightning Reference Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummins, Kenneth L.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Bateman, Monte G.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Rudlosky, Scott D.; Petersen, Walter Arthur; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to produce useful proxy data for the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) in regions not covered by VLF lightning mapping systems, we intend to employ data produced by ground-based (regional or global) VLF/LF lightning detection networks. Before using these data in GLM Risk Reduction tasks, it is necessary to have a quantitative understanding of the performance of these networks, in terms of CG flash/stroke DE, cloud flash/pulse DE, location accuracy, and CLD/CG classification error. This information is being obtained through inter-comparison with LMAs and well-quantified VLF/LF lightning networks. One of our approaches is to compare "bulk" counting statistics on the spatial scale of convective cells, in order to both quantify relative performance and observe variations in cell-based temporal trends provided by each network. In addition, we are using microsecond-level stroke/pulse time correlation to facilitate detailed inter-comparisons at a more-fundamental level. The current development status of our ground-based inter-comparison and evaluation tools will be presented, and performance metrics will be discussed through a comparison of Vaisala s Global Lightning Dataset (GLD360) with the NLDN at locations within and outside the U.S.

  7. Comparison of light transport-incorporated MCNPX and FLUKA codes in generating organic scintillators responses to neutrons and gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, M.; Ghal-Eh, N.

    2015-08-01

    The NE102 plastic scintillator response to 137Cs gamma rays and NE213 liquid scintillator response to both mono-energetic and 241Am-Be neutrons have been modeled using FLUKA's EVENTBIN and MCNPX's PTRAC cards. The comparison made in different energy regions confirms that the overall difference is less than 6%.

  8. Comparison of a RELAP5/MOD2 posttest calculation to the data during the recovery portion of a semiscale single-tube steam generator tube rupture experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.C.

    1986-09-01

    This report discusses the comparisons of a RELAP5 posttest calculation of the recovery portion of the Semiscale Mod-2B test S-SG-1 to the test data. The posttest calculation was performed with the RELAP5/MOD2 cycle 36.02 code without updates. The recovery procedure that was calculated mainly consisted of secondary feed and steam using auxiliary feedwater injection and the atmospheric dump valve of the unaffected steam generator (the steam generator without the tube rupture). A second procedure was initiated after the trends of the secondary feed and steam procedure had been established, and this was to stop the safety injection that had been provided by two trains of both the charging and high pressure injection systems. The Semiscale Mod-2B configuration is a small scale (1/1705), nonnuclear, instrumented, model of a Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactor power plant. S-SG-1 was a single-tube, cold-side, steam generator tube rupture experiment. The comparison of the posttest calculation and data included comparing the general trends and the driving mechanisms of the responses, the phenomena, and the individual responses of the main parameters.

  9. Information loss in approximately bayesian data assimilation: a comparison of generative and discriminative approaches to estimating agricultural yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data assimilation and regression are two commonly used methods for predicting agricultural yield from remote sensing observations. Data assimilation is a generative approach because it requires explicit approximations of the Bayesian prior and likelihood to compute the probability density function...

  10. Business Education Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This revised curriculum gives information on the skills and knowledge students should acquire through a business education program. The competencies listed reflect the skills that employers see as necessary for success in clerical and accounting occupations. The handbook is organized in seven sections that cover the following: (1) the concept of…

  11. AGRICOLA User's Guide. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilreath, Charles L.

    This document is the newest revision of the third manual documenting the National Agricultural Library database. Since it began in 1970, the AGRICOLA database has continued to grow and to change steadily; new subfiles have been added, database record formats have been expanded, and subject category code schemes have been modified several times.…

  12. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies for Comprehensive Assessment of Full-Length Hepatitis C Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Emma; Ip, Camilla L C; Badhan, Anjna; Christiansen, Mette T; Adamson, Walt; Ansari, M Azim; Bibby, David; Breuer, Judith; Brown, Anthony; Bowden, Rory; Bryant, Josie; Bonsall, David; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Hinds, Chris; Hudson, Emma; Klenerman, Paul; Lythgow, Kieren; Mbisa, Jean L; McLauchlan, John; Myers, Richard; Piazza, Paolo; Roy, Sunando; Trebes, Amy; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Barnes, Eleanor; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Affordable next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) may potentially identify both viral genotype and resistance genetic motifs in the era of directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. This study compared the ability of high-throughput NGS methods to generate full-length, deep, HCV sequence data sets and evaluated their utility for diagnostics and clinical assessment. NGS methods using (i) unselected HCV RNA (metagenomics), (ii) preenrichment of HCV RNA by probe capture, and (iii) HCV preamplification by PCR implemented in four United Kingdom centers were compared. Metrics of sequence coverage and depth, quasispecies diversity, and detection of DAA resistance-associated variants (RAVs), mixed HCV genotypes, and other coinfections were compared using a panel of samples with different viral loads, genotypes, and mixed HCV genotypes/subtypes [geno(sub)types]. Each NGS method generated near-complete genome sequences from more than 90% of samples. Enrichment methods and PCR preamplification generated greater sequence depth and were more effective for samples with low viral loads. All NGS methodologies accurately identified mixed HCV genotype infections. Consensus sequences generated by different NGS methods were generally concordant, and majority RAVs were consistently detected. However, methods differed in their ability to detect minor populations of RAVs. Metagenomic methods identified human pegivirus coinfections. NGS provided a rapid, inexpensive method for generating whole HCV genomes to define infecting genotypes, RAVs, comprehensive viral strain analysis, and quasispecies diversity. Enrichment methods are particularly suited for high-throughput analysis while providing the genotype and information on potential DAA resistance.

  13. What Research Says about Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Larry A.

    The process, content, and effect of revision in the writing process is analyzed in light of recent writing process research. Taylor calls for an approach to English as second language composition in which students are taught how to write with an emphasis on revision. Most authorities agree that revision entails a complex set of behaviors that…

  14. A comparison of reproductive characteristics of boars generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer to highly related conventionally produced boars.

    PubMed

    Williams, N E; Walker, S C; Reeves, D E; Sherrer, E; Galvin, J M; Polejaeva, I; Rampacek, G; Benyshek, L; Christenson, R K; Graves, W M; Pratt, S L

    2006-01-01

    This study compares the reproductive performance of boars produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer versus conventional breeding. Two different genotypes were selected for comparison: terminal cross line 1 (TX1) and terminal cross line 2 (TX2). The boars selected for comparison from TX1 were three cloned boars, produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer and the conventionally produced progenitor of the clones. The boars selected for comparison from TX2 were a cloned boar produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer and two conventionally produced half sibling boars that were offspring of the progenitor of the clone. Semen from each boar was collected, extended, evaluated and shipped offsite. Upon arrival, the semen was reevaluated and utilized for artificial insemination of 89 commercial gilts, at least 12 gilts per boar, producing 625 piglets. Pregnancy rates were determined at day 30 and 110 of gestation; and farrowing rate and gestation length were recorded. Differences were observed in some of the semen characteristics analyzed with the clones usually possessing superior semen quality to the control, this likely being a result of age differences amongst the clones and controls. Additionally no differences were noted between the clones and controls (progenitor) or between individual boars within genetic line for pregnancy rates, gestation length or any of the litter parameters examined between the clones and controls. These data further support previous reports with limited numbers that the reproductive capabilities of cloned boars are equal to that of conventionally produced boars.

  15. Rayleigh's Scattering Revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiets, Sergey; Gorelik, Andrey

    Mie’s waves while sounding within coincident volumes. Being sensitive to the size of scatters, Mie’s waves can give us additional information about particle size distribution. But how about using several wavelengths corresponding to Rayleigh’s diffraction on scatters only? Can any effects be detected in such a case and what performance characteristics of the equipment are required to detect them? The deceptive simplicity of the negative answer to the first part of the question posed will disappear if one collects different definitions of Rayleigh's scattering and consider them more closely than usually. Several definitions borrowed from the introductory texts and most popular textbooks and articles can be seen as one of the reasons for the research presented in the report. Hopefully, based on the comparison of them all, anyone could easily conclude that Rayleigh's scattering has been analyzed extensively, but despite this extensive analysis made fundamental ambiguities in introductory texts are not eliminated completely to date. Moreover, there may be found unreasonably many examples on how these ambiguities have already caused an error to be foreseen, published on the one article, amplified in another one, then cited with approval in the third one, before being finally corrected. Everything indicated that in the light of all the lesions learned and based on modern experimental data, it is time to address these issues again. After the discussion of ambiguities of Rayleigh's scattering concepts, the development of the corrections to original ideas looks relatively easy. In particular, there may be distinguished at least three characteristic regions of the revised models application from the point of view of the scattered field statistical averaging. The authors of the report suggest naming them Rayleigh’s region, Einstein’s region and the region with compensations of the scattering intensity. The most important fact is that the limits of applicability of all

  16. Revision of the standard reference data for thermocouples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Revision of the International Practical Temperature Scale requires that there be changes for all accurately tabulated thermophysical values. Revised reference data for thermocouples have been generated in a program carried out by the National Bureau of Standards. The new reference data reflect not only revisions in the temperature scale, but also slight changes in the materials themselves and improvements in data fitting methods. A new NBS monograph that contains tables, analytic expressions, various approximations, and explanatory text has been prepared. A general discussion of the project and some specific examples are given.

  17. Coal within a revised energy perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Darmstadter, J.

    2006-07-15

    The author considers the use of coal within a revised energy perspective, focusing on the factors that will drive which fuels are used to generate electricity going forward. He looks at the world markets for fossil fuels and the difficulties of predicting oil and natural gas supply and prices, as demonstrated by the variability in projections from one year to another in the EIA's Annual Energy Outlook. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Propagation of the shock wave generated from excimer laser heating of aluminum targets in comparison with ideal blast wave theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S. H.; Greif, R.; Russo, R. E.

    1998-05-01

    Propagation of the shock wave generated during pulsed laser heating of aluminum targets was measured utilizing a probe beam deflection technique. The transit time of the laser-generated shock wave was compared with that predicted from the Sedov-Taylor solution for an ideal spherical blast wave. It was found that the most important parameters for the laser-generated shock wave to be consistent with the theoretically predicted propagation are the ambient pressure and the laser beam spot size. The prediction for laser energy conversion into the laser-induced vapor flow using the Sedov-Taylor solution overestimated the energy coupling efficiency, indicating a difference between a laser-induced gas-dynamic flow and an ideal blast wave.

  19. Computer-Generated Versus Physician-Documented History of Present Illness (HPI): Results of a Blinded Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Almario, Christopher V.; Chey, William; Kaung, Aung; Whitman, Cynthia; Fuller, Garth; Reid, Mark; Nguyen, Ken; Bolus, Roger; Dennis, Buddy; Encarnacion, Rey; Martinez, Bibiana; Talley, Jennifer; Modi, Rushaba; Agarwal, Nikhil; Lee, Aaron; Kubomoto, Scott; Sharma, Gobind; Bolus, Sally; Chang, Lin; Spiegel, Brennan M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare delivery now mandates shorter visits with higher documentation requirements, undermining the patient-provider interaction. To improve clinic visit efficiency, we developed a patient-provider portal that systematically collects patient symptoms using a computer algorithm called Automated Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Symptoms (AEGIS). AEGIS also automatically “translates” the patient report into a full narrative history of present illness (HPI). We aimed to compare the quality of computer-generated vs. physician-documented HPIs. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study with a paired sample design among individuals visiting outpatient adult gastrointestinal (GI) clinics for evaluation of active GI symptoms. Participants first underwent usual care and then subsequently completed AEGIS. Each individual thereby had both a physician-documented and computer-generated HPI. Forty-eight blinded physicians assessed HPI quality across six domains using 5-point scales: (1) overall impression; (2) thoroughness; (3) usefulness; (4) organization; (5) succinctness; and (6) comprehensibility. We compared HPI scores within patient using a repeated measures model. Results Seventy-five patients had both computer-generated and physician-documented HPIs. The mean overall impression score for computer-generated HPIs was higher versus physician HPIs (3.68 vs. 2.80; p<.001), even after adjusting for physician and visit type, location, mode of transcription, and demographics. Computer-generated HPIs were also judged more complete (3.70 vs. 2.73; p<.001), more useful (3.82 vs. 3.04; p<.001), better organized (3.66 vs. 2.80; p<.001), more succinct (3.55 vs. 3.17; p<.001), and more comprehensible (3.66 vs. 2.97; p<.001). Conclusion Computer-generated HPIs were of higher overall quality, better organized, and more succinct, comprehensible, complete and useful compared to HPIs written by physicians during usual care in GI clinics. PMID:25461620

  20. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies for Comprehensive Assessment of Full-Length Hepatitis C Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Emma; Ip, Camilla L C; Badhan, Anjna; Christiansen, Mette T; Adamson, Walt; Ansari, M Azim; Bibby, David; Breuer, Judith; Brown, Anthony; Bowden, Rory; Bryant, Josie; Bonsall, David; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Hinds, Chris; Hudson, Emma; Klenerman, Paul; Lythgow, Kieren; Mbisa, Jean L; McLauchlan, John; Myers, Richard; Piazza, Paolo; Roy, Sunando; Trebes, Amy; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Barnes, Eleanor; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Affordable next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) may potentially identify both viral genotype and resistance genetic motifs in the era of directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. This study compared the ability of high-throughput NGS methods to generate full-length, deep, HCV sequence data sets and evaluated their utility for diagnostics and clinical assessment. NGS methods using (i) unselected HCV RNA (metagenomics), (ii) preenrichment of HCV RNA by probe capture, and (iii) HCV preamplification by PCR implemented in four United Kingdom centers were compared. Metrics of sequence coverage and depth, quasispecies diversity, and detection of DAA resistance-associated variants (RAVs), mixed HCV genotypes, and other coinfections were compared using a panel of samples with different viral loads, genotypes, and mixed HCV genotypes/subtypes [geno(sub)types]. Each NGS method generated near-complete genome sequences from more than 90% of samples. Enrichment methods and PCR preamplification generated greater sequence depth and were more effective for samples with low viral loads. All NGS methodologies accurately identified mixed HCV genotype infections. Consensus sequences generated by different NGS methods were generally concordant, and majority RAVs were consistently detected. However, methods differed in their ability to detect minor populations of RAVs. Metagenomic methods identified human pegivirus coinfections. NGS provided a rapid, inexpensive method for generating whole HCV genomes to define infecting genotypes, RAVs, comprehensive viral strain analysis, and quasispecies diversity. Enrichment methods are particularly suited for high-throughput analysis while providing the genotype and information on potential DAA resistance. PMID:27385709

  1. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Neil; Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4cm(2) and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4cm(2) or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  2. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies for Comprehensive Assessment of Full-Length Hepatitis C Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Emma; Ip, Camilla L. C.; Badhan, Anjna; Christiansen, Mette T.; Adamson, Walt; Ansari, M. Azim; Breuer, Judith; Brown, Anthony; Bowden, Rory; Bonsall, David; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Hinds, Chris; Hudson, Emma; Klenerman, Paul; Lythgow, Kieren; Mbisa, Jean L.; McLauchlan, John; Myers, Richard; Piazza, Paolo; Roy, Sunando; Trebes, Amy; Sreenu, Vattipally B.; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Affordable next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) may potentially identify both viral genotype and resistance genetic motifs in the era of directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. This study compared the ability of high-throughput NGS methods to generate full-length, deep, HCV sequence data sets and evaluated their utility for diagnostics and clinical assessment. NGS methods using (i) unselected HCV RNA (metagenomics), (ii) preenrichment of HCV RNA by probe capture, and (iii) HCV preamplification by PCR implemented in four United Kingdom centers were compared. Metrics of sequence coverage and depth, quasispecies diversity, and detection of DAA resistance-associated variants (RAVs), mixed HCV genotypes, and other coinfections were compared using a panel of samples with different viral loads, genotypes, and mixed HCV genotypes/subtypes [geno(sub)types]. Each NGS method generated near-complete genome sequences from more than 90% of samples. Enrichment methods and PCR preamplification generated greater sequence depth and were more effective for samples with low viral loads. All NGS methodologies accurately identified mixed HCV genotype infections. Consensus sequences generated by different NGS methods were generally concordant, and majority RAVs were consistently detected. However, methods differed in their ability to detect minor populations of RAVs. Metagenomic methods identified human pegivirus coinfections. NGS provided a rapid, inexpensive method for generating whole HCV genomes to define infecting genotypes, RAVs, comprehensive viral strain analysis, and quasispecies diversity. Enrichment methods are particularly suited for high-throughput analysis while providing the genotype and information on potential DAA resistance. PMID:27385709

  3. Validating CAR - A comparison study of experimentally-derived and computer-generated reach envelopes. [Crewstation Assessment of Reach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.; Bennett, J.; Stokes, J.

    1982-01-01

    In the present investigation, Crewstation Assessment of Reach (CAR) results in the form of male hand reach envelopes were generated and compared with an anthropometric survey performed by Kennedy (1978) to determine the extent of the validity of the CAR model with respect to experimentally-derived anthropometric data. The CAR-generated reach envelopes extensively matched the Kennedy envelopes. The match was particularly good in the areas to the front and side from which the reach originated. Attention is given to the crewstation model, the operator sample population, the CAR analysis, aspects of validation methodology, and the modeling of experimental parameters.

  4. Is Education the Pathway to Success? A Comparison of Second Generation Turkish Professionals in Sweden, France, Germany and the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crul, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Education is often seen as the most important mobility channel for children of immigrants. To what extent is this true? In this article, we look at successful second generation Turkish professionals in Sweden, France, Germany and The Netherlands. What kind of pathways did they take to become a professional? Based on the large quantitative…

  5. MC generator TAUOLA: Implementation of resonance chiral theory for two and three meson modes. Comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhovtsova, O.; Nugent, I. M.; Przedzinski, T.; Roig, P.; Was, Z.

    2012-10-23

    We present a partial upgrade of the Monte Carlo event generator TAUOLA with the two and three hadron decay modes using the theoretical models based on Resonance Chiral Theory. These modes account for 88% of total hadronic width of the tau meson. First results of the model parameters have been obtained using BaBar data for 3{pi} mode.

  6. A Comparison of Dietary Intakes between Male and Female Korean American College Students: A Two Generation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Chick F.; Lew, PoLong; Schwartz, Miriam; Poon, George; An, JaeYoon; Lee, Jina; Chan, Katie; Li, Kenneth; Cheung, Yuen Ting; Luong, Duyen; Davis, Rebecca; Kim, James C.; Kim, Rachel Byungsook; Kim, Samuel Saychang

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to observe the differences in dietary intakes between two generations, male and female Korean American college students with their respective parents, living in the Los Angeles Areas. This study compared dietary nutrient intakes between old Koreans (KO) (n=28, average age: 53.4[plus or minus]6.4 years, with 13 males…

  7. Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Sam B; Degens, Hans; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-03-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men.

  8. Simulation of integrated first and second generation bioethanol production from sugarcane: comparison between different biomass pretreatment methods.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marina O S; da Cunha, Marcelo Pereira; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Bonomi, Antonio; Jesus, Charles D F; Rossell, Carlos E V

    2011-08-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is used as a fuel in conventional bioethanol production, providing heat and power for the plant; therefore, the amount of surplus bagasse available for use as raw material for second generation bioethanol production is related to the energy consumption of the bioethanol production process. Pentoses and lignin, byproducts of the second generation bioethanol production process, may be used as fuels, increasing the amount of surplus bagasse. In this work, simulations of the integrated bioethanol production process from sugarcane, surplus bagasse and trash were carried out. Selected pre-treatment methods followed, or not, by a delignification step were evaluated. The amount of lignocellulosic materials available for hydrolysis in each configuration was calculated assuming that 50% of sugarcane trash is recovered from the field. An economic risk analysis was carried out; the best results for the integrated first and second generation ethanol production process were obtained for steam explosion pretreatment, high solids loading for hydrolysis and 24-48 h hydrolysis. The second generation ethanol production process must be improved (e.g., decreasing required investment, improving yields and developing pentose fermentation to ethanol) in order for the integrated process to be more economically competitive.

  9. Sediment-generated noise (SGN): Comparison with physical bedload measurements in a small semi-arid watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive acoustic techniques for the measurement of Sediment-Generated Noise (SGN) in gravel-bed rivers present a promising alternative to traditional bedload measurement techniques. Where traditional methods are often prohibitively costly, particularly in labor requirements, and produce point-scale ...

  10. A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained by nanosecond- and microsecond-pulse generators in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Yixiao

    2014-10-15

    Power source is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs), because it can play a key role on the discharge characteristics and ionization process of APPJs. In this paper, the characteristics of helium APPJs sustained by both nanosecond-pulse and microsecond-pulse generators are compared from the aspects of plume length, discharge current, consumption power, energy, and optical emission spectrum. Experimental results showed that the pulsed APPJ was initiated near the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, and then the stable helium APPJ could be observed when the applied voltage increased. Moreover, the discharge current of the nanosecond-pulse APPJ was larger than that of the microsecond-pulse APPJ. Furthermore, although the nanosecond-pulse generator consumed less energy than the microsecond-pulse generator, longer plume length, larger instantaneous power per pulse and stronger spectral line intensity could be obtained in the nanosecond-pulse excitation case. In addition, some discussion indicated that the rise time of the applied voltage could play a prominent role on the generation of APPJs.

  11. Simulation of integrated first and second generation bioethanol production from sugarcane: comparison between different biomass pretreatment methods.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marina O S; da Cunha, Marcelo Pereira; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Bonomi, Antonio; Jesus, Charles D F; Rossell, Carlos E V

    2011-08-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is used as a fuel in conventional bioethanol production, providing heat and power for the plant; therefore, the amount of surplus bagasse available for use as raw material for second generation bioethanol production is related to the energy consumption of the bioethanol production process. Pentoses and lignin, byproducts of the second generation bioethanol production process, may be used as fuels, increasing the amount of surplus bagasse. In this work, simulations of the integrated bioethanol production process from sugarcane, surplus bagasse and trash were carried out. Selected pre-treatment methods followed, or not, by a delignification step were evaluated. The amount of lignocellulosic materials available for hydrolysis in each configuration was calculated assuming that 50% of sugarcane trash is recovered from the field. An economic risk analysis was carried out; the best results for the integrated first and second generation ethanol production process were obtained for steam explosion pretreatment, high solids loading for hydrolysis and 24-48 h hydrolysis. The second generation ethanol production process must be improved (e.g., decreasing required investment, improving yields and developing pentose fermentation to ethanol) in order for the integrated process to be more economically competitive. PMID:20838849

  12. How Different Are They? A Comparison of Generation 1.5 and International L2 Learners' Writing Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Gennaro, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of literature in second-language writing suggests that the writing ability of international second language (L2) learners, who attend post-secondary education abroad after having completed high school in their home countries, and the so-called Generation 1.5 population, that is, L2 learners who enter post-secondary education after…

  13. Theoretical comparison, equivalent transformation, and conjunction operations of electromagnetic induction generator and triboelectric nanogenerator for harvesting mechanical energy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Tang, Wei; Han, Changbao; Fan, Fengru; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-06-11

    Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a newly invented technology that is effective using conventional organic materials with functionalized surfaces for converting mechanical energy into electricity, which is light weight, cost-effective and easy scalable. Here, we present the first systematic analysis and comparison of EMIG and TENG from their working mechanisms, governing equations and output characteristics, aiming at establishing complementary applications of the two technologies for harvesting various mechanical energies. The equivalent transformation and conjunction operations of the two power sources for the external circuit are also explored, which provide appropriate evidences that the TENG can be considered as a current source with a large internal resistance, while the EMIG is equivalent to a voltage source with a small internal resistance. The theoretical comparison and experimental validations presented in this paper establish the basis of using the TENG as a new energy technology that could be parallel or possibly equivalently important as the EMIG for general power application at large-scale. It opens a field of organic nanogenerator for chemists and materials scientists who can be first time using conventional organic materials for converting mechanical energy into electricity at a high efficiency.

  14. 75 FR 45080 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) emissions from boilers, steam... Boilers, Steam Generators 12/17/09 05/17/10 and Process Heaters-- 0.75 to less than 2.0 MMbtu/hr. On June... from boilers, steam generators, process heaters and water heaters with a total rated heat input...

  15. Comparison of 'HoBi'-like viral populations among persistent infected calves generated under experimental conditions and to inoculum virus.

    PubMed

    Weber, M N; Bauermann, F V; Bayles, D O; Canal, C W; Neill, J D; Ridpath, J F

    2016-05-01

    Like other members from the Pestivirus genus, 'HoBi'-like pestiviruses cause economic losses for cattle producers due to both acute and persistent infections. The present study analyzed for the first time PI animals derived from a controlled infection with two different 'HoBi'-like strains where the animals were maintained under conditions where superinfection by other pestiviruses could be excluded. The sequence of the region coding for viral glycoproteins E1/E2 of variants within the swarms of viruses present in the PI calves and two viral inoculums used to generate them were compared. Differences in genetic composition of the viral swarms were observed suggesting that host factors can play a role in genetic variations among PIs. Moreover, PIs generated with the same inoculum showed amino acid substitutions in similar sites of the polyprotein, even in serum from PIs with different quasispecies composition, reinforcing that some specific sites in E2 are important for host adaptation.

  16. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems.

    PubMed

    Hatzell, Marta C; Ivanov, Ivan; Cusick, Roland D; Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-28

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m(-3). However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ~1.5× to 118 W h m(-3). Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m(-3) or ~1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  17. Failure behavior of internally pressurized flawed and unflawed steam generator tubing at high temperatures -- Experiments and comparison with model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.; Mruk, K.; Franklin, J.; Knoblich, L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on the failure of internally pressurized steam generator tubing at high temperatures ({le} 700 C). A model was developed for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under internal pressure and temperature histories postulated to occur during severe accidents. The model was validated by failure tests on specimens with part-through-wall axial and circumferential flaws of various lengths and depths, conducted under various constant and ramped internal pressure and temperature conditions. The failure temperatures predicted by the model for two temperature and pressure histories, calculated for severe accidents initiated by a station blackout, agree very well with tests performed on both flawed and unflawed specimens.

  18. Comparison of life cycle carbon dioxide emissions and embodied energy in four renewable electricity generation technologies in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Rule, Bridget M; Worth, Zeb J; Boyle, Carol A

    2009-08-15

    In order to make the best choice between renewable energy technologies, it is important to be able to compare these technologies on the basis of their sustainability, which may include a variety of social, environmental, and economic indicators. This study examined the comparative sustainability of four renewable electricity technologies in terms of their life cycle CO2 emissions and embodied energy, from construction to decommissioning and including maintenance (periodic component replacement plus machinery use), using life cycle analysis. The models developed were based on case studies of power plants in New Zealand, comprising geothermal, large-scale hydroelectric, tidal (a proposed scheme), and wind-farm electricity generation. The comparative results showed that tidal power generation was associated with 1.8 g of CO2/kWh, wind with 3.0 g of CO2/kWh, hydroelectric with 4.6 g of CO2/kWh, and geothermal with 5.6 g of CO2/kWh (not including fugitive emissions), and that tidal power generation was associated with 42.3 kJ/kWh, wind with 70.2 kJ/kWh, hydroelectric with 55.0 kJ/kWh, and geothermal with 94.6 kJ/kWh. Other environmental indicators, as well as social and economic indicators, should be applied to gain a complete picture of the technologies studied.

  19. Comparison of life cycle carbon dioxide emissions and embodied energy in four renewable electricity generation technologies in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Rule, Bridget M; Worth, Zeb J; Boyle, Carol A

    2009-08-15

    In order to make the best choice between renewable energy technologies, it is important to be able to compare these technologies on the basis of their sustainability, which may include a variety of social, environmental, and economic indicators. This study examined the comparative sustainability of four renewable electricity technologies in terms of their life cycle CO2 emissions and embodied energy, from construction to decommissioning and including maintenance (periodic component replacement plus machinery use), using life cycle analysis. The models developed were based on case studies of power plants in New Zealand, comprising geothermal, large-scale hydroelectric, tidal (a proposed scheme), and wind-farm electricity generation. The comparative results showed that tidal power generation was associated with 1.8 g of CO2/kWh, wind with 3.0 g of CO2/kWh, hydroelectric with 4.6 g of CO2/kWh, and geothermal with 5.6 g of CO2/kWh (not including fugitive emissions), and that tidal power generation was associated with 42.3 kJ/kWh, wind with 70.2 kJ/kWh, hydroelectric with 55.0 kJ/kWh, and geothermal with 94.6 kJ/kWh. Other environmental indicators, as well as social and economic indicators, should be applied to gain a complete picture of the technologies studied. PMID:19746744

  20. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code simulation results and comparison with theory scaling laws for photoelectron-generated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dipp, T.M. |

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code computer simulations. Using the MAGIC PIC code, the simulations were performed in one dimension to handle the diverse scale lengths of the particles and fields in the problem. The simulations involved monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. A sinusoidal, 100% modulated, 6.3263 ns pulse train, as well as unmodulated emission, were used to explore the behavior of the particles, fields, and generated radiation. A special postprocessor was written to convert the PIC code simulated electron sheath into far-field radiation parameters by means of rigorous retarded time calculations. The results of the small-spot PIC simulations were used to generate various graphs showing resonance and nonresonance radiation quantities such as radiated lobe patterns, frequency, and power. A database of PIC simulation results was created and, using a nonlinear curve-fitting program, compared with theoretical scaling laws. Overall, the small-spot behavior predicted by the theoretical scaling laws was generally observed in the PIC simulation data, providing confidence in both the theoretical scaling laws and the PIC simulations.

  1. Comparison of broiler performance when fed diets containing grain from second-generation insect-protected and glyphosate-tolerant, conventional control or commercial reference corn.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Hartnell, G; Nemeth, M; Lucas, D; Davis, S

    2007-09-01

    Two 42-d floor pen studies were conducted to compare broiler (Ross x Ross 308) performance and carcass measurements when broilers were fed diets containing grain from either second-generation lepidopteran insect-protected corn (MON 89034; study 1) or second-generation lepidopteran combined with second-generation corn rootworm-protected and glyphosate-tolerant corn (MON 89034 x MON 88017; study 2) with those of diets containing corn grain from the conventional control and 4 conventional corn hybrids. In both studies, broilers were fed starter diets (approximately 55%, wt/wt, corn grain) from d 0 to 21 and grower-finisher diets (approximately 59%, wt/wt, corn grain) from d 21 to 42. Each study used a randomized complete block design with 6 dietary treatments assigned randomly within 5 blocks of 12 pens each (6 male and 6 female) and 10 pens per treatment group (5 male and 5 female). In study 1 (MON 89034), no treatment differences were detected among dietary treatments for feed intake, weight gain, or any measured carcass parameter. A significant difference was noted for adjusted feed conversion between MON 89034 and control birds; however, no differences were detected in individual treatment comparisons between the MON 89034 and 3 of the 4 commercial corn diets. In study 2 (MON 89034 x MON 88017), no treatment differences were observed for feed intake and most carcass parameters. When significant treatment differences were detected, no differences were observed between MON 89034 x MON 88017, its control, and 2 or more of the commercial corn diets. In each study, comparison of all parameters measured showed no differences between birds fed the test diet and the population of birds fed the control and 4 commercial corn diets. In conclusion, the test diets were nutritionally equivalent to diets containing the control and corn grain from commercial hybrids.

  2. Comparison of Normalization Methods for Construction of Large, Multiplex Amplicon Pools for Next-Generation Sequencing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Sahl, Jason W.; Castoe, Todd A.; Wagner, Brandie D.; Pollock, David D.; Spear, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Constructing mixtures of tagged or bar-coded DNAs for sequencing is an important requirement for the efficient use of next-generation sequencers in applications where limited sequence data are required per sample. There are many applications in which next-generation sequencing can be used effectively to sequence large mixed samples; an example is the characterization of microbial communities where ≤1,000 sequences per samples are adequate to address research questions. Thus, it is possible to examine hundreds to thousands of samples per run on massively parallel next-generation sequencers. However, the cost savings for efficient utilization of sequence capacity is realized only if the production and management costs associated with construction of multiplex pools are also scalable. One critical step in multiplex pool construction is the normalization process, whereby equimolar amounts of each amplicon are mixed. Here we compare three approaches (spectroscopy, size-restricted spectroscopy, and quantitative binding) for normalization of large, multiplex amplicon pools for performance and efficiency. We found that the quantitative binding approach was superior and represents an efficient scalable process for construction of very large, multiplex pools with hundreds and perhaps thousands of individual amplicons included. We demonstrate the increased sequence diversity identified with higher throughput. Massively parallel sequencing can dramatically accelerate microbial ecology studies by allowing appropriate replication of sequence acquisition to account for temporal and spatial variations. Further, population studies to examine genetic variation, which require even lower levels of sequencing, should be possible where thousands of individual bar-coded amplicons are examined in parallel. PMID:20418443

  3. A comparison of hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide generation in ambient particle extracts and laboratory metal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huiyun; Anastasio, Cort

    2012-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - including superoxide ( rad O 2-), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) - has been suggested as one mechanism underlying the adverse health effects caused by ambient particulate matter (PM). In this study we compare HOOH and rad OH production from fine and coarse PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California, as well as from laboratory solutions containing dissolved copper or iron. Samples were extracted in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). In our laboratory solutions we find that Cu is a potent source of both HOOH and rad OH, with approximately 90% of the electrons that can be donated from Asc ending up in HOOH and rad OH after 4 h. In contrast, in Fe solutions there is no measurable HOOH and only a modest production of rad OH. Soluble Cu in the SJV PM samples is also a dominant source of HOOH and rad OH. In both laboratory copper solutions and extracts of ambient particles we find much more production of HOOH compared to rad OH: e.g., HOOH generation is approximately 30-60 times faster than rad OH generation. The formation of HOOH and rad OH are positively correlated, with roughly 3% and 8% of HOOH converted to rad OH after 4 and 24 h of extraction, respectively. Although the SJV PM produce much more HOOH than rad OH, since rad OH is a much stronger oxidant it is unclear which species might be more important for oxidant-mediated toxicity from PM inhalation.

  4. A Comparison of Hydroxyl Radical and Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Ambient Particle Extracts and Laboratory Metal Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huiyun; Anastasio, Cort

    2011-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) – including superoxide (•O2−), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical (•OH) – has been suggested as one mechanism underlying the adverse health effects caused by ambient particulate matter (PM). In this study we compare HOOH and •OH production from fine and coarse PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California, as well as from laboratory solutions containing dissolved copper or iron. Samples were extracted in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). In our laboratory solutions we find that Cu is a potent source of both HOOH and •OH, with approximately 90% of the electrons that can be donated from Asc ending up in HOOH and •OH after 4 h. In contrast, in Fe solutions there is no measurable HOOH and only a modest production of •OH. Soluble Cu in the SJV PM samples is also a dominant source of HOOH and •OH. In both laboratory copper solutions and extracts of ambient particles we find much more production of HOOH compared to •OH: e.g., HOOH generation is approximately 30 – 60 times faster than •OH generation. The formation of HOOH and •OH are positively correlated, with roughly 3 % and 8 % of HOOH converted to •OH after 4 and 24 hr of extraction, respectively. Although the SJV PM produce much more HOOH than •OH, since •OH is a much stronger oxidant it is unclear which species might be more important for oxidant-mediated toxicity from PM inhalation. PMID:22267949

  5. A Comparison of Hydroxyl Radical and Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Ambient Particle Extracts and Laboratory Metal Solutions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huiyun; Anastasio, Cort

    2012-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - including superoxide ((•)O(2) (-)), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) - has been suggested as one mechanism underlying the adverse health effects caused by ambient particulate matter (PM). In this study we compare HOOH and (•)OH production from fine and coarse PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California, as well as from laboratory solutions containing dissolved copper or iron. Samples were extracted in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). In our laboratory solutions we find that Cu is a potent source of both HOOH and (•)OH, with approximately 90% of the electrons that can be donated from Asc ending up in HOOH and (•)OH after 4 h. In contrast, in Fe solutions there is no measurable HOOH and only a modest production of (•)OH. Soluble Cu in the SJV PM samples is also a dominant source of HOOH and (•)OH. In both laboratory copper solutions and extracts of ambient particles we find much more production of HOOH compared to (•)OH: e.g., HOOH generation is approximately 30 - 60 times faster than (•)OH generation. The formation of HOOH and (•)OH are positively correlated, with roughly 3 % and 8 % of HOOH converted to (•)OH after 4 and 24 hr of extraction, respectively. Although the SJV PM produce much more HOOH than (•)OH, since (•)OH is a much stronger oxidant it is unclear which species might be more important for oxidant-mediated toxicity from PM inhalation. PMID:22267949

  6. Comparison of Water Turbine Characteristics using Different Blades in Darrieus Water Turbines used for Tidal Current Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiono, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Kiho, Seiji

    The use of renewable energies has been focused on for preserving environments and coping with the shortage of future energy supplies. In oceans, a tide reverses its current direction every six hours, and the current velocity changes into a sine wave after a period of time. Tidal current generation uses a generator to produce energy, changing the kinetic energy of current into a turning force by setting a water turbine in the tidal current. Therefore, it is considered to be very advantageous to use a water turbine that can always revolve in a fixed direction without any influence from tidal current directions. Water turbines with these characteristics are known as Darrieus water turbines. The Darrieus water turbines were modified for water from turbines originally developed for windmills. Darrieus water turbines have a difficulty in starting, but these days Darrieus water turbines have been developed with spiral blades, which make it easy to get the turbines started. However, there are very few reports regarding Darrieus water turbines with spiral blades, and therefore their characteristics are unknown. From the above points of view, this study devises and investigates spiral blade-Darrieus water turbines to clarify their characteristics through hydrographic experiments, and at the same time, it compares the characteristics of spiral-blade Darrieus water turbines with those of straight-blade ones.

  7. Comparison of cattle of a five-breed diallel: size, growth, condition and pubertal characters of second-generation heifers.

    PubMed

    Baker, J F; Long, C R; Posada, G A; McElhenney, W H; Cartwright, T C

    1989-05-01

    Monthly weights, heights and condition scores and measurements taken at the time of puberty were utilized to estimate effects of breed-type and heterosis on characters related to growth, size and puberty of second-generation heifers of a five-breed diallel involving Angus, Brahman, Hereford, Holstein and Jersey. One group of heifers was maintained on pasture with supplemental feed; two other groups were fed in individual pens starting at weaning and 1 yr of age, respectively. A model including main effects of breed-type, sire within breed-type, management, parity of dam and birth-season was used for analyzing all characters. Breed-type tested with sire within breed-type was significant for all characters except ADG from 360 to 450 d. Straightbred and crossbred means were larger for the second generation than for the first, presumably due to management and(or) year effects. Heterosis generally was positive and, when expressed as a percentage, decreased with age, which is in agreement with other research reports. Holsteins and Brahmans were largest for growth and size characters, whereas Jerseys were smallest. Jerseys were the youngest, lightest and shortest at puberty, whereas Brahmans were oldest, heaviest and tallest. PMID:2737979

  8. Generation of dc pin-hole discharges in liquids: comparison of discharge breakdown in diaphragm and capillary configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozáková, Zdenka; Krčma, František; Vašíček, Michal; Hlavatá, Lucie; Hlochová, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    Electrical discharges in liquids can be generated in several electrode configurations; one of them is called as a pin-hole. The discharge is created inside a small orifice in the dielectric barrier connecting two chambers filled by any conductive solution. Each chamber contains one electrode. Based on the orifice length/diameter ratio, the discharge is called as a capillary or diaphragm discharge. The present paper gives the first detailed observation of the dependence of discharge creation on the orifice shape for selected NaCl solution conductivities (250-1000 μS cm-1). As a dielectric barrier, ceramic discs with thickness varying from 0.3 to 1.5 mm were used. Diameter of one central pin-hole was in the range of 0.25-1.00 mm. The non-pulsing dc high voltage up to 2 kV with power up to 500 W was used for the presented study. The bubble theory of the discharge generation was confirmed at the set conditions.

  9. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against MGA and comparison of their application in breast cancer detection by immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cuimi; Yang, Xiqin; Zhang, Xuhui; Feng, Jiannan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Que, Haiping; Johnson, Heather; Zhao, Yanfeng; Fan, Yawen; Lu, Yinglin; Zhang, Heqiu; Huang, Yan; Xiu, Bingshui; Feng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Mammaglobin A (MGA) is an organ specific molecular biomarker for metastatic breast cancer diagnosis. However, there are still needs to develop optimal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to detect MGA expression in breast carcinoma by immunohistochemistry. In this study, we first generated mAbs against MGA. Then, we used epitope prediction and computer-assisted structural analysis to screen five dominant epitopes and identified mAbs against five epitopes. Further immunohistochemical analysis on 42 breast carcinoma specimens showed that MHG1152 and MGD785 had intensive staining mainly in membrane, while CHH11617, CHH995 and MJF656 had more intensive staining within the cytoplasm. MGA scoring results showed that MJF656 had the highest rate (92.8%) of positive staining among five mAbs, including higher staining intensity when compared with that of MHG1152 (p < 0.01) and CHH995 (p < 0.05) and the highest the mean percentage of cells stained among mAbs. Furthermore, we analyzed the relationship of positive staining rate by mAbs with patient clinical characteristics. The results suggest that MJF656 was able to detect MGA expression, especially in early clinical stage, low grade and lymph node metastasis-negative breast carcinoma. In conclusion, our study generated five mAbs against MGA and identified the best candidate for detection of MGA expression in breast cancer tissues. PMID:26272389

  10. Solid waste integrated forecast technical (SWIFT) report: FY1997 to FY 2070, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, O.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Morgan, J.

    1997-01-07

    This web site provides an up-to-date report on the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; program-level and waste class-specific estimates; background information on waste sources; and comparisons with previous forecasts and with other national data sources. This web site does not include: liquid waste (current or future generation); waste to be managed by the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) contractor (i.e., waste that will be disposed of at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF)); or waste that has been received by the WM Project to date (i.e., inventory waste). The focus of this web site is on low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). Some details on low-level waste and hazardous waste are also provided. Currently, this web site is reporting data th at was requested on 10/14/96 and submitted on 10/25/96. The data represent a life cycle forecast covering all reported activities from FY97 through the end of each program's life cycle. Therefore, these data represent revisions from the previous FY97.0 Data Version, due primarily to revised estimates from PNNL. There is some useful information about the structure of this report in the SWIFT Report Web Site Overview.

  11. Low level of alcohol drinking among two generations of non-Western immigrants in Oslo: a multi-ethnic comparison

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alcohol drinking is a risk factor for harm and disease. A low level of drinking among non-Western immigrants may lead to less alcohol-related harm and disease. The first aim of this study was to describe frequency of drinking in two generations of immigrants in Oslo, contrasting the result to drinking frequency among ethnic Norwegians. The second aim was to study how frequency of drinking among adult immigrants was associated with social interaction with their own countrymen and ethnic Norwegians, acculturation, age, gender, socioeconomic factors and the Muslim faith. Method The Oslo Health Study (HUBRO) was conducted during the period 2000 to 2002 and consisted of three separate surveys: a youth study (15-16-year-olds, a total of 7343 respondents, response rate 88.3%); adult cohorts from 30 to 75 years old (18,770 respondents, response rate 46%); the five largest immigrant groups in Oslo (aged 20–60 years, a total of 3019 respondents, response rate 39.7%). Based on these three surveys, studies of frequency of drinking in the previous year (four categories) were conducted among 15-16-year-olds and their parents’ generation, 30-60-year-old Iranians, Pakistanis, Turks and ethnic Norwegians. A structural equation model with drinking frequency as outcome was established for the adult immigrants. Results Adults and youth of ethnic Norwegian background reported more frequent alcohol use than immigrants with backgrounds from Iran, Turkey and Pakistan. Iranians reported a higher drinking frequency than Turks and Pakistanis. In the structural equation model high drinking frequency was associated with high host culture competence and social interaction, while high own culture competence was associated with low drinking frequency. Adult first-generation immigrants with a longer stay in Norway, those of a higher age, and females drank alcohol less frequently, while those with a higher level of education and work participation drank more frequently. Muslim

  12. Comparison of Galvanic Currents Generated Between Different Combinations of Orthodontic Brackets and Archwires Using Potentiostat: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Rabindra S; Shafiuddin, Bareera; Pasha, Azam; Vinay, K; Narayan, Anjali; Shetty, Smitha V

    2015-01-01

    Background: Technological advances in wire selection and bracket design have led to improved treatment efficiency and allowed longer time intervals between appliance adjustments. The wires remain in the mouth for a longer duration and are subjected to electrochemical reactions, mechanical forces of mastication and generalized wear. These cause different types of corrosion. This study was done to compare the galvanic currents generated between different combinations of brackets and archwires commonly used in orthodontic practices. Materials and Methods: The materials used for the study included different commercially available orthodontic archwires and brackets. The galvanic current generated by individual materials and different combinations of these materials was tested and compared. The orthodontic archwires used were 0.019″ × 0.025″ heat-activated nickel-titanium (3M Unitek), 0.019″ × 0.025″ beta-titanium (3M Unitek) and 0.019″ × 0.025″ stainless steel (3M Unitek). The orthodontic brackets used were 0.022″ MBT laser-cut (Victory Series, 3M Unitek) and metal-injection molded (Leone Company) maxillary central incisor brackets respectively. The ligature wire used for ligation was 0.009″ stainless steel ligature (HP Company). The galvanic current for individual archwires, brackets, and the different bracket-archwire-ligature combinations was measured by using a Potentiostat machine. The data were generated using the Linear Sweep Voltammetry and OriginPro 8.5 Graphing and Data Analysis Softwares. The study was conducted in two phases. Phase I comprised of five groups for open circuit potential (OCP) and galvanic current (I), whereas Phase II comprised of six groups for galvanic current alone. Results: Mean, standard deviation and range were computed for the OCP and galvanic current (I) values obtained. Results were subjected to statistical analysis through ANOVA. In Phase I, higher mean OCP was recorded in stainless steel archwire, followed by beta

  13. Generation of parabolic similaritons in tapered silicon photonic wires: comparison of pulse dynamics at telecom and mid-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Lavdas, Spyros; Driscoll, Jeffrey B; Jiang, Hongyi; Grote, Richard R; Osgood, Richard M; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2013-10-01

    We study the generation of parabolic self-similar optical pulses in tapered Si photonic nanowires (Si-PhNWs) at both telecom (λ=1.55 μm) and mid-infrared (λ=2.2 μm) wavelengths. Our computational study is based on a rigorous theoretical model, which fully describes the influence of linear and nonlinear optical effects on pulse propagation in Si-PhNWs with arbitrarily varying width. Numerical simulations demonstrate that, in the normal dispersion regime, optical pulses evolve naturally into parabolic pulses upon propagation in millimeter-long tapered Si-PhNWs, with the efficiency of this pulse-reshaping process being strongly dependent on the spectral and pulse parameter regime in which the device operates, as well as the particular shape of the Si-PhNWs.

  14. Comparison of thrombin generation assay with conventional coagulation tests in evaluation of bleeding risk in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, Omid R; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Dehghani, Javad; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Peyvandi, Flora; Karimi, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    Based on the premise that the capacity of plasma to generate thrombin in vitro is a comprehensive and precise functional test of the clotting system, we designed a cross-sectional, single-center study involving 83 patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) to compare the usefulness of the thrombin generation (TG) assay versus conventional tests including prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) in predicting bleeding risk in patients with RBD in southern Iran. The TG parameters consisted of endogenous thrombin potential, lag time, peak, time to peak (ttPeak), and start tail. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed statistically significant associations between bleeding risk and lag time, ttPeak, and start tail. We determined cutoff values for these 3 TG parameters and obtained a negative predictive value of 86% to 90% in patients with RBD who had a bleeding score (BS) ≤13. The ROC curves for the association of PT and aPTT with BS did not indicate any significant association. Correlation analysis supported the results of ROC curve analysis, only lag time, ttPeak, and start tail showed significant positive correlations with BS (P < .05). Disease severity based on plasma factor activity was significantly associated with prolonged lag time and ttPeak and with prolonged PT (P <.05). We suggest that TG assay is a potentially more useful tool for predicting the bleeding risk in patients with RBD. However, the small sample size in different RBD subgroups precluded subgroup analysis. Prospective multicenter studies with larger numbers of patients are therefore advisable.

  15. Comparison of Hematopoietic Stem Cells Derived from Fresh and Cryopreserved Whole Cord Blood in the Generation of Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Florian; Egger, Dietmar; Wege, Anja Kathrin; Patties, Ina; Köberle, Margarethe; Sack, Ulrich; Lange, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    To study the function and maturation of the human hematopoietic and immune system without endangering individuals, translational human-like animal models are needed. We compare the efficiency of CD34+ stem cells isolated from cryopreserved cord blood from a blood bank (CCB) and fresh cord blood (FCB) in generating highly engrafted humanized mice in NOD-SCID IL2Rγnull (NSG) rodents. Interestingly, the isolation of CD34+ cells from CCB results in a lower yield and purity compared to FCB. The purity of CD34+ isolation from CCB decreases with an increasing number of mononuclear cells that is not evident in FCB. Despite the lower yield and purity of CD34+ stem cell isolation from CCB compared to FCB, the overall reconstitution with human immune cells (CD45) and the differentiation of its subpopulations e.g., B cells, T cells or monocytes is comparable between both sources. In addition, independent of the cord blood origin, human B cells are able to produce high amounts of human IgM antibodies and human T cells are able to proliferate after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibodies. Nevertheless, T cells generated from FCB showed increased response to restimulation with anti-CD3. Our study reveals that the application of CCB samples for the engraftment of humanized mice does not result in less engraftment or a loss of differentiation and function of its subpopulations. Therefore, CCB is a reasonable alternative to FCB and allows the selection of specific genotypes (or any other criteria), which allows scientists to be independent from the daily changing birth rate. PMID:23071634

  16. A quality comparison of protein crystals grown under containerless conditions generated by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Sun, Li-Hua; Li, Jian; Tang, Lin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Guo, Yun-Zhu; He, Jin; Liu, Yong-Ming; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Shen, He-Fang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Huang, Lin-Jun; Shang, Peng; He, Jian-Hua; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2013-10-01

    High-quality crystals are key to obtaining accurate three-dimensional structures of proteins using X-ray diffraction techniques. However, obtaining such protein crystals is often a challenge. Several containerless crystallization techniques have been reported to have the ability to improve crystal quality, but it is unknown which is the most favourable way to grow high-quality protein crystals. In this paper, a quality comparison of protein crystals which were grown under three containerless conditions provided by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel was conducted. A control experiment on a vessel wall was also simultaneously carried out. Seven different proteins were crystallized under the four conditions, and the crystal quality was assessed in terms of the resolution limit, the mosaicity and the Rmerge. It was found that the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions demonstrated better morphology than those of the control. X-ray diffraction data indicated that the quality of the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions was better than that of the control. Of the three containerless crystallization techniques, the diamagnetic levitation technique exhibited the best performance in enhancing crystal quality. This paper is to our knowledge the first report of improvement of crystal quality using a diamagnetic levitation technique. Crystals obtained from agarose gel demonstrated the second best improvement in crystal quality. The study indicated that the diamagnetic levitation technique is indeed a favourable method for growing high-quality protein crystals, and its utilization is thus potentially useful in practical efforts to obtain well diffracting protein crystals.

  17. A quality comparison of protein crystals grown under containerless conditions generated by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Sun, Li-Hua; Li, Jian; Tang, Lin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Guo, Yun-Zhu; He, Jin; Liu, Yong-Ming; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Shen, He-Fang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Huang, Lin-Jun; Shang, Peng; He, Jian-Hua; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2013-10-01

    High-quality crystals are key to obtaining accurate three-dimensional structures of proteins using X-ray diffraction techniques. However, obtaining such protein crystals is often a challenge. Several containerless crystallization techniques have been reported to have the ability to improve crystal quality, but it is unknown which is the most favourable way to grow high-quality protein crystals. In this paper, a quality comparison of protein crystals which were grown under three containerless conditions provided by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel was conducted. A control experiment on a vessel wall was also simultaneously carried out. Seven different proteins were crystallized under the four conditions, and the crystal quality was assessed in terms of the resolution limit, the mosaicity and the Rmerge. It was found that the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions demonstrated better morphology than those of the control. X-ray diffraction data indicated that the quality of the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions was better than that of the control. Of the three containerless crystallization techniques, the diamagnetic levitation technique exhibited the best performance in enhancing crystal quality. This paper is to our knowledge the first report of improvement of crystal quality using a diamagnetic levitation technique. Crystals obtained from agarose gel demonstrated the second best improvement in crystal quality. The study indicated that the diamagnetic levitation technique is indeed a favourable method for growing high-quality protein crystals, and its utilization is thus potentially useful in practical efforts to obtain well diffracting protein crystals. PMID:24100310

  18. On Comparison of Series and Numerical Solutions for Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid with Newtonian Heating And Internal Heat Generation/Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ali, Shafqat; Farooq, Muhammad Asif; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the combined effects of Newtonian heating and internal heat generation/absorption in the two-dimensional flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over a stretching surface. The governing non-linear analysis of partial differential equations is reduced into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting problems are computed for both series and numerical solutions. Series solution is constructed using homotopy analysis method (HAM) whereas numerical solution is presented by two different techniques namely shooting method and bvp4c. A comparison of homotopy solution with numerical solution is also tabulated. Both solutions are found in an excellent agreement. Dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are plotted and discussed for various emerging physical parameters. PMID:26402366

  19. On Comparison of Series and Numerical Solutions for Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid with Newtonian Heating And Internal Heat Generation/Absorption.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ali, Shafqat; Farooq, Muhammad Asif; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the combined effects of Newtonian heating and internal heat generation/absorption in the two-dimensional flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over a stretching surface. The governing non-linear analysis of partial differential equations is reduced into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting problems are computed for both series and numerical solutions. Series solution is constructed using homotopy analysis method (HAM) whereas numerical solution is presented by two different techniques namely shooting method and bvp4c. A comparison of homotopy solution with numerical solution is also tabulated. Both solutions are found in an excellent agreement. Dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are plotted and discussed for various emerging physical parameters.

  20. On Comparison of Series and Numerical Solutions for Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid with Newtonian Heating And Internal Heat Generation/Absorption.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ali, Shafqat; Farooq, Muhammad Asif; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the combined effects of Newtonian heating and internal heat generation/absorption in the two-dimensional flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over a stretching surface. The governing non-linear analysis of partial differential equations is reduced into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting problems are computed for both series and numerical solutions. Series solution is constructed using homotopy analysis method (HAM) whereas numerical solution is presented by two different techniques namely shooting method and bvp4c. A comparison of homotopy solution with numerical solution is also tabulated. Both solutions are found in an excellent agreement. Dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are plotted and discussed for various emerging physical parameters. PMID:26402366

  1. A Post-Flight Comparison Between GPS Signal Generator and On-Orbit Testing Results from the STS-101 and STS-106 SOAR Shuttle Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Gomez, Susan; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The use of a GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG) prior to launch for verification of a GPS subsystem and GN&C system on a spacecraft is becoming a very common practice. The level of confidence in the verification created by running a receiver with a GPSSG can greatly impact both schedule and cost of spacecraft development. This paper addresses the comparison of the Space Shuttle STS-101 and STS-106 Space Integrated GPS/INS (SIGI) Orbital Attitude Readiness (SOAR) flight experiments on-orbit performance with the performance from the same receiver on a Global Simulation Systems (GSS) GPSSG. The SOAR flight experiment was designed to demonstrate on-orbit performance of the International Space Station Force-19 GPS receiver. This paper discusses the process involved in getting the post-flight Best Estimate of Trajectory and Best Estimate of Attitude into the GPSSG such that the Force-19 receiver will experience the same trajectory and environmental conditions as observed during the SOAR flight experiment. Results of the comparison conclude with recommendations of how better to construct and interpret results from receiver tests using a GSS GPSSG.

  2. Direct Determination of Trace Antimony in Natural Waters by Photochemical Vapor Generation ICPMS: Method Optimization and Comparison of Quantitation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Mester, Zoltán; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin; Yang, Lu

    2015-08-01

    A novel and sensitive approach for the accurate determination of antimony (Sb) in natural waters is described using photochemical vapor generation (PVG) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for detection. Utilizing a unique flow-through photochemical reactor capable of subjecting the samples to deep-UV (185 nm) radiation, generation efficiency was found to be independent of whether Sb(III), Sb(V), or organometallic species [trimethyltantimony(V)dibromine, TMSb(V)] were present, eliminating the shortcoming of Sb species depended sensitivity encountered during direct solution nebulization by ICPMS. Furthermore, the potentially severe matrix effect from seawater was efficiently eliminated by using a mixture of 5% (v/v) formic and 15% acetic acids (v/v) as the photochemical reductant, making direct determination of Sb in seawater feasible. The proposed method provides a 15-fold improvement in sensitivity over direct solution nebulization. A method detection limit of 0.0006 ng g(-1) based on external calibration was obtained (0.0002 ng g(-1) for isotope dilution), yielding a 15-fold improvement over that for direct solution nebulization. Accuracy is demonstrated by analysis of two water certified reference materials (CRMs, e.g., SLRS-6 and NIST 1640a) with satisfying results. In addition, spike recoveries of 100.6 ± 5.5% and 100.8 ± 3.8% (standard deviation, n = 3) were obtained for NASS-6 and CASS-5 seawater CRMs, respectively, since no certified values for Sb has been established for these materials. The performance of several calibration strategies, including double isotope dilution (ID), multiple and single-point gravimetric standard additions with internal standardization, as well as multiple and single-point gravimetric standard additions alone was examined. High precision of determination of Sb in four natural water samples (0.51-1.4%) was realized based on ID calibration, whereas one-point gravimetric standard addition calibration

  3. Comparison of three next-generation sequencing platforms for metagenomic sequencing and identification of pathogens in blood

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The introduction of benchtop sequencers has made adoption of whole genome sequencing possible for a broader community of researchers than ever before. Concurrently, metagenomic sequencing (MGS) is rapidly emerging as a tool for interrogating complex samples that defy conventional analyses. In addition, next-generation sequencers are increasingly being used in clinical or related settings, for instance to track outbreaks. However, information regarding the analytical sensitivity or limit of detection (LoD) of benchtop sequencers is currently lacking. Furthermore, the specificity of sequence information at or near the LoD is unknown. Results In the present study, we assess the ability of three next-generation sequencing platforms to identify a pathogen (viral or bacterial) present in low titers in a clinically relevant sample (blood). Our results indicate that the Roche-454 Titanium platform is capable of detecting Dengue virus at titers as low as 1X102.5 pfu/mL, corresponding to an estimated 5.4X104 genome copies/ml maximum. The increased throughput of the benchtop sequencers, the Ion Torrent PGM and Illumina MiSeq platforms, enabled detection of viral genomes at concentrations as low as 1X104 genome copies/mL. Platform-specific biases were evident in sequence read distributions as well as viral genome coverage. For bacterial samples, only the MiSeq platform was able to provide sequencing reads that could be unambiguously classified as originating from Bacillus anthracis. Conclusion The analytical sensitivity of all three platforms approaches that of standard qPCR assays. Although all platforms were able to detect pathogens at the levels tested, there were several noteworthy differences. The Roche-454 Titanium platform produced consistently longer reads, even when compared with the latest chemistry updates for the PGM platform. The MiSeq platform produced consistently greater depth and breadth of coverage, while the Ion Torrent was unequaled for speed of

  4. Revision and Validation of the Revised Teacher Beliefs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Jane

    This study revised the Teacher Beliefs Survey (S. Wooley and A. Wooley, 1999; TBS), an instrument to assess teachers beliefs related to constructivist and behaviorist theories of learning, and then studied the validity of the revised TBS. Drawing on a literature review, researchers added items for the existing constructs of the TBS and added a new…

  5. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239).

  6. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

    PubMed

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen.

  7. Generation of Insulin-Producing Cells from Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Comparison of Three Differentiation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Gabr, Mahmoud M.; Zakaria, Mahmoud M.; Refaie, Ayman F.; Khater, Sherry M.; Ashamallah, Sylvia A.; Ismail, Amani M.; El-Badri, Nagwa; Ghoneim, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many protocols were utilized for directed differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to form insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We compared the relative efficiency of three differentiation protocols. Methods. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (HBM-MSCs) were obtained from three insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic patients. Differentiation into IPCs was carried out by three protocols: conophylline-based (one-step protocol), trichostatin-A-based (two-step protocol), and β-mercaptoethanol-based (three-step protocol). At the end of differentiation, cells were evaluated by immunolabeling for insulin production, expression of pancreatic endocrine genes, and release of insulin and c-peptide in response to increasing glucose concentrations. Results. By immunolabeling, the proportion of generated IPCs was modest (≃3%) in all the three protocols. All relevant pancreatic endocrine genes, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, were expressed. There was a stepwise increase in insulin and c-peptide release in response to glucose challenge, but the released amounts were low when compared with those of pancreatic islets. Conclusion. The yield of functional IPCs following directed differentiation of HBM-MSCs was modest and was comparable among the three tested protocols. Protocols for directed differentiation of MSCs need further optimization in order to be clinically meaningful. To this end, addition of an extracellular matrix and/or a suitable template should be attempted. PMID:24818157

  8. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae

    PubMed Central

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen. PMID:27494134

  9. Estimated Seed Shadow Generated by Japanese Martens(Martes melampus): Comparison with Forest-Dwelling Animals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yamato; Okumura, Tadanobu; Kitahara, Masahiko; Jiang, Zhaowen

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the seed shadow generated by wild Japanese martens (Martes melampus), we combined data on their ranging behavior from the northern foot of Mt. Fuji, central Japan (seven males and three females) with data on gut passage time obtained from martens in Toyama Municipal Family Park Zoo (three males and one female). The movement distances varied, and mean distances for 0-1, 2-3, and 4-5 h intervals were 152.4, 734.7, and 1,162.4 m, respectively, with no significant sex difference. The mean gut passage time of ingested seeds was 7.4 h (range: 0.6-51.7 h), and two-thirds were defecated within 12 h. Seeds of fleshy fruits was frequently transported to 501-1,000 m, and 20% of ingested seeds were transported > 1,000 m from feeding sites. We found positive correlations between body size and home range of the animals in Japan and their seed dispersal distances. We conclude that Japanese martens are medium-range dispersers that can transport seeds from the source to open habitats conducive for germination and/or growth, partly due to scent marking behaviors. PMID:27498794

  10. Comparisons of recent growth in actual demand, planned demand, and planned generating capacity at U. S. electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, A.E. )

    1994-12-01

    During the winter of 1993, a number of U.S. electric utilities and some regional power pools discovered that current load exceeded generating capacity. Load restrictions followed, as entire regions-not just isolated utilities or even states-cut back. Was 1993 a typical, or simply a preview of the future If a preview, how did this shortage occur For a number of years, utilities, regulatory agencies, and power pools have been planning to add capacity at a much lower rate than the rate at which load has been growing. The National Electricity Reliability Council (NERC) has projected that eight of it's nine regions will have demand growth exceed capacity growth. The only region where capacity is growing faster is in the Texas Region. There are four reasons behind this shortage: excess capacity in the 1980's, disbelief in current forecasts, passage of the Clean Air act bringing stricter regulation on power plants, and the herd mentality where utilities have all delayed new plant construction.

  11. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

    PubMed

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen. PMID:27494134

  12. Laser sputtering generation of B/sub 2/ for ESR matrix isolation studies: comparison with ab initio CI theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, L.B. Jr.; Gregory, B.W.; Cobranchi, S.T.; Feller, D.; Davidson, E.R.

    1987-06-10

    The /sup 11/B/sub 2/ molecule has been trapped in neon and argon matrices at 5 +/- 1 K for ESR (electron spin resonance) investigations. Laser sputtering from solid boron was used to generate the B/sub 2/ molecule whose ground electronic state has been established experimentally for the first time to be /sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/. The ESR nuclear hyperfine parameters for B/sub 2/ and B atoms have been compared with the results of ab initio CI theoretical calculations. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found for the dipolar component of the A tensor but not for the small and difficult to calculate isotropic hfs. Reasons that make the Fermi contact term especially difficult to calculate in this particular case are presented. The argon matrix ESR results yield the following magnetic parameters for /sup 11/B/sub 2/ in its ground electronic state: g/sub parallel/ = g/sub perpendicular/ = 2.0015 (4); A/sub parallel/ = +/- 11 (1) MHz and A/sub perpendicular/ = +/- 27.4 (3) MHz for /sup 11/B and the zero field parameter; and the D value is 3633 (3) MHz. As discussed, the most reasonable signs for the A values are A/sub parallel/ < O and A/sub perpendicular/ > 0. The neon matrix value of D was found to be 3840 (3) MHz and A/sub perpendicular/ in neon is +/- 26.6 (3) MHz.

  13. Comparison of Pd/D Co-Deposition and DT Neutron Generated Triple Tracks Observed in CR-39 Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Mosier-Boss, J.Y. Dea, L.P.G. Forsley, M.S. Morey, J.R. Tinsley, J.P. Hurley, F.E. Gordon

    2010-08-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), such as CR-39, have been used to detect energetic charged particles and neutrons. Of the neutron and charged particle interactions that can occur in CR-39, the one that is the most easily identifiable is the carbon breakup reaction. The observation of a triple track, which appears as three alpha particle tracks breaking away from a center point, is diagnostic of the 12C(n, n')3α carbon breakup reaction. Such triple tracks have been observed in CR-39 detectors that have been used in Pd/D co-deposition experiments. In this communication, triple tracks in CR-39 detectors observed in Pd/D co-deposition experiments are compared with those generated upon exposure to a DT neutron source. It was found that both sets of tracks were indistinguishable. Both symmetric and asymmetric tracks were observed. Using linear energy transfer (LET) curves and track modeling, the energy of the neutron that created the triple track can be estimated.

  14. Comparison of projection skills of deterministic ensemble methods using pseudo-simulation data generated from multivariate Gaussian distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seok-Geun; Suh, Myoung-Seok

    2016-03-01

    The projection skills of five ensemble methods were analyzed according to simulation skills, training period, and ensemble members, using 198 sets of pseudo-simulation data (PSD) produced by random number generation assuming the simulated temperature of regional climate models. The PSD sets were classified into 18 categories according to the relative magnitude of bias, variance ratio, and correlation coefficient, where each category had 11 sets (including 1 truth set) with 50 samples. The ensemble methods used were as follows: equal weighted averaging without bias correction (EWA_NBC), EWA with bias correction (EWA_WBC), weighted ensemble averaging based on root mean square errors and correlation (WEA_RAC), WEA based on the Taylor score (WEA_Tay), and multivariate linear regression (Mul_Reg). The projection skills of the ensemble methods improved generally as compared with the best member for each category. However, their projection skills are significantly affected by the simulation skills of the ensemble member. The weighted ensemble methods showed better projection skills than non-weighted methods, in particular, for the PSD categories having systematic biases and various correlation coefficients. The EWA_NBC showed considerably lower projection skills than the other methods, in particular, for the PSD categories with systematic biases. Although Mul_Reg showed relatively good skills, it showed strong sensitivity to the PSD categories, training periods, and number of members. On the other hand, the WEA_Tay and WEA_RAC showed relatively superior skills in both the accuracy and reliability for all the sensitivity experiments. This indicates that WEA_Tay and WEA_RAC are applicable even for simulation data with systematic biases, a short training period, and a small number of ensemble members.

  15. Gas uptake in a three-generation model geometry during steady expiration: comparison of axisymmetric and three-dimensional models.

    PubMed

    Madasu, Srinath; Borhan, Ali; Ultman, James

    2007-03-01

    Mass transfer coefficients were predicted and compared for uptake of a formaldehyde-air gas system using an axisymmetric single path model (ASPM) and a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model (CFDM) in three-generation model geometry at steady expiratory flow. The flow and concentration fields in the ASPM were solved using Galerkin's finite-element method and in the CFDM using a commercial finite-element software, FIDAP. Numerical results were compared for two different inlet flow rates, wall mass transfer coefficients, and bifurcation angles. The mass transfer coefficients variation with bifurcation unit from the ASPM and CFDM compared qualitatively and quantitatively closely at all flows and lower wall mass transfer coefficients for both 40 degrees and 70 degrees bifurcation angles. However, at higher wall mass transfer coefficients, quantitatively they were within 40% for both the bifurcation angles. Also, at higher flow and wall mass transfer coefficients, they were off qualitatively for a 70 degrees bifurcation angle although the uptake compared qualitatively. This is due to the normalization of uptake within a bifurcation unit with the average of inlet and outlet average concentrations. Both CFDM and ASPM predict the same trends of increase in mass transfer coefficients with inlet flow and wall mass transfer coefficients. Also, the local values of the mass transfer coefficients compared closely at all conditions. These results validate the simplified ASPM and the complex CFDM. Mass transfer coefficients increase with bifurcation angles and with a flat inlet velocity profile compared to a parabolic velocity profile since the flow is non-fully developed and hence, the uptake increases.

  16. Comparison of a high-resolution melting assay to next-generation sequencing for analysis of HIV diversity.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Matthew M; Ou, San-San; Wawer, Maria J; Munshaw, Supriya; Swan, David; Magaret, Craig A; Mullis, Caroline E; Serwadda, David; Porcella, Stephen F; Gray, Ronald H; Quinn, Thomas C; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H; Redd, Andrew D

    2012-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has recently been used for analysis of HIV diversity, but this method is labor-intensive, costly, and requires complex protocols for data analysis. We compared diversity measures obtained using NGS data to those obtained using a diversity assay based on high-resolution melting (HRM) of DNA duplexes. The HRM diversity assay provides a single numeric score that reflects the level of diversity in the region analyzed. HIV gag and env from individuals in Rakai, Uganda, were analyzed in a previous study using NGS (n = 220 samples from 110 individuals). Three sequence-based diversity measures were calculated from the NGS sequence data (percent diversity, percent complexity, and Shannon entropy). The amplicon pools used for NGS were analyzed with the HRM diversity assay. HRM scores were significantly associated with sequence-based measures of HIV diversity for both gag and env (P < 0.001 for all measures). The level of diversity measured by the HRM diversity assay and NGS increased over time in both regions analyzed (P < 0.001 for all measures except for percent complexity in gag), and similar amounts of diversification were observed with both methods (P < 0.001 for all measures except for percent complexity in gag). Diversity measures obtained using the HRM diversity assay were significantly associated with those from NGS, and similar increases in diversity over time were detected by both methods. The HRM diversity assay is faster and less expensive than NGS, facilitating rapid analysis of large studies of HIV diversity and evolution.

  17. Diagnosing the cause of bilateral paediatric cataracts: comparison of standard testing with a next-generation sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Musleh, M; Hall, G; Lloyd, I C; Gillespie, R L; Waller, S; Douzgou, S; Clayton-Smith, J; Kehdi, E; Black, G C M; Ashworth, J

    2016-09-01

    PurposeIn addition to environmental causes such as TORCH infection, trauma and drug or chemical exposure, childhood cataracts (CC) frequently have a genetic basis. They may be isolated or syndromic and have been associated with mutations in over 110 genes. We have recently demonstrated that next-generation sequencing (NGS), a high throughput sequencing technique that enables the parallel sequencing of multiple genes, is ideally suited to the investigation of bilateral CC. This study assesses the diagnostic outcomes of traditional routine investigations and compares this with outcomes of NGS testing.MethodsA retrospective review of the medical records of 27 consecutive patients with bilateral CC presenting in 2010-2012 was undertaken. The outcomes of routine investigations in these patients, including TORCH screen, urinalysis, karyotyping, and urinary and plasma organic amino acids, were collated. The success of routine genetic investigations undertaken over 10 years (2000-2010) was also assessed.ResultsBy April 2014, the underlying cause of bilateral CC had been identified in just one of 27 patients despite 44% (n=12) receiving a full 'standard' investigative work-up and 22% (n=6) investigations in addition to the standard work-up. Fifteen of these patients underwent NGS testing and nine (60%) of these received a diagnosis for their CC.ConclusionThe frequency of patients receiving a diagnosis for their CC after standard care and the time taken to diagnosis was disappointing. NGS testing improved diagnostic rates and time to diagnosis, as well as changing clinical management. These data serve as a baseline for future evaluation of novel diagnostic modalities. PMID:27315345

  18. Experimental study of an active grid-generated shearless mixing layer and comparisons with large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyung Suk; Meneveau, Charles

    2008-12-01

    displacements are presented. It is found that much of the deviations from Gaussian statistics originate from large-scale motions. The data are well suited to be used as initial condition for simulations and as test for large-eddy simulation (LES) models and codes. Comparison studies for three LES models including Smagorinsky, dynamic Smagorinsky, and dynamic mixed nonlinear models are implemented in simulations of temporally decaying shearless mixing layer using a pseudospectral code. Initial conditions are prescribed by matching the longitudinal energy spectra at all heights across the layer for both streamwise and cross-stream velocity components. LES with all three subgrid scale models tested underpredicts the kinetic energy and exhibits deviations from the measured non-Gaussian behaviors. Overall, the dynamic Smagorinsky model predicts statistics slightly better than the other two models.

  19. Multimodal Revision Techniques in Webtexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Cheryl E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how an online scholarly journal, "Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy," mentors authors to revise their webtexts (interactive, digital media scholarship) for publication. Using an editorial pedagogy in which multimodal and rhetorical genre theories are merged with revision techniques found in process-based…

  20. Gendered Performances during Peer Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styslinger, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the ways gender is accomplished in varied social contexts during the peer revision process in a secondary English classroom. Using a post-structural feminist theoretical framework, an analysis of classroom discourse provided a basis for understanding the performance of gender during peer revision, the effects of gender…

  1. A constant stress-drop model for producing broadband synthetic seismograms: Comparison with the next generation attenuation relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband (0.1-20 Hz) synthetic seismograms for finite-fault sources were produced for a model where stress drop is constant with seismic moment to see if they can match the magnitude dependence and distance decay of response spectral amplitudes found in the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) relations recently developed from strong-motion data of crustal earthquakes in tectonically active regions. The broadband synthetics were constructed for earthquakes of M 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5 by combining deterministic synthetics for plane-layered models at low frequencies with stochastic synthetics at high frequencies. The stochastic portion used a source model where the Brune stress drop of 100 bars is constant with seismic moment. The deterministic synthetics were calculated using an average slip velocity, and hence, dynamic stress drop, on the fault that is uniform with magnitude. One novel aspect of this procedure is that the transition frequency between the deterministic and stochastic portions varied with magnitude, so that the transition frequency is inversely related to the rise time of slip on the fault. The spectral accelerations at 0.2, 1.0, and 3.0 sec periods from the synthetics generally agreed with those from the set of NGA relations for M 5.5-7.5 for distances of 2-100 km. At distances of 100-200 km some of the NGA relations for 0.2 sec spectral acceleration were substantially larger than the values of the synthetics for M 7.5 and M 6.5 earthquakes because these relations do not have a term accounting for Q. At 3 and 5 sec periods, the synthetics for M 7.5 earthquakes generally had larger spectral accelerations than the NGA relations, although there was large scatter in the results from the synthetics. The synthetics showed a sag in response spectra at close-in distances for M 5.5 between 0.3 and 0.7 sec that is not predicted from the NGA relations.

  2. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  3. Hydrogen generation during serpentinisation in ophiolite complexes: A comparison of H2-rich gases from Oman, Philippines and Turkey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Valérie; Vacquand, Christèle; Deville, Eric; Prinzhofer, Alain

    2013-04-01

    H2-rich gas seepages in ultrabasic to basic contexts both in marine and continental environment are by-products of serpentinisation. Hydrothermal systems at MOR expose ultrabasic rocks to thermodynamic conditions favouring oxidation of FeII bearing minerals and water reduction. In continental context such thermodynamic conditions do not exist although active serpentinisation occurs in all known ophiolitic complexes (Barnes et al., 1978; Bruni et al., 2002; Cipolli et al., 2004; Boschetti and Toscani, 2008; Marques et al., 2008). Hyperalkaline springs are reported in these contexts as evidence of this active serpentinisation (Barnes et al., 1967) and are often associated with seepages of reduced gases (Neal and Stanger, 1983; Sano et al., 1993). Dry gas seepages are also observed (Abrajano et al., 1988, 1990; Hosgörmez, 2007; Etiope et al., 2011) Such H2-rich gases from ophiolite complexes were sampled in the Sultanate of Oman, the Philippines and Turkey and were analysed for chemical composition, noble gases contents, stable isotopes of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen. The conditions for present-day serpentinisation in ophiolites were recognised as low temperature processes in Oman with high rock/water ratios (Neal and Stanger, 1985), while the origin of gases is not as univocal for Philippines and Turkey gas seepages. Although, H2 generation is directly linked with FeII oxidation, different reactions can occur during peridotite hydration (McCollom and Bach, 2009; Marcaillou et al., 2011) and serpentine weathering. Produced H2 can react with carbonate species to produce methane via processes that could be biological or abiotic, while carbon availability depends on water recharge chemistry. In the present study, the geochemical properties of gases sampled from three different ophiolite complexes are compared and provide evidence that weathering reactions producing H2 depend on structural, geological, geomorphologic and hydrological local features. REFERENCES Abrajano

  4. A COMPARISON OF NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRA FOR Y DWARFS WITH A NEW GENERATION OF COOL CLOUDY MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, S. K.; Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, M. S.; Saumon, D.; Visscher, Channon

    2013-02-15

    , then the T {sub eff} Almost-Equal-To 300 K cloud-free model fluxes at K and W2 are too faint by 0.5-1.0 mag. We will address this discrepancy in our next generation of models, which will incorporate water clouds and mixing.

  5. Rett Syndrome: Revised Diagnostic Criteria and Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Neul, Jeffrey L.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Christodoulou, John; Clarke, Angus J.; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Leonard, Helen; Bailey, Mark E. S.; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Zappella, Michele; Renieri, Alessandra; Huppke, Peter; Percy, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disease that affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is often caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Despite distinct clinical features, the accumulation of clinical and molecular information in recent years has generated considerable confusion regarding the diagnosis of RTT. The purpose of this work was revise and clarify 2002 consensus criteria for the diagnosis of RTT in anticipation of treatment trials. Method RettSearch members, representing the majority of the international clinical RTT specialists, participated in an iterative process to come to a consensus on a revised and simplified clinical diagnostic criteria for RTT. Results The clinical criteria required for the diagnosis of classic and atypical RTT were clarified and simplified. Guidelines for the diagnosis and molecular evaluation of specific variant forms of RTT were developed. Interpretation These revised criteria provide clarity regarding the key features required for the diagnosis of RTT and reinforce the concept that RTT is a clinical diagnosis based on distinct clinical criteria, independent of molecular findings. We recommend that these criteria and guidelines be utilized in any proposed clinical research. PMID:21154482

  6. Recent Revisions to PVWATTS

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, B.; Anderberg, M.; Gray-Hann, P.

    2005-11-01

    PVWATTS is an Internet-accessible software program that allows the user to easily calculate the energy production and cost savings for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems located throughout the United States. To ensure that PVWATTS continues to meet its users' needs, an online survey form was provided to users to identify areas for improvement. The results of the survey were used to prioritize improvements to PVWATTS in FY2005. PVWATTS was revised by changing the PV system specification input for system size from an AC power rating to a nameplate DC power rating; adding an input for an overall DC to AC derate factor; updating the residential electric rates; adding monthly and yearly solar radiation values for the PV array; and simplifying the user interface for Version 2.

  7. Nuclear Power and the Environment: Questions and Answers. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campana, Robert J.; Langer, Sidney

    This publication is a complete revision of an earlier booklet brought on by the dramatic changes in the energy outlook of the United States that occurred in 1973 and 1974. The purpose of this document is to inform the public on the overall U.S. energy situation, in particular electricity generated from nuclear reactors and other sources. The…

  8. Does the Detection of Misunderstanding Lead to Its Revision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Rodicio, Héctor; Sánchez, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    When dealing with complex conceptual systems, low-prior- knowledge learners develop fragmentary and incorrect understanding. To learn complex topics deeply, these learners have to (a) monitor understanding to detect flaws and (b) generate explanations to revise and repair the flaws. In this research we explored if the detection of a flaw in…

  9. Revised model coefficients for vibrational relaxation in a nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehre, R. M.; Wheatley, V.; Boyce, R. R.

    2012-11-01

    A numerical investigation of thermal non-equilibrium flows requires species specific relaxation rates, which are often calculated using the Landau-Teller model. This model requires the determination of collision specific relaxation times, which can be computed using Millikan and White's empirical formula. The coefficients used in this formula for each specific collision pair form a set of coefficients, which are assessed here. The focus of the investigation lies on their performance in hypersonic low-temperature (300-2,500 K) flows that occur at shock-tunnel nozzle exits or in supersonic combustion ramjets (scramjets) before combustion. Two experimental validation cases are chosen; a shock-tunnel nozzle and a sharp cone in hypersonic cross-flow experiment. A comparison of the experimentally measured vibrational temperatures at the nozzle exit against numerical data shows large discrepancies for two commonly used coefficient sets. A revised set of coefficients is proposed that greatly improves the agreement between the numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, the numerically generated shock shape over the sharp cone using the revised set of coefficients correlates well with the experimental measurements.

  10. Annotation and Classification of Argumentative Writing Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the annotation and classification of students' revision behaviors in argumentative writing. A sentence-level revision schema is proposed to capture why and how students make revisions. Based on the proposed schema, a small corpus of student essays and revisions was annotated. Studies show that manual annotation is reliable with…

  11. Validation of WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) for myelodysplastic syndromes and comparison with the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A study of the International Working Group for Prognosis in Myelodysplasia (IWG-PM).

    PubMed

    Della Porta, M G; Tuechler, H; Malcovati, L; Schanz, J; Sanz, G; Garcia-Manero, G; Solé, F; Bennett, J M; Bowen, D; Fenaux, P; Dreyfus, F; Kantarjian, H; Kuendgen, A; Levis, A; Cermak, J; Fonatsch, C; Le Beau, M M; Slovak, M L; Krieger, O; Luebbert, M; Maciejewski, J; Magalhaes, S M M; Miyazaki, Y; Pfeilstöcker, M; Sekeres, M A; Sperr, W R; Stauder, R; Tauro, S; Valent, P; Vallespi, T; van de Loosdrecht, A A; Germing, U; Haase, D; Greenberg, P L; Cazzola, M

    2015-07-01

    A risk-adapted treatment strategy is mandatory for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We refined the World Health Organization (WHO)-classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) by determining the impact of the newer clinical and cytogenetic features, and we compared its prognostic power to that of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A population of 5326 untreated MDS was considered. We analyzed single WPSS parameters and confirmed that the WHO classification and severe anemia provide important prognostic information in MDS. A strong correlation was found between the WPSS including the new cytogenetic risk stratification and WPSS adopting original criteria. We then compared WPSS with the IPSS-R prognostic system. A highly significant correlation was found between the WPSS and IPSS-R risk classifications. Discrepancies did occur among lower-risk patients in whom the number of dysplastic hematopoietic lineages as assessed by morphology did not reflect the severity of peripheral blood cytopenias and/or increased marrow blast count. Moreover, severe anemia has higher prognostic weight in the WPSS versus IPSS-R model. Overall, both systems well represent the prognostic risk of MDS patients defined by WHO morphologic criteria. This study provides relevant in formation for the implementation of risk-adapted strategies in MDS. PMID:25721895

  12. OMB revises overhead rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    After pressure from university administrators, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has issued a new plan for saving money on research overhead costs, in place of a controversial proposal that was originally published in February 1986 (Eos, May 20, 1986, p. 481). The agency made the new plan more palatable to administrators and faculty by choosing to cap the rate of reimbursement for the activity that researchers say they find among the most difficult to document: the time they spend on administration of federally sponsored grants and contracts. An amendment to a bill signed by President Ronald Reagan on July 2 might force OMB to make additional concessions to colleges and universities.How much money the federal government would save under this policy is a matter of dispute. The agency's revisions to OMB Circular A-21, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions,” call for fixing the reimbursement rate at 3% of modified total direct costs for departmental administration work done by “department heads, directors of divisions faculty, and professional staff.” The 3% figure represents about half of the current national average rate of reimbursement for these costs and would lead to federal government savings of $100 million a year, according to OMB.

  13. Interplay of LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA in the structure and thermodynamics of RNA hybrid systems: a molecular dynamics study using the revised AMBER force field and comparison with experimental results.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard; Schatz, George C

    2014-12-11

    When used in nucleic acid duplexes, locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues enhance the duplex stabilities, and this makes it possible to create much better RNA aptamers to target specific molecules in cells. Thus, LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues are finding increasingly widespread use in RNA-based therapeutics. Herein, we utilize molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and UV melting experiments to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of 13 nucleic acid duplexes, including full DNA, RNA, LNA, and 2'-O-methyl RNA duplexes as well as hybrid systems such as LNA:RNA, 2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA, LNA/2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA, and RNA/2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA duplexes. The MD simulations are based on a version of the Amber force field revised specifically for RNA and LNA residues. Our results indicate that LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues have two different hybridization mechanisms when included in hybrid duplexes with RNA wherein the former underwinds while the latter overwinds the duplexes. These computational predictions are supported by X-ray structures of LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA duplexes that were recently presented by different groups, and there is also good agreement with the measured thermal stabilities of the duplexes. We find out that the "underwinding" phenomenon seen in LNA and LNA:RNA hybrid duplexes happens due to expansion of the major groove widths (Mgw) of the duplexes that is associated with decrease in the slide and twist values in base-pair steps. In contrast, 2'-O-methyl RNA residues in RNA duplexes slightly overwind the duplexes while the backbone is forced to stay in C3'-endo. Moreover, base-pair stacking in the LNA and LNA:RNA hybrid systems is gradually reduced with the inclusion of LNA residues in the duplexes while no such effect is seen in the 2'-O-methyl RNA systems. Our results show how competition between base stacking and structural rigidity in these RNA hybrid systems influences structures and stabilities. Even though both

  14. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Kayako; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Kato, Hiroki; Fukushima, Kentaro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Hatazawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Post-treatment evaluations by CT/MRI (based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds meeting guidelines) and PET (based on Revised Response Criteria), were examined in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML). Methods: 79 patients, undergoing CT/MRI for the examination of suspected lesions and whole-body PET/CT before and after therapy, were included in the study during April 2007-January 2013. The relationship between post-treatment evaluations (CT/MRI and PET) and PFS during the follow-up period was examined, using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The patients were grouped according to the histological type into Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and other histological types. The association between post-treatment evaluations (PET or PET combined with CT/MRI) and PFS was examined separately. Moreover, the relationship between disease recurrence and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor, lactic dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels was evaluated before and after the treatment. Results: Patients with incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET had a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET and those exhibiting incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.001). Post-treatment PET evaluations were strongly correlated with patient outcomes in cases with HL or DLBCL (P<0.01) and other histological types (P<0.001). In patients with HL or DLBCL, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0.05) and those showing incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.01). In patients with other histological types, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to cases with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0

  15. Revision of Primary Series Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a 50-year effort to provide primary series map coverage of the United States. Many of these maps now need to be updated to reflect the construction of new roads and highways and other changes that have taken place over time. The USGS has formulated a graphic revision plan to help keep the primary series maps current. Primary series maps include 1:20,000-scale quadrangles of Puerto Rico, 1:24,000- or 1:25,000-scale quadrangles of the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and U.S. Territories, and 1:63,360-scale quadrangles of Alaska. The revision of primary series maps from new collection sources is accomplished using a variety of processes. The raster revision process combines the scanned content of paper maps with raster updating technologies. The vector revision process involves the automated plotting of updated vector files. Traditional processes use analog stereoplotters and manual scribing instruments on specially coated map separates. The ability to select from or combine these processes increases the efficiency of the National Mapping Division map revision program.

  16. Preparation of cyclotron-produced 186Re and comparison with reactor-produced 186Re and generator-produced 188Re for the labeling of bombesin.

    PubMed

    Moustapha, Moustapha E; Ehrhardt, Gary J; Smith, Charles J; Szajek, Lawrence P; Eckelman, William C; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2006-01-01

    The radioisotopes (186)Re and (188)Re have been extensively investigated for various forms of radiotherapy due to their useful and high-abundance beta particle emissions, low-abundance and imageable gamma-rays, and chemical resemblance to technetium. In addition, (188)Re is available in no-carrier-added (NCA) form from long lived W-188 generators, whereas (186)Re can be produced in large quantities from reactors, although not in NCA form. However, NCA (186)Re can be produced on a cyclotron by a (p,n) reaction on (186)W. The purpose of this study was to compare labeling of the peptide bombesin with these three forms of rhenium radioisotopes. Cyclotron-produced NCA (186)Re was separated radiochemically from enriched (186)W (96.9%) targets using high-purity methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The resulting (186)Re-MEK was then loaded onto a small alumina column to separate the resulting NCA (186)Re from any remaining (186)W. The experimental levels of impurities associated with (186)Re at the end of the separation process were found to be 5.7 x 10(-6) Ci of (182)Re (0.57%, t(1/2) = 12.7 h) and 1.283 x 10(-5) Ci of (182m)Re (1.28%, t(1/2) = 2.67 days). The radionuclidic purity of the separated (186)Re was found to be 99.6%, whereas the chemical identity was determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) to be perrhenate ((186)ReO(4)(-)). Generator-produced (188)ReO(4)(-) from a (188)W/(188)Re generator (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and CA (186)ReO(4)(-) produced from a (185)Re(n,gamma)(186)Re reaction at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) were used for comparison with the NCA (186)Re in subsequent studies. N(3)S-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH(2) conjugates provide flexibility for designing (186,188)Re-labeled conjugates that retain high in vitro and in vivo specificity targeting of GRP receptor-expressing cells. This study showed that the N(3)S-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH(2) could be labeled with (186,188)Re following the preconjugation

  17. The revised classification of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Adl, Sina M.; Simpson, Alastair. G.; Lane, Christopher E.; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S.; Brown, Matt; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; leGall, Line; Lynn, Denis H.; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E.; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W.

    2012-01-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. (2005), retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information. PMID:23020233

  18. The revised classification of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Adl, Sina M; Simpson, Alastair G B; Lane, Christopher E; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S; Brown, Matthew W; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; Le Gall, Line; Lynn, Denis H; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A D; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E; Parfrey, Laura W; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Laura; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad L; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W

    2012-09-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. [J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 52 (2005) 399], retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information.

  19. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  20. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies.

  1. REVISED STREAM CODE AND WASP5 BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K

    2005-05-01

    STREAM is an emergency response code that predicts downstream pollutant concentrations for releases from the SRS area to the Savannah River. The STREAM code uses an algebraic equation to approximate the solution of the one dimensional advective transport differential equation. This approach generates spurious oscillations in the concentration profile when modeling long duration releases. To improve the capability of the STREAM code to model long-term releases, its calculation module was replaced by the WASP5 code. WASP5 is a US EPA water quality analysis program that simulates one-dimensional pollutant transport through surface water. Test cases were performed to compare the revised version of STREAM with the existing version. For continuous releases, results predicted by the revised STREAM code agree with physical expectations. The WASP5 code was benchmarked with the US EPA 1990 and 1991 dye tracer studies, in which the transport of the dye was measured from its release at the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam downstream to Savannah. The peak concentrations predicted by the WASP5 agreed with the measurements within {+-}20.0%. The transport times of the dye concentration peak predicted by the WASP5 agreed with the measurements within {+-}3.6%. These benchmarking results demonstrate that STREAM should be capable of accurately modeling releases from SRS outfalls.

  2. Revised evaluations for ENDF/B-VI Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.Q.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on revised cross-section evaluations for 17 nuclides that have been prepared for ENDF/B-VI Revision 2. The nuclides considered include five fission products and various isotopes of cadmium and hafnium. The previous ENDF/B-VI evaluations for these 17 nuclides were carried over from ENDF/B-V and were completed in the 1974--1980 time period. By utilizing the experimental data that have become available since 1980 the revised evaluations will result in significant improvements in the evaluated nuclear data files. The primary emphasis was placed on the resolved and unresolved resonance regions, but new experimental data were also used to improve the cross sections for energies above the unresolved resonance region. Negative elastic scattering cross sections were encountered in some of the previous evaluations; since the revised evaluations use multilevel Breit-Wigner (MLBW) parameters, rather than single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW), this problem is eliminated.

  3. Generation of Calves Persistently Infected with HoBi-Like Pestivirus and Comparison of Methods for Detection of These Persistent Infections

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, S. M.; Vander Ley, B.; Decaro, N.; Brodersen, B. W.; Harmon, A.; Hessman, B.; Flores, E. F.; Ridpath, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The identification and elimination of persistently infected (PI) cattle are the most effective measures for controlling bovine pestiviruses, including bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and the emerging HoBi-like viruses. Here, colostrum-deprived calves persistently infected with HoBi-like pestivirus (HoBi-like PI calves) were generated and sampled (serum, buffy coat, and ear notches) on the day of birth (DOB) and weekly for 5 consecutive weeks. The samples were subjected to diagnostic tests for BVDV—two reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays, two commercial real-time RT quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), two antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ACE), and immunohistochemistry (IHC)—and to HoBi-like virus-specific RT-PCR and RT-qPCR assays. The rate of false negatives varied among the calves. The HoBi-like virus-specific RT-PCR detected HoBi-like virus in 83%, 75%, and 87% of the serum, buffy coat, and ear notch samples, respectively, while the HoBi-like RT-qPCR detected the virus in 83%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. In comparison, the BVDV RT-PCR test had a higher rate of false negatives in all tissue types, especially for the ear notch samples (missing detection in at least 68% of the samples). The commercial BVDV RT-qPCRs and IHC detected 100% of the ear notch samples as positive. While ACE based on the BVDV glycoprotein Erns detected infection in at least 87% of ear notches, no infections were detected using NS3-based ACE. The BVDV RT-qPCR, ACE, and IHC yielded higher levels of detection than the HoBi-like virus-specific assays, although the lack of differentiation between BVDV and HoBi-like viruses would make these tests of limited use for the control and/or surveillance of persistent HoBi-like virus infection. An improvement in HoBi-like virus tests is required before a reliable HoBi-like PI surveillance program can be designed. PMID:25122860

  4. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Cancer.gov

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  5. Revision Process and Practice: A Kindergarten Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Many educators teach students that are reluctant about the revisions process in writing. However, this longitudinal study follows a group of students from kindergarten through 8th grade who embraced the importance of the revision process. (Contains 8 figures.)

  6. 76 FR 31381 - Office Of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ...), Section 8.1 on ``Electric Power--Introduction,'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS... proposed Revision 3 (ADAMS Accession No. ML070550067). The current revision issues a new Branch Technical Position (BTP) 8-8 on ``Onsite (Emergency Diesel Generators) and Offsite Power Sources Allowed Outage...

  7. Automated revision of CLIPS rule-bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick M.; Pazzani, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes CLIPS-R, a theory revision system for the revision of CLIPS rule-bases. CLIPS-R may be used for a variety of knowledge-base revision tasks, such as refining a prototype system, adapting an existing system to slightly different operating conditions, or improving an operational system that makes occasional errors. We present a description of how CLIPS-R revises rule-bases, and an evaluation of the system on three rule-bases.

  8. An Historical Comparison of Parental Involvement of Three Generations of Japanese Americans (Isseis, Niseis, and Sanseis) in the Education of Their Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoho, Alan R.

    A study was done that compared the parental involvement of three generations of Japanese Americans in their children's education, particularly their involvement in academic work and extracurricular activities and perceived barriers to involvement. First generation Japanese American immigrants are called "Isseis" in Japanese; second generation,…

  9. Air Pollution Primer. Revised Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Rena

    This revised and updated book is written to inform the citizens on the nature, causes, and effects of air pollution. It is written in terms familiar to the layman with the purpose of providing knowledge and motivation to spur community action on clean air policies. Numerous charts and drawings are provided to support discussion of air pollution…

  10. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  11. Ethical considerations in revision rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The problems that arise when reviewing another surgeon's work, the financial aspects of revision surgery, and the controversies that present in marketing and advertising will be explored. The technological advances of computer imaging and the Internet have introduced new problems that require our additional consideration.

  12. Collaborative Revision on a Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Cynthia; Newton, Robert

    A study investigated the effects of using a computer image projected on a large screen to teach revision to college students. Subjects, 19 students at DePauw University, enrolled in a writing intensive literature course in a Writing across the Curriculum program, were divided into test and control groups. It was hypothesized that the modeling of…

  13. Copyright Revision and the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Pierre-Yves

    Proposed revisions of Canada's copyright law are criticized for their failure to address some basic issues of creator's rights, and the academic community's legal responsibility in the infringement of copyrights is discussed. It is argued that the writers of the proposed changes have treated copyrights as property rights without due consideration…

  14. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian Values" relates…

  15. Ethnic Awareness Through Curriculum Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Michael Joseph

    This study compared the attitudes towards ethnic groups of high school students enrolled in a standard U.S. history course with the attitudes of students enrolled in a revised U.S. history course which emphasized ethnic awareness. A review of the literature indicated a need for ethnic awareness. The experimental group consisted of 16 students; the…

  16. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  17. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  18. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  19. "SOAR" to the Stars through Revising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Explains how a teacher uses the acronym SOAR (Sentences Organized and Revised) as the core of a game designed to motivate a class to revise their work through the promise of popcorn, free time, or snacks for their revision work. Describes a worksheet that forces students to pay attention to various parts of their paper. (TB)

  20. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form...

  1. The evolution of a manual revision.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2012-10-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® provides an in-depth overview of the Magnet Recognition Program's Application Manual revision process. The history of the 2005 Manual revision, an evidence-based review of the literature, and revisions to the 2008 Manual are key elements of this article. PMID:22968115

  2. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  3. SARP-II: Safeguards Accounting and Reports Program, Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Kempf, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    A computer code, SARP (Safeguards Accounting and Reports Program) which will generate and maintain at-facility safeguards accounting records, and generate IAEA safeguards reports based on accounting data input by the user, was completed in 1990 by the Safeguards, Safety, and Nonproliferation Division (formerly the Technical Support Organization) at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a task under the US Program of Technical Support to IAEA safeguards. The code was based on a State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC) for off-load refueled power reactor facilities, with model facility and safeguards accounting regime as described in IAEA Safeguards Publication STR-165. Since 1990, improvements in computing capabilities and comments and suggestions from users engendered revision of the original code. The result is an updated, revised version called SARP-II which is discussed in this report.

  4. Revised spatially distributed global livestock emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrar, G.; Wolf, J.; West, T. O.

    2015-12-01

    Livestock play an important role in agricultural carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Quantification and spatial distribution of methane and carbon dioxide produced by livestock is needed to develop bottom-up estimates for carbon monitoring. These estimates serve as stand-alone international emissions estimates, as input to global emissions modeling, and as comparisons or constraints to flux estimates from atmospheric inversion models. Recent results for the US suggest that the 2006 IPCC default coefficients may underestimate livestock methane emissions. In this project, revised coefficients were calculated for cattle and swine in all global regions, based on reported changes in body mass, quality and quantity of feed, milk production, and management of living animals and manure for these regions. New estimates of livestock methane and carbon dioxide emissions were calculated using the revised coefficients and global livestock population data. Spatial distribution of population data and associated fluxes was conducted using the MODIS Land Cover Type 5, version 5.1 (i.e. MCD12Q1 data product), and a previously published downscaling algorithm for reconciling inventory and satellite-based land cover data at 0.05 degree resolution. Preliminary results for 2013 indicate greater emissions than those calculated using the IPCC 2006 coefficients. Global total enteric fermentation methane increased by 6%, while manure management methane increased by 38%, with variation among species and regions resulting in improved spatial distributions of livestock emissions. These new estimates of total livestock methane are comparable to other recently reported studies for the entire US and the State of California. These new regional/global estimates will improve the ability to reconcile top-down and bottom-up estimates of methane production as well as provide updated global estimates for use in development and evaluation of Earth system models.

  5. Relativistic timescale analysis suggests lunar theory revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.

    1995-01-01

    The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by observing the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.

  6. Multiple Acetabular Revisions in THA - Poor Outcome Despite Maximum Effort

    PubMed Central

    Bischel, O; Seeger, JB; Krüge, M; Bitsch, BG

    2012-01-01

    A consecutive series of 52 acetabular revisions was evaluated retrospectively. Inclusion criteria for all patients were at least one former exchange of the acetabular component. Reconstruction was performed with reliable techniques and implants other than extensively porous coated device (e.g. tantalum). The mean follow up was 5.63 (0.01-14.05) years. Cumulative survival at 14.05 years with removal of the acetabular component due to aseptic loosening or the worst case criterion (removal of the acetabular component for any cause and/or lost to follow-up) as the end point was 66.38 (95 % C.-I.: 47.80-84.96) % and 58.42 (95 % C.-I.: 41.01-75.83) %, respectively. The cumulative survival rate with mechanical failure of the acetabular reconstruction as the endpoint was significantly lower in patients with two or more previous revisions in comparison to those with only one former procedure (log rank test: p=0,0112 respectively). The mean Merle d’Aubignée-score improved from 7.3 (0-14) preoperatively to 10.6 (0-17) points at latest follow up examination. Survival of acetabular reconstructions with common techniques and implants is decreasing with the number of previous revisions. This may cause major concerns with regard to the rising number of patients needing repeated revisions. Maximizing durability of primary THA, precise preoperative planning as well as improved techniques and implants for revision may decrease this problem in the long term. PMID:23193432

  7. Risk comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, A.; Hall, R.E.

    1981-02-01

    This report presents data for the comparison of societal risk from natural and man-made hazards. Only fatalities resulting from the hazards are used in the comparison, with the data and the comparative analysis taken from current literature. In comparing societal risks for most of the hazards, both expected values and frequency vs consequence curves are presented. For a subset of hazards, notably the power generation technologies (nuclear, coal, oil, and gas), which have not exhibited high consequence events (catastrophes), the comparisons are based on estimated expected values only. Individual risk data are presented in two ways, a probability of death within a year and the amount of life shortening of an average life span. 27 refs., 21 figs., 25 tabs.

  8. Electrical Power Generation. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Four classroom activities are included in this 8-10 period unit suitable for high school chemistry and physics classes. The first activity is a reading (12th-grade readability level determined by the Fry procedure) which explains electricity conversion, transportation, and efficiency ratings. The second and third activities are electrical energy…

  9. Generation of Requirements for Simulant Measurements. Revised, May 30, 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Edmunson, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a formal, logical explanation of the parameters selected for the Figure of Merit algorithm used to evaluate lunar regolith simulant. The objectives, requirements, assumptions and analysis behind the parameters is provided. From NASA's objectives for lunar simulants a requirement is derived to verify and validate simulant performance versus lunar regolith. This requirement leads to a specification that comparative measurements be taken the same way on the regolith and the simulant. In turn this leads to a set of 9 criteria with which to evaluate comparative measurement. Many of the potential measurements of interest are not defensible under these criteria, for example many geotechnical properties of interest were not explicitly measured during Apollo and they can only be measured in situ on the Moon. A 2005 workshop identified 32 properties of major interest to users (Sibille Carpenter Schlagheck, and French, 2006). Virtually all of the properties are tightly constrained, though not predictable, if just four parameters are controlled. Three: composition, size and shape, are recognized as being definable at the particle level. The fourth, density, is a bulk property. In recent work a fifth parameter has been identified, which will need to be added to future releases of the Figure of Merit: spectroscopy.

  10. National trends in revision spinal fusion in the USA: patient characteristics and complications.

    PubMed

    Rajaee, S S; Kanim, L E A; Bae, H W

    2014-06-01

    Using the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we identified national trends in revision spinal fusion along with a comprehensive comparison of comorbidities, inpatient complications and surgical factors of revision spinal fusion compared to primary spinal fusion. In 2009, there were 410 158 primary spinal fusion discharges and 22 128 revision spinal fusion discharges. Between 2002 and 2009, primary fusion increased at a higher rate compared with revision fusion (56.4% vs 51.0%; p < 0.001). In 2009, the mean length of stay and hospital charges were higher for revision fusion discharges than for primary fusion discharges (4.2 days vs 3.8 days, p < 0.001; USD $91 909 vs. $87 161, p < 0.001). In 2009, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used more in revision fusion than in primary fusion (39.6% vs 27.6%, p < 0.001), whereas interbody devices were used less in revision fusion (41.8% vs 56.6%, p < 0.001). In the multivariable logistic regression model for all spinal fusions, depression (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, p < 0.001), psychotic disorders (OR 1.49, p < 0.001), deficiency anaemias (OR 1.35, p < 0.001) and smoking (OR 1.10, p = 0.006) had a greater chance of occurrence in revision spinal fusion discharges than in primary fusion discharges, adjusting for other variables. In terms of complications, after adjusting for all significant comorbidities, this study found that dural tears (OR 1.41; p < 0.001) and surgical site infections (OR 3.40; p < 0.001) had a greater chance of occurrence in revision spinal fusion discharges than in primary fusion discharges (p < 0.001). A p-value < 0.01 was considered significant in all final analyses.

  11. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  12. Revision IPAA: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Larson, David W

    2014-07-01

    The history of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is one of success with durable surgical and functional results. However, pouch failure, due to infection, mechanical, or functional disability, represents a challenge to both surgeon and patient. Practicing surgeons who deal with the revision pouch face a variety of challenges. Success requires a strategy, which includes critical planning, preparation, and surgical techniques in order that surgeons continue to provide solutions and hope to patients.

  13. SOME ACHIEVE GREATNESS. RHETORIC CURRICULUM IV, REVISED TEACHER AND STUDENT VERSIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO CONSIDER THE IDEA OF THE HERO IN THIS 10TH-GRADE RHETORIC UNIT. EMPHASIS IS ON (1) THE INDUCTIVE PROCESS OF ARRIVING AT A GENERALIZATION, (2) THE PROBLEMS OF DEFINITION, INCLUDING QUALIFICATION AND COMPARISON, AND (3) THE PROCESSES OF SELECTIVITY AND REVISION. LITERARY SELECTIONS USED ARE "BEOWULF,""THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK,"…

  14. The Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test and Wechsler Memory Scale--Revised: Relationship to Everyday Memory Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltai, Deborah C.; Bowler, Rosemarie M.; Shore, Michael D.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (B. Wilson, 1987) and the Wechsler Memory Scale--Revised conducted with 20 neurotoxin-exposed and 20 unexposed adults finds that the two tests do not differ significantly in their relationships to estimates of everyday memory, and using both tests does not improve prediction of memory function.…

  15. Challenges and Demands on Automated Software Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonakdarpour, Borzoo; Kulkarni, Sandeep S.

    2008-01-01

    In the past three decades, automated program verification has undoubtedly been one of the most successful contributions of formal methods to software development. However, when verification of a program against a logical specification discovers bugs in the program, manual manipulation of the program is needed in order to repair it. Thus, in the face of existence of numerous unverified and un- certified legacy software in virtually any organization, tools that enable engineers to automatically verify and subsequently fix existing programs are highly desirable. In addition, since requirements of software systems often evolve during the software life cycle, the issue of incomplete specification has become a customary fact in many design and development teams. Thus, automated techniques that revise existing programs according to new specifications are of great assistance to designers, developers, and maintenance engineers. As a result, incorporating program synthesis techniques where an algorithm generates a program, that is correct-by-construction, seems to be a necessity. The notion of manual program repair described above turns out to be even more complex when programs are integrated with large collections of sensors and actuators in hostile physical environments in the so-called cyber-physical systems. When such systems are safety/mission- critical (e.g., in avionics systems), it is essential that the system reacts to physical events such as faults, delays, signals, attacks, etc, so that the system specification is not violated. In fact, since it is impossible to anticipate all possible such physical events at design time, it is highly desirable to have automated techniques that revise programs with respect to newly identified physical events according to the system specification.

  16. A COMPARISON OF URINARY ARSENIC SPECIATION VIA DIRECT NEBULIZATION AND ON-LINE PHOTOOXIDATION-HYDRIDE GENERATION WITH DETECTION BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic speciation continues to be important in assessing human and environmental exposure risk. Urinary arsenic analysis provides information on recent arsenic exposure. In this study, two sample introduction pathways: direct nebulization (DN) and hydride generation (HG) were ut...

  17. Seismic analyses of equipment in 2736-Z complex. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ocoma, E.C.

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the structural qualification for the existing equipment when subjected to seismic loading in the Plutonium Storage Complex. It replaces in entirety Revision 0 and reconciles the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) comments on Revision 0. The Complex consists of 2736-Z Building (plutonium storage vault), 2736-ZA Building (vault ventilation equipment building), and 2736-ZB Building (shipping/receiving, repackaging activities). The existing equipment structurally qualified in this report are the metal storage racks for 7 inch and lard cans in room 2 of Building 2736-Z; the cubicles, can holders and pedestals in rooms 1, 3, and 4 of Building 2736-Z; the ventilation duct including exhaust fans/motors, emergency diesel generator, and HEPA filter housing in Building 2736-ZA; the repackaging glovebox in Building 2736-ZB; and the interface duct between Buildings 2736-Z and 2736-ZA.

  18. Expedited Technology Demonstration Project Baseline Revision 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.G.; Densley, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    The Expedited Technology Demonstration Project Plan, MWNT Revised Baseline 3.0, replaces and significantly modifies the current baseline. The revised plan will focus efforts specifically on the demonstration of an integrated Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) system. In addition to the MSO primary unit, offgas, and salt recycle subsystems, the demonstrations will include the generation of robust final forms from process mineral residues. A simplified process flow chart for the expedited demonstration is shown. To minimize costs and to accelerate the schedule for deployment, the integrated system will be staged in an existing facility at LLNL equipped to handle hazardous and radioactive materials. The MSO systems will be activated in FY97, followed by the activation of final forms in FY98.

  19. Revised Burnup Code System SWAT: Description and Validation Using Postirradiation Examination Data

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki; Kiyosumi, Takehide

    2002-05-15

    The burnup code system Step-Wise Burnup Analysis Code System (SWAT) is revised for use in a burnup credit analysis. An important feature of the revised SWAT is that its functions are achieved by calling validated neutronics codes without any changes to the original codes. This feature is realized with a system function of the operating system, which allows the revised SWAT to be independent of the development status of each code.A package of the revised SWAT contains the latest libraries based on JENDL-3.2 and the second version of the JNDC FP library. These libraries allow us to analyze burnup problems, such as an analysis of postirradiation examination (PIE), using the latest evaluated data of not only cross sections but also fission yield and decay constants.Another function of the revised SWAT is a library generator for the ORIGEN2 code, which is one of the most reliable burnup codes. ORIGEN2 users can obtain almost the same results with the revised SWAT using the library prepared by this function.The validation of the revised SWAT is conducted by calculation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency burnup credit criticality safety benchmark Phase I-B and analyses of PIE data for spent fuel from Takahama Unit 3. The analysis of PIE data shows that the revised SWAT can predict the isotopic composition of main uranium and plutonium with a deviation of 5% from experimental results taken from UO{sub 2} fuels of 17 x 17 fuel assemblies. Many results of fission products including samarium are within a deviation of 10%. This means that the revised SWAT has high reliability to predict the isotopic composition for pressurized water reactor spent fuel.

  20. Generator acceptance test and inspection report

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1997-07-24

    This Acceptance Test Report(ATR) is the completed testing and inspection of the new portable generator. The testing and inspection is to verify that the generator provided by the vendor meets the requirements of specification WHC-S-0252, Revision 2. Attached is various other documentation to support the inspection and testing.

  1. Addiction and “Generation Me:” Narcissistic and Prosocial Behaviors of Adolescents with Substance Dependency Disorder in Comparison to Normative Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    CARTER, REBECCA R.; JOHNSON, SHANNON M.; EXLINE, JULIE J.; POST, STEPHEN G.; PAGANO, MARIA E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore narcissistic and prosocial behaviors as reported by adolescents with and without substance dependency disorder (SDD). This study employs a quasi-experimental design using SDD adolescents compared with two normative samples of adolescents. In comparison to normative adolescents, adolescents with SDD were strongly distinguished by overt narcissistic behaviors and less monetary giving. Levels of narcissistic and prosocial behaviors among adolescents with SDD suggest a connection between self-centeredness and addiction. Results also suggest volunteerism as a potential option to counter narcissism in substance dependent adolescents. PMID:22544995

  2. Students' Intentions and Social Support as Predictors of Self-Reported Academic Behaviors: A Comparison of First- and Continuing-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purswell, Katherine E.; Yazedjian, Ani; Toews, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine academic intentions, parental support, and peer support as predictors of self-reported academic behaviors among a sample of 329 first- and continuing-generation college freshmen. Regression analyses revealed that different variables predicted academic behaviors for the three groups examined (students…

  3. Search for QGP signals at AGS with a TPC spectrometer, and comparison of our event generator predictions for plasma model and cascade interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Foley, K.J.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.

    1988-06-21

    We have developed and successfully tested a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer to search for QGP signals produced by ion beams at AGS. We also developed a cascade and plasma event generator the predictions of which are used to illustrate how our technique can detect possible plasma signals. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Problems and Prospects of Studying Immigrant Adaptation from the 1990 Population Census: From Generational Comparisons to the Process of "Becoming American."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschman, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Examines alternative methods to measure the status of "second-generation immigrants" using 1990 Census of Population data. Research of the variations in socioeconomic adaptation by duration of American residence among immigrants who arrived as children or teenagers reveals a dominant pattern of successful adaptation with greater exposure to…

  5. A Further Comparison of Manual Signing, Picture Exchange, and Speech-Generating Devices as Communication Modes for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meer, Larah; Sutherland, Dean; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We compared acquisition of, and preference for, manual signing (MS), picture exchange (PE), and speech-generating devices (SGDs) in four children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Intervention was introduced across participants in a non-concurrent multiple-baseline design and acquisition of the three communication modes was compared in an…

  6. WASTE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM PLAN - REVISION 7

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, LK

    2002-01-08

    The primary changes that have been made to this revision reflect the relocation of the Waste Certification Official (WCO) organizationally from the Quality Services Division (QSD) into the Laboratory Waste Services (LWS) Organization. Additionally, the responsibilities for program oversight have been differentiated between the QSD and LWS. The intent of this effort is to ensure that those oversight functions, which properly belonged to the WCO, moved with that function; but retain an independent oversight function outside of the LWS Organization ensuring the potential for introduction of organizational bias, regarding programmatic and technical issues, is minimized. The Waste Certification Program (WCP) itself has been modified to allow the waste certification function to be performed by any of the personnel within the LWS Waste Acceptance/Certification functional area. However, a single individual may not perform both the technical waste acceptance review and the final certification review on the same 2109 data package. Those reviews must be performed by separate individuals in a peer review process. There will continue to be a designated WCO who will have lead programmatic responsibility for the WCP and will exercise overall program operational oversite as well as determine the overall requirements of the certification program. The quality assurance organization will perform independent, outside oversight to ensure that any organizational bias does not degrade the integrity of the waste certification process. The core elements of the previous WCP have been retained, however, the terms and process structure have been modified.. There are now two ''control points,'' (1) the data package enters the waste certification process with the signature of the Generator Interface/Generator Interface Equivalent (GI/GIE), (2) the package is ''certified'', thus exiting the process. The WCP contains three steps, (1) the technical review for waste acceptance, (2) a review of the

  7. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  8. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  9. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  10. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  11. Head-to-head comparison of protocol modifications for the generation of collagen-induced arthritis in a specific-pathogen free facility using DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Sherry; Strait, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a widely used mouse model for studying inflammatory arthritis (IA). However, CIA induction protocols differ between laboratories, and direct comparison between protocol variations has not been reported. To address this issue, DBA/1 mice housed in conventional and specific-pathogen free (SPF) facilities were administered various combinations of two doses of collagen type II (CII) in complete (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA); some mice were also injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or additional CII at specific intervals. Mice were evaluated for IA over the subsequent 2 months. Depending directly on the combination of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS used, the incidence of IA ranged between 20%-100%, and severity extended from mild to severe even in an SPF environment. Our results demonstrate for the first time in head-to-head comparisons that specific variations in the use of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS can induce a range of arthritic disease intensity and severity in an SPF facility. Thus, distinct experimental settings can be designed for robust assessment of factors that either exacerbate or inhibit arthritis pathogenesis. Furthermore, by achieving 100% incidence in an SPF facility, the protocols provide a practical and humane benefit by reducing the number of mice necessary for experimental assessment. PMID:26956089

  12. Comparison of material flows in sewage-free and sewage-generating flue-gas purification systems of municipal waste incineration plants

    SciTech Connect

    Achternbosch, M.; Richers, U.

    1998-07-01

    During incineration of waste in waste incineration plants, polluted flue gases are generated which have to be subjected to flue gas purification. Although the legal requirements are nearly unambiguous, the question of whether wet flue gas purification is to be performed in a sewage-free or sewage-generating manner is discussed controversially by experts in the Federal Republic of Germany. As a contribution to this discussion, material flow studies of sewage-free and sewage-generating flue gas purification processes in waste incineration plants were performed by ITAS in cooperation with ITC-TAB. The study covered three waste incineration plants, two of which were operated in a sewage-generating and one in a sewage-free manner. The data and information submitted by most of the plant operators are not sufficient for a comprehensive balancing of flue gas purification systems in waste incineration plants. For this reason, plant operation often is not optimally tailored to the substances prevailing. During operation, at least temporary strong superstoichiometric dosage of auxiliary chemicals cannot be excluded. By means of plausibility assumptions and model calculations, closed balancing of most plants could be achieved. Moreover, it was demonstrated by the balancing of technical-scale waste incineration plants that the material flows in wet flue gas purification re less dependent on the design of the flue gas purification section (sewage-free/sewage-generating), but considerably affected by the operation of the flue gas purification system (e.g., volume of absorption agents used). Hence, material flows can be controlled in a certain range.

  13. Proposed revision of the Cumberland System Power Marketing Policy and subsequent contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Southeastern Power Administration has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0811) evaluating the proposed revision of the Cumberland System Power Marketing Policy and Subsequent Contracts. The findings of the Environmental Assessment (EA) are: the only significant change from the existing policy will be the term of the contracts executed under the revised policy; and there will be no addition of major new generation resources; there will be no new loads; there will be no major changes in the operating parameters of power generation resources. This paper discusses the need for action, the alternative and the environmental impacts.

  14. Proposed revision of the Cumberland System Power Marketing Policy and subsequent contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Southeastern Power Administration has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0811) evaluating the proposed revision of the Cumberland System Power Marketing Policy and Subsequent Contracts. The findings of the Environmental Assessment (EA) are: the only significant change from the existing policy will be the term of the contracts executed under the revised policy; and there will be no addition of major new generation resources; there will be no new loads; there will be no major changes in the operating parameters of power generation resources. This paper discusses the need for action, the alternative and the environmental impacts.

  15. Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

  16. Comparison of high-order-harmonic generation on single-layer graphene flakes with armchair and zigzag types in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Zhong, Huiying; Yan, Bing; Chen, Yi; Jiang, Yuanfei; Wang, Ting-feng; Shao, Jun-feng; Zheng, Chang-bin; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2016-03-01

    The high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) of graphene in an intense laser field is investigated using the strong-field approximation method. The initial wave function is presented by gaussian and gamess software. The molecular structure along the x and y axes represents different types of graphene: armchair and zigzag, respectively. The results show that the HHG intensity of the armchair type of graphene is two magnitudes higher than that of the zigzag type in the plateau area. The ionization yield and electron density distribution are also presented to further explain this difference. Finally, by superposing a properly selected range of harmonics, a main pulse with the duration of 91 and 99 attoseconds accompanied by weak satellite pulses will be generated for the case of armchair and zigzag graphene, respectively, and the corresponding intensity from armchair graphene is much higher than that from zigzag graphene.

  17. Evaluation of a main steam line break with induced, multiple tube ruptures: A comparison of NUREG 1477 (Draft) and transient methodologies Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, K.R.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the approach taken to analyze the radiological consequences of a postulated main steam line break event, with one or more tube ruptures, for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The analysis was required to support the restart of PVNGS Unit 2 following the steam generator tube rupture event on March 14, 1993 and to justify continued operation of Units 1 and 3. During the post-event evaluation, the NRC expressed concern that Unit 2 could have been operating with degraded tubes and that similar conditions could exist in Units 1 and 3. The NRC therefore directed that a safety assessment be performed to evaluate a worst case scenario in which a non-isolable main steam line break occurs inducing one or more tube failures in the faulted steam generator. This assessment was to use the generic approach described in NUREG 1477, Voltage-Based Interim Plugging Criteria for Steam Generator Tubes - Task Group Report. An analysis based on the NUREG approach was performed but produced unacceptable results for off-site and control room thyroid doses. The NUREG methodology, however, does not account for plant thermal-hydraulic transient effects, system performance, or operator actions which could be credited to mitigate dose consequences. To deal with these issues, a more detailed analysis methodology was developed using a modified version of the Combustion Engineering Plant Analysis Code, which examines the dose consequences for a main steam line break transient with induced tube failures for a spectrum equivalent to 1 to 4 double ended guillotine U-tube breaks. By incorporating transient plant system responses and operator actions, the analysis demonstrates that the off-site and control room does consequences for a MSLBGTR can be reduced to acceptable limits. This analysis, in combination with other corrective and recovery actions, provided sufficient justification for continued operation of PVNGS Units 1 and 3, and for the subsequent restart of Unit 2.

  18. Comparison of advanced DSP techniques for spectrally efficient Nyquist-WDM signal generation using digital FIR filters at transmitters based on higher-order modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yi; Wang, Junyi; Pan, Zhongqi

    2016-02-01

    To support the ever-increasing demand for high-speed optical communications, Nyquist spectral shaping serves as a promising technique to improve spectral efficiency (SE) by generating near-rectangular spectra with negligible crosstalk and inter-symbol interference in wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) systems. Compared with specially-designed optical methods, DSP-based electrical filters are more flexible as they can generate different filter shapes and modulation formats. However, such transmitter-side pre-filtering approach is sensitive to the limited taps of finite-impulse-response (FIR) filter, for the complexity of the required DSP and digital-to-analog converter (DAC) is limited by the cost and power consumption of optical transponder. In this paper, we investigate the performance and complexity of transmitter-side FIR-based DSP with polarization-division-multiplexing (PDM) high-order quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM) formats. Our results show that Nyquist 64-QAM, 16-QAM and QPSK WDM signals can be sufficiently generated by digital FIR filters with 57, 37, and 17 taps respectively. Then we explore the effects of the required spectral pre-emphasis, bandwidth and resolution on the performance of Nyquist-WDM systems. To obtain negligible OSNR penalty with a roll-off factor of 0.1, two-channel-interleaved DAC requires a Gaussian electrical filter with the bandwidth of 0.4-0.6 times of the symbol rate for PDM-64QAM, 0.35-0.65 times for PDM-16QAM, and 0.3-0.8 times for PDM-QPSK, with required DAC resolutions as 8, 7, 6 bits correspondingly. As a tradeoff, PDM-64QAM can be a promising candidate for SE improvement in next-generation optical metro networks.

  19. Comparison of plasma generated nitrogen fertilizer to conventional fertilizers ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate for pre-emergent and seedling growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andhavarapu, A.; King, W.; Lindsay, A.; Byrns, B.; Knappe, D.; Fonteno, W.; Shannon, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma source generated nitrogen fertilizer is compared to conventional nitrogen fertilizers in water for plant growth. Root, shoot sizes, and weights are used to examine differences between plant treatment groups. With a simple coaxial structure creating a large-volume atmospheric glow discharge, a 162 MHz generator drives the air plasma. The VHF plasma source emits a steady state glow; the high drive frequency is believed to inhibit the glow-to-arc transition for non-thermal discharge generation. To create the plasma activated water (PAW) solutions used for plant treatment, the discharge is held over distilled water until a 100 ppm nitrate aqueous concentration is achieved. The discharge is used to incorporate nitrogen species into aqueous solution, which is used to fertilize radishes, marigolds, and tomatoes. In a four week experiment, these plants are watered with four different solutions: tap water, dissolved ammonium nitrate DI water, dissolved sodium nitrate DI water, and PAW. Ammonium nitrate solution has the same amount of total nitrogen as PAW; sodium nitrate solution has the same amount of nitrate as PAW. T-tests are used to determine statistical significance in plant group growth differences. PAW fertilization chemical mechanisms are presented.

  20. Comparison of a semi-automatic annotation tool and a natural language processing application for the generation of clinical statement entries

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Nai-Yuan; Lai, Wei-Shao; Liou, Der-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Electronic medical records with encoded entries should enhance the semantic interoperability of document exchange. However, it remains a challenge to encode the narrative concept and to transform the coded concepts into a standard entry-level document. This study aimed to use a novel approach for the generation of entry-level interoperable clinical documents. Methods Using HL7 clinical document architecture (CDA) as the example, we developed three pipelines to generate entry-level CDA documents. The first approach was a semi-automatic annotation pipeline (SAAP), the second was a natural language processing (NLP) pipeline, and the third merged the above two pipelines. We randomly selected 50 test documents from the i2b2 corpora to evaluate the performance of the three pipelines. Results The 50 randomly selected test documents contained 9365 words, including 588 Observation terms and 123 Procedure terms. For the Observation terms, the merged pipeline had a significantly higher F-measure than the NLP pipeline (0.89 vs 0.80, p<0.0001), but a similar F-measure to that of the SAAP (0.89 vs 0.87). For the Procedure terms, the F-measure was not significantly different among the three pipelines. Conclusions The combination of a semi-automatic annotation approach and the NLP application seems to be a solution for generating entry-level interoperable clinical documents. PMID:25332357

  1. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Varrone, C; Heggeset, T M B; Le, S B; Haugen, T; Markussen, S; Skiadas, I V; Gavala, H N

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable and stable MMC, trying to overcome inhibition problems and enhance substrate degradation efficiency, as well as generation of soluble fermentation products. Repeated transfers in small batches and fed-batch conditions have been applied, comparing the use of different inoculum, growth media, and Kinetic Control. The adaptation of activated sludge inoculum was performed successfully and continued unhindered for several months. The best results showed a substrate degradation efficiency of almost 100% (about 10 g/L glycerol in 21 h) and different dominant metabolic products were obtained, depending on the selection strategy (mainly 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, or butyrate). On the other hand, anaerobic sludge exhibited inactivation after a few transfers. To circumvent this problem, fed-batch mode was used as an alternative adaptation strategy, which led to effective substrate degradation and high 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production. Changes in microbial composition were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing, revealing a dominance of glycerol consuming species, such as Clostridium, Klebsiella, and Escherichia.

  2. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    Varrone, C.; Heggeset, T. M. B.; Le, S. B.; Haugen, T.; Markussen, S.; Skiadas, I. V.; Gavala, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable and stable MMC, trying to overcome inhibition problems and enhance substrate degradation efficiency, as well as generation of soluble fermentation products. Repeated transfers in small batches and fed-batch conditions have been applied, comparing the use of different inoculum, growth media, and Kinetic Control. The adaptation of activated sludge inoculum was performed successfully and continued unhindered for several months. The best results showed a substrate degradation efficiency of almost 100% (about 10 g/L glycerol in 21 h) and different dominant metabolic products were obtained, depending on the selection strategy (mainly 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, or butyrate). On the other hand, anaerobic sludge exhibited inactivation after a few transfers. To circumvent this problem, fed-batch mode was used as an alternative adaptation strategy, which led to effective substrate degradation and high 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production. Changes in microbial composition were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing, revealing a dominance of glycerol consuming species, such as Clostridium, Klebsiella, and Escherichia. PMID:26509171

  3. 36 CFR 219.9 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PLANNING National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning The Framework for Planning § 219.9 Revision. (a) Application..., new or revised Forest Service policies, relevant portions of the Forest Service national...

  4. 75 FR 60485 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... On January 25, 2007 (72 FR 3429), the NRC published a notice announcing that the NRC was undertaking a major revision of its Enforcement Policy. On September 15, 2008 (73 FR 53286), the NRC published a... proposed revised Policy was published (73 FR 61442) on October 16, 2008. The public comment period for...

  5. Positive Culture Rate in Revision Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hobgood, E. Rhett

    2009-01-01

    We recognized a trend of positive cultures taken from presumably uninfected shoulders during revision arthroplasty. Owing to the indolent nature of common shoulder pathogens such as Propionibacterium acnes, these cultures often become positive several days, even weeks, after surgery. Having concern regarding the potential importance of these positive cultures, we reviewed our revision arthroplasty population to determine the rate of positive intraoperative cultures in patients presumed to be aseptic, to characterize the isolated organisms, and to determine the subsequent development of infection. We retrospectively reviewed 27 patients (28 revisions) presumed to be uninfected between April 2005 and October 2007. Intraoperative cultures were positive in eight (29%) of the 28 revisions. Propionibacterium acnes was isolated in six. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in one patient and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in one patient. One-year followup was available on 24 of the 28 revisions. Two of the eight culture-positive revisions had a subsequent infection develop. Cultures taken at revision surgery for failed shoulder arthroplasty are often positive, and our findings document the importance of these positive cultures. Our data confirm previous reports isolating Propionibacterium acnes as a primary pathogen in revision shoulder arthroplasty. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19434469

  6. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  7. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  8. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  9. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  10. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  11. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  12. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  13. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  14. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  15. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  16. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  17. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  18. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  19. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  20. How Mind Works To Revise Compositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Deh-nan

    This study investigated cognitive processes involved in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students' correcting and revising drafts after receiving oral feedback from their teachers, noting factors that led to better written products and factors that did not improve student writing. The study examined what kinds of revision strategies students…

  1. Revised State Budget Sells Kids Short

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Administration's May Revision of the 2012-2013 state budget addresses a $15.7 billion shortfall through funding shifts, cuts, and new revenue sources that place children squarely in harms way. California's kids are already grossly underserved relative to the rest of the nation's children. If the May Revise budget is passed by the Legislature,…

  2. 25 CFR 276.14 - Budget revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revision. 276.14 Section 276.14 Indians BUREAU OF... UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.14 Budget revision. Criteria and procedures to be followed by grantees in reporting deviations from grant budgets and requesting approval for...

  3. 48 CFR 2801.270-1 - Revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Revisions. 2801.270-1 Section 2801.270-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE General DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Administration 2801.270-1 Revisions. In addition to...

  4. 36 CFR 219.9 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Revision. 219.9 Section 219.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PLANNING National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning The Framework for Planning § 219.9 Revision. (a)...

  5. The Supervisor Emphasis Rating Form-Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanning, Wayne; Freeman, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    Discusses revision of Supervisor Emphasis Rating Form (SERF) into ipsative instrument and suggests future research that could profitably be done with new instrument. Explains rationale for choosing ipsative format and presents findings of study conducted to establish instrument reliability. SERF-Revised is appended. (Author/NB)

  6. Deep prosthetic joint infection: a qualitative study of the impact on patients and their experiences of revision surgery

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Ashley W; Whitehouse, Michael R; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Around 1% of patients who have a hip replacement have deep prosthetic joint infection (PJI) afterwards. PJI is often treated with antibiotics plus a single revision operation (1-stage revision), or antibiotics plus a 2-stage revision process involving more than 1 operation. This study aimed to characterise the impact and experience of PJI and treatment on patients, including comparison of 1-stage with 2-stage revision treatment. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews with patients who had undergone surgical revision treatment for PJI. Patients were interviewed between 2 weeks and 12 months postdischarge. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed, anonymised and analysed using a thematic approach, with 20% of transcripts double-coded. Setting Patients from 5 National Health Service (NHS) orthopaedic departments treating PJI in England and Wales were interviewed in their homes (n=18) or at hospital (n=1). Participants 19 patients participated (12 men, 7 women, age range 56–88 years, mean age 73.2 years). Results Participants reported receiving between 1 and 15 revision operations after their primary joint replacement. Analysis indicated that participants made sense of their experience through reference to 3 key phases: the period of symptom onset, the treatment period and protracted recovery after treatment. By conceptualising their experience in this way, and through themes that emerged in these periods, they conveyed the ordeal that PJI represented. Finally, in light of the challenges of PJI, they described the need for support in all of these phases. 2-stage revision had greater impact on participants’ mobility, and further burdens associated with additional complications. Conclusions Deep PJI impacted on all aspects of patients’ lives. 2-stage revision had greater impact than 1-stage revision on participants’ well-being because the time in between revision procedures meant long periods of immobility and related psychological distress

  7. 77 FR 73454 - Revision of Information Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... requirements; revise the Grant Application Narrative questions to clarify new concepts; Simplify language and... alignment between narrative sections and the performance measures work plans. The proposed revisions do...

  8. Comparison between mass spectra of individual organic particles generated by UV laser ablation and in the IR/UV two-step mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Imre, Dan

    2009-04-01

    In ablation-based single particle mass spectrometry it is common to find that the mass spectra of particles with identical compositions exhibit significant particle-to-particle fluctuations and high degree of fragmentation. This is particularly true when it comes to particles containing organic compounds. At laser fluence that is sufficient to ionize sulfates, mass spectra of the identical organic particles are classified into multitude of classes, some of which are indistinguishable from elemental carbon. In contrast, the individual particle mass spectra generated in two-step mode, in which an IR laser pulse is used to evaporate the semivolatile particle components and a time delayed UV laser pulse is used to ionize the evaporating plume, exhibit greatly diminished particle-to-particle fluctuations and significantly improved mass spectral quality. Since individual particle mass spectra must first be classified and only then can be averaged and analyzed, the IR/UV mode greatly improves the capability to properly quantify particle compositions. We present an experimental investigation of the properties and behavior of individual particle mass spectra of organic particles that are generated by ablation and in the two-step mode as function of UV laser fluence and the delay between the two lasers. The study shows that the two-step mode yields highly reproducible mass spectra that contain sufficient detail to allow molecular identification. In addition it produces significantly higher mass spectral intensities that are linearly related to the mass of organics in the particles. In contrast, ablation generated mass spectra were found to exhibit high degree of fragmentation and large particle-to-particle fluctuations.

  9. Comparison of acid generation in EUV lithography films of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) and noria adamantyl ester (Noria-AD(50)).

    PubMed

    Wu, Weiqiang; Nuzhdin, Kirill; Vyushkova, Mariya; Janik, Ireneusz; Bartels, David

    2012-05-31

    The mechanism for acid production in phenolic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography films containing triphenylsulfonium triflate (Ph(3)S(+)TfO(-)) acid generator has been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and by use of the acid indicator coumarin 6 (C6). Gamma radiolysis was substituted for the EUV radiation with the assumption that the chemistry generated by ionization of the matrix does not depend on the ionization source. Poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) was first investigated as a well-studied standard, after which the water-wheel-like cyclic oligomer derivative containing pendant adamantyl ester groups, noria-AD(50), was investigated. EPR measurements confirm that the dominant free radical product is a phenoxyl derivative (PHS-O(•) or noria-O(•)) that exhibits quite slow stretched exponential recombination kinetics at room temperature. Also observed at 77 K was the presence of a significant hydrogen atom product of radiolysis. The G value or yield of acid production in thin lithography films was measured with the C6 indicator on a fused silica substrate. It was found that a significant amount of acid is generated via energy transfer from the irradiated fused-silica substrate to the Ph(3)S(+)TfO(-) in the films. By varying the film thickness on the substrates, the substrate effect on the acid yield was quantitatively determined. After subtraction of the contribution from the substrates, the acid yield G value in the PHS film with 10 wt % Ph(3)S(+)TfO(-) and 5 wt % C6 was determined to be 2.5 ± 0.3 protons per 100 eV of radiation. The acid yield of noria-AD(50) films was found to be 3.2 ± 0.3 protons per 100 eV. PMID:22607084

  10. The mechanical interactions between an American football cleat and playing surfaces in-situ at loads and rates generated by elite athletes: a comparison of playing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kent, Richard; Forman, Jason L; Crandall, Jeff; Lessley, David

    2015-03-01

    This study quantified the mechanical interactions between an American football cleat and eight surfaces used by professional American football teams. Loading conditions were applied with a custom-built testing apparatus designed to represent play-relevant maneuvers of elite athletes. Two natural grass and six infill artificial surfaces were tested with the cleated portion of a shoe intended for use on either surface type. In translation tests with a 2. 8-kN vertical load, the grass surfaces limited the horizontal force on the cleats by tearing. This tearing was not observed with the artificial surfaces, which allowed less motion and generated greater horizontal force (3.2 kN vs. 4.5 kN, p < 0.05). Similarly, rotation tests generated less angular displacement and greater torque on the artificial surfaces (145 N m vs. 197 N m, p < 0.05). Translation/drop tests, in which the foot-form was launched into the surfaces with both horizontal and vertical velocity components generated less peak horizontal force on the natural surfaces than on the artificial surfaces (2.4 kN vs. 3.0 kN, p < 0.05). These results suggest a force-limiting mechanism inherent to natural grass surfaces. Future work should consider implications of these findings for performance and injury risk and should evaluate the findings' sensitivity to cleat pattern and playing conditions.

  11. Revised and extended UTILITIES for the RATIP package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkinen, J.; Fritzsche, S.; Heinäsmäki, S.

    2006-09-01

    in order to facilitate the interpretation of complex spectra. A few further tasks, such as the direct access to the one-electron matrix elements for some given set of orbital functions, have been found useful also in the analysis of data. Summary of revisions: extraction and handling of atomic data within the framework of RATIP. With the revised version, we now 'add' another 13 tasks which refer to the manipulation of data files, the generation and interpretation of Auger spectra, the computation of various one- and two-electron matrix elements as well as the evaluation of momentum densities and grid parameters. Owing to the rather large number of subtasks, the main menu has been divided into seven groups from which the individual tasks can be selected very similarly as before. Typical running time: The program responds promptly for most of the tasks. The responding time for some tasks, such as the generation of a relativistic momentum density, strongly depends on the size of the corresponding data files and the number of grid points. Unusual features of the program: A total of 29 different tasks are supported by the program. Starting from the main menu, the user is guided interactively through the program by a dialog and a few additional explanations. For each task, a short summary about its function is displayed before the program prompts for all the required input data.

  12. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  13. Differences in Mechanisms of Failure, Intraoperative Findings, and Surgical Characteristics Between Single- and Multiple-Revision ACL Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James L.; Allen, Christina R.; Stephens, Thomas E.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Wright, Rick W.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The factors that lead to patients failing multiple anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are not well understood. Hypothesis Multiple-revision ACL reconstruction will have different characteristics than first-time revision in terms of previous and current graft selection, mode of failure, chondral/meniscal injuries, and surgical charactieristics. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A prospective multicenter ACL revision database was utilized for the time period from March 2006 to June 2011. Patients were divided into those who underwent a single-revision ACL reconstruction and those who underwent multiple-revision ACL reconstructions. The primary outcome variable was Marx activity level. Primary data analyses between the groups included a comparison of graft type, perceived mechanism of failure, associated injury (meniscus, ligament, and cartilage), reconstruction type, and tunnel position. Data were compared by analysis of variance with a post hoc Tukey test. Results A total of 1200 patients (58% men; median age, 26 years) were enrolled, with 1049 (87%) patients having a primary revision and 151 (13%) patients having a second or subsequent revision. Marx activity levels were significantly higher (9.77) in the primary-revision group than in those patients with multiple revisions (6.74). The most common cause of reruptures was a traumatic, noncontact ACL graft injury in 55% of primary-revision patients; 25% of patients had a nontraumatic, gradual-onset recurrent injury, and 11% had a traumatic, contact injury. In the multiple-revision group, a nontraumatic, gradual-onset injury was the most common cause of recurrence (47%), followed by traumatic noncontact (35%) and nontraumatic sudden onset (11%) (P < .01 between groups). Chondral injuries in the medial compartment were significantly more common in the multiple-revision group than in the single-revision group, as were chondral injuries in the patellofemoral

  14. Comparison of adsorption behavior of PCDD/Fs on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons in a bench-scale dioxin generating system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujian; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Shuaixi; Zhao, Xiyuan; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    Porous carbon-based materials are commonly used to remove various organic and inorganic pollutants from gaseous and liquid effluents and products. In this study, the adsorption of dioxins on both activated carbons and multi-walled carbon nanotube was internally compared, via series of bench scale experiments. A laboratory-scale dioxin generator was applied to generate PCDD/Fs with constant concentration (8.3 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3)). The results confirm that high-chlorinated congeners are more easily adsorbed on both activated carbons and carbon nanotubes than low-chlorinated congeners. Carbon nanotubes also achieved higher adsorption efficiency than activated carbons even though they have smaller BET-surface. Carbon nanotubes reached the total removal efficiency over 86.8 % to be compared with removal efficiencies of only 70.0 and 54.2 % for the two other activated carbons tested. In addition, because of different adsorption mechanisms, the removal efficiencies of carbon nanotubes dropped more slowly with time than was the case for activated carbons. It could be attributed to the abundant mesopores distributed in the surface of carbon nanotubes. They enhanced the pore filled process of dioxin molecules during adsorption. In addition, strong interactions between the two benzene rings of dioxin molecules and the hexagonal arrays of carbon atoms in the surface make carbon nanotubes have bigger adsorption capacity. PMID:25728198

  15. Comparison of (bio-)transformation methods for the generation of metabolite-like compound libraries of p38α MAP kinase inhibitors using high-resolution screening.

    PubMed

    Falck, David; Rahimi Pirkolachachi, Fatie; Giera, Martin; Honing, Maarten; Kool, Jeroen; Niessen, Wilfried M A

    2014-01-01

    Four hydrophobic p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors were refluxed with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide at 80°C and irradiated with visible light in order to generate more hydrophilic conversion products. The resulting mixtures were analyzed in a high-resolution screening (HRS) platform, featuring liquid chromatographic separation coupled in parallel with a fluorescence enhancement based continuous-flow affinity bioassay towards the p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase and with high-resolution (tandem) mass spectrometry on an ion-trap-time-of-flight hybrid instrument. The results were compared with similar data where chemical diversity was achieved by means of electrochemical conversion or incubation with either human liver microsomes or cytochrome P450s from Bacillus megaterium (BM3s). In total, more than 50 conversion products were identified. The metabolite-like compound libraries studied are discussed in terms of the reactions enabled, the retention of affinity, and the change in hydrophilicity by modification, in summary the ability to generate bioactive, more hydrophilic potential lead compounds. In this context, HRS is demonstrated to be an effective tool as it reduces the effort directed towards laborious synthesis and purification schemes.

  16. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants modify apolipoprotein A-I and generate dysfunctional high-density lipoproteins: comparison of hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) with hypochlorous acid (HOCl).

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Katrina A; Pattison, David I; Brown, Bronwyn E; Hou, Liming; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2013-01-15

    Oxidative modification of HDLs (high-density lipoproteins) by MPO (myeloperoxidase) compromises its anti-atherogenic properties, which may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Although it has been established that HOCl (hypochlorous acid) produced by MPO targets apoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I), the major apolipoprotein of HDLs, the role of the other major oxidant generated by MPO, HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid), in the generation of dysfunctional HDLs has not been examined. In the present study, we characterize the structural and functional modifications of lipid-free apoA-I and rHDL (reconstituted discoidal HDL) containing apoA-I complexed with phospholipid, induced by HOSCN and its decomposition product, OCN- (cyanate). Treatment of apoA-I with HOSCN resulted in the oxidation of tryptophan residues, whereas OCN- induced carbamylation of lysine residues to yield homocitrulline. Tryptophan residues were more readily oxidized on apoA-I contained in rHDLs. Exposure of lipid-free apoA-I to HOSCN and OCN- significantly reduced the extent of cholesterol efflux from cholesterol-loaded macrophages when compared with unmodified apoA-I. In contrast, HOSCN did not affect the anti-inflammatory properties of rHDL. The ability of HOSCN to impair apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, particularly in smokers who have high plasma levels of SCN- (thiocyanate). PMID:23088652

  17. A geometric comparison of video camera-captured raster data to vector-parented raster data generated by the X-Y digitizing table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swalm, C.; Pelletier, R.; Rickman, D.; Gilmore, K.

    1989-01-01

    The relative accuracy of a georeferenced raster data set captured by the Megavision 1024XM system using the Videk Megaplus CCD cameras is compared to a georeferenced raster data set generated from vector lines manually digitized through the ELAS software package on a Summagraphics X-Y digitizer table. The study also investigates the amount of time necessary to fully complete the rasterization of the two data sets, evaluating individual areas such as time necessary to generate raw data, time necessary to edit raw data, time necessary to georeference raw data, and accuracy of georeferencing against a norm. Preliminary results exhibit a high level of agreement between areas of the vector-parented data and areas of the captured file data where sufficient control points were chosen. Maps of 1:20,000 scale were digitized into raster files of 5 meter resolution per pixel and overall error in RMS was estimated at less than eight meters. Such approaches offer time and labor-saving advantages as well as increasing the efficiency of project scheduling and enabling the digitization of new types of data.

  18. Chem-Prep PZT 95/5 for Neutron Generator Applications: Particle Size Distribution Comparison of Development and Production-Scale Powders

    SciTech Connect

    SIPOLA, DIANA L.; VOIGT, JAMES A.; LOCKWOOD, STEVEN J.; RODMAN-GONZALES, EMILY D.

    2002-07-01

    The Materials Chemistry Department 1846 has developed a lab-scale chem-prep process for the synthesis of PNZT 95/5, a ferroelectric material that is used in neutron generator power supplies. This process (Sandia Process, or SP) has been successfully transferred to and scaled by Department 14192 (Ceramics and Glass Department), (Transferred Sandia Process, or TSP), to meet the future supply needs of Sandia for its neutron generator production responsibilities. In going from the development-size SP batch (1.6 kg/batch) to the production-scale TSP powder batch size (10 kg/batch), it was important that it be determined if the scaling process caused any ''performance-critical'' changes in the PNZT 95/5 being produced. One area where a difference was found was in the particle size distributions of the calcined PNZT powders. Documented in this SAND report are the results of an experimental study to determine the origin of the differences in the particle size distribution of the SP and TSP powders.

  19. Flupentixol use and adverse reactions in comparison with other common first- and second-generation antipsychotics: data from the AMSP study.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, R; Engel, R R; Möller, H-J; Rüther, E; van der Velden, J W; Stübner, S

    2014-03-01

    This study compares the first-generation antipsychotic (FGA) flupentixol to haloperidol and common second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) as to drug utilization and severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in clinical treatment of schizophrenia inpatients using data from the drug safety program Arzneimittelsicherheit in der Psychiatrie (AMSP). AMSP drug utilization and reported ADR data were analyzed. Type and frequency of severe ADRs attributed to flupentixol were compared with haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and amisulpride in a total of 56,861 schizophrenia inpatients exposed to these drugs. In spite of increasing prescription of SGAs, flupentixol was consistently used in schizophrenic inpatients (about 5 %) over time. Reporting rates of severe ADR ranged from 0.38 to 1.20 % for the individual antipsychotics (drugs imputed alone); flupentixol ranked lowest. The type of ADR differed considerably; as to severe EPMS, flupentixol (0.27 %), such as risperidone (0.28 %), held an intermediate position between haloperidol/amisulpride (0.55/0.52 %) and olanzapine/quetiapine (<0.1 %). The study is a heuristic approach, not a confirmatory test. Flupentixol has a stable place in the treatment of schizophrenia in spite of the introduction of different SGAs. Comparative ADR profiles suggest an intermediate position between FGAs and SGAs for flupentixol in clinical practice. PMID:23835526

  20. Comparison of adsorption behavior of PCDD/Fs on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons in a bench-scale dioxin generating system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujian; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Shuaixi; Zhao, Xiyuan; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    Porous carbon-based materials are commonly used to remove various organic and inorganic pollutants from gaseous and liquid effluents and products. In this study, the adsorption of dioxins on both activated carbons and multi-walled carbon nanotube was internally compared, via series of bench scale experiments. A laboratory-scale dioxin generator was applied to generate PCDD/Fs with constant concentration (8.3 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3)). The results confirm that high-chlorinated congeners are more easily adsorbed on both activated carbons and carbon nanotubes than low-chlorinated congeners. Carbon nanotubes also achieved higher adsorption efficiency than activated carbons even though they have smaller BET-surface. Carbon nanotubes reached the total removal efficiency over 86.8 % to be compared with removal efficiencies of only 70.0 and 54.2 % for the two other activated carbons tested. In addition, because of different adsorption mechanisms, the removal efficiencies of carbon nanotubes dropped more slowly with time than was the case for activated carbons. It could be attributed to the abundant mesopores distributed in the surface of carbon nanotubes. They enhanced the pore filled process of dioxin molecules during adsorption. In addition, strong interactions between the two benzene rings of dioxin molecules and the hexagonal arrays of carbon atoms in the surface make carbon nanotubes have bigger adsorption capacity.

  1. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: the comparison of two quantitative methods

    PubMed Central

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.; Park, Sung K.; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth; Yates, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild-type yeast and yeast strains lacking key components of the Snf1 kinase complex. Four different strains were grown under well-controlled chemostat conditions. Multidimensional protein identification technology followed by quantitation using either spectral counting or stable isotope labeling approaches was used to identify relative changes in the protein expression levels between the strains. A total of 2388 proteins were relatively quantified and more than 350 proteins were found to have significantly different expression levels between the two strains of comparison when using the stable isotope labeling strategy. The stable isotope labeling based quantitative approach was found to be highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found, the major reason behind the discrepancy was the lack of reproducible sampling for proteins with low spectral counts. The functional categorization of the relative protein expression differences that occur in Snf1-deficient strains uncovers a wide range of biological processes regulated by this important cellular kinase. PMID:18173223

  2. On the comparison of visual discomfort generated by S3D and 2D content based on eye-tracking features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsun, Iana; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    The changing of TV systems from 2D to 3D mode is the next expected step in the telecommunication world. Some works have already been done to perform this progress technically, but interaction of the third dimension with humans is not yet clear. Previously, it was found that any increased load of visual system can create visual fatigue, like prolonged TV watching, computer work or video gaming. But watching S3D can cause another nature of visual fatigue, since all S3D technologies creates illusion of the third dimension based on characteristics of binocular vision. In this work we propose to evaluate and compare the visual fatigue from watching 2D and S3D content. This work shows the difference in accumulation of visual fatigue and its assessment for two types of content. In order to perform this comparison eye-tracking experiments using six commercially available movies were conducted. Healthy naive participants took part into the test and gave their answers feeling the subjective evaluation. It was found that watching stereo 3D content induce stronger feeling of visual fatigue than conventional 2D, and the nature of video has an important effect on its increase. Visual characteristics obtained by using eye-tracking were investigated regarding their relation with visual fatigue.

  3. Revised MITG design, fabrication procedure, and performance predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.

    1983-01-01

    The design, analysis, and key features of the Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG) were described in a 1981 IECEC paper; and the design, fabrication, testing, and post-test analysis of test assemblies simulating prototypical MITG modules were described in preceding papers in these proceedings. These analyses succeeded in identifying and explaining the principal causes of thermal-stress problems encountered in the tests, and in confirming the effectiveness of design changes for alleviating them. The present paper presents additional design improvements for solving these and other problems, and describes new thermoelectric material properties generated by independent laboratories over the past two years. Based on these changes and on a revised fabrication procedure, it presents a reoptimization of the MITG design and computes the power-to-weight ratio for the revised design. That ratio is appreciably lower than the 1981 prediction, primarily because of changes in material properties; but it is still much higher than the specific power of current-generation RTGs.

  4. Comparison of photonic integrated circuits for millimeter-wave signal generation between dual-wavelength sources for optical heterodyning and pulsed mode-locked lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpintero, Guillermo; Gordon, Carlos; Guzman, Robinson; Leijtens, Xaveer; Van Dijk, Frédéric; Kervella, Gaël.; Fice, Martyn J.; Balakier, Katarzyna; Renaud, Cyril C.

    2015-03-01

    A comparative study of two different Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) structures for continuous-wave generation of millimeter-wave (MMW) signals is presented, each using a different approach. One approach is optical heterodyning, using an integrated dual-wavelength laser source based on Arrayed Waveguide Grating. The other is based on ModeLocked Laser Diodes (MLLDs). A novel building block -Multimode Interference Reflectors (MIRs) - is used to integrate on-chip both structures, without need of cleaved facets to define the laser cavity. This fact enables us to locate any of these structures at any location within the photonic chip. As will be shown, the MLLD structure provides a simple source for low frequencies. Higher frequencies are easier to achieve by optical heterodyne. Both types of structures have been fabricated on a generic foundry in a commercial MPW PIC technology.

  5. Comparison of Subjective Experiences and Effectiveness of First-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics and Risperidone Long-Acting Injectables in Patients With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Yin; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to compare the subjective experiences and clinical effects of first-generation long-acting injectable (FGA-LAI) antipsychotics with those of risperidone long-acting injectables (RIS-LAIs) in 434 schizophrenia patients. Compared with the RIS-LAI group, the patients treated with FGA-LAIs had a significantly longer duration of illness and LAI treatment and were older. Our results suggest that patients treated with FGA-LAI have more satisfactory subjective experiences compared with patients treated with RIS-LAI and that both FGA-LAI and RIS-LAI treatments can prevent relapses and hospitalization. Additional longitudinal studies determining the long-term benefits of RIS-LAI are warranted. PMID:27580495

  6. Comparison of the breadth and complexity of bovine viral diarrhea (BVDV) populations circulating in 34 persistently infected cattle generated in one outbreak.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, J F; Bayles, D O; Neill, J D; Falkenberg, S M; Bauermann, F V; Holler, L; Braun, L J; Young, D B; Kane, S E; Chase, C C L

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) results in acute and persistent infections. Persistent infections result from in utero exposure during the first trimester of gestation. Clinical presentation, in persistently infected cattle (PI), is highly variable. The reasons for this variation is largely unknown. The BVDV circulating in PI exist as quasispecies (swarms of individual viruses). An outbreak resulting in 34 PI cattle presented an opportunity to compare a large number of PI׳s. Methods were developed to compare the circulating viral populations within PI animals. It was found that PI animals generated in the same outbreak carry circulating viral populations that differ widely in size and diversity. Further, it was demonstrated that variation in PI viral populations could be used as a quantifiable phenotype. This observation makes it possible to test the correlation of this phenotype to other phenotypes such as growth rate, congenital defects, viral shed and cytokine expression.

  7. Comparison of continuous-wave terahertz wave generation and bias-field-dependent saturation in GaAs:O and LT-GaAs antennas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejian; Li, Yu-tai; Yang, Mong-huan; Cheung, Wing Yiu; Pan, Ci-Ling; Chan, Kam Tai

    2009-04-01

    Terahertz wave (THz) photoconductive (PC) antennas were fabricated on oxygen-implanted GaAs (GaAs:O) and low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs). The measured cw THz power at 0.358 THz from the GaAs:O antenna is about twice that from the LT-GaAs antenna under the same testing conditions, with the former showing no saturation up to a bias of 40 kV/cm, while the latter is already beginning to saturate at 20 kV/cm. A modified theoretical model incorporating bias-field-dependent electron saturation velocity is employed to explain the results. It shows that GaAs:O exhibits a higher electron saturation velocity, which may be further exploited to generate even larger THz powers by reducing the ion dosage and optimizing the annealing process in GaAs:O. PMID:19340176

  8. Gas uptake in a three-generation model geometry with a flat inlet velocity during steady inspiration: comparison of axisymmetric and three-dimensional models.

    PubMed

    Madasu, Srinath; Borhan, Ali; Ultman, James

    2007-05-01

    Mass transfer coefficients were predicted and compared for uptake of reactive gas system using an axisymmetric single-path model (ASPM) with experimentally predicted values in a two-generation geometry and with a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model (CFDM) in a three-generation model geometry at steady inspiratory flow with a flat inlet velocity profile. The flow and concentration fields in the ASPM were solved using Galerkin's finite element method and in the CFDM using a commercial finite element software FIDAP. ASPM predicted average gas phase mass transfer coefficients within 25% of the experimental values. Numerical results in terms of overall mass transfer coefficients from the two models within each bifurcation unit were compared for two different inlet flow rates, wall mass transfer coefficients, and bifurcation angles. The overall mass transfer coefficients variation with bifurcation unit from the ASPM and CFDM compared qualitatively and quantitatively closely at lower wall mass transfer coefficients for both 40 degree and 70 degree bifurcation angles. But at higher wall mass transfer coefficients, quantitatively they were off in the range of 2-10% for 40 degree bifurcation angle and in the range of 4-15% for 70 degree bifurcation angle. Both CFDM and ASPM predict the same trends of increase in mass transfer coefficients with inlet flow, wall mass transfer coefficients, and during inspiration compared to expiration. Higher mass transfer coefficients were obtained with a flat velocity profile compared to a parabolic velocity profile using ASPM. These results validate the simplified ASPM and the complex CFDM.

  9. Head-to-head comparisons of metabolic side effects of second generation antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Komossa, Katja; Schwarz, Sandra; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Lobos, Claudia Asenjo; Kissling, Werner; Davis, John M; Leucht, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Objective The metabolic side effects of second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) are serious and have not been compared head to head in a meta-analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing the metabolic side effects of the following SGAs head-to-head: amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone, zotepine. Method We searched the register of the Cochrane schizophrenia group (last search May 2007), supplemented by MEDLINE and EMBASE (last search January 2009) for randomized, blinded studies comparing the above mentioned SGA in the treatment of schizophrenia or related disorders. At least three reviewers extracted the data independently. The primary outcome was weight change. We also assessed changes of cholesterol and glucose. The results were combined in a meta-analysis. Results We included 48 studies with 105 relevant arms. Olanzapine produced more weight gain than all other second-generation antipsychotics except for clozapine where no difference was found. Clozapine produced more weight gain than risperidone, risperidone more than amisulpride, and sertindole more than risperidone. Olanzapine produced more cholesterol increase than aripiprazole, risperidone and ziprasidone. (No differences with amisulpride, clozapine and quetiapine were found). Quetiapine produced more cholesterol increase than risperidone and ziprasidone. Olanzapine produced more increase in glucose than amisulpride, aripiprazole, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone; no difference was found with clozapine. Conclusions Some SGAs lead to substantially more metabolic side effects than other SGAs. When choosing an SGA for an individual patient these side effects with their potential cause of secondary diseases must be weighed against efficacy and characteristics of the individual patient. PMID:20692814

  10. Comparison of F ratios generated from interphase and metaphase chromosome damage induced by high doses of low- and high-LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Willingham, V.; Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although biophysical models predict a difference in the ratio of interchromosomal to intrachromosomal interarm exchanges (F ratio) for low- and high-LET radiations, few experimental data support this prediction. However, the F ratios in experiments to date have been generated using data on chromosome aberrations in samples collected at the first postirradiation mitosis, which may not be indicative of the aberrations formed in interphase after exposure to high-LET radiations. In the present study, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 2 and 5 Gy of gamma rays and 3 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions (LET = 140 keV/micrometer), stimulated the cells to grow with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and collected the condensed chromosomes after 48 h of incubation using both chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and the conventional metaphase techniques. The PCC technique used here condenses chromosomes mostly in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. The F ratio was calculated using data on asymmetrical chromosome aberrations in both the PCC and metaphase samples. It was found that the F ratios were similar for the samples irradiated with low- and high-LET radiation and collected at metaphase. However, for irradiated samples assayed by PCC, the F ratio was found to be 8.2 +/- 2.0 for 5 Gy gamma rays and 5.2 +/- 0.9 for 3 Gy iron ions. The distribution of the aberrations indicated that, in the PCC samples irradiated with iron ions, most of the centric rings occurred in spreads containing five or more asymmetrical aberrations. These heavily damaged cells, which were either less likely to reach mitosis or may reach mitosis at a later time, were responsible for the difference in the F ratios generated from interphase and metaphase analysis after exposure to iron ions.

  11. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Anna Y; Butler, Daniel P; Cussons, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Background Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria. Methods Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database. Results Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01). Conclusions Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision. PMID:26618120

  12. The economic impact of revision otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Sahar; Leonetti, John P; Pontikis, George

    2016-03-01

    Revision otologic surgery places a significant economic burden on patients and the healthcare system. We conducted a retrospective chart analysis to estimate the economic impact of revision canal-wall-down (CWD) mastoidectomy. We reviewed the medical records of all 189 adults who had undergone CWD mastoidectomy performed by the senior author between June 2006 and August 2011 at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. Institutional charges and collections for all patients were extrapolated to estimate the overall healthcare cost of revision surgery in Illinois and at the national level. Of the 189 CWD mastoidectomies, 89 were primary and 100 were revision procedures. The total charge for the revision cases was $2,783,700, and the net reimbursement (collections) was $846,289 (30.4%). Using Illinois Hospital Association data, we estimated that reimbursement for 387 revision CWD mastoidectomies that had been performed in fiscal year 2011 was nearly $3.3 million. By extrapolating our data to the national level, we estimated that 9,214 patients underwent revision CWD mastoidectomy in the United States during 2011, which cost the national healthcare system roughly $76 million, not including lost wages and productivity. Known causes of failed CWD mastoidectomies that often result in revision surgery include an inadequate meatoplasty, a facial ridge that is too high, residual diseased air cells, and recurrent cholesteatoma. A better understanding of these factors can reduce the need for revision surgery, which could have a positive impact on the economic strain related to this procedure at the local, state, and national levels. PMID:26991218

  13. Economic assessment of the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass (IFBB) in comparison to different energy recovery, animal-based and non-refining management systems.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, Benjamin; Bühle, Lutz; Wachendorf, Michael; Möller, Detlev

    2012-09-01

    The study aimed at the identification of favourable land use options for semi-natural grassland management and preservation. Economic assessments of energy recovery by the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass (IFBB) in comparison with dry fermentation (DF) and hay combustion systems (HC), beef cattle production (BC) and non-refining landscape preservation measures, such as mulching (MU) and composting (CO), were carried out in this study. Energy recovery systems made profitable use of semi-natural grasslands with the highest economic returns attained by IFBB-AO (Return On Investment, ROI: 22.75%) and HC (ROI: 22.00%) systems, followed by the IFBB-SA (ROI: 7.71%) and the DF system (ROI: 6.22%). Animal husbandry (BC) and non-refining management systems (MU, CO) were not profitable considering the current framework conditions. Input parameters critical for profitability were modified in order to identify influences of changing framework conditions.

  14. Can Online Consumers Contribute to Drug Knowledge? A Mixed-Methods Comparison of Consumer-Generated and Professionally Controlled Psychotropic Medication Information on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Ongoing initiatives to filter online health searches exclude consumer-generated content from search returns, though its inferiority compared with professionally controlled content is not demonstrated. The antidepressant escitalopram and the antipsychotic quetiapine have ranked over the last 5 years as top-selling agents in their respective drug classes. Both drugs have various off-label mental health and non–mental health uses, ranging from the relief of insomnia and migraines to the treatment of severe developmental disorders. Objective Our objective was to describe the most frequently reported effects of escitalopram and quetiapine in online consumer reviews, to compare them with effects described in professionally controlled commercial health websites, and to gauge the usability of online consumer medication reviews. Methods A stratified simple random sample of 960 consumer reviews was selected from all 6998 consumer reviews of the two drugs in 2 consumer-generated (www.askapatient.com and www.crazymeds.us) and 2 professionally controlled (www.webmd.com and www.revolutionhealth.com) health websites. Professional medication descriptions included all standard information on the medications from the latter 2 websites. All textual data were inductively coded for medication effects, and intercoder agreement was assessed. Chi-square was used to test for associations between consumer-reported effects and website origination. Results Consumers taking either escitalopram (n = 480) or quetiapine (n = 480) most frequently reported symptom improvement (30.4% or 146/480, 24.8% or 119/480) or symptom worsening (15.8% or 76/480, 10.2% or 49/480), changes in sleep (36% or 173/480, 60.6% or 291/480) and changes in weight and appetite (22.5% or 108/480, 30.8% or 148/480). More consumers posting reviews on consumer-generated rather than professionally controlled websites reported symptom worsening on quetiapine (17.3% or 38/220 versus 5% or 11/220, P < .001), while

  15. 78 FR 25431 - Revised Information Collection Activities (FERC-545, FERC-549, and FERC-550); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... procedures to interstate and intrastate natural gas pipelines and interstate oil pipelines. The Commission... oil pipelines. These procedures will replace the use of random-number generated passwords to... revised procedures, each regulated natural gas pipeline and oil pipeline will be able to maintain a...

  16. 77 FR 21538 - Announcing DRAFT Revisions to Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 186-3, Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... algorithm (DSA) to generate and verify digital signatures. Later revisions (FIPS 186-1, FIPS 186-2, and FIPS 186-3, adopted in 1998, 1999 and 2009, respectively) adopted two additional algorithms: The Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) and the RSA digital signature algorithm. NIST is...

  17. 77 FR 10341 - Revisions to Federal Implementation Plans To Reduce Interstate Transport of Fine Particulate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Matter and Ozone (76 FR 63860, October 14, 2011) (Revisions Rule). In that proposed rule, EPA took... limitations on the ability to meet local electricity demand with generation from outside the area.'' (76 FR... Transport Rule's unit-level allocation methodology (76 FR 48290); however, the final Transport...

  18. 77 FR 10323 - Revisions to Federal Implementation Plans To Reduce Interstate Transport of Fine Particulate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... published on August 8, 2011 (76 FR 48208). These revisions address discrepancies in unit-specific modeling... Federal Regulations EGU Electric Generating Unit FIP Federal Implementation Plan FR Federal Register EPA U.... Executive Summary In a previous proposal published on October 14, 2011 (76 FR 63860), EPA...

  19. Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT[R]: Advanced Skill Practice. Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT: Advanced Skill Practice is a revised and updated edition of Delta's Key to the Next Generation TOEFL Test. Since the introduction of the TOEFL iBT in 2005, there have been significant changes to some of the test questions, particularly the integrated writing and integrated speaking tasks. The new 2011 edition of…

  20. Comparison of next-generation droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) with quantitative PCR (qPCR) for enumeration of Cryptosporidium oocysts in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Paparini, Andrea; Monis, Paul; Ryan, Una

    2014-12-01

    Clinical microbiology laboratories rely on quantitative PCR for its speed, sensitivity, specificity and ease-of-use. However, quantitative PCR quantitation requires the use of a standard curve or normalisation to reference genes. Droplet digital PCR provides absolute quantitation without the need for calibration curves. A comparison between droplet digital PCR and quantitative PCR-based analyses was conducted for the enteric parasite Cryptosporidium, which is an important cause of gastritis in both humans and animals. Two loci were analysed (18S rRNA and actin) using a range of Cryptosporidium DNA templates, including recombinant plasmids, purified haemocytometer-counted oocysts, commercial flow cytometry-counted oocysts and faecal DNA samples from sheep, cattle and humans. Each method was evaluated for linearity, precision, limit of detection and cost. Across the same range of detection, both methods showed a high degree of linearity and positive correlation for standards (R(2)⩾0.999) and faecal samples (R(2)⩾0.9750). The precision of droplet digital PCR, as measured by mean Relative Standard Deviation (RSD;%), was consistently better compared with quantitative PCR, particularly for the 18S rRNA locus, but was poorer as DNA concentration decreased. The quantitative detection of quantitative PCR was unaffected by DNA concentration, but droplet digital PCR quantitative PCR was less affected by the presence of inhibitors, compared with quantitative PCR. For most templates analysed including Cryptosporidium-positive faecal DNA, the template copy numbers, as determined by droplet digital PCR, were consistently lower than by quantitative PCR. However, the quantitations obtained by quantitative PCR are dependent on the accuracy of the standard curve and when the quantitative PCR data were corrected for pipetting and DNA losses (as determined by droplet digital PCR), then the sensitivity of both methods was comparable. A cost analysis based on 96 samples revealed that

  1. AREVA NP next generation fresh UO{sub 2} fuel assembly shipping cask: SCALE - CRISTAL comparisons lead to safety criticality confidence

    SciTech Connect

    Doucet, M.; Landrieu, M.; Montgomery, R.; O' Donnell, B.

    2007-07-01

    cask is designed to handle the complete AREVA NP fuel assembly types from the 14x14 to the 18x18 design with a {sup 235}U enrichment up to 5.0% enriched natural uranium (ENU) and enriched reprocessed uranium (ERU). After a brief presentation of the computer codes and the description of the shipping cask, calculation results and comparisons between SCALE and CRISTAL will be discussed. (authors)

  2. A Comparison of the ATP Generating Pathways Used by S. Typhimurium to Fuel Replication within Human and Murine Macrophage and Epithelial Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gutierrez, Enriqueta; Chidlaw, Amanda C; Le Gall, Gwenaelle; Bowden, Steven D; Tedin, Karsten; Kelly, David J; Thompson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of S. Typhimurium within infected host cells plays a fundamental role in virulence since it enables intracellular proliferation and dissemination and affects the innate immune response. An essential requirement for the intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium is the need to regenerate ATP. The metabolic route used to fulfil this requirement is the subject of the present study. For infection models we used human and murine epithelial and macrophage cell lines. The epithelial cell lines were mICc12, a transimmortalised murine colon enterocyte cell line that shows many of the characteristics of a primary epithelial cell line, and HeLa cells. The model macrophage cell lines were THP-1A human monocyte/macrophages and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Using a mutational approach combined with an exometabolomic analysis, we showed that neither fermentative metabolism nor anaerobic respiration play major roles in energy generation in any of the cell lines studied. Rather, we identified overflow metabolism to acetate and lactate as the foremost route by which S. Typhimurium fulfils its energy requirements.

  3. Repertoire comparison of the B-cell receptor-encoding loci in humans and rhesus macaques by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Oliver, Brian G; Carbonetti, Sara; Dambrauskas, Nicholas; Lange, Miles D; Yacoob, Christina; Leahy, Will; Callahan, Jonathan; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Sather, D Noah

    2016-07-01

    Rhesus macaques (RMs) are a widely used model system for the study of vaccines, infectious diseases and microbial pathogenesis. Their value as a model lies in their close evolutionary relationship to humans, which, in theory, allows them to serve as a close approximation of the human immune system. However, despite their prominence as a human surrogate model system, many aspects of the RM immune system remain ill characterized. In particular, B cell-mediated immunity in macaques has not been sufficiently characterized, and the B-cell receptor-encoding loci have not been thoroughly annotated. To address these gaps, we analyzed the circulating heavy- and light-chain repertoires in humans and RMs by next-generation sequencing. By comparing V gene segment usage, J-segment usage and CDR3 lengths between the two species, we identified several important similarities and differences. These differences were especially notable in the IgM(+) B-cell repertoire. However, the class-switched, antigen-educated B-cell populations converged on a set of similar characteristics, implying similarities in how each species responds to antigen. Our study provides the first comprehensive overview of the circulating repertoires of the heavy- and light-chain sequences in RMs, and provides insight into how they may perform as a model system for B cell-mediated immunity in humans. PMID:27525066

  4. Repertoire comparison of the B-cell receptor-encoding loci in humans and rhesus macaques by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Oliver, Brian G; Carbonetti, Sara; Dambrauskas, Nicholas; Lange, Miles D; Yacoob, Christina; Leahy, Will; Callahan, Jonathan; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Sather, D Noah

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (RMs) are a widely used model system for the study of vaccines, infectious diseases and microbial pathogenesis. Their value as a model lies in their close evolutionary relationship to humans, which, in theory, allows them to serve as a close approximation of the human immune system. However, despite their prominence as a human surrogate model system, many aspects of the RM immune system remain ill characterized. In particular, B cell-mediated immunity in macaques has not been sufficiently characterized, and the B-cell receptor-encoding loci have not been thoroughly annotated. To address these gaps, we analyzed the circulating heavy- and light-chain repertoires in humans and RMs by next-generation sequencing. By comparing V gene segment usage, J-segment usage and CDR3 lengths between the two species, we identified several important similarities and differences. These differences were especially notable in the IgM+ B-cell repertoire. However, the class-switched, antigen-educated B-cell populations converged on a set of similar characteristics, implying similarities in how each species responds to antigen. Our study provides the first comprehensive overview of the circulating repertoires of the heavy- and light-chain sequences in RMs, and provides insight into how they may perform as a model system for B cell-mediated immunity in humans. PMID:27525066

  5. A Comparison of the ATP Generating Pathways Used by S. Typhimurium to Fuel Replication within Human and Murine Macrophage and Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gutierrez, Enriqueta; Chidlaw, Amanda C.; Le Gall, Gwenaelle; Bowden, Steven D.; Tedin, Karsten; Kelly, David J.; Thompson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of S. Typhimurium within infected host cells plays a fundamental role in virulence since it enables intracellular proliferation and dissemination and affects the innate immune response. An essential requirement for the intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium is the need to regenerate ATP. The metabolic route used to fulfil this requirement is the subject of the present study. For infection models we used human and murine epithelial and macrophage cell lines. The epithelial cell lines were mICc12, a transimmortalised murine colon enterocyte cell line that shows many of the characteristics of a primary epithelial cell line, and HeLa cells. The model macrophage cell lines were THP-1A human monocyte/macrophages and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Using a mutational approach combined with an exometabolomic analysis, we showed that neither fermentative metabolism nor anaerobic respiration play major roles in energy generation in any of the cell lines studied. Rather, we identified overflow metabolism to acetate and lactate as the foremost route by which S. Typhimurium fulfils its energy requirements. PMID:26930214

  6. Spectroscopic modeling and comparison of radiation from X-pinches and wire arrays produced on the 1 MA pulsed power generator at UNR.

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, M. Faith; Osborne, Glenn C.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; LePell, Paul David; Fedin, Dmitry; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Deeney, Christopher; Jones, Brent Manley; Ouart, Nicholas D.; Cowan, Thomas E.; Safronova, Alla S.

    2005-06-01

    X-ray spectra and images from Al (with 5% of Mg and some with 5% of NaF dopants) and Cu (pure and with 4% of Ni) wire arrays and X-pinches were accumulated in experiments on the 1 MA pulsed power generator at UNR. In particular, axially and radially resolved K-shell X-ray spectra of Al, Mg, and Na and L-shell X-ray spectra of Cu and Ni were recorded by a KAP crystal (in a spectral region from 6 to 15 Aring) through different slits from 50 mum to 3 mm. In addition, spatially integrated harder X-ray spectra were monitored by a LiF crystal. Non-LTE kinetic models of Al, Mg, and Na, and of Cu and Ni provided spatially resolved electron temperatures and densities for experiments with Al and Cu loads, respectively. Advantages of using alloys and dopants with small concentrations for spectroscopic plasma diagnostics will be presented. Dependence of the plasma's spatial structures, temperatures, and densities from wire material and load configurations, sizes, and masses will be discussed .

  7. The curative effect comparison between prolonged third generation of gamma nail and prolonged dynamic hip screw internal fixation in treating femoral intertrochanteric fracture and the effect on infection.

    PubMed

    He, Wenye; Zhang, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to explore the curative effect of prolonged third generation of gamma nail (pTGN) and prolonged dynamic hip screw (pDHS) internal fixation in treating femoral intertrochanteric fracture, and analyze the incidence rate of infection for better clinical diagnosis and treatment. Sixty five patients with femoral intertrochanteric fracture during February, 2011-February, 2013 were selected and divided into two groups, with one receiving pTGN (control group) and the other one receiving pDHS internal fixation (observation group). The clinical effects of two groups were compared. In control group, the excellent and good rate was 78.13 %, the total effective rate was 87.5 %, and the total complication rate was 6.24 %; in observation group, the excellent and good rate was 78.79 %, the total effective rate was 90.91 %, the total complication rate was 6.06 %; there was no statistical difference between two groups (p > 0.05). The operation time, the intraoperative fluoroscopy time, and the total blood loss had statistically significant difference between two groups (p < 0.05); however, the differences of the total length of incision, the length of preoperative hospitalization, postoperative ambulatory episode, and the length of stay between two groups were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both pTGN and pDHS internal fixation were effective on femoral intertrochanteric fracture, with pDHS internal fixation having better overall efficiency.

  8. CFD study of natural convection mixing in a steam generator mock-up: Comparison between full geometry and porous media approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dehbi, A.; Badreddine, H.

    2012-07-01

    In CFD simulations of flow mixing in a steam generator (SG) during natural circulation, one is faced with the problem of representing the thousands of SG U-tubes. Typically simplifications are made to render the problem computationally tractable. In particular, one or a number of tubes are lumped in one volume which is treated as a single porous medium. This approach dramatically reduces the computational size of the problem and hence simulation time. In this work, we endeavor to investigate the adequacy of this approach by performing two separate simulations of flow in a mock-up with 262 U-tubes, i.e. one in which the porous media model is used for the tube bundle, and another in which the full geometry is represented. In both simulations, the Reynolds Stress (RMS) model of turbulence is used. We show that in steady state conditions, the porous media treatment yields results which are comparable to those of the full geometry representation (temperature distribution, recirculation ratio, hot plume spread, etc). Hence, the porous media approach can be extended with a good degree of confidence to the full scale SG. (authors)

  9. A Comparison of the ATP Generating Pathways Used by S. Typhimurium to Fuel Replication within Human and Murine Macrophage and Epithelial Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gutierrez, Enriqueta; Chidlaw, Amanda C; Le Gall, Gwenaelle; Bowden, Steven D; Tedin, Karsten; Kelly, David J; Thompson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of S. Typhimurium within infected host cells plays a fundamental role in virulence since it enables intracellular proliferation and dissemination and affects the innate immune response. An essential requirement for the intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium is the need to regenerate ATP. The metabolic route used to fulfil this requirement is the subject of the present study. For infection models we used human and murine epithelial and macrophage cell lines. The epithelial cell lines were mICc12, a transimmortalised murine colon enterocyte cell line that shows many of the characteristics of a primary epithelial cell line, and HeLa cells. The model macrophage cell lines were THP-1A human monocyte/macrophages and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Using a mutational approach combined with an exometabolomic analysis, we showed that neither fermentative metabolism nor anaerobic respiration play major roles in energy generation in any of the cell lines studied. Rather, we identified overflow metabolism to acetate and lactate as the foremost route by which S. Typhimurium fulfils its energy requirements. PMID:26930214

  10. Performance Comparison of Illumina and Ion Torrent Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms for 16S rRNA-Based Bacterial Community Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Toana; Rosenthal, Christopher; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Sengupta, Dhruba J.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the taxonomically informative 16S rRNA gene provides a powerful approach for exploring microbial diversity. Here we compare the performances of two common “benchtop” sequencing platforms, Illumina MiSeq and Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM), for bacterial community profiling by 16S rRNA (V1-V2) amplicon sequencing. We benchmarked performance by using a 20-organism mock bacterial community and a collection of primary human specimens. We observed comparatively higher error rates with the Ion Torrent platform and report a pattern of premature sequence truncation specific to semiconductor sequencing. Read truncation was dependent on both the directionality of sequencing and the target species, resulting in organism-specific biases in community profiles. We found that these sequencing artifacts could be minimized by using bidirectional amplicon sequencing and an optimized flow order on the Ion Torrent platform. Results of bacterial community profiling performed on the mock community and a collection of 18 human-derived microbiological specimens were generally in good agreement for both platforms; however, in some cases, results differed significantly. Disparities could be attributed to the failure to generate full-length reads for particular organisms on the Ion Torrent platform, organism-dependent differences in sequence error rates affecting classification of certain species, or some combination of these factors. This study demonstrates the potential for differential bias in bacterial community profiles resulting from the choice of sequencing platform alone. PMID:25261520

  11. An experimental comparison of the K- and L-Auger electron spectra generated in the decays of 140Nd and 111In.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, E A; Kovalík, A; Filosofov, D V; Korolev, N A; Lebedev, N A; Lubashevski, A V; Rösch, F; Novgorodov, A F

    2005-03-01

    The low-energy electron spectra generated in the decay of 140Nd have been measured using a combined electrostatic spectrometer adjusted to the 4, 7, and 35 eV instrumental resolution. In order to estimate the therapeutic potential of low-energy electrons associated with the decay of 140Nd, similar experiments have been performed with 111In. Relative Auger electron intensity ratios per decay are: 111In(K-Auger)/140Nd(K-Auger)=1.47(12), 111In(L-Auger) /140Nd(L-Auger)=1.1(4), and 111In(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])/140Nd(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])=0.24(11). The obtained K-Auger group intensity ratios have been compared with results of calculations. The good agreement found for the experimental and estimated values indicates that such information can be also derived using available nuclear and atomic data. The relative intensity of L-Auger electrons emitted within the 2.8-7 keV interval is higher for 140Nd by a factor of about 4 compared to 111In. As the L-Auger emission is dominating relative to that of the K-Auger group, this implicates that any potential endotherapeutic strategy using 140Nd-labelled targeting vectors requires a maximum accumulation of the endoradiotherapeutical close to the cell nucleus or the DNA of the tumour cell. PMID:15607923

  12. Introductory Business Textbook Revision Cycles: Are They Getting Shorter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinser, Brian; Brunswick, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The rate of textbook revision cycles is examined in light of the recent trend towards more rapid revisions (and adoptions of textbooks). The authors conduct background research to better understand the context for textbook revision cycles and the environmental forces that have been influencing what appears to be more rapid textbook revisions. A…

  13. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  14. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  15. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  16. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  17. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  18. 40 CFR 255.41 - Procedure for revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Submission and Revision of Identifications... for solid waste functions in the region. (b) Revisions or adjustments to the State plan may require... notified of such revisions by the State solid waste agency. (c) Major revisions or adjustments in...

  19. 15 CFR 923.128 - Revisions to assessments and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... strategies. 923.128 Section 923.128 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Program § 923.128 Revisions to assessments and strategies. (a) A State, in consultation with the Assistant Administrator, may propose to revise its approved Strategy. Revision(s) to an approved Strategy must...

  20. A Comparative Study of Three Revision Methods in EFL Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srichanyachon, Napaporn

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to explore effective instruction in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) setting, this study investigated language errors identified by students and teachers in three different revision stages: self-revision, peer revision, and teacher revision. It gave the focus to the effects of the three different methods on learners' writing…

  1. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  2. Real Revision: Authors' Strategies to Share with Student Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messner, Kate

    2011-01-01

    How do you show students that revision is more than a classroom exercise to please the teacher? Take them into the real world of writing for publication. In Real Revision, award-winning author and teacher Kate Messner demystifies the revision process for teachers and students alike and provides tried-and-true revision strategies, field tested by…

  3. Long-range PCR in next-generation sequencing: comparison of six enzymes and evaluation on the MiSeq sequencer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haiying; Guo, Yunfei; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Long-range PCR remains a flexible, fast, efficient and cost-effective choice for sequencing candidate genomic regions in a small number of samples, especially when combined with next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Several long-range DNA polymerases are advertised as being able to amplify up to 15 kb or longer genomic DNA. However, their real-world performance characteristics and their suitability for NGS remain unclear. We evaluated six long-range DNA polymerases (Invitrogen SequalPrep, Invitrogen AccuPrime, TaKaRa PrimeSTAR GXL, TaKaRa LA Taq Hot Start, KAPA Long Range HotStart and QIAGEN LongRange PCR Polymerase) to amplify three amplicons, with sizes of 12.9 kb, 9.7 kb, and 5.8 kb, respectively. Subsequently, we used the PrimeSTAR enzyme to amplify entire BRCA1 (83.2 kb) and BRCA2 (84.2 kb) genes from nine subjects and sequenced them on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. We found that the TaKaRa PrimeSTAR GXL DNA polymerase can amplify almost all amplicons with different sizes and Tm values under identical PCR conditions. Other enzymes require alteration of PCR conditions to obtain optimal performance. From the MiSeq run, we identified multiple intronic and exonic single-nucleotide variations (SNVs), including one mutation (c.5946delT in BRCA2) in a positive control. Our study provided useful results for sequencing research focused on large genomic regions. PMID:25034901

  4. IMGT/HighV-QUEST Statistical Significance of IMGT Clonotype (AA) Diversity per Gene for Standardized Comparisons of Next Generation Sequencing Immunoprofiles of Immunoglobulins and T Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Aouinti, Safa; Malouche, Dhafer; Giudicelli, Véronique; Kossida, Sofia; Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune responses of humans and of other jawed vertebrate species (gnasthostomata) are characterized by the B and T cells and their specific antigen receptors, the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and the T cell receptors (TR) (up to 2.1012 different IG and TR per individual). IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://www.imgt.org), was created in 1989 by Marie-Paule Lefranc (Montpellier University and CNRS) to manage the huge and complex diversity of these antigen receptors. IMGT built on IMGT-ONTOLOGY concepts of identification (keywords), description (labels), classification (gene and allele nomenclature) and numerotation (IMGT unique numbering), is at the origin of immunoinformatics, a science at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT/HighV-QUEST, the first web portal, and so far the only one, for the next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of IG and TR, is the paradigm for immune repertoire standardized outputs and immunoprofiles of the adaptive immune responses. It provides the identification of the variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) genes and alleles, analysis of the V-(D)-J junction and complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) and the characterization of the 'IMGT clonotype (AA)' (AA for amino acid) diversity and expression. IMGT/HighV-QUEST compares outputs of different batches, up to one million nucleotide sequencesfor the statistical module. These high throughput IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles are of prime importance in vaccination, cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders, however their comparative statistical analysis still remains a challenge. We present a standardized statistical procedure to analyze IMGT/HighV-QUEST outputs for the evaluation of the significance of the IMGT clonotype (AA) diversity differences in proportions, per gene of a given group, between NGS IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles. The procedure is generic and

  5. Environmental impact of rejected materials generated in organic fraction of municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion plants: Comparison of wet and dry process layout.

    PubMed

    Colazo, Ana-Belén; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier; Colón, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste is an increasing waste valorization alternative instead of incineration or landfilling of untreated biodegradable wastes. Nevertheless, a significant portion of biodegradable wastes entering the plant is lost in pre-treatments and post-treatments of anaerobic digestion facilities together with other improper materials such as plastics, paper, textile materials and metals. The rejected materials lost in these stages have two main implications: (i) less organic material enters to digesters and, as a consequence, there is a loss of biogas production and (ii) the rejected materials end up in landfills or incinerators contributing to environmental impacts such as global warming or eutrophication. The main goals of this study are (i) to estimate potential losses of biogas in the rejected solid materials generated during the pre- and post-treatments of two full-scale anaerobic digestion facilities and (ii) to evaluate the environmental burdens associated to the final disposal (landfill or incineration) of these rejected materials by means of Life Cycle Assessment. This study shows that there is a lost of potential biogas production, ranging from 8% to 15%, due to the loss of organic matter during pre-treatment stages in anaerobic digestion facilities. From an environmental point of view, the Life Cycle Assessment shows that the incineration scenario is the most favorable alternative for eight out of nine impact categories compared with the landfill scenario. The studied impact categories are Climate Change, Fossil depletion, Freshwater eutrophication, Marine eutrophication, Ozone depletion, Particulate matter formation, Photochemical oxidant formation, Terrestrial acidification and Water depletion.

  6. Comparison of efficacy of various root canal irrigation systems in removal of smear layer generated at apical third: An SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Varun Raj; Bahuguna, Nikhil; Manan, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of different irrigation systems comparing irrigation with syringe and needle (Dispo Van), Max-I-Probe needle (Dentsply Maillefer), EndoActivator (Dentsply Maillefer), and EndoVac (Sybron Endo) in removing the smear layer generated at apical third. Materials and Methods: Instrumentation was done in 40 extracted premolars using different irrigation regimes (Group 1, saline and syringe; Group 2, Max-I-Probe needles with NaOCl and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); Group 3, irrigant activation with EndoActivator using needlesNaOCl and EDTA; and Group 4, irrigation with EndoVac using needles NaOCl and EDTA). Statistical Analysis Used: The percentage of debris was seen with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Mann-Whitney test for significance. Results: The mean score ± standard deviation for the conventional group was 2.8 ± 0.42 with median value of 3.00 (2-3). The results for the Max-I-Probe needle group were 2.3 ± 0.48 with median value of 2.00 (2-3) The mean debris score for EndoActivator group were 0.8 ± 0.42 with median value of 1 (0-1). The mean debris score for EndoVac group were 0.4 ± 0.52 with median value of 1 (0-1). Conclusion: EndoVac and EndoActivator performed much better than other available systems in removing the smear layer from apical third. So they should be incorporated as a regular part of the irrigation regime. PMID:26069415

  7. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process.

  8. Comparison of human gut microbiota in control subjects and patients with colorectal carcinoma in adenoma: Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and next-generation sequencing analyses.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Chika; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Moritani, Isao; Tanaka, Junichiro; Oya, Yumi; Inoue, Hidekazu; Tameda, Masahiko; Shiraki, Katsuya; Ito, Masaaki; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Takase, Kojiro

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Japan. The etiology of CRC has been linked to numerous factors including genetic mutation, diet, life style, inflammation, and recently, the gut microbiota. However, CRC-associated gut microbiota is still largely unexamined. This study used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze and compare gut microbiota of Japanese control subjects and Japanese patients with carcinoma in adenoma. Stool samples were collected from 49 control subjects, 50 patients with colon adenoma, and 9 patients with colorectal cancer (3/9 with invasive cancer and 6/9 with carcinoma in adenoma) immediately before colonoscopy; DNA was extracted from each stool sample. Based on T-RFLP analysis, 12 subjects (six control and six carcinoma in adenoma subjects) were selected; their samples were used for NGS and species-level analysis. T-RFLP analysis showed no significant differences in bacterial population between control, adenoma and cancer groups. However, NGS revealed that i), control and carcinoma in adenoma subjects had different gut microbiota compositions, ii), one bacterial genus (Slackia) was significantly associated with the control group and four bacterial genera (Actinomyces, Atopobium, Fusobacterium, and Haemophilus) were significantly associated with the carcinoma-in-adenoma group, and iii), several bacterial species were significantly associated with each type (control: Eubacterium coprostanoligens; carcinoma in adenoma: Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides fragiles, Clostridium nexile, Fusobacterium varium, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Prevotella stercorea, Streptococcus gordonii, and Veillonella dispar). Gut microbial properties differ between control subjects and carcinoma-in-adenoma patients in this Japanese population, suggesting that gut microbiota is related to CRC prevention and development.

  9. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process. PMID:27554145

  10. Environmental impact of rejected materials generated in organic fraction of municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion plants: Comparison of wet and dry process layout.

    PubMed

    Colazo, Ana-Belén; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier; Colón, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste is an increasing waste valorization alternative instead of incineration or landfilling of untreated biodegradable wastes. Nevertheless, a significant portion of biodegradable wastes entering the plant is lost in pre-treatments and post-treatments of anaerobic digestion facilities together with other improper materials such as plastics, paper, textile materials and metals. The rejected materials lost in these stages have two main implications: (i) less organic material enters to digesters and, as a consequence, there is a loss of biogas production and (ii) the rejected materials end up in landfills or incinerators contributing to environmental impacts such as global warming or eutrophication. The main goals of this study are (i) to estimate potential losses of biogas in the rejected solid materials generated during the pre- and post-treatments of two full-scale anaerobic digestion facilities and (ii) to evaluate the environmental burdens associated to the final disposal (landfill or incineration) of these rejected materials by means of Life Cycle Assessment. This study shows that there is a lost of potential biogas production, ranging from 8% to 15%, due to the loss of organic matter during pre-treatment stages in anaerobic digestion facilities. From an environmental point of view, the Life Cycle Assessment shows that the incineration scenario is the most favorable alternative for eight out of nine impact categories compared with the landfill scenario. The studied impact categories are Climate Change, Fossil depletion, Freshwater eutrophication, Marine eutrophication, Ozone depletion, Particulate matter formation, Photochemical oxidant formation, Terrestrial acidification and Water depletion. PMID:26123979

  11. Interstudy reproducibility of the second generation, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography in patients with coronary artery disease and comparison with intravascular ultrasound: a study applying automated contour detection.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Z; Tearney, G; Bruining, N; Sihan, K; van Soest, G; Ligthart, J; van Domburg, R; Bouma, B; Regar, E

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Fourier domain OCT (FD-OCT) has been introduced for clinical use. This approach allows in vivo, high resolution (15 micron) imaging with very fast data acquisition, however, it requires brief flushing of the lumen during imaging. The reproducibility of such fast data acquisition under intracoronary flush application is poorly understood. To assess the inter-study variability of FD-OCT and to compare lumen morphometry to the established invasive imaging method, IVUS. 18 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease scheduled for PCI were included. In each target vessel a FD-OCT pullback (MGH system, light source 1,310 nm, 105 fps, pullback speed 20 mm/s) was acquired during brief (3 s) injection of X-ray contrast (flow 3 ml/s) through the guiding catheter. A second pullback was repeated under the same conditions after re-introduction of the FD OCT catheter into the coronary artery. IVUS and OCT imaging was performed in random order. FD-OCT and IVUS pullback data were analyzed using a recently developed software employing semi automated lumen contour and stent strut detection algorithms. Corresponding ROI were matched based on anatomical landmarks such as side branches and/or stent edges. Inter-study variability is presented as the absolute difference between the two pullbacks. FD-OCT showed remarkably good reproducibility. Inter-study variability in native vessels (cohort A) was very low for mean and minimal luminal area (0.10 ± 0.38, 0.19 ± 0.57 mm(2), respectively). Likewise inter-study variability was very low in stented coronary segments (cohort B) for mean lumen, mean stent, minimal luminal and minimal stent area (0.06 ± 0.08, 0.07 ± 0.10, 0.04 ± 0.09, 0.04 ± 0.10 mm(2), respectively). Comparison to IVUS morphometry revealed no significant differences. The differences between both imaging methods, OCT and IVUS, were very low for mean lumen, mean stent, minimal luminal and minimal stent area (0.10 ± 0.45, 0.10 ± 0

  12. New and revised standards for coke production

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  13. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  14. 78 FR 59982 - Revisions to Radiation Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Revisions to Radiation Protection AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Standard review... Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition'': Section 12.1, ``Assuring that Occupational...

  15. Suggested revision for west mexican archeological sequences.

    PubMed

    Long, S V; Taylor, R E

    1966-12-16

    A review of the radiocarbon dates and published and unpublished archeological data from the West Mexican states of Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, and Colima has resulted in a revised tentative chronology for West Mexico.

  16. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N.; Simone, Juan P.; Cofield, Robert H.; Sperling, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes of a consecutive series of patients who underwent revision surgery after humeral head resurfacing (HHR). Our joint registry was queried for all patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for failed HHR at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Eleven consecutive patients (average age 54 years; range 38-69 years) that underwent revision of 11 resurfacing arthroplasties were identified. The primary indication for resurfacing had been osteoarthritis in six, glenoid dysplasia in two, a chondral lesion in two, and postinstability arthropathy in one patient. The indication for revision was pain in 10 and infection in one patient. Seven patients had undergone an average of 1.9 surgeries prior to resurfacing (range 1-3). Materials and Methods: All patients were revised to stemmed arthroplasties, including one hemiarthroplasty, two reverse, and eight anatomic total shoulder arthroplasties at a mean 33 months after primary resurfacing (range 10-131 months). A deltopectoral approach was used in seven patients; four patients required an anteromedial approach due to severe scarring. Subscapularis attenuation was found in four cases, two of which required reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Bone grafting was required in one glenoid and three humeri. Results: At a mean follow-up of 3.5 years (range 1.6-6.9 years), modified Neer score was rated as satisfactory in five patients and unsatisfactory in six. Abduction and external rotation improved from 73° to 88° (P = 0.32) and from 23° to 32° (P = 0.28) respectively. Reoperation was required in two patients, including one hematoma and one revision for instability. Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made. PMID:26980986

  17. HLW system plan - revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    The projected ability of the Tank Farm to support DWPF startup and continued operation has diminished somewhat since revision 1 of this Plan. The 13 month delay in DWPF startup, which actually helps the Tank Farm condition in the near term, was more than offset by the 9 month delay in ITP startup, the delay in the Evaporator startups and the reduction to Waste Removal funding. This Plan does, however, describe a viable operating strategy for the success of the HLW System and Mission, albeit with less contingency and operating flexibility than in the past. HLWM has focused resources from within the division on five near term programs: The three evaporator restarts, DWPF melter heatup and completion of the ITP outage. The 1H Evaporator was restarted 12/28/93 after a 9 month shutdown for an extensive Conduct of Operations upgrade. The 2F and 2H Evaporators are scheduled to restart 3/94 and 4/94, respectively. The RHLWE startup remains 11/17/97.

  18. IMGT/HighV-QUEST Statistical Significance of IMGT Clonotype (AA) Diversity per Gene for Standardized Comparisons of Next Generation Sequencing Immunoprofiles of Immunoglobulins and T Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aouinti, Safa; Malouche, Dhafer; Giudicelli, Véronique; Kossida, Sofia; Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune responses of humans and of other jawed vertebrate species (gnasthostomata) are characterized by the B and T cells and their specific antigen receptors, the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and the T cell receptors (TR) (up to 2.1012 different IG and TR per individual). IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://www.imgt.org), was created in 1989 by Marie-Paule Lefranc (Montpellier University and CNRS) to manage the huge and complex diversity of these antigen receptors. IMGT built on IMGT-ONTOLOGY concepts of identification (keywords), description (labels), classification (gene and allele nomenclature) and numerotation (IMGT unique numbering), is at the origin of immunoinformatics, a science at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT/HighV-QUEST, the first web portal, and so far the only one, for the next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of IG and TR, is the paradigm for immune repertoire standardized outputs and immunoprofiles of the adaptive immune responses. It provides the identification of the variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) genes and alleles, analysis of the V-(D)-J junction and complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) and the characterization of the ‘IMGT clonotype (AA)’ (AA for amino acid) diversity and expression. IMGT/HighV-QUEST compares outputs of different batches, up to one million nucleotide sequencesfor the statistical module. These high throughput IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles are of prime importance in vaccination, cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders, however their comparative statistical analysis still remains a challenge. We present a standardized statistical procedure to analyze IMGT/HighV-QUEST outputs for the evaluation of the significance of the IMGT clonotype (AA) diversity differences in proportions, per gene of a given group, between NGS IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles. The procedure is generic and

  19. SU-E-J-141: Comparison of Dose Calculation On Automatically Generated MRBased ED Maps and Corresponding Patient CT for Clinical Prostate EBRT Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Schadewaldt, N; Schulz, H; Helle, M; Renisch, S; Frantzen-Steneker, M; Heide, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of computing radiation dose on automatically generated MR-based simulated CT images compared to true patient CTs. Methods: Six prostate cancer patients received a regular planning CT for RT planning as well as a conventional 3D fast-field dual-echo scan on a Philips 3.0T Achieva, adding approximately 2 min of scan time to the clinical protocol. Simulated CTs (simCT) where synthesized by assigning known average CT values to the tissue classes air, water, fat, cortical and cancellous bone. For this, Dixon reconstruction of the nearly out-of-phase (echo 1) and in-phase images (echo 2) allowed for water and fat classification. Model based bone segmentation was performed on a combination of the DIXON images. A subsequent automatic threshold divides into cortical and cancellous bone. For validation, the simCT was registered to the true CT and clinical treatment plans were re-computed on the simCT in pinnacle{sup 3}. To differentiate effects related to the 5 tissue classes and changes in the patient anatomy not compensated by rigid registration, we also calculate the dose on a stratified CT, where HU values are sorted in to the same 5 tissue classes as the simCT. Results: Dose and volume parameters on PTV and risk organs as used for the clinical approval were compared. All deviations are below 1.1%, except the anal sphincter mean dose, which is at most 2.2%, but well below clinical acceptance threshold. Average deviations are below 0.4% for PTV and risk organs and 1.3% for the anal sphincter. The deviations of the stratifiedCT are in the same range as for the simCT. All plans would have passed clinical acceptance thresholds on the simulated CT images. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the clinical usability of MR based dose calculation with the presented Dixon acquisition and subsequent fully automatic image processing. N. Schadewaldt, H. Schulz, M. Helle and S. Renisch are employed by Phlips Technologie Innovative Techonologies, a

  20. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of... MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  1. Results of Wagner SL revision stem with impaction bone grafting in revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Somesh P; Bhalodiya, Haresh P

    2013-01-01

    Background: As the number of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed increases, so do the number of required revisions. Impaction bone grafting with Wagner SL Revision stem is a good option for managing bone deficiencies arising from aseptic osteolysis. We studied the results of cementless diaphyseal fixation in femoral revision after total hip arthroplasty and whether there was spontaneous regeneration of bone stock in the proximal femur after the use of Wagner SL Revision stem (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) with impaction bone grafting. Materials and Methods: We performed 53 hip revisions using impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL Revision stems in 48 patients; (5 cases were bilateral) for variety of indications ranging from aseptic osteolysis to preiprosthetic fractures. The average age was 59 years (range 44-68 years). There were 42 male and 6 female patients. Four patients died after surgery for reasons unrelated to surgery. 44 patients were available for complete analysis. Results: The mean Harris Hip Score was 42 before surgery and improved to 86 by the final followup evaluation at a mean point of 5.5 years. Of the 44 patients, 87% (n=39) had excellent results and 10% (n=5) had good results. The stem survival rate was 98% (n=43). Conclusion: Short term results for revision THA with impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL revision stems are encouraging. However, it is necessary to obtain long term results through periodic followup evaluation, as rate of complications may increase in future. PMID:23960279

  2. Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joseph A; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific "technical cause of failure." Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons.

  3. Femoral Tunnel Malposition in ACL Revision Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific “technical cause of failure.” Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  4. Evidence-Based Referral: Effects of the Revised “Youth Fit 4 Life” Protocol on Physical Activity Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Annesi, James J; Vaughn, Linda L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lack of physical activity is prevalent in youths. Pediatricians seek referrals to reliably increase outputs, especially in their overweight and underactive patients. Objective: Within a randomized controlled trial, we contrasted 2 physical activity/nutrition treatments on the basis of social cognitive and self-efficacy theory, and a comparison condition, on time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during the 45-min/day physical activity segment of elementary afterschool care. Methods: In youths ranging in age from 9 to 12 years (9.7 ± 0.8 years, overall), the Original Youth Fit For Life treatment (Original YFFL; n = 49), the Revised Youth Fit 4 Life treatment (Revised YF4L, n = 43), and a comparison condition of typical care (Comparison, n = 46) were contrasted using a 3 (groups) × 2 (sexes) analysis of variance incorporating means of 3 accelerometer measurements over 12 weeks. Results: There was a significantly greater amount of time in MVPA in the Revised YF4L group than either the Original YFFL or Comparison groups (F2, 132 = 281.20, p < 0.001). Boys completed significantly more time in MVPA than girls (F2, 132 = 16.43, p < 0.001); however, there was not a significant group × sex interaction. Supplementary analyses indicated sedentary time was significantly less by 29% in the Revised YF4L when contrasted with the Comparison group. Conclusion: The Revised YF4L protocol that sought to maximize participants’ cardiovascular physical activity appeared to improve upon the Original YFFL treatment on time in MVPA. Thus, pediatricians might have confidence in referring their patients to such evidence-based approaches. Future research should also evaluate the effects of YF4L on psychosocial predictors of physical activity and change in body mass index. PMID:26057685

  5. Experience revising an advanced-undergraduate/beginning-graduate fluid mechanics textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David

    2012-11-01

    In the fall of 2009, Elsevier Inc. approached me about taking over as the lead author of the fluid mechanics textbook by P. K. Kundu and I. M. Cohen. I subsequently agreed and this presentation provides the story of the process and the approach taken to revising this fluid mechanics textbook which has been in print for approximately 15 years. The goal of the revision was to produce an excellent textbook for second courses in fluid mechanics taken by advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students while maintaining the book's appeal to instructors who used prior editions. Thus, I sought to maintain or expand the text's fluid mechanics content, while adjusting the text's tone so that this content might be more readily reached by students who may have had only one prior course in fluid mechanics, or who may not specialize in fluid mechanics but do possess appropriate mathematical skills. The entire revision process involved seven steps: (i) formulating a revision plan that was independently reviewed, (ii) agreeing to a formal contract with deadlines, (iii) revising the text, figures, and front matter, (iv) proof reading and correcting copy-edited text, (v) correcting page proofs, (vi) generating the solutions manual, and (vii) tabulating errata. Formulating and executing the

  6. Traveling planetary wave ionospheric disturbances and their role in the generation of equatorial spread-F and GPS phase fluctuations during the last extreme low solar activity and comparison with high solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, A. J.; Fagundes, P. R.; Bolzan, M. J. A.; Gende, M.; Brunini, C.; de Jesus, R.; Pillat, V. G.; Abalde, J. R.; Lima, W. L. C.

    2014-09-01

    This investigation studies traveling planetary wave ionospheric disturbance (TPWID) type oscillations on the modulation of the F region virtual height rise during the E×B electric field pre-reversal enhancement (PRE), near sunset hours. We also studied their role in the generation of equatorial spread F (ESF) and GPS phase fluctuations during periods of the last extreme low solar activity (LSA) of January 2009 to April 2010 (F10.7bar=73). A comparison is made with periods of high solar activity (HSA) in 2003 and 2004 near equatorial region. The ionospheric irregularities investigated are medium (bottom-side) and large (plasma bubble) scales. Ionospheric F region oscillations with period of days are due to the TPWIDs, which play an important role in producing favorable or unfavorable conditions for equatorial ionospheric irregularities, changing the electron vertical profile and F region height. In this paper, we present simultaneous ionospheric sounding (ionosonde) and GPS vertical total electron content (vTEC) observations carried out near equatorial region (Palmas 10.2°S, 48.2°W) and low latitude region (São José dos Campos 23.2°S, 45.9°W; located under the southern crest of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly), Brazil. Observations show that the occurrence of fresh ESF during LSA and HSA and fresh GPS phase fluctuations at equatorial region follow the trend of day-to-day variations in the F region virtual height, which are due to electric field PRE modulated by TPWID wave like oscillations. During LSA, the altitude of 250 km acts as a threshold height for the generation of fresh ionospheric irregularities, whereas during HSA, the threshold height is 300 km. The observations also found a strong increase in the generation of fresh ionospheric irregularities from October 2009 to March 2010 during LSA and from September 2003 to March 2004 during the HSA. Furthermore, in LSA, the period of fresh ionospheric irregularities was less than during HSA, though both

  7. CONFIGURATION GENERATOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-11-18

    ''The Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' prescribes an approach to the methodology for performing postclosure criticality analyses within the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. An essential component of the methodology is the ''Configuration Generator Model for In-Package Criticality'' that provides a tool to evaluate the probabilities of degraded configurations achieving a critical state. The configuration generator model is a risk-informed, performance-based process for evaluating the criticality potential of degraded configurations in the monitored geologic repository. The method uses event tree methods to define configuration classes derived from criticality scenarios and to identify configuration class characteristics (parameters, ranges, etc.). The probabilities of achieving the various configuration classes are derived in part from probability density functions for degradation parameters. The NRC has issued ''Safety Evaluation Report for Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report, Revision 0''. That report contained 28 open items that required resolution through additional documentation. Of the 28 open items, numbers 5, 6, 9, 10, 18, and 19 were concerned with a previously proposed software approach to the configuration generator methodology and, in particular, the k{sub eff} regression analysis associated with the methodology. However, the use of a k{sub eff} regression analysis is not part of the current configuration generator methodology and, thus, the referenced open items are no longer considered applicable and will not be further addressed.

  8. SPRNG Scalable Parallel Random Number Generator LIbrary

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Ashok

    2010-03-16

    This revision corrects some errors in SPRNG 1. Users of newer SPRNG versions can obtain the corrected files and build their version with it. This version also improves the scalability of some of the application-based tests in the SPRNG test suite. It also includes an interface to a parallel Mersenne Twister, so that if users install the Mersenne Twister, then they can test this generator with the SPRNG test suite and also use some SPRNG features with that generator.

  9. Metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Austin, Matthew S

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of bone loss encountered during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often multifactorial and can include stress shielding, osteolysis, osteonecrosis, infection, mechanical loss due to a grossly loose implant, and iatrogenic loss at the time of implant resection. Selection of the reconstructive technique(s) to manage bone deficiency is determined by the location and magnitude of bone loss, ligament integrity, surgeon experience, and patient factors including the potential for additional revision, functional demand, and comorbidities. Smaller, contained defects are reliably managed with bone graft, cement augmented with screw fixation, or modular augments. Large metaphyseal defects require more extensive reconstruction such as impaction bone grafting with or without mesh augmentation, prosthetic augmentation, use of bulk structural allografts, or use of metaphyseal cones or sleeves. While each technique has advantages and disadvantages, the most optimal method for reconstruction of large metaphyseal bone defects during revision TKA is not clearly established. PMID:26362647

  10. The Maunder minimum: a revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, Nadezhda; Ponyavin, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    One of the most enigmatic features of the solar history in the past was the Maunder minimum (1645-1715). We estimated the daily nominal sunspot counts of each observer individually from 1610 to 1720. Simultaneous comparison of textual reports, tables, and sunspot drawings reveals a significant difference between them. Some observers (among whom were Jean Picard and Giovanni Domenico Cassini, both from the Royal Observatory in Paris) systematically made gaps in reports when others noticed sunspots. Philippe de La Hire announced only fewer sunspot groups compared with the other observers. We argue that different points of view of observers of the seventeenth-century on the origin of sunspots resulted in strong underestimation of sunspot groups. Our findings suggest that the Maunder minimum was an ordinary secular minimum with reduced but non-stopped solar cyclicity.

  11. Arthroscopic Hip Revision Surgery for Residual FAI

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.; Giveans, Russell; Bedi, Asheesh; Samuelson, Kathryn M.; Stone, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: There is a steep surgical learning curve when managing femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and residual FAI can lead to continued pain and disability. There is very limited data reporting outcomes after revision arthroscopy for residual FAI. Methods: The records of patients that underwent arthroscopic hip revision surgery for residual FAI based on plain radiographs and 3D CT scans were reviewed. Pre and post-operative structural pathomorphology, intra-operative findings, and pre and post-operative outcomes measures using Modified Harris Hip Scoring (MHHS), SF-12 scoring, and pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) were evaluated. Outcomes after revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to a cohort that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Results: 59 patients (85 hips) underwent arthroscopic revision FAI correction (mean 20.8 months follow-up). There were 98 previous arthroscopic surgeries and 4 previous surgical dislocations. There were 39 males and 46 females with a mean age of 29.5 years (range 16 - 59). 80 hips had residual cam-type FAI, and 64 hips had residual pincer-type FAI and underwent femoral and rim resections, respectively. The labrum was debrided in 27 hips, repaired in 48 hips and reconstructed with allograft in 8 hips. Adhesions were excised for 54 hips. The results of revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to 154 patients (169 hips) that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction (mean 25.2 months follow-up). The mean improvement for outcomes scores after revision FAI correction was 18.9 points (MHHS, p<.01), 13.4 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 2.2 points (VAS, p<.01) compared to 23.7 points (MHHS, p<.01), 22.3 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 4.6 points (VAS, p<.01) after primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Most recent outcomes scores and mean improvement in outcome scores were significantly better after primary (81.1% good/ excellent results) compared to revision (69.8% good/excellent results) FAI correction (MHS

  12. Recent Title V operating permit program revisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicewander, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss recent EPA proposed regulations regarding required procedures to be incorporated into the state operating permit programs to accommodate permit revisions. The development and implementation of an operating permits program must balance air pollution control requirements with the ability of a source to meet changing market demands. This has been the major item of concern during the operating permits program development. Before discussing the specific procedures for revising operating permits, it is necessary to include some generic background information for familiarization with the operating permits program.

  13. Taxonomic revision of Richardiodes Hendel (Diptera, Richardiidae).

    PubMed

    Wendt, Lisiane Dilli; Ale-Rocha, Rosaly

    2016-01-01

    Richardiodes Hendel is a genus scarcely known taxonomically and two species are recognized: Richardiodes rectinervis Hendel from Brazilian Amazon and R. trimaculata Hennig from Peru. Herein, these two species are revised and illustrated. Examination of non-type specimens revealed considerable variation in the general body color, and the geographic distribution of each species has been expanded, especially of R. rectinervis. The limits of the genus are revised and better supported with the addition of new diagnostic characters. The male and female terminalia are described and illustrated for the first time. PMID:27394237

  14. A revised conceptual model of the tropical marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Jennifer L.

    This work consists of the development and validation of a new radar product based on Bragg scattering retrievals from clear air S-band radar returns, a re-conceptualization of the tropical marine boundary layer based on this new radar product, and supplemental analysis of other data from this environment. The running theme throughout is moisture variability---its presence, how it can be better detected, and how it should be portrayed in the tropical marine environment. Data examined include National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR's) S-band Dual Polarization (S-Pol) radar data, rawinsondes, dropsondes, and portable automated mesonet surface station (PAMS) data from the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, along with satellite data which was partially coincident with these other data sets. Dropsondes, released in 34 sets of ˜6 per set, with each sonde released 5 min (30 km) apart around a 60 km diameter circle, demonstrated both the high moisture variability in the tropical marine boundary layer (TMBL) and the inadequacy of an individual sounding for characterizing its moisture field. Same altitude relative humidity (RH) measurements varied by as much as 70% (7-8 g kg-1) and the TMBL top altitude could vary by 2+ km across a single set. Clear-air Bragg scattering layers (BSLs) were common during RICO. An algorithm was developed to determine the location of BSL base and top altitudes, which were used to generate time-height diagrams. These revealed long-lived coherent structure. A statistical comparison of BSL altitudes and RH profiles from the rawinsondes supported the hypothesis that BSL tops are found near altitudes associated with RH minima and BSL bases near altitudes of RH maxima. Mechanisms for BSL formation/maintenance were discussed. On average 4-5 BSLs were detected (including the transition layer), and each BSL as well as the "clear" layers separating them had median depths of 350 m. Both BSLs and clear layers tended to be deeper

  15. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  16. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions. PMID:20395729

  17. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  18. 78 FR 2675 - Revised Jurisdictional Thresholds of the Clayton Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Revised Jurisdictional Thresholds of the Clayton Act AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Trade Commission announces the revised thresholds for interlocking...

  19. Supercontinuum Generation in Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, J. M.; Taylor, J. R.

    2010-04-01

    1. Introduction and history J. R. Taylor; 2. Supercontinuum generation in microstructure fiber - an historical note J. K. Ranka; 3. Nonlinear fiber optics overview J. C. Travers, M. H. Frosz and J. M. Dudley; 4. Fiber supercontinuum generation overview J. M. Dudley; 5. Silica fibers for supercontinuum generation J. C. Knight and W. Wadsworth; 6. Supercontinuum generation and nonlinearity in soft glass fibers J. H. V. Price and D. J. Richardson; 7. Increasing the blue-shift of a picosecond pumped supercontinuum M. H. Frosz, P. M. Moselund, P. D. Rasmussen, C. L. Thomsen and O. Bang; 8. Continuous wave supercontinuum generation J. C. Travers; 9. Theory of supercontinuum and interactions of solitons with dispersive waves D. V. Skryabin and A. V. Gorbach; 10. Interaction of four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman scattering in optical fibers S. Coen, S. G. Murdoch and F. Vanholsbeeck; 11. Nonlinear optics in emerging waveguides: revised fundamentals and implications S. V. Afshar, M. Turner and T. M. Monro; 12. Supercontinuum generation in dispersion varying fibers G. Genty; 13. Supercontinuum generation in chalcogenide glass waveguides Dong-Il Yeom, M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther Davies and B. J. Eggleton; 14. Supercontinuum generation for carrier-envelope phase stabilization of mode-locked lasers S. T. Cundiff; 15. Biophotonics applications of supercontinuum generation C. Dunsby and P. M. W. French; 16. Fiber sources of tailored supercontinuum in nonlinear microspectroscopy and imaging A. M. Zheltikov; Index.

  20. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.