Science.gov

Sample records for generator condensation experiments

  1. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

  2. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  4. Condensed Laboratory Experiences for Nonmajors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, James M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the use of laboratory experiments termed hands-on demonstrations that are designed to reinforce the concepts covered in lecture with emphasis on maximizing the sense content (sight, smell, hearing) to improve retention by the student. (GS)

  5. Femtosecond IR supercontinuum generation in condensed media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, Victor G.; Krylov, Vitaly N.; Seyfang, Georg; Staselko, Dmitry I.; Kozlov, Sergei A.; Shpolyansky, Yury A.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2001-04-01

    We report experimental and theoretical investigation of supercontinuum generation in broad spectral range from 500 nm to 2500 nm induced in water and bulk fused silica by 1mJ 150-fs pulses at 780 nm excitation wavelength. We find that experiments may be modeled theoretically by considering Raman- and Kerr-type nonlinearities such as transient stimulated Raman scattering, parametric four-photon mixing, self-phase modulation and cross-phase modulation.

  6. 2. VIEW NORTHEAST OF CONDENSER WATER INTAKE (LEFT), GENERATING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHEAST OF CONDENSER WATER INTAKE (LEFT), GENERATING PLANT AND STACK (CENTER), AND VIADUCT (EXTREME RIGHT) - Turners Falls Power & Electric Company, Hampden Station, East bank of Connecticut River, Chicopee, Hampden County, MA

  7. Oblique solitons generated by the flow of a polariton condensate past an obstacle

    SciTech Connect

    Kamchatnov, A. M. Korneev, S. V.

    2012-10-15

    The formation of oblique solitons in a polariton condensate flowing past an obstacle is considered. Because of the finite lifetime of polaritons, the condensate flow is inhomogeneous, which leads to a significant modification of the conditions necessary for the generation of oblique solitons as compared to the conditions established earlier for the flow of an atomic condensate. In particular, it is established that oblique solitons in the polariton case can be generated by a subsonic flow of the condensate in agreement with the results of recent experiments [9]. The geometric shape and other parameters of oblique solitons are analytically calculated using a model based on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation with damping, and the analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  8. Pion condensation and instabilities: current theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1980-05-01

    Current calculations of pion condensation phenomena in symmetric nuclear matter are reviewed. The RPA and MFA methods are compared. Latest results (LBL-10572) with a relativistic MFA theory constrained by bulk nuclear properties are presented. The differences between equilibrium (condensation) and nonequilibrium (dynamic) instabilities are discussed. Finally, two-proton correlation experiments aimed at looking for critical scattering phenomena and two-pion correlation experiments aimed at looking for pion field coherence are analyzed. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Experiments on condensation over in-line and staggered condenser tubes in the presence of non-condensable gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Abdulghani; Yamali, Cemil

    2013-12-01

    The problem of the forced film condensation heat transfer of pure steam and steam-air mixture flowing downward a tier of horizontal cylinders is investigated experimentally. An experimental setup was manufactured and mounted at Middle East Technical University workshop. A set of experiments were conducted to observe the condensation heat transfer phenomenon and to verify the theoretical results. The results of the experimental investigation are presented to show the effect of different parameters on the film condensation heat transfer phenomenon over bundle of tubes. These parameters include; free stream velocity, free stream non-condensable gas (air) mass fractions, free stream temperature to wall temperature difference, the angle of inclination. heat transfer coefficients are evaluated at different working conditions for both inline and staggered arrangements. Results show that; a remarked reduction in the vapor side heat transfer coefficient is noticed when very small amounts of air mass fractions present in the vapor. In addition, it decreases by increasing the temperature difference. On the other hand, it increases by increasing the free stream velocity (Reynolds number). Average heat transfer coefficient at the middle and the bottom cylinders increases by increasing the angle of inclination, whereas, no significant change is observed for that of the upper cylinder. Although some discrepancies are noticed, the present study results are inline and in a reasonable agreement with the theory and experiment in the literature.

  10. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-01-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  11. High gliding fluid power generation system with fluid component separation and multiple condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Ahmad M; Lee, Jaeseon; Radcliff, Thomas D

    2014-10-14

    An example power generation system includes a vapor generator, a turbine, a separator and a pump. In the separator, the multiple components of the working fluid are separated from each other and sent to separate condensers. Each of the separate condensers is configured for condensing a single component of the working fluid. Once each of the components condense back into a liquid form they are recombined and exhausted to a pump that in turn drives the working fluid back to the vapor generator.

  12. Depolarization properties of the femtosecond supercontinuum generated in condensed media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. Sai Santosh; Deepak, K. L. N.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we present a study of depolarization of a supercontinuum across its spectral range as a function of the femtosecond laser pump intensity for an anisotropic crystalline condensed medium, potassium-dihydrogen-phosphate (KDP) crystal, and compare our results with commonly used supercontinuum generation (SCG) materials, namely borosilicate glass Schott (BK-7) glass (representing isotropic amorphous condensed media) and BaF2 (isotropic crystalline condensed media). Our results show that at higher input powers, depolarization in the continuum increases for BK-7, BaF2 , and along the direction of the optic axis of the KDP crystal. However, in the case of KDP crystal, we observe that the depolarization properties are strongly dependent on (i) the plane of polarization of incident light and (ii) the orientation of the crystal with respect to the incident light. Our studies also confirm that one can achieve SCG in a KDP crystal that maintains the same state of input polarization even at high input intensities when proper orientation of the crystal is used.

  13. Experiments and Modeling of Evaporating/Condensing Menisci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Discuss the Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) experiment and how it aims to achieve a better understanding of the physics of evaporation and condensation and how they affect cooling processes in microgravity using a remotely controlled microscope and a small cooling device.

  14. Entanglement generation in quantum networks of Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrkov, Alexey N.; Byrnes, Tim

    2013-09-01

    Two component (spinor) Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) are considered as the nodes of an interconnected quantum network. Unlike standard single-system qubits, in a BEC the quantum information is duplicated in a large number of identical bosonic particles, thus can be considered to be a ‘macroscopic’ qubit. One of the difficulties with such a system is how to effectively interact such qubits together in order to transfer quantum information and create entanglement. Here we propose a scheme of cavities containing spinor BECs coupled by optical fiber in order to achieve this task. We discuss entanglement generation and quantum state transfer between nodes using such macroscopic BEC qubits.

  15. An experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Results obtained from an experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode are presented. The obtained empirical dependence for calculating the power of heat exchangers operating in the steam condensation mode is presented.

  16. Generation of the Higgs condensate and its decay after inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Meriniemi, Tuukka; Nurmi, Sami E-mail: tuukka.meriniemi@helsinki.fi

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the Standard Model higgs with a minimal coupling to gravity during and after inflation. In the regime where the Standard Model vacuum is stable, we find that the higgs becomes a light spectator field after about 30 efolds of inflation, irrespectively of its initial value. Once the higgs has become light, its root-mean-square value h{sub *} relaxes to equilibrium in about 85 efolds for the inflationary scale of H{sub *} = 10{sup 4} GeV and in 20 efolds for H{sub *} = 10{sup 10} GeV. The equilibrium value is given by h{sub *} ∼ 0.36λ{sub *}{sup −1/4}H{sub *}, where λ{sub *} = 0.09...0.0005 is the higgs self coupling at the scales H{sub *} = 10{sup 4}...10{sup 10} GeV. We show that the main decay channel of the higgs condensate after inflation is the resonant production of Standard Model gauge bosons. For a set of parameters we find that a significant part of the condensate has decayed in between 340 and 630 Hubble times after the onset of higgs oscillations, depending on H{sub *} in a non-trivial way. The higgs perturbations correspond to isocurvature modes during inflation but they could generate significant adiabatic perturbations at a later stage for example through a modulation of the reheating stage. However, this requires that the inflaton(s) decay no later than a few hundred Hubble times after the onset of higgs oscillations.

  17. Condensation during gravity driven ECC: Experiments with PACTEL

    SciTech Connect

    Munther, R.; Kalli, H.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper provides the results of the second series of gravity driven emergency core cooling (ECC) experiments with PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop). The simulated accident was a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) with a break in a cold leg. The ECC flow was provided from a core makeup tank (CMT) located at a higher elevation than the main part of the primary system. The CMT was pressurized with pipings from the pressurizer and a cold leg. The tests indicated that steam condensation in the CMT can prevent ECC and lead to core uncovery.

  18. Generating periodic interference in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shen-Tong; Wang, Yuan-Sheng; Luo, Yue-E.; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2016-09-01

    The interference between two condensates with repulsive interaction is investigated numerically by solving the one-dimensional time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The periodic interference pattern forms in two condensates, which are prepared in a double-well potential consisting of two truncated harmonic wells centered at different positions. Dark solitons are observed when two condensates overlap. Due to the existence of atom-atom interactions, atoms are transferred among the ground state and the excited states, which coincides with the condensate energy change. Project supported by the Doctoral Funds of Guizhou Normal College, China (Grant No. 2015BS006) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11271158 and 11174108).

  19. Refractory residues, condensates and chondrules from solar furnace experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Vertical access solar furnace experiments have produced refractory residues, condensates and chondrules that are similar to components of chondritic meteorites. In particular, Ca-Al-rich refractory residues similar in chemistry to inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites have been produced by partial evaporation of basaltic bulk rock samples. Fe-Mg-Si-rich condensates with distinctive microbotryoidal morphology have been collected from the same sample runs. Particle coatings and aggregates with virtually identical microbotryoidal morphology and major element chemistry have been identified in both the Allende and Murchison meteorites. Spattered drops from melt beads undergoing heating and partial evaporation resemble some meteoritic chondrules in their mineralogies, textures, grain size, and sorting. The spatter mechanism is highly efficient in the production of chondrules. If any of the refractory inclusions in chondrites are, in fact, partial evaporation residues, many meteoritic fluid drop chondrules must have been formed by this process. The hot central portion of the solar nebula, acting on a cloud of dust and gas, is the probable source of heat required to produce the fractionated chemistry and physical state of many of the components of chondritic meteorites.

  20. Development and Capabilities of ISS Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Patania, Michelle; Hall, Nancy; Wagner, James; Mackey, Jeffrey; Frankenfield, Bruce; Hauser, Daniel; Harpster, George; Nawrocki, David; Clapper, Randy; Kolacz, John; Butcher, Robert; May, Rochelle; Chao, David; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; O'Neill, Lucas E.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments in long duration microgravity environment is being designed for operation on the International Space Station (ISS). This work describes the design of the subsystems of the FBCE including the Fluid subsystem modules, data acquisition, controls, and diagnostics. Subsystems and components are designed within the constraints of the ISS Fluid Integrated Rack in terms of power availability, cooling capability, mass and volume, and most importantly the safety requirements. In this work we present the results of ground-based performance testing of the FBCE subsystem modules and test module which consist of the two condensation modules and the flow boiling module. During this testing, we evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, heat loss from different modules and components, and performance of the test modules. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is manifested for flight in late 2017-early 2018.

  1. Recent experiments with ring Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, S.; Kumar, A.; Anderson, N. W.; Campbell, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we present three recent results of our experiments with ring-shaped 23 Na Bose-Einstein condensates. First, we present results of the effect of temperature on the decay of persistent currents in the presence of a local, stationary perturbation, or weak link. When the weak link rotates, it can drive transitions between quantized persistent current states in the ring, that form hysteresis loops whose size depends strongly on temperature. We find that our data does not fit with a simple model of thermal activation. Second, we present a new method to measure the quantized persistent current state of the ring in a minimally-destructive way. This technique uses phonons as probes of the background flow through the Doppler effect. Finally, we present a set of experiments designed to reproduce the horizon problem in the early universe. Supersonic expansion of the ring creates causally-disconnected regions of BEC whose phase evolves at different rates. When the expansion stops and these regions are allowed to recombine, they form topological excitations. These excitations can be predicted using a simple theory that shows excellent agreement with the data.

  2. Recent multiwave Cherenkov generator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.; Richter-Sand, R.; Hacker, F.; Walsh, J.; Arman, M.

    1994-12-31

    The initial operating characteristics of the North Star Research Corporation (NSRC) multiwave generator experiment are discussed. The first radiation from the NSRC apparatus has now been observed and the immediate goal is to optimize the power output by providing a beam which is better matched to the field profile (a thinner beam propagating closer to the vanes). When this has been accomplished a detailed comparison of the performance of MWCG/MWDG (multiwave diffraction generator/multiwave Cherenkov generator) structures with BWO structures of the same interaction length will be undertaken.

  3. Expressing death risk as condensed life experience and death intensity.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2013-08-01

    Some risk exposures, including many medical and surgical procedures, typically carry hazards of death that are difficult to convey and appreciate in absolute terms. I propose presenting the death risk as a condensed life experience (i.e., the equivalent amount of life T that would carry the same cumulative mortality hazard for a person of the same age and sex based on life tables). For example, if the risk of death during an elective 1-hour procedure is 0.01%, and same-age and same-sex people have a 0.01% death risk over 1 month, one can inform the patient that "this procedure carries the same death risk as living 1 month of normal life." Comparative standards from other risky activities or from a person with the same disease at the same stage and same predictive profile could also be used. A complementary metric that may be useful to consider is the death intensity. The death intensity λ is the hazard function that shows the fold-risk estimate of dying compared with the reference person. The death intensity can vary substantially for different phases of the event, operation, or procedure (e.g., intraoperative, early postoperative, late postoperative), and this variability may also be useful to convey. T will vary depending on the time window for which it is computed. I present examples for calculating T and λ using literature data on accidents, ascent to Mount Everest, and medical and surgical procedures.

  4. The first experiments with Bose-Einstein condensation of rubidium-87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensher, Jason Remington

    1999-10-01

    Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) is the macroscopic occupation of the ground-state of a system of bosons that occurs when the extent of the wavefunctions of the particles is comparable to the interparticle spacing. Although predicted by Albert Einstein in 1924) BEC in a dilute system was observed only recently in an atomic vapor of 87Rb by our group in 1995. This thesis describes the first experiments to explore the properties of this new state of matter. In early experiments, we studied how interparticle interactions modify the ground-state wavefunction and mean energy. We observed phonon-like collective excitations of the condensate. We studied modes of different angular momenta and energies. Our observations of how the characteristics of the modes depend on interactions quantitatively supported the mean- field picture of the dilute BEC. Shortly thereafter, we developed thermometry and calorimetry to study the ground-state fraction and mean energy of the Bose gas as a function of temperature. The BEC transition temperature and the temperature dependence of the ground-state fraction are in good agreement with predictions for an ideal Bose gas. However, the measured mean energy is larger than that of the ideal gas below the transition. We observe a distinct change in the energy-temperature curve near the transition, which indicates a sharp feature in the specific heat. In an effort to produce larger condensates we constructed a double-MOT apparatus that became the third-generation machine at JILA to observe and study BEC. The new apparatus produces condensates five times more quickly than the original experiment, increasing the number of atoms in the condensate from several thousand to 1-2 million atoms. Using the improved apparatus, we studied the TOP (time-averaged orbiting potential) magnetic trap. An important, new observation is that the trap symmetry is affected by the sag due to gravity, an effect which can be exploited to create very harmonic, spherical

  5. WIPP Gas-Generation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frank S. Felicione; Steven M. Frank; Dennis D. Keiser

    2007-05-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750 ml headspace in each vessel was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure estimated in the repository were it to be inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30°C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generated by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6 1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. Up to 4.2% hydrogen, by volume, was measured. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in vessels containing carbon steel. Visual examination of carbon-steel coupons confirmed the correspondence between the extent of observable corrosion and hydrogen generation. Average corrosion penetration rates

  6. Dropwise Condensation Experiments with Humid Air at a Polymer Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, P.; Philipp, Ch; Gross, U.

    2012-11-01

    A new test facility has been developed to investigate dropwise condensation heat transfer in a humid air environment. It is designed as a closed loop system in which air is circulated by a fan, enabling investigations in the following parameter ranges: velocity up to 20 m/s; Reynolds number up to 20,000; temperature 20 to 100 °C relative humidity up to 100 %. Heat transfer measurements are done with a specifically designed micro sensor which is flush mounted at one of the vertical surfaces of a horizontal flow channel 12 mm × 32 mm (inner width and height, respectively) and covered at its air-side surface by a newly developed polymer layer containing 20 % of carbon nanotubes for improvement of the thermal conductivity. A total of 8 thermocouples is embedded inside the sensor. Their readings serve as input data to a numerical model which enables consideration of heat losses and evaluation of surface temperature and heat flux. The measuring system allows to analyse the effects of heat flux, air-to-wall temperature difference, absolute and relative humidity, and Reynolds number on the heat transfer coefficient. Single phase heat transfer results show excellent agreement with well established correlations for turbulent air flow. The onset of dropwise condensation was detected with very good repeatability. This paper covers details of the experimental device, measuring system and data evaluation including accuracy considerations. Single phase and preliminary dropwise condensation results with humid air are reported.

  7. The next generation HAPPEX experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard S. Holmes

    2005-02-01

    A new generation of parity violating electron scattering experiments began running in Summer 2004 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. HAPPEX-H will measure the parity violating asymmetry in polarized electron scattering from protons at Q2 = 0.11 (GeV/c)2. This asymmetry is sensitive to a linear combination of the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. HAPPEX-He will measure the parity violating asymmetry in polarized electron scattering from a 4He target at the same value of Q2, using the same spectrometers and similar detectors, accessing the strange electric form factor cleanly. PREX will use parity violating electron scattering to determine the neutron radius of the 206Pb nucleus.

  8. Oblique half-solitons and their generation in exciton-polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Flayac, H.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2011-05-15

    We describe oblique half-solitons, a new type of topological defects in a two-dimensional spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. A realistic protocol based on the optical spin Hall effect is proposed toward their generation within an exciton-polariton system.

  9. Study to perform preliminary experiments to evaluate particle generation and characterization techniques for zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of particle generation and characterization with regard to their applicability for experiments requiring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of specified properties were investigated. Since aerosol characterization is a prerequisite to assessing performance of particle generation equipment, techniques for characterizing aerosol were evaluated. Aerosol generation is discussed, and atomizer and photolytic generators including preparation of hydrosols (used with atomizers) and the evaluation of a flight version of an atomizer are studied.

  10. Generation of massive entanglement through an adiabatic quantum phase transition in a spinor condensate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Duan, L-M

    2013-11-01

    We propose a method to generate massive entanglement in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate from an initial product state through an adiabatic sweep of the magnetic field across a quantum phase transition induced by competition between the spin-dependent collision interaction and the quadratic Zeeman effect. The generated many-body entanglement is characterized by the experimentally measurable entanglement depth in the proximity of the Dicke state. We show that the scheme is robust to practical noise and experimental imperfection and under realistic conditions it is possible to generate genuine entanglement for hundreds of atoms. PMID:24237490

  11. Generation of massive entanglement through an adiabatic quantum phase transition in a spinor condensate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Duan, L-M

    2013-11-01

    We propose a method to generate massive entanglement in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate from an initial product state through an adiabatic sweep of the magnetic field across a quantum phase transition induced by competition between the spin-dependent collision interaction and the quadratic Zeeman effect. The generated many-body entanglement is characterized by the experimentally measurable entanglement depth in the proximity of the Dicke state. We show that the scheme is robust to practical noise and experimental imperfection and under realistic conditions it is possible to generate genuine entanglement for hundreds of atoms.

  12. Mesh generation and energy group condensation studies for the jaguar deterministic transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R. A.; Watson, A. M.; Iwueke, C. I.; Edwards, E. J.

    2012-07-01

    The deterministic transport code Jaguar is introduced, and the modeling process for Jaguar is demonstrated using a two-dimensional assembly model of the Hoogenboom-Martin Performance Benchmark Problem. This single assembly model is being used to test and analyze optimal modeling methodologies and techniques for Jaguar. This paper focuses on spatial mesh generation and energy condensation techniques. In this summary, the models and processes are defined as well as thermal flux solution comparisons with the Monte Carlo code MC21. (authors)

  13. Experiment and analysis of ablation and condensation in NIF first wall materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, H.; Peterson, P.F.; Turner, R.E.; Anderson, A.T.

    1996-06-14

    Experiments were performed on Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the ablation and condensation process of National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall materials. Plates of candidate first wall materials (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 4}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were exposed to x-rays from hohlraums in the Nova chamber. Ablated material was collected and measured on a receiving plate which was blocked form direct x-ray exposure. This article presents the results form these experiments and comparisons with predictions from numerical simulations The net condensation flux was calculated using the TSUNAMI code, which was modified to incorporate the feature of condensation boundaries.

  14. Intermolecular forces between low generation PAMAM dendrimer condensed DNA helices: role of cation architecture.

    PubMed

    An, Min; Parkin, Sean R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2014-01-28

    In recent years, dendriplexes, complexes of cationic dendrimers with DNA, have become attractive DNA delivery vehicles due to their well-defined chemistries. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing dendriplexes, we studied low generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-DNA complexes and compared them to comparably charged linear arginine peptides. Using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering, we have investigated the effect of molecular chain architecture on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance within these polycation condensed DNA arrays. In order to compact DNA, linear cations are believed to bind in DNA grooves and to interact with the phosphate backbone of apposing helices. We have previously shown a length dependent attraction resulting in higher packaging densities with increasing charge for linear cations. Hyperbranched polycations, such as polycationic dendrimers, presumably would not be able to bind to DNA and correlate their charges in the same manner as linear cations. We show that attractive and repulsive force amplitudes in PAMAM-DNA assemblies display significantly different trends than comparably charged linear arginines resulting in lower DNA packaging densities with increasing PAMAM generation. The salt and pH dependencies of packaging in PAMAM dendrimer-DNA and linear arginine-DNA complexes were also investigated. Significant differences in the force curve behaviour and salt and pH sensitivities suggest that different binding modes may be present in DNA condensed by dendrimers when compared to linear polycations.

  15. Sculpting quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate to generate calibrated matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Javed; Pelster, Axel

    2016-02-01

    We explore theoretically how to tune the dynamics of a quasi-one-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) due to an additional red- and blue-detuned Hermite-Gaussian dimple trap (HGdT). To this end we study a BEC in a highly nonequilibrium state, which is not possible in a traditional harmonically confined trap. Our system is modeled by a time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which is numerically solved by the Crank-Nicolson method in both imaginary and real time. For equilibrium, we obtain a condensate with two bumps or dips which are induced by the chosen TEM01 mode for the red- or blue-detuned HGdT, respectively. Afterward, in time-of-flight dynamics, we examine the adherence or decay of the two bumps or dips in the condensate, which are induced by the still present red- or blue-detuned HGdT, respectively. On the other hand, once the red or blue HGdT potential is switched off, shock waves or bi-trains of gray or dark pair-solitons are created. During this process it is found that the generation of gray or dark pair-soliton bi-trains are generic phenomena of collisions of moderately or fully fragmented BEC. Additionally, it turns out that the special shape of generated solitons in the harmonically trapped BEC firmly depends upon the geometry of the HGdT.

  16. (X-ray diffraction experiments with condenser matter)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: high-{Tc} superconductors; The response of crystal to an applied electric field; quasicrystals; surface structure and kinetics of surface layer formation; EXAFS studies of superconductors and heterostructures; effect of iron on the crystal structure of perovskite; x-ray detector development; and SAXS experiments. (LSP)

  17. Generation and characterization of condensation aerosols of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, K.W.; Kanapilly, G.M.; Mitchell, C.E.

    1981-03-01

    Condensation aerosols of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) with particle sizes ranging from 0.1 to 2 ..mu..m (aerodynamic diameter) were produced and studied. These aerosols were generated in a glove box by direct vaporization of BaP and homogeneous condensation of the vapor. The aerosol concentration ranged from 50 to 700 ..mu..g/l with aerosol production rates up to 15 mg BaP per minute. The effects of vaporization temperature and flow rate of diluting air on the particle size distribution and aerosol output were studied. The BaP aerosol was produced with relatively constant mass concentration and particle size distribution for more than 5 h. The aerosol was physicochemically and thermally stable. Data on the in vitro dissolution of BaP particles in aqueous solvents and in different dissolution systems suggested that the organic BaP particle does not dissolve in simple aqueous solvents.

  18. MELCOR 1.8.1 assessment: PNL Ice Condenser Aerosol Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    The MELCOR code was used to simulate PNL`s Ice Condenser Experiments 11-6 and 16-11. In these experiments, ZnS was injected into a mixing chamber, and the combined steam/air/aerosol mixture flowed into an ice condenser which was l4.7m tall. Experiment 11-6 was a low flow test; Experiment l6-1l was a high flow test. Temperatures in the ice condenser region and particle retention were measured in these tests. MELCOR predictions compared very well to the experimental data. The MELCOR calculations were also compared to CONTAIN code calculations for the same tests. A number of sensitivity studies were performed. It as found that simulation time step, aerosol parameters such as the number of MAEROS components and sections used and the particle density, and ice condenser parameters such as the energy capacity of the ice, ice heat transfer coefficient multiplier, and ice heat structure characteristic length all could affect the results. Thermal/hydraulic parameters such as control volume equilibrium assumptions, flow loss coefficients, and the bubble rise model were found to affect the results less significantly. MELCOR results were not machine dependent for this problem.

  19. Generation of monodisperse droplets by spontaneous condensation of flow in nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Der-Shaiun; Kadambi, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Submicron size monodisperse particles are of interest in many industrial and scientific applications. These include the manufacture of ceramic parts using fine ceramic particles, the production of thin films by deposition of ionized clusters, monodisperse seed particles for laser anemometry, and the study of size dependence of cluster chemical and physical properties. An inexpensive and relatively easy way to generate such particles is by utilizing the phenomenon of spontaneous condensation. The phenomenon occurs when the vapor or a mixture of a vapor and a noncondensing gas is expanded at a high expansion rate. The saturation line is crossed with the supercooled vapor behaving like a gas, until all of a sudden at the so called Wilson point, condensation occurs, resulting in a large number of relatively monodisperse droplets. The droplet size is a function of the expansion rate, inlet conditions, mass fraction of vapor, gas properties, etc. Spontaneous condensation of steam and water vapor and air mixture in a one dimensional nozzle was modeled and the resulting equations solved numerically. The droplet size distribution at the exit of various one dimensional nozzles and the flow characteristics such as pressure ratio, mean droplet radius, vapor and droplet temperatures, nucleation flux, supercooling, wetness, etc., along the axial distance were obtained. The numerical results compared very well with the available experimental data. The effect of inlet conditions, nozzle expansion rates, and vapor mass fractions on droplet mean radius, droplet size distribution, and pressure ratio were examined.

  20. Stabilization of Solitons Generated by a Supersonic Flow of Bose-Einstein Condensate Past an Obstacle

    SciTech Connect

    Kamchatnov, A. M.; Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2008-04-25

    The stability of dark solitons generated by supersonic flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate past an obstacle is investigated. It is shown that in the reference frame attached to the obstacle a transition occurs at some critical value of the flow velocity from absolute instability of dark solitons to their convective instability. This leads to the decay of disturbances of solitons at a fixed distance from the obstacle and the formation of effectively stable dark solitons. This phenomenon explains the surprising stability of the flow picture that has been observed in numerical simulations.

  1. Entanglement generation between spinor Bose-Einstein condensates using Rydberg excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idlas, Sandrine; Domenzain, Luis; Spreeuw, Robert; Byrnes, Tim

    2016-02-01

    We propose an experimental scheme of generating entangled states between two spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) using Rydberg excitations. Due to the strong interaction between Rydberg atoms, the Rydberg excitation creates an interaction between two closely located BECs. The method is suitable particularly for atom chip and permanent magnetic trap systems, which can create many BECs with an arbitrary two-dimensional geometry. We show two schemes of entangled state generation, based on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) methods. The first method produces a symmetric state with total Sx spin zero between ground and excited states of the atoms using a single STIRAP pair, while the second produces a NOON state between hyperfine ground states using two STIRAP pairs. We show that despite the additional complexity of the BECs, it is possible to identify the initial and final adiabatic states exactly. We verify our theoretical predictions using numerical simulations on small boson number systems.

  2. Generativity: Lived Experience as Curricular Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallin, Jason; Graham, Tanya

    2002-01-01

    Modern educational practice, inspired by the scientific rationalism of the 17th and 18th centuries, focuses on control, certainty, and order, thus rendering students' experiences superficial. Generativity "finds" the curriculum in students' life experiences, giving them relevance and the opportunity to be explored. Where life is not the source of…

  3. Observations of condensation nuclei in the 1987 airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Smith, S. D.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.

    1988-01-01

    The condensation nucleus counter (CNC) flown of the NASA ER-2 in the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment provides a measurement of the number mixing ratio of particles which can be grown by exposure to supersaturated n-butyl alcohol vapor to diameters of a few microns. Such particles are referred to as condensation nuclei (CN). The ER-2 CNC was calibrated with aerosols of known size and concentration and was found to provide an accurate measure of the number concentration of particles larger than about 0.02 micron. Since the number distribution of stratospheric aerosols is usually dominated by particles less than a few tenths of micron in diameter, the upper cutoff of the ER-2 CNC has not been determined experimentally. However, theory suggests that the sampling and counting efficiency should remain near one for particles as large as 1 micron in diameter. Thus, the CN mixing ratio is usually a good measure of the mixing ratio of submicron particles.

  4. Generation of directional, coherent matter beams through dynamical instabilities in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Graham R.; Johnsson, Mattias T.

    2010-09-15

    We present a theoretical analysis of a coupled, two-state Bose-Einstein condensate with nonequal scattering lengths and show that dynamical instabilities can be excited. We demonstrate that these instabilities are exponentially amplified, resulting in highly directional, oppositely propagating, coherent matter beams at specific momenta. To accomplish this we prove that the mean field of our system is periodic and extend the standard Bogoliubov approach to consider a time-dependent, but cyclic, background. This allows us to use Floquet's theorem to gain analytic insight into such systems, rather than employing the usual Bogoliubov-de Gennes approach, which is usually limited to numerical solutions. We apply our theory to the metastable helium atom laser experiment by Dall et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 011601(R) (2009)] and show that it explains the anomalous beam profiles they observed. Finally, we demonstrate that the paired particle beams will be Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled on formation.

  5. Pinch Experiments in a Table Top Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    The design and construction of a table top multipurpose capacitor bank of hundred of Joules and hundred of kiloAmperes conceived to be used in small scale Z-pinch experiments is reported. A recent result on a Z-pinch gas embedded discharge using hollow conical electrodes done in a similar table top generator is also presented.

  6. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B. K.; Althof, J. A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations.

  7. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

  8. Analysis of dynamical tunneling experiments with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hensinger, W.K.; Mouchet, A.; Julienne, P. S.; Delande, D.; Heckenberg, N.R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H.

    2004-07-01

    Dynamical tunneling is a quantum phenomenon where a classically forbidden process occurs that is prohibited not by energy but by another constant of motion. The phenomenon of dynamical tunneling has been recently observed in a sodium Bose-Einstein condensate. We present a detailed analysis of these experiments using numerical solutions of the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation and the corresponding Floquet theory. We explore the parameter dependency of the tunneling oscillations and we move the quantum system towards the classical limit in the experimentally accessible regime.

  9. Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler--Generating condensed-phase models of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Sündermann, Axel; Solc, Roland; Tunega, Daniel; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment and have manifold functions. While their composition is well known, information on the chemical structure and three-dimensional conformation is scarce. Here we describe the Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler, which is an online tool to generate condensed phase computer models of humic substances (http://somm.boku.ac.at). Many different models can be created that reflect the diversity in composition and conformations of the constituting molecules. To exemplify the modeler, 18 different models are generated based on two experimentally determined compositions, to explicitly study the effect of varying e.g. the amount of water molecules in the models or the pH. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the models, which were subsequently analyzed in terms of structure, interactions and dynamics, linking macroscopic observables to the microscopic composition of the systems. We are convinced that this new tool opens the way for a wide range of in silico studies on soil organic matter. PMID:26521208

  10. Generating, dragging, and releasing dark solitons in elongated Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, I.; Stockhofe, J.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically analyze quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates under the influence of a harmonic trap and a narrow potential defect that moves through the atomic cloud. Performing simulations on the mean-field level, we explore a robust mechanism in which a single dark soliton is nucleated and immediately pinned by the moving defect, making it possible to drag it to a desired position and release it there. We argue on a perturbative level that a defect potential which is attractive to the atoms is suitable for holding and moving dark solitons. The soliton generation protocol is investigated over a wide range of model parameters and its success is systematically quantified by a suitable fidelity measure, demonstrating its robustness against parameter variations, but also the need for tight focusing of the defect potential. Holding the soliton at a stationary defect for long times may give rise to dynamical instabilities, whose origin we explore within a Bogoliubov-de Gennes linearization analysis. We show that iterating the generation process with multiple defects offers a perspective for initializing multiple soliton dynamics with freely chosen initial conditions.

  11. Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler--Generating condensed-phase models of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Sündermann, Axel; Solc, Roland; Tunega, Daniel; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment and have manifold functions. While their composition is well known, information on the chemical structure and three-dimensional conformation is scarce. Here we describe the Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler, which is an online tool to generate condensed phase computer models of humic substances (http://somm.boku.ac.at). Many different models can be created that reflect the diversity in composition and conformations of the constituting molecules. To exemplify the modeler, 18 different models are generated based on two experimentally determined compositions, to explicitly study the effect of varying e.g. the amount of water molecules in the models or the pH. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the models, which were subsequently analyzed in terms of structure, interactions and dynamics, linking macroscopic observables to the microscopic composition of the systems. We are convinced that this new tool opens the way for a wide range of in silico studies on soil organic matter.

  12. Demonstration of beneficial uses of warm water from condensers of electric-generating plants

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, L.L.; Ashley, G.C.; Hietala, J.S.; Stansfield, R.V.; Tonkinson, T.R.C.

    1980-05-01

    The report gives results of a project to demonstrate that warmed cooling water from condensers of electric generating plants can effectively and economically heat greenhouses. The 0.2-hectare demonstration greenhouse, at Northern States Power Co.'s Sherburne County (Sherco) Generating Plant, used 29.4 C water to heat both air and soil: finned-tube commercial heat exchangers were used to heat the air; and buried plastic pipes, the soil. Warm water from the Sherco 1 cooling tower was piped over 0.8 km to the greenhouse where it was cooled from 2.7 to 5.6 C before returning to the cooling tower basin. Roses and tomatoes were the principal crops in the 3-year test, although other flowers and vegetables, and conifer seedlings were also grown. The warm water heating system supplied all the greenhouse heating requirements, even at ambient temperatures as low as -40 C. Roses, snapdragons, geraniums, tomatoes, lettuce, and evergreen seedlings were grown successfully. The demonstration proved the concept to be both technically and economically feasible at Sherco, with an apparent saving of $4500/hectare in 1978 dollars over fuel oil heating, plus an annual oil savings of about 500 cu m/hectare. Privately financed commercial greenhouses heated with warm water were built at Sherco in 1977. The commercial greenhouses will expand from 0.48 to almost 1 hectare by late 1980.

  13. Chemical and mutagenic properties of asphalt fume condensates generated under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, G; Swanson, M; Paustenbach, D; Beach, J

    2000-08-21

    Exposure to asphalt fumes is widely recognized as a potential occupational health concern for paving and roofing workers. Two studies suggest that asphalt fumes generated in the laboratory are carcinogenic to mice. In this study, asphalt fume condensate (AFC) was collected from the head space of an operating hot mix asphalt storage tank and from a laboratory fume-generating apparatus operating at approximately 149 degrees C and 316 degrees C. Salmonella assays for mutagenesis, in vitro chromosomal aberration assays using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, chemical analyses, and simulated distillations were performed using gas chromatography to characterize the toxicological and chemical properties of AFCs generated by these two methods. The 316 degrees C lab AFC sample was more mutagenic in the Salmonella assay than the 149 degrees C lab AFC sample, with mutagenicity indices (MIs) of 8.3 and 5.3, respectively. AFCs collected from the storage tank were not mutagenic. Chromosomal aberration assays of all AFCs were negative. Chemical analyses and simulated distillations showed substantial differences in the chemical composition of the AFC samples. The 316 degrees C lab AFC sample contained more higher-boiling-point (three- and four-ring) polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycle compounds than the 149 degrees C lab AFC sample, and both lab AFC samples contained 5 to 100 times more of these compounds than AFC samples collected from the asphalt storage tank. These results are consistent with other data reported in the scientific literature describing the carcinogenicity of higher-boiling-point sulfur heterocycle compounds. In contrast to other recent studies, the results of this study indicate that the chemical composition and toxicological properties of laboratory-generated asphalt fumes are not representative of those properties of fumes to which workers and the public might be exposed. PMID:10946241

  14. Steam condensation and liquid hold-up in steam generator U-tubes during oscillatory natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    De Santi, G.F.; Mayinger, F.

    1990-01-01

    In many accident scenarios, natural circulation is an important heat transport mechanism for long-term cooling of light water reactors. In the event of a small pipe break, with subsequent loss of primary cooling fluid loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or under abnormal operating conditions, early tripping of the main coolant pumps can be actuated. Primary fluid flow will then progress from forced to natural convection. Understanding of the flow regimes and heat-removal mechanisms in the steam generators during the entire transient is of primary importance to safety analysis. Flow oscillations during two-phase natural circulation experiments for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with inverted U-tube steam generators occur at high pressure and at a primary inventory range between two-phase circulation and reflex heat removal. This paper deals with the oscillatory flow behavior that was observed in the LOBI-MOD2 facility during the transition period between two-phase natural circulation and reflex condensation.

  15. Role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter--I: generation of gases and condensates under dry condition.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, E; Kaplan, I R

    1985-01-01

    Pyrolysis experiments were carried out on Monterey formation kerogen and bitumen and Green River formation kerogen (Type II and I, respectively), in the presence and absence of montmorillonite, illite and calcite at 200 and 300 degrees C for 2-2000 hours. The pyrolysis products were identified and quantified and the results of the measurements on the gas and condensate range are reported here. A significant catalytic effect was observed for the pyrolysis of kerogen with montmorillonite, whereas small or no effects were observed with illite and calcite, respectively. Catalytic activity was evident by the production of up to five times higher C1-C6 hydrocarbons for kerogen with montmorillonite than for kerogen alone, and by the dominance of branched hydrocarbons in the C4-C6 range (up to 90% of the total amount at any single carbon number). This latter effect in the presence of montmorillonite is attributed to cracking via a carbonium-ion [carbocation] intermediate which forms on the acidic sites of the day. No catalytic effect, however, was observed for generation of methane and C2 hydrocarbons which form by thermal cracking. The catalysis of montmorillonite was significantly greater during pyrolysis of bitumen than for kerogen, which may point to the importance of the early formed bitumen as an intermediate in the production of low molecular weight hydrocarbons. Catalysis by minerals was also observed for the production of carbon dioxide. These results stress the importance of the mineral matrix in determining the type and amount of gases and condensates forming from the associated organic matter under thermal stress. The literature contains examples of gas distribution in the geologic column which can be accounted for by selective mineral catalysis, mainly during early stages of organic matter maturation. PMID:11539655

  16. Oblique breathers generated by a flow of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates past a polarized obstacle.

    PubMed

    Kamchatnov, A M; Kartashov, Y V

    2013-10-01

    We predict that oblique breathers can be generated by a flow of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates past a polarized obstacle that attracts one component of the condensate and repels the other one. The breather exists if intraspecies interaction constants differ from the interspecies interaction constant, and it corresponds to the nonlinear excitation of the so-called polarization mode with domination of the relative motion of the components. Analytical theory is developed for the case of small-amplitude breathers that is in reasonable agreement with the numerical results.

  17. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Dilute Gas; the First 70 Years and Some Recent Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, E. A.; Wieman, C. E.

    Bose-Einstein condensation, or BEC, has a long and rich history dating from the early 1920s. In this article we will trace briefly over this history and some of the developments in physics that made possible our successful pursuit of BEC in a gas. We will then discuss what was involved in this quest. In this discussion we will go beyond the usual technical description to try and address certain questions that we now hear frequently, but are not covered in our past research papers. These are questions along the lines of ``How did you get the idea and decide to pursue it? Did you know it was going to work? How long did it take you and why?'' We will review some of our favorites from among the experiments we have carried out with BEC. There will then be a brief encore on why we are optimistic that BEC can be created with nearly any species of magnetically trappable atom. Throughout this article we will try to explain what makes BEC in a dilute gas so interesting, unique, and experimentally challenging. This article is our ``Nobel Lecture'' and as such takes a relatively personal approach to the story of the development of experimental Bose-Einstein condensation. For a somewhat more scholarly treatment of the history, the interested reader is referred to E. A. Cornell, J. R. Ensher and C. E. Wieman, ``Experiments in dilute atomic Bose-Einstein condensation in Bose-Einstein Condensation in Atomic Gases, Proceedings of the International School of Physics ``Enrico Fermi'' Course CXL'' (M. Inguscio, S. Stringari and C. E. Wieman, Eds., Italian Physical Society, 1999), pp. 15-66, which is also available as cond-mat/9903109. For a reasonably complete technical review of the three years of explosive progress that immediately followed the first observation of BEC, we recommend reading the above article in combination with the corresponding review from Ketterle, cond-mat/9904034.

  18. Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

    2010-09-01

    As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of

  19. Laboratory Experiments of Rip Current Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, R.; Coco, G.; Lomonaco, P.; Dalrymple, R. A.; Alvarez, A.; Gonzalez, M.; Medina, R.

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis of rip current generation from purely hydrodynamic processes is here investigated through laboratory experiments. The experiments have been performed at the Cantabria Coastal and Ocean Basin (CCOB) with a segmented wavemaker consisting of 64 waveboards. The basin measures 25m in the cross-shore and 32m in the alongshore direction and the water depth at the wavemaker is 1m. A concrete plane sloping (1:5) beach has been built in the opposite side of the wave machine, its toe is 15m from the waveboards. Reflective lateral walls covered the full length of the basin. The set of instruments consists of 33 wave gauges deployed along two longshore and two cross-shore transects, 7 acoustic Doppler velocimeters and 15 run-up wires. Furthermore a set of two cameras has been synchronized with the data acquisition system. Two types of experiments have been performed to specifically study the generation of rip currents under wave group forcing. First, similarly to the experiments of Fowler and Dalrymple (Proc. 22nd Int. Conf. Coast. Eng.,1990), two intersecting wave trains with opposite directions have been imposed. They give rise to the formation of a non-migrating rip current system with a wavelength that depends on wave frequency and direction. Second, single wave trains with alongshore periodic amplitude attenuation have been imposed. Although the attenuation has been set such that the incident wave field has the same envelope as in the first type of experiments, the rip current system differs due to diffraction and interference processes. The results for different wave conditions (maximum incident wave height from 0.2m to 0.4m, wave period from 1.4s to 2s) will be presented and the intensity of the rip currents will be compared to the alongshore variation in wave set-up. This research is part of the ANIMO project funded by the Spanish Government under contract BIA2012-36822.

  20. Measurement of condensed water mass during mechanical ventilation with heated wire humidifiers: experiments with and without pre-warming.

    PubMed

    Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Giorgino, M; Silvestri, S

    2014-01-01

    Heated wire humidifiers (HWHs) are employed in mechanical ventilation with the objective of heating and humidifying the gases delivered to the mechanical ventilator. They use a control based on the adjustment of gas temperature at the chamber outlet. The condensation occurring within the breathing circuit is one of the most important concerns related to this control strategy. In the present study we focused on the measurement of the condensation amount within the breathing circuit during the employment of a commercial HWH (MR850, Fisher & Paykel). The measurement of the condensed vapor mass, performed during 7 h of ventilation, provides more objective information than the visual-based scale used in literature. Moreover, two solutions were proposed to minimize the condensation in the breathing circuit tract downward the heated chamber: i) a flexible insulating pipe was used to cover the mentioned breathing circuit tract, and ii) the air delivered by ventilator was heated before it passes through the chamber at different inlet temperature Ti obtained by employing pre-warming. To assess the improvement obtained by these two solutions, experiments have been carried out with and without their employment at two minute volumes. Results show that: i) insulation and pre-warming allows minimizing the condensation (e.g., at 8 L·min(-1) the mass of condensation after 7 h of ventilation decreases from 9.3 g to 2.5 g by using insulation and T(i)=27 °C); ii) the condensation mass decreases with T(i) (e.g., at 8 L·min(-1) the mass condensation was 2.5 g at T(i)= 27 °C and 1.1 g at T(i)= 30 °C); and iii) the amount of condensation linearly increases with time of ventilation.

  1. Fermion condensate generates a new state of matter by making flat bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Popov, K. G.; Khodel, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    This short review paper is devoted to 90th anniversary of S.T. Belyaev birthday. Belyaev's ideas associated with the condensate state in Bose interacting systems have stimulated intensive studies of the possible manifestation of such a condensation in Fermi systems. In many Fermi systems and compounds at zero temperature a phase transition happens that leads to a quite specific state called fermion condensation. As a signal of such a fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT) serves unlimited increase of the effective mass of quasiparticles that determines the excitation spectrum and creates flat bands. We show that the class of Fermi liquids with the fermion condensate forms a new state of matter. We discuss the phase diagrams and the physical properties of systems located near that phase transition. A common and essential feature of such systems is quasiparticles different from those suggested by L.D. Landau by crucial dependence of their effective mass on temperature, external magnetic field, pressure, etc. It is demonstrated that a huge amount of experimental data collected on different compounds suggest that they, starting from some temperature and down, form the new state of matter, and are governed by the fermion condensation. Our discussion shows that the theory of fermion condensation develops completely good description of the NFL behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems. Moreover, the fermion condensation can be considered as the universal reason for the NFL behavior observed in various HF metals, liquids, compounds with quantum spin liquids, and quasicrystals. We show that these systems exhibit universal scaling behavior of their thermodynamic properties. Therefore, the quantum critical physics of different strongly correlated compounds is universal, and emerges regardless of the underlying microscopic details of the compounds. This uniform behavior, governed by the universal quantum critical physics, allows us to view it as the main

  2. Aerosol generation and distribution system for the Third International Cloud Condensation Nuclei Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.; Dea, J. Y.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain identical samples participating CCN instruments and aerosol characterizing equipment were located along and connected to a 8.2 cm diameter aluminum tube through which the test aerosols were pumped directly from the source at very slight overpressure. Of the total of 29 experiments, 18 were carried out with artificial NaCl or (NH4)2SO4 aerosols. These were generated from salt solutions by pneumatic atomizers of special design to ensure high constancy of the aerosol output concentration. In three experiments with insoluble CCN (AgI, paraffin wax) the aerosols were generated thermally. In some of the tests, an electrostatic classifier was used for narrowing the particle size distributions.

  3. Yang-Baxter integrable models in experiments: from condensed matter to ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Murray T.; Foerster, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The Yang-Baxter equation has long been recognised as the masterkey to integrability, providing the basis for exactly solved models which capture the fundamental physics of a number of realistic classical and quantum systems. In this article we provide an introductory survey of the impact of Yang-Baxter integrable models on experiments in condensed matter physics and ultracold atoms. A number of prominent examples are covered, including the hard-hexagon model, the Heisenberg spin chain, the transverse quantum Ising chain, a spin ladder model, the Lieb-Liniger Bose gas, the Gaudin-Yang Fermi gas and the two-site Bose-Hubbard model. The review concludes by pointing to some other recent developments with promise for further progress.

  4. Fermi liquid-to-Bose condensate crossover in a two-dimensional ultracold gas experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmashova, T. V.; Mart'yanov, K. A.; Makhalov, V. B.; Turlapov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    By controling interparticle interactions, it is possible to transform a fermionic system into a bosonic system and vice versa, while preserving quantum degeneracy. Evidence of such a transformation may be found by monitoring the pressure and interference. The Fermi pressure is an indication of the fermion?ic character of a system, while the interference implies a nonzero order parameter and Bose condensation. Lowering from three to two spatial dimensions introduces new physics and makes the system more difficult to describe due to the increased fluctuations and the reduced applicability of mean field methods. An experiment with a two-dimensional ultracold atomic gas shows a crossover between the Bose and Fermi limits, as evident from the value of pressure and from the interference pattern, and provides data to test models of 2D Fermi and Bose systems, including the most-difficult-to-model strongly coupled systems.

  5. Hydride generation and condensation flame atomic absorption spectroscopic determination of antimony in raw coffee beans and processed coffee.

    PubMed

    Kuennen, R W; Hahn, M H; Fricke, F L; Wolnik, K A

    1982-09-01

    A method was developed for determining Sb at nanogram per gram levels in raw coffee beans and processed coffee. The procedure uses either total acid digestion or extraction with 6M HCl followed by hydride generation/condensation with subsequent revolatilization of stibine (SbH3) and detection by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The lowest quantifiable level, based on a 2 g (dry weight) sample, is 2 ng Sb/g. The results of recoveries on spiked samples, precision studies on composited coffee samples, and the analysis of National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the procedure. Sb concentrations in coffee samples were verified by neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Advantages of the method compared with the AOAC colorimetric procedure and hydride generation without condensation are discussed. PMID:7130087

  6. Investigation and mitigation of condensation induced water hammer by stratified flow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Hiral J.

    This research primarily focuses on the possibility of using stratified flow in preventing an occurrence of condensation induced water hammer (CIWH) in horizontal pipe involving steam and subcooled water. A two-phase flow loop simulating the passive safety systems of an advanced light water reactor was constructed and a series of stratified flow experiments were carried out involving a system of subcooled water, saturated water, and steam. Special instruments were designed to measure steam flow rate and subcooled liquid velocity. These experiments showed that when flow field conditions meet certain criteria CIWH does occur. Flow conditions used in experiments were typically observed in passive safety systems of an advanced light water cooled reactor. This research summarizes a) literature research and other experimental data that signify an occurrence of CIWH, b) experiments in an effort to show an occurrence of CIWH and the ability to prevent CIWH, c) qualitative and quantitative results to underline the mechanism of CIWH, d) experiments that show CIWH can be prevented under certain conditions, and e) guidelines for the safe operating conditions. Based on initial experiment results it was observed that Bernoulli's effect can play an important role in wave formation and instability. A separate effect table top experiment was constructed with plexi-glass. A series of entrance effect tests and stratified experiments were carried out with different fluids to study wave formation and wave bridging. Special test series experiments were carried out to investigate the presence of a saturated layer. The effect of subcooled water and steam flow on wedge length and depth were recorded. These experiments helped create a model which calculates wedge and depth of wedge for a given condition of steam and subcooled water. A very good comparison between the experiment results and the model was obtained. These experiments also showed that the presence of saturated layer can mitigate

  7. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  8. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E.; Hanna, B.

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  9. Design and performance evaluation of a cryogenic condenser for an in-pile experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Crum, R. J.; Hsu, Y.

    1972-01-01

    An apparatus was designed to enable in-pile irradiation of materials in liquid hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures. One of the principal components of this apparatus was a horizontal tube condenser. The performance of the condenser was evaluated by running a liquid-nitrogen prototype of the apparatus at heat loads comparable to or greater than those expected during the irradiation. The test showed that the condenser was capable of handling the design heat load and that the design procedure was sound.

  10. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  11. Infrasound Generation from the Source Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.; Schramm, K. A.; Jones, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the acoustic and infrasound source generation mechanisms from underground explosions is of great importance for usage of this unique data type in non-proliferation activities. One of the purposes of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), a series of underground explosive shots at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), is to gain an improved understanding of the generation and propagation of physical signals, such as seismic and infrasound, from the near to far field. Two of the SPE shots (SPE-1 and SPE-4') were designed to be small "Green's Function" sources with minimal spall or permanent surface deformation. We analyze infrasound data collected from these two shots at distances from ~300 m to ~1 km and frequencies up to 20 Hz. Using weather models based upon actual observations at the times of these sources, including 3-D variations in topography, temperatures, pressures, and winds, we synthesized full waveforms using Sandia's moving media acoustic propagation simulation suite. Several source mechanisms were simulated and compared and contrasted with observed waveforms using full waveform source inversion. We will discuss results of these source inversions including the relative roll of spall from these small explosions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. A Next-Generation Apparatus for Lithium Optical Lattice Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Aviv

    Quantum simulation is emerging as an ambitious and active subfield of atomic physics. This thesis describes progress towards the goal of simulating condensed matter systems, in particular the physics of the Fermi-Hubbard model, using ultracold Lithium atoms in an optical lattice. A major goal of the quantum simulation program is to observe phase transitions of the Hubbard model, into Neal antiferromagnetic phases and d-wave superfluid phases. Phase transitions are generally accompanied by a change in an underlying correlation in a physical system. Such correlations may be most amenable to probing by looking at fluctuations in the system. Experimental techniques for probing density and magnetization fluctuations in a variety of atomic Fermi systems are developed. The suppression of density fluctuations (or atom "shot noise") in an ideal degenerate Fermi gas is observed by absorption imaging of time-of-flight expanded clouds. In-trap measurements of density and magnetization fluctuations are not easy to probe with absorption imaging, due to their extremely high attenuation. A method to probe these fluctuations based on speckle patterns, caused by fluctuations in the index of refraction for a detuned illumination beam, is developed and applied first to weakly interacting and then to strongly interacting in-trap gases. Fluctuation probes such as these will be a crucial tool in future quantum simulation of condensed matter systems. The quantum simulation experiments that we want to perform require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. A distributed GUI-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, The Cicero Word Generator, is described. The system makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature allows this to be extended to other output

  13. The effect of the number of condensed phases modeled on aerosol behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Schaperow, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    VICTORIA is a mechanistic computer code designed to analyze fission product behavior within a nuclear reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from the reactor core and transport and deposition of these materials within the RCS. A recently completed independent peer review of VICTORIA, while confirming the overall adequacy of the code, recommended a number of modeling improvements. One of these recommendations, to model three rather than a single condensed phase, is the focus of the work reported here. The recommendation has been implemented as an option so that either a single or three condensed phases can be treated. Both options have been employed in the study of fission product behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence. Differences in deposition patterns and mechanisms predicted using these two options are discussed.

  14. Role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. I - Generation of gases and condensates under dry condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1985-01-01

    Pyrolysis experiments conducted at 200 and 300 C on kerogen and bitumen from the Monterey formation and on the Green River Formation kerogen with montmorillonite, illite, and calcite added are described. The pyrolysis products are identified and gas and condensate analyses are performed. A catalytic effect is detected in the pyrolysis of kerogen with montmorillonite; however, illite and calcite display no catalytic activity. The increased production of C1-C6 hydrocarbons and the dominance of branched hydrocarbons in the C4-C6 range reveals a catalytic influence. It is observed that the catalysis of montmorillonite is greater during bitumen pyrolysis than for kerogen, and catalysis with minerals affects the production of CO2. It is concluded that a mineral matrix is important in determining the type and amount of gases and condensates forming from organic matter under thermal stress.

  15. A novel experiment for coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate with two crossed cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Tobias; Leonard, Julian; Lee, Moojnoo; Morales, Andrea; Karg, Thomas; Esslinger, Tilman

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decade, combining cavity quantum electrodynamics and quantum gases allowed to explore the coupling of quantized light fields to coherent matter waves, leading e.g. to new optomechanical phenomena and the realization of quantum phase transitions. Triggered by the interest to study setups with more complex cavity geometries, we built a novel, highly flexible experimental system for coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with optical cavities, which allows to switch the cavity setups by means of an interchangeable science platform. The BEC is generated from a cloud of laser-cooled 87-Rb atoms which is first loaded into a hybrid trap, formed by a combined magnetic and optical potential, and then optically transported into the cavity setup, where it is cooled down to quantum degeneracy. At first we aim to explore the coupling of a BEC with two crossed cavity modes. We report on our progress on the implementation of a science setup involving two cavities intersecting under an angle of 60°. his setup will allow us to study the coherent interaction of a BEC and the two cavity modes both in internal lambda-level transitions and in spatial self-organization processes in dynamical hexagonal lattices.

  16. Spectral probing of impact-generated vapor in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Eberhardy, Clara A.

    2015-03-01

    High-speed spectra of hypervelocity impacts at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) captured the rapidly evolving conditions of impact-generated vapor as a function of impact angle, viewpoint, and time (within the first 50 μs). Impact speeds possible at the AVGR (<7 km/s) are insufficient to induce significant vaporization in silicates, other than the high-temperature (but low-mass) jetting component created at first contact. Consequently, this study used powdered dolomite as a proxy for surveying the evolution and distribution of chemical constituents within much longer lasting vapor. Seven separate telescopes focused on different portions of the impact vapor plume and were connected through quartz fibers to two 0.35 cm monochromaters. Quarter-space experiments reduced the thermal background and opaque phases due to condensing particles and heated projectile fragments while different exposure times isolated components passing through different the fields of view, both above and below the surface within the growing transient cavity. At early times (<5 μs), atomic emission lines dominate the spectra. At later times, molecular emission lines dominate the composition of the vapor plume along a given direction. Layered targets and target mixtures isolated the source and reveal that much of the vaporization comes from the uppermost surface. Collisions by projectile fragments downrange also make significant contributions for impacts below 60° (from the horizontal). Further, impacts into mixtures of silicates with powdered dolomite reveal that frictional heating must play a role in vapor production. Such results have implications for processes controlling vaporization on planetary surfaces including volatile release, atmospheric evolution (formation and erosion), vapor generated by the Deep Impact collision, and the possible consequences of the Chicxulub impact.

  17. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Kharangate, Chirag; O'Neill, Lucas; Konishi, Chris; Nahra, Henry; Hall, Nancy; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mackey, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The proposed research aims to develop an integrated two-phase flow boiling/condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS) to serve as primary platform for obtaining two-phase flow and heat transfer data in microgravity.

  18. Generating solitons by phase engineering of a bose-einstein condensate

    PubMed

    Denschlag; Simsarian; Feder; Clark; Collins; Cubizolles; Deng; Hagley; Helmerson; Reinhardt; Rolston; Schneider; Phillips

    2000-01-01

    Quantum phase engineering is demonstrated with two techniques that allow the spatial phase distribution of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to be written and read out. A quantum state was designed and produced by optically imprinting a phase pattern onto a BEC of sodium atoms, and matter-wave interferometry with spatially resolved imaging was used to analyze the resultant phase distribution. An appropriate phase imprint created solitons, the first experimental realization of this nonlinear phenomenon in a BEC. The subsequent evolution of these excitations was investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  19. Direct Observation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation during Cloud Condensation-Evaporation Cycles (SOAaq) in Simulation Chamber Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussin, J. F.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Gratien, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Pangui, E.; Tapparo, A.; Kalberer, M.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) undergo many reactions in the atmosphere and form a wide range of oxidised and water-soluble compounds. These compounds can partition into atmospheric water droplets, and react within the aqueous phase producing higher molecular weight and/or less volatile compounds which can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation and thus increase the organic aerosol mass (Ervens et al., 2011; Altieri et al., 2008; Couvidat et al., 2013). While this hypothesis is frequently discussed in the literature, so far, almost no direct observations of such a process have been provided.The aim of the present work is to study SOA formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles.The experiments were performed during the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere), in the CESAM simulation chamber located at LISA. CESAM is a 4.2 m3 stainless steel chamber equipped with realistic irradiation sources and temperature and relative humidity (RH) controls (Wang et al., 2011). In each experiment, isoprene was allowed to oxidize during several hours in the presence on nitrogen oxides under dry conditions. Gas phase compounds were analyzed on-line by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), NOx and O3 analyzers. SOA formation was monitored on-line with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The experimental protocol was optimised to generate cloud events in the simulation chamber, which allowed us to generate clouds lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light.In all experiments, we observed that during cloud formation, water-soluble gas-phase oxidation products (e.g., methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) readily partitioned into cloud

  20. Mass generation via the Higgs boson and the quark condensate of the QCD vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Martin

    2016-09-01

    The Higgs boson, recently discovered with a mass of 125.09$\\pm$0.24 GeV is known to mediate the masses of elementary particles, but only 2% of the mass of the nucleon. Extending a previous investigation [1] and including the strange-quark sector, hadron masses are derived from the quark condensate of the QCD vacuum and from the effects of the Higgs boson. These calculations include the $\\pi$ meson, the nucleon and the scalar mesons $\\sigma(600)$, $\\kappa(800)$, $a_0(980)$ $f_0(980)$ and $f_0(1370)$. The predicted second $\\sigma$ meson $\\sigma'(1344)=|s\\bar{s}\\rangle$, is investigated and identified with the $f_0(1370)$ meson. An outlook is given on the hyperons $\\Lambda$, $\\Sigma^{0,\\pm}$ and $\\Xi^{0,-}$.

  1. Elemental composition of aerosols in fourteen experiments of the Cloud Condensation Nuclei Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, W. H.; Hucek, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Aeosols were collected with two Ci impactors and analyzed with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for chemical composition and to detect if contamination was present. One of the impactors sampled the generated aerosols; the other impactor sampled droplets from a diffusion cloud chamber. The purpose of the experiments was to test the feasibility of a study of the transfer of chemical elements from the fine particle sizes to the coarse particle sizes, after CCN are activated and cloud droplets are formed. The data indicated that sulfur-containing aerosols did exhibit the expected transfer.

  2. Dropwise condensation: experiments and simulations of nucleation and growth of water drops in a cooling system.

    PubMed

    Leach, R N; Stevens, F; Langford, S C; Dickinson, J T

    2006-10-10

    Dropwise condensation of water vapor from a naturally cooling, hot water reservoir onto a hydrophobic polymer film and a silanized glass slide was studied by direct observation and simulations. The observed drop growth kinetics suggests that smallest drops grow principally by the diffusion of water adsorbed on the substrate to the drop perimeter, while drops larger than about 50 microm in diameter grow principally by direct deposition from the vapor onto the drop surface. Drop coalescence plays a critical role in determining the drop-size distribution and stimulates the nucleation of new, small drops on the substrates. Simulations of drop growth incorporating these growth mechanisms provide a good description of the observed drop-size distribution. Because of the large role played by coalescence, details of individual drop growth make little difference to the final drop-size distribution. The rate of condensation per unit substrate area is especially high for the smallest drops and may help account for the high heat transfer rates associated with dropwise condensation relative to filmwise condensation in heat exchange applications.

  3. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for a Condensate Distillation System: Design and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical in long duration space exploration. One of the more promising methods of reclaiming urine is the distillation/condensation process used in the cascade distillation system (CDS). This system accepts a mixture of urine and toxic stabilizing agents, heats it to vaporize the water and condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating and its condensate flow requires cooling. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately requires two separate units, each of which would require large amounts of electrical power. By heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit, mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump performance tests are provided. A summary is provided of the heat pump mass, volume and power trades and a selection recommendation is made.

  4. AN EXPERIMENT IN "ANIMATION SOCIALE" AMONG THE CLERGY OF THE PILOT REGION (BAEQ). CONDENSED REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MONTMINY, J.P.

    THIS REPORT, PREPARED FOR THE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION BY CARLETON OPINION RESEARCH SERVICES, IS A CONDENSATION OF A SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY IN THE PILOT REGION OF THE BAEQ (BUREAU D'AMENAGEMENT DE L'EST DU QUEBEC). MEETINGS WERE HELD IN 1964 IN THE DIOCESES OF RIMOUSKI AND GASPE TO HELP INDUCE ROMAN CATHOLIC CLERGYMEN TO…

  5. Second generation experiments in fault tolerant software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Multi-Version Software (MVS) experiment is to obtain empirical measurements of the performance of multi-version systems. Twenty version of a program were prepared under reasonably realistic development conditions from the same specifications. The overall structure of the testing environment for the MVS experiment and its status are described. A preliminary version of the control system is described that was implemented for the MVS experiment to allow the experimenter to have control over the details of the testing. The results of an empirical study of error detection using self checks are also presented. The analysis of the checks revealed that there are great differences in the ability of individual programmers to design effective checks.

  6. Circulation control lift generation experiment: Hardware development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A circulation control airfoil and its accompanying hardware were developed to allow the investigation of lift generation that is independent of airfoil angle of attack and relative flow velocity. The test equipment, designed for use in a water tunnel, includes the blown airfoil, the support systems for both flow visualization and airfoil load measurement, and the fluid control system, which utilizes hydraulic technology. The primary design tasks, the selected solutions, and the unforseen problems involved in the development of these individual components of hardware are described.

  7. Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) electrodynamic tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, Mario D.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) flight of June 26, 1993 has been the most sophisticated and most successful mission that has been carried out thus far with an electrodynamic tether. Three papers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Washington, DC concerned with the PMG, submitted at the Fourth International Space Conference on Tethers in Space, in Washington, DC, in April 1995, are contained in this document. The three papers are (1) Electromagnetic interactions between the PMG tether and the magneto-ionic medium of the Ionosphere; (2) Tether-current-voltage characteristics, as determined by the Hollow Cathode Operation Modes; and (3) Hawaii-Hilo ground observations on the occasion for the PMG flight of June 23, 1993.

  8. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapour on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, Peter

    2014-05-01

    A physical experiment, in which atmospheric air is enclosed in two interconnecting 4.8-metre high insulated PVC columns, consistently gives results showing that the condensation of water vapor, precipitated by means of refrigeration coils, gives rise to detectable air movements, with air speeds of up to 0.1 m/s. Once the compressor, sited well away from the two columns, is shut down, heavy drops of precipitated water are obtained which funnel into a flask for collection and measurement. The results in kg.m-2 (mm) from the 20 m3 volume of enclosed air accord well (>90%) with the physical calculations based on water vapour as an ideal gas. Air flow, resulting from the highly localized condensation, is measured through the movement of light-weight gauzes and an anemometer. It has a circulation time of some two minutes, such that both columns show cooling and a significant reduction in specific humidity from 0.01 to 0.005 (kg water vapour to kg dry air, r) with a drop in relative humidity of up to 40 per cent. Air flow is minimal during the control, non-refrigeration period of the experiment but becomes substantial within a minute of the compressor being switched on. The negative partial pressure change peaks at as much as 0.4 Pa/s during the first 30 minutes but reduces to approx.0.08 Pa/s during the latter part of the 110 minute-long experiment. Airflow displays an inverse relationship to the partial pressure change, initially rising rapidly and then reducing before returning to zero once refrigeration has been switched off. Inverse correlations of up to 0.8 or higher between the partial pressure reduction and the airflow are obtained routinely. Semi-aquatic vegetation from the nearby marshland enhances precipitation, suggesting that evapotranspiration adds significantly to humidity. Without vegetation the condensation rate is 0.06 to 0.07 millimol.m-3.s-1 on average compared with 0.11 when vegetation is present. Cooling, by some 2°C, combined with a reduction in

  9. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapor on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P. P.; Nechev, P.

    2013-12-01

    A physical experiment, in which atmospheric air is enclosed in two interconnecting 4.8-metre high insulated PVC columns, consistently gives results showing that the condensation of water vapor, precipitated by means of refrigeration coils, gives rise to detectable air movements, with air speeds of up to 0.1 m/s. Once the compressor, sited well away from the two columns, is shut down, heavy drops of precipitated water are obtained which funnel into a flask for collection and measurement. The results in kg.m-2 (mm) from the 20 m3 volume of enclosed air accord well (>90%) with the physical calculations based on water vapor as an ideal gas. Air flow, resulting from the highly localized condensation, is measured through the movement of light-weight gauzes and an anemometer. It has a circulation time of some two minutes, such that both columns show cooling and a significant reduction in specific humidity from 0.01 to 0.005 (kg water vapor to kg dry air, r) with a drop in relative humidity of up to 40 per cent. Air flow is minimal during the control, non-refrigeration period of the experiment but becomes substantial within a minute of the compressor being switched on. The negative partial pressure change peaks at as much as 0.4 Pa/s during the first 30 minutes but reduces to approx. 0.08 Pa/s during the latter part of the 110 minute- long experiment. Airflow displays an inverse relationship to the partial pressure change, initially rising rapidly and then reducing before returning to zero once refrigeration has been switched off. Inverse correlations of up to 0.8 or higher between the partial pressure reduction and the airflow are obtained routinely. Semi-aquatic vegetation from the nearby marshland enhances precipitation, suggesting that evapotranspiration adds significantly to humidity. Without vegetation the condensation rate is 0.06 to 0.07 millimol.m-3.s-1 on average compared with 0.11 when vegetation is present. Cooling, by some 2°C, combined with a reduction in

  10. Next Generation Muon g - 2 Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzog, David W.

    2016-04-01

    I report on the progress of two new muon anomalous magnetic moment experiments, which are in advanced design and construction phases. The goal of Fermilab E989 is to reduce the experimental uncertainty of aμ from Brookhaven E821 by a factor of 4; that is, δaμ ˜ 16 × 10-11, a relative uncertainty of 140 ppb. The method follows the same magic-momentum storage ring concept used at BNL, and pioneered previously at CERN, but muon beam preparation, storage ring internal hardware, field measuring equipment, and detector and electronics systems are all new or upgraded significantly. In contrast, J-PARC E34 will employ a novel approach based on injection of an ultra-cold, low-energy, muon beam injected into a small, but highly uniform magnet. Only a small magnetic focusing field is needed to maintain storage, which distinguishes it from CERN, BNL and Fermilab. E34 aims to roughly match the previous BNL precision in their Phase 1 installation.

  11. Next Generation Muon g-2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, David W.

    2015-12-02

    I report on the progress of two new muon anomalous magnetic moment experiments, which are in advanced design and construction phases. The goal of Fermilab E989 is to reduce the experimental uncertainty of $a_\\mu$ from Brookhaven E821 by a factor of 4; that is, $\\delta a_\\mu \\sim 16 \\times 10^{-11}$, a relative uncertainty of 140~ppb. The method follows the same magic-momentum storage ring concept used at BNL, and pioneered previously at CERN, but muon beam preparation, storage ring internal hardware, field measuring equipment, and detector and electronics systems are all new or upgraded significantly. In contrast, J-PARC E34 will employ a novel approach based on injection of an ultra-cold, low-energy, muon beam injected into a small, but highly uniform magnet. Only a small magnetic focusing field is needed to maintain storage, which distinguishes it from CERN, BNL and Fermilab. E34 aims to roughly match the previous BNL precision in their Phase~1 installation.

  12. Proceedings: 2003 EPRI Workshop on Condensate Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    2004-02-01

    Successful condensate polishing operations maintain control of ionic and particulate impurity transport to the pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator and the boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor and recirculation system, thus allowing the units to operate more reliably. This report contains the work presented at EPRI's 2003 Workshop on Condensate Polishing, where 30 papers were presented on current issues, research, and utility experiences involving polishing issues at both PWR and BWR units.

  13. Generating and manipulating quantized vortices on-demand in a Bose-Einstein condensate: A numerical study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gertjerenken, B.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-González, R.; Anderson, B. P.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we numerically investigate an experimentally viable method for generating and manipulating on-demand several vortices in a highly oblate atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in order to initialize complex vortex distributions for studies of vortex dynamics. The method utilizes moving laser beams to generate, capture, and transport vortices inside and outside the BEC. This methodology is examined in detail and shows a wide parameter range of applicability for the prototypical two-vortex case, as well as case examples of producing and manipulating several vortices for which there is no net circulation, corresponding to equal numbers of positive and negative circulation vortices, andmore » cases for which there is one net quantum of circulation. We also find that the presence of dissipation can help stabilize the pinning of the vortices on their respective laser beam pinning sites. Finally, we illustrate how to utilize laser beams as repositories that hold large numbers of vortices and how to deposit individual vortices in a sequential fashion in the repositories in order to construct superfluid flows about the repository beams with several quanta of circulation.« less

  14. Generation of atom-photon entangled states in atomic Bose-Einstein condensate via electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang Leman; Zhou Lan

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method to generate continuous-variable-type entangled states between photons and atoms in atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The proposed method involves an atomic BEC with three internal states, a weak quantized probe laser, and a strong classical coupling laser, which form a three-level {lambda}-shaped BEC system. We consider a situation where the BEC is in electromagnetically induced transparency with the coupling laser being much stronger than the probe laser. In this case, the upper and intermediate levels are unpopulated, so that their adiabatic elimination enables an effective two-mode model involving only the atomic field at the lowest internal level and the quantized probe laser field. Atom-photon quantum entanglement is created through laser-atom and interatomic interactions, and two-photon detuning. We show how to generate atom-photon entangled coherent states and entangled states between photon (atom) coherent states and atom-(photon-) macroscopic quantum superposition (MQS) states, and between photon-MQS and atom-MQS states.

  15. Demonstration of beneficial uses of warm water from condensers of electric generating plants. Final report, May 1975-April 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, L.L.; Ashley, G.C.; Hietala, J.S.; Stansfield, R.V.; Tonkinson, T.R.C.

    1980-05-01

    The report gives results of a project to demonstrate that warmed cooling water from condensers of electric generating plants can effectively and economically heat greenhouses. The 0.2-hectare demonstration greenhouse, at Northern States Power Co.'s Sherburne County (Sherco) Generating Plant, used 29.4 C water to heat both air and soil: finned-tube commercial heat exchangers were used to heat the air; and buried plastic pipes, the soil. Warm water from the Sherco 1 cooling tower was piped over 0.8 km to the greenhouse where it was cooled from 2.7 to 5.6 C before returning to the cooling tower basin. Roses and tomatoes were the principal crops in the 3-year test, although other flowers and vegetables, and conifer seedlings were also grown. The warm water heating system supplied all the greenhouse heating requirements, even at ambient temperatures as low as -40 C. Roses, snapdragons, geraniums, tomatoes, lettuce, and evergreen seedlings were grown successfully.

  16. Vortices and turbulence in trapped atomic condensates

    PubMed Central

    White, Angela C.; Anderson, Brian P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than a decade of experiments generating and studying the physics of quantized vortices in atomic gas Bose–Einstein condensates, research is beginning to focus on the roles of vortices in quantum turbulence, as well as other measures of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. Such research directions have the potential to uncover new insights into quantum turbulence, vortices, and superfluidity and also explore the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence in entirely new settings. Here we present a critical assessment of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. PMID:24704880

  17. One-Piece Faraday Generator: A Paradoxical Experiment from 1851

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, M. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment based on Faraday's one-piece generator, where the rotating disk is replaced by a cylindrical permanent magnet. Explains the apparent paradox that an observer in an inertial frame could measure his absolute velocity. (GA)

  18. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissman, T. A.; Varutbangkul, V.; Surratt, J. D.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11% 0.21%, and 0.32%) in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3). Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM). The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) for malonic acid and glutaric acid. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before the methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  19. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissman, T. A.; Varutbangkul, V.; Surratt, J. D.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-06-01

    Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11%, 0.21%, and 0.32%) in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3). Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM). The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) for malonic acid and glutaric acid, preventing confident interpretation of experimental data for these two compounds. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  20. Towards generating synthetic gauge potentials for a Bose-Einstein condensate in a toroidal trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pan-Pan; Chen, Cheng-An; Wei, Hung-Ji; Yu, Chin-Yeh; Wang, Jung-Bin; Lin, Yu-Ju

    2015-05-01

    We have designed a setup to experimentally study ultracold atoms dressed by Raman laser beams in a ring-shaped trapping potential. To make BECs of Rb87 atoms, we first capture zeeman-slowed atoms in a Magneto-Optical-Trap, perform polarization gradient cooling, and then load the atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap with a number of ~1e9. After 3.5s of rf-evaporation, these pre-cooled atoms are transferred into a hybrid potential, a crossed optical dipole trap with a magnetic gradient. Evaporative cooling of 4.3 s in the dipole trap is performed by first ramping down the power of dipole beams, followed by ramping off the magnetic gradient during which the trap frequency largely remains the same. We achieved a BEC with 2e5 atoms with an experimental cycle time of 15 s. Our next step is to load the atoms into a toroidal dipole trap and use two Raman beams with orbital angular momentum to dress the atoms, thus generating synthetic vector gauge potentials. Both the dipole beam for the toroidal trap and the Raman beam(s) are Laguerre-Gaussian beams produced by spiral phase plates.

  1. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 1. Summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the first rotation of the wind turbine. This summary report presents in brief form the experiences of two utilities, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the Bonneville Power Administration, with wind turbine projects at Solano County, California and Goodnoe Hills, Washington, respectively. All documents and reports pertaining to the experiences with the wind turbine projects were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. Condensed descriptions of the projects, a comparison of the projects, and highlights of the utilities' experiences are presented. Some of the insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Aldol Condensation Products from Unknown Aldehydes and Ketones: An Inquiry-Based Experiment in the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelo, Nicholas G.; Henchey, Laura K.; Waxman, Adam J.; Canary, James W.; Arora, Paramjit S.; Wink, Donald

    2007-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate chemistry laboratory in which students perform the aldol condensation on an unknown aldehyde and an unknown ketone is described. The experiment involves the use of techniques such as TLC, column chromatography, and recrystallization, and compounds are characterized by [to the first power]H NMR, GC-MS, and FTIR.…

  3. Proceedings: Condenser technology conference

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.L. ); Mussalli, Y.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Seam surface condenser and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in nuclear and fossil power plants. Thirty-six papers presented at a 1990 conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of condenser problems and solutions. This report contains papers on life extension, performance improvement, corrosion and failure analysis, fouling prevention, and recommendation for future R D. The information represents recent work on condenser problems and solutions to improve the procurement, operation, and maintenance functions of power plant personnel. Several key points follow: A nuclear and a fossil power plant report show that replacing titanium tube bundles improves condenser availability and performance. One paper reports 10 years of experience with enhanced heat transfer tubes in utility condensers. The newly developed enhanced condenser tubes could further improve condensing heat transfer. A new resistance summation method improves the accuracy of condenser performance prediction, especially for stainless steel and titanium tubed condensers. Several papers describe improved condenser fouling monitoring techniques, including a review of zebra mussel issues.

  4. Improving Vortex Generators to Enhance the Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers in a Geothermal Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes work at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop strategies to enhance air-side heat transfer in geothermal air-cooled condensers such that it should not significantly increase pressure drop and parasitic fan pumping power. The work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, Yokohama National University, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was performed to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to largescale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique was employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that included four tube rows in a staggered array. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were also acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus in the Single Blow Test Facility. In addition, a numerical modeling technique was developed to predict local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds number flows, with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results were obtained that reveal quantitative details of local finsurface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results were obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500. The winglets were of triangular (delta) shape with a 1:2 or 1:3 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface heat transfer results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (in terms of

  5. Strange Disoriented Chiral Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed; Gavin, Sean

    2002-10-01

    Enhancement of omega and anti-omega baryon production in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS can be explained by the formation of many small regions of disordered chiral condensate. This explanation implies that neutral and charged kaons as well as pions must exhibit novel isospin fluctuations. Fluctuations due to transient behavior of the Polyakov Loop condensate can produce similar phenomena. Kapusta and Gavin have computed the distribution of the fraction of neutral pions and kaons from such regions. We proposed robust statistical observables that can be used to extract the novel isospin fluctuations from background contributions in neutral/charged pion and K-short/K-charged correlation measurements at RHIC and LHC. The STAR experiment is currently examining K-short/K-charged correlations. Note that Pruneau, Voloshin and Gavin have proposed similar observables to study net-charge fluctuations. To obtain a baseline for comparison to RHIC and SPS experiments, Abdel-Aziz and Gavin compute these observables using numerical simulations using HIJING and URQMD event generators. We also obtain limits on the size and number of disordered regions by comparing to photon and charged-pion searches from WA98 and other SPS experiments. We will compare to the first results from STAR K-short/K-charged analysis.

  6. Schooling Experiences of Central California Indian People across Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tara

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study took a post-colonialist lens to record, examine and document schooling experiences of California Indian people across several generations representing three Central Valley tribes: the Mono, the Tachi Yokuts of Santa Rosa Rancheria, and the Tule River Tribe. Past and present perceptions of Indian schooling were elicited…

  7. Multifunctional radio-frequency generator for cold atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chun-hua; Yan, Shu-hua

    2016-05-01

    We present a low cost radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold atoms. The RF source achieves a sub-hertz frequency with tunable resolution from 0 MHz to 400 MHz and a maximum output power of 33 dBm. Based on a direct digital synthesizer (DDS) chip, we implement a ramping capability for frequency, amplitude and phase. The system can also operate as an arbitrary waveform generator. By measuring the stability in a duration of 600 s, we find the presented device performs comparably as Agilent33522A in terms of short-term stability. Due to its excellent performance, the RF generator has been already applied to cold atom trapping experiments.

  8. Experiments on H2-O2MHD power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic power generation experiments utilizing a cesium-seeded H2-O2 working fluid were carried out using a diverging area Hall duct having an entrance Mach number of 2. The experiments were conducted in a high-field strength cryomagnet facility at field strengths up to 5 tesla. The effects of power takeoff location, axial duct location within the magnetic field, generator loading, B-field strength, and electrode breakdown voltage were investigated. For the operating conditions of these experiments, it is found that the power output increases with the square of the B-field and can be limited by choking of the channel or interelectrode voltage breakdown which occurs at Hall fields greater than 50 volts/insulator. Peak power densities of greater than 100 MW/cu M were achieved.

  9. Modeling HEDLA magnetic field generation experiments on laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, M.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Lamb, D.; Lee, D.; Marques, J. R.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Park, H.-S.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B.; Reville, B.; Scopatz, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Woolsey, N.; Young, R.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Flash Center is engaged in a collaboration to simulate laser driven experiments aimed at understanding the generation and amplification of cosmological magnetic fields using the FLASH code. In these experiments a laser illuminates a solid plastic or graphite target launching an asymmetric blast wave into a chamber which contains either Helium or Argon at millibar pressures. Induction coils placed several centimeters away from the target detect large scale magnetic fields on the order of tens to hundreds of Gauss. The time dependence of the magnetic field is consistent with generation via the Biermann battery mechanism near the blast wave. Attempts to perform simulations of these experiments using the FLASH code have uncovered previously unreported numerical difficulties in modeling the Biermann battery mechanism near shock waves which can lead to the production of large non-physical magnetic fields. We report on these difficulties and offer a potential solution.

  10. Reduced gravity boiling and condensing experiments simulated with the COBRA/TRAC computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, J.M.; Krotiuk, W.J.

    1988-02-01

    It is being recognized that there does not currently exist an adequate understanding of flow and heat transfer behavior in reduced- and zero-gravity. There is not a sufficient experimental fluid-thermal data base to develop design correlations for two-phase pressure losses, heat transfer coefficients, and critical heat flux limits in systems proposed for advanced power sources, propulsion, and other thermal management systems in space. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is the lead laboratory for thermal hydraulics in the Department of Energy's Multimegawatt Space Power Program, and has the responsibility of developing microgravity thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities for application to space nuclear power systems. In support of this program, PNL has performed a series of reduced-gravity two-phase flow experiments in the NASA KC-135 aircraft. The objective of the experiment was to supply basic thermal-hydraulic information that could be used in development of analytical design tools. 6 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Geothermal steam condensate reinjection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasteen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Geothermal electric generating plants which use condensing turbines and generate and excess of condensed steam which must be disposed of are discussed. At the Geysers, California, the largest geothermal development in the world, this steam condensate has been reinjected into the steam reservoir since 1968. A total of 3,150,000,000 gallons of steam condensate has been reinjected since that time with no noticeable effect on the adjacent producing wells. Currently, 3,700,000 gallons/day from 412 MW of installed capacity are being injected into 5 wells. Reinjection has also proven to be a satisfactory method of disposing of geothermal condensate a Imperial Valley, California, and at the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

  12. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna.

  13. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna. PMID:26110629

  14. The VELOCE pulsed power generator for isentropic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy; Asay, James Russell; Chantrenne, Sophie J.; Hickman, Randall John; Willis, Michael David; Shay, Andrew W.; Grine-Jones, Suzi A.; Hall, Clint Allen; Baer, Melvin R.

    2007-12-01

    Veloce is a medium-voltage, high-current, compact pulsed power generator developed for isentropic and shock compression experiments. Because of its increased availability and ease of operation, Veloce is well suited for studying isentropic compression experiments (ICE) in much greater detail than previously allowed with larger pulsed power machines such as the Z accelerator. Since the compact pulsed power technology used for dynamic material experiments has not been previously used, it is necessary to examine several key issues to ensure that accurate results are obtained. In the present experiments, issues such as panel and sample preparation, uniformity of loading, and edge effects were extensively examined. In addition, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the ALEGRA code were performed to interpret the experimental results and to design improved sample/panel configurations. Examples of recent ICE studies on aluminum are presented.

  15. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  16. Discovering the Majorana neutrino: The next generation of experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, L. A.

    2015-07-15

    The discovery of a Majorana neutrino would be revolutionary with far-reaching consequences in both particle physics and cosmology. The only feasible experiments to determine the Majorana nature of the neutrino are searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay. The next generation of double-beta decay experiments are being prepared. The general goal is to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay throughout the parameter space corresponding to the inverted hierarchy for neutrino mass. There are a several strong proposals for how to achieve this goal. The status of these efforts is reviewed.

  17. Utility experience with two demonstration wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrey, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Edison has committed 360 MW of nameplate generating capacity to wind energy by year 1990 in its long-range generation plan. To reach this goal the Company's wind energy program focuses on three areas: the continuous evaluation of the wind resource, the hands-on demonstration of wind turbine generators (WTG) and an association with wind park developers. Two demonstration WTGs have been installed and operated at Edison's Wind Energy Center near Palm Springs, California: a 3 MW horizontal axis Bendix/Schachle WTG and a 500 kW vertical axis Alcoa WTG. They are part of a one to two year test program during which the performance of the WTGs will be evaluated, their system operation and environmental impact will be assessed and the design criteria of future WTGs will be identified. Edison's experience with these two WTGs is summarized and the problems encountered with the operation of the two machines are discussed.

  18. FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations of shock-generated magnetic field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of benchmark FLASH magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. We first outline the implementation of 2D cylindrical geometry in the unsplit MHD solver in FLASH and present results of verification tests. We then describe the results of benchmark 2D cylindrical MHD simulations of the LULI experiments using FLASH that explore the impact of external fields along with the possibility of magnetic field amplification by turbulence that is associated with the shock waves and that is induced by a grid placed in the gas-filled chamber.

  19. Kibble-Zurek scaling and its breakdown for spontaneous generation of Josephson vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Wei; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Bradley, Ashton; Fialko, Oleksandr; Brand, Joachim

    2013-05-24

    Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined to a dual-ring trap support Josephson vortices as topologically stable defects in the relative phase. We propose a test of the scaling laws for defect formation by quenching a Bose gas to degeneracy in this geometry. Stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii simulations reveal a -1/4 power-law scaling of defect number with quench time for fast quenches, consistent with the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. Slow quenches show stronger quench-time dependence that is explained by the stability properties of Josephson vortices, revealing the boundary of the Kibble-Zurek regime. Interference of the two atomic fields enables clear long-time measurement of stable defects and a direct test of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in Bose-Einstein condensation. PMID:23745894

  20. Dynamic properties of dilute Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin S.

    In this thesis, a new apparatus for the study of Bose- Einstein condensation is described, and the first two experiments performed with the new device are discussed. The new instrument was constructed for the creation of dilute gas sodium Bose-Einstein condensates, and features an optical quality quartz cell, a high-flux spin-flip Zeeman slower, a tightly confining magnetic trap, and a high-resolution imaging system. The theory, design, and construction of each component is discussed, including a detailed explanation of non-destructive dispersive imaging. Bose-Einstein condensation was first achieved in the new apparatus in January of this year. Bose condensates consisting of 10 to 25 million atoms can be produced in this apparatus at a rate of two condensates per minute. The first two experiments performed with the new instrument probed the dynamic properties of dilute Bose condensates, allowing comparisons to be made with long standing theories of weakly-interacting degenerate Bose fluids. The first experiment was the study of ``surface wave'' excitations of Bose condensates. Standing and rotating quadrupole and octopole excitations were driven with a novel scanned optical dipole potential, a new tool which allows us to generate arbitrary two-dimensional perturbations to the trapping potential which confines the atoms. The second experiment studied the transition from dissipationless to dissipative flow in a Bose condensate. This study, performed by ``stirring'' the condensate with a focused laser, provided the first experimental evidence for the existence of a critical velocity for dissipation in dilute gas Bose condensates. This experiment is discussed in the context of earlier studies of the critical velocity of superfluid liquid helium. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  1. Experiments with Test Case Generation and Runtime Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artho, Cyrille; Drusinsky, Doron; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Mike; Pasareanu, Corina; Rosu, Grigore; Visser, Willem; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Software testing is typically an ad hoc process where human testers manually write many test inputs and expected test results, perhaps automating their execution in a regression suite. This process is cumbersome and costly. This paper reports preliminary results on an approach to further automate this process. The approach consists of combining automated test case generation based on systematically exploring the program's input domain, with runtime analysis, where execution traces are monitored and verified against temporal logic specifications, or analyzed using advanced algorithms for detecting concurrency errors such as data races and deadlocks. The approach suggests to generate specifications dynamically per input instance rather than statically once-and-for-all. The paper describes experiments with variants of this approach in the context of two examples, a planetary rover controller and a space craft fault protection system.

  2. Dynamic-stability experiments in LMFBR steam-generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.; Roy, R.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of instabilities have been recognized in two-phase flows. Parallel channel two-phase flows are particularly sensitive to static instability and dynamic instability of the density wave type. Sodium-heated steam generators, for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) electric power plants, fall into this category, since they are typically comprised of 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/ water tubes. The purpose of this study was to experimentally determine the threshold of dynamic instability in sodium-heated boiling-water tubes using a full scale LMFBR tube and prototypic system parameters. A series of 72 dynamic stability experiments were performed in the Steam Generator Test Facility (SGTF) at Argonne National Laboratory.

  3. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  4. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  5. Recent operating experiences with steam generators in Japanese NPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, Seiji

    1997-02-01

    In 1994, the Genkai-3 of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. and the Ikata-3 of Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. started commercial operation, and now 22 PWR plants are being operated in Japan. Since the first PWR plant now 22 PWR plants are being operated in was started to operate, Japanese PWR plants have had an operating experience of approx. 280 reactor-years. During that period, many tube degradations have been experienced in steam generators (SGs). And, in 1991, the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) occurred in the Mihama-2 of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. However, the occurrence of tube degradation of SGs has been decreased by the instructions of the MITI as regulatory authorities, efforts of Electric Utilities, and technical support from the SG manufacturers. Here the author describes the recent SGs in Japan about the following points. (1) Recent Operating Experiences (2) Lessons learned from Mihama-2 SGTR (3) SG replacement (4) Safety Regulations on SG (5) Research and development on SG.

  6. Final Report for Intravenous Fluid Generation (IVGEN) Spaceflight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; McKay, Terri L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Brown, Dan F.; Zoldak, John T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA designed and operated the Intravenous Fluid Generation (IVGEN) experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS), Increment 23/24, during May 2010. This hardware was a demonstration experiment to generate intravenous (IV) fluid from ISS Water Processing Assembly (WPA) potable water using a water purification technique and pharmaceutical mixing system. The IVGEN experiment utilizes a deionizing resin bed to remove contaminants from feedstock water to a purity level that meets the standards of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the governing body for pharmaceuticals in the United States. The water was then introduced into an IV bag where the fluid was mixed with USP-grade crystalline salt to produce USP normal saline (NS). Inline conductivity sensors quantified the feedstock water quality, output water purity, and NS mixing uniformity. Six 1.5-L bags of purified water were produced. Two of these bags were mixed with sodium chloride to make 0.9 percent NS solution. These two bags were returned to Earth to test for compliance with USP requirements. On-orbit results indicated that all of the experimental success criteria were met with the exception of the salt concentration. Problems with a large air bubble in the first bag of purified water resulted in a slightly concentrated saline solution of 117 percent of the target value of 0.9 g/L. The second bag had an inadequate amount of salt premeasured into the mixing bag resulting in a slightly deficient salt concentration of 93.8 percent of the target value. The USP permits a range from 95 to 105 percent of the target value. The testing plans for improvements for an operational system are also presented.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas: the first 70 years and some recent experiments (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Cornell, Eric A; Wieman, Carl E

    2002-06-17

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases offer a rich field to study fundamental quantum-mechanical processes, manipulation of the speed at which light propogates, observation of atomic pair-formation and superfluidity, or even simulating white dwarf stars. Still more radical applications are on the horizon. However, their initial creation was a masterpiece of experimental physics. After an initial process of laser cooling (which itself won its developers the 1997 Nobel Prize), atoms in a magnetic-optical trap must be safely transferred into a purely magnetic trap, where the condensation process begins at 170 nK and 20 nK a pure condensate of 2000 atoms could be created. More astonishingly, Wieman and Cornell showed these low temperatures could be achieved in "bench scale" equipment rather than the massive pieces normally demanded by cryoscience. For their 1995 discovery of this new state of matter, they were awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics. PMID:12465486

  8. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas: the first 70 years and some recent experiments (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Cornell, Eric A; Wieman, Carl E

    2002-06-17

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases offer a rich field to study fundamental quantum-mechanical processes, manipulation of the speed at which light propogates, observation of atomic pair-formation and superfluidity, or even simulating white dwarf stars. Still more radical applications are on the horizon. However, their initial creation was a masterpiece of experimental physics. After an initial process of laser cooling (which itself won its developers the 1997 Nobel Prize), atoms in a magnetic-optical trap must be safely transferred into a purely magnetic trap, where the condensation process begins at 170 nK and 20 nK a pure condensate of 2000 atoms could be created. More astonishingly, Wieman and Cornell showed these low temperatures could be achieved in "bench scale" equipment rather than the massive pieces normally demanded by cryoscience. For their 1995 discovery of this new state of matter, they were awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics.

  9. Machine discovery based on numerical data generated in computer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Tsuyoshi; Shimura, Masamichi

    1996-12-31

    In the discovery of useful theorems or formulas, experimental data acquisition plays a fundamental role. Most of the previous discovery systems which have the abilities for experimentation, however, require much knowledge for evaluating experimental results, or require plans of common experiments which are given to the systems in advance. Only few systems have been attempted to make experiments which enable the discovery based on acquired experimental data without depending on given initial knowledge. This paper proposes a new approach for discovering useful theorems in the domain of plane geometry by employing experimentation. In this domain, drawing a figure and observing it correspond to making experimentation since these two processes are preparations for acquiring geometrical data. EXPEDITION, a discovery system based on experimental data acquisition, generates figures by itself and acquires expressions describing relations among line segments and angles in the figures. Such expressions can be extracted from the numerical data obtained in the computer experiments. By using simple heuristics for drawing and observing figures, the system succeeds in discovering many new useful theorems and formulas as well as rediscovering well-known theorems, such as power theorems and Thales` theorem.

  10. Condensation of water vapor in rarefaction waves. I - Homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation has been made of the condensation of water vapor/carrier gas mixtures in the nonstationary rarefaction wave generated in a shock tube. It is assumed that condensation takes place by homogeneous nucleation. The equations of motion together with the nucleation rate and the droplet growth equations were solved numerically by the method of characteristics and Lax's method of implicit artificial viscosity. It is found that, for the case considered, the condensation wave formed by the collapse of the metastable nonequilibrium state is followed by a shock wave generated by the intersection of characteristics of the same family. The expansion is practically isentropic up to the onset of condensation. The condensation front accelerates in the x,t plane. The results of the computations for a chosen case of water vapor/nitrogen mixture are presented by plotting variations of pressure, nucleation rate, number density of critical clusters, and condensate mass-fraction along three particle paths. Some consideration is given to homogeneous condensation experiments conducted in a shock tube. Although a direct comparison of the present theoretical work and these experiments is not possible, several worthwhile interpretative features have resulted nevertheless.

  11. Solar wind-generated current in the Lunar Dust Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lianghai; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zheng, Yongchun; Guo, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Measurements from the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) show that the current associated with lofted lunar dust lacks an altitude dependence, implying that the current may come from other sources. Here we present some evidences for solar wind (SW)-generated current. Direct SW influx on the nightside can cause a large current, and the backscattered energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) on the dayside can bring a good correlation between the current and SW density. It is found that the current favors a lower SW speed and a smaller SW incident angle, but the dependences are also affected by the solar zenith angle (SZA) and the scattering function of ENAs. Picked-up ions can enhance the current when the angle between the convection electric field and LDEX's normal is larger than 90°. But when the angle is smaller than 90°, the enhancement is negligible.

  12. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  13. UPTF-TRAM experiments for SBLOCA: Evaluation of condensation processes in TRAM tests A6 and A7

    SciTech Connect

    Sonneburg, H.G.; Tuunanen, J.; Palazov, V.V.

    1995-09-01

    The investigation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena related to reactor transients with accident management measures is the goal of the TRansient and accident Management (TRAM) experimental programme being carried out at the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) at Mannheim (Germany). These experimental investigations and test analyses are funded by the German Federal Minister for Research and Technology (BMFT). The UPTF simulates these phenomena in a 1:1 such relative to the dimension of a PWR. Condensation of steam during Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) water injection from accumulators into the primary system is one of the phenomena studied within the accumulators into the primary system is one of the phenomena studied within the TRAM programme. This phenomenon partly controls the efficiency of accumulator injection if the high pressure safety systems fail. Beside this, the condensation within the nitrogen inside the accumulator for a certain period controls the pressure development inside the accumulator. Thus, both condensation phenomena determine the ECC flow rate delivered to the primary system. Concerning the condensation inside the primary system, this is also of safety relevance in the case of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) during cold leg injection.

  14. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  15. Kr gas puff implosion experiments on the Z generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampleford, David; Jennings, Christopher; Hansen, Stephanie; Harvey-Thompson, Adam; Rochau, Gregory; Lamppa, Derek; Jones, Brent; Dasgupta, Arati; Giuliani, John; Thornhill, J. Ward

    2015-11-01

    We discuss experiments imploding large diameter Kr gas puffs on the Z generator. Thermalization of kinetic energy leads to high pinch temperatures; the plasma conditions achieved are conducive to 13-keV K-shell emission from Kr. By tailoring the density profile and designing experiments using hydrodynamic gas flow modeling coupled to MHD modeling we are able to implode these gas puffs at high velocities (> 100cm / μs) from 12-cm initial diameters to a tight (~ 1 mm diameter) uniform stagnated pinch. Data indicates that changes to the initial density profile affect the implosion stability and significantly affect the radiated output, with the most stable implosion radiating ~ 8 kJ at >10 keV, the majority of which is radiated in the Kr He α line. In this poster we will compare an extensive suite of yield, spectral, imaging and pulse shape diagnostics to MHD modeling, and discuss the plasma conditions inferred from comparing data to atomic modeling. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.J.; Peterson, P.F.; Corradini, M.L.; Pernsteiner, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure was studied numerically and the results were compared with experiments. In both the numerical and experimental investigations, mist formation was observed to occur near the cooling wall, with significant droplet concentrations in the bulk. Large recirculation cells near the end of the condensing section were generated as the heavy noncondensing gas collecting near the cooling wall was accelerated downward. Near the top of the enclosure the recirculation cells became weaker and smaller than those below, ultimately disappearing near the top of the condenser. In the experiment the mist density was seen to be highest near the wall and at the bottom of the condensing section, whereas the numerical model predicted a much more uniform distribution. The model used to describe the formation of mist was based on a Modified Critical Saturation Model (MCSM), which allows mist to be generated once the vapor pressure exceeds a critical value. Equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and MCSM calculations were preformed, showing the experimental results to lie somewhere in between the equilibrium and nonequilibrium predictions of the numerical model. A single adjustable constant (indicating the degree to which equilibrium is achieved) is used in the model in order to match the experimental results.

  17. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; Ferretti, J.; Filippi, A.; Fox, G.; Galata, G.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Glazier, Derek; Grube, B.; Hanhart, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, David G.; Ketzer, B.; Klein, Franz J.; Kubis, B.; Liu, B.; Masjuan, P.; Mathieu, Vincent; McKinnon, Brian; Mitchel, R.; Nerling, F.; Paul, S.; Peláez, J. R.; Rademacker, J.; Rizzo, Alessandro; Salgado, Carlos; Santopinto, E.; Sarantsev, Andrey V.; Sato, Toru; Schlüter, T.; da Silva, M. L.L.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, Igor; Szczepaniak, Adam; Vassallo, A.; Walford, Natalie K.; Watts, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.

  18. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; et al

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopymore » in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.« less

  19. Quantitative assessment of DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Slattum, P M; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A; Budker, V G

    1999-02-15

    A fluorescent method is proposed for assessing DNA condensation in aqueous solutions with variety of condensing agents. The technique is based on the effect of concentration-dependent self-quenching of covalently bound fluorophores upon DNA collapse. The method allows a more precise determination of charge equivalency in titration experiments with various polycations. The technique's ability to determine the number of DNA molecules that are condensed together in close proximity is under further investigation.

  20. Generation and characterization of aerosols and vapors for inhalation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, M I; Wood, G O; Ettinger, H J

    1976-01-01

    Control of aerosol and vapor characteristics that affect the toxicity of inhaled contaminants often determines the methods of generating exposure atmospheres. Generation methods for aerosols and vapors are presented. The characteristics of the resulting exposure atmosphere and the limitations of the various generation methods are discussed. Methods and instruments for measuring the airborne contaminant with respect to various charcteristics are also described. PMID:797565

  1. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  2. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  3. Dropwise condensation on a cold gradient substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Distributions of drops that arise from dropwise condensation evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence of drops. An understanding of how surface-energy gradients applied to the substrate affect drop growth and coalescence is needed for design of effective surfaces for large-scale dropwise condensation. Transient dropwise condensation from a vapor phase onto a cold and chemically treated surface is reported. The surfaces were treated to deliver either a uniform contact-angle or a gradient of contact-angles by silanization. The time evolution of drop-size and number-density distributions is reported. For a typical condensation experiment, the drop distributions advance through two stages: an increase in drop density as a result of nucleation and a decrease in drop density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Because the experiment is transient in nature, the shape of the distribution can be used to predict the number of drop generations and their stage of development. Preliminary results for gradient surfaces will be discussed and compared against observations of behavior on uniformly coated surfaces. NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF).

  4. Enhancing the Academic Experiences of First-Generation Master's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portnoi, Laura M.; Kwong, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Is being "first generation" significant for undergraduates only? The narratives of 25 first-generation master's students in this phenomenological study suggest not. Participants experienced challenges pursuing their master's degrees, yet these were counterbalanced by other factors. The authors identified five areas that educators may address to…

  5. Lived Experiences of Low Socioeconomic Millennial Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics and needs of college students across the United States are ever-changing. As Millennial generation students, born between 1982 and 2003 (Howe & Strauss, 2000), attend college, unique characteristics are present. Commonalities within the Millennial generation have been identified; however, socioeconomic status can impact a…

  6. A second generation experiment in fault-tolerant software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Information was collected on the efficacy of fault-tolerant software by conducting two large-scale controlled experiments. In the first, an empirical study of multi-version software (MVS) was conducted. The second experiment is an empirical evaluation of self testing as a method of error detection (STED). The purpose ot the MVS experiment was to obtain empirical measurement of the performance of multi-version systems. Twenty versions of a program were prepared at four different sites under reasonably realistic development conditions from the same specifications. The purpose of the STED experiment was to obtain empirical measurements of the performance of assertions in error detection. Eight versions of a program were modified to include assertions at two different sites under controlled conditions. The overall structure of the testing environment for the MVS experiment and its status are described. Work to date in the STED experiment is also presented.

  7. A spectroscopic study of intermediates in the condensation of refractory smokes: Matrix isolation experiments SiO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Stranz, D. D.; Donn, D.

    1980-01-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of N2 matrix isolated silicon oxides are investigated. The vibrational frequencies of SiO, Si2O2, and Si3O3 were identified and assigned on the basis of normal coordinate analyses. Heating the solid to 50 K (evaporating the matrix) leaves a residue whose infrared spectrum is identical to that of a smoke condensed at ambient temperatures. Further heating of the sample to 500 K leads to significant changes in the band shapes. Investigations of the infrared spectra at several stages of the diffusion process result in the proposal of a mechanism for the transition from molecular properties to those of the residue (bulk) material, which is characterized as Si2O3.

  8. [Ecological effect of hygroscopic and condensate water on biological soil crusts in Shapotou region of China].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan-Xia; Wang, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Hu, Rui

    2013-03-01

    By the method of field experiment combined with laboratory analysis, this paper studied the ecological significance of hygroscopic and condensate water on the biological soil crusts in the vegetation sand-fixing area in Shapotou region of China. In the study area, 90% of hygroscopic and condensate water was within the 3 cm soil depth, which didn' t affect the surface soil water content. The hygroscopic and condensate water generated at night involved in the exchange process of soil surface water and atmosphere water vapor, made up the loss of soil water due to the evaporation during the day, and made the surface soil water not reduced rapidly. The amount of the generated hygroscopic and condensate water had a positive correlation with the chlorophyll content of biological soil crusts, indicating that the hygroscopic and condensate water could improve the growth activity of the biological soil crusts, and thus, benefit the biomass accumulation of the crusts. PMID:23755477

  9. Squeezed light from second-harmonic generation: experiment versus theory.

    PubMed

    Ralph, T C; Taubman, M S; White, A G; McClelland, D E; Bachor, H A

    1995-06-01

    We report excellent quantitative agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental observation of squeezing from a singly resonant second-harmonic-generating crystal. Limitations in the noise suppression imposed by the pump laser are explicitly modeled and confirmed by our measurements.

  10. Steam generator operating experience, update for 1987--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, L.; Stokley, J.

    1989-06-01

    This report summarizes operational events and degradation mechanisms affecting pressurized water reactor steam generator integrity, provides results of 1987 and 1988 steam generator inspections, and highlights both prevalent problem areas and improvements that have been made in nondestructive testing methods, preventive measures, repair techniques, and replacement procedures. It describes the equipment of the three major suppliers and discusses recent examinations of 76 plants. Major areas of concern are the steam generator degradation mechanisms that affect tube integrity or cause tube leakage and tube failure. These include intergranular attack (IGA), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), pitting, and vibrational wear and fatigue. Also discussed are plugging, sleeving, heat treatment, peening, chemical cleaning, and steam generator replacements, the current status of regulatory instruments and inspection guidelines for ensuring the steam generator integrity, and highlights of steam generator research and unresolved safety issues. The report concludes that cracking, both IGSCC on the tube outside diameter and PWSCC on the tube inside diameter, was the major cause of tube degradation during the 1987--1988 period. 24 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. An Integral Effects Test to investigate the effects of condensate levels of water and preexisting hydrogen on direct containment heating in the Surtsey Test Facility. The IET-7 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the seventh experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-7) series. The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of preexisting hydrogen in the Surtsey vessel on direct containment heating. Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 4-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The cavity contained 3.48 kg of water, and the containment basement floor inside the cranewall contained 71 kg of water, which corresponds to scaled condensate levels in the Zion plant. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected by steam at an initial pressure of 5.9 MPa into the reactor cavity.

  12. Field Experiments Aimed To The Analysis of Flood Generation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriero, D.; Iacobellis, V.; Oliveto, G.; Romano, N.; Telesca, V.; Fiorentino, M.

    The study of the soil moisture dynamics and of the climate-soil-vegetation interac- tion is essential for the comprehension of possible climatic change phenomena, as well as for the analysis of occurrence of extreme hydrological events. In this trend the theoretically-based distribution of floods recently derived by Fiorentino and Ia- cobellis, [ŞNew insights about the climatic and geologic control on the probability distribution of floodsT, Water Resources Research, 2001, 37: 721-730] demonstrated, by an application in some Southern Italy basins, that processes at the hillslope scale strongly influence the basin response by means of the different mechanisms of runoff generation produced by various distributions of partial area contributing. This area is considered as a stochastic variable whose pdf position parameter showed strong de- pendence on the climate as it can seen in the studied basins behavior: in dry zones, where there is the prevalence of the infiltration excess (Horton) mechanism, the basin water loss parameter decreases as basin area increases and the flood peak source area depends on the permeability of soils; in humid zones, with the prevalence of satu- ration excess (Dunne) process, the loss parameter seems independent from the basin area and very sensitive to simple climatic index while only small portion of the area invested by the storm contributes to floods. The purpose of this work is to investigate the consistency of those interpretations by means of field experiments at the hillslope scale to establish a parameterization accounting for soil physical and hydraulic prop- erties, vegetation characteristics and land-use. The research site is the catchment of River Fiumarella di Corleto, which is located in Basilicata Region, Italy, and has a drainage area of approximately 32 km2. The environment has a rather dynamic geo- morphology and very interesting features from the soil-landscape modeling viewpoint [Santini A., A. Coppola, N. Romano, and

  13. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  14. Proceedings: 2000 Workshop on Condensate Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    Condensate polishing maintains control of impurities in the nuclear power plant and allows the unit to operate more reliably. This report presents proceedings of EPRI's 2000 Workshop on Condensate Polishing, where 30 papers were presented on current issues and utility experience involving condensate polishing at both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants.

  15. Evolution and Next Generation of Large Cosmic-Ray Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinto, Angela

    2016-03-01

    With collaborations involving as many as 32 countries, next generation astro-particle observatories are being built to understand the puzzling origin of the most energetic processes in the Universe. We will review some recent results and the effort behind next generation observatories, which include large arrays of detectors and space missions to study high to ultra-high energy cosmic-rays, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. The great opportunity of word-wide scientific productivity and funding motivates these large-scale efforts, which also face many challenges due to geopolitical events and differences in science funding cultures.

  16. Gravity Effects in Condensing and Evaporating Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Som, S. M.; Allen, J. S.; Pedersen, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    A general overview of gravity effects in condensing and evaporating films is presented. The topics include: 1) Research Overview; 2) NASA Recognizes Critical Need for Condensation & Evaporation Research to Enable Human Exploration of Space; 3) Condensation and Evaporation Research in Reduced Gravity is Enabling for AHST Technology Needs; 4) Differing Role of Surface Tension on Condensing/Evaporating Film Stability; 5) Fluid Mechanisms in Condensing and Evaporating Films in Reduced Gravity; 6) Research Plan; 7) Experimental Configurations for Condensing Films; 8) Laboratory Condensation Test Cell; 9) Aircraft Experiment; 10) Condensation Study Current Test Conditions; 11) Diagnostics; 12) Shadowgraph Images of Condensing n- pentane Film in Unstable (-1g) Configuration; 13) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) at Constant Pressure; 14) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) with Cyclic Pressure; 15) Non-condensing Pumped Film in Normal Gravity (-1g); 16) Heat Transfer Coefficient in Developing, Unstable Condensing Film in Normal Gravity; 17) Heat Transfer for Unsteady Condensing Film (-1g); 18) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Stable (+1g) Configuration; and 19) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Unstable (-1g) Configuration.

  17. Polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Snoke, David; Littlewood, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Most students of physics know about the special properties of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) as demonstrated in the two best-known examples: superfluid helium-4, first reported in 1938, and condensates of trapped atomic gases, first observed in 1995. (See the article by Wolfgang Ketterle in PHYSICS TODAY, December 1999, page 30.) Many also know that superfluid {sup 3}He and superconducting metals contain BECs of fermion pairs. An underlying principle of all those condensed-matter systems, known as quantum fluids, is that an even number of fermions with half-integer spin can be combined to make a composite boson with integer spin. Such composite bosons, like all bosons, have the property that below some critical temperature--roughly the temperature at which the thermal de Broglie wavelength becomes comparable to the distance between the bosons--the total free energy is minimized by having a macroscopic number of bosons enter a single quantum state and form a macroscopic, coherent matter wave. Remarkably, the effect of interparticle repulsion is to lead to quantum mechanical exchange interactions that make that state robust, since the exchange interactions add coherently.

  18. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill

    2016-07-12

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  19. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill

    2013-12-05

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  20. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  1. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  2. Automatically generated acceptance test: A software reliability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protzel, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    This study presents results of a software reliability experiment investigating the feasibility of a new error detection method. The method can be used as an acceptance test and is solely based on empirical data about the behavior of internal states of a program. The experimental design uses the existing environment of a multi-version experiment previously conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, in which the launch interceptor problem is used as a model. This allows the controlled experimental investigation of versions with well-known single and multiple faults, and the availability of an oracle permits the determination of the error detection performance of the test. Fault interaction phenomena are observed that have an amplifying effect on the number of error occurrences. Preliminary results indicate that all faults examined so far are detected by the acceptance test. This shows promise for further investigations, and for the employment of this test method on other applications.

  3. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2015-12-08

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments can dramatically improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal to noise of the CMB polarized signal as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of high redshift large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are extremely tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density $\\Omega_{c}h^{2}$ and the Hubble constant $H_{0}$. If polarization on the largest scales ($\\ell<50$) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude $A_{s}$ or the optical depth $\\tau$ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, $N_{\\rm eff}$, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index $n_{s}$ and the baryon energy density $\\Omega_{b}h^{2}$. Finally, an external prior on $H_{0}$ will help constrain the dark energy equation of state ($w$).

  4. Internal Gravity Waves: Generation and Breaking Mechanisms by Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    la Forgia, Giovanni; Adduce, Claudia; Falcini, Federico

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs), occurring within estuaries and the coastal oceans, are manifest as large amplitude undulations of the pycnocline. IGWs propagating horizontally in a two layer stratified fluid are studied. The breaking of an IGW of depression shoaling upon a uniformly sloping boundary is investigated experimentally. Breaking dynamics beneath the shoaling waves causes both mixing and wave-induced near-bottom vortices suspending and redistributing the bed material. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a Perspex tank through the standard lock-release method, following the technique described in Sutherland et al. (2013). Each experiment is analysed and the instantaneous pycnocline position is measured, in order to obtain both geometric and kinematic features of the IGW: amplitude, wavelength and celerity. IGWs main features depend on the geometrical parameters that define the initial experimental setting: the density difference between the layers, the total depth, the layers depth ratio, the aspect ratio, and the displacement between the pycnoclines. Relations between IGWs geometric and kinematic features and the initial setting parameters are analysed. The approach of the IGWs toward a uniform slope is investigated in the present experiments. Depending on wave and slope characteristics, different breaking and mixing processes are observed. Sediments are sprinkled on the slope to visualize boundary layer separation in order to analyze the suspension e redistribution mechanisms due to the wave breaking.

  5. Ballistic range experiments on superbooms generated by refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanai, M.; Toong, T.-Y.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    The enhanced sonic boom or supersonic boom generated as a result of atmospheric refraction in threshold Mach number flights was recreated in a ballistic range by firing projectiles at low supersonic speeds into a stratified medium obtained by slowly injecting carbon dioxide into air. The range was equipped with a fast-response dynamic pressure transducer and schlieren photographic equipment, and the sound speed variation with height was controlled by regulating the flow rate of the CO2. The schlieren observations of the resulting flow field indicate that the generated shocks are reflected near the sonic cutoff altitude where local sound speed equals body speed, provided such an altitude exists. Maximum shock strength occurs very nearly at the point where the incident and reflected shocks join, indicating that the presence of the reflected shock may have an appreciable effect on the magnitude of the focus factor. The largest focus factor detected was 1.7 and leads to an estimate that the constant in the Guiraud-Thery scaling law should have a value of 1.30.

  6. Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckle, Susan; Schultz, John R.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.

  7. Model Experiment on the Generation of the Korotkoff Sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Mieko

    1980-07-01

    The mechanism of the genesis of the Korotkoff sounds is investigated by model experiment using latex tubes and a segment of isolated blood vessel of dogs. The tube compliance is much reduced when the transmural (internal minus external) pressure is very high or very low, and increases radically for intermediate states. It can be concluded that there are two different mechanisms by which the sounds are emitted. One is durable sounds caused by self-excited vibration in the process of collapse of the tube, and the other is impulsive sounds emitted transiently when the tube compliance is abruptly decreased. It is possible to explain qualitatively the change of sound phases over a wide range from systole to diastole as an appropriate mixture of durable and impulsive sounds.

  8. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  9. Bose-Einstein Condensation in Extended Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharringhausen, Marco; Quantus Team; Rasel, Ernst Maria

    2012-07-01

    The setup and the envisaged experiment timeline of the QUANTUS-III experiment onboard a sounding rocket to be started in the near future are presented. The major intention of QUANTUS-III is the stable generation of a number of Bose-Einstein condensates as a source for atom interferometry during several minutes of microgravity onboard the sounding rocket. Later missions aim at the realization of atom interferoemeters as precursor satellite missions. These condesates will be generated serially, allowing a large number of repeatable tests. Within such Bose-Einstein condensates, millions of atoms lose their identity and can be described by a single macroscopic wave function. During the expansion over several seconds, the atoms form a giant coherent matter wave that is delocalized on a millimeter scale, which represents a promising source for matter-wave interferometry to test the universality of free fall with quantum matter. Cold quantum gases and, in particular, Bose-Einstein condensates represent a new state of matter which is nowadays established in many laboratories. They offer unique insights into a broad range of fundamental physics as well as prospects for novel quantum sensors. Microgravity will substantially extend the science of quantum gases towards nowadays inaccessible regimes at lowest temperatures, to macroscopic dimensions, and to unequalled durations of unperturbed evolution of these distinguished quantum objects. Right now, the QUANTUS-III experiment is in the development phase, taking heritage from QUANTUS-I and QUANTUS-II. Major components of the engineering model are available. Boundary conditions of the rocket, requirements of the experiment and interface considerations are presented. This include laser stabilization, vacuum technology and magnetic shielding. The planned trajectory of the rocket will have an apogee of 200 - 300 km and a total microgravity time of 4 - 7 minutes, both depending on the total experiment mass.

  10. Statistical techniques for signal generation: the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Patrick; Barty, Simon

    2002-01-01

    National voluntary reporting systems generate large volumes of clinical data pertinent to drug safety. Currently descriptive statistical techniques are used to assist in the detection of drug safety 'signals'. Australian data have been coded according to guidelines formulated almost 30 years ago and which have resulted in many drugs which are not associated with an adverse drug reaction or 'innocent bystander' drugs being recorded as 'suspected' in individual reports. In this paper we explore the application of an iterative probability filtering algorithm titled 'PROFILE'. This serves to identify the 'signals' and remove the 'innocent bystander' drugs, thus providing a clearer view of the drugs most likely to have caused the reactions. Reaction terms analysed include neutropenia, agranulocytosis, hypotension, hypertension, myocardial infarction, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and rectal haemorrhage. In this version of PROFILE, Fishers exact test has been used as the statistical tool but other methods could be used in future. Advantages and limitations of the method and its assumptions are discussed together with the rationale underlying the method and suggestions for further enhancements.

  11. Technology for the Next-Generation-Mobile User Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delagi, Greg

    The current mobile-handset market is a vital and growing one, being driven by technology advances, including increased bandwidth and processing performance, as well as reduced power consumption and improved screen technologies. The 3G/4G handsets of today are multimedia internet devices with increased screen size, HD video and gaming, interactive touch screens, HD camera and camcorders, as well as incredible social, entertainment, and productivity applications. While mobile-technology advancements to date have made us more social in many ways, new advancements over the next decade will bring us to the next level, allowing mobile users to experience new types of "virtual" social interactions with all the senses. The mobile handsets of the future will be smart autonomous-lifestyle devices with a multitude of incorporated sensors, applications and display options, all designed to make your life easier and more productive! With future display media, including 3D imaging, virtual interaction and conferencing will be possible, making every call feel like you are in the same room, providing an experience far beyond today's video conferencing technology. 3D touch-screen with integrated image-projection technologies will work in conjunction with gesturing to bring a new era of intuitive mobile device applications, interaction, and information sharing. Looking to the future, there are many challenges to be faced in delivering a smart mobile companion device that will meet the user demands. One demand will be for the availability of new and compelling services, and features on the "mobile companion". These mobile companions will be more than just Internet devices, and will function as on-the-go workstations, allowing users to function as if they were sitting in front of their computer in the office or at home. The massive amounts of data that will be transmitted through, to and from these mobile companions will require immense improvements in system performance, including

  12. Infrasound Generated by Strombolian Eruptions - Insights from Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowa, A.; Phillips, J. C.; Rust, A.; Green, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years infrasonic monitoring at volcanoes has become an increasingly common tool. Much of the current work on interpreting volcano infrasound has concentrated on Strombolian eruptions, and several mechanisms have been suggested for the sound produced at these eruptions. However, the precise mechanisms at the vent need to be identified and understood if infrasound recorded in the field is to be used to infer conditions in the volcanic system. In this work, laboratory experiments using audio recordings coupled with high speed video footage have been conducted to gain a deeper understanding of these sounds. A simplified analogue model is used as an analogy for a Strombolian eruption: an air bubble rises through a tank containing a viscous Newtonian liquid (golden syrup) and bursts at the surface. Although the experimental set-up is simple and idealized, it allows control of physical properties and measurement of the processes observed far more accurately than would be possible in the field. Physical parameters which may control the form of the acoustic wave produced, such as liquid viscosity (achieved by dilution of pure golden syrup with water) and bubble volume are investigated. Initial results show that the onset of the main part of the acoustic waveform occurs concurrently with the onset of bubble rupture. Trends in the amplitude and frequency of the acoustic waveform, as well as bubble rupture speed are seen as the liquid viscosity varied. A number of candidate mechanisms for the production of sound during the experiments have been investigated, and synthetic waveforms compared to experimental data. These include the flow of gas through a growing hole from a pressurised reservoir (the bubble), and the mass flux due to the collapse of the bubble film. Importantly it has been shown that even in this very simple case - the sound produced by the bursting of a hemispherical bubble formed at the surface of a viscous liquid - is not as simple as some theories

  13. Control of a Bose-Einstein condensate on a chip by external optical and magnetic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Maluckov, A.; Petrovic, J.; Gligoric, G.; Hadzievski, Lj.; Lombardi, P.; Schaefer, F.; Cataliotti, F.S.

    2012-09-15

    In this paper we explore the possibilities of control of a Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip by the use of potentials generated by photonic and magnetic components. We show that the fields produced by both types of components can be modelled by a generic exponential potential and derive analytic expressions that allow for an easy assessment of their impact on a trapped condensate. Using dynamical numerical simulations we study the transport of the condensate between the control structures on a chip. We study in detail different regimes of the condensate behaviour in an evanescent light potential generated by a photonic structure in the vicinity of the condensate and in magnetic potentials generated by a wire or a coil. The calculations are based on the reported parameters of atom chip setups and available photonic and magnetic components. Finally, the model is verified by an experiment with a condensate on an atom chip and a coil. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generic potential used to describe both the optical evanescent and magnetic fields. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytic closed form solution found for the impact of a generic potential on a BEC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BEC dynamics calculated for potential time sequences attainable in experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditions for BEC transfer by an external field identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exponential-potential model validated by a BEC-on-chip experiment.

  14. Spatial coherence of a polariton condensate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hui; Solomon, Glenn S; Hey, Rudolf; Ploog, Klaus H; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-09-21

    We perform Young's double-slit experiment to study the spatial coherence properties of a two-dimensional dynamic condensate of semiconductor microcavity polaritons. The coherence length of the system is measured as a function of the pump rate, which confirms a spontaneous buildup of macroscopic coherence in the condensed phase. An independent measurement reveals that the position and momentum uncertainty product of the condensate is close to the Heisenberg limit. An experimental realization of such a minimum uncertainty wave packet of the polariton condensate opens a door to coherent matter-wave phenomena such as Josephson oscillation, superfluidity, and solitons in solid state condensate systems.

  15. Condensation heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J. W.

    The paper gives a brief description of some of the better understood aspects of condensation heat transfer and includes discussion of the liquid-vapour interface, natural and forced convection laminar film condensation and dropwise condensation.

  16. Operational experience on the MP-200 series commercial wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The MP-200 wind turbine generator is described. The mechanical system, microprocessor controller, and display devices, are described. Also discussed are modifications to the prototype, operational experience, and MP-600 systems development.

  17. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  18. Preliminary experiments on surface flow visualization in the cryogenic wind tunnel by use of condensing or freezing gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic wind tunnel users must have available surface flow visualization techniques to satisfy a variety of needs. While the ideal from an aerodynamic stand would be non-intrusive, until an economical technique is developed there will be occasions when the user will be prepared to resort to an intrusive method. One such method is proposed, followed by preliminary evaluation experiments carried out in environments representative of the cryogenic nitrogen tunnel. The technique uses substances which are gases at normal temperature and pressure but liquid or solid at cryogenic temperatures. These are deposited on the model in localized regions, the patterns of the deposits and their subsequent melting or evaporation revealing details of the surface flow. The gases were chosen because of the likelihood that they will not permanently contaminate the model or tunnel. Twenty-four gases were identified as possibly suitable and four of these were tested from which it was concluded that surface flow direction can be shown by the method. Other flow details might also be detectable. The cryogenic wind tunnel used was insulated on the outside and did not show signs of contamination.

  19. A NOVEL HIGH-SPEED METHOD FOR THE GENERATION OF 4-ARYLDIHYDROPYRIMIDINE COMPOUND LIBRARIES USING A MICROWAVE-ASSISTED BIGINELLI CONDENSATION PROTOCOL -

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this presentation we report the application of microwave assisted chemistry to the parallel synthesis of 4-aryl-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones employing a solventless Biginelli multicomponent condensation protocol. The novel method employs neat mixtures of B-ketoesters, aryl ...

  20. Chondrules of the Very First Generation in Bencubbin/CH-like Meteorites QUE94411 and Hammadah Al Hamra 237: Condensation Origin at High Ambient Nebular Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Meibom, Anders; Russell, Sara S.; Young, Edward; Alexander, Conel M.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Lofgren, Gary; Cuzzi, Jeff; Zipfel, Jutta; Keil, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Chondrules in QUE94411 and HH 237 formed at high ambient T prior to condensation of Fe,Ni-metal following a large scale thermal event that resulted in complete vaporization of a solar nebula region. These chondrules escaped subsequent remelting.

  1. Participatory Reality Constitution: A Phenomenological Study of Generative Experiences in Higher Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiter, Sean M. Avila

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological inquiry into the felt experience of participatory sense-making and collaborative presence in small groups explores where and when a common field of resonance is generated among individuals. The experience is named "participatory reality constitution" (PRC). Nine co-participants who met criteria of having experienced…

  2. Little Experience with ICT: Are They Really the Net Generation Student-Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Hyo-Jeong; Choi, Hyungshin; Lim, Wei Ying; Xiong, Yao

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the complexity of past experiences with ICT, pedagogical beliefs, and attitude toward ICT in education that the Net Generation student teachers have about their intention to teach and learn with technology. This study has a particular focus on their lived experiences as school students where ICT related…

  3. The Role of Physical Education and Other Formative Experiences of Three Generations of Female Football Fans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Stacey; Kirk, David

    2014-01-01

    The experiences of female sports fans have been largely marginalised in academic research to date and little research has examined the formative sporting experiences of female spectators. This article draws on 51 semi-structured interviews with three generations of female fans of one (men's) professional football club (Leicester City), to…

  4. Connection and Commitment: Exploring the Generation and Experience of Emotion in a Participatory Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Julie; Bundy, Penny; Stinson, Madonna

    2015-01-01

    Emotion is a complex and important aspect of participatory drama experience. This is because drama work of this kind provokes emotional responses to both actual and dramatic worlds. This paper identifies two key features of participatory drama that influence the generation and experience of emotion: commitment and connection. These features are…

  5. Experiences of Adult Students in Multi-Generational Community College Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemente, Kathleen Ann

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study is a basic interpretative inquiry studying the experiences of fourteen adult students 45 years of age or older in a multi-generational community college classroom. The study is informed by social constructivism, social constructionism and andragogy. It focused on how students viewed their experiences in the…

  6. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  7. In-Space technology experiments program. A high efficiency thermal interface (using condensation heat transfer) between a 2-phase fluid loop and heatpipe radiator: Experiment definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohner, John A.; Dempsey, Brian P.; Herold, Leroy M.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verify the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.

  8. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  9. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  10. Flies from meat and wasps from trees: Reevaluating Francesco Redi's spontaneous generation experiments.

    PubMed

    Parke, Emily C

    2014-03-01

    Francesco Redi's seventeenth-century experiments on insect generation are regarded as a key contribution to the downfall of belief in spontaneous generation. Scholars praise Redi for his experiments demonstrating that meat does not generate insects, but condemn him for his claim elsewhere that trees can generate wasps and gallflies. He has been charged with rejecting spontaneous generation only to change his mind and accept it, and in the process, with failing (at least in some sense) as a rigorous experimental philosopher. In this paper I defend Redi from both of these charges. In doing so, I draw some broader lessons for our understanding of spontaneous generation. 'Spontaneous generation' does not refer to a single theory, but rather a landscape of possible views. I analyze Redi's theoretical commitments and situate them within this landscape, and argue that his error in the case of insects from plants is not as problematic as previous commentators have said it is. In his research on gall insects Redi was addressing a different question from that of his experiments on insect generation-the question was not "Can insects come from nonliving matter?," but rather, "Can insects come from living organisms which are not their parents (namely, trees)?" In the latter case, he gave an answer which we now know to be false, but this was not due to any failure in his rigor as an experimental philosopher. PMID:24509515

  11. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

  12. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  13. Self-interfering matter-wave patterns generated by a moving laser obstacle in a two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate inside a power trap cut off by box potential boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhel, Roger R.; Sakhel, Asaad R.; Ghassib, Humam B.

    2011-09-15

    We report the observation of highly energetic self-interfering matter-wave (SIMW) patterns generated by a moving obstacle in a two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) inside a power trap cut off by hard-wall box potential boundaries. The obstacle initially excites circular dispersive waves radiating away from the center of the trap which are reflected from hard-wall box boundaries at the edges of the trap. The resulting interference between outgoing waves from the center of the trap and reflected waves from the box boundaries institutes, to the best of our knowledge, unprecedented SIMW patterns. For this purpose we simulated the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation using the split-step Crank-Nicolson method and the obstacle was modelled by a moving impenetrable Gaussian potential barrier. Various trapping geometries are considered in which the dynamics of the spatial and momentum density, as well as the energy, are considered. The momentum dynamics reveal an oscillatory behavior for the condensate fraction, indicative of excitations out of and de-excitations back into the condensate state. An oscillatory pattern for the energy dynamics reveals the presence of solitons in the system. Some vortex features are also obtained.

  14. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  15. Dual-monitor deterministic hardware for visual stimuli generation in neuroscience experiments.

    PubMed

    Gazziro, Mario; Almeida, Lirio

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of a dual-monitor visual stimulus generator that is used in neuroscience experiments with invertebrates such as flies. The experiment consists in the visualization of two fixed images that are displaced horizontally according to the stimulus data. The system was developed using off-the-shelf FPGA kits and it is capable of displaying 640x480 pixels with 256 intensity levels at 200 frames per second (FPS) on each monitor. A Raster plot of the experiment with the superimposed stimuli was generated as the result of this work. A novel architecture was developed, using the same DOT Clock for both monitors, and its implementation generates a perfect synchronism in both devices.

  16. Dual-monitor deterministic hardware for visual stimuli generation in neuroscience experiments.

    PubMed

    Gazziro, Mario; Almeida, Lirio

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of a dual-monitor visual stimulus generator that is used in neuroscience experiments with invertebrates such as flies. The experiment consists in the visualization of two fixed images that are displaced horizontally according to the stimulus data. The system was developed using off-the-shelf FPGA kits and it is capable of displaying 640x480 pixels with 256 intensity levels at 200 frames per second (FPS) on each monitor. A Raster plot of the experiment with the superimposed stimuli was generated as the result of this work. A novel architecture was developed, using the same DOT Clock for both monitors, and its implementation generates a perfect synchronism in both devices. PMID:21096378

  17. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  18. The Second Generation Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C (E01-011 experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Akihiko

    2008-11-01

    The second generation Λ hypernuclear spectroscopy by (e,e’K{sup +}) reaction has been carried out successfully at JLab in 2005. New configurations, HKS and Tilt method, significantly improved both energy resolution and statistics. Systematic error depend on tuning procedure was estimated by the blind analysis. Analysis is in the final stage. Third generation experiment (JLab E05-115) will be performed in the summer of 2009 w/ new e’ spectrometer (HES).

  19. Proceedings: 2002 Workshop on Condensate Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    2002-06-01

    Condensate polishing aims to control impurities in a nuclear power plant, thus allowing the unit to operate more reliably. This report contains the work presented at EPRI's 2002 Workshop on Condensate Polishing, where 36 papers were presented on current issues, research, and utility experiences involving polishing issues at both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) units.

  20. Adiabatic preparation of Floquet condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, Christoph; Holthaus, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We argue that a Bose-Einstein condensate can be transformed into a Floquet condensate, that is, into a periodically time-dependent many-particle state possessing the coherence properties of a mesoscopically occupied single-particle Floquet state. Our reasoning is based on the observation that the denseness of the many-body system's quasienergy spectrum does not necessarily obstruct effectively adiabatic transport. Employing the idealized model of a driven bosonic Josephson junction, we demonstrate that only a small amount of Floquet entropy is generated when a driving force with judiciously chosen frequency and maximum amplitude is turned on smoothly.

  1. Self-generated Magnetic Fields in Blast-wave Driven Rayleigh-Taylor Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaig, Markus; Plewa, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    We study the generation of magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect in blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiments. Previous estimates have shown that in a typical experiment, one should expect fields in the MG range to be generated, with the potential to influence the Rayleigh-Taylor morphology. We perform two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations, where we solve the extended set of MHD equations known as the Braginskii equations. The simulation parameters reflect the physical conditions in past experiments performed on the OMEGA laser and potential future experiments on the NIF laser facility. When neglecting the friction force between electrons and ions in the simulations, magnetic fields of the order of a few 0.1 MG (with a plasma smaller than 1000) are generated, and are found to be dynamically significant. However, it turns out that once the friction force is included, the magnetic fields become much smaller (with a plasma beta greater than 100000) which have negligible influence on the dynamics of the system. Our results therefore indicate that, contrary to previous speculations, it is highly unlikely that self-generated magnetic fields can influence the morphology of a typical blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiment. M.F. and T.P. were supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG52- 09NA29548 and the NSF Grant AST-1109113. This research used resources of the National Energy Re.

  2. Simulation experiments to generate broadband chaos using dual-wavelength optically injected Fabry-Perot laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Hafiz Muhammad; Khawar Islam, Muhammad; Obaid Ullah, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    Broadband chaos can be generated by beating two wavelengths in a hybrid arrangement of Fabry-Perot (FP) Laser and Fiber ring cavity by injecting dual wavelengths. The bandwidth of generated chaos can be controlled by detuning different modes of FP Laser for beating. The bandwidth of generated chaos increased to many folds depending upon the injected strength and wavelength spacing matched to FP laser modes. The bandwidth enhancement in different simulation experiments conducted is optimized by varying different parameters of FP laser and cavity. The waveforms are analyzed and Lyapunov exponents are calculated in order to validate the existence of high bandwidth non-pulsating chaos.

  3. Influence of interactions with noncondensed particles on the coherence of a one-dimensional polariton condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutzler, Johannes; Kazimierczuk, Tomasz; Bayraktar, Ömer; Aßmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven

    2014-03-01

    One-dimensional polariton condensates (PoCos) in a photonic wire are generated through nonresonant laser excitation, by which also a reservoir of background carriers is created. Interaction with this reservoir may affect the coherence of the PoCo, which is studied here by injecting a condensate locally and monitoring the coherence along the wire. While the incoherent reservoir is mostly present within the excitation laser spot, the condensate can propagate ballistically through the wire. Photon correlation measurements show that far from the laser spot the second-order correlation function approaches unity value, as expected for the coherent condensed state. When approaching the spot, however, the correlation function increases up to values of 1.2 showing the addition of noise to the emission due to interaction with the reservoir. This finding is substantiated by measuring the first-order coherence by a double-slit experiment, which shows a reduced visibility of interference at the excitation laser spot.

  4. Report on the NASA Soft and Complex Condensed Matter Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor); Chaikin, Paul; Nagel, Sidney

    2003-01-01

    During the past decade, NASA has been a leading U.S. supporter of soft and complex condensed matter research. Experiments in space shuttles, MIR, the International Space Station (ISS), as well as ground-based research have provided new insights into several areas including hard sphere colloids, crystal growth, phase ordering, and transport of complex fluids at the critical point. To help define the next generation of flight experiments needed to answer remaining important questions in the field of soft and complex condensed matter, NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Science sponsored a workshop on Soft and Complex Condensed Matter, March 6, 2003. This workshop asked leading members in the field of Soft and Complex Condensed Matter (at the APS March Meeting) to help identify exciting unanswered questions in the field, along with specific research topics for which the absence of gravity would enable significant results unobtainable by other means. The workshop was attended by 24 participants from universities across the U.S. and from five different countries (in addition to NASA GRC participants).

  5. Condensation in Titan's lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Griffith, C. A.; Yelle, R. V.

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent description of Titan's aerosols-clouds-gases system and compare our results with the optical properties retrieved from measurements made by the Descent Imager / Spectral Radiometer (DISR) experiment on the Huygens probe [4]. Our calculations include the condensation of methane, ethane and hydrogen cyanide on photochemical aerosols produced in the thermosphere. Our results suggest that the two distinct extinction layers observed by DISR below 80 km are produced by HCN and methane condensation, respectively, while for the Huygens' equatorial conditions simulated here, the contribution of ethane clouds to the total opacity is negligible

  6. An Exploration of First-Generation College Students' Career Development Beliefs and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Kevin A.; Caperton, William; Kaiser, Dakota; Pruitt, Nathan T.; White, Heather; Hall, Eric

    2015-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) represent a large proportion of individuals seeking higher education in the United States; yet this population does not perform as well academically as, and persist to graduation at lower rates than, their peers who have more familial context for the college-going experience. Completing a college degree is…

  7. Stories as Knowledge: Bringing the Lived Experience of First-Generation College Students into the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jehangir, Rashne

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study of first-generation, low-income students examines the impact of their participation in a multicultural learning community (MLC) designed to challenge the isolation and marginalization they experience at a large, predominantly White research university. The MLC employed multicultural curriculum and critical pedagogy to bring…

  8. The Experience of Arranged Marriage by the 1.5 Generation Asian Indian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Rita

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the experiences of arranged marriage by the 1.5 Generation Asian Indian college students. The researcher identified 10 participants who met the following criteria: (a) were born in India to Asian Indian parents, (b) migrated to the United States under the age of 15, (c) were college students between the…

  9. Four Generations of Women's Educational Experience in a Rural Chinese Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Haigen; Placier, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Our study sought to understand changes in gender inequality in education across four generations of rural Chinese women's educational experiences in a small community in southern China. The 24 interviews and numerous informal conversations with 12 women showed that gender-based favouritism for men and against women undergirded family expectations,…

  10. 13_2_30: Experiences, Perceptions and Expectations of Retail Employment for Generation Y

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbridge, Adelina M.; Maxwell, Gillian A.; Ogden, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine Generation Y, potential graduate entrants to UK retailing, in respect of their job experiences, career perceptions and initial employment expectations. Design/methodology/approach: Utilising qualitative research methods, an exploratory study was undertaken with 33 students (all of whom fell into the…

  11. Open string decoupling and tachyon condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, Gordon

    2001-06-01

    The amplitudes in perturbative open string theory are examined as functions of the tachyon condensate parameter. The boundary state formalism demonstrates the decoupling of the open string modes at the non-perturbative minima of the tachyon potential via a degeneration of open world-sheets and identifies an independence of the coupling constants gs and gYM at general values of the tachyon condensate. The closed string sector is generated at the quantum level; it is also generated at the classical level perturbatively through the condensation of propagating open string modes on the D-brane degrees of freedom.

  12. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  13. Condensates in Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium theory which starts with temperature/pressure profiles, compositional information and thermodynamic data for condensable species in the jovian planet atmospheres predicts layers of condensate clouds in the upper troposphere.

  14. The Four-Year Experience of First-Generation Students at a Small Independent University: Engagement, Student Learning, and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahan, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation explored the four-year college experience of first-generation and continuing-generation students at a small private institution. Using Astin's I-E-O model (1970), the following variables in the student experience were considered: precollege student characteristics (input); engagement in academic experiences, cocurricular…

  15. Experimental simulation of the condensation and metamorphism of seasonal CO2 condensates under martian conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisolle, F.; Schmitt, B.; Beck, P.; Philippe, S.; Brissaud, O.

    2014-04-01

    An experimental set-up, CARBON-IR, has been developed in order to perform the condensation and metamorphism of CO2 condensates in various controlled martian conditions at, or out of, equilibrium. The sample texture is monitored and near-infrared reflectance spectra are recorded. We present a first set of experiments aimed to simulate the formation of compact translucent slabs by condensation of CO2 gas, the metamorphism of CO2 snow, as well as their sublimation.

  16. Vortex formation during the growth of Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Chad; Neely, Tyler; Scherer, David; Anderson, Brian

    2007-06-01

    We experimentally study of the growth of Bose-Einstein condensates in harmonic trapping potentials with laser-induced perturbations to the potential well. We find that some time- independent perturbations can significantly impact the growth process and final state of the BEC. In particular, in numerical simulations and our experiments, we have observed the generation of vortices and vortex-antivortex pairs as a result of creating BECs in perturbed potentials. We will describe the results of our ongoing and completed experiments (D.R. Scherer, C.N. Weiler, T.W. Neely, B.P. Anderson, cond-mat/0610187, to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett.).

  17. Bose-Einstein Condensates with Spin-Orbit Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ho Tinlun; Zhang Shizhong

    2011-10-07

    Motivated by recent experiments carried out by Spielman's group at NIST, we study a general scheme for generating families of gauge fields, spanning the scalar, spin-orbit, and non-Abelian regimes. The NIST experiments, which impart momentum to bosons while changing their spin state, can in principle realize all these. In the spin-orbit regime, we show that a Bose gas is a spinor condensate made up of two non-orthogonal dressed spin states carrying different momenta. As a result, its density shows a stripe structure with a contrast proportional to the overlap of the dressed states, which can be made very pronounced by adjusting the experimental parameters.

  18. Generation of surface waves by an underwater moving bottom: experiments and application to tsunami modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, Leonardo; Jamin, Timothée; Ruiz-Chavarría, Gerardo; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Most of the ocean waves that we observe in nature are generated by processes that take place near the ocean surface. This occurs mainly because fluid layers reduce significantly the transfer of motion between the source and the free surface as the depth increases. In any case, when the disturbances at a deep source are wide and fast enough, a wave can still be generated. The archetype of this kind of process is tsunami generation: during earthquakes, the seabed of the ocean experiences a sudden net vertical displacement that can yield waves capable of flooding entire coastlines. In this talk, we will focus on laboratory experiments concerning the generation of free surface waves in a three-dimensional uniform layer whose bottom uplifts suddenly. Based on simultaneous measurements of the free surface deformation and the velocity field, we analyze the wave generation dependence on the bottom kinematics. Our results display excellent agreement with a classical linear theory of gravity waves. In addition, we develop a new theoretical approach that can be applied to improve real-time numerical simulations used by the tsunami hazard mitigation programs. Supported by the AXA Research Fund.

  19. A qualitative study of adaptation experiences of 1.5-generation Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bryan S K; Brenner, Bradley R; Liang, Christopher T H; Asay, Penelope A

    2003-05-01

    Adaptation experiences of 1.5-generation Asian American college students (N = 10) were examined using the consensual qualitative research method. Results indicated 4 domains of adaptation experiences: preimmigration experiences, acculturation and enculturation experiences, intercultural relationships, and support systems. Participants reported that English proficiency played a significant role in their initial adjustment. Currently, most of the participants reported feeling identified with both the U.S. and Asian cultures. Some participants reported having experienced racism in the past. Many participants noted that they currently have no difficulty establishing friendships with culturally different persons. Participants reported currently feeling most close to friends of a similar background and that they usually seek support from friends, family, and religious organizations, but not from a psychologist or counselor.

  20. Flow Optimization in the Princeton MRI Experiment and Zonal Flow Generation in HTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspary, Kyle; Burin, Michael; Gilson, Erik; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao; McNulty, Michael; Schartman, Ethan; Sloboda, Peter; Wei, Xing

    2015-11-01

    The Princeton Magneto-Rotational Instability (MRI) experiment and the Hydrodynamic Turbulence Experiment (HTX) are a pair of modified Taylor-Couette devices which explore rotating magnetohydrodynamic and hydrodynamic flows. The Princeton MRI experiment uses a GaInSn working fluid and was designed to study the MRI, which is believed to be the mechanism responsible for the rapid accretion rate observed in some magnetized accretion disks. The experiment utilizes ultrasound Doppler velocimetry to measure velocity profiles and a newly installed suite of hall sensors on the inner and outer cylinders to characterize the magnetic field. Results are presented from experiments which seek to optimize the flow by varying the inner ring speed for a given magnetic field strength. In HTX, we explore the generation of zonal flows from turbulence by flow jets with water as the working fluid. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the mean and fluctuating velocity. The generation of anisotropic mean flow by means of beta plane turbulence is investigated through the use of a sloped end-cap. The impact of varying the end cap slope, fluid height and jet flow rate will be discussed.

  1. Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium.

    PubMed

    Griesmaier, Axel; Werner, Jörg; Hensler, Sven; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-04-29

    We report on the generation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a gas of chromium atoms, which have an exceptionally large magnetic dipole moment and therefore underlie anisotropic long-range interactions. The preparation of the chromium condensate requires novel cooling strategies that are adapted to its special electronic and magnetic properties. The final step to reach quantum degeneracy is forced evaporative cooling of 52Cr atoms within a crossed optical dipole trap. At a critical temperature of T(c) approximately 700 nK, we observe Bose-Einstein condensation by the appearance of a two-component velocity distribution. We are able to produce almost pure condensates with more than 50,000 condensed 52Cr atoms.

  2. Bose-Einstein Condensate-Hidden Riches for New Forms of Technology and Energy Generation; Potential for Glimpse into Inner Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Don

    With the announcement of the recent successful production of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of photons, a circle has been completed which started in 1925 with the vision of Albert Einstein and Satyendra Nath Bose - a sustained macroscopic condensed state of matter where all atoms are in the same lowest quantum state. The creation of an all-optical BEC, involving a surprisingly straightforward "tabletop" method which bypasses the normally requisite laser/evaporative cooling equipment and ultra-high vacuum chambers necessary for production of the standard delicate atomic BEC, elevates this phenomenon to a new level well beyond its current perception as mere laboratory curiosity. Accordingly, this development certainly heralds eventual incorporation of atomic and photon BECs as standard operating components of energy-efficient mechanical, optical and electrical systems, implying novel ingenious engineering protocols amenable to all the tools of non-linear and quantum optics. Pointing towards such a promising technological future are the suggestion that a photon BEC could serve as a new high-energy ultra-violet (UV) laser photon source, as well as the recent unprecedented implementation of a closed-loop atom circuit (toroidal atomic BEC) demonstrating precise control of superfluid current flow, forecasting the coveted development of an atomic SQUID. Perhaps more significantly, the new highly robust and manageable optical BEC will allow heretofore unfathomable precise probing of the atomic and nano-levels of nature, affording novel high-quality testing procedures of the major foundations of quantum mechanics itself. Such a primary advancement, providing a clearer glimpse into the microscopic realms, may present us as never before with an unprecedented view of the quantum engine that underpins physical reality itself and help place the contextual nature of entanglement and quantum superposition on a firmer foundation. Thus, further progress in achieving mastery over

  3. FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of experiments to explore the generation of cosmological magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Ravasio, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of the experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation de Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. The simulations show that the result of the laser illuminating the target is a series of complex hydrodynamic phenomena.

  4. Outdoor Science Experiment Classes; Raising the Next Generation for Researchers and Teachers of Natural Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shida, Masakazu; Danjo, Shinji; Takahashi, Noriaki

    The objectives of the outdoor science experiment classes are; for a few tens of young students and pupils as trainees to develop large-scale natural science experiments and to demonstrate them for the approximately 3,000 visitors in the venue of the EXPO park at Osaka. This method, though hardly realisable in the framework of school education, is proposed with recent successful examples, as a new means of active learning for the motivated next generation who wishes to enter the field of natural science as researchers and/or teachers.

  5. Generation and reduction of the data for the Ulysses gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, R.; Bonifazi, P.; Iess, L.; Trager, G. B.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for the generation and reduction of the radiometric data known as REGRES is described. The software is implemented on a HP-1000F computer and was tested on REGRES data relative to the Voyager I spacecraft. The REGRES data are a current output of NASA's Orbit Determination Program. The software package was developed in view of the data analysis of the gravitational wave experiment planned for the European spacecraft Ulysses.

  6. A Proof-Of-Principle Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Michael; Colby, Eric; Ding, Yuantao; Frederico, Joel; Gilevich, Sasha; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, R.; McCormick, Douglas; Nelson, Janice; Raubenheimer, Tor; Soong, Ken; Stupakov, Gennady; Szalata, Zenon; Walz, Dieter; Weathersby, Stephen; Woodley, Mark; Xiang, Dao; Corlett, John; Penn, Gregory; Prestemon, Soren; Qiang, Ji; /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-05-20

    In this paper we describe the technical design of an ongoing proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC.We present the design considerations and the technical details of the experiment. Recently a new method, entitled echo-enabled harmonic generation, was proposed for generation of high harmonics using the beam echo effect. In an EEHG free electron laser (FEL), an electron beam is energy modulated in a modulator and then sent through a dispersive section with a high dispersion strength. After this first stage, the modulation obtained in the modulator is macroscopically washed out, while simultaneously introducing complicated fine structure (separated energy bands) into the phase space of the beam. A second laser is used to further modulate the beam energy in a second modulator. After passing through a second dispersive section, the separated energy bands will be converted into current modulation and the echo signal then occurs as a recoherence effect caused by the mixing of the correlations between the modulation in the second modulator and the fine structures in the beam. The EEHG scheme has a remarkable up-frequency conversion efficiency; it has been shown that the EEHG FEL scheme may allow generation of soft x-rays directly from a UV seed laser in a single stage. In order to confirm the physics behind the EEHG technique and benchmark the theory, a proof-of-principleEEHG experimentwas planned at SLAC. The experiment is now in a commissioning stage and the preliminary results are reported in a separate paper of these proceedings. In this paper we present the design considerations and the details of the experiment setup.

  7. Next Generation Endstation for Concurrent Measurements of Charged Products and Photons in LCLS FEL Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Bostedt, C.; Castagna, J.-C.; Hartmann, R.; Bozek, J. D.; Schlichting, I.; Strüder, L.; Ullrich, J.; Berrah, N.

    2012-11-01

    We are designing and building the next generation multi-purpose instrumentation especially adapted to accommodate unique large-area, single-photon counting pnCCD detectors together with advanced many-particle ion and electron imaging spectrometers (reaction microscope, REMI; velocity map imaging, VMI; magnetic bottle) for simultaneous detection of scattered and fluorescent photons and charged particles in experiments at the LCLS FEL.

  8. Operating experience with the 200 kW MOD-OA wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.; Saunders, A. L.; Nyland, T. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The machine configuration and its advantages and disadvantages, particularly as it affects reliability are discussed. The machine performance, both availability and power output characteristics are described. The Mod-OA operational experience is documented. The characteristics of the wind energy generated, the machine performance, and the subsystem strengths and weaknesses are discussed. An assessment of the project success in fulfilling its goals and objectives is also presented.

  9. Evaluation of stack criteria pollutant gas absorption in the new generation thermoelectric water condenser fitted with laminar impinger type heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, T.

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorized the Environmental Protection Agency to establish an Acid Rain Program to reduce the adverse effects of acidic deposition. The Act specifically stipulated that CEMS (continuous emissions monitoring systems) be used to measure the stack emissions under this program. Along with these rules, comes the task of the Stack Tester (Reference Method) to routinely perform RATA (Relative Accuracy Test Audit) tests on the installed CEMS. This paper presents a laboratory and field test sequence to evaluate the signal attenuation through the gas sample conditioning, water condensation removal process, using laminar flow impinger heat exchangers. This method is compared to the EPA CFR 40, Part 60, Appendix A, Method 6, glass impinger train, commonly used by RATA stack testers. CFR 40, Part 75 revisions as of the CAAA 1990, requires more stringent certification and CEMS performance standards. These standards are summarized and related to gas absorption in both the thermoelectric cooler heat exchanger and the Method 6 glass impinger train system. As an incentive to reduce the frequency of RATA tests required per year, emitters are encouraged to achieve relative accuracies of 7.5% or less compared to the reference method. This incentive requires better reference method test apparatus definition. This paper will explore these alternatives and provide test data for comparison to the currently available apparatus. Also discussed is the theory of Electronic Gas Sample Coolers and their practical application to the removal of water from stack gas.

  10. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  11. FLASH Hydrodynamic Simulations of Experiments to Explore the Generation of Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, Anthony; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Don; Lee, Dongwook; Meineke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Weide, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous throughout the universe. However, the origin and strength of these fields are not fully understood. A promising mechanism for the origin of seed fields is the asymmetric shocks that occur in hierarchical structure formation when smaller halos merge to form galaxies and galaxies merge to form clusters of galaxies. The seed fields are generated by the Biermann battery mechanism. The COSMOLAB team are conducting experiments to investigate the generation of magnetic fields by asymmetric shocks. These experiments involve laser illumination of a foil target, driving a shock into a gas-filled chamber, and a variety of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. Hydrodynamic-only simulations are useful because the shock-generated magnetic fields are not dynamically important. In this paper, we describe hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment conducted using the FLASH code. The scientific objective of these simulations is to explore the sensitivity of the properties of the jet-like shock to target composition, thickness, and lateral extent.

  12. FLASH Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Experiments to Explore the Generation of Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald Q.; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous throughout the universe. However, the origin and strength of these fields are not fully understood. A promising mechanism for the origin of seed fields is the asymmetric shocks that occur in hierarchical structure formation when smaller halos merge to form galaxies and galaxies merge to form clusters of galaxies. The seed fields are generated by the Biermann battery mechanism. The COSMOLAB team of the University of Oxford is conducting experiments to investigate the generation of magnetic fields by asymmetric shocks. These experiments involve the laser illumination of a foil target, driving a shock into a gas-filled chamber, and a variety of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. In this paper, we describe magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiment carried out using the FLASH code. The scientific objective of these simulations is to explore the morphology and strength of the magnetic fields generated by ablation of target material by the laser, and by the jet-like shock that is produced on the opposite side of the target.

  13. The generation and amplification of intergalactic magnetic fields in analogue laboratory experiments with high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of high-power laser facilities has, in the past two decades, opened a new field of research where astrophysical environments can be scaled down to laboratory dimensions, while preserving the essential physics. This is due to the invariance of the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics to a class of similarity transformations. Here we review the relevant scaling relations and their application in laboratory astrophysics experiments with a focus on the generation and amplification of magnetic fields in cosmic environment. The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields is a multi stage process whereby a vanishing magnetic seed is first generated by a rotational electric field and is then amplified by turbulent dynamo action to the characteristic values observed in astronomical bodies. We thus discuss the relevant seed generation mechanisms in cosmic environment including resistive mechanism, collision-less and fluid instabilities, as well as novel laboratory experiments using high power laser systems aimed at investigating the amplification of magnetic energy by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Future directions, including efforts to model in the laboratory the process of diffusive shock acceleration are also discussed, with an emphasis on the potential of laboratory experiments to further our understanding of plasma physics on cosmic scales.

  14. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-01

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ˜10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ˜1015 W/cm2. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ˜107 V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ˜3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇Te × ∇ne source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  15. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  16. Condensation of the air-steam mixture in a vertical tube condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlík, Jan; Dlouhý, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable air. Experimental and theoretical solutions of this problem are presented here. A heat exchanger for the condensation of industrial waste steam containing infiltrated air was designed. The condenser consists of a bundle of vertical tubes in which the steam condenses as it flows downwards with cooling water flowing outside the tubes in the opposite direction. Experiments with pure steam and with mixtures of steam with added air were carried out to find the dependence of the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC) on the air concentration in the steam mixture. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical formulas describing the cases. The theoretical determination of the HTC is based on the Nusselt model of steam condensation on a vertical wall, where the analogy of heat and mass transfer is used to take into account the behaviour of air in a steam mixture during the condensation process. The resulting dependencies obtained from the experiments and obtained from the theoretical model have similar results. The significant decrease in the condensation HTC, which begins at very low air concentrations in a steam mixture, was confirmed.

  17. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  18. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of

  19. Characterisation of heat transfer and pressure drop in condensation processes within mini-channel tubes with last generation of refrigerant fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Belchi, D. Alejandro

    Heat exchanger developments are driven by energetic efficiency increase and emissionreduction. To reach the standards new system are required based on mini-channels. Mini-channels can be described as tubes with one or more ports extruded in aluminiumwith hydraulic diameter are in the range of 0.2 to 3 mm. Its use in refrigeration systemsfor some years ago is a reality thanks to the human ability to made micro-scale systems.Some heat exchanger enterprises have some models developed specially for their use inautomotive sector, cooling sector, and industrial refrigeration without having a deepknowledge of how these reduced geometries affect the most important parameters suchas pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient. To respond to this objective, an exhaustive literature review of the last two decades hasbeen performed to determinate the state of the research. Between all the publications,several models have been selected to check the predicting capacities of them becausemost of them were developed for single port mini-channel tubes. Experimentalmeasurements of heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop were recorded inan experimental installation built on purpose at the Technical University of Cartagena.Multiple variables are recorded in this installation in order to calculate local heattransfer coefficient in two-phase condensing flow within mini-channels. Both pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient experimental measurements arecompared to the previously mentioned models. Most of them capture the trend correctlybut others fail predicting experimental data. These differences can be explained by theexperimental parameters considered during the models development. In some cases themodels found in the literature were developed specific conditions, consequently theirpredicting capacities are restricted. As main contributions, this thesis provides new modelling tools for mini-channelscondensing pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient

  20. A high impedance mega-ampere generator for fiber z-pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, I. H.; Bayley, J. M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Worley, J. F.; Dangor, A. E.; Haines, M. G.; Choi, P.

    1996-04-01

    At Imperial College a mega-ampere generator for plasma implosion experiments has been designed, built, and commissioned. With a final line impedance of 1.25 Ω this terawatt class generator has been designed primarily to drive a maximum current of 1.8 MA with a rise time of 150 ns into high inductance z-pinch loads of interest to radiative collapse studies. This article describes the design and tests of the generator which has a novel configuration of lines and a new design of a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). In summary, the generator consists of four Marx generators each of the Hermes III type (2.4 MV, 84 kJ), each connected to 5 Ω pulse forming lines and trigatron gas switches. The power is fed into the matched 1.25 Ω vertical transfer line which feeds a diode stack and a short conical MITL in vacuum which concentrates the power into the z-pinch load. At 80% charge a current rising to 1.4 MA in 150 ns has been measured in a 15 nH inductive short. Similar results are obtained when using a plasma load.

  1. Recent progress in experiment and performance evalution of Chinese 25MWt coal-fired MHD generators

    SciTech Connect

    Jianzhong Tong; Qiuya Ni

    1995-12-31

    Recent experimental results of Chinese 25 MWt coal-fired MHD generator are presented here. The peak power output has reached up to 119.7 kW and the continuous generating duration has been one hour. It is shown that a better performance is resulted by the improvements of the generator channel structure to a great extent, in particular, the utilization of the ceramic-capped elements. The discrepancy between the experiment and the design calculation in gasdynamics is indicated and its possible reasons are discussed. The plasma conductivity deduced based on experimental data is still lower than the predicted one, and so is the total Hall voltage across the channel longitudinally. The low conductivity could be caused by the excess slag carryover through the channel and the incompleteness of the combustion. And, the low longitudinal Hall voltage could be considered due to the unsatisfactory axial insulation. No effects of axial leakage of the cathode wall has been observed yet. Also, though the reliable operation of the hardware has been proved, a further investigation and relevant approaches for getting a steady power generation should be needed, which would depend upon the stability of the coal feeding as well as the combustion mainly. In summary, the further enhancement of the performance of this generator channel seems to be possible if the described problems above could be resolved.

  2. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condensate system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-29

    Preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Condensate System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides a collection point for condensate generated by the W-030 primary vent offgas cooling system serving tanks AYIOI, AY102, AZIOI, AZI02. The system is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell and consists of a condensate seal pot, sampling features, a drain line to existing Catch Tank 241-AZ-151, and a cell sump jet pump. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  3. Condensate polishers add operating reliability and flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, C.M.; Bennett, L.L.

    2008-08-15

    Many of today's advanced steam generators favour either an all-volatile treatment or oxygenated treatment chemistry programme, both of which require strict maintenance of an ultra-pure boiler fedwater ro condensate system. Those requirements are many times at odds with the lower-quality water sources, such as greywater, available for plant makeup and cooling water. Adding a condensate polisher can be a simple, cost-effective solution. 4 figs.

  4. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin; Liu Yanming

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Learning a generative probabilistic grammar of experience: a process-level model of language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Kolodny, Oren; Lotem, Arnon; Edelman, Shimon

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a set of biologically and computationally motivated design choices for modeling the learning of language, or of other types of sequential, hierarchically structured experience and behavior, and describe an implemented system that conforms to these choices and is capable of unsupervised learning from raw natural-language corpora. Given a stream of linguistic input, our model incrementally learns a grammar that captures its statistical patterns, which can then be used to parse or generate new data. The grammar constructed in this manner takes the form of a directed weighted graph, whose nodes are recursively (hierarchically) defined patterns over the elements of the input stream. We evaluated the model in seventeen experiments, grouped into five studies, which examined, respectively, (a) the generative ability of grammar learned from a corpus of natural language, (b) the characteristics of the learned representation, (c) sequence segmentation and chunking, (d) artificial grammar learning, and (e) certain types of structure dependence. The model's performance largely vindicates our design choices, suggesting that progress in modeling language acquisition can be made on a broad front-ranging from issues of generativity to the replication of human experimental findings-by bringing biological and computational considerations, as well as lessons from prior efforts, to bear on the modeling approach.

  6. Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenberger, John; Arnott, James; Wright, Alyson

    2014-10-30

    The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, “Next generation climate change experiments needed to advance knowledge and for assessment of CMIP6,” on August 4-9, 2013 in Aspen, CO. Jerry Meehl (NCAR), Richard Moss (PNNL), and Karl Taylor (LLNL) served as co-chairs for the workshop which included the participation of 32 scientists representing most of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 160 participant days. In August 2013, AGCI gathered a high level meeting of representatives from major climate modeling centers around the world to assess achievements and lessons learned from the most recent generation of coordinated modeling experiments known as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project – 5 (CMIP5) as well as to scope out the science questions and coordination structure desired for the next anticipated phase of modeling experiments called CMIP6. The workshop allowed for reflection on the coordination of the CMIP5 process as well as intercomparison of model results, such as were assessed in the most recent IPCC 5th Assessment Report, Working Group 1. For example, this slide from Masahiro Watanabe examines performance on a range of models capturing Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).

  7. Optical Spectroscopy Experiments on the 500 kA XP Pulsed-Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Blesener, I. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.; Greenly, J. B.; Maron, Y.

    2009-01-21

    Recent experiments on the 500 kA XP pulsed-power generator at Cornell University have explored the properties of optical spectra in single wires and wire arrays. In the single wire experiments, {approx}1% of the current from XP has been directed through the single wire. Spectra have been recorded using a half-meter spectrometer and a CCD camera located adjacent to the XP pulser. We are studying the visible spectra emitted by the wires and the background light from the machine hardware in order to identify the levels of current per wire for which visible spectroscopy might provide a means to measure magnetic field strength. We have also investigated the dependence of single wire visible spectra on the current, which was measured using a calibrated non-integrating Rogowski coil. UV and XUV diodes were employed to gather information about the temporal structure of the background and wire radiation. The line radiation in the spectra was recorded with wire currents at the few kA level. This is comparable to the first 10 ns of a 32-wire array experiment on 1 Ma generator and a 600-wire array at 20 MA.

  8. Direct containment heating and aerosol generation during high pressure melt ejection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Washington, K.E.; Pilch, M.; Marx, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    Containment loading in the form of increased atmosphere pressure and temperature during a severe reactor accident can result from the expulsion of core debris from the reactor cavity. This increase in the pressure and temperature can be accompanied by an aerosol source term that may have enhanced compositions of the more volatile radionuclide. Large scale experiments have been conducted in the Surtsey facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study the energy exchange processes and the generation of aerosols. Test results are reported here and compared to analytical predictions made by an experiment analysis code and a containment response model. The experiments show that the energy exchange and aerosol generation processes are greatly affected by trapping of the debris on the surfaces of the test chamber. Good agreement is achieved between experimental data and model predictions by incorporating models for debris trapping on surfaces and the formation of the retained material into drops that fall through the chamber at late time. 23 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. GAS-GENERATION EXPERIMENTS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE OF TRU WASTES AT WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F.S.; Carney, K.P.; Dwight, C.C.; Cummings, D.G.; Foulkrod, L.E.

    2003-02-27

    An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH-TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750-ml headspace was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure expected in the repository were it inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30 C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generate d by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6-1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. One vessel measured over 4.2% hydrogen, by volume. Two other vessels generated well over 1% hydrogen, and another was at nearly 1%. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in tests containing carbon steel. Average corrosion penetration rates in carbon-steel of up to 2.3 microns per year were deduced. Conversion of

  10. Orbital diamagnetic susceptibility in excitonic condensation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Koudai; Ohta, Yukinori

    2016-08-01

    We study the orbital diamagnetic susceptibility in excitonic condensation phase using the mean-field approximation for a two-band model defined on a square lattice. We find that, in semiconductors, the excitonic condensation acquires a finite diamagnetic susceptibility due to spontaneous hybridization between the valence and the conduction bands, whereas in semimetals, the diamagnetic susceptibility in the normal phase is suppressed by the excitonic condensation. We also study the orbital diamagnetic and Pauli paramagnetic susceptibilities of Ta2NiSe5 using a two-dimensional three-band model and find that the calculated temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  11. Shear Wave Generation and Modeling Ground Motion From a Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Underground Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, Arben; Mellors, Robert; Rodgers, Arthur; Vorobiev, Oleg; Ezzedine, Souheil; Matzel, Eric; Ford, Sean; Walter, Bill; Antoun, Tarabay; Wagoner, Jeffery; Pasyanos, Mike; Petersson, Anders; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the excitation and propagation of far-field (epicentral distance larger than 20 m) seismic waves by analyzing and modeling ground motion from an underground chemical explosion recorded during the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), Nevada. The far-field recorded ground motion is characterized by complex features, such as large azimuthal variations in P- and S-wave amplitudes, as well as substantial energy on the tangential component of motion. Shear wave energy is also observed on the tangential component of the near-field motion (epicentral distance smaller than 20 m) suggesting that shear waves were generated at or very near the source. These features become more pronounced as the waves propagate away from the source. We address the shear wave generation during the explosion by modeling ground motion waveforms recorded in the frequency range 0.01-20 Hz, at distances of up to 1 km. We used a physics based approach that combines hydrodynamic modeling of the source with anelastic modeling of wave propagation in order to separate the contributions from the source and near-source wave scattering on shear motion generation. We found that wave propagation scattering caused by the near-source geological environment, including surface topography, contributes to enhancement of shear waves generated from the explosion source. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25946/ NST11-NCNS-TM-EXP-PD15.

  12. Preliminary experiments on the noise generated by target-type thrust reverser models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, O. A.; Stone, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments are reported on the noise generated by model V-gutter and semicylindrical target-type reversers with circular nozzles. Nozzles were 5.24 and 7.78 cm in diameter. Nozzle pressure ratio ranged from 1.25 to 1.72. The spacing between reversers and nozzle, as well as the reverser orientation, was also varied. More noise was generated with reversers than with the nozzle alone. The measured maximum overall sound pressure level varied with the sixth power of the nozzle exit velocity. Noise levels were more uniform in regard to directivity with reversers than with the nozzle alone. It is concluded that thrust reversers, can be a significant noise problem, especially for STOL aircraft using thrust reversers during approach.

  13. Self-generated magnetic fields in blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaig, Markus; Plewa, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    We study the effect of self-generated magnetic fields in two-dimensional computer models of blast-wave driven high-energy density Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) experiments. Previous works [1,2] suggested that such fields have the potential to influence the RTI morphology and mixing. When neglecting the friction force between electrons and ions, we do indeed find that dynamically important (β≲103) magnetic fields are generated. However, in the more realistic case where the friction force is accounted for, the resulting fields are much weaker, β≳105 , and can no longer influence the dynamics of the system. Although we find no evidence for dynamically important magnetic fields being created in the two-dimensional case studied here, the situation might be different in a three-dimensional setup, which will be addressed in a future study.

  14. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  15. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.; Nadezhkin, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Experiment was carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanik Horizon taken from boreholes drilled in the northeastern part of the south Tatar arch. The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed at laboratory modeling of HC generation in an undisturbed rock sample by its heating in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 μm). A cylinder, 44 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300°C - discharge of free and adsorbed HC and water; (3) 300-400°C - initial stage of HC formation owing to high-temperature pyrolysis of the solid organic matter and discharge of the chemically bound water; (4) 400-470°C - temperature interval fitting the most intense stage of HC formation; (5) 470-510°C - final stage of HC formation. Maximum sample heating in the experiment was determined as temperature of the onset of active decomposition of carbonates, i.e., in essence, irreversible metamorphism of the rock. Additional

  16. Wire array experiments in a low impedance and low current generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrini, Nibaldo; Pavez, Cristian; Avaria, Gonzalo; San Martin, Patricio; Veloso, Felipe; Zúñiga, Barbara; Sepúlveda, Adolfo; Soto, Leopoldo

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a preliminary study about the behavior of a low impedance generator on different wire array configurations is reported. The experimental measurements were carried out on a small multi-purpose generator (1.2μF, 345J, 47.5nH, T/4 = 375 ns and Z = 0.2Ω in short circuit) which produces currents up to 122 kA with 500 ns quarter period, when a charging voltage of 24kV and a wire load are used. Two types of configurations were tested: parallel wires (two and four) and X-pinch configurations. The experiments were carried out on W, Al, and Cu wires with different diameters. The discharge was characterized by means of a set of diagnostics which included: Rogowski coil; filtered PCD detector; filtered PIN diode; gated VUV/soft X-ray pinhole camera, Shadow diagnostic and dark field Schlieren technique. From the set of experimental results, the following observations can be established: (i) The generator is highly sensitive to the changes of load impedance due to its low impedance design. (ii) Every shot shows a dip in the current derivative signal shortly after the discharge onset time (from 6 to 40 ns), which is inversely related to the load resistance. (iii) Both configurations show a similar dynamic to those observed in experiments of higher current and shorter quarter period. (iv) At the X-pinch experiments, two or more hard X-ray bursts are detected, around 200 ns from the current onset time. These X-ray bursts are correlated with the dips observed in the current derivative signal.

  17. Experiment and simulations of sub-ps electron bunch train generation at Fermilab photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Church, M.; Piot, P.; Prokop, C.R.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-10-01

    Recently the generation of electron bunch trains with sub-picosecond time structure has been experimentally demonstrated at the A0 photoinjector of Fermilab using a transverse-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. The temporal profile of the bunch train can be easily tuned to meet the requirements of the applications of modern accelerator beams. In this paper we report the A0 bunch-train experiment and explore numerically the possible extension of this technique to shorter time scales at the Fermilab SRF Accelerator Test Facility, a superconducting linear electron accelerator currently under construction in the NML building.

  18. Magnetic field measurements of a superconducting undulator for a Harmonic Generation FEL experiment at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, L.; Ingold, G.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.; Sampson, W.; Robins, K.

    1993-07-01

    An 18mm period, 0.54 Tesla, 8mm gap superconducting undulator with both horizontal and vertical focusing has been built and tested. This magnet, which is fabricated in 25 cm length sections, is being tested for use in the radiator section (total magnet length of 1.5 m) of the Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser experiment at the National Synchrotron Light Source - Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab., in collaboration with Grumman Corp. The measurement system is outlined, sources and estimates of errors are described, and some magnetic field data are presented and discussed.

  19. A superconducting short period undulator for a harmonic generation FEL experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Solomon, L.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Li, D.; Lynch, D.; Sheehan, J.; Woodle, M.; Qiu, X.Z.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Sampson, W.; Gardner, M.; Robins, K.; Lehrman, I.; Heuer, R.; Sheehan, J.; Weissenburger, D.

    1993-07-01

    A three stage superconducting (SC) undulator for a high gain harmonic generation (HGE) FEL experiment in the infrared is under construction at the NSLS in collaboration with Grumman Corporation. A novel undulator technology suitable for short period (6--40mm) undulators will be employed for all three stages, the modulator, the dispersive section and the radiator. The undulator triples the frequency of a 10.4{mu}m CO{sub 2} seed laser. So far a 27 period (one third of the final radiator) prototype radiator has been designed, built and tested.

  20. A superconducting short period undulator for a harmonic generation FEL experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Solomon, L.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Li, D.; Lynch, D.; Sheehan, J.; Woodle, M.; Qiu, X.Z.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Sampson, W.; Gardner, M.; Robins, K. ); Lehrman, I.; Heuer, R.; Sheehan, J.; Weissenburger, D. )

    1993-01-01

    A three stage superconducting (SC) undulator for a high gain harmonic generation (HGE) FEL experiment in the infrared is under construction at the NSLS in collaboration with Grumman Corporation. A novel undulator technology suitable for short period (6--40mm) undulators will be employed for all three stages, the modulator, the dispersive section and the radiator. The undulator triples the frequency of a 10.4[mu]m CO[sub 2] seed laser. So far a 27 period (one third of the final radiator) prototype radiator has been designed, built and tested.

  1. Rainfall simulation experiments with a small portable rainfall simulator: research on runoff generation and soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserloh, Thomas; Peter, Klaus Daniel; Fister, Wolfgang; Wirtz, Stefan; Butzen, Verena; Brings, Christine; Marzen, Miriam; Casper, Markus C.; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2015-04-01

    The results of more than 500 rainfall simulations with a small portable rainfall simulator at various locations in West and North Africa and South and Central Europe will be presented. The analysis of this comprehensive database offers results concerning different research objectives: - erodibility of local soils regarding different vegetation cover, stone cover and land uses - runoff generation in gully catchments - process oriented experiments on the influence of sealing and crusting - trail erosion caused by goat- or sheep-trampling - recent erosion on geomorphological forms Runoff coefficients range from 0 to 100 % and eroded material from 0 to 500 g m^-2 during 30 min experiments with a rainfall intensity of 40 mm h^-1.

  2. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N. Burdiak, G. C.; Suttle, L.; Stuart, N. H.; Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Smith, R. A.; Patankar, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Grouchy, P. de; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; Skidmore, J.

    2014-11-15

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  3. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Burdiak, G C; Suttle, L; Stuart, N H; Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Smith, R A; Patankar, S; Suzuki-Vidal, F; de Grouchy, P; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Bennett, M; Bland, S N; Pickworth, L; Skidmore, J

    2014-11-01

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  4. Probing the excitation spectrum of polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, Michiel; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2009-03-15

    We propose a four-wave mixing experiment to probe the elementary excitation spectrum of a nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton-polaritons under nonresonant pumping. Analytical calculations based on mean-field theory show that this method is able to reveal the characteristic negative energy feature of the Bogoliubov dispersion. Numerical simulations including the finite spatial profile of the excitation laser spot and a weak disorder confirm the practical utility of the method for realistic condensates.

  5. Dynamic simulation recalls condensate piping event

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, R.J.; Reneberg, K.O. ); Moy, H.C. )

    1994-05-01

    This article describes how experience gained from simulating and reconstructing a condensate piping event will be used by Consolidated Edison to analyze control system problems. A cooperative effort by Con Edison and the Chemical Engineering Department at Polytechnic University used modular modeling system to investigate the probable cause of a Con Edison condensate piping event. Con Edison commissioned the work to serve as a case study for the more general problem of control systems analysis using dynamic simulation and MMS.

  6. HT to HTO conversion and field experiments near Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Stuart, M; Bredlaw, M; Festarini, A; Beaton, D

    2014-06-01

    The Canadian input parameters related to tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) used in tritium dose models are currently based on experiments performed at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in 1986, 1987 and 1994. There is uncertainty in how well other sites experiencing atmospheric HT releases are represented by these data. In order to address this uncertainty, HT to HTO conversion factors were evaluated at different locations near the Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site using various experimental approaches. These were D2 gas exposure chamber experiments, atmospheric tritium measurements, and HTO and OBT measurements in vegetation and soil. In addition to these field experiments, chamber experiments were conducted using HT gas on field soil samples. The suggested Canadian input parameters for atmospheric tritium releases estimate the total fraction of HT oxidized in air and in soil, at the site, to be up to a maximum of 2.4%. Based on the more limited data obtained near DNPGS in early spring, this fraction would likely be closer to 0.5%. The result suggests that current parameters provide a conservative estimate for the DNPGS site.

  7. Molten salt steam generator subsystem research experiment. Volume I. Phase 1 - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    A study was conducted for Phase 1 of a two-phase project whose objectives were to develop a reliable, cost-effective molten salt steam generating subsystem for solar thermal plants, minimize uncertainty in capital, operating, and maintenance costs, and demonstrate the ability of molten salt to generate high-pressure, high-temperature steam. The Phase 1 study involved the conceptual design of molten salt steam generating subsystems for a nominal 100-MWe net stand-alone solar central receiver electric generating plant, and a nominal 100-MWe net hybrid fossil-fueled electric power generating plant that is 50% repowered by a solar central receiver system. As part of Phase 1, a proposal was prepared for Phase 2, which involves the design, construction, testing and evaluation of a Subsystem Research Experiment of sufficient size to ensure successful operation of the full-size subsystem designed in Phase 1. Evaluation of several concepts resulted in the selection of a four-component (preheater, evaporator, superheater, reheater), natural circulation, vertically oriented, shell and tube (straight) heat exchanger arrangement. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the system included full and part load performance, circulation requirements, stability, and critical heat flux analysis. Flow-induced tube vibration, tube buckling, fatigue evaluation of tubesheet junctions, steady-state tubesheet analysis, and a simplified transient analysis were included in the structural analysis of the system. Operating modes and system dynamic response to load changes were identified. Auxiliary equipment, fabrication, erection, and maintenance requirements were also defined. Installed capital costs and a project schedule were prepared for each design.

  8. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  9. Pulsed-neutron techniques for condensed-matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Price, D.L.; Kamitakahara, W.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources are reviewed in a historical content as the latest generation of neutron sources in a line that started with the discovery of the neutron in 1932 and proceeded through research-reactor and accelerator-driven sources. The characteristics of the spallation sources are discussed in relation to their capabilities for structural and dynamical studies of condensed matter with slow neutrons and radiation effects research with fast neutrons. The new scientific opportunities opened up in these fields by the unique features of the sources are briefly reviewed, with some examples of completed work and experiments being planned.

  10. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  11. Dynamics of adaptation and diversification: a 10,000-generation experiment with bacterial populations.

    PubMed Central

    Lenski, R E; Travisano, M

    1994-01-01

    We followed evolutionary change in 12 populations of Escherichia coli propagated for 10,000 generations in identical environments. Both morphology (cell size) and fitness (measured in competition with the ancestor) evolved rapidly for the first 2000 generations or so after the populations were introduced into the experimental environment, but both were nearly static for the last 5000 generations. Although evolving in identical environments, the replicate populations diverged significantly from one another in both morphology and mean fitness. The divergence in mean fitness was sustained and implies that the populations have approached different fitness peaks of unequal height in the adaptive landscape. Although the experimental time scale and environment were microevolutionary in scope, our experiments were designed to address questions concerning the origin as well as the fate of genetic and phenotypic novelties, the repeatability of adaptation, the diversification of lineages, and thus the causes and consequences of the uniqueness of evolutionary history. In fact, we observed several hallmarks of macroevolutionary dynamics, including periods of rapid evolution and stasis, altered functional relationships between traits, and concordance of anagenetic and cladogenetic trends. Our results support a Wrightian interpretation, in which chance events (mutation and drift) play an important role in adaptive evolution, as do the complex genetic interactions that underlie the structure of organisms. PMID:8041701

  12. CODEX: a next-generation sequencing experiment database for the haematopoietic and embryonic stem cell communities.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castillo, Manuel; Ruau, David; Wilkinson, Adam C; Ng, Felicia S L; Hannah, Rebecca; Diamanti, Evangelia; Lombard, Patrick; Wilson, Nicola K; Gottgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    CODEX (http://codex.stemcells.cam.ac.uk/) is a user-friendly database for the direct access and interrogation of publicly available next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, specifically aimed at experimental biologists. In an era of multi-centre genomic dataset generation, CODEX provides a single database where these samples are collected, uniformly processed and vetted. The main drive of CODEX is to provide the wider scientific community with instant access to high-quality NGS data, which, irrespective of the publishing laboratory, is directly comparable. CODEX allows users to immediately visualize or download processed datasets, or compare user-generated data against the database's cumulative knowledge-base. CODEX contains four types of NGS experiments: transcription factor chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), histone modification ChIP-Seq, DNase-Seq and RNA-Seq. These are largely encompassed within two specialized repositories, HAEMCODE and ESCODE, which are focused on haematopoiesis and embryonic stem cell samples, respectively. To date, CODEX contains over 1000 samples, including 221 unique TFs and 93 unique cell types. CODEX therefore provides one of the most complete resources of publicly available NGS data for the direct interrogation of transcriptional programmes that regulate cellular identity and fate in the context of mammalian development, homeostasis and disease.

  13. Analyses of internal tides generation and propagation over a Gaussian ridge in laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossmann, Yvan; Paci, Alexandre; Auclair, Francis; Floor, Jochem

    2010-05-01

    Internal tides are suggested to play a major role in the sustaining of the global oceanic circulation [1][5]. Although the exact origin of the energy conversions occurring in stratified fluids is questioned [2], it is clear that the diapycnal energy transfers provided by the energy cascade of internal gravity waves generated at tidal frequencies in regions of steep bathymetry is strongly linked to the general circulation energy balance. Therefore a precise quantification of the energy supply by internal waves is a crucial step in forecasting climate, since it improves our understanding of the underlying physical processes. We focus on an academic case of internal waves generated over an oceanic ridge in a linearly stratified fluid. In order to accurately quantify the diapycnal energy transfers caused by internal waves dynamics, we adopt a complementary approach involving both laboratory and numerical experiments. The laboratory experiments are conducted in a 4m long tank of the CNRM-GAME fluid mechanics laboratory, well known for its large stratified water flume (e.g. Knigge et al [3]). The horizontal oscillation at precisely controlled frequency of a Gaussian ridge immersed in a linearly stratified fluid generates internal gravity waves. The ridge of e-folding width 3.6 cm is 10 cm high and spans 50 cm. We use PIV and Synthetic Schlieren measurement techniques, to retrieve the high resolution velocity and stratification anomaly fields in the 2D vertical plane across the ridge. These experiments allow us to get access to real and exhaustive measurements of a wide range of internal waves regimes by varying the precisely controlled experimental parameters. To complete this work, we carry out some direct numerical simulations with the same parameters (forcing amplitude and frequency, initial stratification, boundary conditions) as the laboratory experiments. The model used is a non-hydrostatic version of the numerical model Symphonie [4]. Our purpose is not only to

  14. Hydroclast and Peperite generation: Experimental Results produced using the Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, W. S.; Mastin, L. G.; Spieler, O.; Kunzmann, T.; Shaw, C. S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment (SMILE) allows for the effusive and explosive injection of molten glass into a variety of media - air, water, water spray, and wet sediments. Experiments have been preformed using the SMILE apparatus to evaluate the mechanisms of "turbulent shedding" during shallow submarine volcanic eruptions and magma/wet-sediment interactions. In these experiments, approximately 0.5 kg of basaltic melt with 5 wt.% Spectromelt (dilithium tetraborate) is produced in an internally heated autoclave at 1150° C and ambient pressure. The molten charge is ejected via the bursting of a rupture disc at 3.5 MPa into the reaction media, situated within the low pressure tank (atmospheric conditions). Preliminary experiments ejecting melt into a standing water column have yielded hydroclasts of basalt. SEM images of the clasts show ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in strips. Adhering to the clast surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material, up to 10 μm in size. The presence of partially detached rinds and rind debris likely reflects repeated bending, scraping, impact, and other disruption through turbulent velocity fluctuations. These textures are comparable to littoral explosive deposits at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where lava tubes are torn apart by wave action, the lava is quenched, and thrown back on the beach as loose fragments (hyaloclastite). Preliminary experiments injecting melt into wet sediments show evidence of sediment ingestion and fluidal textures. These results support the interpretation that peperite generation can be driven by hydrodynamic mixing of a fuel and a coolant.

  15. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  16. The Mirrortron experiment: A proof of principle test for a method of generating high transient potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, S.R.

    1993-09-01

    The Mirrortron is a concept in which heavy ions are accelerated by a large local transient space potential that is produced in a hot electron plasma. The purpose of this experiment is to begin a proof of principle experiment to investigate the feasibility of producing this space potential and its associated electric field. If a large magnetic field is suddenly generated in a hot electron plasma with a loss-cone distribution, then potentials on the order of the electron temperature are expected. This potential lasts a few tens of nanoseconds. The investigation begins with a theoretical analysis of this phenomenon giving the space potential as a function of the applied magnetic field. The theory is further extended to cases of relativistic electron distributions. This is then followed by design work on a mirror confinement system for hot electrons. In this experiment a 50--100 keV electron temperature plasma is created with electron cyclotron resonance heating using two frequencies of relatively low microwave power. The microwaves are coupled to resonant frequencies of the vacuum chamber. The volume averaged plasma density is measured to be in the 10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}3} range. A strap coil and a flat Blumlein transmission line pulse generator were developed to produce a 150 gauss field within 70 ns. The strap coil was placed at the midplane of the mirror field, where the field is 700 gauss. Based on theoretical estimates and computer simulations a 20 kV potential is expected. Measurement of this potential is derived from the modulation of the current of a monoenergetic electron beam after it passes through the high potential region. The variation in the beam energy allows bunching to occur in transit to the detector.

  17. Collisional Dynamics of Half-Quantum Vortices in a Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Won; Kwon, Woo Jin; Kang, Seji; Shin, Y

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental study on the interaction and dynamics of half-quantum vortices (HQVs) in an antiferromagnetic spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. By exploiting the orbit motion of a vortex dipole in a trapped condensate, we perform a collision experiment of two HQV pairs, and observe that the scattering motions of the HQVs is consistent with the short-range vortex interaction that arises from nonsingular magnetized vortex cores. We also investigate the relaxation dynamics of turbulent condensates containing many HQVs, and demonstrate that spin wave excitations are generated by the collisional motions of the HQVs. The short-range vortex interaction and the HQV-magnon coupling represent two characteristics of the HQV dynamics in the spinor superfluid. PMID:27203331

  18. Collisional Dynamics of Half-Quantum Vortices in a Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Sang Won; Kwon, Woo Jin; Kang, Seji; Shin, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental study on the interaction and dynamics of half-quantum vortices (HQVs) in an antiferromagnetic spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. By exploiting the orbit motion of a vortex dipole in a trapped condensate, we perform a collision experiment of two HQV pairs, and observe that the scattering motions of the HQVs is consistent with the short-range vortex interaction that arises from nonsingular magnetized vortex cores. We also investigate the relaxation dynamics of turbulent condensates containing many HQVs, and demonstrate that spin wave excitations are generated by the collisional motions of the HQVs. The short-range vortex interaction and the HQV-magnon coupling represent two characteristics of the HQV dynamics in the spinor superfluid.

  19. Collisional Dynamics of Half-Quantum Vortices in a Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Won; Kwon, Woo Jin; Kang, Seji; Shin, Y

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental study on the interaction and dynamics of half-quantum vortices (HQVs) in an antiferromagnetic spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. By exploiting the orbit motion of a vortex dipole in a trapped condensate, we perform a collision experiment of two HQV pairs, and observe that the scattering motions of the HQVs is consistent with the short-range vortex interaction that arises from nonsingular magnetized vortex cores. We also investigate the relaxation dynamics of turbulent condensates containing many HQVs, and demonstrate that spin wave excitations are generated by the collisional motions of the HQVs. The short-range vortex interaction and the HQV-magnon coupling represent two characteristics of the HQV dynamics in the spinor superfluid.

  20. Factors affecting the pore space transformation during hydrocarbon generation in source rock (shales): laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Oil and gas generation is a set of processes which taking place in the interior, the processes can't be observable in nature. In the process of dumping the source rock, organic matter is transformed into a complex of high-molecular compounds - precursors of oil and gas (kerogen). Entering of a source column for specific thermobaric conditions, triggers the formation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds. Generation of sufficient quantities of hydrocarbons leads to the primary fluid migration within the source rock. For the experiment were selected mainly siliceous-carbonate composition rocks from Domanic horizon South-Tatar arch. The main aim of experiment was heating the rocks in the pyrolyzer to temperatures which correspond katagenes stages. For monitoring changes in the morphology of the pore space X-ray microtomography method was used. As a result, when was made a study of the composition of mineral and organic content of the rocks, as well as textural and structural features, have been identified that the majority of the rock samples within the selected collection are identical. However, characteristics such as organic content and texture of rocks are different. Thus, the experiment was divided into two parts: 1) the study of the influence of organic matter content on the morphology of the rock in the process of thermal effects; 2) study the effect of texture on the primary migration processes for the same values of organic matter. Also, an additional experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of changes in the structure of the pore space. At each stage of the experiment morphology of altered rocks characterized by the formation of new pores and channels connecting the primary voids. However, it was noted that the samples with a relatively low content of the organic matter had less changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks with a high organic content. At the second stage of the research also revealed that the conversion of the pore

  1. New Planar Wire Array Experiments on the LTD Generator at U Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, M. E.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Cooper, M. C.; Lorance, M. Y.; Stafford, A.; Petkov, E. E.; Jordan, N. M.; Patel, S. G.; Steiner, A. M.; Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments on planar wire array z-pinches have been carried out on the MAIZE Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) generator at the University of Michigan (UM) for the first time. Specifically, Al (Al 5056, 95% Al, 5% Mg) double planar wire arrays (DPWAs) comprising six wires in each plane with interplanar gaps of 3.0 mm and 6.0 mm and interwire gaps of 0.7 mm and 1.0 mm were imploded with x-ray time-integrated spectra indicating electron temperatures of over 450 eV for K-shell Al and Mg, while producing mostly optically thin lines. In addition to x-ray time-integrated spectra, the diagnostics included x-ray time-integrated pinhole cameras, two silicon diodes, and shadowgraphy, which are analyzed and compared. The MAIZE LTD is capable of supplying up 1.0 MA, 100 kV pulses with 100 ns rise time into a matched load. However, for these experiments the LTD was charged to +-70 kV resulting in up to 0.5 MA with a current rise time of approximately 150 ns. Future experiments and the importance of studying planar wire arrays on LTD devices are discussed. This work supported by NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984. S. Patel & A. Steiner supported by Sandia. D. Yager-Elorriaga supported by NSF GF.

  2. Seismic evaluation of a diesel generator system at the Savannah River Site using earthquake experience data

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.J.; Tong, Wen H.; Rawls, G.B.

    1990-12-31

    New equipment and systems have been seismically qualified traditionally by either two methods, testing or analysis. Testing programs are generally expensive and their input loadings are conservative. It is generally recognized that standard seismic analysis techniques produce conservative results. Seismic loads and response levels for equipment that are typically calculated exceed the values actually experienced in earthquakes. An alternate method for demonstrating the seismic adequacy of equipment has been developed which is based on conclusions derived from studying the performance of equipment that has been subjected to actual earthquake excitations. The conclusion reached from earthquake experience data is that damage or malfunction to most types of equipment subjected to earthquakes is less than that predicted by traditional testing and analysis techniques. The use of conclusions derived from experience data provides a realistic approach in assessing the seismic ruggedness of equipment. By recognizing the inherently higher capacity that exists in specific classes of equipment, commercial ``off-the-shelf`` equipment can be procured and qualified without the need to perform expensive modifications to meet requirements imposed by traditional conservative qualification analyses. This paper will present the seismic experience data methodology applied to demonstrate the seismic adequacy of several commercially supplied 800KW diesel powered engine driven generator sets with peripheral support components installed at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  3. Seismic evaluation of a diesel generator system at the Savannah River Site using earthquake experience data

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.J.; Tong, Wen H. ); Rawls, G.B. )

    1990-01-01

    New equipment and systems have been seismically qualified traditionally by either two methods, testing or analysis. Testing programs are generally expensive and their input loadings are conservative. It is generally recognized that standard seismic analysis techniques produce conservative results. Seismic loads and response levels for equipment that are typically calculated exceed the values actually experienced in earthquakes. An alternate method for demonstrating the seismic adequacy of equipment has been developed which is based on conclusions derived from studying the performance of equipment that has been subjected to actual earthquake excitations. The conclusion reached from earthquake experience data is that damage or malfunction to most types of equipment subjected to earthquakes is less than that predicted by traditional testing and analysis techniques. The use of conclusions derived from experience data provides a realistic approach in assessing the seismic ruggedness of equipment. By recognizing the inherently higher capacity that exists in specific classes of equipment, commercial off-the-shelf'' equipment can be procured and qualified without the need to perform expensive modifications to meet requirements imposed by traditional conservative qualification analyses. This paper will present the seismic experience data methodology applied to demonstrate the seismic adequacy of several commercially supplied 800KW diesel powered engine driven generator sets with peripheral support components installed at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  4. Guiding the Next Generation of Forest FACE Experiments with Lessons from the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, Richard

    2016-04-01

    respond to future CO2 concentrations. The FACE model-data synthesis (FACE-MDS) project challenged 11 terrestrial ecosystem models with data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory FACE experiment in Tennessee, USA, and Duke FACE in North Carolina, USA. This exercise was valuable in identifying critical model assumptions and evaluating whether the assumptions were supported by the experimental data, and it provided a framework to evaluate forest processes that occur over much longer time frames than the duration of the experiments. The next generation of forest FACE experiments will greatly expand the breadth of our knowledge base on responses to elevated CO2 by investigating responses of mature forest ecosystems in boreal to tropical biomes over a wide range of climatic and edaphic conditions. Our experience with the FACE-MDS has shown the value in initiating the model-data interaction as an integral part of experimental design. The FACE-MDS framework has led to a set of model-guided, cross-site science questions for new FACE experiments, including responses of mature forests; interactions with temperature, water stress, and phosphorus limitation; and the influence of biodiversity. This sets an exciting research agenda for the next decade.

  5. Sedimentary condensation and authigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föllmi, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Most marine authigenic minerals form in sediments, which are subjected to condensation. Condensation processes lead to the formation of well individualized, extremely thin (< 1m) beds, which were accumulated during extremely long time periods (> 100ky), and which experienced authigenesis and the precipitation of glaucony, verdine, phosphate, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides, iron sulfide, carbonate and/or silica. They usually show complex internal stratigraphies, which result from an interplay of sediment accumulation, halts in sedimentation, sediment winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass. They may include amalgamated faunas of different origin and age. Hardgrounds may be part of condensed beds and may embody strongly condensed beds by themselves. Sedimentary condensation is the result of a hydrodynamically active depositional regime, in which sediment accumulation, winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass are processes, which alternate as a function of changes in the location and intensity of currents, and/or as the result of episodic high-energy events engendered by storms and gravity flow. Sedimentary condensation has been and still is a widespread phenomenon in past and present-day oceans. The present-day distribution of glaucony and verdine-rich sediments on shelves and upper slopes, phosphate-rich sediments and phosphorite on outer shelves and upper slopes, ferromanganese crusts on slopes, seamounts and submarine plateaus, and ferromanganese nodules on abyssal seafloors is a good indication of the importance of condensation processes today. In the past, we may add the occurrence of oolitic ironstone, carbonate hardgrounds, and eventually also silica layers in banded iron formations as indicators of the importance of condensation processes. Besides their economic value, condensed sediments are useful both as a carrier of geochemical proxies of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change, as well as the product of episodes of paleoceanographic and

  6. Magnons in a box: Condensation and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Olf, Ryan; Wu, Shun; Kadau, Holger; Marti, G. Edward; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold gases offer us a remarkable window into the quantum world, allowing direct access to a wide range of manybody and condensed matter phenomena at convenient macroscopic length and time scales. However, producing ultracold gases at ever lower entropy, and measuring statistical properties such as temperature in these low entropy regimes, is a persistent challenge. Magnons, gapless spin excitations of spinor Bose Einstein Condensate (BEC), are expected to behave like free particles. We show that magnons can be used to cool BEC in a deep trap and serve as a thermometer to measure temperatures at extremely low entropy-per-particle. Unlike atoms trapped in a harmonic trap, trapped magnons experience a box potential due to near exact cancellation of the trapping potential by the mean-field interaction within the condensate. We observe the quasi-condensation of magnon excitations within this nature-made box.

  7. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  8. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, Richard A.; Szydlowski, Donald F.; Sawyer, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well.

  9. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  10. Measuring the X-ray background in the reionization era with first generation 21 cm experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Pierre; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-09-01

    The X-ray background during the epoch of reionization is currently poorly constrained. We demonstrate that it is possible to use first generation 21 cm experiments to calibrate it. Using the semi-numerical simulation, 21cmFAST, we calculate the dependence of the 21 cm power spectrum on the X-ray background flux. Comparing the signal to the sensitivity of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) we find that in the redshift interval z =8-14 the 21 cm signal is detectable for certain values of the X-ray background. We show that there is no degeneracy between the X-ray production efficiency and the Lyα production efficiency and that the degeneracy with the ionization fraction of the intergalactic medium can be broken.

  11. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  12. [A dust generator for inhalation experiments in a high-pressure chamber].

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, K H; Bergmann, K H

    1984-03-01

    The health effect of inhalable dust particles at working places is predominantly related to "normal" conditions (i.e. temperature = 20 degrees C, atmospheric pressure = 1013 mbar). A probable risk for humans, working in pressurized places (tunnels) raises from modified respiration conditions. An inhalation experiment with rats was performed in a pressurized exposure chamber (1,5 bar). The dust generator was placed in the chamber and consisted of an endless ball-chain, which was lead through a glass-funnel as a dust-store. The average dust concentration ranged between 10 and 14 mg/m3 air. Short-time variations in case of the quartz dust DQ 12 were unavoidable.

  13. Support and control system of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Rosenberg, K.E.

    1997-09-01

    A glovebox was designed and fabricated to house test containers loaded with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. The test containers were designed to simulate the environmental characteristics of the caverns at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The support and control systems used to operate and maintain the Gas Generation Experiment (GGE) include the following: glovebox atmosphere and pressure control, test container support, glovebox operation support, and gas supply and exhaust systems. The glovebox atmosphere and pressure control systems consist of various components used to control both the pressure and quality of the argon atmosphere inside the glovebox. The glovebox pressure is maintained by three separate pressure control systems. The primary pressure control system is designed to maintain the glovebox at a negative pressure with the other two control systems serving as redundant safety backups. The quality of the argon atmosphere is controlled using a purifying bed system that removes oxygen and moisture. Glovebox atmosphere contaminants that are monitored on a continuous or periodic basis include moisture, oxygen, and nitrogen. The gas generation experiment requires the test containers to be filled with brine, leak tested, maintained at a constant temperature, and the gas head space of the test container sampled on a periodic basis. Test container support systems consisting of a brine addition system, leak test system, heating system, and gas sampling system were designed and implemented. A rupture disk system was constructed to provide pressure relief to the test containers. Operational requirements stipulated that test container temperature and pressure be monitored and collected on a continuous basis. A data acquisition system (DAS) was specifically designed to meet these requirements.

  14. Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

  15. Coseismic Damage Generation in Fault Zones by Successive High Strain Rate Loading Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aben, F. M.; Doan, M. L.; Renard, F.; Toussaint, R.; Reuschlé, T.; Gratier, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Damage zones of active faults control both resistance to rupture and transport properties of the fault. Hence, knowing the rock damage's origin is important to constrain its properties. Here we study experimentally the damage generated by a succession of dynamic loadings, a process mimicking the stress history of a rock sample located next to an active fault. A propagating rupture generates high frequency stress perturbations next to its tip. This dynamic loading creates pervasive damage (pulverization), as multiple fractures initiate and grow simultaneously. Previous single loading experiments have shown a strain rate threshold for pulverization. Here, we focus on conditions below this threshold and the dynamic peak stress to constrain: 1) if there is dynamic fracturing at these conditions and 2) if successive loadings (cumulative seismic events) result in pervasive fracturing, effectively reducing the pulverization threshold to milder conditions. Monzonite samples were dynamically loaded (strain rate > 50 s-1) several times below the dynamic peak strength, using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. Several quasi-static experiments were conducted as well (strain rate < 10-5-s). Samples loaded up to stresses above the quasi-static uniaxial compressive strength (qsUCS) systematically fragmented or pulverized after four successive loadings. We measured several damage proxies (P-wave velocity, porosity), that show a systematic increase in damage with each load. In addition, micro-computed tomography acquisition on several damage samples revealed the growth of a pervasive fracture network between ensuing loadings. Samples loaded dynamically below the qsUCS failed along one fracture after a variable amount of loadings and damage proxies do not show any a systematic trend. Our conclusions is that milder dynamic loading conditions, below the dynamic peak strength, result in pervasive dynamic fracturing. Also, successive loadings effectively lower the pulverization

  16. Design/build/mockup of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    A glovebox was designed, fabricated, and mocked-up for the WIPP Gas Generation Experiments (GGE) being conducted at ANL-W. GGE will determine the gas generation rates from materials in contact handled transuranic waste at likely long term repository temperature and pressure conditions. Since the customer`s schedule did not permit time for performing R&D of the support systems, designing the glovebox, and fabricating the glovebox in a serial fashion, a parallel approach was undertaken. As R&D of the sampling system and other support systems was initiated, a specification was written concurrently for contracting a manufacturer to design and build the glovebox and support equipment. The contractor understood that the R&D being performed at ANL-W would add additional functional requirements to the glovebox design. Initially, the contractor had sufficient information to design the glovebox shell. Once the shell design was approved, ANL-W built a full scale mockup of the shell out of plywood and metal framing; support systems were mocked up and resultant information was forwarded to the glovebox contractor to incorporate into the design. This approach resulted in a glovebox being delivered to ANL-W on schedule and within budget.

  17. Analysis of Thermoelectric Generator Performance by Use of Simulations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högblom, Olle; Andersson, Ronnie

    2014-06-01

    A method that enables accurate determination of contact resistances in thermoelectric generators and which gives detailed insight into how these reduce module performance is presented in this paper. To understand the importance taking thermal and electrical contact resistances into account in analysis of thermoelectric generators, full-scale modules were studied. Contact resistances were determined by means of non-linear regression analysis on the basis of results from 3D finite element simulations and experiments in a setup in which heat flow, voltage, and current were measured. Statistical evaluation showed that the model and the identified contact resistances enabled excellent prediction of performance over the entire range of operating conditions. It was shown that if contact resistances were not included in the analysis the simulations significantly over-predicted both heat flow and electric power output, and it was concluded that contact resistance should always be included in module simulations. The method presented in this paper gives detailed insight into how thermoelectric modules perform in general, and also enables prediction of potential improvement in module performance by reduction of contact resistances.

  18. Helical Striation Pattern Generation and Axial Field Compression in Aluminum Liner Experiments at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, Levon; Byvank, Tom; Greenly, John; Kusse, Bruce; Pikuz, Sergei; Potter, William; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David

    2015-11-01

    Awe et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 235005, 2014] found on the 20 MA Z machine that applying an externally generated axial magnetic field to an imploding liner produces a helical plasma pattern near the surface of the liner. Here we show that this phenomenon is also observed using 10 mm long cylindrical metal liners having 16 mm diameter and 3 to 6 μm wall thickness on the 1 MA, 100-200 ns COBRA pulsed power generator [T. A. Shelkovenko et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10F521, 2006]. The magnetic field in these experiments is created using a 150 μs rise time Helmholtz coil, and the pattern is observed using extreme ultraviolet imaging. Moreover, using B-dot probes we show that there is a 4-8% axial magnetic field compression relative to the initially applied Bz. Using a visible light framing camera, we show that this compression begins before the outside surface of the liner has become a visible light emitting plasma. This research was sponsored by the NNSA SSAP under DOE Coop Agreement DE-NA0001836 and DOE grant DE-NA0001847 as well as by NSF grant PHY-1102471.

  19. Status of the LBL experiment on femtosecond x-ray generation through 90{degree} Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Conde, M.; Glover, E.; Kim, K.J.; Schoenlein, R.; Shank, C.V.

    1994-06-01

    A status report on the generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses through 90{degrees} Thompson scattering is presented. The experiment involves a relativistic electron beam (tunable from 25--50 MeV) with a bunch length of 10 ps containing 1 {minus}2 nC, and a ultrashort pulse (50--200 fs), high power (4 TW) 0.8 {mu}m Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser system. Both beams are focussed down to about a 50 {mu}m waist size and intersect at 90{degrees}. The laser field acts as an electromagnetic undulator for the relativistic electron beam generating radiation upshifted by 2 {gamma}{sup 2} and a pulse length given by the transit time of the laser beam across the electron beam. For a 50 MeV electron beam we expect 10{sup 5} photons at 0.4 {angstrom} (10% bandwidth) in a cone angle of 6 mrad in a 170 fs pulse.

  20. Theory and experiment on particle trapping and manipulation via optothermally generated bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenglong; Xie, Yuliang; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Yanhui; Rufo, Joseph; Yang, Shikuan; Guo, Feng; Mai, John D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration of particle trapping and manipulation around optothermally generated bubbles. We show that a particle located within 500 μm of a surface bubble can be attracted towards a bubble by the drag force resulting from a convective flow. Once the particle comes in contact with the bubble’s surface, a balance between surface tension forces and pressure forces traps the particle on the bubble surface, allowing the particle to move with the bubble without detaching. The proposed mechanism is confirmed by computational fluid dynamics simulations, force calculations, and experiments. Based on this mechanism, we experimentally demonstrated a novel approach for manipulating microparticles via optothermally generated bubbles. Using this approach, randomly distributed microparticles were effectively collected and carried to predefined locations. Single particles were also manipulated along prescribed trajectories. This bubble-based particle trapping and manipulation technique can be useful in applications such as micro assembly, particle concentration, and high-precision particle separation. PMID:24276624

  1. Peer generation of multiple-choice questions: student engagement and experiences.

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Pettigrew, Graham W

    2012-01-01

    A free online system for generation of multiple-choice questions (PeerWise) was implemented in three courses (course A, B, and C) in two different years (second and third year) of a veterinary degree program. Students were asked to author questions, and answer and rate each other's questions. Student experiences of the system were explored using an online survey. The majority of students in both years either agreed or strongly agreed that both authoring and answering questions was helpful for their studies and wanted to use the system again in future courses. Thematic analysis highlighted students' views that engaging with the resource increased breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding and was very useful for revision purposes. There was a statistically significant difference between students in second and third year regarding whether students felt it was necessary for academic staff to be involved in the review process. Thematic analysis of this aspect identified issues relating to confidence in the ability of the peer group and the need for reassurance in the second-year group. Student engagement with the system was correlated with examination performance. In courses A and B there was a positive correlation between number of questions answered and examination performance, in course C there was no correlation. This study highlights the benefits of peer activity around question generation and proposes that such activities are an efficient and effective means to support student learning.

  2. Ghost condensate busting

    SciTech Connect

    Bilic, Neven; Tupper, Gary B; Viollier, Raoul D E-mail: gary.tupper@uct.ac.za

    2008-09-15

    Applying the Thomas-Fermi approximation to renormalizable field theories, we construct ghost condensation models that are free of the instabilities associated with violations of the null-energy condition.

  3. THE COLOR GLASS CONDENSATE.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    2001-08-26

    The Color Glass Condensate is a state of high density gluonic matter which controls the high energy limit of hadronic interactions. Its properties are important for the initial conditions for matter produced at RHIC.

  4. Dropwise condensation dynamics in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo Chacon, Julian Eduardo

    Dropwise condensation of atmospheric water vapor is important in multiple practical engineering applications. The roles of environmental factors and surface morphology/chemistry on the condensation dynamics need to be better understood to enable efficient water-harvesting, dehumidication, and other psychrometric processes. Systems and surfaces that promote faster condensation rates and self-shedding of condensate droplets could lead to improved mass transfer rates and higher water yields in harvesting applications. The thesis presents the design and construction of an experimental facility that allows visualization of the condensation process as a function of relative humidity. Dropwise condensation experiments are performed on a vertically oriented, hydrophobic surface at a controlled relative humidity and surface subcooling temperature. The distribution and growth of water droplets are monitored across the surface at different relative humidities (45%, 50%, 55%, and 70%) at a constant surface subcooling temperature of 15 °C below the ambient temperature. The droplet growth dynamics exhibits a strong dependency on relative humidity in the early stages during which there is a large population of small droplets on the surface and single droplet growth dominates over coalescence effects. At later stages, the dynamics of droplet growth is insensitive to relative humidity due to the dominance of coalescence effects. The overall volumetric rate of condensation on the surface is also assessed as a function of time and ambient relative humidity. Low relative humidity conditions not only slow the absolute rate of condensation, but also prolong an initial transient regime over which the condensation rate remains significantly below the steady-state value. The current state-of-the-art in dropwise condensation research indicates the need for systematic experimental investigations as a function of relative humidity. The improved understanding of the relative humidity

  5. Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

  6. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis

    2010-06-24

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  7. Effects of self generated magnetic fields and non local heat transport in laser experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurtz, Guy; Nicolai, Philippe; Dattolo, Evelyne; Babonneau, Danielle

    2002-11-01

    Electron conduction is known to be a leading transport process in laser created plasmas. Several effects may cause the heat flux to depart from the classical linear Spitzer-Harm theory. First of all, kinetic effects result in the non locality of the heat flux in case of strong temperature gradients. A two dimensionnal non local model has been developed by the authors and implemented in the FCI2 hydrocode (G.P. Schurtz et al., Ph.Plasmas,7,10,4238, 2000). Conduction may also be affected by magnetic fields. FCI2 simulations including a MHD model and Braginskii conduction indicate that magnetic fields with intensities up to several MG may be generated and strongly inhibit electron heat flow. In this communication, we briefly discuss the strategy we use in FCI2 in order to couple both models and compare code predictions to experimental data over a wide range of experiments in open and close (hohlraum) geometries. As compared to flux limited Spitzer Harm conduction, this new model succeeds as well in restituting global energy balance (e.g. radiation production in hohlraums) but predicts large differences in hydrodynamics, which are actually observed in experiments.

  8. Generating structure from experience: A retrieval-based model of language processing.

    PubMed

    Johns, Brendan T; Jones, Michael N

    2015-09-01

    Standard theories of language generally assume that some abstraction of linguistic input is necessary to create higher level representations of linguistic structures (e.g., a grammar). However, the importance of individual experiences with language has recently been emphasized by both usage-based theories (Tomasello, 2003) and grounded and situated theories (e.g., Zwaan & Madden, 2005). Following the usage-based approach, we present a formal exemplar model that stores instances of sentences across a natural language corpus, applying recent advances from models of semantic memory. In this model, an exemplar memory is used to generate expectations about the future structure of sentences, using a mechanism for prediction in language processing (Altmann & Mirković, 2009). The model successfully captures a broad range of behavioral effects-reduced relative clause processing (Reali & Christiansen, 2007), the role of contextual constraint (Rayner & Well, 1996), and event knowledge activation (Ferretti, Kutas, & McRae, 2007), among others. We further demonstrate how perceptual knowledge could be integrated into this exemplar-based framework, with the goal of grounding language processing in perception. Finally, we illustrate how an exemplar memory system could have been used in the cultural evolution of language. The model provides evidence that an impressive amount of language processing may be bottom-up in nature, built on the storage and retrieval of individual linguistic experiences.

  9. Solid State Analogs in Bose-Condensed Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Gretchen

    2008-05-01

    Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices have proven to be a powerful tool for emulating a wide variety of physical systems. Although our Rubidium condensates are a million times less dense than air, in several regards they also act like solids. In this talk, I demonstrate this behavior in three different experiments. First, similar to a piece of glass, the refractive index of the condensate changes the momentum of a photon propagating through it. This systematic shift of the photon recoil momentum due to the index of refraction was measured with a two-pulse light grating interferometer, and has important ramifications for precision measurements of the fine structure constant, α. Second, a 1D light crystal is shown to create a lattice band structure that allows two atoms traveling at the same velocity to collide and scatter into two different velocity states (which is impossible in free space), allowing us to demonstrate parametric generation and amplification of ultracold atom pairs. Finally, the Superfluid-Mott Insulator transition was studied in a 3D lattice using microwave spectroscopy. Using a density dependent shift to the clock transition, we were able to spectroscopically distinguish sites with different occupation numbers, and to directly image sites with occupation number from 1 to 5, revealing the shell structure of the Mott Insulator phase. This work was performed at MIT, under the direction of David E. Pritchard and Wolfgang Ketterle

  10. Mixing and transient interface condensation of a liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of axial jet-induced mixing on the pressure reduction of a thermally stratified liquid hydrogen tank. The tank was nearly cylindrical, having a volume of about 0.144 cu m with 0.559 m in diameter and 0.711 m length. A mixer/pump unit, which had a jet nozzle outlet of 0.0221 m in diameter was located 0.178 m from the tank bottom and was installed inside the tank to generate the axial jet mixing and tank fluid circulation. Mixing tests began with the tank pressures at which the thermal stratification results in 4.9-6.2 K liquid subcooling. The mixing time and transient vapor condensation rate at the liquid-vapor interface are determined. Two mixing time correlations, based on the thermal equilibrium and pressure equilibrium, are developed and expressed as functions of system and buoyancy parameters. The limited liquid hydrogen data of the present study shows that the modified steady state condensation rate correlation may be used to predict the transient condensation rate in a mixing process if the instantaneous values of jet sub cooling and turbulence intensity at the interface are employed.

  11. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  12. Weakest students benefit most from a customized educational experience for Generation Y students

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Most current dental students were born in the 1980s and 1990s and are defined as Generation Y (Gen Y). The authors developed a customized educational experience that brought together some characteristics of Gen Y and the objective of this educational experience was to develop the critical thinking skills of Gen Y students. The objective of the current study is to evaluate outcomes from pre-session and post-session tests. Additionally, we wanted to integrate aspects of team-based learning, self-directed learning and peer-to-peer teaching as a means of reducing the need for intense faculty supervision but maintain positive educational outcomes. Single bitewing x-ray was displayed and informal class discussion was facilitated by a Senior Tutor. A list of questions and concepts that needed to be understood more clearly was made. Student groups self allocated research tasks to members. After conducting research, students presented to class and faculty facilitated discussions aiming to foster critical thinking and identify what information needed to be more thoroughly understood. Pre-session and post-session tests were conducted and compared. Students who scored below 85% in their pre-session test improved their score in the post-session test by a mean of 9.5 points (p = 0.02). Those who scored above 95% in their pre-session test scored less in the post-session test (mean reduction of 6.31 points, p = 0.001). Findings from this study demonstrate that the weakest students in the class (those who scored below 85% correct in the pre-session test) benefitted most from this unique educational experience. PMID:25493212

  13. Real-time biomimetic Central Pattern Generators in an FPGA for hybrid experiments.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Matthieu; Levi, Timothée; Joucla, Sébastien; Yvert, Blaise; Saïghi, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    This investigation of the leech heartbeat neural network system led to the development of a low resources, real-time, biomimetic digital hardware for use in hybrid experiments. The leech heartbeat neural network is one of the simplest central pattern generators (CPG). In biology, CPG provide the rhythmic bursts of spikes that form the basis for all muscle contraction orders (heartbeat) and locomotion (walking, running, etc.). The leech neural network system was previously investigated and this CPG formalized in the Hodgkin-Huxley neural model (HH), the most complex devised to date. However, the resources required for a neural model are proportional to its complexity. In response to this issue, this article describes a biomimetic implementation of a network of 240 CPGs in an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), using a simple model (Izhikevich) and proposes a new synapse model: activity-dependent depression synapse. The network implementation architecture operates on a single computation core. This digital system works in real-time, requires few resources, and has the same bursting activity behavior as the complex model. The implementation of this CPG was initially validated by comparing it with a simulation of the complex model. Its activity was then matched with pharmacological data from the rat spinal cord activity. This digital system opens the way for future hybrid experiments and represents an important step toward hybridization of biological tissue and artificial neural networks. This CPG network is also likely to be useful for mimicking the locomotion activity of various animals and developing hybrid experiments for neuroprosthesis development.

  14. Weakest students benefit most from a customized educational experience for Generation Y students.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Most current dental students were born in the 1980s and 1990s and are defined as Generation Y (Gen Y). The authors developed a customized educational experience that brought together some characteristics of Gen Y and the objective of this educational experience was to develop the critical thinking skills of Gen Y students. The objective of the current study is to evaluate outcomes from pre-session and post-session tests. Additionally, we wanted to integrate aspects of team-based learning, self-directed learning and peer-to-peer teaching as a means of reducing the need for intense faculty supervision but maintain positive educational outcomes. Single bitewing x-ray was displayed and informal class discussion was facilitated by a Senior Tutor. A list of questions and concepts that needed to be understood more clearly was made. Student groups self allocated research tasks to members. After conducting research, students presented to class and faculty facilitated discussions aiming to foster critical thinking and identify what information needed to be more thoroughly understood. Pre-session and post-session tests were conducted and compared. Students who scored below 85% in their pre-session test improved their score in the post-session test by a mean of 9.5 points (p = 0.02). Those who scored above 95% in their pre-session test scored less in the post-session test (mean reduction of 6.31 points, p = 0.001). Findings from this study demonstrate that the weakest students in the class (those who scored below 85% correct in the pre-session test) benefitted most from this unique educational experience. PMID:25493212

  15. Parameterization experiments performed via synthetic mass movements prototypes generated by 3D slope stability simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangelo, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    each cell in synthetic slope systems performed by relief unity emulator. The central methodological strategy is to locate the potential rupture surfaces (prs), main material discontinuities, like soil-regolith or regolith-rock transitions. Inner these "prs", we would to outline the effective potential rupture surfaces (eprs). This surface is a sub-set of the "prs" that presents safety factor less than unity (f<1), the sub-region in the "prs" equal or deeper than critical depths. When the effective potential rupture surface acquires significant extension with respect the thickness of critical depth and retaining walls, the "slope stability simulator" generates a synthetic mass movement. The overlay material will slide until that a new equilibrium be attained at residual shear strength. These devices generate graphic 3D cinematic sequences of experiments in synthetic slope systems and numerical results about physical and morphological data about scars and deposits. Thus, we have a detailed geotechnical, morphological, topographic and morphometric description of these mass movements prototypes, for deal with effective mass movements found in the real environments.

  16. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  17. MOON for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment: Present status and perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, T.; Doe, P.J.; Ejiri, H.; Elliot, S.R.; Engel, J.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fushimi, K.; Gehman, V.M.; Greenfield, M.B.; Hazama, R.; /Hiroshima U. /NIRS, Chiba

    2008-01-01

    The performance of the MOON detector for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment was evaluated by means of the Monte Carlo method. The MOON detector was found to be a feasible solution for the future experiment to search for the Majorana neutrino mass in the range of 100-30 meV.

  18. Exploring the Basic Principles of Electric Motors and Generators with a Low-Cost Sophomore-Level Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, T. F.; Jacobitz, F. G.; Kim, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    In order to meet changing curricular needs, an electric motor and generator laboratory experience was designed, implemented, and assessed. The experiment is unusual in its early placement in the curriculum and in that it focuses on modeling electric motors, predicting their performance, and measuring efficiency of energy conversion. While…

  19. From Parent to Child: Early Labor Market Experiences of Second-Generation Immigrants in the Netherlands. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ours, Jan C.; Veenman, Justus

    This study investigated the early labor market experiences of second generation immigrants in the Netherlands, focusing on Turks, Moroccans, Surinamese, and Antilleans. Researchers examined those leaving school and their job experiences. Data came from a 1998 nationwide survey involving the four minority groups and a Dutch reference group in 13…

  20. Quantification and kinetics of H2 generation during hydrothermal serpentinisation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelain, Teddy; Fauguerolles, Colin; Villeneuve, Johan; Pichavant, Michel

    2013-04-01

    H2-rich hydrothermal fluids generated by serpentinisation of mantle rocks at slow-spreading ridges have been revealed by recent studies [1, 2]. Fluxes and the future of the H2 produced by this process are poorly constrained [1, 3]. In this study, we aim to quantitatively evaluate the H2 production fluxes associated with these hydrothermal systems and to document the kinetics of the hydrogen-producing reaction. For this matter, hydrothermal serpentinisation experiments are being undertaken on mixtures composed of a natural peridotite from the Pindus ophiolite and olivine crystals from San Carlos. The experiments are conducted at a temperature of ~ 300° C and a pressure of 450-500 bars in large-volume Dickson-Seyfried bombs for periods of × 1 month. Starting materials are powders between 1 - 100 μm for the peridotites and individual grains ranging from 1 - 2 mm for the San Carlos olivine. They are reacted with a homemade artificial seawater in such proportion that water-rock ratio = 1.8. The reactants are loaded in a modified Ti cell fitted with a semi-permeable Au-Pd membrane simultaneously allowing direct sampling of the hydrothermal fluid and in situ monitoring of the pH2 during the advancement of the reaction. The gas fraction of the fluid sampled is then analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The pH2 readings show traces of H2 to be present from the second day of experiment. The increase of the pH2 reaches a maximum after ~ 6 days and the pH2 finally stabilizes after ~ 16 days at ~ 12.5 bars, which corresponds to a local fO2 of about NNO-4. The GC measurements, performed after 30, 43, 51 and 65 days, yield respectively, H2 concentrations of 82.4, 89.7, 90.3 and 101 mmol.kg-1 of water, in reasonable agreement with results from previous studies [4-6]. Further experiments are being undertaken in order to: duplicate observations, especially the pH2 readings, more closely link the GC measurements and the in situ pH2 readings, especially during the first 15 days of

  1. Condenser biofouling control with ferrate(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, J.; Waite, T.D.

    1982-01-01

    Biofouling is caused by bacterial growth on the walls of the condenser. The cells become attached, increase in number, secrete extracellular material and create a slime. The organic deposits attract additional deposits of organic and inorganic material. Also increases in heat transfer resistance result in less efficient condensation and therefore less backpressure to the turbine. With less vacuum in the system, the steam passes more slowly through the turbine, generating less electricity, and resulting in greater fuel consumption per unit of electrical energy produced. To reduce this extra energy generation cost, condensers must be treated to reduce biofouling. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible use of iron(VI) ferrate as an alternative to chlorine in controlling biofilm formation. The effectiveness of ferrate in controlling film growth was investigated using a model laboratory condenser system. Potassium ferrate was used in this study. Results indicate that ferrate(VI) ion appears to be an effective antifoulant. Short contact times are required for ferrate concentrations of 10/sup -5/M to maintain condenser cleanliness. (DMC)

  2. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Koppers, W. R.; Rooij, G. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes; Kleyn, A. W.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial magnetic field. In this way, the neutrals are prevented to reach the target region. The neutral flux to the target must be lower than the plasma flux to enable ITER relevant plasma-surface interaction (PSI) studies. It is therefore essential to control the neutral gas dynamics. The DSMC method was used to model the expansion of a hot gas in a low pressure vessel where a small discrepancy in shock position was found between the simulations and a well-established empirical formula. Two stage differential pumping was modeled and applied in the linear plasma devices Pilot-PSI and PLEXIS. In Pilot-PSI a factor of 4.5 pressure reduction for H{sub 2} has been demonstrated. Both simulations and experiments showed that the optimum skimmer position depends on the position of the shock and therefore shifts for different gas parameters. The shape of the skimmer has to be designed such that it has a minimum impact on the shock structure. A too large angle between the skimmer and the forward direction of the gas flow leads to an influence on the expansion structure. A pressure increase in front of the skimmer is formed and the flow of the plasma beam becomes obstructed. It has been shown that a skimmer with an angle around 53 deg. gives the best performance. The use of skimmers is implemented in the design of the large linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. Here, a three stage differentially pumped vacuum system is used to reach low enough neutral pressures near the target, opening a door to PSI research in the ITER relevant regime.

  3. First-generation hybrid solar lighting collector system development and operating experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshears, David; Earl, D. D.; Muhs, Jeff; Maxey, L. Curt; Capps, Gary; Stellern, Scott; Bayless, David; Switzer, Shyler

    2004-01-01

    Research is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that could lead to entirely new, highly energy-efficient ways of lighting buildings using the power of sunlight. In addition to providing light, the hybrid lighting system will convert sunlight to electricity much more efficiently than conventional solar technologies using thermo-photovoltaic cells. In commercial buildings today, lighting consumes more electric energy than any other building end-use. It accounts for more than a third of all electricity consumed for commercial use in the United States. Typically, less than 25% of that energy actually produces light; the rest generates heat that increases the need for air-conditioning. ORNL is developing a system to reduce the energy required for lighting and the air-conditioning loads associated with it, while generating power for other uses. The system uses roof-mounted concentrators to collect and separate the visible and infrared portions of sunlight. The visible portion is distributed through large-diameter optical fibers to hybrid luminaires. (Hybrid luminaires are lighting fixtures that contain both electric lamps and fiber optics for direct sunlight distribution.) When sunlight is plentiful, the fiber optics in the luminaries, provide all or most of the light needed in an area. Unlike conventional electric lamps, they produce little heat. During times of little or no sunlight, sensor-controlled electric lamps will operate to maintain the desired illumination level. A second use of the hybrid lighting collector system is to provide sunlight for enhanced practical photosynthesis carbon dioxide mitigation. In this project the hybrid lighting collector system is being used to provide sunlight to a lab-scale photobioreactor for growing algae that is being used for CO2 mitigation. The end goal of this project is to provide a photobioreactor that can be used to mitigate CO2 in fossil fuel fire power plants. This paper will discuss the development and

  4. Ultra-large-scale Cosmology in Next-generation Experiments with Single Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, David; Bull, Philip; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Maartens, Roy; Santos, Mário G.

    2015-12-01

    Future surveys of large-scale structure will be able to measure perturbations on the scale of the cosmological horizon, and so could potentially probe a number of novel relativistic effects that are negligibly small on sub-horizon scales. These effects leave distinctive signatures in the power spectra of clustering observables and, if measurable, would open a new window on relativistic cosmology. We quantify the size and detectability of the effects for the most relevant future large-scale structure experiments: spectroscopic and photometric galaxy redshift surveys, intensity mapping surveys of neutral hydrogen, and radio continuum surveys. Our forecasts show that next-generation experiments, reaching out to redshifts z≃ 4, will not be able to detect previously undetected general-relativistic effects by using individual tracers of the density field, although the contribution of weak lensing magnification on large scales should be clearly detectable. We also perform a rigorous joint forecast for the detection of primordial non-Gaussianity through the excess power it produces in the clustering of biased tracers on large scales, finding that uncertainties of σ ({f}{{NL}})∼ 1-2 should be achievable. We study the level of degeneracy of these large-scale effects with several tracer-dependent nuisance parameters, quantifying the minimal priors on the latter that are needed for an optimal measurement of the former. Finally, we discuss the systematic effects that must be mitigated to achieve this level of sensitivity, and some alternative approaches that should help to improve the constraints. The computational tools developed to carry out this study, which requires the full-sky computation of the theoretical angular power spectra for {O}(100) redshift bins, as well as realistic models of the luminosity function, are publicly available at http://intensitymapping.physics.ox.ac.uk/codes.html.

  5. Mixing and transient interface condensation of a liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of axial jet-induced mixing on the pressure reduction of a thermally stratified liquid hydrogen tank. The tank was nearly cylindrical, having a volume of about 0.144 cu m with 0.559 m in diameter and 0.711 m long. A mixer/pump unit, which had a jet nozzle outlet of 0.0221 m in diameter was located 0.178 m from the tank bottom and was installed inside the tank to generate the axial jet mixing and tank fluid circulation. The liquid fill and jet flow rate ranged from 42 to 85 percent (by volume) and 0.409 to 2.43 cu m/hr, respectively. Mixing tests began with the tank pressure ranging from 187.5 to 238.5 kPa at which the thermal stratification results in 4.9 to 6.2 K liquid sub cooling. The mixing time and transient vapor condensation rate at the liquid-vapor interface are determined. Two mixing time correlations, based on the thermal equilibrium and pressure equilibrium, are developed. Both mixing time correlations are expressed as functions of system and buoyancy parameters and compared well with other experimental data. The steady state condensation rate correlation of Sonin et al. based on steam-water data is modified and expressed as a function of jet subcooling. The limited liquid hydrogen data of the present study shows that the modified steady state condensation rate correlation may be used to predict the transient condensation rate in a mixing process if the instantaneous values of jet sub cooling and turbulence intensity at the interface are employed.

  6. Performance study and analysis method for a new-generation MIPAS experiment.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, Massimo; Castelli, Elisa; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Papandrea, Enzo

    2014-11-17

    This study fits within the ongoing activities aimed at filling the lack of an operational IR limb sounder after the ENVISAT fault. Notably, we report the performance of a possible evolution of the MIPAS experiment. The strategy proposed for the new experiment (that we denote as MIPAS2k) is derived from the PREMIER infrared limb sounder (IRLS) and relies on both 1D array detector technology and reduction of the spectral resolution to achieve dense atmospheric sampling. We define observation parameters and report, as an example, the performance obtained by MIPAS2k when measuring O₃fields. The information load (IL) analysis was exploited to assess the sensitivity of MIPAS2k and to select optimal spectral intervals for retrieval tests on simulated observations of the new experiment. The results of the IL analysis suggest a new approach to the retrieval strategy (denoted as full-2D) in which the unknown parameter is no longer an element of the altitude profile but the constant value taken by the atmospheric quantity within a parcel (denoted as "clove") of the 2D discretization. We demonstrate that the clove homogeneity assumption generates errors that are below the spectral noise of MIPAS2k when an appropriate clove thickness is used. Full-2D retrievals have been carried out on MIPAS2k simulated observations corresponding to a high resolution model atmosphere. We report a test case on O₃ VMR in which the retrieval precision is better than 5% between 20 and 40 km and better than 30% in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. We test the ability of MIPAS2k to reconstruct a fine O₃ structure present in the model atmosphere and we show how this structure would have been represented by MIPAS when measuring the same scenario. We have estimated the spatial resolution of MIPAS2k products by means of the perturbation approach that, in simulated retrievals, can be adopted to evaluate the averaging kernel of the retrieval parameters. For O₃ we have found the estimates of

  7. [Field experiment of F1 generation and superior families selection of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Si, Jin-Ping; Wu, Ling-Shang; Guo, Ying-Ying; Yu, Jie; Wang, Lin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Based on randomized block design of experiment, agronomic traits and yields of 14 F1 generations of Dendrobium officinale were determined. The results showed that the differences in agronomic traits and yields among families were significant, and the hybrid vigor was obvious. Families of 6b x 2a, 9 x 66 and 78 x 69 were selected with the remarkable superiority of yields, agronomic traits and product customization. Correlation analysis between agronomic traits and yields showed that plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, blade length and blade width were all significantly correlated with biological yields and economic yields. Among which, stem diameter, leaf number and blade length were the most significant, and an optimal linear regression model could be established. When the number of shoots was fewer than 4.5, both biological yields and economic yields increased with the increasing number of shoots, but it could not much affect yields when the number of shoots was larger than 4.5. Shoots number, stem diameter and leaf index were basic stability when compared biennial traits to annual, which could be used for early selection. PMID:24558865

  8. Anesthesia for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: Teikyo University Hospital experience using the third generation lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Koji; Kamiyama, Yutaka; Saito, Keisuke; Yasuda, Mitsuko; Ide, Hisamitsu; Muto, Satoru; Okada, Hiroshi; Horie, Shigeo

    2007-08-01

    A single-board certified urologist with training and experience in anesthesiology was assigned to treat 502 patients (185 with renal stones, 317 with ureteral stones) using the Dornier Compact Delta lithotripter under general or epidural anesthesia. Data were obtained regarding stone location, stone size, shockwave use, stone-free rate, and complications. In all, 502 stones were treated with the Dornier Compact Delta lithotripter. Among renal stones, 73% were in the renal pelvis. Among ureteral stones, 60% were in the upper, 10% in the middle, and 30% in the lower ureter. Diameters of 61.8% of stones were less than 1 cm. The mean number of shocks was 3,471 at a mean power setting of 5. The stone-free rate for renal stones was 71.5%, while for ureteral stones this reached 99%. The efficiency quotient was calculated as 0.65. One patient with a renal stone developed perinephric hematoma requiring 3 units of transfusion. With a success rate higher than that reported for other lithotripters, the Dornier Compact Delta lithotripter represents a feasible treatment for urolithiasis. We stress that even in the third generation machines the lithotripsy under anesthesia can improve the treatment efficacy.

  9. Trophic and Non-Trophic Interactions in a Biodiversity Experiment Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Julia; Wemheuer, Bernd; Traugott, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Tscharntke, Teja; Ebeling, Anne; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant diversity affects species richness and abundance of taxa at higher trophic levels. However, plant diversity effects on omnivores (feeding on multiple trophic levels) and their trophic and non-trophic interactions are not yet studied because appropriate methods were lacking. A promising approach is the DNA-based analysis of gut contents using next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Here, we integrate NGS-based analysis into the framework of a biodiversity experiment where plant taxonomic and functional diversity were manipulated to directly assess environmental interactions involving the omnivorous ground beetle Pterostichus melanarius. Beetle regurgitates were used for NGS-based analysis with universal 18S rDNA primers for eukaryotes. We detected a wide range of taxa with the NGS approach in regurgitates, including organisms representing trophic, phoretic, parasitic, and neutral interactions with P. melanarius. Our findings suggest that the frequency of (i) trophic interactions increased with plant diversity and vegetation cover; (ii) intraguild predation increased with vegetation cover, and (iii) neutral interactions with organisms such as fungi and protists increased with vegetation cover. Experimentally manipulated plant diversity likely affects multitrophic interactions involving omnivorous consumers. Our study therefore shows that trophic and non-trophic interactions can be assessed via NGS to address fundamental questions in biodiversity research. PMID:26859146

  10. On the generation of sound by turbulent convection. I - A numerical experiment. [in solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Thomas J.; Cattaneo, Fausto; Malagoli, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of the origin of the solar p-modes, we study the generation of acoustic waves by turbulent convection. Our approach uses the results of high-resolution 3D simulations as the experimental basis for our investigation. The numerical experiment describes the evolution of a horizontally periodic layer of vigorously convecting fluid. The sound is measured by a procedure, based on a suitable linearization of the equations of compressible convection that allows the amplitude of the acoustic field to be determined. Through this procedure we identify unambiguously some 400 acoustic modes. The total energy of the acoustic field is found to be a fraction of a percent of the kinetic energy of the convection. The amplitudes of the observed modes depend weakly on (horizontal) wavenumber but strongly on frequency. The line widths of the observed modes typically exceed the natural linewidths of the modes as inferred from linear theory. This broadening appears to be related to the (stochastic) interaction between the modes and the underlying turbulence which causes abrupt, episodic events during which the phase coherence of the modes is lost.

  11. Trophic and Non-Trophic Interactions in a Biodiversity Experiment Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Julia; Wemheuer, Bernd; Traugott, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Tscharntke, Teja; Ebeling, Anne; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant diversity affects species richness and abundance of taxa at higher trophic levels. However, plant diversity effects on omnivores (feeding on multiple trophic levels) and their trophic and non-trophic interactions are not yet studied because appropriate methods were lacking. A promising approach is the DNA-based analysis of gut contents using next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Here, we integrate NGS-based analysis into the framework of a biodiversity experiment where plant taxonomic and functional diversity were manipulated to directly assess environmental interactions involving the omnivorous ground beetle Pterostichus melanarius. Beetle regurgitates were used for NGS-based analysis with universal 18S rDNA primers for eukaryotes. We detected a wide range of taxa with the NGS approach in regurgitates, including organisms representing trophic, phoretic, parasitic, and neutral interactions with P. melanarius. Our findings suggest that the frequency of (i) trophic interactions increased with plant diversity and vegetation cover; (ii) intraguild predation increased with vegetation cover, and (iii) neutral interactions with organisms such as fungi and protists increased with vegetation cover. Experimentally manipulated plant diversity likely affects multitrophic interactions involving omnivorous consumers. Our study therefore shows that trophic and non-trophic interactions can be assessed via NGS to address fundamental questions in biodiversity research.

  12. Trophic and Non-Trophic Interactions in a Biodiversity Experiment Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Julia; Wemheuer, Bernd; Traugott, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Tscharntke, Teja; Ebeling, Anne; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant diversity affects species richness and abundance of taxa at higher trophic levels. However, plant diversity effects on omnivores (feeding on multiple trophic levels) and their trophic and non-trophic interactions are not yet studied because appropriate methods were lacking. A promising approach is the DNA-based analysis of gut contents using next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Here, we integrate NGS-based analysis into the framework of a biodiversity experiment where plant taxonomic and functional diversity were manipulated to directly assess environmental interactions involving the omnivorous ground beetle Pterostichus melanarius. Beetle regurgitates were used for NGS-based analysis with universal 18S rDNA primers for eukaryotes. We detected a wide range of taxa with the NGS approach in regurgitates, including organisms representing trophic, phoretic, parasitic, and neutral interactions with P. melanarius. Our findings suggest that the frequency of (i) trophic interactions increased with plant diversity and vegetation cover; (ii) intraguild predation increased with vegetation cover, and (iii) neutral interactions with organisms such as fungi and protists increased with vegetation cover. Experimentally manipulated plant diversity likely affects multitrophic interactions involving omnivorous consumers. Our study therefore shows that trophic and non-trophic interactions can be assessed via NGS to address fundamental questions in biodiversity research. PMID:26859146

  13. {sup 39}K Bose-Einstein Condensate with Tunable Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Roati, G.; Zaccanti, M.; D'Errico, C.; Catani, J.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.; Modugno, M.; Simoni, A.

    2007-07-06

    We produce a Bose-Einstein condensate of {sup 39}K atoms. Condensation of this species with a naturally small and negative scattering length is achieved by a combination of sympathetic cooling with {sup 87}Rb and direct evaporation, exploiting the magnetic tuning of both inter- and intraspecies interactions at Feshbach resonances. We explore the tunability of the self-interactions by studying the expansion and the stability of the condensate. We find that a {sup 39}K condensate is interesting for future experiments requiring a weakly-interacting Bose gas.

  14. Fidelity Decay in Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, G.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2008-02-08

    The quantum coherence of a Bose-Einstein condensate is studied using the concept of quantum fidelity (Loschmidt echo). The condensate is confined in an elongated anharmonic trap and subjected to a small random potential such as that created by a laser speckle. Numerical experiments show that the quantum fidelity stays constant until a critical time, after which it drops abruptly over a single trap oscillation period. The critical time depends logarithmically on the number of condensed atoms and on the perturbation amplitude. This behavior may be observable by measuring the interference fringes of two condensates evolving in slightly different potentials.

  15. Mechanocaloric and thermomechanical effects in Bose-Einstein-condensed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, G.C.; Bagnato, V.S.; Muniz, S.R.; Spehler, D.

    2004-05-01

    In this paper we extend previous hydrodynamic equations, governing the motion of Bose-Einstein-condensed fluids, to include temperature effects. This allows us to analyze some differences between a normal fluid and a Bose-Einstein-condensed one. We show that, in close analogy with superfluid {sup 4}He, a Bose-Einstein-condensed fluid exhibits the mechanocaloric and thermomechanical effects. In our approach we can explain both effects without using the hypothesis that the Bose-Einstein-condensed fluid has zero entropy. Such ideas could be investigated in existing experiments.

  16. Evaporation and condensation at a liquid surface. II. Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Yasuoka, Kenji; Kataoka, Yosuke

    1994-11-01

    The rates of evaporation and condensation of methanol under the vapor-liquid equilibrium condition at the temperature of 300 and 350 K are investigated with a molecular dynamics computer simulation. Compared with the argon system (reported in part I), the ratio of self-reflection is similar (˜10%), but the ratio of molecule exchange is several times larger than the argon, which suggests that the conventional assumption of condensation as a unimolecular process completely fails for associating fluids. The resulting total condensation coefficient is 20%-25%, and has a quantitative agreement with a recent experiment. The temperature dependence of the evaporation-condensation behavior is not significant.

  17. A Green Enantioselective Aldol Condensation for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, George D.

    2006-01-01

    A number of laboratory exercises for the organic chemistry curriculum that emphasize enantioselective synthesis of the aldol condensation which involves the proline-catalyzed condensation between acetone and isobutyraldehyde are explored. The experiment illustrates some of the trade-offs involved in green chemistry like the use of acetone in large…

  18. Condensation of gauge interacting massless fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Siringo, Fabio

    2004-09-15

    A single massless fermionic field with an Abelian U(1) gauge interaction (electrodynamics of a massless Dirac fermion) is studied by a variational method. Even without the insertion of any extra interaction the vacuum is shown to be unstable towards a particle-antiparticle condensate. The single particle excitations do acquire a mass and behave as massive Fermi particles. An explicit low-energy gap equation has been derived and numerically solved. Some consequences of condensation and mass generation are discussed in the framework of the standard model.

  19. An autonomous information generation and distribution system for the next generation of small satellites: examples of the BIRD mission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, Winfried; Briess, Klaus; Kayal, Hakan

    2004-02-01

    The general trend in remote sensing is on one hand to increase the number of spectral bands and the geometric resolution of the imaging sensors which leads to higher data rates and data volumes. On the other hand the user is often only interested in special information of the received sensor data and not in the whole data mass. Concerning these two tendencies a main part of the signal pre-processing can already be done for special users and tasks on-board a satellite. For the BIRD (Bispectral InfraRed Detection) mission a new approach of an on-board data processing is made. The main goal of the BIRD mission is the fire recognition and the detection of hot spots. This paper describes the technical solution and the first results, of an on-board image data processing system based on the sensor system on two new IR-Sensors and the stereo line scanner WAOSS (Wide-Angle-Optoelectronic-Scanner). The aim of this data processing system is to reduce the data stream from the satellite due to generations of thematic maps. This reduction will be made by a multispectral classification. For this classification a special hardware based on the neural network processor NI1000 was designed. This hardware is integrated in the payload data handling system of the satellite.

  20. An event generator for simulations of complex β-decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, D.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a Monte Carlo event generator for the design, optimization and performance characterization of beta decay spectroscopy experimental set-ups. The event generator has been developed within the Geant4 simulation architecture and provides new features and greater flexibility in comparison with the current available decay generator.

  1. Experience in Developing a Single-Phase Two Winding 5 kW Self-excited Induction Generator for Off-Grid Renewable Energy Based Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, S. S.; Singh, Bhim; Sandeep, Vuddanti

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the design and development of a novel single-phase two winding self-excited squirrel cage induction generator (SEIG) for off-grid renewable energy based power generation. The principles underlying the design process and experience with SPEED design tool are described to design a 5 kW, 50 Hz, 230 V, 4 pole single phase AC generator. All possible configurations to reduce harmonic components of induced e.m.f. are attempted for desired performance and to get an optimum design keeping in view the manufacturing constraints. The development of a prototype based on this design has been completed with the help of an industry. Typical test results on the prototype are presented to demonstrate its performance. Computed results are obtained with a design based computational procedure for performance analysis and a critical comparison is made with test results.

  2. Stability and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Condensing Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Pedersen, P. C.; Allen, J. S.; Shear, M. A.; Chen, Z. Q.; Alexandrou, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    . Non-condensing experiments in -1g have employed 50 cSt and 125 cSt silicone oil pumped through the perforated disks at a specified rate by a syringe micropump. The time to droplet break-off and the disturbance wavelengths appear to decrease with increasing pumping rate. The ability to reliably perform multi-point, ultrasonic measurements of the film thickness has been demonstrated. A linear array of eight transducers of 6 mm diameter (with a beam footprint of comparable size) are pulsed with a square-wave signal at a frequency of 5 MHz and a pulse duration of approximately 0.3 s. For thin films (60 m to 2-3 mm in thickness) the layer thickness is determined by frequency analysis, where the received ultrasound pulse is Fourier transformed and the spacing between the peaks in the frequency spectrum is analyzed. For thicker layers (up to at least 1 cm in thickness), time-domain analysis is performed of the received ultrasound pulses to generate directly the layer thickness. A time-trace of the film thickness at a point using a single transducer in the linear array is shown for the case of an unstable (-1g) n-pentane film. The oscillations in film thickness are evidently due to the passage and/or shedding of droplets from the cooled plate surface. The entire transducer array was used to measure the changes in film thickness resulting from the passage of gravity waves generated either by an oscillating wall or the impact of a single droplet on the free surface of a film. The enclosure in both cases was 14 cm square and the transducer spacing was 12 mm. Best results were obtained using as test fluid a mixture of 50% glycerol and 50% water with a fluid layer thickness of 3-5 mm. In both cases the measured wavelengths and wave propagation speeds using the ultrasound technique compared reasonably well with those observed by optical imaging. Additional information can be found in the original extended abstract.

  3. Dynamical spin-density waves in a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Qu, Chunlei; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic spin-orbit (SO) coupling, an important ingredient for quantum simulation of many exotic condensed matter physics, has recently attracted considerable attention. The static and dynamic properties of a SO-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) have been extensively studied in both theory and experiment. Here we numerically investigate the generation and propagation of a dynamical spin-density wave (SDW) in a SO-coupled BEC using a fast moving Gaussian-shaped barrier. We find that the SDW wavelength is sensitive to the barrier's velocity while varies slightly with the barrier's peak potential or width. We qualitatively explain the generation of SDW by considering a rectangular barrier in a one-dimensional system. Our results may motivate future experimental and theoretical investigations of rich dynamics in the SO-coupled BEC induced by a moving barrier.

  4. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach—based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants—that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle’s bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  5. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach--based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants--that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  6. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach--based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants--that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  7. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  8. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  9. Simplification of coding of NRU loop experiment software with dimensional generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. S.

    2006-07-01

    The following are specific topics of this paper: 1.There is much creativity in the manner in which Dimensional Generator can be applied to a specific programming task [2]. This paper tells how Dimensional Generator was applied to a reactor-physics task. 2. In this first practical use, Dimensional Generator itself proved not to need change, but a better user interface was found necessary, essentially because the relevance of Dimensional Generator to reactor physics was initially underestimated. It is briefly described. 3. The use of Dimensional Generator helps make reactor-physics source code somewhat simpler. That is explained here with brief examples from BURFEL-PC and WIMSBURF. 4. Most importantly, with the help of Dimensional Generator, all erroneous physical expressions were automatically detected. The errors are detailed here (in spite of the author's embarrassment) because they show clearly, both in theory and in practice, how Dimensional Generator offers quality enhancement of reactor-physics programming. (authors)

  10. Simulation Prediction of Transient Dropwise Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    In order to design effective surfaces for large-scale dropwise condensation, an understanding of how surface functionalization affects drop growth and coalescence is needed. The long term technological goal is a set of design conditions to help NASA achieve maximum heat transfer rates of waste heat generated from electronics and habitable environments under microgravity conditions. Prediction of condenser surface heat transfer performance requires accurate simulation and modeling of the evolution of populations of drops in time. At shorter times, drops are primarily isolated and grow mainly by condensation onto the liquid-gas interface. At longer times, drops grow mainly by coalescence with neighbors. Simulation of dropwise condensation on a neutrally wetting surface and comparison with our previous experimental results is reported. A steady-state single drop conduction model is empirically fitted to determine a temperature profile that captures the drop size evolution. The simulation accurately predicts the continuous time evolution of number-density of drops, drop-size distributions, total condensate volume, fractional coverage, and median drop-size for both transient and steady states, all with no free parameters. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  11. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  12. Inflation from gravitino condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2015-07-01

    We review work on the formation of gravitino condensates via the super-Higgs effect in the early Universe. This is a scenario for both inflating the early universe and breaking local supersymmetry(supergravity), entirely independent of any coupling to external matter. The goldstino mode associated with the breaking of (global) supersymmetry is “eaten” by the gravitino field, which becomes massive (via its own vacuum condensation) and breaks supergravity dynamically. The most natural association of gravitino condensates with inflation proceeds in an indirect way, via a Starobinsky-type inflation, in the massive gravitino phase. This inflationary phase is associated with scalar modes hidden in the higher order curvature corrections of the effective action arising from integrating out massive gravitino degrees of freedom. The scenario is in agreement with Planck data phenomenology in a natural and phenomenologically-relevant range of parameters, namely Grand-Unified-Theory values for the supersymmetry breaking energy scale and dynamically-induced gravitino mass. A hill-top inflation, on the other hand, which could also occur in the model, whereby the role of the inflaton field is played by the gravitino condensate itself, would require significant fine tuning in the inflaton's wave function renormalisation and thus may be discarded on naturalness grounds.

  13. Loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture and steam line break thermohydraulic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mendler, O J; Takeuchi, K; Young, M Y

    1986-10-01

    The Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, was reinstrumented and modified for performing a series of tests simulating steam generator accident transients. The transients simulated were: loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break events. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the tests performed, and (3) the analyses of the test results.

  14. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  15. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26237312

  16. Condensation and Evaporation of Solar System Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. M.; Richter, F. M.

    2003-12-01

    absence of isotopic fractionation in a volatile element-depleted condensed phase is more a measure of the degree to which the system maintained thermodynamic equilibrium than a diagnostic of whether the path involved condensation or evaporation.The pervasive volatile element depletion of inner solar system planets and the asteroidal parent bodies of most meteorites is a major, but by no means the only reason to consider evaporation and condensation processes in the early history of the solar system. Chondrules appear to have been rapidly heated and then cooled over a period of minutes to hours (see Chapter 1.07). If this occurred in a gas of solar composition under nonequilibrium conditions, chondrules should have partially evaporated and an isotopic fractionation record should remain. The absence of such effects can be used to chonstrain the conditions of chondrule formation (e.g., Alexander et al., 2000; Alexander and Wang, 2001). There is good petrologic, chemical, and isotopic evidence suggesting that certain solar system materials such as the coarse-grained CAIs are likely evaporation residues. For example, the type B CAIs are often found to have correlated enrichments in the heavy isotopes of silicon and magnesium ( Figure 1), and these isotopic fractionations are very much like those of evaporation residues produced in laboratory experiments. Condensation also appears to be a major control of elemental zoning patterns in metal grains in CH chondrites (Meibom et al., 1999, 2001; Campbell et al., 2001; Petaev et al., 2001; Campbell et al., 2002). A more contemporary example is the isotopic and chemical compositions of deep-sea spherules that have been significantly affected by evaporative loss during atmospheric entry ( Davis et al., 1991a; Davis and Brownlee, 1993; Herzog et al., 1994, 1999; Xue et al., 1995; Alexander et al., 2002). (7K)Figure 1. Isotopic mass fractionation effects in CAIs. Most coarse-grained CAIs have enrichments of a few ‰ amu-1 in magnesium

  17. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation.

    PubMed

    Tolokh, Igor S; Pabit, Suzette A; Katz, Andrea M; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to inter-DNA attraction and eventual condensation. Surprisingly, the condensation is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same negative charge as DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. Here, we combine experiment and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that explains the variations in condensation of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplexes, from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA. Circular dichroism measurements suggest that duplex helical geometry is not the fundamental property that ultimately determines the observed differences in condensation. Instead, these differences are governed by the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding to NA. There are two major NA-CoHex binding modes--internal and external--distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. We find a significant difference, up to 5-fold, in the fraction of ions bound to the external surfaces of the different NA constructs studied. NA condensation propensity is determined by the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode.

  18. The NSF Condensed Matter Physics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Paul

    The Condensed Matter Physics (CMP) program in the NSF Division of Materials Research (DMR) supports experimental, as well as combined experiment and theory projects investigating the fundamental physics behind phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. CMP is the largest Individual Investigator Award program in DMR and supports a broad portfolio of research spanning both hard and soft condensed matter. Representative research areas include: 1) phenomena at the nano- to macro-scale including: transport, magnetic, and optical phenomena; classical and quantum phase transitions; localization; electronic, magnetic, and lattice structure or excitations; superconductivity; topological insulators; and nonlinear dynamics. 2) low-temperature physics: quantum fluids and solids; 1D & 2D electron systems. 3) soft condensed matter: partially ordered fluids, granular and colloid physics, liquid crystals, and 4) understanding the fundamental physics of new states of matter as well as the physical behavior of condensed matter under extreme conditions e.g., low temperatures, high pressures, and high magnetic fields. In this talk I will review the current CMP portfolio and discuss future funding trends for the program. I will also describe recent activities in the program aimed at addressing the challenges facing current and future principal investigators.

  19. Laser Isotope Separation Employing Condensation Repression

    SciTech Connect

    Eerkens, Jeff W.; Miller, William H.

    2004-09-15

    Molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) techniques using condensation repression (CR) harvesting are reviewed and compared with atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), gaseous diffusion (DIF), ultracentrifuges (UCF), and electromagnetic separations (EMS). Two different CR-MLIS or CRISLA (Condensation Repression Isotope Separation by Laser Activation) approaches have been under investigation at the University of Missouri (MU), one involving supersonic super-cooled free jets and dimer formation, and the other subsonic cold-wall condensation. Both employ mixtures of an isotopomer (e.g. {sup i}QF{sub 6}) and a carrier gas, operated at low temperatures and pressures. Present theories of VT relaxation, dimerization, and condensation are found to be unsatisfactory to explain/predict experimental CRISLA results. They were replaced by fundamentally new models that allow ab-initio calculation of isotope enrichments and predictions of condensation parameters for laser-excited and non-excited vapors which are in good agreement with experiment. Because of supersonic speeds, throughputs for free-jet CRISLA are a thousand times higher than cold-wall CRISLA schemes, and thus preferred for large-quantity Uranium enrichments. For small-quantity separations of (radioactive) medical isotopes, the simpler coldwall CRISLA method may be adequate.

  20. Next-Generation Analysis of Deep Sequencing Data: Bringing Light into the Black Box of SELEX Experiments.

    PubMed

    Blank, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In silico analysis of next-generation sequencing data (NGS; also termed deep sequencing) derived from in vitro selection experiments enables the analysis of the SELEX procedure (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) in an unprecedented depth and improves the identification of aptamers. Besides quality control and optimization of starting libraries, advanced screening strategies for difficult targets or early identification of rare but high quality aptamers which are otherwise lost in the in vitro selection experiments become possible. The high information content of sequence data obtained from selection experiments is furthermore useful for subsequent lead optimization.

  1. Legacy, legitimacy, and possibility: an exploration of community health worker experience across the generations in Khayelitsha, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Alison

    2013-06-01

    In South Africa, the response to HIV and TB epidemics is complex, varied, and contextually defined. "Task-shifting" and a movement toward a decentralized model of care have led to an increased reliance on community health workers (CHWs) providing health care services to residents of impoverished, peri-urban areas. Public health policy tends to present CHWs as a homogeneous group, with little attention paid to the nuances of experience, motivation, and understanding, which distinguish these care workers from one another and from other kinds of health workers. An exploration of the layered meanings of providing community health care services under financially, politically, and socially difficult conditions reveals clear distinctions of experience across the generations. Many older CHWs say that ubuntu, a notion of shared African humanity, is being "killed off" by the younger generation, whereas younger CHWs often describe older women as being "jealous" of the opportunities that this younger generation has for education, training, and employment. The structure of the South African health system, past and present responses to disease epidemics, and the legacy of apartheid's structural violence have amplified these generational differences among CHWs. Using ethnographic data collected from approximately 20 CHWS in a peri-urban settlement in Cape Town, South Africa, I explore how CHWs experience and understand legitimacy in the moral economy of care. A call for closer attention to the experiences of CHWs is critical when designing public health policies for the delivery of health care services in impoverished communities in South Africa.

  2. Hispanic First-Generation Commuter Students at a Private College Reflect on Their Experience through the First Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurvey, Phyllis C.

    2011-01-01

    A volunteer sample of 16 Hispanic first-generation commuter college students, 9 women and 7 men, 18-30 years of age, attending a private college in the Northeast, were interviewed about their first-year college experience, with an emphasis on issues related to cultural capital and habitus. Five aspects of cultural capital were of interest:…

  3. Relationship between Academic Resilience and College Success: Cross-National Experiences of Low-Income/First-Generation Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbindyo, Margaret N.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the relationship between academic resilience (defined as the ability to effectively deal with setbacks, stress, or pressure in an academic setting) and the experiences of US students served by TRIO intervention programs (federally funded programs) that serve low-income/first-generation students. Based on a sample of 106,…

  4. "Desafios y Bendiciones": A Multiperspective Examination of the Educational Experiences and Coping Responses of First-Generation College Latina Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett

    2012-01-01

    Taking a multiperspective approach, seven Latina students, two student services personnel, and one mental health service provider are interviewed to gain different stakeholder perspectives regarding Latina first-generation college educational and coping experiences. Familial involvement and connections with family, peers, and university personnel…

  5. Legacy, legitimacy, and possibility: an exploration of community health worker experience across the generations in Khayelitsha, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Alison

    2013-06-01

    In South Africa, the response to HIV and TB epidemics is complex, varied, and contextually defined. "Task-shifting" and a movement toward a decentralized model of care have led to an increased reliance on community health workers (CHWs) providing health care services to residents of impoverished, peri-urban areas. Public health policy tends to present CHWs as a homogeneous group, with little attention paid to the nuances of experience, motivation, and understanding, which distinguish these care workers from one another and from other kinds of health workers. An exploration of the layered meanings of providing community health care services under financially, politically, and socially difficult conditions reveals clear distinctions of experience across the generations. Many older CHWs say that ubuntu, a notion of shared African humanity, is being "killed off" by the younger generation, whereas younger CHWs often describe older women as being "jealous" of the opportunities that this younger generation has for education, training, and employment. The structure of the South African health system, past and present responses to disease epidemics, and the legacy of apartheid's structural violence have amplified these generational differences among CHWs. Using ethnographic data collected from approximately 20 CHWS in a peri-urban settlement in Cape Town, South Africa, I explore how CHWs experience and understand legitimacy in the moral economy of care. A call for closer attention to the experiences of CHWs is critical when designing public health policies for the delivery of health care services in impoverished communities in South Africa. PMID:23804283

  6. Conducting Multi-Generational Qualitative Research in Education: An Experiment in Grounded Theory. Black Studies and Critical Thinking. Volume 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    This book outlines a methodology for viewing multiple generations of African Americans, specifically those who were called or called themselves Negro, Colored, Black, or African American (NCBAA). Within this framework, African Americans of varying ages describe their lives and educational experiences, allowing researchers to address a variety of…

  7. Experiences of Latina First Generation College Students: Exploring Resources Supporting the Balancing of Academic Pursuits and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona-Ordonez, Hercilia B.

    2013-01-01

    This study used a qualitative interview approach and thematic analysis (Braune and Clark, 2006) to interview first generation college student Latinas, exploring their experiences with higher education, their navigation/negotiation of resources for academic success and for wellness of self and family, and barriers they face as they attempt to both…

  8. First-Generation Latino Males in Latino Fraternities at a Predominately White Institution: Psychological, Social, and Cultural College Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Sheila Marie

    2011-01-01

    This research study explores the first-generation undergraduate Latino male student experience at a Predominantly White Institution (PWI) affiliated within Latino Greek fraternities. The Psychosociocultural (PSC) model (Gloria & Rodriguez, 2000; Pope & Reynolds, 2000) that is used highlights the psychological, social and cultural contributing…

  9. Earning and Learning: Exploring the Meaning of Work in the Experiences of First-Generation Latino College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuñez, Anne-Marie; Sansone, Vanessa A.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study examines how working influences students' college experiences, extending the predominantly quantitative research in this area. Findings based on interviews with Latino first-generation students who work reveal three themes. First, these students bring a familial orientation that motivates them to increase occupational…

  10. Perceptions of the College Experience Held by Life Partners of Rural, Nontraditionally-Aged, First-Generation Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Methvin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rural community colleges serve a large population of nontraditional, first-generation students, many of whom encounter obstacles to degree completion. A life partner who cohabits with a college student impacts the perceptions and actions of that student. However, a gap in research exists about the experiences and perceptions of those life…

  11. First-Generation College Seniors: A Phenomenological Exploration of the Transitional Experience of the Final College Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton-Healy, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the transitional experience of college seniors who are also first-generation status. This topic merits investigation because there is an increasing interest in various demographics of college students, and because college seniors represent an important retention demographic for American higher education, where the retention…

  12. Race-Gender Experiences and Schooling: Second-Generation Dominican, West Indian, and Haitian Youth in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Examined the race-gender gap in education among second-generation Caribbean American young adults (Dominicans, Haitians, and anglophone West Indians), using life history interviews, focus groups, and participant observation to investigate how their cumulative race-gender experiences influenced their outlooks toward schooling. Overall, women…

  13. Experimental Investigation of Flow Condensation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hyoungsoon; Park, Ilchung; Konishi, Christopher; Mudawar, Issam; May, Rochelle I.; Juergens, Jeffery R.; Wagner, James D.; Hall, Nancy R.; Nahra, Henry K.; Hasan, Mohammed M.; Mackey, Jeffery R.

    2013-01-01

    Future manned missions to Mars are expected to greatly increase the space vehicle's size, weight, and heat dissipation requirements. An effective means to reducing both size and weight is to replace single-phase thermal management systems with two-phase counterparts that capitalize upon both latent and sensible heat of the coolant rather than sensible heat alone. This shift is expected to yield orders of magnitude enhancements in flow boiling and condensation heat transfer coefficients. A major challenge to this shift is a lack of reliable tools for accurate prediction of two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in reduced gravity. Developing such tools will require a sophisticated experimental facility to enable investigators to perform both flow boiling and condensation experiments in microgravity in pursuit of reliable databases. This study will discuss the development of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station (ISS), which was initiated in 2012 in collaboration between Purdue University and NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility was recently tested in parabolic flight to acquire condensation data for FC-72 in microgravity, aided by high-speed video analysis of interfacial structure of the condensation film. The condensation is achieved by rejecting heat to a counter flow of water, and experiments were performed at different mass velocities of FC-72 and water and different FC-72 inlet qualities. It is shown that the film flow varies from smooth-laminar to wavy-laminar and ultimately turbulent with increasing FC-72 mass velocity. The heat transfer coefficient is highest near the inlet of the condensation tube, where the film is thinnest, and decreases monotonically along the tube, except for high FC-72 mass velocities, where the heat transfer coefficient is enhanced downstream. This enhancement is attributed to both turbulence and increased interfacial waviness. One-ge correlations are shown to

  14. Applications in biology and condensed matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.

    1991-12-01

    Position-sensitive detectors are a vital research tool in many areas of structural and molecular biology and condensed matter physics. The present review is mainly restricted to structural information obtained by X-ray scattering and diffraction and in DNA sequence analysis using autoradiography. Film has traditionally played the most important role, and for many applications is still the best medium for recording data, but advances in various types of detector technology has made them attractive, and in some cases essential alternatives. The requirements imposed by experiments vary a great deal and can be very demanding in terms of detector performance, e.g. in terms of count rates, particularly for synchrotron radiation, dynamic range, spatial resolution, ability to do time-resolved measurements on a millisecond time scale, differential and integral linearity and resistance to radiation damage. A brief review of detector properties will be presented and how they are matched in different cases with the experimental requirements along with a small selection of recent results and what new developments are needed to cope with the new generation of storage rings now under construction.

  15. Parameterizing cloud condensation nuclei concentrations during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hande, Luke B.; Engler, Christa; Hoose, Corinna; Tegen, Ina

    2016-09-01

    An aerosol model was used to simulate the generation and transport of aerosols over Germany during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) field campaign of 2013. The aerosol number concentrations and size distributions were evaluated against observations, which shows satisfactory agreement in the magnitude and temporal variability of the main aerosol contributors to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. From the modelled aerosol number concentrations, number concentrations of CCN were calculated as a function of vertical velocity using a comprehensive aerosol activation scheme which takes into account the influence of aerosol chemical and physical properties on CCN formation. There is a large amount of spatial variability in aerosol concentrations; however the resulting CCN concentrations vary significantly less over the domain. Temporal variability is large in both aerosols and CCN. A parameterization of the CCN number concentrations is developed for use in models. The technique involves defining a number of best fit functions to capture the dependence of CCN on vertical velocity at different pressure levels. In this way, aerosol chemical and physical properties as well as thermodynamic conditions are taken into account in the new CCN parameterization. A comparison between the parameterization and the CCN estimates from the model data shows excellent agreement. This parameterization may be used in other regions and time periods with a similar aerosol load; furthermore, the technique demonstrated here may be employed in regions dominated by different aerosol species.

  16. A solution study of silica condensation and speciation with relevance to in vitro investigations of biosilicification.

    PubMed

    Belton, David J; Deschaume, Olivier; Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Perry, Carole C

    2010-08-12

    Requiring mild synthesis conditions and possessing a high level of organization and functionality, biosilicas constitute a source of wonder and inspiration for both materials scientists and biologists. In order to understand how such biomaterials are formed and to apply this knowledge to the generation of novel bioinspired materials, a detailed study of the materials, as formed under biologically relevant conditions, is required. In this contribution, data from a detailed study of silica speciation and condensation using a model bioinspired silica precursor (silicon catechol complex, SCC) is presented. The silicon complex quickly and controllably dissociates under neutral pH conditions to well-defined, metastable solutions of orthosilicic acid. The formation of silicomolybdous (blue) complexes was used to monitor and study different stages of silicic acid condensation. In parallel, the rates of silicomolybdic (yellow) complex formation, with mathematical modeling of the species present, was used to follow the solution speciation of polysilicic acids. The results obtained from the two assays correlate well. Monomeric silicic acid, trimeric silicic acids, and different classes of oligomeric polysilicic acids and silica nuclei can be identified and their periods of stability during the early stages of silica condensation measured. For experiments performed at a range of temperatures (273-323 K), an activation energy of 77 kJ.mol(-1) was obtained for the formation of trimers. The activation energies for the forward and reverse condensation reactions for addition of monomers to polysilicic acids (273-293 +/- 1 K) were 55.0 and 58.6 kJ.mol(-1), respectively. For temperatures above 293 K, these energies were reduced to 6.1 and 7.3 kJ.mol(-1), indicating a probable change in the prevailing condensation mechanism. The impact of pH on the rates of condensation were measured. There was a direct correlation between the apparent third-order rate constant for trimer formation

  17. Generational Differences and Participant Experiences in Leadership Development: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remedies, Suzanne E.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study examines generational cohort perceptions as they apply to civilian leadership training within the DOD. Zenger, Ulrich and Smallwood (2000) describe that a new approach for developing future leaders is necessary. Identifying whether generational perceptions of ELDP members positively or negatively impact DOD…

  18. Examining the Experiences of Three Generations of Teacher Researchers through Collaborative Science Teacher Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capobianco, Brenda M.; Lincoln, Susan; Canuel-Browne, Donna; Trimarchi, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the teacher research movement from the perspective of three generations of teacher researchers within the context of a unique collaborative science teacher action research group. The question that guided the study was the following: In what ways do three generations of science teachers perceive their…

  19. Exploring the Experiences of Successful First-Generation Community College Students in Florida: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patron, Iliana M.

    2012-01-01

    As jobs become more competitive and demanding of specialized training, the presence of first-generation college students will continue to be a growing reality. However, unless the needs of first-generation students are addressed by educational institutions, the motivation experienced by those students to attend college will be short-lived. Even…

  20. "Limbo" through the Looking Glass: Adding the Voice of Family to the First Generation College Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Malinda Nichols

    2012-01-01

    In 2009 of the 9,793 undergraduates attending the University of Wyoming during the fall semester, 3,453 of them were first generation college students. The cultural assimilation often associated with college for first generation college students is often experienced by not only the student, but also the family left at home. This research serves as…

  1. First-Generation College Students' Descriptions of the Experience of Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francois, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that first-generation college students are less likely than their non-first-generation peers to persist to graduation. Impediments to persistence in college education include a lack of knowledge regarding navigating the college system, obstacles with the campus environment, inadequate academic preparation, and lack of family…

  2. French Regulatory practice and experience feedback on steam generator tube integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Sandon, G.

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the way the French Safety Authority applies regulatory rules and practices to the problem of steam generator tube cracking in French PWR reactors. There are 54 reactors providing 80% of French electrical consumption. The Safety Authority closely monitors the performance of tubes in steam generators, and requires application of a program which deals with problems prior to the actual development of leakage. The actual rules regarding such performance are flexible, responding to the overall performance of operating steam generators. In addition there is an inservice inspection service to examine tubes during shutdown, and to monitor steam generators for leakage during operation, with guidelines for when generators must be pulled off line.

  3. Photon condensation: A new paradigm for Bose-Einstein condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Renju; Ramesh Babu, P.; Senthilnathan, K.

    2016-10-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation is a state of matter known to be responsible for peculiar properties exhibited by superfluid Helium-4 and superconductors. Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in its pure form is realizable with alkali atoms under ultra-cold temperatures. In this paper, we review the experimental scheme that demonstrates the atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. We also elaborate on the theoretical framework for atomic Bose-Einstein condensation, which includes statistical mechanics and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. As an extension, we discuss Bose-Einstein condensation of photons realized in a fluorescent dye filled optical microcavity. We analyze this phenomenon based on the generalized Planck's law in statistical mechanics. Further, a comparison is made between photon condensate and laser. We describe how photon condensate may be a possible alternative for lasers since it does not require an energy consuming population inversion process.

  4. CLAS+FROST: new generation of photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Pasyuk

    2009-12-01

    A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to baryon spectroscopy. Photoproduction experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. Recent addition of the Frozen Spin Target (FROST) gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double and triple polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete experiment becomes possible and will allow model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experiment and its current status is presented.

  5. Feshbach-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, V. G.; Denteneer, P. J. H.

    2009-01-09

    We investigate the phase diagram of a two-species Bose-Hubbard model describing atoms and molecules on a lattice, interacting via a Feshbach resonance. We identify a region where the system exhibits an exotic super-Mott phase and regions with phases characterized by atomic and/or molecular condensates. Our approach is based on a recently developed exact quantum Monte Carlo algorithm: the stochastic Green function algorithm with tunable directionality. We confirm some of the results predicted by mean-field studies, but we also find disagreement with these studies. In particular, we find a phase with an atomic but no molecular condensate, which is missing in all mean-field phase diagrams.

  6. Multilayer graphene condenser microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, Dejan; Matković, Aleksandar; Milićević, Marijana; Jovanović, Djordje; Gajić, Radoš; Salom, Iva; Spasenović, Marko

    2015-12-01

    Vibrating membranes are the cornerstone of acoustic technology, forming the backbone of modern loudspeakers and microphones. Acoustic performance of a condenser microphone is derived mainly from the membrane’s size, surface mass and achievable static tension. The widely studied and available nickel has been a dominant membrane material for professional microphones for several decades. In this paper we introduce multilayer graphene as a membrane material for condenser microphones. The graphene device outperforms a high end commercial nickel-based microphone over a significant part of the audio spectrum, with a larger than 10 dB enhancement of sensitivity. Our experimental results are supported with numerical simulations, which also show that a 300 layer thick graphene membrane under maximum tension would offer excellent extension of the frequency range, up to 1 MHz.

  7. Development and application of an analysis methodology for interpreting ambiguous historical pressure data in the WIPP gas-generation experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.

    2006-01-23

    The potential for generation of gases in transuranic (TRU) waste by microbial activity, chemical interactions, corrosion, and radiolysis was addressed in the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-West) Gas-Generation Experiments (GGE). Data was collected over several years by simulating the conditions in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) after the eventual intrusion of brine into the repository. Fourteen test containers with various actual TRU waste immersed in representative brine were inoculated with WIPP-relevant microbes, pressurized with inert gases, and kept in an inert-atmosphere environment for several years to provide estimates of the gas-generation rates that will be used in computer models for future WIPP Performance Assessments. Modest temperature variations occurred during the long-term ANL-West experiments. Although the experiment temperatures always remained well within the experiment specifications, the small temperature variation was observed to affect the test container pressure far more than had been anticipated. In fact, the pressure variations were so large, and seemingly erratic, that it was impossible to discern whether the data was even valid and whether the long-term pressure trend was increasing, decreasing, or constant. The result was that no useful estimates of gas-generation rates could be deduced from the pressure data. Several initial attempts were made to quantify the pressure fluctuations by relating these to the measured temperature variation, but none was successful. The work reported here carefully analyzed the pressure measurements to determine if these were valid or erroneous data. It was found that a thorough consideration of the physical phenomena that were occurring can, in conjunction with suitable gas laws, account quite accurately for the pressure changes that were observed. Failure of the earlier attempts to validate the data was traced to the omission of several phenomena, the most important being the variation in

  8. Next-Generation Thermal Infrared Multi-Body Radiometer Experiment (TIMBRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, M.; Mariani, G.; Johnson, B.; Brageot, E.; Hayne, P.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an instrument concept called TIMBRE which belongs to the important class of instruments called thermal imaging radiometers (TIRs). TIMBRE is the next-generation TIR with unparalleled performance compared to the state-of-the-art.

  9. Operating experience with four 200 kW Mod-0A wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.; Saunders, A. L.; Nyland, T. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    The windpowered generator, Mod-0A, and its advantages and disadvantages, particularly as it affects reliability, are discussed. The machine performance with regard to power availability and power output is discussed.

  10. Chondrules as condensation products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. A.; Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The formation of meteoritic chondrules via condensation from the primordial solar nebula is discussed. Chondrule formation in regions where the gas/dust ratio was enhanced, and where transient high energy events heated the gas and temporarily vaporized the dust, is advocated. The observed diversity of chondrule types can be understood as resulting from local variations in the initial gas/dust proportions and other parameters.

  11. Educational Generations and the Futures of Adult Education: A Nordic Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antikainen, Ari; Kauppila, Juha

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of life stories of Finnish adults identified three cohorts with distinct life/education experiences (born pre-1935, 1936-55, post-1955). Core experiences were summarized as narratives of national culture and economic structural change. Three future scenarios for adult education were developed: formal rationality and bureaucracy, material…

  12. Heat transfer from a high temperature condensable mixture. II. Sedimentation of fog condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Condiff, D.W.; Cho, D.H.; Chan, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic wave analysis of fog sedimentation is employed to relate growth of a fog condensate deposit layer to radiation generated fog formation rates. The increase of surface radiation absorptivity with deposit layer thickness promotes a feedback mechanism for higher growth rates, which is evaluated in detail.

  13. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  14. "Hard to crack": experiences of community integration among first- and second-generation Asian MSM in Canada.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nadine; Chan, Elic; Fischer, Benedikt

    2013-07-01

    Asians are the largest racial minority in Canada making up 11% of the population and represented over 60% of new immigrants between 2001 and 2006. We examined the experiences of community integration for first-generation (n = 27) and second-generation (n = 22) Asian Canadian men who have sex with men (MSM) in their ethnic and gay communities. Through focus group interviews, we explored their level of connectedness and the level of discrimination they experienced in the two communities. Findings indicate that Asian MSM in general perceived their ethnic community as homophobic, stemming from a combination of seeing sex as taboo, stereotypes about being gay, and the affiliation with religion. Although the literature indicates that immigrants rely on the support of their ethnic communities, our finding suggest that this is not the case for Asian immigrant MSM, who in our sample reported feeling less connected compared to their second-generation counterparts. For the gay community, our sample reported mixed experiences as some regarded it as welcoming, whereas others described it as racist. However, these experiences did not differ by generational status. Many were aware of explicit messages stating "No Asians" in dating contexts, while at the same time being aware that some older White men were interested in dating Asians exclusively. Barriers to integration in both communities may contribute to feelings of isolation. Theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:23875850

  15. "Hard to crack": experiences of community integration among first- and second-generation Asian MSM in Canada.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nadine; Chan, Elic; Fischer, Benedikt

    2013-07-01

    Asians are the largest racial minority in Canada making up 11% of the population and represented over 60% of new immigrants between 2001 and 2006. We examined the experiences of community integration for first-generation (n = 27) and second-generation (n = 22) Asian Canadian men who have sex with men (MSM) in their ethnic and gay communities. Through focus group interviews, we explored their level of connectedness and the level of discrimination they experienced in the two communities. Findings indicate that Asian MSM in general perceived their ethnic community as homophobic, stemming from a combination of seeing sex as taboo, stereotypes about being gay, and the affiliation with religion. Although the literature indicates that immigrants rely on the support of their ethnic communities, our finding suggest that this is not the case for Asian immigrant MSM, who in our sample reported feeling less connected compared to their second-generation counterparts. For the gay community, our sample reported mixed experiences as some regarded it as welcoming, whereas others described it as racist. However, these experiences did not differ by generational status. Many were aware of explicit messages stating "No Asians" in dating contexts, while at the same time being aware that some older White men were interested in dating Asians exclusively. Barriers to integration in both communities may contribute to feelings of isolation. Theoretical implications are discussed.

  16. [Growth and development of plants in a row of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinskikh, M. A.; Sychev, V. N.; Derendiaeva, T. A.; Signalova, O. B.; Podol'skii, I. G.; Avdeev, S. V.; Bingheim, G. E.; Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Results of the experiment aimed at harvesting a second space generation of wheat var. Apogee in Mir greenhouse Svet (experiment GREENHOUSE-5) are presented. In space flight, germination rate of space seeds from the first crop made up 89% against 100% of the ground seeds. The full biological ripeness was observed in 20 plants grown from the ground seeds and one plant grown from the space seeds following 80- to 90-d vegetation. The plant of the second space generation was morphologically different neither from the species in the first space crop nor from the ground controls. To study the biological characteristics of Apogee seeds gathered in the first and second crops in spaceflight experiment GREENHOUSE-5, the seeds were planted on their return to the laboratory. Morphometric analysis showed that they were essentially similar to the controls. Hence, the space experiments in Mir greenhouse Svet performed during 1998-1999 gave proof that plants cultivated in microgravity can pass the ontogenetic cycle more than once. However, initial results of the investigations into growth and development of plants through several generations are still in-sufficient to speak of possible delayed effects of the spaceflight factors (microgravity, multicomponent radiation, harmful trace contaminants etc.).

  17. The Role of Garnet Pyroxenite in High-Fe Mantle Melt Generation: High Pressure Melting Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuff, J.; Takahashi, E.; Gibson, S.

    2004-12-01

    Evidence for the existence of heterogeneous or 'marble cake' convecting mantle1 is provided recently by rare, high MgO ( ˜ 15 wt.%) primitive magmas with anomalously high abundances of FeO* ( ˜ 13.5 to 16 wt. %2,3; where FeO* = total Fe as FeO). These high-Fe mantle melts show a limited occurrence in the initial stage of magmatism in large igneous provinces (e.g. Deccan, Ethiopia and Paraná-Etendeka) and some have incompatible trace-element and radiogenic-isotopic ratios (Sr, Nd and Pb) that resemble those of ocean-island basalts. This suggests that they are predominantly derived from the convecting mantle2. The ferropicrites are mildly- to sub-alkaline and have low contents of Al2O3 (< 10 wt.%) and heavy rare-earth elements (e.g. Lu < 0.18ppm) that are consistent with the increased stability of garnet, due to the high FeO* content in the ferropicrite mantle source. It has been proposed that the source of the high FeO* may be garnet-pyroxenite streaks derived from subducted mafic oceanic crust2. We have undertaken melting experiments between 1 atmosphere and 7 GPa in order to determine the anhydrous phase relations of an uncontaminated ferropicrite lava from the base of the Early-Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka continental flood-basalt province. The sample has high contents of MgO ( ˜ 14.9 wt.%), FeO* (14.9 wt.%) and NiO (0.07 wt.%). Olivine phenocrysts have maximum Fo contents of 85 and are in equilibrium with the host rock, assuming a Kd of 0.32 and we believe that the sample is representative of a primary Fe-rich mantle plume derived melt. In total, 75 experimental runs were carried out. Melting phase relations as well as compositions and modal proportions of all coexisting phases were successfully determined in 60 run products. Phase relations indicate that the ferropicrite melt was generated either at ˜ 2.2 GPa from an olivine-pyroxene residue or ˜ 5 GPa from a garnet-pyroxene residue. A low bulk-rock Al2O3 content (9 wt.%) and high [Gd/Yb]n ratio (3.1) are

  18. Defining the next generation journal: The NLM–Elsevier interactive publications experiment*

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Elliot R.; Lindberg, Donald A.B.; Campbell, Glen P.; Harless, William G.; Goodwin, C. Rory

    2010-01-01

    Objective A unique collaborative project to identify interactive enhancements to conventional-print journal articles, and to evaluate their contribution to readers’ learning and satisfaction. Hypothesis It was hypothesized that (a) the enhanced article would yield more knowledge acquisition than the original article; (b) the interactivity aspects of the enhanced article would measurably contribute to the acquisition of knowledge; and (c) the enhancements to the original article would increase reader acceptance. Methods Fifteen SNMA medical students, assumed to have a greater generational familiarity and comfort level with interactive electronic media, reviewed 12 articles published in three Elsevier clinical and basic science journals. They used the Student National Medical Association’s asynchronous online discussion forum over a four month period to suggest desired enhancements to improve learning. “Prognostic Factors in Stage T1 Bladder Cancer”, published in the journal Urology was selected by the investigators as presenting the best opportunity to incorporate many of the students’ suggested interactive and presentational enhancements in the limited timeframe available prior to the established test date. Educational, statistical, and medical consultants assisted in designing a test protocol in which 51 second to fourth year medical students were randomly assigned to experimental and control conditions, and were administered either the original or enhanced interactive version of the article on individual computer workstations. Test subjects consisted of 23 participants in the control group (8 males, 15 females) and 28 participants in the experimental group (9 males, 19 females). All subjects completed pre- and post-test instruments which measured their knowledge gain on 30 true-false and multiple-choice questions, along with 7 Likert-type questions measuring acceptance of the articles’ format. Time to completion was recorded with the experimental

  19. Development of Next Generation Memory Test Experiment for Deployment on a Small Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd; Ho, Fat D.

    2012-01-01

    The original Memory Test Experiment successfully flew on the FASTSAT satellite launched in November 2010. It contained a single Ramtron 512K ferroelectric memory. The memory device went through many thousands of read/write cycles and recorded any errors that were encountered. The original mission length was schedule to last 6 months but was extended to 18 months. New opportunities exist to launch a similar satellite and considerations for a new memory test experiment should be examined. The original experiment had to be designed and integrated in less than two months, so the experiment was a simple design using readily available parts. The follow-on experiment needs to be more sophisticated and encompass more technologies. This paper lays out the considerations for the design and development of this follow-on flight memory experiment. It also details the results from the original Memory Test Experiment that flew on board FASTSAT. Some of the design considerations for the new experiment include the number and type of memory devices to be used, the kinds of tests that will be performed, other data needed to analyze the results, and best use of limited resources on a small satellite. The memory technologies that are considered are FRAM, FLASH, SONOS, Resistive Memory, Phase Change Memory, Nano-wire Memory, Magneto-resistive Memory, Standard DRAM, and Standard SRAM. The kinds of tests that could be performed are read/write operations, non-volatile memory retention, write cycle endurance, power measurements, and testing Error Detection and Correction schemes. Other data that may help analyze the results are GPS location of recorded errors, time stamp of all data recorded, radiation measurements, temperature, and other activities being perform by the satellite. The resources of power, volume, mass, temperature, processing power, and telemetry bandwidth are extremely limited on a small satellite. Design considerations must be made to allow the experiment to not interfere

  20. The third generation (e,e'K+) hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment at JLab Hall-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawama, Daisuke; JLab E05-115 Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    We carried out a Λ hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment at Jefferson Lab in 2009, aiming at precise spectroscopy of Λ hypernuclei in the wide-mass region up to A=52. The experiment has been successfully carried out and now we are in data analysis phase. The most important point of the analysis is precision mass scale calibration by comparing mass spectra of Λ hypernuclei and Λ and Σ0 hyperons in the same setup with Λ hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment. We show a preliminary result of the calibration analysis with 12ΛB spectrum.

  1. The third generation (e,e'K+) hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment at JLab Hall-C

    SciTech Connect

    Daisuke Kawama, Jlab E05-115 Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    We carried out a Lambda hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment at Jefferson Lab in 2009, aiming at precise spectroscopy of {Lambda} hypernuclei in the wide-mass region up to A = 52. The experiment has been successfully carried out and now we are in data analysis phase. The most important point of the analysis is precision mass scale calibration by comparing mass spectra of Lambda hypernuclei and Lambda and {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperons in the same setup with {Lambda} hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment. We show a preliminary result of the calibration analysis with {sup 12}{sub {Lambda}}B spectrum.

  2. An experience in mesh generation for three-dimensional calculation of potential flow around a rotating propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, W.-H.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a three-dimensional, finite volume computational code for highly swept, twisted, small aspect ratio propeller blades with supersonic tip speeds, in a way that accounts for cascade effects, hub-induced flow, and nonlinear transonic effects. Attention is presently given to the generation of a computational mesh for such a complex propeller configuration, with the aim of sharing developmental process experience. The problem treated is unique, in that blade chord, blade length, hub length and blade-to-blade distance represent several characteristic length scales among which there is considerable disparity. An ad hoc mesh-generation scheme is accordingly developed.

  3. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey

    2014-09-15

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to attraction between the negatively charged helices and eventually to condensation. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same charge as the DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. However, additional characterization of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplex structures by circular dichroism shows that measured differences in condensation are not solely determined by duplex helical geometry. Here we combine experiment, theory, and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that connects the observed variations in condensation of short NA duplexes with the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding at the NA duplex surface. The atomistic picture that emerged showed that CoHex distributions around the NA reveals two major NA-CoHex binding modes -- internal and external -- distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. Decreasing trends in experimentally observed condensation propensity of the four studied NA duplexes (from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA) are explained by the progressive decrease of a single quantity: the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. Thus, while NA condensation depends on a complex interplay between various structural and sequence features, our coupled experimental and theoretical results suggest a new model in which a single parameter connects the NA condensation propensity with geometry and sequence dependence of CoHex binding.

  4. Optical Comb Generation for Streak Camera Calibration for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Justin, Terence Davies, Frans Janson, Bruce Marshall, Perry Bell, Daniel Kalantar, Joseph Kimbrough, Stephen Vernon, Oliver Sweningsen

    2008-09-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is coming on-line to support physics experimentation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and Stockpile Stewardship (SS). Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation at NIF. To accurately reduce streak camera data a highly accurate temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for simultaneously generating a precise +/- 2 ps optical marker pulse (fiducial reference) and trains of precisely timed, short-duration optical pulses (so-called “comb” pulse trains) that are suitable for the timing calibrations. These optical pulse generators are used with the LLNL optical streak cameras. They are small, portable light sources that, in the comb mode, produce a series of temporally short, uniformly spaced optical pulses, using a laser diode source. Comb generators have been produced with pulse-train repetition rates up to 10 GHz at 780 nm, and somewhat lower frequencies at 664 nm. Individual pulses can be as short as 25-ps FWHM. Signal output is via a fiber-optic connector on the front panel of the generator box. The optical signal is transported from comb generator to streak camera through multi-mode, graded-index optical fiber.

  5. Experiments on bubble generation by a hydrofoil moving beneath the water surface for reducing ship drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Ichiro; Murai, Yuichi; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Sakamaki, Haruki; Tsukahara, Takahiro; Ozaki, Tsubasa; Tasaka, Yuji; Oishi, Yoshihiko

    2014-04-01

    We have invented two types of hydrofoil bubble generator for drag reduction of ship that can reduce the energy for air bubble generation on the ship hull. Their fundamental process of air entrainment and subsequent bubble generation by the hydrofoil facility are described by a simple fluid dynamic model. We experimentally determined the critical velocity of the bubble generation and the relationship between air volume flow rate and the hydrofoil velocity. The magnitude of the negative pressure produced above the hydrofoil, which is a driving force of the air entrainment, depends on the shape of the hydrofoil, gap ratio (normalized depth of the hydrofoil), Reynolds number, Froude number, and angle of attack. Recent applications of the drag-reduction technology with air bubbles to a ship save about 10%-15% of the total energy consumption of the ship. The device works as a self-priming pump when the draft of the ship is shallow (< ˜5 m) as predicted by the theory. For ships of deeper draft, the device needs the assistance of an air compressor. Because the magnitude of the negative pressure above the hydrofoil depends on the flow condition around the hydrofoil, proper operation of compressors is necessary. We also show experimental results on optimization of hydrofoils to enhance the hydrofoil performance of air entrainment and air bubble generation.

  6. Dual stator winding variable speed asynchronous generator: magnetic equivalent circuit with saturation, FEM analysis and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutelea, L. N.; Muntean, N.; Deaconu, S. I.; Cunţan, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The authors carried out a theoretical and experimental study of dual stator winding squirrel cage asynchronous generator (DSWA) behaviour in the presence of saturation regime (non-sinusoidal) due to the variable speed operation. The main aims are the determination of the relations of calculating the equivalent parameters of the machine windings, FEM validation of parameters and characteristics with free FEMM 4.2 computing software and the practice experimental tests for verifying them. Issue is limited to three phase range of double stator winding cage-asynchronous generator of small sized powers, the most currently used in the small adjustable speed wind or hydro power plants. The tests were carried out using three-phase asynchronous generator having rated power of 6 [kVA].

  7. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any

  8. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 2. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Solano County project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the wind turbine's first rotation. This technical report presents the experiences of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) with its wind turbine installation at Solano County, California. All documents and reports pertaining to PG and E's experience with wind energy at Solano County were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. The chronology of steps taken by PG and E in implementing the Solano wind turbine experience and some of the lessons learned are included in the report. In each section, important activities, critical assumptions, and interesting insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  9. Generation of Mie size microdroplet aerosols with applications in laser-driven fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, A P; Semonin, O; Bruce, S; Chan, C; Maindi, M; Donnelly, T D; Maurer, M; Bang, W; Churina, I; Osterholz, J; Kim, I; Bernstein, A C; Ditmire, T

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a tunable source of Mie scale microdroplet aerosols that can be used for the generation of energetic ions. To demonstrate this potential, a terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser focused to 2 x 10(19) W/cm2 was used to irradiate heavy water (D2O) aerosols composed of micron-scale droplets. Energetic deuterium ions, which were generated in the laser-droplet interaction, produced deuterium-deuterium fusion with approximately 2 x 10(3) fusion neutrons measured per joule of incident laser energy. PMID:19566203

  10. Preliminary results of the on-demand vortex-generator experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1995-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of our experimental investigations (Saddoughi 1994) of 'on-demand' vortex generators. Conventional vortex generators as found on aircraft wings are mainly for suppression of separation during the off-design conditions. In cruise they perform no useful function and exert a significant drag penalty. Therefore, replacement of fixed rectangular or delta-wing generators by devices that could be activated when needed would be of interest. Also in our previous report, we described one example of an 'on-demand' device, which was developed by Jacobson & Reynolds (1995) at Stanford University, suitable for manufacture by micro-electro-mechanical technology. This device consists of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and covered with a lid cantilevered at the upstream end. The lid, which is a metal sheet with a sheet of piezoelectric ceramic bonded to it, lies flush with the boundary. On application of a voltage the ceramic expands or contracts; however, adequate amplitude can be obtained only by running at the cantilever resonance frequency and applying amplitude modulation: for 2.5 mm x 20 mm cantilevered lids, they obtained maximum tip displacements of the order of 100 pm. Thus fluid is expelled from the cavity through the gap around the lid on the downstroke. They used an asymmetrical gap configuration and found that periodic emerging jets on the narrow side induced periodic longitudinal vorticity into the boundary layer. Their device was used to modify the inner layer of the boundary layer for skin-friction reduction. The same method could be implemented for the replacement of the conventional vortex generators; however, to promote mixing and suppress separation we needed to deposit longitudinal vortices into the outer layer of the boundary layer, which required a larger vortex generator than the device built by Jacobson & Reynolds. Our vortex generator was built with a mechanically-driven cantilevered lid with an

  11. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-15

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π{sup 0} vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of ν{sub µ} charged current interactions.

  12. Coherence expansion and polariton condensate formation in a semiconductor microcavity.

    PubMed

    Belykh, V V; Sibeldin, N N; Kulakovskii, V D; Glazov, M M; Semina, M A; Schneider, C; Höfling, S; Kamp, M; Forchel, A

    2013-03-29

    The dynamics of the expansion of the first order spatial coherence g(1) for a polariton system in a high-Q GaAs microcavity was investigated on the basis of Young's double slit experiment under 3 ps pulse excitation at the conditions of polariton Bose-Einstein condensation. It was found that in the process of condensate formation the coherence expands with a constant velocity of about 10(8)  cm/s. The measured coherence is smaller than that in a thermal equilibrium system during the growth of condensate density and well exceeds it at the end of condensate decay. The onset of spatial coherence is governed by polariton relaxation while condensate amplitude and phase fluctuations are not suppressed.

  13. Spin selective filtering of polariton condensate flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, T.; Antón, C.; Martín, M. D.; Liew, T. C. H.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Viña, L.; Eldridge, P. S.; Savvidis, P. G.

    2015-07-06

    Spin-selective spatial filtering of propagating polariton condensates, using a controllable spin-dependent gating barrier, in a one-dimensional semiconductor microcavity ridge waveguide is reported. A nonresonant laser beam provides the source of propagating polaritons, while a second circularly polarized weak beam imprints a spin dependent potential barrier, which gates the polariton flow and generates polariton spin currents. A complete spin-based control over the blocked and transmitted polaritons is obtained by varying the gate polarization.

  14. Effect of spontaneous condensation on condensation heat transfer in the presence of non-condensable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, J.; Hein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The presence of non condensable gases like nitrogen or air reduces the condensation heat transfer during condensation of binary steam mixtures. The non condensable gas accumulates in the vapor phase boundary layer and causes a high heat transfer resistance. Especially with high pressures and low water temperatures spontaneous condensation reduces heat transfer additionally. Fog forms within the steam-nitrogen boundary layer and the steam condenses on the water droplets of the fog layer. The convective mass transfer to the cooling water interface diminishes. Raman spectroscopy and film theory are used to quantify this effect locally. The calculation of overall condensation rates in large steam nitrogen systems requires to use three dimensional CFD codes. The paper presents equations to predict fog formation in the boundary layer which can be implemented in CFD codes.

  15. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation

  16. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  17. A Cultural Mismatch: The Experience of First-Generation College Students in Elite Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    "First-generation" college students, whose parents have not attended college, are an increasing presence at elite colleges and universities. Admitting these students, however, is not enough to ensure that they can take full advantage of the opportunities available to them in college and succeed there. Indeed, research indicates that…

  18. First-Generation College Students' 1st-Year College Experiences: Challenges Attending a Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) face challenges when switching from high school to college and during their 1st-year in college. Additionally, FGCS may have difficulty understanding the steps required to prepare for and enroll in postsecondary education. The social capital theory examines support of social, academic, and cultural networks…

  19. Discovering Shared Experiences of Second Generation Community College Employees: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studebaker, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The second generation community college employee had not been a target population of any previous research in the field of higher education. This study added to a broader understanding of employees, their various characteristics, and the implications of those characteristics. The purpose of this study was to develop a grounded theory defining the…

  20. Faculty Perceptions of the First-Generation Student Experience and Programs at Tribal Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Jacqueline J.; Akande, Yemi

    2011-01-01

    Although an increasing number of Native Americans are enrolling as first-generation college students (FGS) at postsecondary institutions, the percentage of those attaining bachelor's degrees or higher remains relatively low--11 percent, compared with more than 25 percent for the general population. Native Americans face not only the retention…

  1. Perceptions of the Persistent: Academic Experiences of First Generation Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Anthea E.

    2010-01-01

    While open access is still possible at community colleges and state colleges in Florida through the Florida College System, and the numbers of those enrolling are increasing, retention of first generation students is still an issue. Florida has increased the opportunity to attend college by limiting the barrier that inadequate financial support…

  2. Theorizing Multidimensional Identity Negotiation: Reflections on the Lived Experiences of First-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orbe, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Drawing from recent research on first-generation college (FGC) students, this chapter advances an interdisciplinary theoretical framework for understanding how these students enact multiple aspects of their personal, cultural, and social identities. I use dialectical and cross-cultural adaptation theories as a foundation to extend examinations of…

  3. Developing the next Generation of Education Researchers: UCLA's Experience with the Spencer Foundation Research Training Grant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorr, Aimee; Arms, Emily; Hall, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Background/Context: In the early 1990s, the Spencer Foundation instituted an Institutional Research Training Grant (RTG) program to improve the preparation of the next generation of education researchers. UCLA received an RTG in the first round of competition. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: UCLA's Spencer RTG program sought to…

  4. Quantification of parameters influencing methane generation due to biodegradation of municipal solid waste in landfills and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xunchang; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    The energy conversion potential of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposed of in landfills remains largely untapped because of the slow and variable rate of biogas generation, delayed and inefficient biogas collection, leakage of biogas, and landfill practices and infrastructure that are not geared toward energy recovery. A database consisting of methane (CH4) generation data, the major constituent of biogas, from 49 laboratory experiments and field monitoring data from 57 landfills was developed. Three CH4 generation parameters, i.e., waste decay rate (k), CH4 generation potential (L0), and time until maximum CH4 generation rate (tmax), were calculated for each dataset using U.S. EPA's Landfill Gas Emission Model (LandGEM). Factors influencing the derived parameters in laboratory experiments and landfills were investigated using multi-linear regression analysis. Total weight of waste (W) was correlated with biodegradation conditions through a ranked classification scheme. k increased with increasing percentage of readily biodegradable waste (Br0 (%)) and waste temperature, and reduced with increasing W, an indicator of less favorable biodegradation conditions. The values of k obtained in the laboratory were commonly significantly higher than those in landfills and those recommended by LandGEM. The mean value of L0 was 98 and 88L CH4/kg waste for laboratory and field studies, respectively, but was significantly affected by waste composition with ranges from 10 to 300L CH4/kg. tmax increased with increasing percentage of biodegradable waste (B0) and W. The values of tmax in landfills were higher than those in laboratory experiments or those based on LandGEM's recommended parameters. Enhancing biodegradation conditions in landfill cells has a greater impact on improving k and tmax than increasing B0. Optimizing the B0 and Br0 values of landfilled waste increases L0 and reduces tmax.

  5. Condensation enhancement by means of electrohydrodynamic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butrymowicz, Dariusz; Karwacki, Jarosław; Trela, Marian

    2014-12-01

    Short state-of-the-art on the enhancement of condensation heat transfer techniques by means of condensate drainage is presented in this paper. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) technique is suitable for dielectric media used in refrigeration, organic Rankine cycles and heat pump devices. The electric field is commonly generated in the case of horizontal tubes by means of a rod-type electrode or mesh electrodes. Authors proposed two geometries in the presented own experimental investigations. The first one was an electrode placed just beneath the tube bottom and the second one consisted of a horizontal finned tube with a double electrode placed beneath the tube. The experimental investigations of these two configurations for condensation of refrigerant R-123 have been accomplished. The obtained results confirmed that the application of the EHD technique for the investigated tube and electrode arrangement caused significant increase in heat transfer coefficient. The condensation enhancement depends both on the geometry of the electrode system and on the applied voltage.

  6. Convection, evaporation, and condensation of binary fluids in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Roman; Qin, Tongran; Li, Yaofa; Chan, Benjamin; Yoda, Minami

    2011-11-01

    Phase change has a major effect on convection in liquid layers with a free surface. Significant latent heat generated at the free surface as a result of phase change can dramatically alter the interfacial temperature, inducing thermocapillary stresses. For binary fluids, differential evaporation leads to a variation in the concentration, and hence, induces solutocapillary stresses. This talk describes numerical and experimental studies of convection in alcohol-water mixtures due to a horizontal temperature gradient in the presence of phase change. Evaporation and condensation is known to be a notoriously difficult problem to model due to a poorly defined vapor transport problem which is strongly influenced by the presence/absence and flows of non-condensable gases (e.g., air). This issue is addressed by using a sealed cuvette heated at one end and cooled at the other. Both numerics and experiments show that, by adding or removing air from the cuvette, the direction of flow in a liquid layer covering the bottom of the cell can be reversed by emphasizing either thermocapillary or solutocapillary stresses. Supported by ONR.

  7. Route to Quantum Turbulence in Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A.; Parker, Nick; Proukakis, Nick; Barenghi, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    Turbulence in superfluid Helium has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations (for review see e.g. L. Skrbek and K.R. Sreenivasan, Phys. of Fluids 24, 011301 (2012)) and recently, experimentalists have been able to visualize vortex lines, reconnection events and Kelvin waves (E. Fonda et al. arXiv:1210.5194). Weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensates however, present a unique opportunity to resolve the structure of vortices and in turn study the dynamics of a vortex tangle (as has recently been created in an atomic cloud E.A.L. Henn et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 103, 04301 (2009)). We investigate ways of generating turbulence in atomic systems by numerically stirring the condensate using a Gaussian `spoon' (analogous to a laser beam in the experiments), and study the isotropy of the resulting vortex tangle depending on whether the path the spoon stirs is circular or random. We model the system using the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation and extend our analysis to finite temperature using the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin (ZNG) formalism (E. Zaremba et al. Jour. Low Temp. Phys. 116, 277 (1999)), whereby the full dynamics of the noncondensate atoms are described by a semiclassical Boltzmann equation.

  8. Polarimeter Arrays with Comprehensive Frequency Coverage for the Next Generation of Precision Microwave Background Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, Jason Edward; Beall, James; Becker, Dan; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Duff, Shannon; gao, jiansong; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent; li, dale; McKenney, Christopher; Ullom, Joel; van lanen, jeffrey; Vissers, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Spectral resolution at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths is now understood to be crucially important in precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Recent results from the Planck and BICEP/KECK experiments have established that measurements of the CMB polarization signal is limited, in part, by polarized foreground emission. In particular, polarized emission from galactic dust has been found to dominate and obscure potential signals of cosmic inflation, even in regions of the sky specifically identified as having relatively low galactic emission. Current and future experiments aim to address foreground contamination by conducting high-sensitivity observations with broad spectral coverage that will allow for differentiation within the measured signal between foreground sources of polarization and that of the CMB, which each have distinct spectral characteristics. To efficiently achieve these goals within a limited focal plane area, NIST-Boulder has developed multi-band TES-based polarimeters that simultaneously measure multiple spectral bands in each of two orthogonal polarizations. This acts to both increase pixel sensitivity through an increased total bandwidth, as well as providing broad spectral information for differentiation of emission sources. Here, we describe recent achievements and ongoing efforts at NIST-Boulder in the development of millimeter and sub-millimeter detector and focal plane technologies for future experiments, including the stage-IV CMB experiment, CMB-S4. NIST-Boulder provides critical cryogenic components to a large number of current and in-development CMB experiments. Recent milestones include the fielding of the first broadband multi-chroic mm-wave polarimeters in the ACTPol experiment, multi-band array fabrication on large-format 150 mm wafers, and development of matching 150 mm silicon platelet feedhorn arrays. We also review several related development efforts in detector, optical coupling, and readout technologies

  9. Condensation Processes in Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Hill, Hugh G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Astrophysical systems present an intriguing set of challenges for laboratory chemists. Chemistry occurs in regions considered an excellent vacuum by laboratory standards and at temperatures that would vaporize laboratory equipment. Outflows around Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars have timescales ranging from seconds to weeks depending on the distance of the region of interest from the star and, on the way significant changes in the state variables are defined. The atmospheres in normal stars may only change significantly on several billion-year timescales. Most laboratory experiments carried out to understand astrophysical processes are not done at conditions that perfectly match the natural suite of state variables or timescales appropriate for natural conditions. Experimenters must make use of simple analog experiments that place limits on the behavior of natural systems, often extrapolating to lower-pressure and/or higher-temperature environments. Nevertheless, we argue that well-conceived experiments will often provide insights into astrophysical processes that are impossible to obtain through models or observations. This is especially true for complex chemical phenomena such as the formation and metamorphism of refractory grains under a range of astrophysical conditions. Data obtained in our laboratory has been surprising in numerous ways, ranging from the composition of the condensates to the thermal evolution of their spectral properties. None of this information could have been predicted from first principals and would not have been credible even if it had.

  10. Insight from Laboratory Experiments on the Generation of Granular Flows on the Flanks of Vibrated Pyroclastic Cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Romano, G. P.; Ventura, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out laboratory experiments to study the generation of granular flows on the slopes of pyroclastic cones that are experiencing volcanic tremor or tectonic earthquakes. These experiments are inspired by the occurrence of granular flows on the flanks of Mount Vesuvius during its 1944 eruption. Our laboratory model consists of sand cones built around a vibrating tube which represents a volcanic conduit with erupting magma inside. A video camera allows the study of the granular flow inception, movement and deposition. Although the collapse of the entire cone is obtained at a specific resonance frequency, individual granular flows can be generated by all the vibration frequencies and all the vibration amplitudes that our experimental apparatus has allowed us to adopt. We believe that this is due to the fact that the energy threshold to generate the flows is small in value. Therefore, if this is true in nature as well, shaken pyroclastic cones are always potentially dangerous because they can easily generate flows that can strike the surrounding areas.

  11. Bose-Einstein condensation of dilute atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Biao

    The Bose-Einstein condensation of dilute atomic gases is studied. The focus is on the interesting properties and the dynamical behavior of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs1) under various external manipulations. We investigate how the interaction affects the interference pattern between two BEC clouds, and show how the interference pattern can be calculated. We then present a theory on the generation of dark solitons in BECs with a new experimental technique called phase imprint. By mapping this problem into a classic pendulum problem, we show how to design the phase step imprinted on a BEC cloud to generate desired dark solitons. We finally study the system of a BEC in an optical lattice, a nonlinear periodic system, which exhibits interesting new effects on the tunneling and superfluidity in terms of its Bloch bands and Bloch waves. 1In the dissertation, BEC stands for Bose-Einstein condensate, not Bose-Einstein condensation.

  12. A multi-field approach to DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shi-Yong; Jia, Jun-Li

    2015-12-01

    DNA condensation is an important process in many fields including life sciences, polymer physics, and applied technology. In the nucleus, DNA is condensed into chromosomes. In polymer physics, DNA is treated as a semi-flexible molecule and a polyelectrolyte. Many agents, including multi-valent cations, surfactants, and neutral poor solvents, can cause DNA condensation, also referred to as coil-globule transition. Moreover, DNA condensation has been used for extraction and gene delivery in applied technology. Many physical theories have been presented to elucidate the mechanism underlying DNA condensation, including the counterion correlation theory, the electrostatic zipper theory, and the hydration force theory. Recently several single-molecule studies have focused on DNA condensation, shedding new light on old concepts. In this document, the multi-field concepts and theories related to DNA condensation are introduced and clarified as well as the advances and considerations of single-molecule DNA condensation experiments are introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21204065 and 20934004) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y4110357).

  13. Gravity Waves from the Nonperturbative Decay of Condensates along Supersymmetric Flat Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois

    2009-07-24

    Nonperturbative effects may lead to an explosive decay of flat direction condensates in supersymmetric theories. We confirm the efficiency of this process with lattice simulations: After only one to five rotations of the condensates in their complex plane, most of their energy is converted into inhomogeneous fluctuations. This generates a gravitational wave background, which depends on the inflaton sector and falls in the hertz-kilohertz frequency range today. These gravity waves can be observable by upcoming experiments such as Advanced LIGO and depend crucially on (i) the initial vacuum expectation value of flat directions when they start to oscillate, (ii) their soft supersymmetry-breaking mass, and (iii) the reheat temperature of the Universe. This signal could open a new observational window on inflation and low-energy supersymmetry.

  14. Expansion in condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J.; Sajjad Zahir, M.

    1985-03-01

    We show that the product of local current operators in quantum chromodynamics (QCD), when expanded in terms of condensates, such as psi-barpsi, G/sup a//sub munu/ G/sup a//sub munu/, psi-barGAMMA psipsi-barGAMMApsi, f/sub a/bcG/sup a//sub munu/G/sup b//sub nualpha/ x G/sup c//sub alphamu/, etc., yields a series in Planck's constant. This, however, provides no hint that the higher terms in such an expansion may be less significant.

  15. Generation of large scale field-aligned density irregularities in ionospheric heating experiments. [electromagnetic wave decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold and growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering are calculated for a uniform magnetoplasma. These are then compared with the threshold and growth rate of a new thermal instability in which the nonlinear Lorentz force felt by the electrons at the beat frequency of the two electromagnetic waves is replaced by a pressure force due to differential heating in the interference pattern of the pump wave and the generated electromagnetic wave. This thermal instability, which is still essentially stimulated Brillouin scattering, has a threshold which is especially low when the propagation vector of the beat wave is almost normal to the magnetic field. The threshold is then considerably lower than the threshold for normal stimulated Brillouin scattering and therefore this new instability is probably responsible for the generation of large scale field aligned irregularities and ionospheric spread F.

  16. Generation of available potential energy and the energy cycle during the global weather experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, D. A.; Rosen, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Two parallel sets of analyses, which in one case included and in the other omitted data observed by satellite based and other FGGE special observing systems are examined. The results of our previous work is extended in two separate, but not unrelated, ways. First, from these two parallel analyses, which are labeled FGGE (full FGGE system) and NOSAT (satellite omitted), it was discovered that the two sets of fields were quite close over much of the globe. Locally the influence of satellite based systems led to some differences, particularly over the Southern Hemisphere Oceans. The diabatic heating fields generated by the GLA FGGE analysis was also examined. From these fields, one can ascertain the role of total diabatic heating and of the various diabatic heating components in the atmospheric energy cycle, in particular in the generation of available potential energy.

  17. The American Reincarnation of the Superfluous Experience: Finding Meaning in Generation Y

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Madelyn Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The superfluous man became a prominent literary figure in Russia during the 19th century. This article makes a comparison of the superfluous experience to the "celebutante" phenomenon, as reflected in the media. It also includes a discussion on the impact that the celebutante influence may have on the dreams, values and meaning-making experience…

  18. Chinese experiences in mini-hydropower generation. Small Hydropower Series No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ruizhang, G.

    1985-06-01

    The study describes Chinese experiences in the field. It deals with policies and measures, economic issues, technical problems of exploitation and design, production of machines and equipment, promotion of research and development, manpower training, and other important aspects of the promotion and implementation of mini-hydropower projects.

  19. The Nature of Experiences Responsible for the Generation and Maintenance of Interest in STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltese, Adam V.; Melki, Christina S.; Wiebke, Heidi L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has established the importance of early interest in STEM as a key factor in persistence. Our current research builds on this foundation and extends it to add more detail to understanding the types of experiences that trigger and maintain interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Using survey data from…

  20. Learning a Generative Probabilistic Grammar of Experience: A Process-Level Model of Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodny, Oren; Lotem, Arnon; Edelman, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a set of biologically and computationally motivated design choices for modeling the learning of language, or of other types of sequential, hierarchically structured experience and behavior, and describe an implemented system that conforms to these choices and is capable of unsupervised learning from raw natural-language corpora. Given…

  1. Generative Role of Experiments in Physics and in Teaching Physics: A Suggestion for Epistemological Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Mantyla, Terhi

    2006-01-01

    In physics teaching experimentality is an integral component in giving the starting point of knowledge formation and conceptualization. However, epistemology of experiments is not often addressed directly in the educational and pedagogical literature. This warrants an attempt to produce an acceptable reconstruction of the epistemological role of…

  2. Meeting the Next Generation Science Standards Through "Rediscovered" Climate Model Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.; Zhou, J.

    2013-12-01

    Since the Educational Global Climate Model (EdGCM) Project made its debut in January 2005, over 150 institutions have employed EdGCM software for a variety of uses ranging from short lab exercises to semester-long and year-long thesis projects. The vast majority of these EdGCM adoptees have been at the undergraduate and graduate levels, with few users at the K-12 level. The K-12 instructors who have worked with EdGCM in professional development settings have commented that, although EdGCM can be used to illustrate a number of the Disciplinary Core Ideas and connects to many of the Common Core State Standards across subjects and grade levels, significant hurdles preclude easy integration of EdGCM into their curricula. Time constraints, a scarcity of curriculum materials, and classroom technology are often mentioned as obstacles in providing experiences to younger grade levels in realistic climate modeling research. Given that the NGSS incorporates student performance expectations relating to Earth System Science, and to climate science and the human dimension in particular, we feel that a streamlined version of EdGCM -- one that eliminates the need to run the climate model on limited computing resources, and provides a more guided climate modeling experience -- would be highly beneficial for the K-12 community. This new tool currently under development, called EzGCM, functions through a browser interface, and presents "rediscovery experiments" that allow students to do their own exploration of model output from published climate experiments, or from sensitivity experiments designed to illustrate how climate models as well as the climate system work. The experiments include background information and sample questions, with more extensive notes for instructors so that the instructors can design their own reflection questions or follow-on activities relating to physical or human impacts, as they choose. An added benefit of the EzGCM tool is that, like EdGCM, it helps

  3. Generation of desired signals from acoustic drivers. [for aircraft engine internal noise propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure to control transient signal generation is developed for the study of internal noise propagation from aircraft engines. A simple algorithm incorporating transform techniques is used to produce signals of any desired waveform from acoustic drivers. The accurate driver response is then calculated, and from this the limiting frequency characteristics are determined and the undesirable frequencies where the driver response is poor are eliminated from the analysis. A synthesized signal is then produced by convolving the inverse of the response function with the desired signal. Although the shape of the synthesized signal is in general quite awkward, the driver generates the desired signal when the distorted signal is fed into the driver. The results of operating the driver in two environments, in a free field and in a duct, are presented in order to show the impedance matching effect of the driver. In addition, results using a high frequency cut-off value as a parameter is presented in order to demonstrate the extent of the applicability of the synthesis procedure. It is concluded that the desired signals can be generated through the signal synthesis procedure.

  4. High Frequency Resolution TOA Analysis for ELF/VLFWave Generation Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddle, J. D.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Modulated HF heating of the ionosphere in the presence of natural ionospheric current sources has been used as a method to generate electromagnetic ELF/VLF waves since the 1970's. In the ~1-5 kHz band, the amplitude and phase of the received ELF/VLF signal depends on the amplitude and phase of the conductivity modulation generated throughout the HF-heated ionospheric body, as well as on the signal propagation parameters (i.e., the attenuation and phase constants) between each of the current sources and the receiver. Recent signal processing advances have produced an accurate ELF/VLF time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis technique that differentiates line-of-sight and ionospherically-reflected signal components, determining the amplitude and phase of each component observed at the receiver. This TOA method requires a wide bandwidth (> 2.5 kHz) and therefore is relatively insensitive to the frequency-dependent nature of ELF/VLF wave propagation. In this paper, we present an improved ELF/VLF TOA method that is capable of providing high frequency resolution. The new analysis technique is applied to experimental observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating at HAARP. We present measurements of the amplitude and phase of the received ELF/VLF signal as a function of frequency and compare the results with the predictions of an HF heating model.

  5. Role of spatial anisotropy in design storm generation: Experiment and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Tero J.; Guillaume, Joseph H. A.; Kokkonen, Teemu; Hoang, Tam M. T.; Seed, Alan W.

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall accumulation depths over a given area are strongly dependent on the shape of the storm together with its direction of advection. A method to produce design storms exhibiting anisotropic spatial scaling is presented by combining a state-of-the-art stochastic rainfall generator STEPS with the linear generalized scale invariance (GSI) notation. The enhanced model is used to create ensembles of design storms based on an extreme storm with a distinct rainband shape observed in Melbourne, Australia. Design storms are generated both with and without accounting for anisotropy. Effect of anisotropy on precipitation characteristics is studied using the entire region covered by the radar (radar scale) and at a significantly smaller catchment scale. A rainfall-runoff model is applied to route the rainfall through the catchment into streamflow. Accounting for anisotropy allows for a more realistic description of precipitation features at the radar scale. At the catchment scale, anisotropy increases the probability of high rainfall accumulations, which translates into greater flood volumes. No discernible difference was observed in streamflow characteristics after controlling for the accumulation over the catchment. This could be explained by a lower importance of anisotropy relative to other factors affecting streamflow generation, and by the difficulties in creating representative rainfall temporal properties at the catchment scale when the radar scale is used for model calibration. The proposed method provides a tool to create ensembles of design storms when the anisotropic shape of the fields is of importance.

  6. Model-data synthesis for the next generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments.

    PubMed

    Norby, Richard J; De Kauwe, Martin G; Domingues, Tomas F; Duursma, Remko A; Ellsworth, David S; Goll, Daniel S; Lapola, David M; Luus, Kristina A; MacKenzie, A Rob; Medlyn, Belinda E; Pavlick, Ryan; Rammig, Anja; Smith, Benjamin; Thomas, Rick; Thonicke, Kirsten; Walker, Anthony P; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments has successfully provided deeper understanding about how forests respond to an increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Located in aggrading stands in the temperate zone, they have provided a strong foundation for testing critical assumptions in terrestrial biosphere models that are being used to project future interactions between forest productivity and the atmosphere, despite the limited inference space of these experiments with regards to the range of global ecosystems. Now, a new generation of FACE experiments in mature forests in different biomes and over a wide range of climate space and biodiversity will significantly expand the inference space. These new experiments are: EucFACE in a mature Eucalyptus stand on highly weathered soil in subtropical Australia; AmazonFACE in a highly diverse, primary rainforest in Brazil; BIFoR-FACE in a 150-yr-old deciduous woodland stand in central England; and SwedFACE proposed in a hemiboreal, Pinus sylvestris stand in Sweden. We now have a unique opportunity to initiate a model-data interaction as an integral part of experimental design and to address a set of cross-site science questions on topics including responses of mature forests; interactions with temperature, water stress, and phosphorus limitation; and the influence of biodiversity. PMID:26249015

  7. Model-data synthesis for the next generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments.

    PubMed

    Norby, Richard J; De Kauwe, Martin G; Domingues, Tomas F; Duursma, Remko A; Ellsworth, David S; Goll, Daniel S; Lapola, David M; Luus, Kristina A; MacKenzie, A Rob; Medlyn, Belinda E; Pavlick, Ryan; Rammig, Anja; Smith, Benjamin; Thomas, Rick; Thonicke, Kirsten; Walker, Anthony P; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments has successfully provided deeper understanding about how forests respond to an increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Located in aggrading stands in the temperate zone, they have provided a strong foundation for testing critical assumptions in terrestrial biosphere models that are being used to project future interactions between forest productivity and the atmosphere, despite the limited inference space of these experiments with regards to the range of global ecosystems. Now, a new generation of FACE experiments in mature forests in different biomes and over a wide range of climate space and biodiversity will significantly expand the inference space. These new experiments are: EucFACE in a mature Eucalyptus stand on highly weathered soil in subtropical Australia; AmazonFACE in a highly diverse, primary rainforest in Brazil; BIFoR-FACE in a 150-yr-old deciduous woodland stand in central England; and SwedFACE proposed in a hemiboreal, Pinus sylvestris stand in Sweden. We now have a unique opportunity to initiate a model-data interaction as an integral part of experimental design and to address a set of cross-site science questions on topics including responses of mature forests; interactions with temperature, water stress, and phosphorus limitation; and the influence of biodiversity.

  8. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 3: Bonneville Power Administration Goodnoe Hills Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the wind turbine's first rotation. This technical report presents the experiences of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as the participating utility in the MOD-2 cluster field test program. Under this program the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as management agent for the US Department of Energy, has installed three MOD-2 wind turbines at Bonneville's Goodnoe Hills site. All documents and reports pertaining to BPA's experience with wind energy at Goodnoe Hills were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with the appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. The chronology of the steps taken in implementing the wind turbine project and some of the lessons learned are included in the report. In each section, important activities, critical assumptions, and interesting insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  9. Internally and externally generated emotions in people with acquired brain injury: preservation of emotional experience after right hemisphere lesions.

    PubMed

    Salas Riquelme, Christian E; Radovic, Darinka; Castro, Osvaldo; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2015-01-01

    The study of emotional changes after brain injury has contributed enormously to the understanding of the neural basis of emotion. However, little attention has been placed on the methods used to elicit emotional responses in people with brain damage. Of particular interest are subjects with right hemisphere [RH] cortical lesions, who have been described as presenting impairment in emotional processing. In this article, an internal and external mood induction procedure [MIP] was used to trigger positive and negative emotions, in a sample of 10 participants with RH damage, and 15 healthy controls. Emotional experience was registered by using a self-report questionnaire. As observed in previous studies, internal and external MIPs were equally effective in eliciting the target emotion, but the internal procedure generated higher levels of intensity. Remarkably, participants with RH lesions were equally able to experience both positive and negative affect. The results are discussed in relation to the role of the RH in the capacity to experience negative emotions.

  10. Condensation on a noncollapsing vapor bubble in a subcooled liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure is presented by which an estimate can be made of the condensation coefficient on a noncollapsing stationary vapor bubble in subcooled liquid nitrogen. Film boiling from a thin wire was used to generate vapor bubbles which remain fixed to the wire at their base. A balance was established between the evaporation in the thin annular region along the wire and the condensation in the vapor bubbles.

  11. Examination of laboratory-generated coated soot particles: An overview of the LACIS Experiment in November (LExNo) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratmann, F.; Bilde, M.; Dusek, U.; Frank, G. P.; Hennig, T.; Henning, S.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kiselev, A.; Kristensson, A.; Lieberwirth, I.; Mentel, T. F.; PöSchl, U.; Rose, D.; Schneider, J.; Snider, J. R.; Tillmann, R.; Walter, S.; Wex, H.

    2010-06-01

    In the suite of laboratory measurements described here and in companion articles we deal with the hygroscopic growth and activation behavior of coated soot particles synthesized to mimic those of an atmospheric aerosol originating from biomass combustion. The investigations were performed during the measurement campaign LACIS Experiment in November (LExNo) which took place at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). The specific goals of this campaign were (1) to perform a critical supersaturation measurement intercomparison using data sets from three different cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) instruments (two static thermal gradient type, one stream-wise thermal gradient type) and LACIS, (2) to examine particle hygroscopic growth (hydrated particle size as function of relative humidity) for particle characteristics such as aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measured soluble mass and particle morphology, and (3) to relate critical supersaturations derived from both measurements of soluble mass and high-humidity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HH-TDMA) determined growth factors to critical supersaturations measured by means of the CCN instruments. This paper provides information on the particle synthesis techniques used during LExNo, an overview concerning the particle characterization measurements performed, and, by proving relations between measured composition, hygroscopic growth, and activation data, lay the foundations for the detailed investigations described in the companion studies. In the context of the present paper, excellent agreement of the critical supersaturations measured with three different CCN instruments and LACIS was observed. Furthermore, clear relations between coating masses determined with AMS and both hygroscopic growth factors at 98% RH and measured critical supersaturations could be seen. Also, a strong correlation between measured hygroscopic growth (growth factors at 98%) and measured critical supersaturation for all

  12. Condensation in hypersonic nitrogen wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, Melissa A.; Yanta, William J.; Ragsdale, William C.; Hudson, Susan T.; Griffith, Wayland C.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental observations and a theoretical model for the onset and disappearance of condensation are given for hypersonic flows of pure nitrogen at M = 10, 14 and 18. Measurements include Pitot pressures, static pressures and laser light scattering experiments. These measurements coupled with a theoretical model indicate a substantial non-equilibrium supercooling of the vapor phase beyond the saturation line. Typical results are presented with implications for the design of hypersonic wind tunnel nozzles.

  13. Mitotic chromosome structure and condensation.

    PubMed

    Belmont, Andrew S

    2006-12-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure has been the cell biology equivalent of a 'riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma'. Observations that genetic knockout or knockdown of condensin subunits or topoisomerase II cause only minimal perturbation in overall chromosome condensation, together with analysis of early stages of chromosome condensation and effects produced by histone H1 depletion, suggest a need to reconsider textbook models of mitotic chromosome condensation and organization. PMID:17046228

  14. Scattering processes in Bose-Einstein condensed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynveen, Aaron Sundby

    Unambiguous proof of the existence of Bose condensation in superfluid helium has long eluded researchers ever since condensation was hypothesized to be responsible for superfluidity sixty years ago. Both experimentalists and theorists have been stymied in this effort due to the complexity of this system. Our group has predicted, though, a means by which Bose condensation may be directly probed via a condensate mediated transmission process. Experiments in which helium beams are transmitted through a superfluid to provide information concerning the condensate nature of helium have been undertaken by our group. In the context of these experiments, we have carried out theoretical and computational studies of this process in weakly interacting systems in which calculations may be readily performed. These studies have demonstrated that there exists effective transparency of the condensate to the scattering atoms in these weakly interacting systems similar to that predicted for helium. Dissipation, which may screen the condensate mediated process, has also been shown to be negligible in the weakly interacting systems. Simulations of the helium beams used in the transmission experiments have also been developed. By combining gas dynamics with a hydrodynamic simulation, we have been able to explore a broader range of experimental regimes and thus were able to simulate the anomalous signals observed in the beam experiments. A full characterization of these beams is necessary for correct interpretation of the transmitted signals, and the results of the simulations have led to beneficial modifications to the transmission experiment. And finally, we have presented another means by which condensation may be studied in helium by analyzing the motion of small helium drops through a background helium vapor.

  15. Kaon Condensation with Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, Will; Detmold, William; Detmold, Will; Detmold, William; Savage, Martin; Walker-Loud, Andre; Orginos, Konstantinos; Torok, Aaron

    2008-09-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.78.054514
    Kaon condensation may play an important role in the structure of hadronic matter at densities greater than that of nuclear matter, as exist in the interior of neutron stars. We present the results of the first lattice QCD calculation of kaon condensation obtained by studying systems containing up to twelve charged kaons. Surprisingly, the equation of state of the condensate is remarkably well reproduced by leading order chiral perturbation theory. We determine the three-kaon interaction from the multi-kaon systems and update our results for pion condensates.

  16. Object library for a new generation of experiment-controlling applications under the UNIX operating system.

    PubMed

    Gaponov, Y A; Ito, K; Amemiya, Y

    1998-05-01

    The Interface Object Library based on the Motif extension of the X Windows system and on the ESONE SVIC-VCC Library is presented. Some features of the applications for controlling a synchrotron radiation experiment are discussed. The Interface Object Library is written in the object-oriented C++ language. The library class-hierarchy structure is presented and discussed. Several interfaces were realized in the Interface Object Library: the Windows interface, the CAMAC interface and the interface for supporting the experiment. The behaviour of the objects describing the CAMAC crate and CAMAC block is discussed. The application of these protocols for controlling the fast one-coordinate position-sensitive X-ray detector OD3 is presented.

  17. Models of the uniformity of electro-magnetic fields generated for biological experiments by Merritt coils.

    PubMed

    Vesper, D N; Swez, J A; Nindl, G; Fox, M T; Sandrey, M A; Balcavage, W X

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) producing wire coils were described by Merritt et al, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 54 (7), 1983. Merritt coils produce large volume EMFs in which statistical numbers of biological experiments are performed. We build and use Merritt coils for cell/animal studies and are developing therapeutic EMF systems. Here we present models illustrating the EMFs produced by our coils and discuss the criteria that should be applied to the use of Merritt and other coils to achieve valid experimental results. In a companion paper at this meeting Nindl et al, describe biological experiments, using these Merritt coils, showing that EMFs may be useful in treating many inflammatory disease states. Although the large-volume EMFs produced by Merritt coils are convenient for biological experiments the EMFs are not perfectly uniform and the deviations can be a significant source of experimental error. The orientation and size of experimental objects are key contributors to these deviations. To evaluate our Merritt coils we solved the Biot-Savart law explicitly for ideal 3-coil and 4-coil Merritt systems and compared these theoretical EMFs with those of our systems. We present a detailed examination of deviations in magnetic field amplitude, as well as magnetic field direction, as a function of location within the coils. We find that spherically shaped experimental sets minimize these deviations. We developed simple formulae for accurately predicting deviations associated with Merritt coils. PMID:10834267

  18. Using natural seeding material to generate nucleation in protein crystallization experiments.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Allan; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Haber, Alexander

    2003-07-01

    The nucleation event in protein crystallization is a part of the process that is poorly controlled. It is generally accepted that the protein should be in the metastable phase for crystal growth, but for nucleation higher levels of saturation are needed. Formation of nuclei in bulk solvent requires interaction of protein molecules until a critical size of aggregate is created. In many crystallization experiments sufficiently high levels of saturation are not reached to allow this critical nucleation event to occur. If an environment can be created that favours a higher local concentration of macromolecules, the energy barrier for nucleation may be lowered. When seeds are introduced at lower levels of saturation in a crystallization experiment, nucleation may be facilitated and crystal growth initiated. In this study, the use of natural materials as stable seeds for nucleation has been investigated. The method makes it possible to introduce seeds into crystallization trials at any stage of the experiment using both microbatch and vapour-diffusion methods.

  19. Fan interaction noise reduction using a wake generator: experiments and computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacsek, C.; Desbois-Lavergne, F.

    2003-08-01

    A control grid (wake generator) aimed at reducing rotor-stator interaction modes in fan engines when mounted upstream of the rotor has been studied here. This device complements other active noise control systems currently proposed. The compressor model of the instrumented ONERA CERF-rig is used to simulate suitable conditions. The design of the grid is drafted out using semi-empirical models for wake and potential flow, and experimentally achieved. Cylindrical rods are able to generate a spinning mode of the same order and similar level as the interaction mode. Mounting the rods on a rotating ring allows for adjusting the phase of the control mode so that an 8 dB sound pressure level (SPL) reduction at the blade passing frequency is achieved when the two modes are out of phase. Experimental results are assessed by a numerical approach using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes 2-D solver, developed at ONERA, is used to provide the unsteady force components on blades and vanes required for acoustics. The loading noise source term of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is used to model the interaction noise between the sources, and an original coupling to a boundary element method (BEM) code is realized to take account of the inlet geometry effects on acoustic in-duct propagation. Calculations using the classical analytical the Green function of an infinite annular duct are also addressed. Simple formulations written in the frequency domain and expanded into modes are addressed and used to compute an in-duct interaction mode and to compare with the noise reduction obtained during the tests. A fairly good agreement between predicted and measured SPL is found when the inlet geometry effects are part of the solution (by coupling with the BEM). Furthermore, computed aerodynamic penalties due to the rods are found to be negligible. These results partly validate the computation chain and highlight the potential of the wake generator

  20. Experiments on the acoustic solitary wave generated thermoacoustically in a looped tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Dai; Sugimoto, Nobumasa

    2015-10-01

    Emergence of an acoustic solitary wave is demonstrated in a gas-filled, looped tube with an array of Helmholtz resonators connected. The solitary wave is generated thermoacoustically and spontaneously by a pair of stacks positioned diametrically on exactly the opposite side of the loop. The temperature gradient is imposed on both stacks in the same sense along the tube. The stacks made of ceramics and of many square pores are sandwiched by hot and cold heat exchangers. The pressure profile measured and the propagation speed show good agreements with the theoretical ones of the acoustic solitary wave obtained by Sugimoto (J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 99, 1971-1976 (1996)).

  1. The Role of XMM for Present and Next Generation SZ Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointecouteau, E.

    2016-06-01

    A strong synergy exists between X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich observations of the hot gas in clusters of galaxies. XMM-Newton has been a major asset in joint scientific analysis with data from the current generation of SZ instruments such as Planck, SPT or ACT. I will review the main X-ray/SZ results from the last few years. I will discuss the expectations and perspectives for upcoming and future measurements of the SZ signal and their combination with X-ray data, focussing on the role to be played by XMM-Newton in these studies.

  2. Multiple incidence angle SIR-B experiment over Argentina Generation of secondary image products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.; Cimino, J.

    1986-01-01

    Original radar images may be geometrically and radio metrically distorted. This may be a particular problem when multiple angle imagery is analyzed and there is topographic relief in the area of interest. This paper describes a set of techniques designed to combine a multiple angle radar data set with a digital terrain elevation model, to generate a set of new images called secondary image products. These new images are geometrically rectified radar ortho-images radiometrically rectified images, and stereo ortho-images. These secondary images can then reliably be used for thematic interpretation.

  3. Optical turbulence and spectral condensate in long fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Turitsyna, E. G.; Falkovich, Gregory; El-Taher, Atalla; Shu, Xuewen; Harper, Paul; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2012-01-01

    We study numerically optical turbulence using the particular example of a recently created, ultra-long fibre laser. For normal fibre dispersion, we observed an intermediate state with an extremely narrow spectrum (condensate), which experiences instability and a sharp transition to a fluctuating regime with a wider spectrum. We demonstrate that the number of modes has an impact on the condensate's lifetime. The smaller the number of modes, the more resistant is the condensate to perturbations. Experimental results show a good agreement with numerical simulations. PMID:22870062

  4. Experiments evaluating subsidence generated within a subaqueous deformable substrate due to varying differential sediment loading patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, B.; Chatmas, E. S.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    The intraslope areas of many passive margins display a complex bathymetry of topographic depressions and crests that form series of minibasins. These minibasins are linked to the deformation of subsurface salt layers and act as localized sediment traps. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the initiation of minibasins, including tectonic forces (both extensional and contractional), regional gravitational sliding, density inversion between salt layers and overburden, and differential sediment loading. Regardless of initiation mechanism, it is widely recognized that synkinematic deposition plays a active role in determining subsidence patterns and sediment routing within and among the minibasins. We undertook a series of simplified 1-D and 2-D experiments 1) to evaluate the feasibility of developing a series of well-defined minibasins created exclusively by differential sediment loading and 2) to quantitatively determine the effects of substrate thickness, density contrast, and sedimentation rate on the resultant subsidence pattern. We also present an initial non-dimensionalized formulation of the problem that relates density contrasts, clinoform thickness, substrate thickness, progradation rate, and viscosity of the deformable substrate. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first set (1-D) vertically loaded a subaqueous corn syrup substrate (capturing the rheology of subsurface salt as a Newtonian fluid) with walnut sand. The second set (2-D) of experiments prograded a walnut sediment clinoform across a corn syrup substrate. We systematically varied sedimentation rate, substrate thickness, and, in the case of the prograding clinoform, base level. In no cases did we successfully reproduce a series of minibasins similar to those observed in natural settings. Instead the substrate was simply displaced laterally as sediment was deposited, forming a single depression. High sedimentation rates tended to produce wider zones of subsidence, however, if given

  5. Parental olfactory experience influences behavior and neural structure in subsequent generations

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Brian G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2014-01-01

    Using olfactory molecular specificity, we examined the inheritance of parental traumatic exposure, a phenomenon that has been frequently observed, but not understood. We subjected F0 mice to odor fear conditioning before conception and found that subsequently conceived F1 and F2 generations had an increased behavioral sensitivity to the F0-conditioned odor, but not to other odors. When an odor (acetophenone) that activates a known odorant receptor (Olfr151) was used to condition F0 mice, the behavioral sensitivity of the F1 and F2 generations to acetophenone was complemented by an enhanced neuroanatomical representation of the Olfr151 pathway. Bisulfite sequencing of sperm DNA from conditioned F0 males and F1 naive offspring revealed CpG hypomethylation in the Olfr151 gene. In addition, in vitro fertilization, F2 inheritance and cross-fostering revealed that these transgenerational effects are inherited via parental gametes. Our findings provide a framework for addressing how environmental information may be inherited transgenerationally at behavioral, neuroanatomical and epigenetic levels. PMID:24292232

  6. Complex kinetics of DNA condensation revealed through DNA twist tracing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei Juan; Lim, Ci Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism for DNA condensation in cells. The length change during DNA condensation was investigated in previous single-molecule experiments. However, DNA twist is key to understanding the topological kinetics of DNA condensation. In this study, DNA twist as well as DNA length was traced during the DNA condensation by the freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and the tilted magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results disclose the complex relationship between DNA extension and backbone rotation. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the toroid formation follows a wiggling pathway which leads to the complex DNA backbone rotation as revealed in our experiments. These findings provide the complete description of multivalent cation-dependent DNA toroid formation under tension.

  7. Streak instability and generation of hairpin-vortices by a slotted jet in channel crossflow: Experiments and linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Jimmy; Karp, Michael; Cohen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Streaks and hairpin-vortices are experimentally generated in a laminar plane Poiseuille crossflow by injecting a continuous jet through a streamwise slot normal to the crossflow, with air as the working media. Small disturbances form stable streaks, however, higher disturbances cause the formation of streaks which undergo instability leading to the generation of hairpin vortices. Particular emphasis is placed on the flow conditions close to the generation of hairpin-vortices. Measurements are carried out in the cases of natural and phase-locked disturbance employing smoke visualisation, particle image velocimetry, and hot-wire anemometry, which include, the dominant frequency, wavelength, and the disturbance shape (or eigenfunctions) associated with the coherent part of the velocity field. A linear stability analysis for both one- and two-dimensional base-flows is carried out to understand the mechanism of instability and good agreement of wavelength and eigenfunctions are obtained when compared to the experimental data, and a slight under-prediction of the growth-rates by the linear stability analysis consistent with the final nonlinear stages in transitional flows. Furthermore, an energy analysis for both the temporal and spatial stability analysis revels the dominance of the symmetric varicose mode, again, in agreement with the experiments, which is found to be governed by the balance of the wallnormal shear and dissipative effects rather than the spanwise shear. In all cases the anti-symmetric sinuous modes governed by the spanwise shear are found to be damped both in analysis and in our experiments.

  8. Monte Carlo generator for full simulation of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}hadrons cross section scan experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rong, G.; Chen, J. C.

    2006-09-01

    A generator with {alpha}{sup 2} order radiative correction effects, including both the initial state radiative corrections and the photon vacuum polarization corrections, is built for the full simulation of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}hadrons in a cross section scan experiment in the quarkonium energy region. The contributions from the hadron production structures including the resonances of 1{sup --} quarkonium families and the light hadrons spectrum below 2 GeV as well as the QED continuum hadron spectrum are all taken into account in the event generation. It was employed successfully to determine the detection efficiency for selection of the events of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}hadrons from the data taken in the energy region from 3.650 GeV to 3.872 GeV covering both the {psi}(3686) and {psi}(3770) resonances in BES experiment. The generator reproduces the properties of hadronic event production and inclusive decays well.

  9. Experiences of citizen-based reporting of rainfall events using lab-generated videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Leonardo; Chacon, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Hydrologic studies rely on the availability of good-quality precipitation estimates. However, in remote areas of the world and particularly in developing countries, ground-based measurement networks are either sparse or nonexistent. This creates difficulties in the estimation of precipitation, which limits the development of hydrologic forecasting and early warning systems for these regions. The EC-FP7 WeSenseIt project aims at exploring the involvement of citizens in the observation of the water cycle with innovative sensor technologies, including mobile telephony. In particular, the project explores the use of a smartphone applications to facilitate the reporting water-related situations. Apart from the challenge of using such information for scientific purposes, the citizen engagement is one of the most important issues to address. To this end effortless methods for reporting need to be developed in order to involve as many people as possible in these experiments. A potential solution to overcome these drawbacks, consisting on lab-controlled rainfall videos have been produced to help mapping the extent and distribution of rainfall fields with minimum effort [1]. In addition, the quality of the collected rainfall information has also been studied [2] by means of different experiments with students. The present research shows the latest results of the application of this method and evaluates the experiences in some cases. [1] Alfonso, L., J. Chacón, and G. Peña-Castellanos (2015), Allowing Citizens to Effortlessly Become Rainfall Sensors, in 36th IAHR World Congress edited, The Hague, the Netherlands [2] Cortes-Arevalo, J., J. Chacón, L. Alfonso, and T. Bogaard (2015), Evaluating data quality collected by using a video rating scale to estimate and report rainfall intensity, in 36th IAHR World Congress edited, The Hague, the Netherlands

  10. A new micro-strip tracker for the new generation of experiments at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2005-12-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a prototype Silicon micro-strip detector that can be used in the forward (high rapidity) region of a hadron collider. These detectors must operate in a high radiation environment without any important degradation of their performance. The innovative feature of these detectors is the readout electronics, which, being completely data-driven, allows for the direct use of the detector information at the lowest level of the trigger. All the particle hits on the detector can be readout in real-time without any external trigger and any particular limitation due to dead-time. In this way, all the detector information is available to elaborate a very selective trigger decision based on a fast reconstruction of tracks and vertex topology. These detectors, together with the new approach to the trigger, have been developed in the context of the BTeV R&D program; our aim was to define the features and the design parameters of an optimal experiment for heavy flavour physics at hadron colliders. Application of these detectors goes well beyond the BTeV project and, in particular, involves the future upgrades of experiments at hadron colliders, such as Atlas, CMS and LHCb. These experiments, indeed, are already considering for their future high-intensity runs a new trigger strategy a la BTeV. Their aim is to select directly at trigger level events containing Bhadrons, which, on several cases, come from the decay of Higgs bosons, Zo's or W±'s; the track information can also help on improving the performance of the electron and muon selection at the trigger level. For this reason, they are going to develop new detectors with practically the same characteristics as those of BTeV. To this extent, the work accomplished in this thesis could serve as guide-line for those upgrades.

  11. Report of the Next Generation TRIUMF-MTV Experiment Run-IV Using Cylindrical Drift Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, R.; Seitaibashi, E.; Baba, H.; Kawamura, H.; Behr, J. A.; Onishi, J.; Ninomiya, K.; Pearson, M.; Ikeda, M.; Levy, P.; Narikawa, R.; Openshaw, R.; Tanaka, S.; Saiba, S.; Iguri, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Nakaya, Y.; Murata, J.

    The MTV (Mott polarimetry for T-Violation) experiment is running from 2009 at TRIUMF, which aims to search a large non-standard T-Violation in polarized nuclear beta decay. Existence of a large transverse polarization of electrons emitted from polarized Li-8 nuclei, which are produced at TRIUMF-ISAC and stopped inside an aluminum stopper, is investigated. We utilize a Mott polarimeter consists of a CDC (Cylindrical Drift Chamber), measuring backward scattering left-right asymmetry from a thin lead analyzer foil. In this paper, results from the final performance test run using CDC performed in 2012 are described.

  12. Design of laser-generated shockwave experiments. An approach using analytic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. T.; Trainor, R. J.

    1980-11-01

    Two of the target physics phenomena which must be understood before a clean experiment is performed are preheating due to suprathermal electrons and shock decay due to a shock rarefaction interactions. Analytic models are described for these two processes and the predictions of these models are compared with those of the LASNEX fluid physics code. This work was not with the view of surpassing or even approaching the reliability of the code calculations, but rather with the aim of providing models which are used for quick parameter sensitivity evaluations, while providing physical insight into the problems.

  13. [Growth and development of plants in a sequence of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-3)].

    PubMed

    Levinskikh, M A; Sychev, V N; Signalova, O B; Derendiaeva, T A; Podol'skiĭ, I G; Masgreĭv, M E; Bingheim, G E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose was to study characteristic features of growth and development of several plant generations in space flight in experiment GREENHOUSE-3 as a part of the Russian-US space research program MIR/NASA in 1997. The experiment consisted of cultivation of Brassica rapa L. in board greenhouse Svet. Two vegetative cycles were fully completed and the third vegetation was terminated on day 13 on the phase of budding. The total duration of the space experiment was 122 days, i.e. same as in the ground controls. In the experiment with Brassica rapa L. viable seeds produced by the first crop were planted in space flight and yielded next crop. Crops raised from the ground and space seeds were found to differ in height and number of buds. Both parameters were lowered in the plants grown from the space seeds. The prime course for smaller size and reduced organogenic potential of plantTs reproductive system seems to be a less content of nutrients in seeds that had matured in the space flight. Experiment GREENHOUSE-3 demonstrated principle feasibility of plant reproduction in space greenhouse from seeds developed in microgravity.

  14. [Growth and development of plants in a sequence of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinskikh, M. A.; Sychev, V. N.; Signalova, O. B.; Derendiaeva, T. A.; Podol'skii, I. G.; Masgreiv, M. E.; Bingheim, G. E.; Musgrave, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose was to study characteristic features of growth and development of several plant generations in space flight in experiment GREENHOUSE-3 as a part of the Russian-US space research program MIR/NASA in 1997. The experiment consisted of cultivation of Brassica rapa L. in board greenhouse Svet. Two vegetative cycles were fully completed and the third vegetation was terminated on day 13 on the phase of budding. The total duration of the space experiment was 122 days, i.e. same as in the ground controls. In the experiment with Brassica rapa L. viable seeds produced by the first crop were planted in space flight and yielded next crop. Crops raised from the ground and space seeds were found to differ in height and number of buds. Both parameters were lowered in the plants grown from the space seeds. The prime course for smaller size and reduced organogenic potential of plantTs reproductive system seems to be a less content of nutrients in seeds that had matured in the space flight. Experiment GREENHOUSE-3 demonstrated principle feasibility of plant reproduction in space greenhouse from seeds developed in microgravity.

  15. Condensation Processes in Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, D. I.; Moore, J. N.

    2005-12-01

    We model condensation processes in geothermal systems to understand how this process changes fluid chemistry. We assume two processes operate in geothermal systems: 1) condensation of a vapor phase derived by boiling an aqueous geothermal fluid into a cool near surface water and 2) condensation of a magmatic vapor by a deep circulating meteoric thermal fluid. It is assumed that the condensation process has two stages. Initially the condensing fluid is under saturated in gaseous species. Condensation of the vapor phase continues until the pressure on the fluid equals the sum of the partial pressures of water and the dissolved gaseous species. At that time bubbles flux through the condensing fluid. In time the fluid and fluxing gas phase come to equilibrium. Calculation shows that during the second stage of the condensation process the liquid phase becomes enriched in more soluble gaseous species like CO2 and H2S, and depleted in less soluble species like CH4 and N2. Stage 2 condensation processes can therefore be monitored by ratios of more and less condensable species like CO2/N2. Condensation of vapor released by boiling geothermal fluids results in liquids with high concentrations of H2S and CO2 like is seen in geothermal system steam-heated waters. Condensation of a magmatic vapor into circulating meteoric water has been proposed, but not well demonstrated. We compare to our models the Cerro Prieto, Mexico gas analysis data set collected over twelve years time by USGS personnel. It was assumed for modeling that the Cerro Prieto geothermal fluids are circulating meteoritic fluids with N2/Ar ratios about 40 to which is added a magmatic vapor with N2/Ar ratio = 400. The Cerro Prieto analyses show a strong correlation between N2/Ar and CO2/N2 as predicted by calculation. Two dimensional image plots of well N2/Ar + CO2/N2 show a bull's-eye pattern on the geothermal field. Image plots of analyses collected over a year or less time show N2/Ar and CO2/N2 hot spots

  16. On-site mirror facet condensation measurements for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipold, J.; Medina, M. C.; García, B.; Rasztocky, E.; Mancilla, A.; Maya, J.; Larrarte, J. J.; de Souza, V.

    2016-09-01

    The Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT) has provided very important discoveries in Very High Energy (VHE) γ-ray astronomy for the last two decades, being exploited mainly by experiments such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. The same technique will be used by the next generation of γ-ray telescopes, Cherenkov Telescope Array - CTA, which is conceived to be an Observatory composed by two arrays strategically placed in both hemispheres, one in the Northern and one in the Southern. Each site will consist of several tens of Cherenkov telescopes of different sizes and will be equipped with about 10000 m2 of reflective surface. Because of its large size, the reflector of a Cherenkov telescope is composed of many individual mirror facets. Cherenkov telescopes operate without any protective system from weather conditions therefore it is important to understand how the reflective surfaces behave under different environmental conditions. This paper describes a study of the behavior of the mirrors in the presence of water vapor condensation. The operational time of a telescope is reduced by the presence of condensation on the mirror surface, therefore, to control and to monitor the formation of condensation is an important issue for IACT observatories. We developed a method based on pictures of the mirrors to identify the areas with water vapor condensation. The method is presented here and we use it to estimate the time and area two mirrors had condensation when exposed to the environmental conditions in the Argentinean site. The study presented here shows important guidelines in the selection procedure of mirror technologies and shows an innovative monitoring tool to be used in future Cherenkov telescopes.

  17. Prediction of rare single-nucleotide causative mutations for muscular diseases in pooled next-generation sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Maria Brigida; Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Nigro, Vincenzo; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2014-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a new approach for biomedical research, useful for the diagnosis of genetic diseases in extremely heterogeneous conditions. In this work, we describe how data generated by high-throughput NGS experiments can be analyzed to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA samples of patients affected by neuromuscular disorders. In particular, we consider untagged pooled NGS data, where DNA samples of different individuals are combined in a single experiment, still providing information with an uncertainty limited to only two patients. At the moment, only few publications address the problem of SNPs detection in pooled experiments, and existing tools are often inaccurate. We propose a computational procedure consisting of two parts. In the first, data are filtered by means of decision rules. The second phase is based on a supervised classification technique. In the present work, we compare different de facto standard supervised and unsupervised procedures to identify and classify variants potentially related to muscular diseases, and we discuss results in terms of statistical and biological validation.

  18. Experiments on multiple vortices in a side dump gas generator ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The role of multiple vortices in the flame stabilization process of a 4 inlet side dump ramjet was determined. Very rich propane air mixtures were injected at the head to simulate a gas generator ramjet. Swirl was introduced by canting the inlets at the dump station. The inlet angle, swirl angle, and the distance of the head from the dump station were varied over a wide range to determine the importance of the vortices located at the dump stations and at the head. It is shown that with proper design, the vortex at the head can be made to perform as a pilot burner allowing a great deal of versatility of operation and it appears to provide all the criteria of pollution free operation.

  19. Tempo and mode of genome evolution in a 50,000-generation experiment.

    PubMed

    Tenaillon, Olivier; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Ribeck, Noah; Deatherage, Daniel E; Blanchard, Jeffrey L; Dasgupta, Aurko; Wu, Gabriel C; Wielgoss, Sébastien; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Médigue, Claudine; Schneider, Dominique; Lenski, Richard E

    2016-08-11

    Adaptation by natural selection depends on the rates, effects and interactions of many mutations, making it difficult to determine what proportion of mutations in an evolving lineage are beneficial. Here we analysed 264 complete genomes from 12 Escherichia coli populations to characterize their dynamics over 50,000 generations. The populations that retained the ancestral mutation rate support a model in which most fixed mutations are beneficial, the fraction of beneficial mutations declines as fitness rises, and neutral mutations accumulate at a constant rate. We also compared these populations to mutation-accumulation lines evolved under a bottlenecking regime that minimizes selection. Nonsynonymous mutations, intergenic mutations, insertions and deletions are overrepresented in the long-term populations, further supporting the inference that most mutations that reached high frequency were favoured by selection. These results illuminate the shifting balance of forces that govern genome evolution in populations adapting to a new environment. PMID:27479321

  20. Vorticity deposition, structure generation and the approach to self-similarity in colliding blast wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.; Fox, T. E.; Pasley, J.; Symes, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    When strong shocks interact with transverse density gradients, it is well known that vorticity deposition occurs. When two non-planar blast waves interact, a strong shock will propagate through the internal structure of each blast wave where the shock encounters such density gradients. There is therefore the potential for the resulting vorticity to produce pronounced density structures long after the passage of these shocks. If the two blast waves have evolved to the self-similar (Sedov) phase this is not a likely prospect, but for blast waves at a relatively early stage of their evolution this remains possible. We show, using 2D numerical simulations, that the interactions of two 'marginally young' blast waves can lead to strong vorticity deposition which leads to the generation of a strong protrusion and vortex ring as mass is driven into the internal structure of the weaker blast wave.

  1. Experiments and modelling of active quasi-single helicity regime generation in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-07-01

    The interaction of a static resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) with a tearing mode (TM) is becoming a relevant topic in fusion plasma physics. RMPs can be generated by active coils and then used to affect the properties of TMs and of the corresponding magnetic islands. This paper shows how the feedback system of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) can produce a RMP that affects a rotating TM and stimulate the transition to the so-called quasi-single helicity (QSH) regime, a RFP plasma state characterized by a magnetic island surrounded by low magnetic chaos. The application of the RMP can increase the QSH probability up to 10% and enlarge the size of the corresponding island. Part of the experimental results are supported by a theoretical study that models the effect of the active coils on the magnetic island.

  2. Search for 1st Generation Leptoquarks in the eejj channel with the DZero experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barfuss, Anne-Fleur

    2008-09-12

    An evidence of the existence of leptoquarks (LQ) would prove the validity of various extensions of the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM). The search for first generation leptoquarks presented in this dissertation has been performed by analyzing a 1.02 fb-1 sample of data collected by the D0 detector, events with a final state comprising two light jets and two electrons. The absence of an excess of events in comparison to SM expectations leads to exclude scalar LQ masses up to 292 GeV and vector LQ masses from 350 to 458 GeV, depending on the LQ-l-q coupling type. The great importance of a good jet energy measurement motivated the study of the instrumental backgrounds correlated to the calorimeter, as much as studies of the hadronic showers energy resolution in γ + jets events.

  3. Next generation experiments and models for shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Current phenomenological hydrodynamic reactive flow models, such as Ignition and Growth and Johnson- Tang-Forest, when normalized to embedded gauge and laser velocimetry data, have been very successful in predicting shock initiation and detonation properties of solid explosives in most scenarios. However, since these models use reaction rates based on the compression and pressure of the reacting mixture, they can not easily model situations in which the local temperature, which controls the local reaction rate, changes differently from the local pressure. With the advent of larger, faster, parallel computers, microscopic modeling of the hot spot formation processes and Arrhenius chemical kinetic reaction rates that dominate shock initiation and detonation can now be attempted. Such a modeling effort can not be successful without nanosecond or better time resolved experimental data on these processes. The experimental and modeling approaches required to build the next generation of physically realistic reactive flow models are discussed.

  4. Texture Control in a Pseudospin Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Gary; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.

    2010-11-26

    We describe a wave function engineering approach to the formation of textures in nonrotated multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates. With numerical simulations of a viable two-component condensate experiment, we demonstrate the formation of a ballistically expanding regular lattice texture, composed of half-quantum vortices and spin-2 textures. The formation is described by a linear interference process in which the geometry and phase of three initially separated wave packets provide deterministic control over the resulting lattice texture.

  5. Beyond Spontaneously Broken Symmetry in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, W. J.; Laloee, F.

    2010-04-16

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) for Bose-Einstein condensates cannot treat phase off-diagonal effects, and thus cannot explain Bell inequality violations. We describe another situation that is beyond a SSB treatment: an experiment where particles from two (possibly macroscopic) condensate sources are used for conjugate measurements of the relative phase and populations. Off-diagonal phase effects are characterized by a 'quantum angle' and observed via 'population oscillations', signaling quantum interference of macroscopically distinct states.

  6. AlpArray - Probing Alpine geodynamics with the next generation of geophysical experiments and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissling, Edi; Hetenyi, György; AlpArray Working Group

    2014-05-01

    AlpArray is a European initiative to advance our understanding of orogenesis and its relationship to mantle and plate dynamics, surface processes, seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Alps and the surrounding Apennines-Carpathians-Dinarides orogenic system. The initiative will integrate present-day Earth observables with high-resolution geophysical imaging of 3D structure and physical properties of the lithosphere and of the upper mantle, with focus on a high-end seismological array. With nearly three years of scientific and technical preparation, the start of AlpArray experiments is now on the horizon. In this presentation we overview the general idea and purpose of AlpArray, reason why the initiative focuses on the greater Alpine area and discuss some of the outstanding scientific questions. We provide an overview of the planned field efforts, mainly the overall AlpArray seismic network with 40 km average station spacing and a large aerial coverage. Further plans of targeted seismological experiments with regional interests as well as of other field measurement techniques (magnetotellurics, gravity) are also presented. The outline of collaborative projects between the numerous participating institutions and researchers are described in the frame of seven main AlpArray themes. These include state-of-the-art modelling techniques that will ultimately describe the dynamic evolution of the orogenic system in great detail. Finally, the most recent news regarding the organization of the AlpArray project will be summarized.

  7. Lightning-Generated NO(x) Seen By OMI during NASA's TC-4 Experiment: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucsela, Eric; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Huntemann, Tabitha; Cohen, Ronald; Perring, Anne; Gleason, James; Blakeslee, Richard; Navarro, Dylana Vargas; Segura, Ileana Mora; Hernandez, Alexia Pacheco; Laporte-Molina, Sadi

    2009-01-01

    We present here case studies identifying upper-tropospheric NO2 produced in convective storms during NASA's Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TCi)n July and August 2007. DC8 aircraft missions, flown from the mission base in Costa Rica, recorded in situ NO2 profiles near active storms and in relatively quiet areas. We combine these data with measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite to estimate the amount of NO2 produced by lightning (LN02) above background levels in the regions influenced by storms. In our analysis, improved off-line processing techniques are employed to minimize known artifacts in the OM1 data. Information on lightning flashes (primarily CG) observed by the surface network operated by the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad are examined upwind of regions where OM1 indicates enhanced LNO2. Comparisons of the observed flash data with measurements by the TRMM/LIS satellite instrument are used to obtain the lightning detection efficiency for total flashes. Finally, using the NO/NO2 ratio estimated from DC-8 observations, we estimate the average NO(x) production per lightning flash for each case in this study. The magnitudes of the measured NO(x) enhancements are compared with those observed by the DC-8 and with similar OM1 measurements analyzed in mid-latitude experiments.

  8. Convective flows generated by evaporation: experiments, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, Jocelyn; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Park, Simon; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    A novel form of convection was observed in a suspension of non-motile Photobacterium phosphoreum bacteria. The pattern resembles classical bioconvection, however this strain has limited if any motility, which excludes this possible explanation. After performing a series of control experiments we found that the convection was actually driven by the evaporation of the salty bacterial medium, and the same kind of plumes were observed using polystyrene beads suspended in water with salt added. A mathematical model was formulated for the process and studied using a linear stability analysis and finite element method simulations, reproducing most of the observed experimental features. From the linear stability analysis, a threshold in salt concentration to observe convective motion was obtained, as well as the wavelength of the pattern at the onset of the instability. This was complemented by finite element simulations, which produced plume dynamics remarkably similar to the experimental observations. Evaporation-driven convection on the millimeter scale has not been studied extensively, and its effect may have been underestimated in other experiments.

  9. A New Generation of Large Seismic Refraction Experiments in Central Europe (1997-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterch, A.; Grad, M.; Spicak, A.; Brueckl, E.; Hegedus, E.; Keller, G. R.; Thybo, H.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1997, Central Europe has been covered by an unprecedented network of seismic refraction experiments. These experiments (POLONAISE'97, CELEBRATION 2000, ALP 2002, SUDETES 2003) have only been possible due a massive international cooperative effort. The total length of all profiles is about 19,000 km, and over 300 explosive sources were employed. The result is a network of seismic refraction profiles that extends along the Trans-European Suture Zone region of Poland and the Bohemian massif, Pannonian basin, trough the Carpathians and Alps to the Adriatic Sea and the Dinarides. As reflected in structures within these areas, Central Europe has experienced a complex tectonic history that includes the Caledonian, Variscan, and Alpine orogenies. The related TESZ region is a broad zone of deformation that extends across Europe from British Isles to the Black Sea region that formed as Europe was assembled from a complex collage of terranes during the late Palaeozoic. For example, the Bohemian massif is mostly located in the Czech Republic and is a large, complex terrane whose origin can be traced to northern Gondwana (Africa). These terranes were accreted along the margin of Baltica that was formed during the break-up of Rodinia. The tectonic evolution of this region shares many attributes with the Appalachian/Ouachita origin and is certainly of global important to studies in terrane tectonics and continental evolution. In southern Poland, several structural blocks are located adjacent to Baltica and were probably transported laterally along it similar to the Cenozoic movement of terranes along the western margin of North America. The younger Carpathian arc and Pannonian back-arc basin were also targeted by these experiments. Thickness of the crust in the area of investigations changes from 22-25 km in the Pannonian basin to about 55 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland. Together, these experiments are providing an unprecedented 3-D image of the

  10. Dynamic Characteristics of X-pinch Experiments Conducted in a Small Capacitive Generator:Refractive Optical Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, Adolfo; Pavez, Cristian; Pedreros, José; Avaria, Gonzalo; San Martín, Patricio; Soto, Leopoldo

    2016-05-01

    Among the dense plasmas configurations of interest for applications as a portable intense source of X-rays, the X-pinches are the most attractive by their brightness, source size, short duration and space localization, being particularly reproducible when they are conducted with fast pulsed power generators. In recent time, several characteristics of the dynamics and emission have been reproduced in compact generators (typically capacitive generators) of low current rise-rate (less than 0.5 kA/ns). In this work, a preliminary characterization of the dynamic of X-pinch plasma conducted in a small capacitive generator is reported. In order to obtain the plasma dynamics and quantitative information of the plasma density, the dark field Schlieren technique and interferometry were implemented. The experiments were carried out on the multipurpose generator (1.2 μF, 345 J, 47.5 nH, T/4=375 ns and Z = 0.2 Ω in short circuit) capable to produce currents up to 122 kA with 500 ns quarter period, when a charging voltage of 24 kV and metallic X-pinches are used as load. The electrical behavior of the discharge and the X-ray emission are monitored with a Rogowski coil and filtered PIN diodes respectively. For the refractive optical diagnostics a 532 nm frequency- doubled Nd-YAG laser was used. As from a single Schlieren record per shot, a sequence with the time evolution of the plasma is constructed. From the images, a similar dynamic of X- pinches conducted in fast generators of high current is observed, where structures such as coronal plasma, plasma flares and plasma jets are identified. The plasma dynamics observed from a VUV gated pinhole image system is compared with registered dynamic with refractive optical techniques.

  11. Coupling a Bose condensate to micromechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Chandler; Fox, Eli; Flanz, Scott; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2011-05-01

    We describe the construction of a compact apparatus to investigate the interaction of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate and a micromechanical oscillator. The apparatus uses a double magneto-optical trap, Raman sideband cooling, and evaporative cooling to rapidly produce a 87Rb BEC in close proximity to a high Q membrane. The micromotion of the membrane results in small Zeeman shifts at the location of the BEC due to a magnetic domain attached to the oscillator. Detection of this micromotion by the condensate results in a backaction on the membrane. We investigate prospects of using this backaction to generate nonclassical states of the mechanical oscillator. This work was funded by the DARPA ORCHID program.

  12. Condenser for photolithography system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.

    2004-03-02

    A condenser for a photolithography system, in which a mask image from a mask is projected onto a wafer through a camera having an entrance pupil, includes a source of propagating radiation, a first mirror illuminated by the radiation, a mirror array illuminated by the radiation reflected from said first mirror, and a second mirror illuminated by the radiation reflected from the array. The mirror array includes a plurality of micromirrors. Each of the micromirrors is selectively actuatable independently of each other. The first mirror and the second mirror are disposed such that the source is imaged onto a plane of the mask and the mirror array is imaged into the entrance pupil of the camera.

  13. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  14. Recurrent filmwise and dropwise condensation on a beetle mimetic surface.

    PubMed

    Hou, Youmin; Yu, Miao; Chen, Xuemei; Wang, Zuankai; Yao, Shuhuai

    2015-01-27

    Vapor condensation plays a key role in a wide range of industrial applications including power generation, thermal management, water harvesting and desalination. Fast droplet nucleation and efficient droplet departure as well as low interfacial thermal resistance are important factors that determine the thermal performances of condensation; however, these properties have conflicting requirements on the structural roughness and surface chemistry of the condensing surface or condensation modes (e.g., filmwise vs dropwise). Despite intensive efforts over the past few decades, almost all studies have focused on the dropwise condensation enabled by superhydrophobic surfaces. In this work, we report the development of a bioinspired hybrid surface with high wetting contrast that allows for seamless integration of filmwise and dropwise condensation modes. We show that the synergistic cooperation in the observed recurrent condensation modes leads to improvements in all aspects of heat transfer properties including droplet nucleation density, growth rate, and self-removal, as well as overall heat transfer coefficient. Moreover, we propose an analytical model to optimize the surface morphological features for dramatic heat transfer enhancement.

  15. Recurrent filmwise and dropwise condensation on a beetle mimetic surface.

    PubMed

    Hou, Youmin; Yu, Miao; Chen, Xuemei; Wang, Zuankai; Yao, Shuhuai

    2015-01-27

    Vapor condensation plays a key role in a wide range of industrial applications including power generation, thermal management, water harvesting and desalination. Fast droplet nucleation and efficient droplet departure as well as low interfacial thermal resistance are important factors that determine the thermal performances of condensation; however, these properties have conflicting requirements on the structural roughness and surface chemistry of the condensing surface or condensation modes (e.g., filmwise vs dropwise). Despite intensive efforts over the past few decades, almost all studies have focused on the dropwise condensation enabled by superhydrophobic surfaces. In this work, we report the development of a bioinspired hybrid surface with high wetting contrast that allows for seamless integration of filmwise and dropwise condensation modes. We show that the synergistic cooperation in the observed recurrent condensation modes leads to improvements in all aspects of heat transfer properties including droplet nucleation density, growth rate, and self-removal, as well as overall heat transfer coefficient. Moreover, we propose an analytical model to optimize the surface morphological features for dramatic heat transfer enhancement. PMID:25482594

  16. Development of a next generation short range gravity experiment NEWTON-V, using digital microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Ando, Hiroaki; Hatori, Mirei; Inaba, Shoki; Ninomiya, Kazufumi; Sakuta, Tomomi; Shinozaki, Natsumi; Murata, Jiro; Newton Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    According to a large extra dimensional model, a deviation from Newton's inverse square law is expected at sub-millimeter range. Current NEWTON-IVh project aims to test the inverse-square law at millimeter scale, using a torsion pendulum. In order to examine the gravitational force at around micrometer distances, we are developing the new apparatus NEWTON-V, using a digital microscope. This experiment is going to measure gravity between two wires of around 10 to 100 micrometer, which are separated by distances in the range of 100 micrometer. One wire is used as a cantilever for the force sensing, which motion is measured by a pico-precision displacement sensor. This method was originally developed for the micron precision optical alignment system (OASys) for the PHENIX muon tracking chambers at RHIC, using digital image analysis technique. In this presentation, development status and preliminary results will be reported.

  17. Ballistic range experiments on the superboom generated at increasing flight Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanai, M.; Toong, T.-Y.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    Ballistic range experiments for the study of the propagation of converging shocks are described and the similarity between the observed phenomenon and that expected for superbooms created by accelerating supersonic aircraft is discussed. For weak shocks (shock Mach numbers of about 1.03), a structure resembling that of a folded shock predicted by geometrical acoustics theory is observed while for stronger shocks, a concave front with enhanced overpressure is recorded. Other results are in general accord with the basic concepts of shock propagation and in conjunction with some theoretical scaling laws indicate that the peak magnification of sonic booms due to aircraft flight acceleration in the real atmosphere should be in the range of 6 to 13.

  18. Detector Noise Susceptibility Issues for the Future Generation of High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arteche, F.; Esteban, C.; Iglesias, M.; Rivetta, C.; Arcega, F.J.; /Zaragoza U.

    2011-11-22

    The front-end electronics (FEE) noise characterization to electromagnetic interference and the compatibility of the different subsystems are important topics to consider for the LHC calorimeter upgrades. A new power distribution scheme based on switching power converters is under study and will define a noticeable noise source very close to the detector's FEE. Knowledge and experience with both FFE noise and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues from previous detectors are important conditions to guarantee the design goals and the good functionality of the upgraded LHC detectors. This paper shows an overview of the noise susceptibility studies performed in different CMS subdetectors. The impact of different FEE topologies in the final sensitivity to electromagnetic interference of the subsystem is analyzed and design recommendations are presented to increase the EMC of the detectors to the future challenging power distribution topologies.

  19. Amine catalyzed condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S.

    2001-01-01

    The catalysis of the condensation of hydrolyzed metal alkoxides by amines has been mentioned in the literature, but there has been no systematic study of their influence on the rate of the condensation reaction of the alkoxide and the microstructure of the resultant gel.

  20. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Ding, B. J.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Li, M. H.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.